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(Re)Considering What We Know: Learning Thresholds in Writing, Composition, Rhetoric, and Literacy

Book
Adler-Kassner, Linda; Wardle, Elizabeth, eds.
2019
University Press of Colorado
LB1575.8.R4 2019
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching

Additional Info:
Naming What We Know: Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies, published in 2015, contributed to a discussion about the relevance of identifying key concepts and ideas of writing studies. (Re)Considering What We Know continues that conversation while simultaneously raising questions about the ideas around threshold concepts. Contributions introduce new concepts, investigate threshold concepts as a framework, and explore their use within and beyond writing.

Part 1 raises questions about the ...
Additional Info:
Naming What We Know: Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies, published in 2015, contributed to a discussion about the relevance of identifying key concepts and ideas of writing studies. (Re)Considering What We Know continues that conversation while simultaneously raising questions about the ideas around threshold concepts. Contributions introduce new concepts, investigate threshold concepts as a framework, and explore their use within and beyond writing.

Part 1 raises questions about the ideologies of consensus that are associated with naming threshold concepts of a discipline. Contributions challenge the idea of consensus and seek to expand both the threshold concepts framework and the concepts themselves. Part 2 focuses on threshold concepts in action and practice, demonstrating the innovative ways threshold concepts and a threshold concepts framework have been used in writing courses and programs. Part 3 shows how a threshold concepts framework can help us engage in conversations beyond writing studies.

(Re)Considering What We Know raises new questions and offers new ideas that can help to advance the discussion and use of threshold concepts in the field of writing studies. It will be of great interest to scholars and graduate students in writing studies, especially those who have previously engaged with Naming What We Know. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors’ Introduction: Threshold Concepts, Naming What We Know and Reconsidering our Shared Conceptions (Linda Adler-Kassner, Elizabeth Wardle)

PART 1: CHALLENGES, CRITIQUES, AND NEW CONCEPTIONS
Ch 1. Recognizing the Limits of Threshold Concept Theory (Elizabeth Wardle, Linda Adler-Kassner, Jonathan Alexander, Norbert Elliot, J.W. Hammond, Mya Poe, Jacqueline Rhodes, Anne-Marie Womack)
Ch 2. Literacy Is a Sociohistoric Phenomenon with the Potential to Liberate and Oppress (Kate Vieira, Lauren Heap, Sandra Descourtis, Jonathan Isaac, Samitha Senanayake, Brenna Swift, Chris Castillo, Ann Meejung Kim, Kassia Krzus-Shaw, Maggie Black, Ọlá Ọládipọ`, Xiaopei Yang, Patricia Ratanapraphart, Nikhil M. Tiwari, Lisa Velarde, Gordon Blaine West)
Ch 3. Thinking like a Writer: Threshold Concepts and First Year Writers in Open-Admissions Classrooms (Cassandra Phillips, Holly Hassel, Jennifer Heinert, Joanne Baird Giordano, and Katie Kalish)
Ch 4. Writing as Practiced and Studied Beyond "Writing Studies" (Doug Hese, Peggy O'Neill)
Ch 5. Phetoric as Persistently "Troublesome Knowledge": Implications for Disciplinarity (Jennifer Helene Maher)
Ch 6. The World Confronts Us with Uncertainty: Deep Reading as a Threshold Concept (Patrick Sullivan)
Ch 7. Expanding the Inquiry: What Everyday Writing with Drawing Helps Us Understand about Writing and about Writing-Based Threshold Concepts (Kathleen Blake Yancey)

PART 2: USING THRESHOLD CONCEPTS TO ENGAGE WITH WRITING TEACHERS AND STUDENTS
Ch 8. Doors between Disciplines: Threshold Concepts and the Community College Writing Program (Mark Blaauw-Hara, Carrie Strand Tebeau, Dominic Borowiak, Jami Blaauw-Hara)
Ch 9. Extending What We Know: Reflections on the Transformational Value of Threshold Concepts for Writing Studies Contingent Faculty (Lisa Tremain, Marianne Ahokas, Sarah Ben-Zvi, Kerry Marsden)
Ch 10. Threshold Concepts and Curriculum Redesign in First-Year Writing (Heidi Estrem, Dawn Shepherd, Susan E. Shadle)
Ch 11. Framing Graduate Teaching Assistant Preparation around Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies (Aimee C. Mapes, Susan Miller-Cochran)
Ch 12. Threshold Concepts and the Phenomenal Forms (Deborah Mutnick)
Ch 13. Grappling with Threshold Concepts over Time: A Perspective from Tutor Education (Rebecca Nowacek, Aishah Mahmood, Katherine Stein, Madylan Yarc, Saul Lopez, Matt Thul)
Ch 14. "I Can't Go On, I'll Go On": Liminality in Undergraduate Writing (Matthew Fogarty, Páraic Kerrigan, Sarah O'Brien, Alison Farrell)

PART 3 : THRESHOLD CONCEPTS AND WRITING: BEYOND THE DISCIPLINE
Ch 15. Rethinking Epistemologically Inclusive Teaching (Linda Adler-Kassner)
Ch 16. Using a Threshold Concepts Framework to Facilitate an Expertise-Based WAC Model for Faculty Development (Elizabeth Wardle)
Ch 17. Talking about Writing: A Study of Key Writing Terms Used Instructionally Across the Curriculum (Chris M. Anson, Chen Chen, Ian G. Anson)

Editors’ Conclusion: Expanding and Examining What We (Think We) Know (Linda Adler-Kassner, Elizabeth Wardle)

About the Authors
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Making Learning-Centered Teaching Work: Practical Strategies for Implementation

Book
Blumberg, Phyllis
2019
Stylus Publishing, Llc.
LB2331.B553 2019
Topics: Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This is a substantially expanded and enhanced revision of Phyllis Blumberg’s acclaimed and bestselling book, Developing Learner-Centered Teaching: A Practical Guide for Faculty (Jossey-Bass, 2009).

This easy to follow how-to-guide provides faculty with both a thorough introduction to this evidence-based approach to teaching and practical guidance on how to progressively implement it to strengthen the impact of their teaching. It demonstrates how they can integrate learning-centered teaching into ...
Additional Info:
This is a substantially expanded and enhanced revision of Phyllis Blumberg’s acclaimed and bestselling book, Developing Learner-Centered Teaching: A Practical Guide for Faculty (Jossey-Bass, 2009).

This easy to follow how-to-guide provides faculty with both a thorough introduction to this evidence-based approach to teaching and practical guidance on how to progressively implement it to strengthen the impact of their teaching. It demonstrates how they can integrate learning-centered teaching into their classroom practice without sacrificing content and rigor, and how to positively engage students in the process by demonstrating its impact on their mastery and recall of key concepts and knowledge.

An added outcome, given that learning-centered teaching is correlated with improved student learning, is the resulting assessment data that it provides faculty with the measures to meet the increased demands by accreditors, legislators and society for evidence of improved teaching and learning outcomes. Phyllis Blumberg demonstrates how to use rubrics to not only satisfy outside requirements and accreditation self-studies but, more importantly, for faculty to use for the purposes of self-improvement or their teaching portfolios.

She provides examples of how the rubrics can be used to ascertain whether college-wide strategic plans for teaching excellence are being met, for program review, and to determine the effectiveness of faculty development efforts. The book includes the following features:
- Boxes with easy-to-implement and adaptable examples, covering applications across disciplines and course types
- Worksheets that foster easy implementation of concepts Rubrics for self- assessment and peer assessment of learning-centered teaching
- Detailed directions on how to use the rubrics as a teaching assessment tool for individuals, courses, and programs
- List of examples of use classified by discipline and type of course

Phyllis Blumberg offers Making Learning Centered Teaching Course Design Institutes and workshops on this and other teaching and assessment topics. Half day to multiple day modules. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Acknowledgments

Part One: Using Learning-Centered Teaching Approaches
Introduction

Ch 1. Overview of the Model of Learning-Centered Teaching
Ch 2. Role of Instructor
Ch 3. Development of Student Responsibility for Learning
Ch 4. Function of Content
Ch 5. Purposes and Processes of Student Assessment
Ch 6. Balance of Power
Ch 7. Increasing Your Use of Learning-Centered Teaching
Ch 8. Overcoming Barriers to Using Learning-Centered Teaching

Part Two: Assessing Learning-Centered Teaching using Rubrics
Ch 9. How to Use Rubrics as Measurement Tools
Ch 10. Individual Instructor or Course Assessment of Learning-Centered Teaching
Ch 11. Program and Institutional Assessment of Learning-Centered Teaching
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The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide

Book
Stachowiak, Bonni
2020
Stylus Publishing, Llc.
LB2395.7.S763 2020
Topics: Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
What does it mean to be a productive professor in higher education? What would it feel like to have more peace and productivity? To have nothing fall through the cracks? The Productive Online and Offline Professor is written for today’s busy higher education professional. Through an exploration of what it means to make work meaningful, this book offers practical strategies and tips to support higher education professionals in efficiently ...
Additional Info:
What does it mean to be a productive professor in higher education? What would it feel like to have more peace and productivity? To have nothing fall through the cracks? The Productive Online and Offline Professor is written for today’s busy higher education professional. Through an exploration of what it means to make work meaningful, this book offers practical strategies and tips to support higher education professionals in efficiently managing and effectively using a wide range of technologies and productivity tools.

Higher education instructors will find this guide helps them to fulfill their teaching roles with excellence and to build engaging relationships with students while also successfully managing other priorities in their professional and personal lives.

The Productive Online Professor assists those who teach online and blended courses with managing their personal productivity. Faculty are often expected to provide support and feedback to learners outside of normal work hours in non-traditional classes. Programs that are designed with more asynchronous content may cause faculty to perceive that it is difficult to ever press the “off button” on their teaching.The author offers guidance and suggests software tools for streamlining communication and productivity that enable faculty to better balance their lives while giving rich feedback to students.

Part 1 addresses the challenges in defining productivity and presents a working definition for the text.

Part 2 describes the ability to communicate using both synchronous and asynchronous methods, along with ways of enriching such communication.

Part 3 describes methods for finding, curating, and sharing relevant knowledge both within one’s courses and to a broader personal learning network (PLN).

Part 4 examines specific tools for navigating the unique challenges of productivity while teaching online. It includes ways to grade more productively while still providing rich feedback to students.

Part 5 shares techniques for keeping one’s course materials current and relevant in the most efficient ways possible.

The Productive Online Professor is a practical guide for how to provide high quality online classes to diverse students. This book shares specific technology and other tools that may be used in charting a course toward greater productivity. It is intended to be a professional resource for fulfilling our roles with excellence and joy, while managing other priorities in our personal and professional lives.(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword—Kathryn E. Linder

Foreword—Robert Talbert

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Part One: Translating Intention Into Action
Part Two: Facilitating Communication
Part Three: Finding, Curating, and Sharing Knowledge
Part Four: Leveraging Technology Toward Greater Productivity
Part Five: Keeping Current

Conclusion
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Thrive Online: A New Approach to Building Expertise and Confidence as an Online Educator

Book
Riggs, Shannon
2020
Stylus Publishing, Llc.
LB2395.7.R55 2019
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
Research shows that online education, when designed and facilitated well, is as effective as traditional campus-based instruction. Despite the evidence, many faculty perceive online education as inferior to traditional instruction—and are often quite vocal in their skepticism. Simultaneously, however, more and more students are seeking online courses and degree programs.

Thrive Online: A New Approach to Building Expertise and Confidence as an Online Educator is an invitation ...
Additional Info:
Research shows that online education, when designed and facilitated well, is as effective as traditional campus-based instruction. Despite the evidence, many faculty perceive online education as inferior to traditional instruction—and are often quite vocal in their skepticism. Simultaneously, however, more and more students are seeking online courses and degree programs.

Thrive Online: A New Approach to Building Expertise and Confidence as an Online Educator is an invitation for the rising tide of online educators who are relatively new to teaching online, and also for those more experienced instructors who are increasingly frustrated by the dominant bias against online education.

Readers will find:
• An approach that empowers online educators to thrive professionally using a set of specific agentic behaviors
• Strategies for approaching conversations about online learning in new ways that inform the skeptics and critics
• Strategies that celebrate the additional skills and proficiencies developed by successful online educators
• Guidance for educators who want to feel natural and fluent in the online learning environment
• Guidance for enhancing the user-centered nature of online spaces to create student-centered learning environments
• Encouragement for online educators to pursue leadership opportunities

The internet is changing how people communicate and learn. Thrive Online: A New Approach to Building Expertise and Confidence as an Online Educator offers guidance, inspiration and strategies required to adapt and lead higher education through this change. This book is for higher education instructors who are seeking community, a sense of belonging, and the professional respect they deserve. Thriving is not a reaction to our environment, but rather a state of being we can create intentionally for ourselves.

The time has come to change the conversation about online education. Add your voice – join the community and #ThriveOnline. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword—Kathryn E. Linder

Foreword—Penny Ralston-Berg

Preface

Acknowledgments

Part One: Changing the Conversation
Part Two: Thriving as an Online Educator
Part Three: Hitting Your Stride
Part Four: Leading the Way

References
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