Teaching On The Pulse

Welcome to the Wabash Center's blog series:
Teaching On The Pulse

This monthly blog provides updates on the Wabash Center’s doings and happenings. As well, it is a space where Lynne shares her insights, commentary, and opinion on issues of teaching, learning, and justice in theology and religion.  This blog is meant to be evocative, even provocative. You are welcome to use her blog entries to spark dialogue in your classrooms, among your faculty and with your administrators. 

 

 

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Recent Posts

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Have you ever asked a question in class for which you did not know the answer; a question for which you did not have THE one answer in mind? Have you ever planned an assignment or designed a learning activity that was so freewheeling that you did not know what ...

The narration below is my recollection of a typical interchange between my mother and my father when I was a child. Be mindful that we lived in a large home and invariably during these conversations my father would be on the first floor and my mother would be on the ...

Listen to Dr. Westfield read this blog in an audio format. My mother was deeply loved. She and my father came to live with me in 2008. Mom and Dad became known in the school community as they regularly attended chapel services, lectures and community dinners. Students who were my research ...

Listen to Dr. Westfield read this blog post in her "I'm Just Saying" audio blog series “Will somebody please Hold My Mule,” might sound like an urgent plea for animal restraint. Spoken in the African American vernacular tradition, it is a warning of a pending ecstatic release. But, here, context ...

Teachers are people who plan. We cross classroom thresholds with worn briefcases bulging with written lectures clearly forecasted in thick, detailed, syllabi. Entire curriculums are planned three, four, five years into the future. Course learning outcomes are carefully aligned with degree programs and degree programs are carefully align with budgets – ...

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