Teaching Writing

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Engaging Ideas: The Professor's Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom

Book
Bean, John C.
1996
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
PE1404.B35 1996
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
A practical nuts and bolts guide for teachers from any discipline who want to design interest-provoking writing and critical thinking activities and incorporate them into their courses in a way that encourages inquiry, exploration, discussion and debate. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A practical nuts and bolts guide for teachers from any discipline who want to design interest-provoking writing and critical thinking activities and incorporate them into their courses in a way that encourages inquiry, exploration, discussion and debate. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Foreword
The Author

ch. 1 Using Writing to Promote Thinking: A Busy Professor's Guide to the Whole Book
ch. 2 How Writing Is Related to Critical Thinking
ch. 3 Engaging All Learners: Valuing Professional and Personal Writing
ch. 4 Dealing with Issues of Grammar and Correctness
ch. 5 Formal Writing Assignments
ch. 6 Informal, Exploratory Writing Activities
ch. 7 Designing Tasks for Active Thinking and Learning
ch. 8 Helping Students Read Difficult Texts
ch. 9 Coaching Thinking Through the Use of Small Groups
ch. 10 Alternative Approaches to Active Learning in the Classroom
ch. 11 Enhancing Learning and Critical Thinking in Essay Exams
ch. 12 Encouraging Engagement and Inquiry in Research Papers
ch. 13 Coaching the Writing Process and Handling the Paper Load
ch. 14 Writing Comments on Students' Papers
ch. 15 Developing and Applying Grading Criteria

References
Index
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Writing to Learn: Strategies for Assigning and Responding to Writing Across the Disciplines

Book
Sorcinelli, Mary Deane and Peter Elbow
1997
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 69)
LB2365.E5W75 1997
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
This volume provides instructors who teach writing with an array of strategies and philosophies about the way writing is learned, both in the context of a discipline and as an independent skill. Focusing primarily on the best ways to give feedback about written work, the authors describe a host of alternatives that have a solid foundation in research. This is the 69th issue of the journal New Directions for Teaching ...
Additional Info:
This volume provides instructors who teach writing with an array of strategies and philosophies about the way writing is learned, both in the context of a discipline and as an independent skill. Focusing primarily on the best ways to give feedback about written work, the authors describe a host of alternatives that have a solid foundation in research. This is the 69th issue of the journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 High Stakes and Low Stakes in Assigning and Responding to Writing (Peter Elbow)
ch. 2 Writing Back and Forth: Class Letters (Toby Fulwiler)
ch. 3 Mentoring, Modeling, Monitoring, Motivating: Response to Students' Ungraded Writing as Academic Conversation (Art Young)
ch. 4 Peer Response to Low Stakes Writing in a WAC Literature Classroom (M. Elizabeth Sargent)
ch. 5 Student Writing in Philosophy: A Sketch of Five Techniques (Stephen M. Fishman)
ch. 6 Developing and Responding to Major Writing Projects (Anne J. Herrington)
ch. 7 Negotiating the Margins: Some Principles for Responding to Our Students' Writing, Some Strategies for Helping Students Read Our Comments (Elizabeth Hodges)
ch. 8 When Less is More: Principles for Responding in the Disciplines (Ronald F. Lunsford)
ch. 9 In Our Own Voices: Using Recorded Commentary to Respond to Writing (Chris M. Anson)
ch. 10 Responding to Writing On-Line (Gail E. Hawisher and Charles Moran)
ch. 11 Grading Student Writing: Making It Simpler, Fairer, Clearer (Peter Elbow)
ch. 12 The Role of Faculty Development Programs in Helping Teachers to Improve Student Learning Through Writing (Elizabeth Ann Caldwell and Mary Deane Sorcinelli)
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"Improving Student Writing" (pdf)

Article
Smit, David W.
1993
Idea Paper No. 25, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1993)
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Strategies for teaching writing across the curriculum. Idea Paper no. 25, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Strategies for teaching writing across the curriculum. Idea Paper no. 25, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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"Responding to Student Writing"

Article
MacAllister, Joyce
1982
in Teaching Writing in All Disciplines (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass,1982), 59-65
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
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"The Personal Connection: Journal Writing Across the Curriculum"

Article
Fulwiler, Toby
1982
in Language Connections: Writing and Readings Across the Curriculum (Urbana, IL: National Council of Tearchers of English), 15-31
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
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The Seminary Student Writes

Book
Core, Deborah
2000
Chalice Press, St. Louis, MO
BR117.C67 2000
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Deborah Core offers practical guidance for beginning seminary students who feel overwhelmed and under-prepared to write the number and quality of papers their courses require.

The book begins with reflections on writing as a sacred action, then addresses such practical matters as choosing and researching a topic; outlining, drafting, and polishing a paper; and using the proper format for footnotes and bibliography. Also included are sample papers in ...
Additional Info:
Deborah Core offers practical guidance for beginning seminary students who feel overwhelmed and under-prepared to write the number and quality of papers their courses require.

The book begins with reflections on writing as a sacred action, then addresses such practical matters as choosing and researching a topic; outlining, drafting, and polishing a paper; and using the proper format for footnotes and bibliography. Also included are sample papers in MLA and Chicago styles and an overview of grammar and usage. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Abbreviations
Preface

ch. 1. Why Write?
ch. 2. Beginning and Beyond
ch. 3. Reading to Write
ch. 4. Seminary Research Papers
ch. 5. A Brief Manual of Usage

Appendix 1 Using Inclusive Language
Appendix 2 Writing Essay Exams
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"Responding to Response Papers"

Article
Lonoff, Sue
2002
Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 2002)
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
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Promoting Journal Writing in Adult Education

Book
English, Leona M., and Marie A. Gillen, eds.
2001
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5219.P76 2001
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Adult Learners   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
The use of journal writing to enhance reflective practice is not well documented in the adult education literature. This New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education volume brings insights relating to journal writing to bear on the theory and practice of adult education. The goal of this volume is to establish journal writing as an integral part of the teaching and learning process, point out how journal writing can blur ...
Additional Info:
The use of journal writing to enhance reflective practice is not well documented in the adult education literature. This New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education volume brings insights relating to journal writing to bear on the theory and practice of adult education. The goal of this volume is to establish journal writing as an integral part of the teaching and learning process, point out how journal writing can blur the boundaries between personal and professional, and suggest ways that adult educators can play a role in using journal writing to enhance reflection in learning. The chapter authors give examples of how journal writing can be, and has been, integrated into educational areas as diverse as health education, higher education, education for women, and English as a Second Language. The individual chapters go beyond description. The authors raise practical and ethical issues about the use and place of journal writing and provide suggestions for educators working in a variety of settings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Using Journal Writing to Enhance Reflective Practice (David Bond)
ch. 2 Uses and Benefits of Journal Writing (Roger Hiemstra)
ch. 3 Ethical Concerns Relating to Journal Writing (Leona M. English)
ch. 4 Responding to Journals in a Learning Process (Tara J. Fenwick)
ch. 5 Journal Writing in Health Education (Angela J. Gillis)
ch. 6 Women, Journal Writing, and the Reflective Process (Elizabeth A. Peterson and Ann M. Jones)
ch. 7 Journal Writing in Adult ESL: Improving Practice Through Reflective Writing (Richard A. Oren)
ch. 8 Journal Writing in Higher Education (Peter Jarvis)
ch. 9 Journal Writing in Practice: From Vision to Reality (Leona M. English and Marie A. Gillen)

Index
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Learning Through Writing: A Compendium of Assignments and Techniques

Book
Wright, W. Alan, Eileen M. Herteis, Brad Abernethy, eds.
2001
Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS
PE65.L43 2001
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Learning Through Writing is a collection of assignments, techniques, and tips that have proven successful at the university level. These readily transferable activities can be used by university instructors in all disciplines as a resource to help students to improve the quality of their writing, and, ultimately, their learning.

The assignments in this guide aim to develop students' analytical skills, writing skills, library research skills, and comprehension of ...
Additional Info:
Learning Through Writing is a collection of assignments, techniques, and tips that have proven successful at the university level. These readily transferable activities can be used by university instructors in all disciplines as a resource to help students to improve the quality of their writing, and, ultimately, their learning.

The assignments in this guide aim to develop students' analytical skills, writing skills, library research skills, and comprehension of subject matter. To help the reader find relevant assignments quickly, assignments with the same primary purpose have been grouped together. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Acknowledgment of Contributors

ch. 1 Principles of Writing and Learning
Basic Theories and Assumptions about Writing
Using Writing as a Learning Tool
How Do Students Use Writing to Learn?

ch. 2 Writing Across the Disciplines
Patrolling the Academic Mall: Writing Across the Disciplines

ch. 3 Tips for Teachers
Writing Assignments in Larger Classes
Responding to Student Writers - Some Guidelines
Using Writing as a Learning Tool: Professional Development Exercises
Students With Literacy Problems: Suggestions for Instructors

ch. 4 Writing Assignments to Improve Comprehension
The Abstract Exercise
Evaulating "Pop" Psychology
Apply Research
Linking the Theory to Students' Own Personalities
Demonstrating the Relevance of Cell Biology
Writing a Mathematics Class: Two Examples

ch. 5 Writing Assignments To Improve Analytical Skills
The Critique Exercise
Writing in Medicine
Writing Research Grant Proposals
Writing Abstracts to Improve Interpretation and Synthesis
Sharpening Students' Analytical Skills
Students Respond to Readings
Close Analysis of a Single Paragraph
Taking on the Critics

ch. 6 Tips for Student Writiers
Essential Features of Academic Writing: A Writing Centre Handout
Recommendations to Strenthen Term Papers
Guidelines for Essays
Essay Assessment Sheet

ch. 7 Assignments that Emphasize Feedback and the Process of Writing
Weekly Feedback to Improve Performance
Encouraging Students to Address Comments on Previous Papers
Peer Review to Increase the Quality of Students' Work
A Pre-Writing Activity: Planning to Write Using the Planning Diamond
Trying Titles First
Emphasizing the Process of Writing
Using Frequent Feedback to Improve Laboratory Reports
Evidence-Based Case Report in Pharmacy

ch. 8 Different Formats for Assignments
Asking Students to Design and Answer an Exam Question
Learning Journals
Learning to Write in a Foreign Language: The No-Red-Ink Method
Using Journals and a Mock Courtroom to Teach Literature and Feminist Theory
Combining Writing and In-Class Presentations
Letter Writing: Four Assignments
Wordy and Redundant Sentences in Scientific Writing
A Sesquipedalian Vignette
Writing an Editorial and Defending it in the Classroom
Application of Dental Biomaterials Science in a Clinical Setting
Reviewing the Reviews
Informal Writing in an English Class
Blurring the Line Between Fiction and Non-Fiction
Writing-Intensive Laboratory Reports
The Classroom as an Editorial Board
The Professional Identity Scrapbook and the History of a Discipline

ch. 9 Demonstrating the Writing Process
Writing a "Live" Essay in Class

ch. 10 Encouraging Effective Use of the Library
Why Use Library Assignments?
Faculty-Librarian Cooperation
Developing Information Literacy: One View From the Library
Applying the Earlham College Model
Library Assignment: A Step-Wise Worksheet
Indexes: A Valuable Research Tool
Beyond the Research Paper: Ideas for Other Types of Library Assignments
Eight Easy Pieces
Tips for Designing Effective Library Assignments

ch. 11 Writing and Computers
Introduction
Using Computers in Your Class: A Dozen Specific Suggestions
Commenting on Eectronic Papers
Software for Teaching Writing
OWLs (Online Writing Labs)
Resources
References
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"'Nothing Can Ever Be the Case of 'Us' and 'Them' Again': Exploring the Politics of Difference Through Border Pedagogy and Student Journal Writing"

Article
Cook, Ian
2000
Journal of Geography in Higher Education 24, no. 1 (2000): 13-27
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Linda McDowell (1994) has called for styles of teaching which put into practice arguments about the 'politics of difference', which has become an increasingly central part of human geographical research. This paper draws on a number of years' experience of teaching an undergraduate course on multicultural historical geography, in which this was attempted. Here students were encouraged to get more involved in these debates, to take them more personally, and to ...
Additional Info:
Linda McDowell (1994) has called for styles of teaching which put into practice arguments about the 'politics of difference', which has become an increasingly central part of human geographical research. This paper draws on a number of years' experience of teaching an undergraduate course on multicultural historical geography, in which this was attempted. Here students were encouraged to get more involved in these debates, to take them more personally, and to develop 'situated knowledges' about the UK as a multicultural society. The approach to teaching, learning and assessment which made this possible was based on the principles of 'border pedagogy' and on students writing journals throughout the course which charted the development of their understandings of the materials they encountered.
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"Writing in Large Classes: Don't Be overwhelmed With Grading!"

Article
McKinney, Kathleen
2000
Center for the Advancement of Teaching, Illinois State University (2000)
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students   |   Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
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Learning Together: Keeping Teachers and Students Actively Involved in Learning by Writing Across the Curriculum: A Sourcebook of Ideas and Writing Exercises

Book
Panitz, Theodore
2001
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB1631.P36 2001
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
Keeping Teachers and Students Actively Involved by Writing Across the Curriculum -- Writing is an evolutionary process whereby the author revises his/her ideas, values and approaches, not just a mechanical act of placing words in a correct sequence with appropriate grammar. It is intensely personal and interactive with the subject matter, whether in the form of a brief One-Minute Paper at the end of class, a five-minute summary during ...
Additional Info:
Keeping Teachers and Students Actively Involved by Writing Across the Curriculum -- Writing is an evolutionary process whereby the author revises his/her ideas, values and approaches, not just a mechanical act of placing words in a correct sequence with appropriate grammar. It is intensely personal and interactive with the subject matter, whether in the form of a brief One-Minute Paper at the end of class, a five-minute summary during class, an extended essay, or research paper. The purpose of this book is to provide a wide range of examples of writing across the curriculum (WAC) activities in order to encourage teachers to use writing in their classes regularly as a way of stimulating critical thinking in their students and providing variety in their teaching methods. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Why Use Writing Across the Curriculum
ch. 2 Writing Across the Curriculum Exercises

1 Motivational - General
2 Personal Reflection/Motivation
3 Group Processing
4 Content/Personal Reflection
5 Content/Enhancing
6 Additional Samples of Writing Assignments

WAC Web Pages
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"Evaluating Writing"

Article
Tchudi, Stephen
1986
in Teaching Writing in the Content Areas: College Level (Washington, D.C.: National Education Association of the United States, 1986), 51-62
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
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Facilitating Students' Collaborative Writing

Book
Speck, Bruce W.
2002
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
PN181.S64 2002
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Collaboration is interwoven in the writing process in both obvious and subtle ways--from a writer using the language that he or she inherited, to referring to the works of other writers both explicitly and implicitly, to writing together with a colleague. In this book, the author explains that collaborative writing can be a useful pedagogical tool professors can use to help students actively learn about the subject matter and about ...
Additional Info:
Collaboration is interwoven in the writing process in both obvious and subtle ways--from a writer using the language that he or she inherited, to referring to the works of other writers both explicitly and implicitly, to writing together with a colleague. In this book, the author explains that collaborative writing can be a useful pedagogical tool professors can use to help students actively learn about the subject matter and about themselves. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Pedagogical Support for Classroom Collaborative Writing Assignments
The Collaborative Nature of Writing
Collaborative Writing and Pedagogical Theory
Challenges to Integrating Collaborative Writing in the Classroom
The Role of the Professor in Classroom Collaborative Writing Assignments
Practical Benefits of Using Collaborative Writing in the Classroom
Conclusion
The Range of Collaborative Writing Opportunities
Brief In-class Collaborative Writing Assignments
Larger Collaborative Writing Projects
Conclusion
Constructing Collaborative Writing Assignments
The Writing Process
The Writing Assignment
The Collaborative Writing Assignment
Forming Groups, Training Students to Be Effective Collaborators, and Managing Collaborative Groups
Forming Groups
Training Students to Be Effective Collaborators
Managing Collaborative Groups
Conclusion
Collaborative Writing and Computers
Why Use Computer Technology to Teach Collaborative Writing?
What Problems Might Arise in Using Computer Technology to Teach Collaborative Writing?
Conclusion
Grading Students' Collaborative Writing Projects
Fairness
The Problem of Cheating
Rubrics
Methods of Assigning Grades
Conclusion
Conclusions and Recommendations
References
Index
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Grading Students' Classroom Writing: Issues and Strategies

Book
Speck, Bruce W.
2000
ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report 27, no. 3, George Washington Univ. Press, Washington, DC
LB1576.S72 2000
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This report explores the connection between the process of writing and the process of grading. It also explains how to construct effective writing assignments, resolve issues of fairness and professional judgment, include students in the process of assessment, and provide effective feedback to students as they revise their writing. Speck synthesizes the best practices in teaching and learning to help faculty and part-time instructors envision grading as a process, not ...
Additional Info:
This report explores the connection between the process of writing and the process of grading. It also explains how to construct effective writing assignments, resolve issues of fairness and professional judgment, include students in the process of assessment, and provide effective feedback to students as they revise their writing. Speck synthesizes the best practices in teaching and learning to help faculty and part-time instructors envision grading as a process, not a product. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Overview
Why is it Important to Integrate Grading into the Writing Process?
Why do Professors Need to Construct Effective Writing Assignments?
How Can Professors Ensure That Their Professional Judgments Are Fair?
How Can Professors Use Their Authority To Promote Students' Learning
How Can the Professors Help Students to Learn How to Respond Effectively in Writing?
What Support is Available to Help Professors Effectively Grade Student's Writing?
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"Negotiating the Margins: Some Principles for Responding to Our Students' Writing, Some Strategies for Helping Students Read Our Comments"

Article
Hodges, Elizabeth
1997
in Writing to Learn: Strategies for Assigning and Responding to Writing Across the Disciplines (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997), 77-89
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
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Risky Writing: Self-Disclosure and Self-Transformation in the Classroom

Book
Berman, Jeffrey
2001
University of Massachusetts Press, Amherst, MA
PE1404 .B465 2001
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This is the final volume in a trilogy of works that examine the impact of writing and reading about traumatic subjects. "Diaries to an English Professor" (1994) explores the ways in which undergraduate students use psychoanalytic diaries to probe conflicted issues in their lives. "Surviving Literary Suicide" (1999) investigates how graduate students respond to suicidal literature-novels and poems that portray and sometimes glorify self-inflicted death.

In Risky Writing, Jeffrey Berman ...
Additional Info:
This is the final volume in a trilogy of works that examine the impact of writing and reading about traumatic subjects. "Diaries to an English Professor" (1994) explores the ways in which undergraduate students use psychoanalytic diaries to probe conflicted issues in their lives. "Surviving Literary Suicide" (1999) investigates how graduate students respond to suicidal literature-novels and poems that portray and sometimes glorify self-inflicted death.

In Risky Writing, Jeffrey Berman builds on those earlier studies, describing ways teachers can encourage college students to write safely on a wide range of subjects often deemed too personal or too dangerous for the classroom: grieving the loss of a beloved relative or friend, falling into depression, coping with the breakup of one's family, confronting sexual abuse, depicting a drug or alcohol problem, encountering racial prejudice. Berman points out that nearly everyone has difficulty talking or writing about such issues because they arouse shame and tend to be enshrouded in secrecy and silence. This is especially true for college students, who are just emerging from adolescence and find themselves at institutions that rarely promote self-disclosure.

Recognizing the controversial nature of his subject, Berman confronts academic opposition to personal writing head on. He also discusses the similarities between the "writing cure" and the "talking cure," the role of the teacher and audience in the self-disclosing classroom, and the pedagogical strategies necessary to minimize risk, including the importance of empathy and other befriending skills. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Risky Writing: Theoretical and Practical Implications
ch. 2 Seeing Ourselves through the Eyes of Others
ch. 3 The Dark Side of Diversity
ch. 4 Sexual Disclosures Revisited
ch. 5 Unmasking Shame
ch. 6 Writing under the Influence
ch. 7 Pedagogy of Risk

Afterword
Appendix
Works Cited
Student Writers
Index
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Writing in Multicultural Settings

Book
Severino, Carol, Juan C. Guerra, and Johnnella E. Butler, eds.
1997
Modern Language Association, New York, NY
PE1405.U6W75 1997
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The twenty essays and four responses ("cross-talks") in this volume, the fifth in the Research and Scholarship in Composition series, confront the challenges presented by the racial, ethnic, class, gender, religious, age, and physical-ability differences among today's writing students. The contributors, who teach in classrooms and writing centers at a variety of private and public institutions, discuss their immersion in students' discourses and cultures and balance descriptions of their teaching ...
Additional Info:
The twenty essays and four responses ("cross-talks") in this volume, the fifth in the Research and Scholarship in Composition series, confront the challenges presented by the racial, ethnic, class, gender, religious, age, and physical-ability differences among today's writing students. The contributors, who teach in classrooms and writing centers at a variety of private and public institutions, discuss their immersion in students' discourses and cultures and balance descriptions of their teaching experiences with careful and critical reflection.

The volume begins and ends with sections examining the tensions and conflicts in the classroom; the two sections in between focus more specifically on texts and curricula and on teaching English as a second language. The cross-talks that conclude each section synthesize and critique the essays.

Writing in Multicultural Settings is essential, thought-provoking reading for college administrators, writing teachers, and scholars and students in composition studies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface to the Series
Acknowledgments
Introduction
ch. 1 Embracing a Multicultural Rhetoric (Bonnie Lisle and Sandra Mano)
ch. 2 Whose Voice Is It Anyway? Marked Features in the Writing of Black English Speakers (Denise Troutman)
ch. 3 Teaching American Indian Students: Interpreting the Rhetorics of Silence (Michelle Grijalva)
ch. 4 Exploring Bias in Essay Tests (Liz Hamp-Lyons)
ch. 5 "Real Niggaz's Don't Die": African American Students Speaking Themselves into Their Writing (Kermit E. Campbell)
ch. 6 Negotiating Authority through One-to-One Collaboration in the Multicultural Writing Center (Susan Blalock)
ch. 7 Cross-Talk: Talking Cross-Difference (Gail Y. Okawa)
ch. 8 Two Approaches to "Cultural Text": Toward Multicultural Literacy (Carol Severino)
ch. 9 Decolonizing the Classroom: Freshman Composition in a Multicultural Setting (Esha Niyogi De and Donna Uthus Gregory)
ch. 10 Writing Identities: The Essence of Difference in Multicultural Classrooms (Wendy S. Hesford)
ch. 11 Composition Readers and the Construction of Identity (Sandra Jamieson)
ch. 12 "But Isn't This the Land of the Free?": Resistance and Discovery in Student Responses to Farewell to Manzanar (Virginia A. Chappell)
ch. 13 Cross-Talk: Teachers, Texts, Readers, and Writers (Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés)
ch. 14 Contrastive Rhetoric: Implications for Teachers of Writing in Multicultural Classrooms (Ulla Connor)
ch. 15 Differences in ESL and Native-English-Speaker Writing: The Research and Its Implications (Tony Silva)
ch. 16 Cultural Conflicts in the Writing Center: Expectations and Assumptions of ESL Students (Muriel Harris)
ch. 17 Cross-Talk: ESL Issues and Contrastive Rhetoric (Ilona Leki)
ch. 18 The Place of Intercultural Literacy in the Writing Classroom (Juan C. Guerra)
ch. 19 The Politics of Difference: Toward a Pedagogy of Reciprocity (Mary Soliday)
ch. 20 An Afrocentric Multicultural Writing Project (Henry L. Evans)
ch. 21 "Better Than What People Told Me I Was": What Students of Color Tell Us about the Multicultural Composition Classroom (Carol A. Miller)
ch. 22 Students on the Border (Kate Mangelsdorf )
ch. 23 When the Writing Test Fails: Assessing Assessment at an Urban College (Barbara Gleason)
ch. 24 Cross-Talk: Toward Transcultural Writing Classrooms
Notes on Contributors (Keith Gilyard)
Works Cited
Index
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Crossing the Digital Divide: Race, Writing, and Technology in the Classroom

Book
Monrie, Barbara
2004
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
PE1405.U6M66 2004
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Online Learning   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
As poor, non-white communities on "the other side" of the digital divide become immersed in electronic media, how can we evaluate their experiences to transform the teaching of writing and literature and improve student learning? This important book offers a balanced view of instructional technology and critical multiculturalism as experienced in today’s public schools. With valuable insights to help English educators at all levels working in all types of ...
Additional Info:
As poor, non-white communities on "the other side" of the digital divide become immersed in electronic media, how can we evaluate their experiences to transform the teaching of writing and literature and improve student learning? This important book offers a balanced view of instructional technology and critical multiculturalism as experienced in today’s public schools. With valuable insights to help English educators at all levels working in all types of schools, this accessible volume features:

* Case studies of high-poverty secondary schools as they come online, offering an examination of the literacy practices of some of the country’s most underserved students on Indian reservations and in central cities.
* A unique approach to teaching writing and literature at both high school and middle school levels, including practical suggestions for classroom practice.
* A compelling analysis and critique of the contrasting rhetoric of American adolescent minority groups, differences in their early language socialization, and the impact of those differences on academic performance.
* A fresh angle on the public policy debate on access to technology, arguing that high-poverty schools do not have student access and, when they do, computers are used to "reform," rather than "transform" schooling. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Reconsidering the terms of the debate
ch. 2 Putting one's business on Front Street
ch. 3 Crucible for critical literacy
ch. 4 Storytime on the reservation
ch. 5 Revisiting the access issue

Notes
References
Index
About the author
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Writing Alone and With Others

Book
Schneider, Pat
2003
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
PE 1408.S3154 2003
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
For more than a quarter of a century, Pat Schneider has helped writers find and liberate their true voices. She has taught all kinds -- the award winning, the struggling, and those who have been silenced by poverty and hardship. Her innovative methods have worked in classrooms from elementary to graduate level, in jail cells and public housing projects, in convents and seminaries, in youth at-risk programs, and with groups ...
Additional Info:
For more than a quarter of a century, Pat Schneider has helped writers find and liberate their true voices. She has taught all kinds -- the award winning, the struggling, and those who have been silenced by poverty and hardship. Her innovative methods have worked in classrooms from elementary to graduate level, in jail cells and public housing projects, in convents and seminaries, in youth at-risk programs, and with groups of the terminally ill. Now, in Writing Alone and with Others, Schneider's acclaimed methods are available in a single, well-organized, and highly readable volume. The first part of the book guides the reader through the perils of the solitary writing life: fear, writer's block, and the bad habits of the internal critic. In the second section, Schneider describes the Amherst Writers and Artists workshop method, widely used across the U.S. and abroad. Chapters on fiction and poetry address matters of technique and point to further resources, while more than a hundred writing exercises offer specific ways to jumpstart the blocked and stretch the rut-stuck. Schneider's innovative teaching method will refresh the experienced writer and encourage the beginner. Her book is the essential owner's manual for the writer's voice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contents
Foreword by Peter Elbow
Acknowledgments
How to Use This Book
Introduction: A Writer Is Someone Who Writes

Part I: The Writer Alone
1. "Feeling and Facing Fear"
2. "Getting Started (Again)"
3. "Toward a Disciplined Writing Life"
4. "Writing Practice: The Journal"
5. "Writing Practice: Developing Craft"
6. "Voice"
7. "Growing as a Writer"
8. "The Form Your Writing Takes"
9. "The Ethical Questions: Spirituality, Privacy, and Politics"

Part II: Writing With Others
Introduction: Writing With Others
10. "Basic Principles of a Healthy Workshop"
11. "Writing in a Classroom"
12. "Creating Your Own Workshop or Writing Group"
13. "Using Writing to Empower the Silenced"

Part III: Additional Exercises
Afterword
List of Exercises
Recommended Resources and Reading List
Credits

Index
TTR cover image

"Teaching Theological Reflection Well, Reflecting on Writing as a Theological Practice"

TTR
Yaghjian, Lucretia B.
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 2 (2004): 83-94
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
In order to teach theological reflection well, it is necessary to teach students how to write it well. This paper probes the writing of theological reflection as a rhetorical process and a theological practice by (1) situating theological reflection broadly within a "correlation" model, adapted for theological writers; (2) identifying two "generic" styles of theological reflection papers, the pastoral reflection paper and the systematic reflection paper; (3) following a writer's progress as she ...
Additional Info:
In order to teach theological reflection well, it is necessary to teach students how to write it well. This paper probes the writing of theological reflection as a rhetorical process and a theological practice by (1) situating theological reflection broadly within a "correlation" model, adapted for theological writers; (2) identifying two "generic" styles of theological reflection papers, the pastoral reflection paper and the systematic reflection paper; (3) following a writer's progress as she writes a one-page pastoral reflection paper and constructs a working theology in the process of writing it. In conclusion, the correlation-based "Reflecting on Paper" process provides a pedagogical bridge between the writing and teaching of "pastoral" and "systematic" theological reflection, and exemplifies the dynamic interplay between teaching theological reflection and reflecting on writing as a theological practice.
TTR cover image

"'I Wasn't Prepared for the Emotion': Archival Research in Religious and Theological Studies"

TTR
Hicks, Jane E.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 1 (2003): 43-47
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
One might think that primary research in library and church archives would be a dry, lifeless endeavor, far removed from the present–day spiritual urgency that quickens the religious studies classroom. After all, archives raise the specter of musty tomes housed in dark, dank, and isolated basements. To the contrary, based on interviews with several students and teachers doing such research, this article maintains that primary archival research in religious ...
Additional Info:
One might think that primary research in library and church archives would be a dry, lifeless endeavor, far removed from the present–day spiritual urgency that quickens the religious studies classroom. After all, archives raise the specter of musty tomes housed in dark, dank, and isolated basements. To the contrary, based on interviews with several students and teachers doing such research, this article maintains that primary archival research in religious and theological studies is often experienced as empowering, connecting researchers to their subjects with an immediacy that secondary sources simply cannot provide. Diaries, letters, hymns, administrative reports, and church–school teaching notes are the sorts of documentary evidence and personal effects at issue, and these offer unexpected insights to researchers who brave the archives.
TTR cover image

"Writing Cultures, Enculturating Writing at Two Theological Schools: Mapping Rhetorics of Correlation and Liberation"

TTR
Yaghjian, Lucretia B.
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 3 (2002): 128-140
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Taking the theory and practice of contrastive rhetoric as a point of departure, this article identifies two rhetorical models that inform the teaching and writing of theology at two theological schools where the author directs a joint writing program. The models of correlation and liberation are drawn from the official documents and typical theological/rhetorical practices of each school, exemplified by representative student and faculty writing. In conclusion, the common ...
Additional Info:
Taking the theory and practice of contrastive rhetoric as a point of departure, this article identifies two rhetorical models that inform the teaching and writing of theology at two theological schools where the author directs a joint writing program. The models of correlation and liberation are drawn from the official documents and typical theological/rhetorical practices of each school, exemplified by representative student and faculty writing. In conclusion, the common ground encouraging comparative and cooperative models of writing theological culture(s) is intimated by four concluding motives that warrant wider disciplinary discussion of the rhetorics we have and those we need as religious scholars and theological educators at the beginning of the third millennium.
TTR cover image

"Writing Discernment in Theological Education"

TTR
McAvoy, Jane and Deborah Core
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 1 (2000): 47-53
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
How can we best address writing improvement for seminary students? This article describes the implementation of a Writing Assistance Program that teaches remedial skills in grammar structure and paper organization as well as mentors all students to develop their fullest writing potential. Four models of writing instruction are discussed and examples are given of the best use of each. The article concludes with lessons learned from the experience and tips ...
Additional Info:
How can we best address writing improvement for seminary students? This article describes the implementation of a Writing Assistance Program that teaches remedial skills in grammar structure and paper organization as well as mentors all students to develop their fullest writing potential. Four models of writing instruction are discussed and examples are given of the best use of each. The article concludes with lessons learned from the experience and tips for other seminaries.
TTR cover image

"The Method of Interactive Writing and University Pedagogy"

TTR
Boisvert, Mathieu
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 1 (1998): 58-61
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
For many years now, specialists in learning have remarked that a specific method of writing is used for the elaboration of interactive multimedia systems. This method of writing, which I qualify as interactive, has a primary objective: facilitating information access for the user. In this paper I propose an analysis of the different elements that characterize this method of writing and, more specifically, the different ways in which this new ...
Additional Info:
For many years now, specialists in learning have remarked that a specific method of writing is used for the elaboration of interactive multimedia systems. This method of writing, which I qualify as interactive, has a primary objective: facilitating information access for the user. In this paper I propose an analysis of the different elements that characterize this method of writing and, more specifically, the different ways in which this new method can be integrated into the elaboration of magistral university courses without using any added computer technology. The professor would then resemble a multimedia system while the students would be the users of this system. This new method of writing and pedagogical structure would be highly propitious for the stimulation of exchange and interactivity, while leaving students the possibility to choose a structure of the presentation that best fits the group. However, for this to happen we must first envisage the possibility of adapting certain multimedia learning methods, recognized as functional, to the more conventional learning methods that the classroom represents.
Article cover image

"Beyond "Good" and "Awk": Paper Comments That Challenge Students to Think, Rethink, and Revise"

Article
Cozzens, Christine
Center for Writing and Speaking, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, GA
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image
Wabash tree

Thinking and Writing in College

Book
Walvoord, Barbara E. and Lucille P. McCarthy
1990
National Council of Teachers of English, Urbana, Il.
LB2395.35.T47 1990
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Offering insights into the effective use of writing to teach students to think like professionals in various fields, this book is the result of a 7-year naturalistic study. The book documents how a writing specialist paired with an experienced professor in another discipline (business, history, psychology, and biology) to study: (1) teachers' expectations about "good" writing and thinking in each discipline; (2) the kinds of difficulties students encountered in trying to meet ...
Additional Info:
Offering insights into the effective use of writing to teach students to think like professionals in various fields, this book is the result of a 7-year naturalistic study. The book documents how a writing specialist paired with an experienced professor in another discipline (business, history, psychology, and biology) to study: (1) teachers' expectations about "good" writing and thinking in each discipline; (2) the kinds of difficulties students encountered in trying to meet those expectations; and (3) how teachers' methods and students' strategies helped or hindered progress. Chapters in the book are: "Preview of the Book" (Barbara E. Walvoord and Lucille Parkinson McCarthy); "Research Theory and Methods" (Lucille Parkinson McCarthy and Barbara E. Walvoord); "Managerial Decision Making: Sherman's Business Course" (Barbara E. Walvoord and A. Kimbrough Sherman); "Arguing and Debating: Breihan's History Course" (Barbara E. Walvoord and John R. Breihan); "Using Social Science to Help Oneself and Others: Robison's Human Sexuality Course" (Barbara E. Walvoord and Susan Miller Robison); "Conducting and Reporting Original Scientific Research: Anderson's Biology Class" (Virginia Johnson Anderson and Barbara E. Walvoord); and "Conclusion" (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Preview of the Book
ch. 2 Research Theory and Methods
ch. 3 Managerial Decision Making
ch. 4 Arguing and Debating
ch. 5 Using Social Science to Help Oneself and Others
ch. 6 Conducting and Reporting Original Scientific Research
ch. 7 Conclusion
Cover image

In the Long Run: A Study of Faculty in Three Writing-Across-the-Curriculum Programs

Book
Walvoord, Barbara E., Linda Lawrence Hunt, H. Fil Dowling Jr., Joan D. McMahon, eds.
1997
National Council of Teachers of Education, Urbana Il.
PE1404.I4 1997
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This volume allows both those teachers immersed in WAC programs and those still contemplating increasing the use of writing in their courses to peer into classrooms of those that have participated in such programs for years. Walvoord et al. report the long-term impact upon faculty of writing-across-the-curriculum programs, collecting interviews, questionnaires, classroom observations, student evaluations, and course documents from more than 700 faculty, one to fifteen years after their first WAC ...
Additional Info:
This volume allows both those teachers immersed in WAC programs and those still contemplating increasing the use of writing in their courses to peer into classrooms of those that have participated in such programs for years. Walvoord et al. report the long-term impact upon faculty of writing-across-the-curriculum programs, collecting interviews, questionnaires, classroom observations, student evaluations, and course documents from more than 700 faculty, one to fifteen years after their first WAC experiences. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Context and Methods for Study
ch. 3 Detailed Reports: The Institutions, Their WAC Programs, Their Research Methods
University of Cincinnati (Barbara E. Walvoord, Virginia Slachman, and Lisa Udel)
Townson State University(H. Fil Dowling Jr., Joan D. McMahon, and Barbara E. Walvoord)
Whitworth College (Linda Lawrence Hunt)
ch. 4 What Did Faculty Expect from WAC?
ch. 5 What did WAC Experiences mean to faculty?
ch. 6 How did WAC Affect Philosophies and Attitudes about Teaching?
ch. 7 WAC Teaching Strategies
ch. 8 WAC and Faculty Career patterns
ch. 9 Conclusions

Appendix
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Writing Teacher's Sourcebook, Fourth Edition

Book
Corbett, Edward P.J., Nancy Myers, and Gary Tate
2000
Oxford University Press, New York
PE1404.W74 2000
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
Now in its fourth edition, this widely acclaimed sourcebook remains one of the most up-to-date and inclusive works on teaching writing today. In this edition, the editors have added twelve new essays and deleted several from the previous edition, making the content as timely as possible. Emphasizing the importance of adapting good pedagogy to multiple environments and audiences, this unique collection features some of the most intellectually exciting and pedagogically ...
Additional Info:
Now in its fourth edition, this widely acclaimed sourcebook remains one of the most up-to-date and inclusive works on teaching writing today. In this edition, the editors have added twelve new essays and deleted several from the previous edition, making the content as timely as possible. Emphasizing the importance of adapting good pedagogy to multiple environments and audiences, this unique collection features some of the most intellectually exciting and pedagogically sound articles in the field. The Writing Teacher's Sourcebook, 4/e, is the definitive resource for beginning and experienced teachers alike. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part 1 The Contexts Of Teaching
ch. 1 Perspectives
Four Philosophies of Composition (Richard Fulkerson)
Rhetoric and Ideology in the Writing Class (James Berlin)
Rhetoric, the Enabling Discipline (Edward P.J. Corbett)
The Problematic of Experience: Redefining Critical Work in Ethnography and Pedagogy (Min-Zhan Lu and Bruce Horner)

ch. 2 Teachers
Embracing Contraries in the Teaching Process (Peter Elbow)
The Listening Eye: Reflections on the Writing Conference (Donald M. Murray)
Reading Students, Reading Ourselves: Revising the Teacher's Role in the Writing Class (Lad Tobin)
Ethical Issues Raised by Students' Personal Writing (Dan Morgan)

ch. 3 Students
Diving In: An Introduction to Basic Writing (Mina P. Shaughnessy)
Strangers in Academia: The Experiences of Faculty and ESL Students Across the Curriculum (Vivian Zamel)
The Persistence of Difference in Networked Classrooms: Non-Negotiable Difference and the African American Student Body (Todd Taylor)

ch. 4 Locations
The Risky Business of Group Work (Hephzibah Roskelly)
The Rhetoric of Technology and the Electronic Writing Class (Gail E. Hawisher and Cynthia L. Selfe)
Talking in the Middle: Why Writers Need Writing Tutors (Muriel Harris)

ch. 5 Approaches
Redefining the Legacy of Mina Shaughnessy: A Critique of the Politics of Linguistic Innocence (Min-Zhan Lu)
Conversations with Texts: Reading in the Teaching of Composition (Mariolina Salvatori)
A Place for Literature in Freshman Composition, Gary Tate Experience as Evidence: Teaching Students to Write Honestly and Knowledgeably about Public Issues (Carolyn Matalene)

Part 2 The Teaching Of Writing
ch. 6 Assigning
Remedial Writing Courses: A Critique and a Proposal (Mike Rose)
A Comment and Response on "Remedial Writing Courses" (David Peck, Elizabeth Hoffman, and Mike Rose)
The "Research Paper" in the Writing Course: A Non-Form of Writing (Richard L. Larson)
Teaching Argument: A Theory of Types (Jeanne Fahnestock and Marie Secor) Beyond Argument in Feminist Composition (Catherine E. Lamb)

ch. 7 Responding And Assessing
The Components of Written Response: A Practical Synthesis of Current Views (Brooke K. Horvath)
The Study of Error (David Bartholomae)
Learning How to Teach: A Progress Report (Jerry Farber)

ch. 8 Composing And Revising
Between the Drafts (Nancy Sommers)
Writing and Knowing: Toward Redefining the Writing Process (James A. Reither)
Collaboration and the Pedagogy of Disclosure (David Bleich)

ch. 9 Audiences
The Meanings of "Audience" (Douglas B. Park)
Audience Addressed/Audience Invoked: The Role of Audience in Composition Theory and Pedagogy (Lisa Ede and Andrea Lunsford)
Closing My Eyes as I Speak: An Argument for Ignoring Audience (Peter Elbow)

ch. 10 Styles
Static Abstractions and Composition (Robert J. Connors)
Teaching Style: A Possible Anatomy (Winston Weathers)
Revitalizing Style: Toward a New Theory and Pedagogy (Elizabeth D. Rankin)
Use Definite, Specific, Concrete Language (Richard Ohmann)
Cover image

Journal Keeping: How to Use Reflective Writing for Learning, Teaching, Professional Insight, and Positive Change

Book
Dannelle D. Stevens and Joanne E. Cooper
2009
Stylus Publishing, LLC., Sterling, VA
PE1404.S827 2009
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
** By the authors of the acclaimed Introduction to Rubrics
** Major growth of interest in keeping journals or diaries for personal reflection and growth; and as a teaching tool
** Will appeal to college faculty, administrators and teachers

One of the most powerful ways to learn, reflect and make sense of our lives is through journal keeping.

This book presents the potential uses and benefits of ...
Additional Info:
** By the authors of the acclaimed Introduction to Rubrics
** Major growth of interest in keeping journals or diaries for personal reflection and growth; and as a teaching tool
** Will appeal to college faculty, administrators and teachers

One of the most powerful ways to learn, reflect and make sense of our lives is through journal keeping.

This book presents the potential uses and benefits of journals for personal and professional development-particularly for those in academic life; and demonstrates journals' potential to foster college students' learning, fluency and voice, and creative thinking.

In professional life, a journal helps to organize, prioritize and address the many expectations of a faculty member's or administrator's roles. Journals are effective for developing time management skills, building problem-solving skills, fostering insight, and decreasing stress.

Both writing and rereading journal entries allow the journal keeper to document thinking; to track changes and review observations; and to examine assumptions and so gain fresh perspectives and insights over past events.

The authors present the background to help readers make an informed decision about the value of journals and to determine whether journals will fit appropriately with their teaching objectives or help manage their personal and professional lives. They offer insights and advice on selecting the format or formats and techniques most appropriate for the reader's purposes. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Tables and Figures
Acknowledgements
Preface

Part One
Journal Writing and Its Theoretical Foundation
ch. 1 Journal Writing: Definition and Rationale
ch. 2 Reflection and Learning from Experience
ch. 3 Reflection and Adult Development Theory

Part Two
Using Journals in Classrooms and Professional Life
ch. 4 Introducing and Structuring Classroom Journal Writing
ch. 5 Classroom Journal-Writing Techniques
ch. 6 Grading Classroom Journal Writing
ch. 7 Journal Writing in Professional Life
ch. 8 Journal Writing in the Computer Age

Part Three
A Collection of Case Studies
Teaching with Journals and Keeping Journals in Professional Life
ch. 9 Case Studies: Teaching With Journals
ch. 10 Case Studies: Journal Keeping in Professional Life

Afterword
Appendices
A. Journal Writing Techniques
B. Contributor Contact Information
References
Index
Cover image

The Way Literacy Lives: Rhetorical Dexterity and Basic Writing Instruction

Book
Carter, Shannon
2008
State University of New York Press, Albany
LB1576.C31793 2008
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Challenges an autonomous model of literacy instruction in favor of one that recognizes and builds on students' facility in navigating other rhetorical contexts. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Challenges an autonomous model of literacy instruction in favor of one that recognizes and builds on students' facility in navigating other rhetorical contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Way Literacy Tests
ch. 2 The Way Literacy Oppresses
ch. 3 The Way Literacy Liberates
ch. 4 The Way Literacy Stratifies
ch. 5 The Way Literacy (Re)produces
ch. 6 The Way Literacy Lives

Conclusion

Appendix A
Appendix B
Appendix C (Sample Writing Assignments)
Appendix D

Note
Works Cited
Index
Tactics cover image

"A Research Idea is Hatched"

Tactic
DeRogatis, Amy
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 2 (2009): 138-139
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: helping students get started focusing a research topic.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: helping students get started focusing a research topic.
Cover image
Wabash tree

Writing-Based Teaching: Essential Practices and Enduring Questions

Book
Vilardi, Teresa; and Chang, Mary, eds.
2009
State University of New York Press, Albany
LB1576.W7344 2009
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
Written by the team at Bard College's Institute for Writing and Thinking, this book is designed to provide practical guidance regarding the challenges and potential of writing-based teaching, and suggestions for how to adapt the practices to particular classroom situations. The contributors share candid, first-hand accounts of what it is like to make writing central to teaching in secondary schools and colleges. As teachers of literature, composition, poetry, mathematics, anthropology, ...
Additional Info:
Written by the team at Bard College's Institute for Writing and Thinking, this book is designed to provide practical guidance regarding the challenges and potential of writing-based teaching, and suggestions for how to adapt the practices to particular classroom situations. The contributors share candid, first-hand accounts of what it is like to make writing central to teaching in secondary schools and colleges. As teachers of literature, composition, poetry, mathematics, anthropology, and education, they offer philosophical and theoretical reflections, practical guidance, and personal stories about how to help students become better, more-fluent writers, close readers, and reflective thinkers. This book will be of interest to writing center directors, for what it says about how to do collaborative learning and revision and seeing writing as a way to build community, and to writing teachers for how it demystifies freewriting, focused freewriting, and dialectical notebooks.

Any individual, program, or institution seriously interested in understanding and practicing the writing process would benefit from using this text.
One of the most important ideas in this collection is that we, as writing teachers, need to develop habits of action and habits of mind that students can take with them. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 A Case for Private Freewriting in the Classroom (Sharon Marshall)
ch. 2 Focused Freewriting: How to Do Things with Writing Prompts (Nicole B. Wallack)
ch. 3 Process Writing: Reflection and the Arts of Writing and Teaching (Alfred E. Guy Jr.)
ch. 4 Odd Questions, Strange Texts, and Other People: Collaborative Learning, Play, and New Knowledge (Alice Lesnick)
ch. 5 Dialectical Notebooks (Margaret Ranny Bledsoe)
ch. 6 Radical Revision: Toward Demystifying the Labor of Writing (Carley Moore)
ch. 7 Learning Culture: Writing in Community (Robert D. Wittemore)
ch. 8 To Write and Think in the Community of School (Ray Peterson)

Postscript: Community and Collaboration: The Workshop in Language and Thinking and the Institute for Writing and Thinking at Bard College
List of Contributors
Index
Cover image

To Delight and Instruct: Celebrating Ten Years of Pedagogy

Journal Issue
Holberg, Jennifer L. and Taylor, Marcy, eds.
2010
Duke University Press, Durham
LB2331.T59 2009
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
This issue considers the sustainability of English studies and of the humanities as a whole in the context of shrinking budgets and job opportunities and of shifting resources. Exploring topics from academic freedom and globalization to digitization, diversity, and the value of a humanities-based education, “To Delight and Instruct” reexamines the work of the English professor and calls for a reassessment of the priorities and means that ...
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
This issue considers the sustainability of English studies and of the humanities as a whole in the context of shrinking budgets and job opportunities and of shifting resources. Exploring topics from academic freedom and globalization to digitization, diversity, and the value of a humanities-based education, “To Delight and Instruct” reexamines the work of the English professor and calls for a reassessment of the priorities and means that undergird it.

Contributors examine the faculty’s fundamental responsibilities to classroom teaching, the university, and the community. Attending to the relationship between changing technologies and literacy in a global environment, the issue not only argues for a reassertion and reimagining of the humanities in the contemporary university but, perhaps as important, helps articulate a way forward.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Introduction: "Our Work"

Articles

ch. 1 Returning to Community and Praxis: A Circuitous Journey through Pedagogy and Literacy Studies (Martin Bickman)
ch. 2 Disappearing Acts: The Problem of the Student in Composition Studies (Marlolina Rizzi Salvatori and Patricia Donahue)
ch. 3 The Demands of the Day (Colin Jager)
ch. 4 Globalism and Multimodality in the Digitized World: Computers and Composition Studies (Gail E. Hawisher, Cynthia L. Selfe, Gorjana Kisa, Shafinaz Ahmed)
ch. 5 Can We Teach a Transnational Queer Studies? (Donald E. Hall)
ch. 6 Lore, Practice, and Social Identity in Creative Writing Pedagogy: Speaking with a Yellow Voice? (Shirley Geok-lin Lim)
ch. 7 Threat Level (Michael Berube)
ch. 8 Contexts for Canons (Paul Lauter)
ch. 9 The Figure of Writing and the Future of English Studies (Marc Bousquet)
ch. 10 Bringing Our Brains to the Humanities: Increasing the Value of Our Classes while Supporting Our Futures (Sheila T.Cavanagh)
ch. 11 The Coming Apocalypse (Richard E. Miller)
ch. 12 Why Assessment? (Gerald Graff)
ch. 13 Performing Discussion: The Dream of a Common Language in the Literature Classroom (Harriet Kramer Linkin)
ch. 14 What's the Trouble with Knowing Students? Only Time Will Tell (Julie Lindquist)
ch. 15 Paradigms, Conversation, Prayer: Liberal Arts in Christian Colleges (Donald G. Marshall)
ch. 16 English Studies and Intellectual Property: Copyright, Creativity, and the Commons (Danielle Nicole DeVoss)
ch. 17 Teaching Narrative as Rhetoric: The Example of Time's Arrow (James Phelan)
ch. 18 The English Curriculum after the Fall (Robert Scholes)
ch. 19 Taking Stock: A Decade of From the Classroom (Elizabeth Brockman)
ch. 20 Who We Are, Why We Care (Mark C. Long)

Contributors
Cover image

Writing Theology Well

Book
Yaghjian, Lucretia
2006
Continuum International London
BR44.Y34 2006
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Religion   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
In its creative integration of the disciplines of writing, rhetoric, and theology, Writing Theology Well provides a standard text for theological educators engaged in the teaching and mentoring of writing across the theological curriculum. As a theological rhetoric, it will also encourage excellence in theological writing in the public domain by helping to equip students for their wider vocations as writers, preachers, and communicators in a variety of ministerial and ...
Additional Info:
In its creative integration of the disciplines of writing, rhetoric, and theology, Writing Theology Well provides a standard text for theological educators engaged in the teaching and mentoring of writing across the theological curriculum. As a theological rhetoric, it will also encourage excellence in theological writing in the public domain by helping to equip students for their wider vocations as writers, preachers, and communicators in a variety of ministerial and professional contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface

Part I Writing Theological Rhetorics Well
ch. 1 Writing Theology Well in Its Own Context
ch. 2 Writing Theological Reflection Well: Rhetorics of Process, Problem Solving, and Proclamation
ch. 3 Writing Theological Argument Well: Rhetorics of Inquiry, Reading, Reflection, and Persuasion
ch. 4 Writing the Theological Essay Well: Rhetorics of Identification, Correlation, Suspicion, and Construction

Part II Writing Theological and Biblical Research Well
ch. 5 Writing Theological Research Well (I): Rhetorics of Research and Investigation
ch. 6 Writing Theological Research Well (II): Rhetorics of Organization and Documentation
ch. 7 Writing the Biblical Essay Well (I): Rhetorics of Exegesis and Interpretation
ch. 8 Writing the Biblical Essay Well (II): A Critical-Hermeneutical Rhetoric

Part III Toward a Theological Style and Voice of Your Own
ch. 9 Writing with Theological Imagination Well: Rhetorics of Analogy, Metaphor, and Symbol
ch. 10 Rewriting Theology Well (I): Rhetorics of Style and Voice
ch. 11 Rewriting Theology Well (II): Rhetorics of Words, Sentences, and Paragraphs
ch. 12 Rewriting Theology Well (III): A Rhetoric of Revision

Epilogue: Writing Theology Well in Your New Context: From Writing for Professors to Writing with a Professional Voice
Notes
Index
Cover image

Argumentation in Higher Education: Improving Practice Through Theory and Research

Book
Andrews, Richard
2010
Routledge, New York, NY
PN4181.A59 2010
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Argumentation in Higher Education offers professors, lecturers and researchers informative guidance for teaching effective argumentation skills to their undergraduate and graduate students. This professional guide aims to make the complex topic of argumentation open and transparent. Grounded in empirical research and theory, but with student voices heard strongly throughout, this book fills the gap of argumentation instruction for the undergraduate and graduate level.

Written to enlighten even the ...
Additional Info:
Argumentation in Higher Education offers professors, lecturers and researchers informative guidance for teaching effective argumentation skills to their undergraduate and graduate students. This professional guide aims to make the complex topic of argumentation open and transparent. Grounded in empirical research and theory, but with student voices heard strongly throughout, this book fills the gap of argumentation instruction for the undergraduate and graduate level.

Written to enlighten even the most experienced professor, this text contributes to a better understanding of the demands of speaking, writing, and visual argumentation in higher education, and will undoubtedly inform and enhance course design. The book argues for a more explicit treatment of argument (the product) and argumentation (the process) in higher education, so that the ground rules of the academic discipline in question are made clear. Each chapter concludes with practical exercises for staff development use.

Topics discussed include:

The importance of argument

The current state of argumentation in higher education

Generic skills in argumentation

The balance between generic and discipline specific skills

Information communication technologies and visual argumentation

How can we best teach argumentation so that students feel fully empowered in their academic composition? Professors (new and experienced), lecturers, researchers, professional developers and writing coaches worldwide grappling with this question will find this accessible text to be an extremely valuable resource.

Richard Andrews is Professor in English at the Institute of Education, University of London. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Illustrations
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Why Argument?
The Importance of Argument
Argument and/or Argumentation
Argumentation in Higher Education
An Example
Is Argumentation Too 'High' a Term?
The Position of Argumentation
Theoretical justifications for the Focus on Argumentation
Is Argument a New Preoccupation?
The Structure of the Book
The Practical Dimension

ch. 2 The Current State of Argumentation in Higher Education
Who?
What?
To Whom?
Why?
A Case Study: Argumentation in History
The Practical Dimension

ch. 3 Generic Skills in Argumentation
Recent Models of Argumentation in Education
Definitions
Literature Review
The ‘Toulmin Model’
Models of Argument
Visual Argumentation
A Spectrum of Models
The Practical Dimension

ch. 4 Discipline-Specific Skills in Argumentation Richard Andrews Carole Torgerson Beng-Huat See
First-Year Students Believe Argument to be Important in Their Disciplines
Students Feel the Need for More Explicit Instruction
Students Tend to Draw on Argumentation Skills Learned in the Previous Stage of Formal Education
Most Students are not Sceptical in their Academic Reading
Differences Among Institutions, Disciplines and Individual Lecturers are Highly Significant
There is a Mismatch Between the Way Lecturers and Students see Argument
If Argument is Formally Assessed, it is More Highly Valued by Students
Argument in Three Disciplines: History, Biology, Electronics
History
Biology
Electronics/Electrical Engineering
Conclusion
The Practical Dimension

ch. 5 The Balance Between Generic and Discipline-Specific Skills
Generic Stages in the Development of an Argument
The Balance Between Generic and Discipline-Specific Skills
Argumentation and Academic Literacy/Literacies
Interdisciplinary
The Practical Dimension

ch. 6 Information and Communication Technologies, Multimodality and Argumentation
An Example of an Undergraduate Dissertation
What Does Argumentation Look Like From a Modal Perspective?
Argumentation and Information and Communication Technologies in Higher Education
Conclusion
The Practical Dimension

ch. 7 Further Evidence from Research
Argumentation at School Level: Lessons for Higher Education
Implications for Higher Education
Implications: The Conditions That Have to be in Place
Implications: Specific Activities
Transitions in Education: How Does Argument Change?
The Practical Dimension

ch. 8 Students' Views on Argumentation
Students Interviewing Other Students
Case Study 1 Argumentation in a Medical Course
Case Study 2 Argumentation in Mathematics
Case Study 3 Argumentation in Psychology
Case Study 4 Argumentation in Politics
Case Study 5 Argumentation in Literature Studies, Writing and Performance
Case Study 6 Argumentation and Discussion in a Vocational Course
Case Study 7 A More In-Depth Look at Argumentation in Chemistry
The Practical Dimension

ch. 9 Students' Essays and Reports in a Range of Disciplines
Two Examples
The End of the Essay?
The Personal Voice
Conclusion
The Practical Dimension

ch. 10 The Significance of Feedback from Lecturers
Feedback at Undergraduate Level
Feedback at Postgraduate Level
The Practical Dimension

ch. 11 Methodological Issues in Researching Argumentation
What Counts as Evidence?
Existing Evidence
New Evidence
Questions to Ask Regarding 'Evidence': A Provisional Checklist
What Kinds of Methods can be Used to Investigate Argumentation?
Argumentation and Scientific Method
The Practical Dimension

ch. 12 Conclusion and a Way Forward in Argumentation Studies in Education
Introduction
Looking Back
The Distinctiveness of the English Argumentational Tradition at Postgraduate Level
What are the Principles of Argumentation as Manifested in Postgraduate Student Writing?
Four Dissertations
Argument in Engineering: The Case of a Dissertation
The Critical Dimension
Interim Conclusion
Further Discussion

References and Bibliography
Index
Tactics cover image
Wabash tree

"Asynchronous Writing Assignments Using the Writing Rubric"

Tactic
Galle, Jeffery
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 4 (2010): 371
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Online Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students reflect on the writing rubric used to grade their writing, in an online or hybrid course.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students reflect on the writing rubric used to grade their writing, in an online or hybrid course.
Article cover image

"Engaging Conversation: Evaluating the Contribution of Library Instruction to the Quality of Student Research"

Article
Emmons, Mark, and Martin, Wanda
2002
College & Research Libraries, Vol. 63, No. 6, pgs. 545-560
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Librarians as Teachers   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Compared research papers before and after implementation of an inquiry-based library instruction program at the University of New Mexico to asses the program's effectiveness and consider its future development. Discusses increased collaboration between the library and the English department and suggests more training for instructors and greater emphasis on a rhetorical research approach.
Additional Info:
Compared research papers before and after implementation of an inquiry-based library instruction program at the University of New Mexico to asses the program's effectiveness and consider its future development. Discusses increased collaboration between the library and the English department and suggests more training for instructors and greater emphasis on a rhetorical research approach.
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Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies: Pedagogical Challenges and Strategies

Journal Issue
McNary-Zak, Bernadette, and Peters, Rebecca Todd, eds.
2010
Spotlight on Teaching 25, no. 3 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies: Pedagogical Challenges and Strategies (Bernadette McNary-Zak and Rebecca Todd Peters)
ch. 2 Learning Contracts in Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies (Lynn R. Huber)
ch. 3 Close Reading for Undergraduate Research (Carolyn Jones Medine)
ch. 4 Journal Writing for Undergraduate Research (Jeffrey Brackett)
ch. 5 Transferring Undergraduate Research Pedagogies to the Classroom (John R. Lanci)
ch. 6 Undergraduate Research as Collaborative Pedagogy and Research (Paul O. Myhre, and Brandon Cornett)
ch. 7 Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies: References and Resources
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Everyone Can Write: Essays toward a Hopeful Theory of Writing and Teaching Writing

Book
Elbow, Peter
2000
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
LD571.B743 no 173
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
With Writing without Teachers (OUP 1975) and Writing with Power (OUP 1995) Peter Elbow revolutionized the teaching of writing. His process method--and its now commonplace "free writing" techniques--liberated generations of students and teachers from the emphasis on formal principles of grammar that had dominated composition pedagogy.

This new collection of essays brings together the best of Elbow's writing since the publication of Embracing Contraries in 1987. The volume includes sections on ...
Additional Info:
With Writing without Teachers (OUP 1975) and Writing with Power (OUP 1995) Peter Elbow revolutionized the teaching of writing. His process method--and its now commonplace "free writing" techniques--liberated generations of students and teachers from the emphasis on formal principles of grammar that had dominated composition pedagogy.

This new collection of essays brings together the best of Elbow's writing since the publication of Embracing Contraries in 1987. The volume includes sections on voice, the experience of writing, teaching, and evaluation. Implicit throughout is Elbow's commitment to humanizing the profession, and his continued emphasis on the importance of binary thinking and nonadversarial argument. The result is a compendium of a master teacher's thought on the relation between good pedagogy and good writing; it is sure to be of interest to all professional teachers of writing, and will be a valuable book for use in composition courses at all levels. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part I - Premises and Foundations
ch. 1 Illiteracy at Oxford and Harvard: Reflections on the Inability to Write
ch. 2 A Map of Writing in Terms of Audience and Response
ch. 3 The Uses of Binary Thinking
Fragments: The Believing Game - A Challenge After Twenty-Five Years

Part II - The Generative Dimension
ch. 4 Freewriting and the Problem of Wheat and Tares
ch. 5 Closing My Eyes as I Speak: An Argument for Ignoring Audience
ch. 6 Toward a Phenomenology of Freewriting
Fragments: Wrongness and Felt Sense
The Neglect and Rediscovery of Invention
Form and Content as Sources of Creation

Part III - Speech, Writing, and Voice
ch. 7 The Shifting Relationships Between Speech and Writing
ch. 8 Voice in Literature
ch. 9 Silence: A Collage
ch. 10 What Is Voice in Writing?
Fragments: On the Concept of Voice
Audible Voice: How Much Do We Hear the Text?
Voice in Texts as It Relates to Teaching

Part IV - Discourses
ch. 11 Reflections on Academic Discourse: How It Relates to Freshmen and Colleagues
ch. 12 In Defense of Private Writing: Consequences for Theory and Research
ch. 13 The War Between Reading and Writing - and How to End It
ch. 14 Your Cheatin' Art: A Collage
Fragments: Can Personal Expressive Writing Do the Work of Academic Writing?

Part V - Teaching
ch. 15 Inviting the Mother Tongue: Beyond "Mistakes," "Bad English," and "Wrong Language"
ch. 16 High Stakes and Low Stakes in Assigning and Responding to Writing
ch. 17 Breathing Life into the Text
ch. 18 Using the Collage for Collaborative Writing
Fragments: Being a Writer vs. Being an Academic: A Conflict in Goals
Separating Teaching from Certifying
What Kind of Leadership Is Best for Collaborative Learning?

Part VI - Evaluation and Grading
ch. 19 Getting Along With Grades - and Getting Along With Them Too
ch. 20 Starting the Portfolio Experiment at SUNY Stony Brook
Fragments: Problems with Grading
The Conflict Between Reliability and Validity
How Portfolios Shake Up the Assessment Process and Thereby Lead too Minimal Holistic Scoring and Multiple Trait Scoring
Multiple Trait Scoring as an Alternative to Holistic Scoring
Tracking Leads to a Narrow Definition of Intelligence
The Benefits and Feasibility of Linking
ch. 21 Writing Assessment in the Twenty-First Century: A Utopian View

Published Works
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Wabash tree

Writing With Power: Techniques for Mastering the Writing Process

Book
Elbow, Peter
1998
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
PE1408.E39 1998
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
A classic handbook for anyone who needs to write, Writing With Power speaks to everyone who has wrestled with words while seeking to gain power with them. Here, Peter Elbow emphasizes that the essential activities underlying good writing and the essential exercises promoting it are really not difficult at all.

Employing a cookbook approach, Elbow provides the reader (and writer) with various recipes: for getting words down on ...
Additional Info:
A classic handbook for anyone who needs to write, Writing With Power speaks to everyone who has wrestled with words while seeking to gain power with them. Here, Peter Elbow emphasizes that the essential activities underlying good writing and the essential exercises promoting it are really not difficult at all.

Employing a cookbook approach, Elbow provides the reader (and writer) with various recipes: for getting words down on paper, for revising, for dealing with an audience, for getting feedback on a piece of writing, and still other recipes for approaching the mystery of power in writing. In a new introduction, he offers his reflections on the original edition, discusses the responses from people who have followed his techniques, how his methods may differ from other processes, and how his original topics are still pertinent to today's writer. By taking risks and embracing mistakes, Elbow hopes the writer may somehow find a hold on the creative process and be able to heighten two mentalities--the production of writing and the revision of it.

From students and teachers to novelists and poets, Writing with Power reminds us that we can celebrate the uses of mystery, chaos, nonplanning, and magic, while achieving analysis, conscious control, explicitness, and care in whatever it is we set down on paper. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction to the Second Edition

I. Some Essentials
ch. 1 An Approach to Writing
ch. 2 Freewriting
ch. 3 Sharing
ch. 4 The Direct Writing Process for Getting Words on Paper
ch. 5 Quick Revisiting
ch. 6 The Dangerous Method: Trying To Write It Right the First Time

II. More Ways of Getting Words On Paper
ch. 7 The Open-ended Writing Process
ch. 8 The Loop Writing Process
ch. 9 Metaphors for Priming the Pump
ch. 10 Working on Writing While Not Thinking about Writing
ch. 11 Poetry as No Big Deal

III. More Ways To Revise
ch. 12 Thorough Revising
ch. 13 Revising with Feedback
ch. 14 Cut-and -Paste Revising and the Collage
ch. 15 The Last Step: Getting Rid of Mistakes in Grammar
ch. 16 Nausea

IV. Audience
ch. 17 Other People
ch. 18 Audience as Focusing Force
ch. 19 Three Tricky Relationships to an Audience
ch. 20 Writing for Teachers

V. Feedback
ch. 21 Criterion-Based Feedback and Reader-Based Feedback
ch. 22 A Catalogue of Criterion-Based Questions
ch. 23 A Catalogue of Reader-Based Questions
ch. 24 Options for Getting Feedback

VI. Power In Writing
ch. 25 Writing and Voice
ch. 26 How To Get Power through Voice
ch. 27 Breathing Experience into Words
ch. 28 Breathing Experience into Expository Writing
ch. 29 Writing and Magic

A Select Annotated Bibliography on Publishing
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CLASH! Superheroic Yet Sensible Strategies for Teaching the New Literacies Despite the Status Quo

Book
Vavra, Sandra, and Spencer, Sharon L., eds.
2011
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB1028.3.C6 2011
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book offers ideas that secondary teachers, university content faculty, and teacher educators can use to challenge traditional literacy practices and demonstrate creative, innovative ways of incorporating new literacies into the classroom, all within a strong theoretical framework. Teachers are trying to catch up to the new challenges of the twenty-first century. It is a superheroic feat that must be achieved if education is to stay relevant and viable. There ...
Additional Info:
This book offers ideas that secondary teachers, university content faculty, and teacher educators can use to challenge traditional literacy practices and demonstrate creative, innovative ways of incorporating new literacies into the classroom, all within a strong theoretical framework. Teachers are trying to catch up to the new challenges of the twenty-first century. It is a superheroic feat that must be achieved if education is to stay relevant and viable. There is a lot of zip, bam, whap, and wow in the fast-paced, social networking, technological world, but not so much in the often laboriously slow-paced educational world. Where is the balance? How do teachers and students learn together, since one group has seasoned wisdom with limited technological know-how and the other uses all the cool new tools, but not in the service of learning? These are some important issues to consider in finding the balance in an unstable, fast-moving, ever-changing world.

This book is practical and useful to literacy teachers, teacher educators, and university faculty by bringing together the expertise of composition/rhetoric researchers and writers, literacy specialists, technology specialists, and teachers who are on the cutting edge of new literacies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

Part I: Batman Begins, Simply
ch. 1 The Cold, Hard Cash of Truth about Literacy in the 21st Century (Sandra A. Vavra and Sharon L. Spencer)
ch. 2 “And Now... A Word From Our Students”: Creating Better Writers and Thinkers by Having Students Study, Write and Film TV Commercials (Tom Scheft)
ch. 3 Superheroic Resourcefulness: Expanding Literacy and Engagement through YouTube (Sarah Wynn)

PPart II: The Force Is With Reluctant New Media Adopters
ch. 4 Popular Culture as a Sponsor of Literacy: Confronting the CLASH! BOOM! POW! in the Basic Writing Classroom (Tabetha Adkins)
ch. 5 Making Messes and Meaning with Wikis and Blogs (Collie Fulford)
ch. 6 “Are You Now or Have You Ever Been?”: Teaching “Writerly” Confidence, Media Literacy, and Historical, Civic, and Cultural Awareness with This I Believe (Rachelle S. Gold.)

PART III: BRINGING AN X-MENTALITY TO THE EVERYDAY CLASSROOM
ch. 7 Teaching Poetry in a Freestyle World: A Pedagogy for the Unimpressed (Lisa Carl)
ch. 8 Capitalizing on Digital Literacy: Visual Rhetoric, the Graphic Novel and Academic Identity (Sara Littlejohn and Hephzibah Roskelly)
ch. 9 Unraveling the Riddler: New Media, Technology, and Literacies in Exploring Heroes and Superheroes (Sarah M. Henchey and Sharon L. Spencer)
ch. 10 Changing the World–One Zip Code At a Time (Stefanie Frigo)
ch. 11 New Media as Instructional Supports in Inclusive Classrooms (Doris K. Tyler)

Part IV: From Indiana Jones To Buzz Lightyear: Moving Literacy From The Temple of Memory To Infinity and Beyond
ch. 12 Taking Risks and (Re)defining Expertise: Facilitating the Move from Consumption to Production in the Use of Digital Media (Colleen Reilly)
ch. 13 Composing Digitally and Learning Languages: Using Linguistic Models of Competency to Teach Multimedia Assignments (Mark Pepper)
ch. 14 Remembering: The Past and the Future, (George Pullman) Grappling with the Infonauts: Archival Literacy and the Fight for Memory (Tom Sura)

About the Authors
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Teaching Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies

Book
McNary-Zak, Berenadette, and Peters, Rebecca Todd, eds.
2011
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
BL41.T455 2011
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Religion   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Teaching Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies offers an introduction to the philosophy and practice of Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies and takes up several significant ongoing questions related to it. This volume emerges from sustained conversations about the pedagogy of Undergraduate Research by a group of teacher-scholars in the discipline, and it seeks to extend those conversations. For those new to ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Teaching Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies offers an introduction to the philosophy and practice of Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies and takes up several significant ongoing questions related to it. This volume emerges from sustained conversations about the pedagogy of Undergraduate Research by a group of teacher-scholars in the discipline, and it seeks to extend those conversations. For those new to Undergraduate Research, this book provides an overview of fundamental issues and pedagogical questions and practical models for application in the classroom. For seasoned mentors, it acts as a dialogue partner on emerging issues and offers insight into pertinent questions in the field based on the experience of recognized experts. Individual chapters focus on select theoretical and practical topics including the nature of collaboration between faculty and students, what it means for undergraduate students to make an "original contribution" in their research, how to identify and shape a research project that is appropriate and manageable, the types of institutional and professional support systems needed to adequately support and reward faculty who participate in this kind of pedagogy, and procedures for adequate and appropriate assessment. Student perspectives highlight the importance of Undergraduate Research to student learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
ch. 1 Theorizing Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies (Bernadette McNary-Zak and Rebecca Todd Peters)

Part I - Defining Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies
ch. 2 Contributing to the Discipline (Rebecca Todd Peters and Bernadette McNary-Zak)
ch. 3 Mentoring Undergraduate Research (Lynn Huber and John Lanci)
ch. 4 Thinking about Method (Robin Rinehart)

Part II - Approaching Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies
ch. 5 Exploring Archival Material (Paul O. Myhre)
ch. 6 Reading Religion and Culture (Carolyn M. Jones)
ch. 7 Sending Students into the Field (Jeffrey M. Brackett)
ch. 8 Examining History (David C. Ratke)
ch. 9 Working with Texts (Lynn R. Huber and Robin Rinehart)

Part III - Proposing Standards for Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies
ch. 10 Training the Undergraduate Scholar (Nadia M. Lahutsky)
ch. 11 Promoting Institutional Support (Mark Gstohl)
ch. 12 Afterword: Mastering Undergraduate Research (Ann Marie Chilton)

Appendix I: Working Statements on Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies
Appendix II: Learning Contract
Bibliography
Index
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Wabash tree

The Practice of Response: Strategies for Commenting on Student Writing

Book
Straub, Richard
2000
Hampton Press, Cresskill, NJ
PE1404.S8368 2000
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This book sets out to help teachers gain a practical understanding of response to student writing---essentially, by examining sample comments by knowledgeable teachers. It displays and analyzes over 30 sets of comments from a variety of settings, by a variety of teachers, all of them informed by composition studies. It defines the strategies these teachers put into practice. And it situates teacher repines in the larger context of writing instruction. (From ...
Additional Info:
This book sets out to help teachers gain a practical understanding of response to student writing---essentially, by examining sample comments by knowledgeable teachers. It displays and analyzes over 30 sets of comments from a variety of settings, by a variety of teachers, all of them informed by composition studies. It defines the strategies these teachers put into practice. And it situates teacher repines in the larger context of writing instruction. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Models of Response: How Recognized Teachers Respond to Student Writing
ch. 2 A Way to Analyze Comments
ch. 3 Comments in Context: New Compositionists' Responses to Student Writing
ch. 4 Classroom Instruction, Response, and the Student's Evolving Text: Three Case Studies
ch. 5 Guidelines for Responding to Student Writing
ch. 6 Managing the Paper Load, Or Making Good Use of Time
ch. 7 Students' Perceptions of Teach Comments
ch. 8 A Selected Bibliography on Teach Response
ch. 9 Sample Papers for Response

Appendix
List of Contributors
Index
Tactics cover image

"Writing to Learn Theology"

Tactic
Jordon, Sherry E.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 4 (2012): 355
BL.T4 v.15 no. 4 2012
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: low-stakes writing assignments to improve students engagement with texts.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: low-stakes writing assignments to improve students engagement with texts.
Article cover image
Wabash tree

When Resistance Becomes Reproduction: A Critical Action Research Study

Article
Cale, Gary
2001
Proceedings of the 42nd Adult Education Research Conference East Lansing: Department of Adult Education, Michigan State University, 2001, pp. 83-87
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Adult Learners

Additional Info:
This paper explores how adult learners in a college composition course resisted pedagogies and teaching strategies designed to critically examine student and teacher assumptions about classism, racism, and sexism as well as other oppressive structures and discourses.
Additional Info:
This paper explores how adult learners in a college composition course resisted pedagogies and teaching strategies designed to critically examine student and teacher assumptions about classism, racism, and sexism as well as other oppressive structures and discourses.
Cover image
Wabash tree

Me-Search and Re-Search: A Guide for Writing Scholarly Personal Narrative Manuscripts

Book
Nash, Robert, and Bradley, DeMethra LaSha
2011
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
PN146.N37 2011
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Robert and DeMethra’s book, Me-Searching and Re-Search, has caught my fancy in a number of ways. The book title cleverly captures what SPN is all about—it is about self narratives (the “me-search” part) and about scholarly meaning making (the “re-search” part). This eye-catching title also illuminates the authors’ intent to turn this seemingly intimidating method of self-inquiry into something very accessible and doable. Their jargon-free language is friendly ...
Additional Info:
Robert and DeMethra’s book, Me-Searching and Re-Search, has caught my fancy in a number of ways. The book title cleverly captures what SPN is all about—it is about self narratives (the “me-search” part) and about scholarly meaning making (the “re-search” part). This eye-catching title also illuminates the authors’ intent to turn this seemingly intimidating method of self-inquiry into something very accessible and doable. Their jargon-free language is friendly and inviting. Although they don’t intend to make their many methodological tips and tools too prescriptive, their practical suggestions provided in this guide book are, indeed, helpful and useful. I believe that Robert and DeMethra have demonstrated admirable talents as effective educators by unpacking the complex method of SPN writing into bite-sized steps. I am fully convinced that the steps will help both novices, and the experienced researcher, to reach the ultimate height of producing engaging, and scholarly significant, SPN’s. The book is also fun to read. The authors intersperse throughout their own SPN’s, pedagogical insights from their doing and teaching, and real-life stories, in order to illustrate the methodological process, challenges, and triumphs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

Part I: Setting The Stage For Writing An Spin
ch. 1 What Our Book Is About
ch. 2 Why Can’t I Write More Personally, More Honestly?
ch. 3 Autoethnographies, Memoirs, Personal Narrative Essays, Autobiographies
ch. 4 Okay Then! What Exactly Is Scholarly Personal Narrative Writing?

Part II: The Four Components of Spn: Pre-Search, Me-Search, Re-Search, We-Search
ch. 5 How Do You Get Started?
ch. 6 DeMethra’s Pre-Search Dissertation Process
ch. 7 Speaking to All the Me-Search Self-Doubters
ch. 8 Tell Your Story, Speak Your Truth
ch. 9 The SPN Way to Think About Research
ch. 10 The Relationship of Art to Truth in SPN Writing
ch. 11 The Centrality of Theme-Search in SPN Research
ch. 12 Moving from the Pre-, the Me-, and the Re-, to the We
ch. 13 DeMethra’s Use of We-Search and Universalizability in Her Dissertation

Part III: The Nuts and Bolts Spn Toolbox
ch. 14 The Nuts and Bolts Spn Toolbox

Part IV: Additional Resources For Spn Writers
ch. 15 Our SPN Course Syllabus
ch. 16 Putting It All Together
ch. 17 How to Deal with PSPND Syndrome
ch. 18 Creating an SPN Code of Ethics
ch. 19 How to Create Faculty Support for SPN Writing

References
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Teaching Research Processes: The faculty role in the development of skilled student researchers

Book
Badke, William
2012
Chandos Publishing, Oxford
LB2369.B234 2012
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
- engages the domain of teaching faculty rather than librarians only
 - analyzes the reasons why the research processes concept represents a gap in academia
 - focuses on research ability as a process that can be taught within disciplines
 -  provides concrete examples to help faculty teach research processes while meeting existing academic goals

Information literacy may be defined as the ability to identify a ...
Additional Info:
- engages the domain of teaching faculty rather than librarians only
 - analyzes the reasons why the research processes concept represents a gap in academia
 - focuses on research ability as a process that can be taught within disciplines
 -  provides concrete examples to help faculty teach research processes while meeting existing academic goals

Information literacy may be defined as the ability to identify a research problem, decide the kinds of information needed to tackle it, find the information efficiently, evaluate the information, and apply it to the problem at hand. Teaching Research Processes suggests a novel way in which information literacy can come within the remit of teaching faculty, supported by librarians, and reconceived as ‘research processes’. The aim is to transform education from what some see as a primarily one-way knowledge communication practice, to an interactive practice involving the core research tasks of subject disciplines.

This title is structured into nine chapters, covering: Defining research processes; Research ability inadequacies in higher education; Research processes and faculty understanding; Current initiatives in research processes; The role of disciplinary thinking in research processes; Research processes in the classroom; Tentative case studies in disciplinary research process instruction; Research processes transforming education; and Resourcing the enterprise. The book concludes by encouraging the reader to implement the teaching of research processes.

Readership: This book is intended for university professors, academic administrators, academic librarians, and students in library and Information Studies programs (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: my journey into research processes
Acknowledgements
About the author

ch. 1 Defining research processes
 - Average faculty expectations
 - Common definitions
 - The capabilities actually required by students
 - Keeping the goal consistent with higher education’s mission
 - What are we looking for?
 - The idea of research processes

ch. 2 Research ability inadequacies in higher education
 - Where the problem starts
 - University students and information skills – an overview
 - Information literacy of senior undergraduate/graduate students
 - The information literacy of faculty members
 - The bottom line: information illiteracy in academia
 - Notes

ch. 3 Research processes and faculty understanding
 - The understanding gap
 - The university administration gap
 - The silo problem
 - The perpetuated experience (osmosis) gap
 - Faulty assumptions about students and technology
 - Faculty culture
 - Faculty perception of librarians
 - The hesitation of accrediting bodies
 - Conclusion
 - Note

ch. 4 Current initiatives in research processes
 - Development of standards among academic librarians
 - Remedial instruction
 - Credit-based courses
 - Instruction through the curriculum
 - The essential failure of all such initiatives

ch. 5 The role of disciplinary thinking in research processes
 - The development of scholarly ability within a discipline – content and process
 - Learning about versus doing
 - The difference between disciplinary experts and undergraduates
 - The radical shift in thinking demanded for effective research processes instruction to university students

ch. 6 Research processes in the classroom
 - Essential goals
 - Congruence with active learning and constructivism
 - Required thinking and process skills
 - Required changes in teaching patterns
 - The new classroom
 - What about content?

ch. 7 Tentative case studies in disciplinary research process instruction
 - The humanities
 - The social sciences
 - The sciences
 - Professional programs
 - Conclusion

ch. 8 Research processes transforming education
 - The educational task of the professor
 - Departmental planning for teaching research processes
 - University planning for teaching research processes

ch. 9 Resourcing the enterprise
 - The question of priorities
 - Realigning academic librarians
 - Taking a grassroots approach
 - Buy-in at the top
 - What resources do we need?

ch. 10 Conclusion

References
Index
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Wabash tree

A TA's Guide to Teaching Writing in All Disciplines

Book
Finch Hedengren, Beth
2004
Bedford/St. Martin's
PE1404.H3955 2004
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Written specifically for teaching assistants responsible for WAC or WID courses, A TA's Guide to Teaching Writing in All Disciplines provides the practical advice that teaching assistants — no matter the discipline — need in order to teach and evaluate writing effectively. This informative text is perfectly suited to a teaching assistants' training course, or it can serve as a reference for teaching assistants to use on their own. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Written specifically for teaching assistants responsible for WAC or WID courses, A TA's Guide to Teaching Writing in All Disciplines provides the practical advice that teaching assistants — no matter the discipline — need in order to teach and evaluate writing effectively. This informative text is perfectly suited to a teaching assistants' training course, or it can serve as a reference for teaching assistants to use on their own. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface for Faculty
Preface for TAs

Part I: What You Teach When You Teach Writing
ch. 1 Getting Started — How to Use This Book
About This Book
Writing Theory
Teaching Techniques
Book Features
Web Site Features
Conclusion

ch. 2 Why (and How) We Teach Writing
Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)
Writing to Learn 10
Writing in the Disciplines (Learning to Write)
The Writing Process
Conclusion

ch. 3 Prewriting
Explaining Writing Assignments
Using Detailed Assignment Instructions and Grading Rubrics
Helping Students Find and Focus Their Topics
Listing
Freewriting
Clustering
Talking
Writing-to-Learn Assignments as Invention
Coaching Related Skills
Research
Reading
Conclusion

ch. 4 Drafting
Getting Ideas Down on Paper
Developing a Controlling Objective or Thesis Statement
Science Writing
Thesis Statements
Finding an Appropriate Structure
Paragraphing
Unity
Development
Coherence
Conclusion

ch. 5 Revising
Global Revision
Peer-Review Groups
Provide Guidelines
Plan and Manage the Process
Hold Students Accountable
Conclusion

ch. 6 Editing
Style
Voice
Specialized Language
Mechanics, Usage, Grammar, Spelling, and Punctuation
Conclusion

ch. 7 Publishing
Classroom Publishing
Oral Presentations
Class Books
Posters
Institutional Publishing
Contests
Symposia
Journals
Conclusion

Part II: Ways to Teach Writing
ch. 8 One-on-One Writing Conferences (Office Hours)
Prepare Carefully
Begin the Conference
Use Questions to Draw the Student Out
Use Activities to Get the Student Involved in Revision
When Appropriate, Teach Skills and Concepts
Use Constructive Praise to Build Students’ Confidence
Conclusion

ch. 9 In-Class Help Sessions and Workshops
Planning a Workshop
Ideas for Workshop Activities
Conclusion

ch. 10 Commenting on Student Writing
Problems in Communicating through Written Commentary
Comments That Promote Improved Writing Skills
Responding as an Audience
Guiding Substantive Thought
Encouraging Skills Improvement
Providing a Positive Environment
Guidelines for Writing Effective Commentary
Read the Paper Once without Marking It
Comment on Substantive Issues
Pick Your Battles
Respond Respectfully as a Reader
Make It Clear That Surface Errors Matter, But Don’t Edit the Paper
Write a Substantive Endnote to Summarize Your Comments
Conclusion
Cover image
Wabash tree

Responding to Student Writers

Book
Sommer, Nancy
2013
St. Martin's Press, New York, NY
PE1404.S6664
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Because teachers' comments shape student writers

Written from one teacher to another, Nancy Sommers’ Responding to Student Writers offers a model for thinking about response as a dialogue between students and teachers — and for thinking about the benefits of responding to writers as well as to their writing. Braddock Award–winning Nancy Sommers has taught composition and run composition programs for more than three decades; she currently teaches ...
Additional Info:
Because teachers' comments shape student writers

Written from one teacher to another, Nancy Sommers’ Responding to Student Writers offers a model for thinking about response as a dialogue between students and teachers — and for thinking about the benefits of responding to writers as well as to their writing. Braddock Award–winning Nancy Sommers has taught composition and run composition programs for more than three decades; she currently teaches writing and mentors future teachers in Harvard’s Graduate School of Education. In this resource, which is based on her research and her travels to two- and four-year colleges and universities, she focuses on the roles that teacher feedback plays in writers’ development and offers strategies for moving away from responding as correcting. This is a free resource for instructors. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Note to fellow teachers
Introduction

ch. 1 Setting the scene for responding
ch. 2 Engaging students in a dialogue about their writing
ch. 3 Writing marginal comments
ch. 4 Writing end comments
ch. 5 Managing the paper load
ch. 6 A case study: One reader reading

Bibliography
Responding to student writers: Best practices
TTR cover image

Hidden Treasures in Theological Education: The Writing Tutor, the Spiritual Director, and Practices of Academic and Spiritual Mentoring

TTR
Yaghjian, Lucretia B.
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 3 (2013): 221-245
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 3
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Mentoring is an important but often overlooked resource in theological education and students' academic and spiritual formation. This essay profiles the mentoring practices and postures of the writing tutor and the spiritual director as exemplars of academic and spiritual mentoring. An extended probe of this analogy affirms the integration of academic and spiritual formation as a core value in theological education; identifies mentoring in theological education as a hidden treasure ...
Additional Info:
Mentoring is an important but often overlooked resource in theological education and students' academic and spiritual formation. This essay profiles the mentoring practices and postures of the writing tutor and the spiritual director as exemplars of academic and spiritual mentoring. An extended probe of this analogy affirms the integration of academic and spiritual formation as a core value in theological education; identifies mentoring in theological education as a hidden treasure fostering this integration and warranting attention as a theological practice; and re-envisions the theological practice of mentoring under the traditional rubric of the “care of souls,” embracing the relational, educational, formational, spiritual, and rhetorical dimensions of this practice.
Additional Info:
An essay for students on the web page of Dartmouth’s Writing Program.
Additional Info:
An essay for students on the web page of Dartmouth’s Writing Program.
Additional Info:
An extensive series of essays on related topics describing for students how to write effective academic papers in college.
Additional Info:
An extensive series of essays on related topics describing for students how to write effective academic papers in college.
Additional Info:
A series of related essays providing an overview of writing pedagogy and methods, along with specific examples of how to teach writing.
Additional Info:
A series of related essays providing an overview of writing pedagogy and methods, along with specific examples of how to teach writing.
Additional Info:
For students, a concise review of how to evaluate the authority, usefulness, and reliability of the information found through the process of library research. Including: books, periodical articles, multimedia titles, or Web pages – whether looking at a citation, a physical item in hand, or an electronic version on a computer. Links to lengthier discussions.
Additional Info:
For students, a concise review of how to evaluate the authority, usefulness, and reliability of the information found through the process of library research. Including: books, periodical articles, multimedia titles, or Web pages – whether looking at a citation, a physical item in hand, or an electronic version on a computer. Links to lengthier discussions.
Additional Info:
Purdue University site helping students evaluate bibliographic citations, content in a source, as well as internet sources. Links to further resources.
Additional Info:
Purdue University site helping students evaluate bibliographic citations, content in a source, as well as internet sources. Links to further resources.
Additional Info:
A concise and not too abbreviated set of guidelines from UC Berkeley to help students to assess the many types of resources they’ll encounter through research, and evaluate a source’s authority and appropriateness for their research.
Additional Info:
A concise and not too abbreviated set of guidelines from UC Berkeley to help students to assess the many types of resources they’ll encounter through research, and evaluate a source’s authority and appropriateness for their research.
Additional Info:
Extensive rubric for grading student papers. Clear, concise, and helpful. By Richard Ascough, religion faculty member.
Additional Info:
Extensive rubric for grading student papers. Clear, concise, and helpful. By Richard Ascough, religion faculty member.
Additional Info:
University of Minnesota’s Center for Writing offers this brief essay outlining a process for creating a rubric.
Additional Info:
University of Minnesota’s Center for Writing offers this brief essay outlining a process for creating a rubric.
Additional Info:
A thorough but accessible bulleted list of items to consider when designing writing assignments, from University of Minnesota’s Center for Writing.
Additional Info:
A thorough but accessible bulleted list of items to consider when designing writing assignments, from University of Minnesota’s Center for Writing.
Additional Info:
University of Minnesota’s Writing Center provides this index with definitions, advice, handouts, and resources.
Additional Info:
University of Minnesota’s Writing Center provides this index with definitions, advice, handouts, and resources.
Additional Info:
A short grading rubric from the Bok Center at Harvard University.
Additional Info:
A short grading rubric from the Bok Center at Harvard University.
Additional Info:
A statement on best practices from the council of Writing Program Administrators, covering such issues as: what is plagiarism? why does it occur? what are our shared responsibilities? Provides a concise list of best practices to make plagiarism difficult and unnecessary.
Additional Info:
A statement on best practices from the council of Writing Program Administrators, covering such issues as: what is plagiarism? why does it occur? what are our shared responsibilities? Provides a concise list of best practices to make plagiarism difficult and unnecessary.
Additional Info:
Includes helpful links for students on “safe practices” to avoid plagiarism.
Additional Info:
Includes helpful links for students on “safe practices” to avoid plagiarism.
Additional Info:
An extensive set of short articles to help students learn to write.
Additional Info:
An extensive set of short articles to help students learn to write.
Additional Info:
Discusses the strengths and weaknesses of essay tests, and recommends best practices. Idea Paper no. 17, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Discusses the strengths and weaknesses of essay tests, and recommends best practices. Idea Paper no. 17, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Strategies for teaching writing across the curriculum. Idea Paper no. 48, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Strategies for teaching writing across the curriculum. Idea Paper no. 48, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
A thorough overview, with multiple internal links/articles, to help students as well as professionals identify and prevent plagiarism and to develop an awareness of ethical writing.
Additional Info:
A thorough overview, with multiple internal links/articles, to help students as well as professionals identify and prevent plagiarism and to develop an awareness of ethical writing.
Additional Info:
A clearinghouse with a wealth of publications dealing with undergraduate research and related areas: curriculum, pedagogy, mentoring, program development, and more.
Additional Info:
A clearinghouse with a wealth of publications dealing with undergraduate research and related areas: curriculum, pedagogy, mentoring, program development, and more.
Additional Info:
Series of web pages providing an overview of Elon College's robust program in undergraduate research.
Additional Info:
Series of web pages providing an overview of Elon College's robust program in undergraduate research.
Additional Info:
Information and reviews on digital technologies used for teaching, research, and productivity in a liberal arts context.
Additional Info:
Information and reviews on digital technologies used for teaching, research, and productivity in a liberal arts context.
Additional Info:
A guide from the University of Minnesota's Center for Writing to help students unnderstnad how university writing is unique. It provides detailed reading, research, and writing strategies for successful academic writing.
Additional Info:
A guide from the University of Minnesota's Center for Writing to help students unnderstnad how university writing is unique. It provides detailed reading, research, and writing strategies for successful academic writing.
Additional Info:
Nearly a hundred or more citations on the issue of students and plagiarism, especially with international students, compiled by Rebecca Moore Howard, Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University, and specialist in "authorship studies."
Additional Info:
Nearly a hundred or more citations on the issue of students and plagiarism, especially with international students, compiled by Rebecca Moore Howard, Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University, and specialist in "authorship studies."
Additional Info:
A blog by a widely published and cited author on teaching writing to undergraduates. New postings every few months. Her site includes links to a variety of other recommended blogs for teaching in higher education. 
Additional Info:
A blog by a widely published and cited author on teaching writing to undergraduates. New postings every few months. Her site includes links to a variety of other recommended blogs for teaching in higher education. 
TTR cover image

Human Subjects Research: Lessons about Interreligious Relations beyond the Research Thesis

TTR
Numrich, Paul
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 4 (2013): 392
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

Writing to Learn the Reformation: Or, Who Was Ulrich Zwingli And Why Should I Care?

TTR
Jordon, Sherry
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 1 (2014): 50-60
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 1 2014
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
This article describes the use of “Writing to Learn” assignments in a course on the Theology of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. These short, informal assignments promote active learning by focusing on writing as a process for critical thinking and as a way to learn the content of the course. They help students creatively engage with the texts, thoughtfully reflect on them, and critically assess their significance. This article describes ...
Additional Info:
This article describes the use of “Writing to Learn” assignments in a course on the Theology of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. These short, informal assignments promote active learning by focusing on writing as a process for critical thinking and as a way to learn the content of the course. They help students creatively engage with the texts, thoughtfully reflect on them, and critically assess their significance. This article describes the theory behind these assignments, provides examples of different types of assignments as well as excerpts from student papers, and concludes with an evaluation of their effectiveness. The students in the course found the assignments helpful in learning the content of the course and their attitude toward writing in this course significantly improved.
Additional Info:
Incorporating Wikipedia into the curriculum as a collaborative environment or primary source affords students with the opportunity to develop their media literacy, improve their writing skills, and learn appropriate ways to use Wikipedia as an academic resource.
Additional Info:
Incorporating Wikipedia into the curriculum as a collaborative environment or primary source affords students with the opportunity to develop their media literacy, improve their writing skills, and learn appropriate ways to use Wikipedia as an academic resource.
Additional Info:
Short checklist of good practices.
Additional Info:
Short checklist of good practices.
Additional Info:
Using an online writing diagnostic tool can help your students shape up their writing!
Additional Info:
Using an online writing diagnostic tool can help your students shape up their writing!
Additional Info:
Frost and Stommel capture a 14-minute YouTubevideo of a collaborative writing session on Google Docs (now Google Drive). In the accompanying blog post, they offer suggestions for assigning collaborative writing to students, along with persuasive arguments about the pedagogical goods of collaborative writing.
Additional Info:
Frost and Stommel capture a 14-minute YouTubevideo of a collaborative writing session on Google Docs (now Google Drive). In the accompanying blog post, they offer suggestions for assigning collaborative writing to students, along with persuasive arguments about the pedagogical goods of collaborative writing.
Additional Info:
For this piece, at least half of the action is in the comments section. The author, a long advocate of online student collaborative writing, finds himself "sick of student blogging." He carefully describes the several kinds of student blogging he has assigned in the past, and turns the question over to his commenters: What might he do to "reignite [his] sense of discovery and excitement about student blogging"?
Additional Info:
For this piece, at least half of the action is in the comments section. The author, a long advocate of online student collaborative writing, finds himself "sick of student blogging." He carefully describes the several kinds of student blogging he has assigned in the past, and turns the question over to his commenters: What might he do to "reignite [his] sense of discovery and excitement about student blogging"?
Additional Info:
In this Prezi (without voice-over), Thompson explains "open access" to educators and scholars. Includes attention to Open Educational Resources (OER), the relation of Creative Commons to "public domain" and traditional copyright, the difference between "open access" and "open source," different axes of "openness," and the economic crisis in academic publishing. Includes link to Google Doc capturing all URLs cited in the Prezi.
Additional Info:
In this Prezi (without voice-over), Thompson explains "open access" to educators and scholars. Includes attention to Open Educational Resources (OER), the relation of Creative Commons to "public domain" and traditional copyright, the difference between "open access" and "open source," different axes of "openness," and the economic crisis in academic publishing. Includes link to Google Doc capturing all URLs cited in the Prezi.
Additional Info:
An instructor reports, from the benefit of hindsight, on the mistakes he made when assigning students a multimedia project (podcasting, in this case). Commenters offer their own insights on pedagogically sound multimedia assignments.
Additional Info:
An instructor reports, from the benefit of hindsight, on the mistakes he made when assigning students a multimedia project (podcasting, in this case). Commenters offer their own insights on pedagogically sound multimedia assignments.
Additional Info:
Citation Machine automatically generates citations in MLA, APA, Chicago, and Turabian. Helps students avoid plagiarism.
Additional Info:
Citation Machine automatically generates citations in MLA, APA, Chicago, and Turabian. Helps students avoid plagiarism.
Article cover image

Still Desperately Seeking Citations: Undergraduate Research in the Age of Web-Scale Discovery

Article
Rose-Wiles, Lisa; and Hofmann, Melissa M.
2013
Journal of Library Administration, 53:147–166, 2013
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Librarians as Teachers   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Web-scale discovery services promise fast, easy searching from a single Google-like box, pleasing users and making library resources more discoverable. Some librarians embrace the concept of giving users what they have come to expect from Google, while others are concerned that this will “dumb down” searching and undermine information literacy. In this article we explore the potential impact of Web-scale discovery tools on information literacy, focusing particularly on undergraduate research ...
Additional Info:
Web-scale discovery services promise fast, easy searching from a single Google-like box, pleasing users and making library resources more discoverable. Some librarians embrace the concept of giving users what they have come to expect from Google, while others are concerned that this will “dumb down” searching and undermine information literacy. In this article we explore the potential impact of Web-scale discovery tools on information literacy, focusing particularly on undergraduate research skills. We review the existing literature and present findings and experiences from two mid-sized academic libraries that have adopted EBSCO Discovery Service as their library home page portal.Web-scale discovery services promise fast, easy searching from a single Google-like box, pleasing users and making library resources more discoverable. Some librarians embrace the concept of giving users what they have come to expect from Google, while others are concerned that this will “dumb down” searching and undermine information literacy. In this article we explore the potential impact of Web-scale discovery tools on information literacy, focusing particularly on undergraduate research skills. We review the existing literature and present findings and experiences from two mid-sized academic libraries that have adopted EBSCO Discovery Service as their library home page portal.
Additional Info:
The OpEd Project scouts and trains  under-represented experts to take thought leadership positions in their fields, connecting them with a national network of high-level media mentors, and channeling the best new experts and ideas directly to media gatekeepers who need them, across all platforms.
Additional Info:
The OpEd Project scouts and trains  under-represented experts to take thought leadership positions in their fields, connecting them with a national network of high-level media mentors, and channeling the best new experts and ideas directly to media gatekeepers who need them, across all platforms.
Article cover image

Writing Across Borders

Article
Robertson, Wayne
2010
Oregon State University’s Center for Writing and Learning and its Writing Intensive Curriculum Program
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
A 10 minute YouTube clip from the beginning of a longer film produced to help teachers work with international students in writing environments. (http://www.amazon.com/Writing-Across-Borders/product-reviews/B004HU7SUY)  How do we assess international student writing and what teaching practices disadvantage international students and which help them improve as writers? 
Additional Info:
A 10 minute YouTube clip from the beginning of a longer film produced to help teachers work with international students in writing environments. (http://www.amazon.com/Writing-Across-Borders/product-reviews/B004HU7SUY)  How do we assess international student writing and what teaching practices disadvantage international students and which help them improve as writers? 
Tactics cover image

Religious Cultural Artifacts

Tactic
Campbell, R. Anderson
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 4 (2014): 343
BL41.T4. v.17 no. 4 2014
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: specific prompts for student presentations of a religious artifact they select.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: specific prompts for student presentations of a religious artifact they select.
Tactics cover image

Scholarly Writers' Circle

Tactic
Roach, Jonathan C.
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 4 (2014): 345
BL41.T4. v.17 no. 4 2014
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a structured writing group for graduate students.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a structured writing group for graduate students.
Cover image

The Other Side of Pedagogy: Lacan's Four Discourses and the Development of the Student Writer

Book
Johnson, T. R.
2014
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
PE1404.J647 2014
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Delineates Lacan’s theory of the four discourses as a practical framework through which faculty can reflect on where their students are, developmentally, and where they might go.

University classrooms are increasingly in crisis—though popular demands for accountability grow more insistent, no one seems to know what our teaching should seek to achieve. This book traces how we arrived at ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Delineates Lacan’s theory of the four discourses as a practical framework through which faculty can reflect on where their students are, developmentally, and where they might go.

University classrooms are increasingly in crisis—though popular demands for accountability grow more insistent, no one seems to know what our teaching should seek to achieve. This book traces how we arrived at our current impasse, and it uses Lacan’s theory of the four discourses to chart a path forward via an analysis of the freshman writing class. How did we forfeit a meaningful set of goals for our teaching? T. R. Johnson suggests that, by the 1960s, the work of Bergson and Piaget had led us to see student growth as a journey into more and more abstract thought, a journey that will happen naturally if the teacher knows how to stay out of the way. Since the 1960s, we’ve come to see development, in turn, only as a vague initiation into the academic community. This book, however, offers an alternative tradition, one rooted in Vygotsky and the feminist movement, that defines the developing student writer in terms of a complex, intersubjective ecology, and then, through these precedents, proposes a fully psychoanalytic model of student development. To illustrate his practical use of the four discourses, Johnson draws on a wide array of concepts and a colorful set of examples, including Franz Kafka, Keith Richards, David Foster Wallace, Hannah Arendt, and many others.

“Graceful, provocative, thoughtful, and well researched, The Other Side of Pedagogy connects theory and teaching in compelling ways. This is a groundbreaking book that scholars of writing will want to read, reread, and teach.” — Joseph Harris, author of A Teaching Subject: Composition Since 1966 (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Recovering the Unconscious: Pedagogy’s Other Side

ch. 1 The Crisis: Forfeiting Our Most Valuable Asset
ch. 2 Contemporary Composition Studies: Development Means Joining Our Community, and That’s All There Is to Know
ch. 3 Why the “Growth” Movement Didn’t Grow—And an Alternative
ch. 4 Psychoanalysis and Pedagogy: Some Historical Context and Key Terms for Doing the Impossible
ch. 5 A Perfect Ignorance and Paralysis: The Discourse of the Master
ch. 6 Only Following Directions: The Discourse of the University
ch. 7 “Songs…dripping off my fingers”: The Discourse of Hysteric
ch. 8 Playing by Ear: The Discourse of the Analyst

Works Cited
Index
Tactics cover image

Using Art to Explore Plagiarism

Tactic
McGill, Jenny
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 99
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using images as an analogy to help students understand the difference between plagiarism and other appropriate uses of scholarship.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using images as an analogy to help students understand the difference between plagiarism and other appropriate uses of scholarship.
Cover image
Wabash tree

They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing with Readings (Second Edition)

Book
Graff, Gerald; Birkenstein, Cathy; and Durst, Russel
2012
W.W. Norton & Company, New York, NY
PE1431.G73 2012
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
A textbook for students that provides insights for professors teaching writing. From the publisher: "The book that demystifies academic writing, teaching students to frame their arguments in the larger context of what else has been said about their topic–and providing templates to help them make the key rhetorical moves.

"The best-selling new composition book published in this century, in use at more than 1,000 schools, They Say / I ...
Additional Info:
A textbook for students that provides insights for professors teaching writing. From the publisher: "The book that demystifies academic writing, teaching students to frame their arguments in the larger context of what else has been said about their topic–and providing templates to help them make the key rhetorical moves.

"The best-selling new composition book published in this century, in use at more than 1,000 schools, They Say / I Say has essentially defined academic writing, identifying its key rhetorical moves, the most important of which is to summarize what others have said (“they say”) to set up one’s own argument (“I say”). The book also provides templates to help students make these key moves in their own writing.

"The Second Edition includes a new chapter on reading that shows students how to read for the larger conversation and two new chapters on the moves that matter in the sciences and social sciences." (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: Demystifying Academic Conversation
Introduction: Entering the Conversation

Part 1. “THEY SAY”

ch. 1 “They Say”: Starting with What Others Are Saying

ch. 2 “Her Point Is”: The Art of Summarizing

ch. 3 “As He Himself Puts It”: The Art of Quoting


Part 2. “I SAY”

ch. 4 “Yes / No / Okay, But”: Three Ways to Respond

ch. 5 “And Yet”: Distinguishing What You Say from What They Say

ch. 6 “Skeptics May Object”: Planting a Naysayer in Your Text

ch. 7 “So What? Who Cares?”: Saying Why It Matters


Part 3. TYING IT ALL TOGETHER

ch. 8 “As a Result”: Connecting the Parts

ch. 9 “Ain’t So / Is Not”: Academic Writing Doesn’t Always Mean Setting Aside Your Own Voice

ch. 10 “But Don't Get Me Wrong”: The Art of Metacommentary


Part 4. IN SPECIFIC ACADEMIC SETTINGS

ch. 11 “I Take Your Point”: Entering Class Discussions

ch. 12 “What’s Motivating This Writer?”: Reading for the Conversation

ch. 13 “The Data Suggest”: Writing in the Sciences

ch. 14 “Analyze This”: Writing in the Social Sciences


READINGS

David Zinczenko, Don’t Blame the Eater

Gerald Graff, Hidden Intellectualism

Richard A. Muller, Nuclear Waste

Deborah Tannen, Agonism in the Academy: Surviving the Argument Culture


Index of Templates
Cover image

Uncommonly Good Ideas: Teaching Writing in the Common Core Era

Book
Murphy, Sandra; and Smith, Mary Ann
2015
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LB1576.M863 2015
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This innovative resource provides teachers with a road map for designing a comprehensive writing curriculum that meets Common Core standards. The authors zero in on several “big ideas” that lead to and support effective practices in writing instruction, such as integrating reading, writing, speaking, and listening; teaching writing as a process; extending the range of students’ writing; spiraling and scaffolding a writing curriculum; ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This innovative resource provides teachers with a road map for designing a comprehensive writing curriculum that meets Common Core standards. The authors zero in on several “big ideas” that lead to and support effective practices in writing instruction, such as integrating reading, writing, speaking, and listening; teaching writing as a process; extending the range of students’ writing; spiraling and scaffolding a writing curriculum; and collaborating. These “big ideas” are the cornerstones of best researched-based practices as well as the CCSS for writing.

The first chapter offers a complete lesson designed around teaching narrative writing and illustrating tried and true practices for teaching writing as a process. The remaining chapters explore a broad range of teaching approaches that help students tackle different kinds of narrative, informational, and argumentative writing and understand complexities like audience and purpose. Each chapter focuses on at least one of the uncommonly good ideas and illustrates how to create curricula around it. Uncommonly Good Ideas includes model lessons and assignments, mentor texts, teaching strategies, student writing, and practical guidance for moving the ideas from the page into the classroom.

Book Features:

- Presents no-nonsense information about teaching writing in the era of CCSS, including ways in which the CCSS are misinterpreted.
- Focuses on “the core of the core,” the bedrock on which effective teaching approaches rest.
- Incorporates the voices and practices of many talented teachers of writing, including ELA teachers from urban, rural, and suburban schools, as well as ELL teachers.
- Addresses teachers as respected, dedicated professionals whose experiences and good judgment are the linchpins of any reform. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by (Carol Jago)
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Exploring Uncommonly Good Ideas in Teaching Writing
Teaching Writing Is a Must-See
Writing in the Era of the Common Core
Entering Into a Professional Conversation
Last Thoughts

ch. 2 Integrating the Language Arts
Advantages of Integrating the Language Arts
Capturing the Big Idea of Integration
Taking the Plunge: First Steps in an Integrated Lesson Design
Diving Deeper: Craft Workshop with Mentor Texts and Try-It-On Writing
Diving in Again: More Practice with “Showing” Techniques
Final Reading Assignment
Final Writing Assignment
Classroom Examples: Lesson Design in Action
Last Thoughts

ch. 3 Extending the Range of Writing
Capturing the Big Idea of Range
Taking the Plunge: Investigative and Informational Writing
Diving Deeper: From Information to Argument
Last Thoughts

ch. 4 Spiraling and Scaffolding
Capturing the Big Idea of Spiraling
Taking the Plunge: Exploring Spiraling Techniques
Diving Deeper: Spiraling, Scaffolding, and Scrimmaging
Capturing the Big Idea of Scaffolding
Taking the Plunge: Possibilities for Scaffolding
Diving Deeper: Scaffolding for Writing from Reading
Diving in Again: Learning to Work with Multiple Texts
Last Thoughts

ch. 5 Collaborating
Capturing the Big Idea of Collaboration
Taking the Plunge: Teaching Students to Collaborate
Diving Deeper: Teaching Students to Collaborate Online
Diving in Again: Teaching Students to Collaborate on Long-Term Projects
Teachers Collaborating with Students
Teachers Collaborating with Each Other
Last Thoughts

ch. 6 Turning Reform Inside Out
Taking the Plunge: Teachers in the Lead
Diving Deeper: Some Reminders of What’s What
The Power of Positive Deviance
Bringing Positive Deviance to the Common Core State Standards

References
Index
About the Authors
Additional Info:
Provides a brief explanation and instructions for students to encourage them to learn to annotate while reading texts — produced by a state university writing center. 
Additional Info:
Provides a brief explanation and instructions for students to encourage them to learn to annotate while reading texts — produced by a state university writing center. 
Additional Info:
Ryan Trauman’s blog site on Writing Studies, rhetoric and composition, Digital Humanities and future forms of scholarship
Additional Info:
Ryan Trauman’s blog site on Writing Studies, rhetoric and composition, Digital Humanities and future forms of scholarship
Cover image

Teaching Writing While Standing on One Foot

Book
Danberg, Robert
2015
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LB1576.D26 2015
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Written in a tradition that encourages teachers to see classrooms as laboratories and themselves as artists, intellectuals and researchers, Teaching Writing While Standing on One Foot is a compelling work that will enthrall readers as well as give them knowledge, hope, and inspiration. Written from the perspective of a writer, teacher, father, home cook and learner growing up with a learning disability, Teaching ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Written in a tradition that encourages teachers to see classrooms as laboratories and themselves as artists, intellectuals and researchers, Teaching Writing While Standing on One Foot is a compelling work that will enthrall readers as well as give them knowledge, hope, and inspiration. Written from the perspective of a writer, teacher, father, home cook and learner growing up with a learning disability, Teaching Writing While Standing on One Foot combines essays, poems, recipes, legends, teaching tips and stories to explore the question “How do we teach what we can only learn for ourselves?” Prompts woven throughout the book invite readers to write the stories of their own lives. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Teaching Writing While Standing on One Foot
Commentary: Telly the Story of Your Life as a Writer

ch. 2 Enfolded Knowledge
Commentary: Imagine the Story You Told of Your Life as a Writer as a Wide Sea
Commentary: Start with Something You Do

ch. 3 This Ability
Commentary: Gifts
Commentary: The Listener
Commentary: How Do You Know You are Done?
Commentary: Name Your Materials, Name Your Tools

ch. 4 Four Things
ch. 5 A User’s Manual
ch. 6 Idling at an Intersection
ch. 7 Something from Nothing: The Writing Teacher’s Work

ch. 8 The Kitchen Classroom
Commentary: Think of Your Classroom as a Point that a Line Passes Through

ch. 9 An Image of Expertise
Commentary: That Just Sounds Like Writing

ch. 10 The Empty Room
Commentary: All I kept thinking

ch. 11 The Dining Room Classroom
Commentary: The Host Must Always Choose the Goat
Commentary: Consider the Shape of Time

ch. 12 Four Principles and a Fifth
Commentary: What Persists
Commentary: Ellen Schmidt

ch. 13 Some Rules of My Thumb
ch. 14 Share the Recipe and Teach the Meal
ch. 15 Hats without Rabbits
ch. 16 Making the Class
ch. 17 Imagine the Following
ch. 18 Works Consulted and Relied Upon
Additional Info:
A site with resources for teachers to coach students when providing peer feedback and revision, to promote critical thinking and better writing.
Additional Info:
A site with resources for teachers to coach students when providing peer feedback and revision, to promote critical thinking and better writing.
Cover image

The Elements (and Pleasures) of Difficulty 1st Edition

Book
Salvatori, Mariolina R.; and Donahue, Patricia A.
2005
Longman, New York, NY
PE1479.C7 S25 2005
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
Emphasizing both reading and writing, The Elements of Difficulty helps readers to confront the challenges of interpreting difficult texts and to see those challenges as paths to knowledge, rather than impediments. This short, economical paperback enables readers to acknowledge, name, and assess the nature of their difficulties in reading and interpreting complex texts, with the ultimate goal of transforming confusion into understanding. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Emphasizing both reading and writing, The Elements of Difficulty helps readers to confront the challenges of interpreting difficult texts and to see those challenges as paths to knowledge, rather than impediments. This short, economical paperback enables readers to acknowledge, name, and assess the nature of their difficulties in reading and interpreting complex texts, with the ultimate goal of transforming confusion into understanding. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface for Students
Preface for Teachers

ch. 1 Introducing Difficulty
What Do We Mean By Difficulty?
Why Difficulty Merits Attention
What About the “Easy” Text
What Do We Mean By Reading?
How This Book Is Organize
Three Tools of Teaching And Learning
The Difficulty Paper
The Triple Entry Notebook: Nick Jacobs
Taking Stock
Retrospective

ch. 2 The Difficulty of Poetry
Discovering Your Repertoire
Reading “One Art” Reading Elizabeth Bishop (Liza Funkhouser)
Reading as Participatory (Liza Funkhouse and Kim Woomer)
Distinguishing Between Ordinary and Metaphorical Language
Moving Beyond the Literal (Katie Stamm)
Taking Stock
Retrospective

ch. 3 The Difficulty of Longer Texts
When a Work Seems Long and Boring
Where to Begin with a Longer Text
Introducing The Rime of The Ancyent Marinere
Navigating the Waters (Kristin Pontoski)
Recuperating the Past
Reading the Hybrid Text
Understanding Genre
Viewing Your Own Writing As Hybrid Genre
Reading As Rewriting (Patrick Beh-Forrest)

ch. 4 Intermezzo
Moving from Poetry to Prose
Surveying the Landscape

ch. 5 The Difficulty of Prose Narrative
What You Already Know About Narrative
How Narrative Can Be Theorized (Gerard Genette)
Using Theory to Reframe Your Understanding
Reading Krik? Krak!
Understanding Strange Texts
Reading the “Story” in “History”
Understanding the Language of Prose
Tone in Prose
Symbols in Prose
Taking Stock
Retrospective

ch. 6 Writing and Reading the Personal Essay
Writing About the Self
Reflecting On Personal Writing
Uncovering the Difficulty of Personal Writing
Exploring the Self: The Example of Montaigne
Reading “Of Books”
Reading Against the Grain
Writing About Montaigne: Tom Brennan
Making the Move to the Academic Essay
Understanding the Reading and Writing Transaction
Taking Stock
Retrospective

ch. 7 A Provisional Conclusion
Reading a “Great” Author
Becoming Aware of Shakespeare's Aura
Hearing Cultural Noise
Understanding Shakespeare's Characters
Considering the Author Function
Confronting Shakespeare's Name
Taking Stock
Retrospective
Coda

Glossary
Works Cited
Appendix A: List of Difficulties
Appendix B: Robert Bly, “Snowfall in the Afternoon,” and “Driving My Parents Home at Christmas”
Appendix C: Carolyn Steadman, “Landscape for a Good Woman”
Appendix D: Edwidge Danticat, “Krit?Krat!”
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Wabash tree

Assessing Students' Digital Writing: Protocols for Looking Closely

Book
Hicks, Troy
2015
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LB1576.7.A77 2015
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In this book, Troy Hicks - a leader in the teaching of digital writing - collaborates with seven National Writing Project teacher consultants to provide a protocol for assessing students’ digital writing. This collection highlights six case studies centered on evidence the authors have uncovered through teacher inquiry and structured conversations about students’ digital writing. Beginning with a digital writing sample, each teacher ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In this book, Troy Hicks - a leader in the teaching of digital writing - collaborates with seven National Writing Project teacher consultants to provide a protocol for assessing students’ digital writing. This collection highlights six case studies centered on evidence the authors have uncovered through teacher inquiry and structured conversations about students’ digital writing. Beginning with a digital writing sample, each teacher offers an analysis of a student’s work and a reflection on how collaborative assessment affected his or her teaching. Because the authors include teachers from kindergarten to college, this book provides opportunities for vertical discussions of digital writing development, as well as grade-level conversations about high-quality digital writing. The collection also includes an introduction and conclusion, written by Hicks, that provides context for the inquiry group’s work and recommendations for assessment of digital writing.

Book Features:

An adaptation of the Collaborative Assessment Conference protocol to help professional learning communities examine students’ digital work.

Detailed descriptions of students’ digital writing, including the assessment process and implications for instruction.

Links to the samples of student digital writing available online for further review and to be used as digital mentor texts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword: An Introduction to the National Writing Project’s “Digital Is” Website (Christina Cantril)
Foreword
Acknowledgments

Introduction: An Invitation to Look Closely at Students’ Work
Looking Closely at Student Work: Employing Protocols for Teacher Inquiry
Changing Assessment Practices with Digital Writing
A Brief Description of Our Teacher Inquiry Group’s Process
Outline of the Book

ch. 1 Extending Writing through Augmented Reality
Context for the Project
Looking Closely at Aaron’s Work
Implications for Instruction and Assessment

ch. 2 Wondering in Room 114
Our Writing Workshop
Digital Mentor Texts
Wonderopolis as a Digital Mentor Text
The “Wonder” Project
Looking Closely at Carson’s Project
What Do You Notice?
Questions Invite Deeper Thinking
Reflection on the Process

ch. 3 Nurturing Middle School Readers Through Reviews and Book Trailers
The Project: Using Animoto for a Multimodal Response
Insights from the Collaborative Assessment Conference Protocol
Implications for Future Instruction and Assessment

ch. 4 “Seize the Day”: Finding Voice by Creating Public Service Announcements
Katie as a Digital Learner
Implications for Instruction and Assessment
Epilogue

ch. 5 Chocolate and Change: Gaming for Social Justice
Describing the Project: The Teach-in
Insights from the Protocol Review Process

ch. 6 Remix and Remediate: Social Composing for More than Just the Web
Narrating a Story of Forgiveness
Asking Critical Questions About Digital Composing
Holding Onto Syncretic Tensions in Community and Composition

Conclusion
Broadening Our Vision of Assessment
Next Directions for Digital Writing Assessment

References
Index
About the Contributors
Tactics cover image

Catalyzing the Undergraduate Research Process Collaboratively

Tactic
Brecht, Mara
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 4 (2015): 360
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 4 2015
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: Students work alone and in groups to identify effective research questions for their capstone essay.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: Students work alone and in groups to identify effective research questions for their capstone essay.
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Making Sense in Religious Studies A Student's Guide to Research and Writing, 2nd Edition

Book
Northey, Margot; Anderson, Bradford A.; and Lohr, Joel N.
2015
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
BL41.N67 2015
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Features an overview of research and writing for students in religious studies, for a reasonable price, and can be used as a resource for a student's entire academic career.

Uses straightforward language to discuss the basics of research and writing. Instructors agree that as an overview, the Making Sense series is much easier to digest than heavier writing style guides, and ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Features an overview of research and writing for students in religious studies, for a reasonable price, and can be used as a resource for a student's entire academic career.

Uses straightforward language to discuss the basics of research and writing. Instructors agree that as an overview, the Making Sense series is much easier to digest than heavier writing style guides, and they appreciate the discipline-specific content.

Features up-to-date guidelines for documentation and referencing and provides the most current guidelines for documentation in religious studies, including coverage of MLA, APA, and Chicago styles and referencing.

Along with including the most up-to-date citation styles, the Making Sense series also features current examples, and useful information on using the internet as a research tool.

More Accessible. This edition contains more bulleted points and summaries to make the content easier to reference and absorb.

New to this Edition:
Chapters are reordered to better match the writing and learning process

Includes comprehensive coverage of new developments in technology-based research and writing

Sections on MLA, APA, and Chicago style have been revised to be completely up to date (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
A Note to the Student
A Note to the Instructor

ch. 1 Making the Most of Your Time in Higher Education
ch. 2 Getting to Know Religious Studies
ch. 3 Writing and Thinking
ch. 4 Finding and Using Academic Resources
ch. 5 Writing Essays
ch. 6 Writing Book Reviews and Book Reports
ch. 7 Writing Short Assignments: Chapter Summaries and Article Reviews
ch. 8 Reading Religious Texts and Writing Interpretive Essays
ch. 9 Learning Languages
ch. 10 Writing Comparative Essays
ch. 11 Writing with Style
ch. 12 Tests and Examinations
ch. 13 Giving an Oral Presentation
ch. 14 Receiving Feedback and Reflecting on Your Studies
ch. 15 Documenting Your Sources
ch. 16 Common Errors in Grammar and Usage
ch. 17 Punctuation
ch. 18 Misused Words and Phrases
ch. 19 Afterword

Appendix 1: Sample Book Review
Appendix 2: Sample Chapter Summary and Evaluation
Glossary
Bibliography Index
TTR cover image

Stealing or Sharing? Cross-Cultural Issues of Plagiarism in an Open-Source Era

TTR
Haitch, Russell
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 3 (2016): 264-275
BL41.T4 v.19 no. 3 2016
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
More professors and institutions want to move from a detect-and-punish to an educate-and-prevent model for dealing with plagiarism. Understanding the causes of plagiarism, especially among international students, can aid in efforts to educate students and prevent plagiarism. Research points to a confluence of causal factors, such as time pressure, language differences, and unclear rules. Though not the primary factor, ethical differences between cultures are also germane. Overall, the plight of ...
Additional Info:
More professors and institutions want to move from a detect-and-punish to an educate-and-prevent model for dealing with plagiarism. Understanding the causes of plagiarism, especially among international students, can aid in efforts to educate students and prevent plagiarism. Research points to a confluence of causal factors, such as time pressure, language differences, and unclear rules. Though not the primary factor, ethical differences between cultures are also germane. Overall, the plight of international students summons institutions to examine their ethical norms of attribution. Plagiarism has a cultural history tied to concepts of individual creativity, but its future may look quite different in an era with increased communal sharing of ideas and images.
TTR cover image

Collaborative Questioning through Digital Media: A Strategy for Catalyzing Student Research Conversations

TTR
Brecht, Mara
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 3 (2016): 299-308
BL41.T4 v.19 no. 3 2016
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
Research begins with good questions. Undergraduate students often struggle with research projects because they do not know how to pose good research questions. This note describes a teaching strategy that is collaborative and digital, and enables students to practice asking research questions and acquire skills for evaluating them collectively. Working in groups and through a digital medium, students query each other's research interests and, in turn, inhabit the kinds of ...
Additional Info:
Research begins with good questions. Undergraduate students often struggle with research projects because they do not know how to pose good research questions. This note describes a teaching strategy that is collaborative and digital, and enables students to practice asking research questions and acquire skills for evaluating them collectively. Working in groups and through a digital medium, students query each other's research interests and, in turn, inhabit the kinds of conversational practices that characterize authentic scholarly discourse.
Article cover image

"The Believing Game or Methodological Believing" (pdf)

Article
Elbow, Peter
2009
The Journal of the Assembly for Expanded Perspectives on Learning, Volume 14, Winter 2008 - pgs 1-11
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Three arguments why we need the believing game: to help us find flaws in our thinking, to help us choose among competing claims, and to achieve goals that the doubting game neglects.
Additional Info:
Three arguments why we need the believing game: to help us find flaws in our thinking, to help us choose among competing claims, and to achieve goals that the doubting game neglects.
Cover image

Writers on Writing: Collected Essays from The New York Times

Book
The New York Times; Darnton, John
2001
Owl Books / Holt, Henry & Co.
PN137.W734 2001 V.1
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
By turns poignant, hilarious, and practical, Writers on Writing brings together more than forty of contemporary literature's finest voices.

Pieces range from reflections on the daily craft of writing to the intersection of art's and life's consequential moments. Authors discuss what impels them to write: creating a sense of control in a turbulent universe; bearing witness to events that would otherwise be lost in history or within the ...
Additional Info:
By turns poignant, hilarious, and practical, Writers on Writing brings together more than forty of contemporary literature's finest voices.

Pieces range from reflections on the daily craft of writing to the intersection of art's and life's consequential moments. Authors discuss what impels them to write: creating a sense of control in a turbulent universe; bearing witness to events that would otherwise be lost in history or within the writer's soul; recapturing a fragment of time. Others praise mentors and lessons, whether from the classroom, daily circumstances, or the pages of a favorite writer. For anyone interested in the art and rewards of writing, Writers on Writing offers an uncommon and revealing view of a writer's world.

Contributors include Russell Banks, Saul Bellow, E. L. Doctorow, Richard Ford, Kent Haruf, Carl Hiaasen, Alice Hoffman, Jamaica Kincaid, Barbara Kingsolver, Sue Miller, Walter Mosley, Joyce Carol Oates, Annie Proulx, Carol Shields, Jane Smiley, Susan Sontag, John Updike, Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Alice Walker, and Elie Wiesel. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction / John Darnton
A Literary Pilgrim Progresses to the Past (Andre' Aciman)
A Novelist's Vivid Memory Spins Fiction of Its Own (Russell Banks)
To Engage the World More Fully, Follow a Dog (Rick Bass)
Hidden Within Technology's Empire, a Republic of Letters (Saul Bellow)
Pupils Glimpse an Idea, Teacher Gets a Gold Star (Anne Bernays)
Characters' Weaknesses Build Fiction's Strengths (Rosellen Brown)
How Can You Create Fiction When Reality Comes to Call? (Carolyn Chute)
From Echoes Emerge Original Voices (Nicholas Delbanco)
Quick Cuts: The Novel Follows Film into a World of Fewer Words (E. L. Doctorow)
Two Languages in Mind, but Just One in the Heart (Louise Erdrich)
Instant Novels? In Your Dreams! (Thomas Fleming)
Goofing Off While the Muse Recharges (Richard Ford)
A Novelist Breaches the Border to Nonfiction (Gail Godwin)
Putting Pen to Paper, but Not Just Any Pen or Just Any Paper (Mary Gordon)
To See Your Story Clearly, Start by Pulling the Wool over Your Own Eyes (Kent Haruf)
Real Life, That Bizarre and Brazen Plagiarist (Carl Hiaasen)
Sustained by Fiction While Facing Life's Facts (Alice Hoffman)
The Enduring Commitment of a Faithful Storyteller (Maureen Howard)
Inventing Life Steals Time, Living Life Begs It Back (Gish Jen)
Pesky Themes Will Emerge When You're Not Looking (Diane Johnson)
Sitting Down a Novelist, Getting Up a Playwright (Ward Just)
Those Words That Echo ... Echo ... Echo Through Life (Jamaica Kincaid)
A Forbidden Territory Familiar to All (Barbara Kingsolver)
Summoning the Mystery and Tragedy, but in a Subterranean Way (Hans Koning)
Comforting Lessons in Arranging Life's Details (David Leavitt)
The Humble Genre Novel, Sometimes Full of Genius (David Mamet)
She Was Blond. She Was in Trouble. And She Paid 3 Cents a Word (Ed McBain)
Virtual Reality: The Perils of Seeking a Novelist's Facts in Her Fiction (Sue Miller)
For Authors, Fragile Ideas Need Loving Every Day (Walter Mosley)
To Invigorate Literary Mind, Start Moving Literary Feet (Joyce Carol Oates)
A Storyteller Stands Where Justice Confronts Basic Human Needs (Sara Paretsky)
Life of Prose and Poetry: An Inspiring Combination (Marge Piercy)
Inspiration? Head Down the Back Road, and Stop for the Yard Sales (Annie Proulx)
If You Invent the Story, You're the First to See How It Ends (Roxana Robinson)
Once Upon a Time, Literature. Now What? (James Salter)
Starting with a Tree and Finally Getting to the Death of a Brother (William Saroyan)
Opting for Invention over the Injury of Invasion (Carol Shields)
A Reluctant Muse Embraces His Task, and Everything Changes (Jane Smiley)
Directions: Write, Read, Rewrite. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as Needed (Susan Sontag)
An Odyssey That Started with Ulysses (Scott Turow)
Questions of Character: There's No Ego as Wounded as a Wounded Alter Ego (John Updike as Henry Bech)
Despite Tough Guys, Life Is Not the Only School for Real Novelists (Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.)
Metta to Muriel and Other Marvels: A Poet's Experience of Meditation (Alice Walker)
In the Castle of Indolence You Can Hear the Sound of Your Own Mind (Paul West)
A Sacred Magic Can Elevate the Secular Storyteller (Elie Wiesel)
Embarking Together on Solitary Journeys (Hilma Wolitzer)
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Writers on Writing, Volume II: More Collected Essays from The New York Times

Book
The New York Times; Smiley, Jane
2003
Owl Books / Holt, Henry & Co.
PN137.W734 2001 V. 2
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
In a second volume of original essays drawn from the long-running New York Times column, Writers on Writing brings together another group of contemporary literature's finest voices to muse on the challenges and gifts of language and creativity. The pieces range from taciturn, hilarious advice for aspiring writers to thoughtful, soul-wrenching reflections on writing in the midst of national tragedy. William Kennedy talks about the intersecting lives of real and ...
Additional Info:
In a second volume of original essays drawn from the long-running New York Times column, Writers on Writing brings together another group of contemporary literature's finest voices to muse on the challenges and gifts of language and creativity. The pieces range from taciturn, hilarious advice for aspiring writers to thoughtful, soul-wrenching reflections on writing in the midst of national tragedy. William Kennedy talks about the intersecting lives of real and imagined Albany politics; Susan Isaacs reveals her nostalgia for a long-retired protagonist; and Elmore Leonard offers pithy rules for letting the writing, and not the writer, take charge. With contributions from Diane Ackerman, Margaret Atwood, Frank Conroy, Mary Karr, Patrick McGrath, Arthur Miller, Amy Tan, and Edmund White, Writers on Writing, Volume II offers an uncommon and revealing view of the writer's world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Jane Smiley)
Poems Foster Self-Discovery (Diane Ackerman)
A Path Taken, with All the Certainty of Youth (Margaret Atwood)
Essentials Get Lost in the Shuffle of Publicity (Ann Beattie)
Timeless Tact Helps Sustain a Literary Time Traveler (Geraldine Brooks)
Yes, There Are Second Acts (Literary Ones) in American Lives (Alan Cheuse)
Footprints of Greatness on Your Turf (Frank Conroy)
New Insights into the Novel? Try Reading Three Hundred (Chitra Divakaruni)
Returning to Proust's World Stirs Remembrance (Leslie Epstein)
Forget Ideas, Mr. Author. What Kind of Pen Do You Use? (Stephen Fry)
In Paris and Moscow, a Novelist Finds His Time and Place (Alan Furst)
Recognizing the Book That Needs to Be Written (Dorothy Gallagher)
How to Insult a Writer (Herbert Gold)
Calming the Inner Critic and Getting to Work (Allegra Goodman)
A Narrator Leaps Past Journalism (Vivian Gornick)
They Leap from Your Brain Then Take Over Your Heart (Andrew Greeley)
When Inspiration Stared Stoically from an Old Photograph (Kathryn Harrison)
A Career Despite Dad's Advice (Michael Holroyd)
Seeing Unimaginable Freezes the Imagination (A.M. Homes)
Hemingway's Blessing, Copland's Collaboration (A.E. Hotchner)
Returning to the Character Who Started It All (Susan Isaacs)
Negotiating the Darkness, Fortified by Poets' Strength (Mary Karr)
Hometown Boy Makes Waves (William Kennedy)
As Her Son Creates His Story, a Mother Waits for the Ending (Beth Kephart)
The Glory of a First Book (Brad Leithauser)
Easy on the Adverbs, Exclamation Points and Especially Hooptedoodle (Elmore Leonard)
A Famous Author Says: "Swell Book! Loved It!" (Elinor Lipman)
Hearing the Notes That Aren't Played (David Mamet)
Heroism in Trying Times (Patrick McGrath)
Shattering the Silence, Illuminating the Hatred (Arthur Miller)
Overcome by Intensity, Redeemed by Effort (Honor Moore)
A Novelist's Life Is Altered by Her Alter Ego (Marcia Muller)
Computers Invite a Tangled Web of Complications (P.J. O'Rourke)
Saluting all the King's Mentors (Jay Parini)
Why Not Put Off Till Tomorrow the Novel You Could Begin Today? (Ann Patchett)
The Eye of the Reporter, the Heart of the Novelist (Anna Quindlen)
A Retreat from the World Can Be a Perilous Journey (Jonathan Rosen)
After Six Novels in Twelve Years, a Character Just Moves On (James Sallis)
Fiction and Fact Collide, with Unexpected Consequences (John Sedgwick)
Confession Begets Connection (David Shields)
A Storyteller Finds Comfort in a Cloak of Anonymity (Susan Richards Shreve)
Autumnal Accounting Endangers Happiness (Richard Stern)
Family Ghosts Hoard Secrets That Bewitch the Living (Amy Tan)
A Bedeviling Question in the Cadence of English (Shashi Tharoor)
Still Replying to Grandma's Persistent "And Then?" (Frederic Tuten)
A Pseudonym Returns from an Alter-Ego Trip, with New Tales to Tell (Donald E. Westlake)
Before a Rendezvous with the Muse, First Select the Music (Edmund White)
Cover image

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft

Book
King, Stephen
2010
PS3561.I483Z46 2010
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
Immensely helpful and illuminating to any aspiring writer, this special edition of Stephen King’s critically lauded, million-copy bestseller shares the experiences, habits, and convictions that have shaped him and his work.

“Long live the King” hailed Entertainment Weekly upon publication of Stephen King’s On Writing. Part memoir, part master class by one of the bestselling authors of all time, this superb volume is a revealing and ...
Additional Info:
Immensely helpful and illuminating to any aspiring writer, this special edition of Stephen King’s critically lauded, million-copy bestseller shares the experiences, habits, and convictions that have shaped him and his work.

“Long live the King” hailed Entertainment Weekly upon publication of Stephen King’s On Writing. Part memoir, part master class by one of the bestselling authors of all time, this superb volume is a revealing and practical view of the writer’s craft, comprising the basic tools of the trade every writer must have. King’s advice is grounded in his vivid memories from childhood through his emergence as a writer, from his struggling early career to his widely reported, near-fatal accident in 1999—and how the inextricable link between writing and living spurred his recovery. Brilliantly structured, friendly and inspiring, On Writing will empower and entertain everyone who reads it—fans, writers, and anyone who loves a great story well told. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
First Foreword
Second Foreword
Third Foreword
C.V.
What Writing Is
Toolbox on Writing
On Living: A Postscript
And Furthermore, Part I: Door Shut, Door Open
And Furthermore, Part II: A Booklist
Furthermore to Furthermore, Part III
About Stephen King
Cover image

Voice & Vision: A Guide to Writing History and Other Serious Nonfiction

Book
Pyne, Stephen J.
2009
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
PN145.P96 2009
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
It has become commonplace these days to speak of “unpacking” texts. Voice and Vision is a book about packing that prose in the first place. While history is scholarship, it is also art—that is, literature. And while it has no need to emulate fiction, slump into memoir, or become self-referential text, its composition does need to be conscious and informed. Voice and Vision is for those who wish to ...
Additional Info:
It has become commonplace these days to speak of “unpacking” texts. Voice and Vision is a book about packing that prose in the first place. While history is scholarship, it is also art—that is, literature. And while it has no need to emulate fiction, slump into memoir, or become self-referential text, its composition does need to be conscious and informed. Voice and Vision is for those who wish to understand the ways in which literary considerations can enhance nonfiction writing. At issue is not whether writing is scholarly or popular, narrative or analytical, but whether it is good. Fiction has guidebooks galore; journalism has shelves stocked with manuals; certain hybrids such as creative nonfiction and the new journalism have evolved standards, esthetics, and justifications for how to transfer the dominant modes of fiction to topics in nonfiction. But history and other serious or scholarly nonfiction have nothing comparable. Now this curious omission is addressed by Stephen Pyne as he analyzes and teaches the craft that undergirds whole realms of nonfiction and book-based academic disciplines. With eminent good sense concerning the unique problems posed by research-based writing and with a wealth of examples from accomplished writers, Pyne, an experienced and skilled writer himself, explores the many ways to understand what makes good nonfiction, and explains how to achieve it. His counsel and guidance will be invaluable to experts as well as novices in the art of writing serious and scholarly nonfiction. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part I. Arts
1. In the Beginning, Words
2. Art and Craft
3. Rules of Engagement
4. Nonfiction as Writing
5. Voice…
6. …and Vision
7. Designing
8. Plotting
9. Transitioning
10. Dramatizing
11. Editing I

Part II. Crafts
12. Prose
13. Character
14. Setting
15. Point of View
16. Showing and Telling
17. Editing II
18. Figures of Speech
19. Technical Information
20. Questions of Scale

Part III. Doing It
21. Theory and Practice
22. Writing Lives
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The Writer's Home Companion: An Anthology of the World's Best Writing Advice, From Keats to Kunitz

Book
Bolker, Joan
1997
Owl Books / Holt, Henry & Co.
PN149.W69 1997
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
Writing is a solitary sport—but none of us can do it without good company at crucial moments. This spirited collection of inspiring and useful essays and exercises on the craft of writing is the next best thing to having an experienced writer at your side. These twenty-nine pieces, more than half of which have never been published in book form, include selections as unusual and diverse as behaviorist B. ...
Additional Info:
Writing is a solitary sport—but none of us can do it without good company at crucial moments. This spirited collection of inspiring and useful essays and exercises on the craft of writing is the next best thing to having an experienced writer at your side. These twenty-nine pieces, more than half of which have never been published in book form, include selections as unusual and diverse as behaviorist B. F. Skinner's "How to Discover What You Have to Say"; Brett Candlish Millier's investigation of the seventeen drafts of Elizabeth Bishop's poem "One Art"; Ursula Le Guin's "Where Do You Get Your Ideas From?"; Anne Eisenberg's "E-Mail and the New Epistolary Age"; and Nancy Mair's "The Writer's Thin Skin and Faint Heart." Other contributors include Gloria Naylor, Stanley Kunitz, Bernard Shaw, Natalie Goldberg, Anne Tyler, Rita Dove, Peter Elbow, and Gail Godwin. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
PART I. THE WRITING PROCESS
1. Preparation
"Where Do You Get Your Ideas From?" (Ursula Le Guin)
"The Love of Books" (Gloria Naylor)
"So You Want to Be a Writer?" (Donald M. Murray)
"Still Just Writing" (Anne Tyler)
2. Beginning
"Freewriting" (Peter Elbow)
"Getting Started: Writing Suggestions" (Patricia Cumming)
"Model Train of Thought No. 1" (Lawrence Weinstein)
"Write Anyplace" (Natalie Goldberg )
"How to Discover What You Have to Say: A Talk to Students" (B. F. Skinner )
3. Revision
Houghton Library manuscript pages:
First Page of "To Autumn" ( John Keats)
Manuscript Page of Mrs Warren's Profession (Bernard Shaw)
Manuscript Page from the New York Edition of The Portrait of a Lady (Henry James)
From Writers at Work: The "Paris Review" Interviews (Ernest Hemingway)
"Elusive Mastery: The Drafts of Elizabeth Bishop's 'One Art'" (Brett Candish Millier)
"Options for Getting Feedback" (Peter Elbow)
4. Poetry
"Climbing the Jacob's Ladder" (Ruth Whitman)
"A Wild Surmise: Motherhood and Poetry" (Alicia Ostriker)
The Wisdom of the Body" (Stanley Kunitz)
"To Make a Prairie" (Rita Dove)
PART II. BECOMING A WRITER
5. Voice
"Teaching Griselda to Write" (Joan L. Bolker)
"The Watcher at the Gates" (Gail Godwin)
"E-Mail and the New Epistolary Age" (Anne Eisenberg)
"A Room of One's Own is Not Enough" (Joan L. Bolker)
6. Audience
"A Writer's First Readers" (Helen Benedict)
"The Perils and Payoffs of Persistence" (Linda Weltner)
'The Writer's Thin Skin and Faint Heart" (Nancy Mairs)
7. Practice
"Writing as a Practice" (Natalie Goldberg)
"Examsmanship and the Liberal Arts: An Epistemological Inquiry" (William G. Perry Jr.)
"Not Just Writing, Really Writing" (Joan L. Bolker)
Cover image

On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction

Book
Zinsser, William
1976
Harper & Row, San Francisco, CA
PE1429.Z5 2016
Topics: Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
On Writing Well has been praised for its sound advice, its clarity and the warmth of its style. It is a book for everybody who wants to learn how to write or who needs to do some writing to get through the day, as almost everybody does in the age of e-mail and the Internet.

Whether you want to write about people or places, science and technology, business, ...
Additional Info:
On Writing Well has been praised for its sound advice, its clarity and the warmth of its style. It is a book for everybody who wants to learn how to write or who needs to do some writing to get through the day, as almost everybody does in the age of e-mail and the Internet.

Whether you want to write about people or places, science and technology, business, sports, the arts or about yourself in the increasingly popular memoir genre, On Writing Well offers you fundamental priciples as well as the insights of a distinguished writer and teacher. With more than a million copies sold, this volume has stood the test of time and remains a valuable resource for writers and would-be writers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
PART I Principles
ch. 1 The Transaction
ch. 2 Simplicity
ch. 3 Clutter
ch. 4 Style
ch. 5 The Audience
ch. 6 Words
ch. 7 Usage

PART II Methods
ch. 8 Unity
ch. 9 The Lead and the Ending
ch. 10 Bits & Pieces

PART III Forms
ch. 11 Nonfiction as Literature
ch. 12 Writing About People: The Interview
ch. 13 Writing About Places: The Travel Article
ch. 14 Writing About Yourself: The Memoir
ch. 15 Science and Technology
ch. 16 Business Writing: Writing in Your Job
ch. 17 Sports
ch. 18 Writing About the Arts: Critics and Columnists
ch. 19 Humor

PART IV Attitudes
ch. 20 The Sound of Your Voice
ch. 21 Enjoyment, Fear and Confidence
ch. 22 The Tyranny of the Final Product
ch. 23 A Writer's Decisions
ch. 24 Write as Well as You Can
TTR cover image

Religion for Non-Human Animals

TTR
Menning, Nancy
2018
Teaching Theology and Religion 21, no. 1 (2018): 59
BL41.T4 v.21 no. 1
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: working in groups to practice reading carefully and write academically.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: working in groups to practice reading carefully and write academically.