Other Sessions on Teaching

Sessions on Teaching at the AAR-SBL Conference

A17-204
Friday – 1:00 PM-5:00 PM
Hynes Convention Center-102 (Plaza Level)
Teaching Religion and Disability Studies Workshop: Engaging Curriculum and Pedagogy with Intersectionality and Communities
Panelists:
Mary Jo Iozzio, Boston College

S17-209
Friday 1:00 PM to 4:30 PM
Room: 310 (Third Level) – Hynes Convention Center (HCC)
Using Performance to Teach the Bible/Orality, Memory, Performance Criticism, and Related Disciplines


Registration for this workshop is available through Annual Meetings registration. The sixth annual workshop sponsored by the Bible in Ancient and Modern Media offers sessions on using performance to engage students with biblical text, led by experienced teaching scholars. The participants will be involved in active learning throughout the afternoon. Cost of registration is $50 and can be submitted through SBL Annual Meetings registration. Additional information is available from Phil Ruge-Jones at rugejones@gmail.com.

A17-209
Friday – 3:30 PM-6:00 PM
Hynes Convention Center-207 (Second Level)
Teaching Hinduism Workshop: Teaching Tales: Narrative and Pedagogy in the Hindu Studies Classroom
“Teaching Stories about Teaching Self: Upaniṣadic Narrative in the Classroom,” Steven Lindquist, Southern Methodist University
“Teaching Hinduism with Mahābhārata Dialogues: Intertextuality and Thematic Continuity in Divine/Human Encounters,” Bruce M. Sullivan, Northern Arizona University
“Re-Imagining the Mahābhārata: A Report from the Kochi-Muziris Biennale,” Vishwa Adluri, City University of New York
“Myth and History: Teaching Hinduism Through Narratives,” Joydeep Bagchee, Free University of Berlin
“The Dynamic Canon of the Puranas and the Ethnography of the Classroom,” Elizabeth Mary Rohlman, University of Calgary
“How the Goddess Teaches Hinduism: Decoding Divergent Boons,” Raj Balkaran, University of Toronto
“Translation, Transcreation, and Tukaram,” Jeffrey Brackett, Ball State University
“Stories to Grow On: Shaping Hindu Subjects and Morals through Narrative Pedagogy in the Hindu Diaspora,” Shana Sippy, Carleton College

A18-133
Teaching Religion Unit
Saturday – 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Sheraton Boston-Liberty B (Second Level)
Theme: Teaching about Religion as Anti-Racism Education
Panelists:
Richard Newton, Elizabethtown College
Martha Roberts, University of the South
Christine Hong, Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Tiffany Puett, Institute for Diversity and Civic Life

A18-139
Saturday – 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Hynes Convention Center-207 (Second Level)
Promoting Religious Literacy College-Wide Seminar
Presiding
Eugene V. Gallagher, Connecticut College
Diane L. Moore, Harvard University
Steve Herrick, American Academy of Religion
Panelists:
Cherie Hughes, Tulsa Community College
Amir Hussain, Loyola Marymount University
Eugene Y. Lowe, Northwestern University
Margaret Lowe, Bridgewater State University
Brian K. Pennington, Elon University
Martha Reineke, University of Northern Iowa

S18-109
Saturday 9:00 AM to 11:30 AM

Room: Republic B (Second Level) – Sheraton Boston Hotel (SB)
Academic Teaching and Biblical Studies; Global Education and Research Technology
Joint Session with Academic Teaching and Biblical Studies, Global Education and Research Technology

Theme: Best Practices in Online Teaching
“The Online Capstone: Collaborative Learning and Research in a Virtual Environment,” Sandie Gravett, Appalachian State University
“
Using the Moodle Book module to create and deliver an interactive online Biblical Hebrew course and textbook,” Barry Bandstra, Hope College
“
Wandering in the Online Wilderness – From Classroom to Online and Back Again – Some Observations,” Jonathan D. Lawrence, Canisius College
“
The Corpus-driven Online Hebrew Classroom,” Nicolai Winther-Nielsen, Fjellhaug Internasjonale Høgskole
“
Going Deep and Beyond the Expectations of a Term Paper: Student Contributions to the Website Bible in Its Traditions,” Jean-Francois Racine, Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara University

A18-300 S18-342a
Saturday, 4:00 PM–5:30 PM
HCC-303 (Third Level)
Educational Entrepreneurship: Monetizing Your Expertise through Digital Teaching
Online education is the way of the future. If you’re passionate about sharing your knowledge with others, you can pursue a rewarding career on your own terms as an online educational entrepreneur. You can do so in tandem with, or instead of, teaching at the academy. Most importantly, you will learn how to harness your doctorate in a fulfilling teaching career, irrespective of the state of the tenure-track job market. In this workshop, Raj Balkaran shares key insights on his journey founding the School of Applied Mythology, a digital academy for meaningful learning. This workshop lays the foundation
for successful educational entrepreneurship, including (1) content creation; (2) curriculum design; (3) sales and marketing strategy; and (4) effective digital pedagogy.
Raj Balkaran, University of Toronto, Panelist

S18-301

Saturday 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Grand Ballroom A (Fourth Level) – Marriott Copley Place
Academic Teaching and Biblical Studies
Theme: Gaming, Interactive Fiction, and Simulation in the Classroom
“
Mock Dig as the Culminating Project for a Hebrew Bible Course,” David Bernat, University of Massachusetts Amherst
“Avatars of Antiquity: Helping Students Think About Early Christian Beginnings,” 
Laura Dingeldein, University of Illinois at Chicago and Jeffrey Wheatley, Northwestern University

“
Remembering Dismembering or Where Did That Toe Go?” 
Susan E. Haddox, University of Mount Union
“Yesh Li Malkeka: Using Chess to Teach Biblical Hebrew,” 
Christopher Heard, Pepperdine University

“
Role-Playing Games as Pedagogical Tools in Teaching the New Testament to Undergraduate Students,” 
Melanie A. Howard, Fresno Pacific University
“
Ancient Language Acquisition through Interactive Role-Play and Story Telling,” 
Jordash Kiffiak, Universität Zürich

S18-338
Saturday 
4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Hampton (Third Level) – Sheraton Boston Hotel (SB)
Racism, Pedagogy and Biblical Studies

Theme: Exegeting Racism
Panelists:

Randall Bailey, Interdenominational Theological Center, Panelist

Wil Gafney, Brite Divinity School (TCU)
Jean-Pierre Ruiz, Saint John’s University

Erin Runions, Pomona College

S18-343

Saturday 
4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Regis (Third Level) – Boston Marriott Copley Place (MCP)
Teaching Biblical Studies in an Undergraduate Liberal Arts Context
Theme: Pedagogical Objectives, Strategies, and Assessment
“
Food, Hunger, and the Bible: Teaching Core Students through Experience,” 
Lesley DiFransico, Loyola University Maryland
“
Incorporating the Liberal Arts Mission into an Undergraduate Introductory Biblical Studies Course,” John W. Fadden, Saint John Fisher College
“
Practical Information Literacy Assignments for Biblical and Religious Studies,” 
Steve Jung, Azusa Pacific University
“
Changing the Rules of the Game: Social Hierarchies in Philemon, Sabinianus, and College Campuses,” Michael Kibbe, Moody – Spokane
A18-300
Saturday – 4:00 PM-5:30 PM
Student Lounge Roundtable
Theme: Educational Entrepreneurship: Monetizing Your Expertise through Digital Teaching
Panelists:
Raj Balkaran, University of Toronto

A18-301
 Saturday – 4:00 PM-6:30 PM
Sheraton Boston-Grand & Independence (Second Level)
Academic Labor and Contingent Faculty Committee and Graduate Student Committee and Status of LGBTIQ Persons in the Profession Committee
Theme: Protecting the Vulnerable on Campus
“’Although the Doors Were Shut’: Cultivating Courageous Community at the Borders of the Academy,” Cameron Partridge, Harvard University
“It Doesn’t Always Feel Good: Redefining Notions of Inclusion and Moving Beyond ‘Diversity,’” Prea Persaud, University of Florida
“Solidarity within the Faculty,” James Keenan, Boston College
“Ad Junk: Accounting for Different Vulnerabilities in Vulnerable Professional Positions,” Hussein Rashid, Islamicate, LLC
“Just Employment: Solidarity among Campus Workers,” Kerry Danner, Georgetown University

A18-322
Saturday – 4:00 PM-6:00 PM
Sheraton Boston-Beacon E (Third Level)
Religion and Politics Unit
Theme: International Relations and Religious Studies: Pedagogy and Interdisciplinary Exchange
Panelists:
David Buckley, University of Louisville
Jeremy Menchik, Boston University
James Miller, Queen’s University, Kingston
Anna Bigelow, North Carolina State University
Qamar-ul Huda, Georgetown University
Nukhet Sandal, University of Ohio

S19-110
Sunday
9:00 AM to 11:30 AM
Room: 309 (Third Level) – Hynes Convention Center (HCC)
Bible and Popular Culture

Theme: Pedagogical approaches and Literary themes
“’Lost and Found’: The Bible as Artefact and Metanarrative in Crime Fiction, with Special Reference to Peter May’s Lewis Trilogy,” Alison Jack, University of Edinburgh

“The Problem of Silence: Psalm 109, and “Silence” (Endo, 1969; Scorsese, 2017),” Karl Jacobson, Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd
“’’Here we are now; entertain us’: Making Text-Criticism Interesting to an Uninterested Generation Y,” Adam Tune, Catholic University of America

“Engaging Undergraduate Students with Jesus Memes,” Lesley DiFransico, Loyola University Maryland
“The ‘Netflix Bible’ and Other Pop-culture Means of Teaching Bible to Reticent Students,” Lisa M. Wolfe, Oklahoma City University

A19-123
Sunday – 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Hynes Convention Center-310 (Third Level)
Practical Theology Unit and Transformative Scholarship and Pedagogy Unit
Theme: Theological Education in Spaces of Social Marginality
“Interpreting Injustice: narrating experiences of marginalisation in Scotland as constructing theological praxis,” Clare Radford, University of Glasgow
“Programs in Prisons: Transforming the Who, Where, How, and What of Theological Education,” Sarah Jobe, Duke Divinity School
“Pedagogical Justice: Toward a Theologically Responsible Pedagogy for Teaching Religion to Women in Prison,” Rachelle Green, Emory University
“The pedagogical challenges of teaching theology to first generation students from non-traditional churches,” Richard Burgess, University of Roehampton

Responding:
Daniel Franklin Pilario, Adamson University

A19-200
Sunday – 1:00 PM-2:30 PM
Hynes Convention Center-208 (Second Level)
Academic Labor and Contingent Faculty Committee
Theme: The Rapid Erosion of Tenure: 2008-2018
“The Tenure Myth,” Frank Donoghue, Ohio State University
Responding:
Theresa A. Yugar, California State University, Los Angeles

A19-203 S19-241a
Sunday – 1:00 PM-2:30 PM
Hynes Convention Center-303 (Third Level)
Student Lounge Roundtable
Theme: Using Teaching Opportunities to Expand Your Skill Set
Discussions of “teaching and professional development” often focus on how to improve your teaching. However, teaching opportunities can also be used to expand your skills for beyond the classroom. In an academic world where promising graduate students cannot count on landing professor positions, future teaching careers may not be in the cards for everyone, so we need to find creative ways to translate graduate teaching experience into other professional realms. In this workshop, we will discuss a variety of basic and innovative teaching techniques that can be used to develop transferable skills for the non-teaching aspects of your academic or alt-ac career. In addition to making yourself a more well-rounded teacher, learning to think in this way should also help you to be more maneuverable in the job market.
Kristy Slominski, University of Mississippi, Panelist

A19-204
Sunday – 1:00 PM-2:30 PM
Sheraton Boston-Beacon F (Third Level)
Teaching and Learning Committee
Theme: Conversation with Excellence in Teaching Award Winner Lynn Neal
Panelists:
Lynn S. Neal, Wake Forest University

A19-236 S19-251a
Hynes Convention Center-303 (Third Level)
Sunday 
2:30 PM to 4:00 PM

Room: 303 (Third Level) – Hynes Convention Center (HCC)
Student Lounge Roundtable

Theme: Student-Centered Learning: A Practical Guide

Many of us have heard about the wonders of “student-centered learning”: higher engagement, better critical thinking skills, student empowerment. But how exactly can we implement these methods in college and university Religious Studies classrooms? This Roundtable session will go over simple but effective strategies for both instructors and teaching assistants to create a student-centered learning environment. These strategies are derived from both the educational literature and personal experience in both capacities. Attendees will leave with concrete examples of how to implement student-centered learning in addition to a resource list to aid in additional investigation into student-centered learning activities and principles. In order to see student-centered learning in practice, this session will leave time for a discussion and brainstorming session at the end to workshop some ideas and/or problems particular to instituting student-centered learning in the study of religion.
Gwendolyn Gillson, University of Iowa, Panelist

A19-236
Sunday – 2:30 PM-4:00 PM
Hynes Convention Center-303 (Third Level)
Student Lounge Roundtable
Theme: Student-Centered Learning: A Practical Guide
Panelists:
Gwendolyn Gillson, University of Iowa

A19-250
Sunday – 3:00 PM-4:30 PM
Marriott Copley Place-Berkeley (Third Level)
Applied Religious Studies Committee
Theme: Preparing Scholars of Religion for Non-academic Careers: What’s a Faculty Member to Do?
Panelists:
Molly Bassett, Georgia State University
Jason C. Bivins, North Carolina State University
Kathleen Moore, UC Santa Barbara

A19-252
Sunday – 3:00 PM-4:30 PM
Hynes Convention Center-310 (Third Level)
Publications Committee and Teaching and Learning Committee
Theme: Teaching Interreligious Encounters (Oxford University Press, 2017)
Panelists:
Francis X. Clooney, Harvard University
Zayn Kassam, Pomona College
Martha Reineke, University of Northern Iowa
John Thatamanil, Union Theological Seminary
Responding:
Marc Pugliese, Saint Leo University
Alexander Y. Hwang, Xavier University

A19-261
Sunday – 3:00 PM-4:30 PM
Marriott Copley Place-Boylston (First Level)
Interreligious and Interfaith Studies Unit and Religion in Southeast Asia Unit
Theme: The Interreligious Classroom in Indonesia, Canada, and the US
“Expecting the Common Good: On the Cooperation of Persons in the Interfaith Studies Classroom,” Colleen Windham-Hughes, California Lutheran University
“Indonesian Interreligious Learning,” Nicholas Adams, University of Birmingham
“Re-imagining Pedagogy in Canadian Religious Studies Departments: Connecting Theory with Practice,” Adriana Tulissi, Paul Verhoef, Syd Erais, University of Calgary
“Threading a Needle to Weave a Fabric: Introducing Religion as Interreligion,” Aaron Hollander, University of Chicago

A19-303
Sunday – 5:00 PM-6:30 PM
Sheraton Boston-Back Bay B (Second Level)
Regional Coordinators
Theme: Religious Studies and Interdisciplinary Liberal Arts Teaching and Scholarship in the Age of Austerity
Panelists:
Marc DiPaolo, Southwestern Oklahoma State University

S19-337
Sunday 
4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Beacon H (Third Level) – Sheraton Boston Hotel (SB)
Teaching Biblical Studies in an Undergraduate Liberal Arts Context

Theme: Biblical Studies and the Liberal Arts Mission


”Bring back the Trivium! Rhetoric and the “Trump syllabus” for biblical studies courses,” Christopher M. Jones, Washburn University
“
Why Bother with the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible? Persuading Students to Open the Bible by Helping Them to Enjoy Reading It,” Eric A. Seibert, Messiah College

”
Thinking Critically about Gender and Biblical Interpretation,” Jocelyn McWhirter, Albion College
“
How to Dismantle Christian Nationalism, Or Teaching the Bible in a Trump Presidency,” 
Mike Whitenton, Baylor University

A19-322
Sunday – 5:00 PM-6:30 PM
Religion, Holocaust, and Genocide Unit and Transformative Scholarship and Pedagogy Unit
Sheraton Boston-Republic B (Second Level)
Theme: Teaching Holocaust and Genocide in This Time: Strategies of Engagement
“Teaching about the Holocaust through Geo-science and Archaeology,” Richard A. Freund, University of Hartford
“Teaching Genocide in a “Post-Truth” Age: Strategies for Activism, Engagement, and Scholarship,” Will Livingston, Florida State University
“Holocaust Education, ‘British Values’, and Religious Diversity in the United Kingdom,” David Tollerton, University of Exeter

A20-100
Monday – 9:00 AM-10:30 AM
Hynes Convention Center-303 (Third Level)
Student Lounge Roundtable
Theme: The Potential Value of Genre-based Pedagogy in Religious Studies
Monday – 9:00 AM-10:30 AM
This roundtable is intended to make a case to religious studies instructors for the value of adopting the genre-based method of instruction developed primarily in the discipline of writing studies, explaining its merits and challenges. The syllabus handouts that will be provided model this method for a range of religious studies courses. In addition to genre-based instruction, some of the courses also attempt to integrate two other valuable pedagogical techniques in the context of religious studies: critical pedagogy and technology-supplemented pedagogy. Although the roundtable focuses primarily on the value of genre-based pedagogy as an innovative intervention in religious studies pedagogy, we will also discuss the importance of instructors’ cultivation of critical literacy and use of a variety of media and methods. Genre-based instruction helps cultivate a number of discipline-specific and domain-general skills valued by students and instructional institutions.
Panelists:
Nathan Fredrickson, University of California, Santa Barbara

A20-132
Monday – 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Marriott Copley Place-Arlington (Third Level)
Religion, Media, and Culture Unit and Teaching Religion Unit and Theology and Religious Reflection Unit
Theme: Teaching and Scholarship as Resistance in the Post-Truth Era
In recent years, facts and truth have been undercut to such an extent that our society’s sense of shared reality has eroded. This problem has been highlighted by the 2016 U.S. Presidential election and its aftermath. What is our vocation as teachers, faculty members, and intellectuals in the post-truth age? The difficulties we face are myriad: the deluge of “alt-facts,” the corrosion of democratic institutions, the corporatization of the university, and what Jameson called “the totally-mediatized present.” What practices, institutions, and formations are necessary for us as faculty members to survive, counter, or resist this emerging (non-) epistemology? Bringing together junior and senior scholars from many sub-disciplines and methodological approaches within religious studies and theology and from different kinds of academic institutions, this will be an engaged, ad hoc conversation from which everyone gains new ideas about both classroom strategies and the role of the university in our historical moment.
Panelists:
Charles Mathewes, University of Virginia
Emilie M. Townes, Vanderbilt University
Laura S. Levitt, Temple University
Annika Thiem, Villanova University
Janine Giordano Drake, University of Great Falls
Melissa Borja, City University of New York
Sarah Eltantawi, Evergreen State College
Todd Green, Luther College

A20-246
Monday – 3:00 PM-4:30 PM
Hynes Convention Center-303 (Third Level)
Student Lounge Roundtable
Theme: Tips for Integrating Guest Faith Practitioners in the Classroom
As graduate student instructors of religion, we might face challenges of expertise or authority with our students, or teach students who have never encountered individuals of a particular religious tradition. Bringing faith practitioners to speak in our classes might be a useful strategy to expose students to insider views, hear from more authoritative sources, and encounter faith practitioners perhaps for the first time. In spite of the potential benefits of inviting faith practitioners to our classes, there are also potential challenges. How do we ensure that these experiences are appropriately bracketed to maintain academic rigor? Do certain institutional contexts or programs support this more than others? How does our status as graduate students affect these concerns, especially as graduate students take on such a large role of undergraduate instruction? This roundtable session will discuss these issues and discuss ways of effectively bringing guest faith practitioners into the classroom.
Panelists:
Joshua Patterson, University of Georgia

S20-251
Monday 
3:00 PM to 4:30 PM

Room: 303 (Third Level) – Hynes Convention Center (HCC)
Student Lounge Roundtable

Theme: Tips for Integrating Guest Faith Practitioners in the Classroom

As graduate student instructors of religion, we might face challenges of expertise or authority with our students, or teach students who have never encountered individuals of a particular religious tradition. Bringing faith practitioners to speak in our classes might be a useful strategy to expose students to insider views, hear from more authoritative sources, and encounter faith practitioners perhaps for the first time. In spite of the potential benefits of inviting faith practitioners to our classes, there are also potential challenges. How do we ensure that these experiences are appropriately bracketed to maintain academic rigor? Do certain institutional contexts or programs support this more than others? How does our status as graduate students affect these concerns, especially as graduate students take on such a large role of undergraduate instruction? This roundtable session will discuss these issues and discuss ways of effectively bringing guest faith practitioners into the classroom

P20-333
Monday 
4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Provincetown (Fourth Level) – Boston Marriott Copley Place (MCP)
National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Theme: Communicative Methods for Teaching and Learning Biblical Hebrew
Panelists

Paul Overland, Ashland Theological Seminary

Robert Stallman, Northwest University (Washington)

Benjamin Noonan, Columbia International University

Jennifer Noonan, Liberty University

Steve Cook, Johnson University

David Levenson, Florida State University

S20-340
Monday 
4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: 201 (Second Level) – Hynes Convention Center (HCC)
Racism, Pedagogy and Biblical Studies

Theme: Manifestations of Racism in the Biblical Studies Classroom
Panelists:

Bernadette Brooten, Brandeis University

Lai Ling Elizabeth Ngan, Baylor University

Eric Barreto, Princeton Theological Seminary

J. Ross Wagner, Duke University

Margaret Aymer, Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Respondent

A20-326
Monday – 4:00 PM-6:30 PM
Marriott Copley Place-New Hampshire (Fifth Level)
Religion and Public Schools: International Perspectives Unit
Theme: Nationalism and Religion Education in Public Schools
Norman Richardson, Stranmillis University College, Belfast
Religion, Schooling and Conflicting Nationalisms: Educational Perspectives from Northern Ireland
Erica Larson, Boston University
Building Pious Citizens for a Plural Society: Religious and Civic Education in Indonesia
Kate Soules, Boston College
When Religion Isn’t a Part of Culture: Reviewing the Relationship between Religion and Multicultural Education
Responding:
Jenny Berglund, Södertörn University
Business Meeting:
Jenny Berglund, Södertörn University
Michael Waggoner, University of Northern Iowa

S20-301
Monday 
4:00 PM to 6:30 PM

Room: Beacon E (Third Level) – Sheraton Boston Hotel (SB)
Academic Teaching and Biblical Studies

Theme: Texts That Trigger Responses
“
Inside Out: Seasons of Life, Seasons of Faith in the Psalms,” 
Ma. Maricel S. Ibita, Ateneo de Manila University
“
Reading Biblical Literature With the Heavyhearted,” 
Renate Hood, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor
“’Can This Text Be Saved?’: Applying Mediation Skills to Teaching Troubling Texts,” Tim Koch, Excelsior College and Pacific School of Religion
“
Creative Assignments for Creative Reading,” 
Sylvie Raquel, Trinity International University

A20-333
Monday – 4:00 PM-6:30 PM
Sheraton Boston-Jamaica Pond (Fifth Level)
Teaching Religion Unit
Theme: Teaching the Introductory Course
“Ways and Means (or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Introduction to the Study of Religion),” William Robert, Syracuse University
“The Use and Misuse of Cults and New Religious Movements in an Introduction to World Religions Classroom,” Andrew McKee, Florida State University
“The Impact of Experiential Learning in an Introduction to Asian Religions Course,” Beverley Foulks McGuire, University of North Carolina, Wilmington
“Teaching Common Figures in the Jewish, Christian, and Islamic Scriptures,” Gregory Robbins, Andrea Stanton, University of Denver
“Emerging Frontiers for Interreligious and Interfaith Studies: Interreligious Pedagogy for Pre-Professional Education,” Esther Boyd, Interfaith Youth Core

A21-122
Tuesday – 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Sheraton Boston-Beacon F (Third Level)
Teaching Religion Unit
Theme: Evidence Based Teaching in Religion
Kate DeConinck, University of San Diego
Engaging Contentious Issues Using Team-Based Learning Strategies
John Lyden, Grand View University
Teaching Islam and Current Events through Experiential Learning
Nathaniel Samuel, St. Thomas University
Teaching Introduction to Religious Studies through a Partial Community Engagement Model.
Jeannine Hill Fletcher, Fordham University
“History Repeats: The Critical Theorist’s/Theologian’s Study of Religious History in Real Time”
Calvin Mercer, East Carolina University
Somatic Learning: An Exercise in “Reading” Religious Texts

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