Apocalyptic thought and millennialism

Syllabi - Topic: Apocalyptic thought and millennialism - 21 results

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A 2013 course by Barbara Leung Lai at Tyndale Seminary.

A 2013 course by Robert Kawashima at the University of Florida.

A 2014 course by Doug Kennard at Houston Graduate School of Theology.

A 2013 course by Michael Kuykendall at Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary.

A Spring 2011 course by Sam Thomas at California Lutheran University

A 2003 course by Michael Clark at Warren Wilson College.

A 2001 course by Richard Ascough at Queens Theological College.

A 1999 course by Amy DeRogatis at Michigan State University.

A 2011 course by John Smith at Texas A&M University Commerce.

A course by John Coleman, Felix Just, and Holli Levitsky at Loyola Marymount University.

A 2011 course by James Blythe at the University of Memphis.

A 2011 course by Katherine Rousseau at the University of Colorado Denver.

A 2013 course by Brad Starr at California State University, Fullerton.

A course by Mark Given at Missouri State University.

A course by Catherine Wessinger at Loyola University New Orleans.

A 2011 course by John Smith at Texas A&M University Commerce.

A course by Katherine Rousseau at the University of Colorado Denver.

A 2009 course by Augustine Thompson at the Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology.

A 2014 course by Phil Harland at York University.

A 2016 course by Lynn S. Neal at Wake Forest University that investigates the history of specific “cults,” and the methodological and conceptual issues that arise in studying New Religious Movements (NRMs). Why are some groups called “cults” and seen as dangerous (politically, socially, and religiously)? This fear of cults permeates American culture from our TV shows to news stories to feature films, creating a powerful stereotype that obscures the complex history of religious groups deemed “cults.” The “cult” stereotype prevents us from interrogating why the “cult” concept exists and how it functions in American culture.