Online Learning

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Web-Based Instruction

Book
Khan, Badrul H., ed.
1997
Educational Technology Publications, Englewood Cliffs, NJ
LB1044.87.W43 1997
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
This book covers all significant aspects of the design, development, delivery, and evaluation of instruction using Internet's World Wide Web. In 59 chapters, this 480-page-volume, 7 x 10 inches, provides users of the Web with online sources, case studies, references, and other forms of information regarding ways to use this new techology to improve opportunities for learning at all levels. Nearly one hundred authors, representing institutions situated throughout the world, participated in the ...
Additional Info:
This book covers all significant aspects of the design, development, delivery, and evaluation of instruction using Internet's World Wide Web. In 59 chapters, this 480-page-volume, 7 x 10 inches, provides users of the Web with online sources, case studies, references, and other forms of information regarding ways to use this new techology to improve opportunities for learning at all levels. Nearly one hundred authors, representing institutions situated throughout the world, participated in the writing of this timely volume-using the Web to coordinate their efforts, thus assuring a remarkably complete treatment of this important topic. E-mail and World Wide Web addresses are given for all chapter authors, most of whom have active Web sites that can provide additional information to readers of the book. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
SECTION I WEB-BASED TRAINING: INTRODUCTION
ch. 1 Web-Based Training: An Introduction (Badrul H. Khan)
ch. 2 Web-Based Training: Advantages and Limitations (Wallace Hannum)
ch. 3 Web-Based Training: Benefits and Obstacles to Success (Zane Berge, Mauri Collins, and Tim Fitzsimmons)
ch. 4 Infostructures: Technology, Learning, and Organizations (Greg Kearsley and Michael J. Marquardt)
ch. 5 Emerging Learning Trends and the World Wide Web (Ellen D. Wagner)
ch. 6 Glossary of Terms in Web-Based Training (Rick Hall)
ch. 7 Web-Based Training Resources (Manal A. El-Tigi and Badrul H. Khan)

SECTION II WEB-BASED TRAINING: DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVES
ch. 8 A Framework for Web-Based Learning (Badrul H. Khan)
ch. 9 Designing Instructional Templates for Web-Based Training (Robert J. Mills, Kimberly A. Lawless, and M. David Merrill)
ch. 10 A Practical Model for Conversational Web-Based Training: A Response from the Past to the Needs of the Future (Alexander J. Romiszowski and Echeol Chang)
ch. 11 Web Architectures for Learning (Peter G. Fairweather, Richard B. Lam, and Lei Kuang)
ch. 12 The Web and Model-Centered Instruction (Andrew S. Gibbons, Kimberly A. Lawless, Thor A. Anderson, and Joel Duffin)
ch. 13 Activity Theory and Web-Based Training, (David Peal and Brent G. Wilson)
ch. 14 Design and Development Issues in Web-Based Training (Wallace Hannum)
ch. 15 Web-Based Training Site Design Principles: A Literature Review and Synthesis (Richard H. Hall) ch. 16 Developing Synchronous Web-Based Training for Adults in the Workplace (Margaret M. Driscoll)
ch. 17 Web-Based Instructional Methods for Corporate Training Curricula (Pamela D. Loughner, Douglas M. Harvey, and William D. Milheim)
ch. 18 Developing Web-Based Training for a Global Corporate Community (Judy Cossel Rice, Miles Day Coleman, Vincent E. Shrader, Joanne P. Hall, Sharon A. Gibb, and Reo H. McBride)
ch. 19 Accommodating People with Disabilities in Web-Based Training Programs (Alan Cantor)
ch. 20 An Instructional Design-Based Approach to Developing Online Learning Environments (Bob Hoffman and Donn C. Ritchie)
ch. 21 Playing Interactive Training Games on the Web (Sivasailam Thiagarajan and Raja Thiagarajan)
ch. 22 Simulations for Web-Based Training (Harry A. Pappo)
ch. 23 HyperInquiry: Surfing Below the Surface of the Web (John V. Dempsey and Brenda C. Litchfield)
ch. 24 Practical Guidelines for Facilitating Team Activities in Web-Based Training (Margaret Bailey and Lara Luetkehans)
ch. 25 Industry-University Partnerships in Web-Based Learning: A Working Model (Colla J. MacDonald and Martha Gabriel)
ch. 26 Managing the Development and Evolution of Web-Based Training: A Service Bureau Concept (Thomas M. Welsh and Ben L. Anderson)
ch. 27 Designing Practical Websites for Interactive Training (John G. Hedberg, Christine Brown, John L. Larkin, and Shirley Agostinho)
ch. 28 Design Strategies for Web-Based Training: Using Bandwidth Effectively (David R. Moore and Barbara B. Lockee)
ch. 29 Ideas on Designing Web Pages for OnlineTraining (Don E. Descy)
ch. 30 Web-Based Training: Current Status of This Instructional Tool (William D. Milheim and Brenda Bannan-Ritland)
ch. 31 Review of Web-Based Assessment Tools (Jianping Zhang, Badrul H. Khan, Andrew S. Gibbons, and Yun Ni)
ch. 32 Online Testing Methods in Web-Based Training Courses (Sunil Hazari)
ch. 33 Software Tools for Online Course Management and Delivery (Ann E. Barron and Chet Lyskawa)
ch. 34 Planning for Web-Based Course Management (Henryk R. Marcinkiewicz and Eva M. Ross)
ch. 35 Web-Based Training Administration (Jason D. Baker)
ch. 36 Project Support Sites: A Project Management Tool for Constructing Web-Based Training (Lee T. Gotcher)
ch. 37 Current and Ideal Practices in Designing, Developing, and Delivering Web-Based Training (Carlos Villalba and Alexander J.Romiszowski)
ch. 38 Pedagogy and Web-Based Course Authoring Tools: Issues and Implications (Nada H. Dabbagh, Brenda Bannan-Ritland and Kate Flannery Silc)
ch. 39 A Framework for a Comprehensive Web-Based Authoring System (Badrul H. Khan and David A. Ealy)

SECTION III WEB-BASED TRAINING: IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION PERSPECTIVES
ch. 40 Case Studies of Web-Based Training Sites (Badrul H. Khan, Deborah Waddill, and Jane A. McDonald)
ch. 41 Implementation Issues in Web-Based Training (Kinshuk and Ashok Patel)
ch. 42 Copyright Issues in Web-Based Training (David Throne)
ch. 43 Needed: Digital Libraries for Web-Based Training (John Schmitz)
ch. 44 Positioning for Effectiveness: Applying Marketing Concepts to Web-Based Training (Nancy M. Levenburg)
ch. 45 Benchmarking Educational Technology for Military Planners (R. Thomas Goodden)
ch. 46 Designing Web-Based Learning Environments at the Department of Defense: New Solutions (Sharon G. Fisher and Will S. Peratino)
ch. 47 Repurposing Instructor-Led Training into Web-Based Training: A Case Study and Lessons Learned (Kenneth G. Brown, Karen R. Milner, J. Kevin Ford, and Wendy Golden)
ch. 48 A Corporate/College Partnership for Web-Based Training (Sharon Gray, Suzanne McCann, Earl Robinson, and Sean Warner)
ch. 49 The Future of Continuing Medical Education on the Web (Henry L. Shapiro)
ch. 50 Long Distance Collaborative Authentic Learning (CAL): Recommendations for Problem-Based Training on the Web (Alison A. Carr-Chellman)
ch. 51 Supporting Adult Learners in Web-Based Training (Larry R. Hudson, Linda Greer, and Teresa Buhler)
ch. 52 Web-Based Case Studies: A Multipurpose Tool for the Training Toolkit (M. Elizabeth Hrabe, Mable B. Kinzie, and Marti F. Julian)
ch. 53 Web-Based Rapid Prototyping as a Strategy for Training University Faculty to Teach Web-Based Courses (Betty A. Collis)
ch.. 54 Support for Teachers Enhancing Performance in Schools: An EPSS Professional Development Tool (Pamela Taylor Northrup, Karen L. Rasmussen, and Janet K. Pilcher)
ch. 55 Integrating Web-Based Technology into Teacher-Preparation Training Programs (Nella B. Anderson, LeAnn McKinzie, Don C. Johnson, Jarvis W. Hampton, and Trey McCallie)
ch. 56 The Teachers' Internet Use Guide: Web-Based Training for Educators David Hoffman, Lorraine Sherry, Jonathan Lurie, and Jason McDaniel)
ch. 57 Virtual U: A Hub for Excellence in Education, Training and Learning Resources (Badrul H. Khan)
ch. 58 Evaluating Web-Based Training: The Quest for the Information-Age Employee (Joanne P. Hall and Conrad A. Gottfredson)
ch. 59 Evaluating Web-Based Training Programs (Zane L. Berge)
ch. 60 Online Implementation of Kirkpatrick's Four Levels of Evaluation Using Web Databases (Harvi Singh)
ch. 61 Usability Testing of Web-Based Training (Michael Hughes and Loren Burke)
ch. 62 Cost Analysis and Return on Investment (ROI) for Distance Education (Kent L. Gustafson and Lynne Schrum)
ch. 63 Usability Testing and Return-on-Investment Studies: Key Evaluation Strategies for Web-Based Training (Thomas C. Reeves and Bryan J. Carter)
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Teaching and Learning at a Distance: What It Takes to Effectively Design, Deliver and Evaluate Programs

Book
Cyrs, Thomas
1997
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 71)
LC5800.T4 1997
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Teaching and learning at a distance is an area of education that is growing rapidly alongside the technology that makes it possible. But success in this area requires more than advanced technology; it requires skillful instructors, well-designed courses, and students ready to learn from the format. This issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning provides insights from experienced practitioners into what is needed to make teaching and learning at ...
Additional Info:
Teaching and learning at a distance is an area of education that is growing rapidly alongside the technology that makes it possible. But success in this area requires more than advanced technology; it requires skillful instructors, well-designed courses, and students ready to learn from the format. This issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning provides insights from experienced practitioners into what is needed to make teaching and learning at a distance successful for everyone involved. This is the 71st issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part One: Issues and Trends
ch. 1. Issues and TrAnds to Take Us into the Twenty-First Century (George P. Connick).

Part Two: Instructional Design Principles for Distance Learning.
ch. 2. Competence in Teaching at a Distance (Thomas E. Cyrs).
ch. 3. Interactivity: From Agents to Outcomes (Ellen D. Wagner).
ch. 4. Visual Thinking: Let Them See What You Are Saying (Thomas E. Cyrs)
ch. 5. Student-Centered Instruction for the Design of Telecourses (M. Winston Egan, Gordon S. Gibb).
ch. 6. Learner Development: Beyond the Technology (Darcy Walsh Hardy, Mary H. Boaz).

Part Three: Alternative Delivery Systems for Distance Learning.
ch. 7. Teaching by Television (Virginia A. OstAndorf).
ch. 8. Teaching by Telephone (Christine H. Olgren).
ch. 9. The Internet: A Learning Environment (Rory McGreal).
ch. 10. Networked Learning Environments (Alan G. Chute, Pamela K. Sayers, Richard P. Gardner).

Part Four: Administrative Issues for the Distance Instructor.
ch. 11. Evaluating Teaching and Learning at a Distance (Michael R. Simonson).
ch. 12. Copyright: Opportunities and Restrictions for the Teleinstructor (Janis H. Bruwelheide).
ch. 13. Distance Learning and the Digital Library: Transforming the Library into an Information Center (Roberta L. Derlin, Edward Erazo).
ch. 14. Managing Information Resources and Services in a Distance Environment (Robert S. Tolsma)
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Teaching in the Information Age: The Role of Educational Technology

Book
Albright, Michael and David Graf
1992
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1028.5.T3224 1992
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
New instructional programs and services involving technology are being established which have significant implications for the way teaching and learning will be conducted in the future. This volume contains 10 papers which examine some of the current trends in instructional technology in higher education and discuss implications for teaching and learning in the postsecondary setting. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
New instructional programs and services involving technology are being established which have significant implications for the way teaching and learning will be conducted in the future. This volume contains 10 papers which examine some of the current trends in instructional technology in higher education and discuss implications for teaching and learning in the postsecondary setting. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Instructional Technology and the Faculty Member
ch. 2 New Directions in Presentation Graphics: Impact on Teaching and Learning
ch. 3 Multimedia and the Teaching-Learning Process in Higher Education
ch. 4 Academic Computing: How to Address the Teaching and Learning Challenge
ch. 5 Computer Communications and Learning
ch. 6 Distance Education: Meeting Diverse Learners' Needs in a Changing World
ch. 7 The Emerging Potential of Virtual Reality in Postsecondary Education
ch. 8 The Research Library and Emerging Information Technology
ch. 9 The Future of Campus Media Centers
ch. 10 Faculty Development's Role in Improving Undergraduate Education

Index
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"Pedagogical Principles and Practices for Asynchronous On-line Sociology Courses"

Article
Jaffee, David
2000
Dept. of Sociology, State University of New York, New Paltz (2000)
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
This paper will discuss some pedagogical principles and practices that can be employed in a particular type of distance learning that I refer to as asynchronous learning networks (ALNs). ALNs are courses offered exclusively on-line via the internet or a remote server in an asynchronous mode that involves no face-to-face interaction and no conventional classroom sessions. The pedagogical techniques described below were developed while participating in a Sloan Foundation supported ...
Additional Info:
This paper will discuss some pedagogical principles and practices that can be employed in a particular type of distance learning that I refer to as asynchronous learning networks (ALNs). ALNs are courses offered exclusively on-line via the internet or a remote server in an asynchronous mode that involves no face-to-face interaction and no conventional classroom sessions. The pedagogical techniques described below were developed while participating in a Sloan Foundation supported distance learning project at the State University of New York at New Paltz (under the auspices of the SUNY Learning Network) and teaching a ALN sociology course titled "Social and Economic Development". Many of the ideas and strategies presented stem from conversations with, and the advice and comments of, teaching colleagues in the SUNY Learning Network and instructional developers at the Center for Learning and Technology at Empire State College.
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"Asking the Hard Questions About Technology Use and Education"

Article
Ehrmann, Stephen C.
1999
Change Mar/Apr (1999): 25-29
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Provides information on the availability of data on teaching, learning and technology. Details on the study questions posed by the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute which focused on results; Role of technology in the quality and cost of lower-division composition courses of the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI); Disadvantages of the IUPUI composition students; Effect of technology use on costs.
Additional Info:
Provides information on the availability of data on teaching, learning and technology. Details on the study questions posed by the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute which focused on results; Role of technology in the quality and cost of lower-division composition courses of the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI); Disadvantages of the IUPUI composition students; Effect of technology use on costs.
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"Seven Principles for Good Course Web Site Design"

Article
Creed, Tom and Kathryn Plank
1998
The National Teaching & Learning Forum 7, no. 3(1998): 8-10
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
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"PowerPoint, No! Cyberspace, Yes"

Article
Creed, Tom
1997
The National Teaching & Learning Forum 6, no. 3 (1997): 5-7
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
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Educational Technology and Distance Education: Issues and Implications for Theological Education (pdf)

Journal Issue
1999
Theological Education 36, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.36no.1
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1999-theological-education-v36-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Introduction, (Daniel O. Aleshire)

ISSUE FOCUS
Theme Introduction, The Editors
A Review of Literature on Distance Education, (Linda Cannell)
A Survey of Accrediting Agency Standards and Guidelines for Distance Education, (Samuel K. Roberts)
An Examination of Formational and Transformational Issues in Conducting Distance Learning, (Anne Reissner)
Using Computers in Theological Education: Rules of Thumb, (Scott Cormode)
Summaries of Two Experimental Distance Education Programs, (Jimmy Dukes and Gregory W. Bourgond)
Report of the Survey of ATS Schools on Educational Technology and Distance Education, (Katherine E. Amos)

OPEN FORUM
An Integrated Approach to Theological Education, (Patricia A. Lamoureux)
Pedagogy of the Repressed: What Keeps Seminarians from Transformational Learning?, (F. LeRon Shults)
Writing Practical Christian Wisdom: Genre and the Doctor of Ministry Dissertation, (Timothy D. Lincoln)
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"Classification of Interactivity and Amount of Instruction Delivered Online: All Variables"

Article
Nelson, Laurie
Digital Learning Environments Research and Development Group, Brigham Young University
Topics: Online Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
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"Implementing the Seven Principles: Technology as Lever"

Article
Chickering, Arthur W., and Stephen C. Ehrmann
1993
American Association for Higher Education Bulletin 49, no. 2 (1993): 3-6
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This seminal 1996 essay, still widely referenced, describes some of the most effective and appropriate ways to use technology to advance the “Seven Principles for Good Practices in Undergraduate Education (the widely influential1987 Chickering and Gamson article).
Additional Info:
This seminal 1996 essay, still widely referenced, describes some of the most effective and appropriate ways to use technology to advance the “Seven Principles for Good Practices in Undergraduate Education (the widely influential1987 Chickering and Gamson article).
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"Extending the Classroom Walls Electronically"

Article
Creed, Tom
1997
in New Paradigms for College Teaching (Edina, MN: Interaction Book Company, 1997), 149-84
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
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"Using Computers in Theological Education: Rules of Thumb"

Article
Cormode, Scott
1999
Theological Education 36, no. 1: 101-115
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
There has been little systematic thought about the pedagogical issues that technology creates in theological schools. Addressed both theological institutions and individual professors, this paper addresses basic pedagogical questions. What are the most effective ways to employ technology in the classroom? Are there guidelines for distinguishing productive activities from merely flashy ones? And, what "rules of thumb" exist for enabling novices to make the best use of computer technology for ...
Additional Info:
There has been little systematic thought about the pedagogical issues that technology creates in theological schools. Addressed both theological institutions and individual professors, this paper addresses basic pedagogical questions. What are the most effective ways to employ technology in the classroom? Are there guidelines for distinguishing productive activities from merely flashy ones? And, what "rules of thumb" exist for enabling novices to make the best use of computer technology for theological learning?
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"Managing--and Motivating!--Distance Learning Group Activities"

Article
Mills, Barbara J.
The Teaching, Learning and Technology Group, http://www.tltgroup.org/gilbert/millis.htm
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Online Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Ask yourself key questions about the proposed group activity, be certain that the activity furthers course objects, allow for team building, encourage students to monitor group processing, promote individual accountability, etc.
Additional Info:
Ask yourself key questions about the proposed group activity, be certain that the activity furthers course objects, allow for team building, encourage students to monitor group processing, promote individual accountability, etc.
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"Theological Distance Education: A Librarian's Perspective"

Article
Harmeyer, Dave
2001
Journal of Religious and Theological Information 3, no. 3/4 (2001): 69-86
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
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"Teaching in a Web Based Distance Learning Environment: An Evaluation Summary Based on Four Courses"

Article
Graham, Charles, Kursat Cagiltay, Joni Craner, Byung-Ro Lim, & Thomas M.
2000
Center for Research on Learning and Technology Technical Report No. 13-00, Indiana University, Bloomington (2000)
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
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"Why Bother?"

Article
Gilbert, Steven W.
2001
The Teaching, Learning and Technology Group (2001) http://www.tltgroup.org/gilbert/WhyBother.htm
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Brief, schematic argument for the ways in which new information technologies can improve student learning.
Additional Info:
Brief, schematic argument for the ways in which new information technologies can improve student learning.
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"Using Learning Styles to Adapt Technology for Higher Education"

Article
O'Connor, Terry
1997
Center for Teaching and Learning, Indiana State University (1997)
Topics: Online Learning   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
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A Classroom of One: How Online Learning is Changing Our Schools and Colleges

Book
Maeroff, Gene I.
2003
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
LC5803.C65M34 2003
Topics: Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This is Gene Maeroff's "report from the front" on the short history and status of online learning in the United States and around the world. Maeroff is a reporter who takes you to the schools from Penn State's World Campus to the Florida Virtual School to the newly emerging online learning initiatives in Afghanistan. His journey ultimately provides a snapshot of the way in which technology is changing the minds ...
Additional Info:
This is Gene Maeroff's "report from the front" on the short history and status of online learning in the United States and around the world. Maeroff is a reporter who takes you to the schools from Penn State's World Campus to the Florida Virtual School to the newly emerging online learning initiatives in Afghanistan. His journey ultimately provides a snapshot of the way in which technology is changing the minds of people with regard to the nature of higher education. He looks at the method of electronic delivery, the quality of the information being delivered and quality of interaction it engenders. He looks at the way learners are adapting to this new technology and how much responsibility is put on the student's shoulders. Finally, and maybe tellingly, he looks at the business of online learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 An Invitation to a Revolution
ch. 2 Delivering the Goods
ch. 3 The Nature of Interaction
ch. 4 Facilitating the Conversation
ch. 5 Adapting to the New
ch. 6 Responsibility for Learning
ch. 7 The Business of Online Education
ch. 8 Focusing E-Learning on Careers
ch. 9 But Is It Legitimate?
ch. 10 Controlling the Process
ch. 11 In School, on Campus
ch. 12 Serving Those Least Served
ch. 13 Redefining the Educational Institution
ch. 14 Online Courses across the Gamut
ch. 15 Educational Purposes in the Cyber Era

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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"Teaching the Bible through the Internet: In the Classroom and at a Distance"

Article
Simkins, Ronald A.
2000
Journal of Religion and Society 2 (2000)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
This essay will argue that the internet provides an “added-value” to education, providing resources for more effective teaching and enhancing the learning of the students. The internet emphasizes written communication, facilitating clarity of thought and serving as the basis for critical thinking. The internet emphasizes the social dimensions of learning, and the students’ own role in their learning. This essay will illustrate the value of the internet for teaching and ...
Additional Info:
This essay will argue that the internet provides an “added-value” to education, providing resources for more effective teaching and enhancing the learning of the students. The internet emphasizes written communication, facilitating clarity of thought and serving as the basis for critical thinking. The internet emphasizes the social dimensions of learning, and the students’ own role in their learning. This essay will illustrate the value of the internet for teaching and learning through a case study of transforming a traditional introductory course on the Bible into a distance course.
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"Ten Ways Online Education Matches, or Surpasses Face-to-Face Learning"

Article
Kassop, Mark
2003
The Technology Source (May/June 2003)
Topics: Online Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
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"What to Do About the New Crunch: Ten Most Obvious Cost-Effective Strategies for Improving Teaching and Learning with Technology"

Article
Gilbert, Steven W.
2002
The Teaching, Learning and Technology Group (2002) http://www.tltgroup.org/CostEffective/TenBest.htm
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
not currently available on the web
Additional Info:
not currently available on the web
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"The Mysterious Territory of Distance Learning"

Article
Beck, Evelyn
2002
Thought and Action 18 (2002): 77-89
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
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"Emerging Models of Online Collaborative Learning: Can Distance Enhance Quality?"

Article
Ehrmann, Stephen C., and Collins, Mauri
2001
The Teaching, Learning and Technology Group (2001) http://www.tltgroup.org/resources/Collab_Distance.html
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Argues that online collaboration among students does not need to follow the same forms as traditional interaction in face-to-face classrooms. Reviews pioneering and imaginative ways of helping students learn with one another in virtual space – ways that multiply the advantages of extended access with the strengths of enriched learning environments.
Additional Info:
Argues that online collaboration among students does not need to follow the same forms as traditional interaction in face-to-face classrooms. Reviews pioneering and imaginative ways of helping students learn with one another in virtual space – ways that multiply the advantages of extended access with the strengths of enriched learning environments.
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"'Hybrid' Teaching Seeks to End the Divide Between Traditional and Online Instruction"

Article
Young, Jeffrey R.
2002
The Chronicle of Higher Education, 22 March 2002
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Focuses on the introduction of hybrid teaching which aims to end the gap between traditional and online instruction in the U.S. Advantages of hybrid courses and hybrid degree programs; Colleges offering hybrid instruction; Skepticism on online education projects.
Additional Info:
Focuses on the introduction of hybrid teaching which aims to end the gap between traditional and online instruction in the U.S. Advantages of hybrid courses and hybrid degree programs; Colleges offering hybrid instruction; Skepticism on online education projects.
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"The Catholic Internet: Seminary Technologies Impacting the Teaching and Learning Environment of the Church"

Article
Mahfood, Sebastian, Vic Klimoski, Beverly Lane, and Daniel Harris
Seminary Journal 9, no. 4 (Winter 2003): 10-20
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
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"Learning Online to Teach Online"

Article
Carnevale, Dan
2003
The Chronicle of Higher Education, Vol. 50, Issue 10, October 2003
Topics: Online Learning   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Asserts that while prospective distance educators are flocking to certification programs, some academics question their value. Although certification programs, which can differ significantly in nature and intensity, go well beyond simple technology training, many newly certified distance educators have found that the certification does not necessarily lead to job security or even employment.
Additional Info:
Asserts that while prospective distance educators are flocking to certification programs, some academics question their value. Although certification programs, which can differ significantly in nature and intensity, go well beyond simple technology training, many newly certified distance educators have found that the certification does not necessarily lead to job security or even employment.
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Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning: Leading and Supporting the Transformation on Your Campus

Book
Barone, Carole A. and Paul R. Hagner, eds.
2001
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2395.7 .T43 2001
Topics: Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The ability of the Internet and the World Wide Web to provide a wealth of on-line information that can be easily accessed at any time is changing the basic structure and operations of organizations, especially educational institutions.

Written by a blue-ribbon panel of contributors -- thirteen experts in various fields of educational technology and teaching and learning -- Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning: Leading and Supporting the Transformation on ...
Additional Info:
The ability of the Internet and the World Wide Web to provide a wealth of on-line information that can be easily accessed at any time is changing the basic structure and operations of organizations, especially educational institutions.

Written by a blue-ribbon panel of contributors -- thirteen experts in various fields of educational technology and teaching and learning -- Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning: Leading and Supporting the Transformation on Your Campus offers academic leaders the advice they need to help their institutions initiate, implement, and manage the transformation in order to become Internet-based communication and learning environments. The authors show how leaders can meet the challenge of the information age and the student demand for interactive learning by creating supportive environments that allow faculty to adapt to and sustain this sweeping institutional transformation. This book offers the insights, practical suggestions, and strategies that are essential for engaging the campus community in the transformation process. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Authors

ch. 1. Engaging the Faculty (Paul R. Hagner, Charles A. Schneebeck)
ch. 2. Creating a Context for Consensus (David G. Brown, Sally Jackson)
ch. 3. Managing Complexity in a Transforming Environmen (Vicki N. Suter)
ch. 4. Transforming Traditional Faculty Roles (William H. Graves)
ch. 5. The Holy Grail: Developing Scalable and Sustainable Support Solutions (Joel L. Hartman, Barbara Truman-Davis)
ch. 6. Designing and Delivering Instructional Technology: A Team Approach (Gerard L. Hanley)
ch. 7. Responding to Intellectual Property and Legal Issues (James L. Hilton, James G. Neal )
ch. 8. Form Follows Function: Establishing the Necessary Infrastructure (Bret L. Ingerman)
ch. 9. Assessing Conditions for Campus Transformation (Carole A. Barone, Paul R. Hagner)

Index
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Designing Courses and Teaching on the Web: A "How-To" Guide to Proven, Innovative Strategies

Book
Fisher, Mercedes
2003
ScarecrowEducation, Lanham, MD
LB1044.87.F57 2003
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Here is a practical, how to book written for new online web instructors. It will also be helpful to course designers, trainers, administrators, or anyone interested in the potential of online learning and training by providing an excellent introduction to the online education arena. The format provided will easily fit into any course design while utilizing a variety of current resources and tools. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Here is a practical, how to book written for new online web instructors. It will also be helpful to course designers, trainers, administrators, or anyone interested in the potential of online learning and training by providing an excellent introduction to the online education arena. The format provided will easily fit into any course design while utilizing a variety of current resources and tools. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Illustrations
Tables
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 The Constructivist Approach to Online Learning with Technology
Constructivist Learning Environments and New Technologies
Social Nature of Learning

ch. 2 Effective Planning and Design for Online Teaching
Web-enhanced Teaching
Translating Content to Web-based Environments
Conclusions

ch. 3 Foundation for Instructional Screen Design
Figure-Ground Relationships
Principles of Graphic Design for Your "Web Office" or Class
Conclusions

ch. 4 Communication and Community Create Online Success
Creating Community
Strategies for Successful Online Learning
Best Practices
Translating Instructor Presence Online
Continuous Improvement

ch. 5 Evaluating the Student
Creating and Optimizing Assessment Strategies
How to Measure Student Learning
Types of Assessments
Designing Performance Assessments
Feedback
Assessing the Student
Technology Piece Evaluation
Exhibition
Conclusions

ch. 6 Conclusion
Course Maintenance Checklist
Five Challenges for Online Learning
Online Teaching and Learning: The Winning Combination

App. A Technology Resources
App. B Tools
App. C Online Tutorials
App. D Journals
App. E Instructor's Web Site
App. F Real-time Chat Activity

Glossary
Bibliography
Index
About the Author
Cover image

Discussion-based Online Teaching to Enhance Student Learning: Theory, Practice, and Assessment

Book
Bender, Tisha
2003
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1044.87.B43 2003
Topics: Discussion   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
As online courses proliferate, teachers increasingly realize that they have to connect with their students as they would in face-to-face classes. They have to provide true opportunities for inspirational and meaningful learning, rather than a sterile experience of clicking within a labyrinth of links.

With the specific purpose of switching emphasis from the technical issues of online teaching to the human implications of teaching and learning through the ...
Additional Info:
As online courses proliferate, teachers increasingly realize that they have to connect with their students as they would in face-to-face classes. They have to provide true opportunities for inspirational and meaningful learning, rather than a sterile experience of clicking within a labyrinth of links.

With the specific purpose of switching emphasis from the technical issues of online teaching to the human implications of teaching and learning through the Internet, Tisha Bender draws on her extensive research, her training of online faculty, and her own online teaching experience, to create a fresh vision of online pedagogy. Discussion-Based Online Teaching to Enhance Student Learning consists of three parts:

Theory
Practice
Assessment

The author shows how she applies learning theories to online discussion-based courses. She presents a wealth of suggestions and techniques, illustrated by real examples, for stimulating and managing online discussion effectively, and for improving teaching practices. The book concludes with methods for assessing the efficacy of online courses.

This accessible and comprehensive book offers an engaging and practical approach to online teaching that is rooted in the author's experience and enthusiasm for creating a virtual environment involves students and fosters deep learning.

This is a book for all educators and administrators in higher education, in any discipline, engaged in, or contemplating offering, online classes that involve discussion or collaborative learning. It is relevant both to faculty teaching a hybrid class (a class taught on campus that also has an online component) and courses that are taught entirely online. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 The Distance Factor
ch. 2 The Optimal Role of the Online Teacher
ch. 3 Rethinking Learning Theory Within the Online Class
ch. 4 Course Design
ch. 5 Starting to Teach the Online Class
ch. 6 Aspects of Online Communication
ch. 7 Innovative Online Teaching Techniques
ch. 8 Opinions About Online Teaching and Learning
ch. 9 Building a Model of Assessment of Online Education

Afterword
Glossary
References
Index
Cover image

Crossing the Digital Divide: Race, Writing, and Technology in the Classroom

Book
Monrie, Barbara
2004
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
PE1405.U6M66 2004
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Online Learning   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
As poor, non-white communities on "the other side" of the digital divide become immersed in electronic media, how can we evaluate their experiences to transform the teaching of writing and literature and improve student learning? This important book offers a balanced view of instructional technology and critical multiculturalism as experienced in today’s public schools. With valuable insights to help English educators at all levels working in all types of ...
Additional Info:
As poor, non-white communities on "the other side" of the digital divide become immersed in electronic media, how can we evaluate their experiences to transform the teaching of writing and literature and improve student learning? This important book offers a balanced view of instructional technology and critical multiculturalism as experienced in today’s public schools. With valuable insights to help English educators at all levels working in all types of schools, this accessible volume features:

* Case studies of high-poverty secondary schools as they come online, offering an examination of the literacy practices of some of the country’s most underserved students on Indian reservations and in central cities.
* A unique approach to teaching writing and literature at both high school and middle school levels, including practical suggestions for classroom practice.
* A compelling analysis and critique of the contrasting rhetoric of American adolescent minority groups, differences in their early language socialization, and the impact of those differences on academic performance.
* A fresh angle on the public policy debate on access to technology, arguing that high-poverty schools do not have student access and, when they do, computers are used to "reform," rather than "transform" schooling. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Reconsidering the terms of the debate
ch. 2 Putting one's business on Front Street
ch. 3 Crucible for critical literacy
ch. 4 Storytime on the reservation
ch. 5 Revisiting the access issue

Notes
References
Index
About the author
Journal cover image

Technology and Educational Practices (pdf)

Journal Issue
2005
Theological Education 41, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4020 .T48 2005
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2005-theological-education-v41-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
ISSUE FOCUS
Planning for Innovation: A Framework for Reflective Practice, Victor Klimoski
What Does All This (Technology) Mean for the Church?, John P. Jewell
Not Just One More Good Idea: A Reflection on the Integration of Digital Technology in Theological Education, Jan Viktora
Theological Reflection, Theology and Technology: When Baby Boomer Theologians Teach Generations X & Y, Edward Foley
Implications of a Digital Age for Theological Education, William J. Hook
Mapping Structural Change, David Neidert and John Aukerman
What Difference Does it Make? Digital Technology in the Theological Classroom, Mary Hess
Low Cost Things One Can Do that Have an Impact, James Rafferty
A New Tool or a New Way of Doing Theological Education?, Steve Delamarter

OPEN FORUM
Tethered Together: A Study of the Relationship between a Seminary and its Denomination, David G. Forney
Is Preaching Taught or Caught? How Practitioners Learn, Ronald Allen
Revisiting H. Richard Niebuhr’s The Purpose of the Church and Its Ministry: Love of God and Neighbor as the Goal of Theological Education, Frederick W. Guyette
Considering Consortia, William R. Myers
TTR cover image

"Strategic Planning to Enhance Teaching and Learning with Technology"

TTR
Delamarter, Steve
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 1 (2006): 9-23
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Seminaries across North America are continuing to expand their use of technology for theological education. This article explores eight issues surrounding the strategic planning process when it comes to technology. These have to do with the obstacles to fresh thinking, the current best practices in strategic planning processes, detailed discussions of the impact of various models of technology for theological education on faculty, Information Technology personnel, and students as well ...
Additional Info:
Seminaries across North America are continuing to expand their use of technology for theological education. This article explores eight issues surrounding the strategic planning process when it comes to technology. These have to do with the obstacles to fresh thinking, the current best practices in strategic planning processes, detailed discussions of the impact of various models of technology for theological education on faculty, Information Technology personnel, and students as well as the issues surrounding delivery system models and the issue of sustainability.
TTR cover image

"The Divine Pedagogy as a Model for Online Education"

TTR
Gresham, John
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 1 (2006): 24-28
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
In addition to the pragmatic concerns that often drive the use of technology in theological education, there is a need to develop theological justification and direction for online education. Several Roman Catholic Church documents propose the "divine pedagogy," the manner in which God teaches the human race, as a model for catechesis or religious education. This can provide a rich resource for developing a theological pedagogy for online education. This ...
Additional Info:
In addition to the pragmatic concerns that often drive the use of technology in theological education, there is a need to develop theological justification and direction for online education. Several Roman Catholic Church documents propose the "divine pedagogy," the manner in which God teaches the human race, as a model for catechesis or religious education. This can provide a rich resource for developing a theological pedagogy for online education. This is especially relevant to the justification for online education, because critics sometimes refer to the incarnational character of the divine pedagogy to argue against the disembodied nature of virtual education. This article addresses such criticisms and more constructively, relates several aspects of the divine pedagogy such as adaptation, community, and participation to teaching and learning in the online environment. (This paper was presented at Theology and Pedagogy in Cyberspace II conference in Evanston, Ill. on April 17, 2004.)
TTR cover image

"Theological Educators and their Concerns about Technology"

TTR
Delamarter, Steve
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 3 (2005): 131-143
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Based on results from interviews with theological educators at forty-five seminaries in North America, the author begins by listing twenty-six concerns expressed about technology in theological education, particularly the concerns about electronically mediated distance education. These concerns are categorized loosely under three headings: Practical and Personal Concerns, Pedagogical and Educational Concerns, and Philosophical and Theological Concerns. More important than the list is the sociology of decision-making surrounding technology among theological ...
Additional Info:
Based on results from interviews with theological educators at forty-five seminaries in North America, the author begins by listing twenty-six concerns expressed about technology in theological education, particularly the concerns about electronically mediated distance education. These concerns are categorized loosely under three headings: Practical and Personal Concerns, Pedagogical and Educational Concerns, and Philosophical and Theological Concerns. More important than the list is the sociology of decision-making surrounding technology among theological educators. In the final section of the article entitled, "how concerns about technology function within institutions," the author discusses how it is that these concerns are allowed to function in very different ways across the spectrum of theological education today.
TTR cover image

"Theological Educators, Technology and the Path Ahead"

TTR
Delamarter, Steve
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 1 (2005): 51-55
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Digital technology offers a host of opportunities and challenges for theological education. In this essay the author considers possible futures for theological education through creative uses of technology. The first half of the essay identifies five areas in which theological educators have had to gain technology skills in the last several years: 1. Individual facility with a personal computer; 2. Functioning capably in a connected world; 3. Information literacy for research and ministry; 4. ...
Additional Info:
Digital technology offers a host of opportunities and challenges for theological education. In this essay the author considers possible futures for theological education through creative uses of technology. The first half of the essay identifies five areas in which theological educators have had to gain technology skills in the last several years: 1. Individual facility with a personal computer; 2. Functioning capably in a connected world; 3. Information literacy for research and ministry; 4. Technology for face-to-face instruction; and 5. Technology for asynchronous teaching and learning. The second half of the essay identifies the forces that will likely drive technology learning for theological educators in the coming few years: 1. The pressure to meet student expectations; 2. The pressure to enrich the classroom experience by engaging the visual learner; 3. The pressure to enhance the traditional course through richer pedagogical strategies available with technology; and 4. The pressure to offer distance programs.
TTR cover image

"A Typology of the Use of Technology in Theological Education"

TTR
Delamarter, Steve
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 3 (2004): 134-140
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This essay explores the terrain of technology in theological education and offers a typology for how technology is used in seminary contexts. The author surveys 43 seminaries in North America to gain insight into the attitudes of faculty toward the use of technology in their teaching and for use in the preparation of ministers. Reflections on the typology in the concluding section offer fuel for subsequent work on the topic.
Additional Info:
This essay explores the terrain of technology in theological education and offers a typology for how technology is used in seminary contexts. The author surveys 43 seminaries in North America to gain insight into the attitudes of faculty toward the use of technology in their teaching and for use in the preparation of ministers. Reflections on the typology in the concluding section offer fuel for subsequent work on the topic.
TTR cover image

"The Pedagogy of the Online Wisdom Community: Forming Church Ministers in a Digital Age"

TTR
Esselman, Thomas
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 3 (2004): 159-170
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
While electronic learning is transforming the face of higher education today, some in the theological community question whether it is appropriate for the specific goals of graduate level theological formation for ministry. Drawing on the work of one theological faculty, this article answers yes. The author describes the school's hybrid model of distance education pedagogy. He discusses the underlying teaching and learning principles that guided the faculty in their development ...
Additional Info:
While electronic learning is transforming the face of higher education today, some in the theological community question whether it is appropriate for the specific goals of graduate level theological formation for ministry. Drawing on the work of one theological faculty, this article answers yes. The author describes the school's hybrid model of distance education pedagogy. He discusses the underlying teaching and learning principles that guided the faculty in their development of this model, and, in particular, the pedagogical ideal of the learning cohort as a "wisdom community." Web-based instruction can be effectively designed to nurture wisdom communities for integrative learning. The author describes the "pedagogy of the online wisdom community" from his experience of Web-based distance education teaching. The growing demand for ministry formation programs, particularly in mission areas, underlines the urgent need for continued study of the role of technology in theological pedagogy.
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"Theological Education on the Web: A Case Study in Formation for Ministry"

TTR
Graham, Susan Lochrie
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 4 (2002): 227-235
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Theological education has traditionally required students to come together in real (and often residential) communities and to learn in classroom settings with face–to–face teaching. Until recently, this model alone has been thought to provide the opportunity for the development of personal knowledge and the formation of character necessary for those engaged in professional ministry. This paper outlines a research project on the use of the Web in theological ...
Additional Info:
Theological education has traditionally required students to come together in real (and often residential) communities and to learn in classroom settings with face–to–face teaching. Until recently, this model alone has been thought to provide the opportunity for the development of personal knowledge and the formation of character necessary for those engaged in professional ministry. This paper outlines a research project on the use of the Web in theological education, using an introductory course in biblical studies, offered for the first time this year in an online environment through the University of Exeter. The course is designed to enable the creation of a virtual community where personal theological formation is fostered. This paper describes the design of the course, analyzing the complex competencies required in terms of goals and outcomes, and identifying issues for further research. It provides some preliminary results, with an eye to making recommendations for future curriculum development.
TTR cover image

"Generative Neo-Cyberculture in the Modern Seminary"

TTR
Byer, Glen C.J., John Clark, Sebastian Mahfood & Lawrence J. Welch
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 2 (2002): 113-117
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Four faculty discuss how their institution's launching of a program to implement instructional technology across the campus influenced their teaching and broadened their understanding of student learning. Examples of their first attempts at online projects for classes in homiletics and ecclesiology are described.
Additional Info:
Four faculty discuss how their institution's launching of a program to implement instructional technology across the campus influenced their teaching and broadened their understanding of student learning. Examples of their first attempts at online projects for classes in homiletics and ecclesiology are described.
TTR cover image

"Spiritual Machines, Personal Bodies, and God: Theological Education and Theological Anthropology"

TTR
Kelsey, David H.
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 1 (2002): 2-9
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Programs of theological education in Christian traditions are exploring "distanced learning" as one way to address certain challenges to their educational excellence. A major strand in a twenty-year old discussion of the nature and purpose of theological education has urged that analysis of theological schooling's failures and assessment of proposed remedies ought to be framed explicitly in theological terms as part of an ongoing inquiry into what makes theological education ...
Additional Info:
Programs of theological education in Christian traditions are exploring "distanced learning" as one way to address certain challenges to their educational excellence. A major strand in a twenty-year old discussion of the nature and purpose of theological education has urged that analysis of theological schooling's failures and assessment of proposed remedies ought to be framed explicitly in theological terms as part of an ongoing inquiry into what makes theological education properly theological. This essay tries to show how following that advice can make a practical difference in assessing the merits of distanced learning. It does so by raising questions about the theological-anthropological assumptions, respectively, of theological education and of distanced learning.
TTR cover image

"Practicing the Disseminary: Technology Lessons from Napster"

TTR
Adam, A.K.M.
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 1 (2002): 10-16
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
Whatever will happen in the way of the confluence of pedagogy and technology, it will not so much perpetuate past models in more efficient ways as it will reflect a stronger element of (for example) the unanticipated success of Napster. The author suggests a fivefold interpretation of Napster's implications as a guideline of what cybermedia do well, and how theological educators can use cybermedia to enrich their classroom teaching by ...
Additional Info:
Whatever will happen in the way of the confluence of pedagogy and technology, it will not so much perpetuate past models in more efficient ways as it will reflect a stronger element of (for example) the unanticipated success of Napster. The author suggests a fivefold interpretation of Napster's implications as a guideline of what cybermedia do well, and how theological educators can use cybermedia to enrich their classroom teaching by distinguishing online from in-class education. Cybermedia serve best when they do not duplicate or usurp functions best accomplished in person, and personal interaction thrives when not burdened with information-transmission that might as well take place online.
TTR cover image

"Designing for Online Distance Education: Putting Pedagogy Before Technology"

TTR
Ascough, Richard S.
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 1 (2002): 17-29
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Theological schools are increasingly exploring online distance education as a mode of course delivery. Yet while online course delivery has the potential for effective, deep learning it can also have a number of pitfalls. This article introduces online distance education and examines in detail the pedagogical possibilities for online learning by providing a number of examples drawn from online courses. While championing the use of online course delivery for theological ...
Additional Info:
Theological schools are increasingly exploring online distance education as a mode of course delivery. Yet while online course delivery has the potential for effective, deep learning it can also have a number of pitfalls. This article introduces online distance education and examines in detail the pedagogical possibilities for online learning by providing a number of examples drawn from online courses. While championing the use of online course delivery for theological schools, it also sounds a note of caution by advocating that the use of technology should be driven by sound pedagogical principles. Putting pedagogy before technology will insure quality education no matter what the content or mode of delivery.
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"Pedagogy and Theology in Cyberspace: "All That We Can't Leave Behind. . .""

TTR
Hess, Mary E.
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 1 (2002): 30-38
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
The questions raised by the integration of digital technologies into theology and pedagogy are broader than simple questions of how to use a particular tool. Instead, this integration raises cultural questions that require cultural interventions in response. Shweder's notion of "thinking through others" provides an evocative framework for envisioning more complex pedagogical responses. This essay is based on a presentation delivered to the first annual conference on Theology and Pedagogy ...
Additional Info:
The questions raised by the integration of digital technologies into theology and pedagogy are broader than simple questions of how to use a particular tool. Instead, this integration raises cultural questions that require cultural interventions in response. Shweder's notion of "thinking through others" provides an evocative framework for envisioning more complex pedagogical responses. This essay is based on a presentation delivered to the first annual conference on Theology and Pedagogy in Cyberspace, held in Evanston, Illinois on 19–20 April 2001.
TTR cover image

"Hebrew Exegesis Online Using Information Technology to Enhance Biblical Language Study"

TTR
Klipowicz, Steven W. and Tim Laniak
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 2 (1999): 109-115
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Information technology is bringing change to theological education. Computer-mediated instruction has been employed for teaching basic factual materials and for providing study resources. Information technology has been helpful as an instructional aid using the drill and practice format, but how can it promote learning in more complex areas of knowledge acquisition such as analysis, synthesis, and creative judgment? Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in Charlotte, N.C. developed an online course to ...
Additional Info:
Information technology is bringing change to theological education. Computer-mediated instruction has been employed for teaching basic factual materials and for providing study resources. Information technology has been helpful as an instructional aid using the drill and practice format, but how can it promote learning in more complex areas of knowledge acquisition such as analysis, synthesis, and creative judgment? Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in Charlotte, N.C. developed an online course to teach Hebrew exegesis. A theory-driven pedagogy was employed that used a Web-based instructional design to promote asynchronous learning, collaborative projects, and peer review. This article presents the rationale and design for the class, a narrative of the class experience, and an evaluation of results. Outcomes of the class experience and suggestions for application of technology to other subject areas are included.
Journal cover image

Technology, Teaching, and Learning: Reports from the Field (pdf)

Journal Issue
2007
Theological Education 42, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v.42 no.2 2007
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2007-theological-education-v42-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
ISSUE FOCUS
Cross Cultural Learning as a Paradigm for Encountering Educational Technology, Gayle Gerber Koontz
Technology in the Classroom: A Missiologist's Perspective, Arun W. Jones
Using Film to Teach Theology, Linda Mercadante,br> Beyond Entertainment: A Rationale for the Pedagogy of Technology in the Classroom, Kenneth D. Snyder
Information Technology for Theological Education at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Elizabeth Van Kleek
Technology Development at Ashland Theological Seminary, Vickie Taylor and Dale Stoffer
The Times, They Are A-Changin': How a Training Seminar for Online Education Changed a Seminary One Faculty Member at a Time, Jeff Groeling and Lester Ruth
A Case Narrative of Bethel Seminary's InMinistry Program, Kristin M. Anderson
Taking Control of our Future: Kenrick-Glennon Seminary, Sebastian Mahfood
Establishing Social Presence in Online Courses: Why and How, Mary Hinkle Shore
Web Site Design as a Dynamic Companion in Developing Learning Resources, Barbara Anne Keely

OPEN FORUM
A Dozen Qualities of the Good Dean, Mark G. Toulouse
Using Participatory Action Research in Seminary Internships
What's in an Instrument? The Answer from the Profiles of Ministry Program, Francis A. Lonsway,br>
TTR cover image

"The Potential of the Hybrid Course Vis-à-Vis Online and Traditional Courses"

TTR
Brunner, Daniel. L.
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 4 (2006): 229-235
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
Face-to-face, hybrid, and online courses are part of the panoply of course options available to students and teachers in the twenty-first century. This essay tackles the promise of hybrid courses for enhancing student learning in seminary contexts. The author contends that the introduction of hybrid instruction prompts faculty to revisit questions about pedagogy and improves student learning.
Additional Info:
Face-to-face, hybrid, and online courses are part of the panoply of course options available to students and teachers in the twenty-first century. This essay tackles the promise of hybrid courses for enhancing student learning in seminary contexts. The author contends that the introduction of hybrid instruction prompts faculty to revisit questions about pedagogy and improves student learning.
TTR cover image

"Converting My Course Converted Me: How Reinventing an On-campus Course for an Online Environment Reinvigorated My Teaching"

TTR
Ruth, Lester
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 4 (2006): 236-242
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
The challenge of learning to teach online leads a junior faculty person to achieve greater levels of teaching satisfaction and proficiency overall. For this professor transitioning an on-campus pastoral liturgy course to an online environment brings about serendipitous discoveries that allow him to do more than survive as a frustrated teacher. The transition creates a revolution in one professor's whole approach to teaching.
Additional Info:
The challenge of learning to teach online leads a junior faculty person to achieve greater levels of teaching satisfaction and proficiency overall. For this professor transitioning an on-campus pastoral liturgy course to an online environment brings about serendipitous discoveries that allow him to do more than survive as a frustrated teacher. The transition creates a revolution in one professor's whole approach to teaching.
TTR cover image

"Successfully Teaching Biblical Languages Online at the Seminary Level: Guiding Principles of Course Design and Delivery"

TTR
Harlow, Joel
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 1 (2007): 13-24
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Reformed Theological Seminary's Virtual Campus has successfully taught the biblical languages online since 1999. This article describes the theoretical principles that underlie the design and asynchronous delivery of online Greek and Hebrew to part-time adult distance students. The structure and administration of the courses is discussed, as well as how the students interact with their instructor and with the material. The fields of Adult Education, Learner Autonomy, and Distance Education suggest ...
Additional Info:
Reformed Theological Seminary's Virtual Campus has successfully taught the biblical languages online since 1999. This article describes the theoretical principles that underlie the design and asynchronous delivery of online Greek and Hebrew to part-time adult distance students. The structure and administration of the courses is discussed, as well as how the students interact with their instructor and with the material. The fields of Adult Education, Learner Autonomy, and Distance Education suggest that online students must learn differently than traditional in-class students by being more responsible for their learning. Research also suggests that online instructors must teach differently, assuming a role more like a learning coach. Finally, the literature suggests that institutions must interact with distance students differently than traditional in-class students. The article concludes with a definition of "success" in these courses and description of the time commitment expected of faculty in these courses.
TTR cover image

"Technology, Pedagogy, and Transformation in Theological Education: Five Case Studies"

TTR
Delamarter, Steve, Javier Alanís, Russell Haitch, Mark Vitalis Hoffman, Arun W. Jones and Brent A. Strawn
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 2 (2007): 64-79
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
The exploration described is rooted in the projects of five participants in the 2004/05 Wabash Workshop for Pre-Tenure Theological Faculty (led by Toni Craven and assisted by Daisy Machado and Steve Delamarter). All the projects related technology and pedagogy. Javier Alanís (Lutheran Seminary Program in the Southwest) wanted to use images to help his students engage various concepts of the Trinity, being sensitive all the while to an educational context ...
Additional Info:
The exploration described is rooted in the projects of five participants in the 2004/05 Wabash Workshop for Pre-Tenure Theological Faculty (led by Toni Craven and assisted by Daisy Machado and Steve Delamarter). All the projects related technology and pedagogy. Javier Alanís (Lutheran Seminary Program in the Southwest) wanted to use images to help his students engage various concepts of the Trinity, being sensitive all the while to an educational context marked by all kinds of diversity. Russell Haitch (Bethany Theological Seminary) was brought into the world of online teaching and found himself trying to assess its potential from the standpoints of scripture, reason, experience, and a trinitarian theological-anthropology. Mark Vitalis Hoffman (Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg) wanted to help his students experience a fresh encounter with Jesus' parables and ended up in the esoteric field of video gaming theory (ludology) for help in conceiving an environment and process interactive enough to do justice to all of the possibilities. Arun Jones (Austin Seminary) wondered how he might use historical images of mission work in India to help his students experience some of the issues surrounding intercultural ministry. Brent A. Strawn (Candler School of Theology, Emory University) had some vexing and complex concepts relating to Old Testament introduction (the nature of the interactions between biblical narratives and ancient Near Eastern texts) that required new points of access in order to be able to capture the understanding and imagination of contemporary students in his setting. Over the course of the year together (one week in June 2004, a weekend in January 2005, and a week in June 2005), participants worked on their project as all of us in the workshop explored issues of teaching and learning.
TTR cover image

"Welcoming Design – Hosting a Hospitable Online Course "

TTR
Ascough, Richard
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 131-136
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
A discussion about how instructors can host a hospitable online learning environment can address one of the fundamental philosophical and theological concerns frequently expressed about online learning – the loss of face-to-face interaction and, with it, the loss of community building (cf. Delamarter 2005, 138). This perceived link between physical presence and community creation, sometimes articulated, frequently assumed, often stands in the way of instructors, administrators, and even institutions fully embracing online learning. ...
Additional Info:
A discussion about how instructors can host a hospitable online learning environment can address one of the fundamental philosophical and theological concerns frequently expressed about online learning – the loss of face-to-face interaction and, with it, the loss of community building (cf. Delamarter 2005, 138). This perceived link between physical presence and community creation, sometimes articulated, frequently assumed, often stands in the way of instructors, administrators, and even institutions fully embracing online learning. This article will argue that when one gives due attention to hospitality, the potential for building online community is greatly enhanced, and with it comes a more effective pedagogical strategy for deep learning. It will conclude with some general recommendations for employing hospitality for building online learning communities.
Additional Info:
Written for Higher Education teaching and learning professionals, Learning with Digital Games provides an accessible, straightforward introduction to the field of computer game-based learning. Up to date with current trends and the changing learning needs of today’s students, this text offers friendly guidance, and is unique in its focus on post-school education and its pragmatic view of the use of computer games with adults.

Learning with Digital ...
Additional Info:
Written for Higher Education teaching and learning professionals, Learning with Digital Games provides an accessible, straightforward introduction to the field of computer game-based learning. Up to date with current trends and the changing learning needs of today’s students, this text offers friendly guidance, and is unique in its focus on post-school education and its pragmatic view of the use of computer games with adults.

Learning with Digital Games enables readers to quickly grasp practical and technological concepts, using examples that can easily be applied to their own teaching. The book assumes no prior technical knowledge but guides the reader step-by-step through the theoretical, practical and technical considerations of using digital games for learning. Activities throughout guide the reader through the process of designing a game for their own practice, and the book also offers:

A toolkit of guidelines, templates and checklists.

Concrete examples of different types of game-based learning using six case studies.

Examples of games that show active and experiential learning

Practical examples of educational game design and development.

This professional guide upholds the sound reputation of the Open and Flexible Learning series, is grounded in theory and closely links examples from practice. Higher Education academics, e-learning practitioners, developers and training professionals at all technical skill levels and experience will find this text is the perfect resource for explaining how to integrate computer games into their teaching practice.

A companion website is available and provides up-to-date technological information,additional resources and further examples. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editor's Foreword
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction

Part I
Theory
ch. 2 Recognizing the Characteristics of Digital Games
ch. 3 Understanding the Pedagogy of Digital Games
ch. 4 Identifying Types of Digital Games for Learning

Part II
Practice
ch. 5 Integrating Digital Games Into the Curriculum
ch. 6 Designing a Digital Game for Learning
ch. 7 Assessing the Impact of Digital Games on Learning

Part III
Technology
ch. 8 Using Existing Digital Games for Learning
ch. 9 Developing New Digital Games for Learning
ch. 10 Evaluating Digital Games for Learning
ch. 11 Case Studies
ch. 12 Conclusions

Glossary
References
Index
TTR cover image

"Webbing the Common Good: Virtual Environment, Incarnated Community, and Education for the Reign of God"

TTR
Blier, Helen M.
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 1 (2008): 14-23
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Online technologies, recently embraced by seminaries to respond to changing student needs and demographics, compel practitioners to ask questions about the content, methods, and desired outcomes of teaching/learning experiences. Indeed, as Delamarter and Brunner have pointed out in this journal (2005), many seminaries have turned to these strategies only to find that the issues are not technological; rather, they are pedagogical. This article discusses the insights generated by one such ...
Additional Info:
Online technologies, recently embraced by seminaries to respond to changing student needs and demographics, compel practitioners to ask questions about the content, methods, and desired outcomes of teaching/learning experiences. Indeed, as Delamarter and Brunner have pointed out in this journal (2005), many seminaries have turned to these strategies only to find that the issues are not technological; rather, they are pedagogical. This article discusses the insights generated by one such teaching experiment, a hybrid course on religious education for social justice. Through this educational experiment, the professor and students discovered that the format of the hybrid course proved to be an effective means by which to promote the praxis of social justice as well as develop some of the skills essential for effective ministry and education. The article begins with the rationale of the course design and content and continues with the perspectives of the students and instructor in reflection on the experiment. It concludes with some preliminary insights into the potential usefulness of hybrid learning for both peace and justice education as well as its value in the overall formation of educators and ministers.
TTR cover image

"E-jing: Using Information Technology to Teach about Chinese Religions"

TTR
Deitrick, Jim
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 3 (2008): 153-158
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This article discusses ways in which modern online information technologies may be used to enhance students' understanding of Chinese religions and religious texts. This discussion is predicated upon a model of linguistic communication that places significant weight on the structures and "sedimented presuppositions" of language in determining the meanings of discourse. Assignments are presented that use online technologies to give even beginning students insight into the presuppositions of Chinese religious ...
Additional Info:
This article discusses ways in which modern online information technologies may be used to enhance students' understanding of Chinese religions and religious texts. This discussion is predicated upon a model of linguistic communication that places significant weight on the structures and "sedimented presuppositions" of language in determining the meanings of discourse. Assignments are presented that use online technologies to give even beginning students insight into the presuppositions of Chinese religious discourse, while also allowing them to explore, kinesthetically, one of Confucianism's central practices, the reading and writing of Chinese characters. Appendices providing additional materials related to the course are available online: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu/journal/article2.aspx?id=14153.
TTR cover image

"Religious Education and Information Technology: Challenges and Problems"

TTR
Sajjadi, Seyed Mahdi
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 4 (2008): 185-190
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Religious Education

Additional Info:
With advances in information technology, the velocity of information production on the global level has expanded as well. This acceleration has led to the delegitimizing of knowledge, the equating of information with knowledge, and the giving of predominance to information rather than knowledge. This advance has created epistemological challenges for the process of religious education. At the same time, the growth of the internet has created a "rhizomatic space" possessing ...
Additional Info:
With advances in information technology, the velocity of information production on the global level has expanded as well. This acceleration has led to the delegitimizing of knowledge, the equating of information with knowledge, and the giving of predominance to information rather than knowledge. This advance has created epistemological challenges for the process of religious education. At the same time, the growth of the internet has created a "rhizomatic space" possessing new methodological characteristics that create problems for religious education. Information technology generates a "hypertextual learning space," which weakens the place of traditional texts in the learning process, particularly in a traditional religious education process. This hypertextual development is especially problematic for religious education in conservative or fundamentalist traditions. This article analyzes the epistemological, methodological, and contextual problems and challenges posed by information technology for traditional religious education processes.
Additional Info:
With the general practice of online teaching still in relative infancy, nuanced approaches for teaching target populations such as black students are especially scarce. This article submits a theoretical framework for approaching the activity of teaching black students online using a transformative, postmodern pedagogy that is sensitive to black learning styles. It also offers practical suggestions for course design and deployment in online religion courses. In the interest of providing ...
Additional Info:
With the general practice of online teaching still in relative infancy, nuanced approaches for teaching target populations such as black students are especially scarce. This article submits a theoretical framework for approaching the activity of teaching black students online using a transformative, postmodern pedagogy that is sensitive to black learning styles. It also offers practical suggestions for course design and deployment in online religion courses. In the interest of providing an optimal learning experience for every student, all instructors are encouraged to consider the race and culture variable in their online teaching, whether their roster contains one black student or many.
Cover image

A Guide to Authentic e-Learning

Book
Jan Herrington, Thomas C. Reeves, and Ron Oliver
2010
Routledge, New York
LB1044.87.H47 2010
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
Part of the groundbreaking Connecting with e-Learning series, A Guide to Authentic e-Learning provides effective, working examples to engage learners with authentic tasks in online settings. As technology continues to open up possibilities for innovative and effective teaching and learning opportunities, students and teachers are no longer content to accept familiar classroom or lecture-based pedagogies that rely on information delivery and little else. Situated and constructivist theories advocate that learning ...
Additional Info:
Part of the groundbreaking Connecting with e-Learning series, A Guide to Authentic e-Learning provides effective, working examples to engage learners with authentic tasks in online settings. As technology continues to open up possibilities for innovative and effective teaching and learning opportunities, students and teachers are no longer content to accept familiar classroom or lecture-based pedagogies that rely on information delivery and little else. Situated and constructivist theories advocate that learning is best achieved in circumstances resembling the real-life application of knowledge. While there are multiple learning design models that share similar foundations, authentic e-learning tasks go beyond process to become complex, sustained activities that draw on realistic situations to produce realistic outcomes.

A Guide to Authentic e-Learning:

• develops the conceptual framework for authentic learning tasks in online environments

• provides practical guidance on design, implementation, and evaluation of authentic e-learning tasks

• includes case studies and examples of outcomes of using authentic e-learning tasks

Written for teaching professionals in Higher Education who teach online, A Guide to Authentic e-Learning offers concrete guidelines and examples for developing and implementing authentic e-learning tasks in ways that challenge students to maximize their learning. This essential book provides effective, working examples to engages learners with authentic tasks in online learning settings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
List of Tables
Series Editors' Foreword
Acknowledgments

Introduction
Impediments to Authentic Learning in Higher Education
Inert Knowledge
Emerging Technologies and Cognitive Tools
Technologies of Participatory Culture
Participatory e-Learning
Learning Management Systems in e-Learning

ch. 1 What is Authentic e-Learning?
The Foundations of Authentic Learning: Situated Learning Critical Characteristics of Situated Learning for a Model of Authentic Learning
Elements of Authentic Learning
A Framework for Implementation

ch. 2 Authentic e-Learning Tasks
Activity as Practice
Academic Problems vs Practical Problems
Defining Authentic Tasks
Elements of Authentic Tasks
Authentic e-Learning Tasks
The Underlying Logic of Online Authentic Tasks in Higher Education
A Logic Map of an Authentic Tasks-based Higher Education Course

ch. 3 What is Not Authentic e-Learning?br> Non-authentic Tasks
Misconceptions of Authenticity of Tasks
Continuum of Authentic Characteristics

ch. 4 How Real does Authentic e-Learning Need to be?
Increasing Relevance in Learning
Simulations and Virtual Reality
Realistic or Real?
The Nature of Authenticity

ch. 5 Authentic e-Learning and the Conative Learning Domain
What should Higher Education Students Learn?
Are Today's Postsecondary Students "Millennials" or "Generation Me"?
Alignment is the Key
Putting it all Together

ch. 6 Designing and Producing Authentic e-Learning Courses
Revising an Existing Course
Designing a New Course
Implementing Authentic e-Learning Courses

ch.7 Assessmentof Authentic e-Learning
Assessment versus Evaluation
The Issue of Assessment
The Value of Assessment
Assessment and Student Learning
Restraints of Institutional Assessment Policies
Characteristics of Authentic Assessment
Authentic Assessment for Authentic Learning

ch.8 Evaluating Authentic e-Learning Courses
Evaluation Planning
Preparing an Evaluation Proposal: An Example
Evaluation Project Management
Evaluation Reporting
Summary

ch.9 Researching Authentic e-Learning
The Need for a Different Kind of Research
Design Research
Phases of Educational Design Research
Reporting Design Research
A Research Agenda for Authentic e-Learning

Conclusion
References
Index
Cover image

Networked Collaborative Learning: Social Interaction and Active Learning

Book
Trentin, Guglielmo
2010
Chandos Publishing, Oxford
LB2395.7.T74 2010
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
The sustainability of Networked Collaborative Learning (NCL) is a key topic of discussion amongst the institutions where it has been or may potentially be introduced. In order to determine the extent of NCL's sustainability, the added value university education may yield by adopting collaborative learning strategies must be quantified. In turn, an understanding of the implications NCL produces in terms of design and management is gained. After comparing NCL with ...
Additional Info:
The sustainability of Networked Collaborative Learning (NCL) is a key topic of discussion amongst the institutions where it has been or may potentially be introduced. In order to determine the extent of NCL's sustainability, the added value university education may yield by adopting collaborative learning strategies must be quantified. In turn, an understanding of the implications NCL produces in terms of design and management is gained. After comparing NCL with other Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) approaches and discussing the possible reasons for adopting it, a multidimensional model for the sustainability of NCL is proposed. The model is characterized by four dimensions: pedagogical approaches, e-teacher professional development, instructional design models and valuation/assessment approaches. Each of these dimensions is examined on the basis of the authors direct experience gained through applying NCL to his university teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of tables and figures
About the author
List of acronyms
Preface

ch. 1 Technology-enhanced learning and networked collaborative learning
ch. 2 The Pedagogical dimension
ch. 3 The e-teacher professional dimension
ch. 4 The Instructional design dimension
ch. 5 The evaluation and assessment dimension
ch. 6 Conclusions

Appendix - eduction design support grid
References
Index
Tactics cover image

"The Religious Web-Quest"

Tactic
Woodard, Randall, and Woodard, Rose
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 139-139
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: providing a series of web pages for students to visit and respond to in online posts.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: providing a series of web pages for students to visit and respond to in online posts.
Article cover image
Wabash tree

"Online Education: An Asset in a Period of Educational Change"

Article
Nysse, Richard W.
2005
Peter Lang,New York, NY
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Tactics cover image
Wabash tree

"Asynchronous Writing Assignments Using the Writing Rubric"

Tactic
Galle, Jeffery
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 4 (2010): 371
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Online Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students reflect on the writing rubric used to grade their writing, in an online or hybrid course.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students reflect on the writing rubric used to grade their writing, in an online or hybrid course.
TTR cover image

"The Online Theology Classroom: Strategies for Engaging a Community of Distance Learners in a Hybrid Model of Online Education"

TTR
Hege, Brent A. R.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 1 (2011): 13-20
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
One factor contributing to success in online education is the creation of a safe and vibrant virtual community and sustained, lively engagement with that community of learners. In order to create and engage such a community instructors must pay special attention to the relationship between technology and pedagogy, specifically in terms of issues such as course design, social presence, specially tailored assignments, learner expectations, and objectives, and facilitation of sustained ...
Additional Info:
One factor contributing to success in online education is the creation of a safe and vibrant virtual community and sustained, lively engagement with that community of learners. In order to create and engage such a community instructors must pay special attention to the relationship between technology and pedagogy, specifically in terms of issues such as course design, social presence, specially tailored assignments, learner expectations, and objectives, and facilitation of sustained engagement with the course material, fellow learners, and the instructor. Several strategies for accomplishing this goal are presented here based on the author's experiences teaching second-career students in hybrid introductory theology courses at a mainline denominational seminary.
Cover image

Online and Social Networking Communities

Book
Kear, Karen
2011
Routledge, New York, NY
HM742.K43 2011
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
Online and Social Networking Communities is a professional guide written for educational practitioners and trainers who wish to use online communication tools effectively in their teaching. Focusing on the student experience of learning in online communities, it addresses ‘web 2.0’ and other ‘social software’ tools and considers the role these technologies play in supporting student learning and building learning communities.

The guide offers:

• real-world case studies and ...
Additional Info:
Online and Social Networking Communities is a professional guide written for educational practitioners and trainers who wish to use online communication tools effectively in their teaching. Focusing on the student experience of learning in online communities, it addresses ‘web 2.0’ and other ‘social software’ tools and considers the role these technologies play in supporting student learning and building learning communities.

The guide offers:

• real-world case studies and quality research
• must-have lists of useful resources
• guidance on building and supporting online learning communities
• discussion of how collaborative learning can be assessed
• coverage of wikis, forums, blogging, instant messaging, Second Life, Twitter, desktop videoconferencing and social networking sites such as Facebook.

Online and Social Networking Communities helps educators and trainers develop a critical approach by exploring online learning from both the student’s and educator’s perspective. This practical guide provides the tools to help develop confident and thoughtful online educators, able to create successful and enjoyable learning experiences for their students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
List of Tables
List of Case Studies
Series Editor's Foreword
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Theories of Learning in Online Communities
ch. 3 Tools for Online Learning Communities
ch. 4 Benefits and Problems of Online Learning Communities
ch. 5 Too Much Information
ch. 6 Feeling Connected
ch. 7 In Real Time
ch. 8 Assessment for Learning in Online Communities
ch. 9 Supporting Online Learning Communities

References
Index
Cover image

Learning to Learn with Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT): A Practical Guide for Academic Success

Book
Kitsantas, Anastasia, and Dabbagh, Nada
2009
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB2395.7.K57 2009
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
The purpose of this practical guide is to facilitate college students' academic success by fostering self-regulated learning skills or learning to learn through the use of Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT). It enables the college instructor, online instructor, instructional developer, or educator to envision, plan for, and implement customized instructional and curricular designs that foster learning to learn and motivate students to take ownership of their own learning. Specifically, this book ...
Additional Info:
The purpose of this practical guide is to facilitate college students' academic success by fostering self-regulated learning skills or learning to learn through the use of Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT). It enables the college instructor, online instructor, instructional developer, or educator to envision, plan for, and implement customized instructional and curricular designs that foster learning to learn and motivate students to take ownership of their own learning. Specifically, this book demonstrates how college faculty who use Learning Management Systems (LMS) as well as emerging technologies such as Web 2.0 applications and social software can design learning tasks and course assignments that support and promote student: goal setting use of effective task strategies self-monitoring and self-evaluation time management help seeking motivation and affect Given the emphasis on retention of freshmen as a measure of institutional effectiveness, the focus on student success, and the increasing use of ILT in higher education, this book fulfills a dire need in the literature on the integration of technology and self-regulated learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction to Learning How to Learn
ch. 2 Defining Integrative Learning Technologies
ch. 3 Self-Regulatory Training with Integrative Learning Technologies: A Theory-Based Model
ch. 4 Goal Setting
ch. 5 Task Strategies
ch. 6 Self-Monitoring and Self-Evaluation
ch. 7 Time Management
ch. 8 Help Seeking
ch. 9 Motivation, Affect, and Learning Communities
ch. 10 New Approaches to Integrative Learning Technologies
Tactics cover image

"Using Word Clouds for Reflection and Discussion in an Online Class"

Tactic
Hamm, Scott E.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 2 (2011): 156
BL41.T4
Topics: Discussion   |   Online Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: prompting student discussion using word clouds.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: prompting student discussion using word clouds.
TTR cover image

"The Application of Cognitive-Developmental or Mediated Cognitive Learning Strategies in Online College Coursework"

TTR
Pruitt, Richard A.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 3 (2011): 226-246
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
This research article explores the active use of cognitive-developmental or mediated cognitive learning strategies in undergraduate online courses. Examples and applications are drawn from two online sessions integrating online interaction, essay and discussion assignments, as well as a variety of multimedia components conducted during the spring of 2008. While focus on the interaction among students remains an important aspect of the online discussion environment, particular attention is given to the interaction ...
Additional Info:
This research article explores the active use of cognitive-developmental or mediated cognitive learning strategies in undergraduate online courses. Examples and applications are drawn from two online sessions integrating online interaction, essay and discussion assignments, as well as a variety of multimedia components conducted during the spring of 2008. While focus on the interaction among students remains an important aspect of the online discussion environment, particular attention is given to the interaction between the student and the instructor. This paper argues that while online learning environments are ultimately student-controlled, they should be teacher-centered. The findings of this research suggest that students are more directly influenced by an instructor’s intentional effort to mediate the learning process than by the course objectives, material, or subject matter. Successful use of online technologies requires deliberate action on the part of the instructor to integrate various mediated cognitive learning strategies: (a) student participation and response is significantly increased, and (b) student motivation and morale is dramatically influenced.
TTR cover image

"Forum: Teaching Biblical Studies Online"

TTR
Gravett, Sandra L.; Ulrich, Daniel W.; Nysse, Richard W.; Polaski, Sandra Hack
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 3 (2011): 256-283
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
In this edited transcript of a panel at the Society of Biblical Literature (November 23, 2009, Boston, Massachusetts), five Bible scholars give brief presentations on various challenges and opportunities encountered when teaching academic biblical studies courses online in both undergraduate and theological education contexts. Each presentation is followed by questions from the audience and discussion. Topics include: a typology of different approaches to online teaching, advantages and disadvantages of online compared to ...
Additional Info:
In this edited transcript of a panel at the Society of Biblical Literature (November 23, 2009, Boston, Massachusetts), five Bible scholars give brief presentations on various challenges and opportunities encountered when teaching academic biblical studies courses online in both undergraduate and theological education contexts. Each presentation is followed by questions from the audience and discussion. Topics include: a typology of different approaches to online teaching, advantages and disadvantages of online compared to face-to-face classrooms (for both students and faculty), opportunities for imaginative exercises online, the advantages of online threaded discussions, and the joys and pitfalls of bringing your course into an online environment for the first time.
Article cover image

"Spiritual Formation in Online Higher Education Communities: Nurturing Spirituality in Christian Higher Education Online Degree Programs"

Article
Maddix, Mark A.
2010
Christian Education Journal, Series 3, Vol. 7, No. 2, pgs. 423-434
Topics: Online Learning   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Spiritual formation is one of the recognized benchmarks of higher education that is Christian. A communal commitment to spiritual formation is indeed part of the Christian higher education community's DNA, and is in fact reflected in the criteria for accreditation in both the Association of Biblical Higher Education (ABHE) and the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). However, as many Christian institutions of higher education begin to engage in online instruction, ...
Additional Info:
Spiritual formation is one of the recognized benchmarks of higher education that is Christian. A communal commitment to spiritual formation is indeed part of the Christian higher education community's DNA, and is in fact reflected in the criteria for accreditation in both the Association of Biblical Higher Education (ABHE) and the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). However, as many Christian institutions of higher education begin to engage in online instruction, even offering entire degree programs online, how can they affirm their campus's commitment to the spiritual formation of students? This article addresses the question of providing intentional Christian nurture toward spiritual formation in online degree programs. The aim of the article is to inform participants of the challenges and opportunities for student spiritual formation in online degree programs so as to better equip participants to develop Christian nurture initiatives for online students from an informed perspective. To do so the article includes two parts: (a) the development of a theoretical matrix for online spiritual formation, based principally on precedent literature and the experience of the two authors; and (b) a survey of actual Christian nurture and spiritual formation models specifically designed for online programs.
Cover image

Evaluating e-learning: Guiding Research and Practice

Book
Phillips, Rob; McNaught Carmel; and Kennedy, Gregor
2012
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1028.3.P475 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
How can the average educator who teaches online, without experience in evaluating emerging technologies, build on what is successful and modify what is not?

Written for educators who feel ill-prepared when required to evaluate e-learning initiatives, Evaluating e-Learning offers step-by-step guidance for conducting an evaluation plan of e-learning technologies. It builds on and adapts familiar research methodology to offer a robust and accessible approach to effectively evaluate a ...
Additional Info:
How can the average educator who teaches online, without experience in evaluating emerging technologies, build on what is successful and modify what is not?

Written for educators who feel ill-prepared when required to evaluate e-learning initiatives, Evaluating e-Learning offers step-by-step guidance for conducting an evaluation plan of e-learning technologies. It builds on and adapts familiar research methodology to offer a robust and accessible approach to effectively evaluate a range of innovative initiatives, including those covered in other books in the connecting with e-learning series.

This useful guide offers a multi-level approach that allows both beginners and experienced professionals to follow the level of text that suits their current needs. Practical applications discussed include:

• how to develop broad evaluation questions
• how to use an evaluation framework
• how to determine the sources of data to be used
• how to develop an evaluation matrix
• how to collect, analyze and interpret the data.

Readers will find this jargon-free guide is a must-have resource that provides the proper tools for evaluating their own e-learning practices with ease. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contents
Preface

I. Setting the Scene
ch. 1 E-learning, learning and evaluation
ch. 2 Evaluation as part of a teacher’s role

II. Theory
ch. 3 The Learning Environment, Learning Processes and Learning Outcomes (LEPO) Framework
ch. 4 What is meant by educational evaluation and research?
ch. 5 Research paradigms and methodologies
ch. 6 Evaluation-research approaches suitable for e-learning
ch. 7 The process of carrying out evaluation research
ch. 8 Evaluation research across the e-learning lifecycle
ch. 9 Conducting an Evaluation-research Study
ch. 10 Project-management Evaluation
ch. 11 Using evaluation-research results: An overview of impact issues beyond the confines of a single project
Cover image

Learning Theory and Online Technologies

Book
Harasim, Linda
2012
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1044.87.H365 2012
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
Learning Theory and Online Technologies offers a powerful overview of the current state of elearning, a foundation of its historical roots and growth, and a framework for distinguishing among the major approaches to elearning. It effectively addresses pedagogy (how to design an effective online environment for learning), evaluation (how to know that students are learning), and history (how past research can guide successful online teaching and learning outcomes).

...
Additional Info:
Learning Theory and Online Technologies offers a powerful overview of the current state of elearning, a foundation of its historical roots and growth, and a framework for distinguishing among the major approaches to elearning. It effectively addresses pedagogy (how to design an effective online environment for learning), evaluation (how to know that students are learning), and history (how past research can guide successful online teaching and learning outcomes).

An ideal textbook for undergraduate education and communication programs, and Educational Technology Masters, PhD, and Certificate programs, readers will find Learning Theory and Online Technologies provides a synthesis of the key advances in elearning theory, the key frameworks of research, and clearly links theory and research to successful learning practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction to Learning Theory and Technology
ch. 2 Historical Overview of Learning and Technology
ch. 3 Behaviorist Learning Theory
ch. 4 Cognitivist Learning Theory
ch. 5 Constructivist Learning Theory
ch. 6 Online Collaborative Learning (OCL) Theory
ch. 7 OCL Pedagogies in Practice
ch. 8 OCL Cases of Institutional Innovation
ch. 9 OCL Exemplars: Online Communities of Practice
ch. 10 In Retrospect and In Prospect
Article cover image

"Communicating Faith and Online Learning"

Article
Stuart-Buttle, Ros
2011
Communicating Faith, ch. 21, pgs 328-342
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Teaching Intensive and Accelerated Courses: Instruction that Motivates Learning

Book
Wlodkowski, Raymond J., and Ginsberg, Margery B.
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1029.A22 W63 2010
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   Adult Learners

Additional Info:
In this comprehensive resource, Raymond J. Wlodkowski and Margery B. Ginsberg describe how to meet the challenge of teaching intensive and accelerated courses to nontraditional learners and working adults. By making motivation and cultural relevance essential to instruction, they clearly show what instructors can do to enhance learning in classes that can last from three to six hours. Teaching Intensive and Accelerated Courses makes full use of the authors' twenty ...
Additional Info:
In this comprehensive resource, Raymond J. Wlodkowski and Margery B. Ginsberg describe how to meet the challenge of teaching intensive and accelerated courses to nontraditional learners and working adults. By making motivation and cultural relevance essential to instruction, they clearly show what instructors can do to enhance learning in classes that can last from three to six hours. Teaching Intensive and Accelerated Courses makes full use of the authors' twenty years of experience researching and teaching accelerated courses, along with selected strategies from Wlodkowski's classic Enhancing Adult Motivation to Learn, to offer tried-and-true practices instructors can use to provide continuously engaging learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Authors

ch. 1 Understanding Accelerated and Intensive Courses as Excellent Learning Experiences
ch. 2 Using a Motivational Framework to Enhance Learning in Accelerated and Intensive Courses
ch. 3 Being a Motivating Instructor
ch. 4 Establishing Inclusion in a Learning Environment
ch. 5 Developing Positive Attitudes Toward Learning
ch. 6 Enhancing Meaning in Learning
ch. 7 Engendering Competence Among Learners
ch. 8 Designing Instruction for Intensive and Accelerated Courses
ch. 9 Strengthening Instruction and Retention

References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology Out of Your College Classroom Will Improve Student Learning

Book
Bowen, Jose Antonio
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB1028.3.B69 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Introducing a new way to think about higher education, learning, and technology that prioritizes the benefits of the human dimension. José Bowen recognizes that technology is profoundly changing education and that if students are going to continue to pay enormous sums for campus classes, colleges will need to provide more than what can be found online and maximize “naked” face-to-face contact with faculty. Here, he illustrates how technology is most ...
Additional Info:
Introducing a new way to think about higher education, learning, and technology that prioritizes the benefits of the human dimension. José Bowen recognizes that technology is profoundly changing education and that if students are going to continue to pay enormous sums for campus classes, colleges will need to provide more than what can be found online and maximize “naked” face-to-face contact with faculty. Here, he illustrates how technology is most powerfully used outside the classroom, and, when used effectively, how it can ensure that students arrive to class more prepared for meaningful interaction with faculty. Bowen offers practical advice for faculty and administrators on how to engage students with new technology while restructuring classes into more active learning environments. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Author

Part I: The New Digital Landscape
ch. 1. The Flat Classroom and Global Competition
ch. 2. Social Proximity and the Virtual Classroom
ch. 3. Games, Customization, and Learning

Part II: Designing 21st-Century Courses
ch. 4. Designing College More Like a Video Game
ch. 5. Technology for Information Delivery
ch. 6. Technology for Engagement
ch. 7. Technology for Assessment
ch. 8. The Naked Classroom

Part III: Strategies for Universities of the Future
ch. 9. The Educational Product in the Internet Age
ch. 10. The Naked Curriculum
ch. 11. The Naked Campus

Bibliography
Index
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Digital Games and Learning

Book
Maharg, Paul, author; de Freitas, Sara, ed.
2011
Continuum International Publishing Group, New York
LB1029.G3 D535 2011
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
The popularity of entertainment gaming over the last decades has led to the use of games for non-entertainment purposes in areas such as training and business support. The emergence of the serious games movement has capitalized on this interest in leisure gaming, with an increase in leisure game approaches in schools, colleges, universities and in professional training and continuing professional development.

The movement raises many significant issues and ...
Additional Info:
The popularity of entertainment gaming over the last decades has led to the use of games for non-entertainment purposes in areas such as training and business support. The emergence of the serious games movement has capitalized on this interest in leisure gaming, with an increase in leisure game approaches in schools, colleges, universities and in professional training and continuing professional development.

The movement raises many significant issues and challenges for us. How can gaming and simulation technologies be used to engage learners? How can games be used to motivate, deepen and accelerate learning? How can they be used to greatest effect in learning and teaching? The contributors explore these and many other questions that are vital to our understanding of the paradigm shift from conventional learning environments to learning in games and simulations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Notes on Contributors
Foreword
Introduction

Part I: Theoria - Theoretical Positions
ch. 1 Digital Games and Learning: Modelling learning experiences in the digital age (Paul Maharg and Sara de Freitas)
ch. 2 Four-dimensional Consideration of Feedback in Serious Games (Ian Dunwell, Sara de Freitas and Steve Jarvis)
ch. 3 A Complex Systems Framework for Simulating Teaching and Learning David Gibson (David Gibson)

Part II: Cultura - Cultural Perspectives
ch. 4 Revolution: Experiential learning through virtual role play (Russell Francis)
ch. 5 Stealth Learning in Online Games (Esther MacCallum-Stewart)
ch. 6 Murder on Grimm Isle: The design of a game-based learning environment (Michele Dickey)
ch. 7 Are Games All Child’s Play? (Scot Osterweil and Eric Klopfer)

Part III: Praxis - Theory into practice
ch. 8 Constructions of Games, Teachers and Young People in Formal Learning (Richard Sandford, Keri Facer and Ben Williamson)
ch. 9 Games and Simulations in Informal Science Education (Kurt Squire and Nathan J. Patterson)
ch. 10 From Master to Games-Master: Managing disequilibrium and scaffolding in simulation-based learning (Karen Barton and Patricia McKellar)
ch 11 Designing Serious Games for Cultural Heritage Purposes (Francesco Bellotti, Riccardo Berta, Alessandro De Gloria, Giulia Panizza, Matteo Pellegrino and Ludovica Primavera)

Index
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Wabash tree

Continuing to Engage the Online Learner: More Activities and Resources for Creative Instruction

Book
Conrad, Rita-Marie, and Donaldson, J. Ana
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1044.87.C655 2012
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
This book includes a definitive model for engaged learning that can be applied in a wide range of on-line learning environments and across age levels.  It also addresses current topics such as engaging in a blended learning environment, social networking, and using related technology tools. Continuing to Engage the Online Learner provides an introduction to the theory of engaged learning and its design, assessment, and management in online and blended ...
Additional Info:
This book includes a definitive model for engaged learning that can be applied in a wide range of on-line learning environments and across age levels.  It also addresses current topics such as engaging in a blended learning environment, social networking, and using related technology tools. Continuing to Engage the Online Learner provides an introduction to the theory of engaged learning and its design, assessment, and management in online and blended learning environments. In addition, the book describes the types of activities that engage the online learner in each phase of engagement and provides 50 new examples of activities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Tables, Figure, and Exhibit
Preface
The Authors

Part One : Revisiting Online Engagement
ch. 1 The State of Online Engagement
Foundations of Engagement
Engagement in Today’s Online Learning Environment
Impact of Social Networking and Connectivism
Increasing Transformational Learning
The Twenty-First-Century Learner
The Engaged Educator
Instructor’s Role and Philosophy
Creating a Sense of Presence
Mobile Technology
Summary

ch. 2 Evolution of the Phases of Engagement
Phase 1: Connect
Phase 2: Communicate
Phase 3: Collaborate
Phase 4: Co-Facilitate
Phase 5: Continue
Appropriate Activities
Summary

ch. 3 Implementing the Phases of Engagement
Online or Blended?
Engaging Large Classes
Managing Engagement
Timely Communication
Instructor Time Management
Changing Course
Online Educator’s “Bill of Rights”
Dealing with Diffi cult Students
Summary

ch. 4 Assessing Online Engaged Learning
Developing a Written Assessment for Online Engaged Learning
Developing a Performance Assessment for Online Engaged Learning
Grading
Providing Feedback
Technology to Use for Assessment
Phase-Based Assessment
Using Assessment to Improve Engagement
Summary

Part Two: Activities to Engage Online Learners
ch. 5 Phase 1 Activities: Connect
Ten-Question Hunt
Bucket List
Dream Job
E.T., Phone Home
Four Nouns
Hot Potato
Life Without . . .
Location, Location, Location
Movie or Song of Your Life
Passion
Rainbow
Untidy Timeline
Would You Rather . . . ?

ch. 6 Phase 2 Activities: Communicate
100 . . . 150
Five Words
Boolean Search
Elevator Talk
Focused Listening
Let’s Explore Lingo
Online Resource Time Travel
Reading a Brief
Reincarnation
Uh-Oh!

ch. 7 Phase 3 Activities: Collaborate
Build Your Own Search Engine
Building a Better Keyboard
Group Wiki
Hot Air Balloon
Reverse Brainstorm
Student-Powered Ning Blogging
Team Kickoff
Vegetables
Virtual Lounge
Vlogs Are Us
Whine and Cheese Party

ch. 8 Phase 4 Activities: Co-Facilitate
Course Vocabulary Bank
Facilitating Diversity Online
Factoids
Google Docs for Peer Evaluation
Online Role-Play
Virtual Dining Meeting

ch. 9 Phase 5 Activities: Continue
Cloud Quilt
Concept Quilt
Dollar Store
Do Over
Job Interview
Lessons Learned
Lessons Meet Application
Poem from the Mind of . . .
Poetry Meets Theory
Show Me the Money
Talk with Grandmother
Virtual Door

References
Index
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Managing Online Instructor Workload: Strategies for Finding Balance and Success

Book
Conceição, Simone C. O., and Lehman, Rosemary M.
2011
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5803.C65 C66 2011
Topics: Online Learning   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A large number of institutions are now providing online programs, requiring instructors to change the way they think about teaching and master a distinct set of workload management skills. The first book to discuss workload management for online instructors, Managing Online Instructor Workload offers practical strategies, advice, and examples for how to prioritize, balance, and manage an online teaching workload. Based on surveys and interviews, the timely and comprehensive insight ...
Additional Info:
A large number of institutions are now providing online programs, requiring instructors to change the way they think about teaching and master a distinct set of workload management skills. The first book to discuss workload management for online instructors, Managing Online Instructor Workload offers practical strategies, advice, and examples for how to prioritize, balance, and manage an online teaching workload. Based on surveys and interviews, the timely and comprehensive insight in this book is essential for online instructors, instructional designers, faculty developers and others involved in online learning.

Table Of Content:
List of Tables
Preface
About the Authors

ch. 1 Issues and Challenges When Teaching Online
Institutional Issues and Challenges
Instructional Issues and Challenges
Our Study on Instructor Workload When Teaching Online
Summary

ch. 2 Instructors' Stories for Balancing Workload
Co-Teaching as a Strategy for Balancing Workload
Planning Ahead as a Way to Predict Workload
Giving Individual Feedback as a Workload Management Strategy
Managing Time, Rather Than Time Managing You
Blocking Out Time for the Online Course
Teaching Online During Short Terms
Using Time Allocation Strategies When Teaching for Multiple Institutions
Teaching Online Exclusively from Home
Managing Workload Based on Years of Experience
Teaching Online for a Variety of Institutions
Cohort Program as a Time-Saver
Managing Similar Tasks When Designing for Multiple Courses
Teaching a Recurring Mixed-Mode Online Course
Managing Workload When Current Information Drives Content
Summary

ch. 3 Looking at Workload from a Design Perspective
Identifying Course Tasks
Why It Is Important to Use an Instructional Design Process
Design Framework for Creating a Sense of Presence
Using a Template to Manage Tasks and Prioritize Time
Summary

ch. 4 Managing Tasks and Prioritizing Time
Creating a New Online Course
Converting a Face-to-Face Course
Revising an Existing Online Course
Summary

ch. 5 Using Workload Strategies for Maintaining Quality of Life
Design Strategies
Support Strategies
Teaching Strategies
Time Allocation Strategies
Summary

ch. 6 Final Thoughts and Practical Implications for Balancing Workload
Teaching from an Open Perspective
Adapting the Course Design
Modifying Workload Strategies
Rethinking How to Prioritize Time and Manage Workload
Practical Implications for Balancing Workload

Glossary
References
Index
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Using Social Media Effectively in the Classroom: Blogs, Wikis, Twitter, and More

Book
Seo, Kay
2013
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1044.87.S46 2013
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
The rapid expansion of blogs, Twitter, wikis, and virtual worlds has dramatically transformed the landscape of education. Through highly accessible networks, these new media can integrate students into a learning community by enabling them to create, customize, and share content online. Using Social Media Effectively in the Classroom shows educators how to:

• utilize social media to best support learners
• resolve potential problems
• create a powerful sense ...
Additional Info:
The rapid expansion of blogs, Twitter, wikis, and virtual worlds has dramatically transformed the landscape of education. Through highly accessible networks, these new media can integrate students into a learning community by enabling them to create, customize, and share content online. Using Social Media Effectively in the Classroom shows educators how to:

• utilize social media to best support learners
• resolve potential problems
• create a powerful sense of community within user-centered Web 2.0 technologies.

Moving beyond basic explanations of technologies and how to use them, this book provides research-based, jargon-free, practical examples of what works, what doesn’t, and why when it comes to social media. Organized according to the systematic process of instructional design, contributors describe innovative strategies for incorporating social media into educational settings as well as significant issues to be taken into consideration at each phase of planning, designing, teaching, and evaluation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Preface

Unit I: Planning a Socially Enriched Learning Environment
ch. 1 Analysis in Virtual Worlds: The Influence of Learner Characteristics on Instructional Design
ch. 2 Blurring the Lines: Teacher Insights on the Pitfalls and Possibilities of Incorporating Online Social Media into Instructional Design
ch. 3 Analysis of Second Life as a Delivery Mechanism in EFL Education

Unit II: Developing Powerful Instructional Strategies with Social Media
ch. 4 Designing Recorded Voice Reflection as a Pedagogical Strategy
ch. 5 Live in Your World, Learn in Ours: Virtual Worlds… Engaging the New Generation of Students!
ch. 6 Developing a Wiki for Problem-Based Online Instruction and Web 2.0 Exploration
ch. 7 Learning and Teaching as Communicative Actions: Social Media as Educational Tool

Unit III: Teaching Successfully with Social Media
ch. 8 Everyone’s All a-Twitter about Twitter: Three Operational Perspectives on Using Twitter in the Classroom
ch. 9 Online Videos in the Classroom: Exploring the Opportunities and Barriers to the Use of YouTube in Teaching Introductory Sociology
ch. 10 A Framework to Enrich Student Interaction via Cross-Institutional Microblogging

Assessing Instructional Effectiveness with Social Media
ch. 11 Designing Assessments for Differentiated Instruction Using Social Media Applications
ch. 12 VoiceThread as a Facilitator of Instructional Critique
ch. 13 Is There (still) a Place for Blogging in the Classroom?: Using Blogging to Assess Writing, Facilitate Engagement and Evaluate Student Attitudes
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Using Games to Enhance Learning and Teaching: A Beginner's Guide

Book
Whitton, Nicola, and Moseley, Alex, eds.
2012
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1029.G3 U75 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Using Games to Enhance Learning and Teaching provides educators with easy and practical ways of using games to support student engagement and learning. Despite growing interest in digital game-based learning and teaching, until now most teachers have lacked the resources or technical knowledge to create games that meet their needs. The only realistic option for many has been to use existing games which ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Using Games to Enhance Learning and Teaching provides educators with easy and practical ways of using games to support student engagement and learning. Despite growing interest in digital game-based learning and teaching, until now most teachers have lacked the resources or technical knowledge to create games that meet their needs. The only realistic option for many has been to use existing games which too often are out of step with curriculum goals, difficult to integrate, and require high-end technology.

Using Games to Enhance Learning and Teaching offers a comprehensive solution, presenting five principles for games that can be embedded into traditional or online learning environments to enhance student engagement and interactivity. Extensive case studies explore specific academic perspectives, and featured insights from professional game designers show how educational games can be designed using readily accessible, low-end technologies, providing an explicit link between theory and practice. Practical in nature, the book has a sound theoretical base that draws from a range of international literature and research. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
List of Tables
Notes on Contributors
Notes on Guest Expert Contributors
Acknowledgements

Part I - Background
ch. 1 Introduction (Alex Moseley and Nicola Whitton)
ch. 2 Good Game Design is Good Learning Design (Nicola Whitton)

Part II - Applying Game Principles to Education
ch. 3 Challenge: Levelling Up (Nicola Whitton)
ch. 4 Community: The Wisdom of Crowds (Michelle A. Hoyle and Alex Moseley)
ch. 5 Narrative: Let me tell you a story (Nicola Whitton and Dave White)
ch. 6 Competition: Playing to win? (Alex Moseley)
ch. 7 Multiple media: A picture is worth a thousand words (Peter Whitton)

Part III - Creating Games For Learning
ch. 8 Authentic contextual games for learning (Simon Brookes and Alex Moseley)
ch. 9 Mapping games to curricula (Alex Moseley and Rosie Jones)
ch. 10 Assessment and games (Alex Moseley)
ch. 11 Designing low-cost games for learning (Nicola Whitton and Alex Moseley)

Part IV - Games in Practice
ch. 12 Developing Alternate Reality Games for learning (Katie Piatt)
ch. 13 Evaluating Immersive Virtual Environments for learning (Sarah Smith-Robbins)
ch. 14 Alternate Reality Games and Literature (Danielle Barrios-O'Neill and Alan Hook)

Part V - Conclusions
ch. 15 Conclusions (Nicola Whitton and Alex Moseley)

References
Index
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Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age

Book
Starkey, Louise
2012
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1028.3.S737 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age is for all those interested in considering the impact of emerging digital technologies on teaching and learning. It explores the concept of a digital age and perspectives of knowledge, pedagogy and practice within a digital context.

By examining teaching with digital technologies through new learning theories cognisant of the digital age, it aims to both advance thinking and offer strategies for ...
Additional Info:
Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age is for all those interested in considering the impact of emerging digital technologies on teaching and learning. It explores the concept of a digital age and perspectives of knowledge, pedagogy and practice within a digital context.

By examining teaching with digital technologies through new learning theories cognisant of the digital age, it aims to both advance thinking and offer strategies for teaching technology-savvy students that will enable meaningful learning experiences.

Illustrated throughout with case studies from across the subjects and the age range, key issues considered include:

• how young people create and share knowledge both in and beyond the classroom and how current and new pedagogies can support this level of achievement
• the use of complexity theory as a framework to explore teaching in the digital age
• the way learning occurs – one way exchanges, online and face-to-face interactions, learning within a framework of constructivism, and in communities
• what we mean by critical thinking, why it is important in a digital age, and how this can occur in the context of learning
• how students can create knowledge through a variety of teaching and learning activities, and how the knowledge being created can be shared, critiqued and evaluated.

With an emphasis throughout on what it means for practice, this book aims to improve understanding of how learning theories currently work and can evolve in the future to promote truly effective learning in the digital age. It is essential reading for all teachers, student teachers, school leaders, those engaged in Masters’ Level work, as well as students on Education Studies courses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures and tables
Introduction
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 The complexity of schools
ch. 2 The digital age
ch. 3 Knowledge and connectivism
ch. 4 Connections and relationships
ch. 5 Creating Knowledge
ch. 6 Critical thinking
ch. 7 Learning in the digital age
ch. 8 Teaching in the digital age
ch. 9 The start of the digital age

Notes
References
Index
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Blended Learning Environments for Adults: Evaluations and Frameworks

Book
Anastasiades, Panagiotes S.
2012
IGI Global, Hershey PA
LC5219.B535 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Adult Learners

Additional Info:
There is a general notion that adult education literature generally supports the idea that teaching adults should be approached in a different way than teaching children. Adult learners include working adults with family responsibilities, older workers who may not feel confident about returning to school and people who are currently in the workforce and who need to upgrade skills and knowledge. The combination of synchronous and asynchronous transmission with face ...
Additional Info:
There is a general notion that adult education literature generally supports the idea that teaching adults should be approached in a different way than teaching children. Adult learners include working adults with family responsibilities, older workers who may not feel confident about returning to school and people who are currently in the workforce and who need to upgrade skills and knowledge. The combination of synchronous and asynchronous transmission with face to face instruction allow for the implementation of a new Blended Collaborative Learning Environment, which is flexible in terms of location, time, and pace of adult learners.

Blended Learning Environments for Adults: Evaluations and Frameworks demonstrates the view that Information and Communication Technologies should not be considered as a neutral teaching medium, but instead be implemented under pedagogical conditions; aiming at the development of critical thinking through their creative integration into the social and cultural context. This comprehensive collection brings a group of scholars in order to build up a pedagogical approach and analytical implementation steps and directions for designing and implementing Blended Learning Collaborative Environments for adults. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Academic Development Perspectives of Blended Learning
ch. 2 The Definition of Blended Learning in Higher Education
ch. 3 Social Aspects and Web 2.0 Challenges in Blended Learning
ch. 4 Assistive Technologies and Environmental Design Concepts for Blended Learning and Teaching for Disabilities within 3D Virtual Worlds and Learning Envirornments
ch. 5 The 'Pleasure Principle' in Blended Learning Approaches
ch. 6 The Artificial Intelligence in the Support of e-Learning Management and Quality Maintenance
ch. 7 Developing a Collaborative ELearning Construction Framework for Blended Learning
ch. 8 Internet-Based Remove Laboratories as a Part of a Blended Learning Environment
ch. 9 A Program-Based Approach to Developing and Implementing Blended Instruction: The University of Vermont School Library Media Studies Sequence
ch. 10 Framework for Evaluating Blended Learning in a University Public-Speaking Course in Singapore
ch. 11 Using a Blended e-Learning Cooperative Approach in Higher Education: A Case from Egypt
ch. 12 Design of a Blended Learning Environment for the Training of Greek Teachers: Results of the Survey on Educational Needs
ch. 13 Enabling Creative Blended Learning for Adults through Learning Design
ch. 14 Theoretical Rationale for Designing a Blended Learning Teachers' Professional Development Program

Compilation of References
About the Contributors
Index
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Using Network and Mobile Technology to Bridge Formal and Informal Learning

Book
Trentin, Guglielmo; and Repetto, Manuela, eds.
2013
Chandos Publishing, Oxford
LB1028.5.U85 2013
Topics: Online Learning   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
- includes a framework for the sustainability of new educational paradigms based on the combination of formal and informal learning processes supported by network and mobile technology (NMT)
 - provides a series of recommendations on how to use attitudes towards NMT gained outside the school to integrate formal and informal learning
 - gives a teacher training approach on how to use network and mobile technology-based informal learning to enhance ...
Additional Info:
- includes a framework for the sustainability of new educational paradigms based on the combination of formal and informal learning processes supported by network and mobile technology (NMT)
 - provides a series of recommendations on how to use attitudes towards NMT gained outside the school to integrate formal and informal learning
 - gives a teacher training approach on how to use network and mobile technology-based informal learning to enhance formal learning pathways

An ever-widening gap exists between how students and schools use communication technology. Using Network and Mobile Technology to Bridge Formal and Informal Learning introduces new methods (inspired by ‘pedagogy 2.0’) of harnessing the potential of communication technologies for teaching and learning. This book considers how attitudes towards network and mobile technology (NMT) gained outside the school can be shunted into new educational paradigms combining formal and informal learning processes. It begins with an overview of these paradigms, and their sustainability. It then considers the pedagogical dimension of formal/informal integration through NMT, moving on to teachers’ professional development. Next, the organizational development of schools in the context of formal and informal learning is detailed. Finally, the book covers the role of technologies supporting formal/informal integration into subject-oriented education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures and tables
List of abbreviations
Preface
About the contributors

ch. 1 Tapping the motivational potential of mobile handhelds: defining the research agenda (Cathy Tran, Mark Warschauer, and AnneMarie M. Conley)
 - Introduction
 - Educational technology and motivation: past, present and future
 - Proposed research strands for motivation and mobile handheld technology
 - Methodological considerations for research in mobile learning and motivation
 - Conclusion
 - Acknowledgments
 - References

ch. 2 Using social network sites and mobile technology to scaffold equity of access to cultural resources (John Cook, Norbert Pachler, and Ben Bachmair)
 - Introduction
 - Resources for learning: self-representation and writing in a school context
 - Key concepts
 - Using NMT for bridging social capital
 - Conclusions
 - Notes
 - Bibliography (John Cook, Norbert Pachler, Ben Bachmair)

ch. 3 A mobile Web 2.0 framework: reconceptualising teaching and learning (Thomas Cochrane, and Roger Bateman)
 - Introduction
 - Background
 - Mobile Web 2.0 design framework: some examples of use
 - Mobile Web 2.0 framework: key aspects
 - Discussion
 - Conclusion
 - Bibliography

ch. 4 Facing up to it: blending formal and informal learning opportunities in higher education contexts (Julie Willems, and Debra Bateman)
 - Introduction
 - The blurring of formal and informal learning
 - A new model for the knowledge economy
 - Methodology
 - Discussion
 - Conclusionv  - Bibliography

ch. 5 Networked lives for learning: digital media and young people across formal and informal contexts (Solveig Roth, and Ola Erstad)
 - Introduction
 - Networked lives
 - Learning lives
 - Methodology and research context
 - Three portraits
 - Interpretation of the portraits
 - Conclusion
 - Note
 - Bibliography

ch. 6 Network and mobile technologies in education: a call for e-teachers (Guglielmo Trentin)
 - Introduction
 - The key issues
 - From teacher to e-teacher
 - E-teacher education and professional development
 - Some conclusive reflections on e-teacher status
 - Note
 - Bibliography

ch. 7 Networked informal learning and continuing teacher education (Manuela Repetto)
 - Introduction
 - The Aladin project: general approach and activities
 - The Aladin project: results and attestations
 - Conclusion
 - Note
 - Bibliography

ch. 8 A conclusive thought: the opportunity to change education is, literally, at hand (Cathlee A. Norris, and Elliot Soloway)
 - Introduction
 - Technology = opportunity
 - The Age of Mobilism = opportunity for K-12 to finally change
 - Scaffolding the ‘demanded thinking’
 - Barriers to change
 - Stay tuned!
 - Acknowledgment
 - Notes
 - Bibliography

Index
Additional Info:
A library of practical ideas and suggestions for achieving the “Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education” through the online environment.
Additional Info:
A library of practical ideas and suggestions for achieving the “Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education” through the online environment.
Additional Info:
Teaching Learning, and Technology – a non-profit corporation that helps educational institutions make appropriate use of information technology through workshops, external evaluation, consulting, assessment tools, specialized tools and guides, institutional subscription programs, webcasts and online workshops, free resources and publications.
Additional Info:
Teaching Learning, and Technology – a non-profit corporation that helps educational institutions make appropriate use of information technology through workshops, external evaluation, consulting, assessment tools, specialized tools and guides, institutional subscription programs, webcasts and online workshops, free resources and publications.
Additional Info:
A site is designed to stimulate theological reflection on the uses of technology in theological education, with links to sites on a host of issues on teaching and technology.
Additional Info:
A site is designed to stimulate theological reflection on the uses of technology in theological education, with links to sites on a host of issues on teaching and technology.
Additional Info:
The do's and dont's of civil online communication. Netiquette covers both common courtesy online and the informal "rules of the road" of cyberspace. This site provides links to both summary and detail information.
Additional Info:
The do's and dont's of civil online communication. Netiquette covers both common courtesy online and the informal "rules of the road" of cyberspace. This site provides links to both summary and detail information.
Additional Info:
An extensive, authoritative site on learning theory and distance education, constructed by Martin Ryder at the University of Colorado at Denver, School of Education. Lots of research, definitions, academic papers, philosophical overviews.
Additional Info:
An extensive, authoritative site on learning theory and distance education, constructed by Martin Ryder at the University of Colorado at Denver, School of Education. Lots of research, definitions, academic papers, philosophical overviews.
Additional Info:
A single page “How-To Guide” from UCLA College Library.
Additional Info:
A single page “How-To Guide” from UCLA College Library.
Additional Info:
An online tutorial describing a methodology for creating online learning. Upon completion of the course you should be able to: explain why online education is an effective learning format for adult learners; write measurable learning objectives; organize content into an online format; and create assessment tools/exercises that measure achievement of learning objectives. University of Tennessee.
Additional Info:
An online tutorial describing a methodology for creating online learning. Upon completion of the course you should be able to: explain why online education is an effective learning format for adult learners; write measurable learning objectives; organize content into an online format; and create assessment tools/exercises that measure achievement of learning objectives. University of Tennessee.
Additional Info:
Exhaustive overview to help teachers, administrators, facilitators, and students understand distance education, including: teaching strategies, review of research, the key processes of instructional development, evaluation, profiles of online students, copyright issues, glossary. University of Idaho.
Additional Info:
Exhaustive overview to help teachers, administrators, facilitators, and students understand distance education, including: teaching strategies, review of research, the key processes of instructional development, evaluation, profiles of online students, copyright issues, glossary. University of Idaho.
Additional Info:
A comprehensive set of documents produced by Illinois Online Network (University of Illinois) on such topics as: Assessment, Instructional Design, Course Objectives, Hybrid Courses, Communications, and Intellectual Property Rights
Additional Info:
A comprehensive set of documents produced by Illinois Online Network (University of Illinois) on such topics as: Assessment, Instructional Design, Course Objectives, Hybrid Courses, Communications, and Intellectual Property Rights
Additional Info:
An extensive “checklist” of best practices for pedagogical and user-interface design for online teaching. Hyperlinks are provided within the checklist to expedite and facilitate understanding of each indicator on the checklist.
Additional Info:
An extensive “checklist” of best practices for pedagogical and user-interface design for online teaching. Hyperlinks are provided within the checklist to expedite and facilitate understanding of each indicator on the checklist.
Additional Info:
Contains several versions of a rubric designed for peer review (and thus design and development) of online courses. Includes annotations demonstrating the criteria in practice.
Additional Info:
Contains several versions of a rubric designed for peer review (and thus design and development) of online courses. Includes annotations demonstrating the criteria in practice.
Additional Info:
Data and analysis-rich article (2003) in “Educause,” an education journal, focused especially on the “millennial generation” and computer technology. The author discusses how the learning styles, attitudes, and aptitudes of today's "new students" vary depending on age, experience, and preferences, requiring colleges and universities to find a variety of ways to meet students' expectations.
Additional Info:
Data and analysis-rich article (2003) in “Educause,” an education journal, focused especially on the “millennial generation” and computer technology. The author discusses how the learning styles, attitudes, and aptitudes of today's "new students" vary depending on age, experience, and preferences, requiring colleges and universities to find a variety of ways to meet students' expectations.
Additional Info:
Ask yourself key questions about the proposed group activity, be certain that the activity furthers course objects, allow for team building, encourage students to monitor group processing, promote individual accountability, etc.
Additional Info:
Ask yourself key questions about the proposed group activity, be certain that the activity furthers course objects, allow for team building, encourage students to monitor group processing, promote individual accountability, etc.
Additional Info:
Personal narrative reflecting on the significance of recognizing your own, different, teaching gifts/skills, in the online teaching environment.
Additional Info:
Personal narrative reflecting on the significance of recognizing your own, different, teaching gifts/skills, in the online teaching environment.
Additional Info:
Short essay that argues that digital technology can enhance our students' learning, but only if our goals for student learning drive its use – and the implications there of.
Additional Info:
Short essay that argues that digital technology can enhance our students' learning, but only if our goals for student learning drive its use – and the implications there of.
Additional Info:
Brief, schematic argument for the ways in which new information technologies can improve student learning.
Additional Info:
Brief, schematic argument for the ways in which new information technologies can improve student learning.
Additional Info:
Transitioning into a self-supporting program through institutional subscriptions, license agreements, and a range of fee-based services, the Quality Matters Project offers a peer-review approach to quality assurance and continuous improvement in online education.
Additional Info:
Transitioning into a self-supporting program through institutional subscriptions, license agreements, and a range of fee-based services, the Quality Matters Project offers a peer-review approach to quality assurance and continuous improvement in online education.
Additional Info:
Developed by California State University, Chico, to offer several rubrics to assess various aspects of the design and instruction of online courses: organization and design; learner support, assessment, use of student feedback, etc.
Additional Info:
Developed by California State University, Chico, to offer several rubrics to assess various aspects of the design and instruction of online courses: organization and design; learner support, assessment, use of student feedback, etc.
Additional Info:
Developed by The San Diego State University College of Education.
Additional Info:
Developed by The San Diego State University College of Education.
Additional Info:
Sponsored by the Seminary Department of the National Catholic Educational Association for the purpose of advancing the education of future priests within a distributed learning framework shared by all member schools. Sponsors courses that foster excellence in human, spiritual, intellectual, and pastoral formation within seminaries through the sharing of resources between them.
Additional Info:
Sponsored by the Seminary Department of the National Catholic Educational Association for the purpose of advancing the education of future priests within a distributed learning framework shared by all member schools. Sponsors courses that foster excellence in human, spiritual, intellectual, and pastoral formation within seminaries through the sharing of resources between them.
Additional Info:
A list of faculty development-related people and organizations tweeting on issues of technology in higher education.
Additional Info:
A list of faculty development-related people and organizations tweeting on issues of technology in higher education.
Additional Info:
Video. Extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, showing faculty from a variety of disciplines (foreign language, math, teacher education, and educational leadership) analyzing what happens to classroom learning when you utilize a combination of virtual and physical learning environments (hybrid formats and contexts).
Additional Info:
Video. Extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, showing faculty from a variety of disciplines (foreign language, math, teacher education, and educational leadership) analyzing what happens to classroom learning when you utilize a combination of virtual and physical learning environments (hybrid formats and contexts).
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, analyzing faculty use of technology in several different disciplines (however, NOT in religion or theology), illustrating effective instructional practices culminating in improved engagement.
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, analyzing faculty use of technology in several different disciplines (however, NOT in religion or theology), illustrating effective instructional practices culminating in improved engagement.
Additional Info:
Information and reviews on digital technologies used for teaching, research, and productivity in a liberal arts context.
Additional Info:
Information and reviews on digital technologies used for teaching, research, and productivity in a liberal arts context.
Additional Info:
A wide range of specific learning designs and strategies for the online and blended classroom, organized and reviewed by The University of Central Florida's Center for Distributed Learning. Each entry describes a strategy drawn from the pedagogical practice of online/blended teaching faculty, depicts this strategy with artifacts from actual courses, and is aligned with findings from research or professional practice literature. Search and browse interface.
Additional Info:
A wide range of specific learning designs and strategies for the online and blended classroom, organized and reviewed by The University of Central Florida's Center for Distributed Learning. Each entry describes a strategy drawn from the pedagogical practice of online/blended teaching faculty, depicts this strategy with artifacts from actual courses, and is aligned with findings from research or professional practice literature. Search and browse interface.
Additional Info:
This online journal and website combines the strands of critical pedagogy and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses for technology and new media in education. It is a networked, participant-driven, and open peer reviewed journal that is both academic and collective.
Additional Info:
This online journal and website combines the strands of critical pedagogy and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses for technology and new media in education. It is a networked, participant-driven, and open peer reviewed journal that is both academic and collective.
Article cover image
Wabash tree

"Assessing Quality of Critical Thought In Online Discussion"

Article
Weltzer-Ward, Lisa
2009
Campus-Wide Information Systems, Vol. 26, No. 3, 2009
Topics: Discussion   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe a theoretically based coding framework for an integrated analysis and assessment of critical thinking in online discussion. Design/methodology/approach – The critical thinking assessment framework (TAF) is developed through review of theory and previous research, verified by comparing results to previous research, and checked for reliability by comparing results for multiple coders. Findings – Although process, structure, and quality of online discussions ...
Additional Info:
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe a theoretically based coding framework for an integrated analysis and assessment of critical thinking in online discussion. Design/methodology/approach – The critical thinking assessment framework (TAF) is developed through review of theory and previous research, verified by comparing results to previous research, and checked for reliability by comparing results for multiple coders. Findings – Although process, structure, and quality of online discussions are assessed independently, a standard framework integrating these aspects for comprehensive assessment of critical thinking in online discussions is not found in literature review. The critical TAF described here offers a reliable and valid tool for integrating process, structure, and quality to assess critical thinking in online discussions. Research/limitations/implications – The critical TAF serves as a methodological tool for assessing critical thinking in online discussion. Further research should further assess the validity and reliability of this tool and should integrate the framework with assessments for other aspects of discussion such as social or instructor presence. Practical implications – The implementation of the critical TAF in future studies will ultimately help identify online educational activities and tools which best support development and application of critical thinking skills. Furthermore, it might be used to assess critical thinking of individual participants or small groups in a discussion. Originality/value – The critical TAF described in this paper provides a valid and reliable tool for integrated assessment of the process, structure, and quality of critical thinking in online discussions.
Cover image

The Plugged-In Professor: Tips and Techniques For Teaching With Social Media

Book
Ferris, Sharmila Pixy; and Wilder, Hilary Anne, eds.
2013
Chandos Publishing, Oxford
LB1028.3.P58 2013
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Provides a cutting-edge resource for academics and practitioners in effective ways of reaching today’s students through the use of their favorite tool, social media

Outlines a range of strategies taking advantage of the unique learning styles and habits of net generation learners

Exposes students to ways in which these technologies can be used in their professional and personal ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Provides a cutting-edge resource for academics and practitioners in effective ways of reaching today’s students through the use of their favorite tool, social media

Outlines a range of strategies taking advantage of the unique learning styles and habits of net generation learners

Exposes students to ways in which these technologies can be used in their professional and personal lives

Reinforces students' growth as productive, reflective, and involved twenty-first century citizens

New technologies are transforming the way students work. The Plugged in Professor provides a timely and exceptional resource for using social media and other new technologies to help college students meet both general and discipline-specific objectives. The title covers techniques built around well-known social networking technologies, as well as other emerging technologies such as mobile phone and tablet apps. With a practical focus and reader-friendly format, this book shows educators how to apply techniques in each technology, and includes clear student learning objectives, step-by-step directions, observations and advice, and supplemental readings and resources. Twenty-five chapters by leading contributors cover key aspects of new technologies in education, in four parts: Writing, research and information fluency; Communication and collaboration; Critical thinking and creativity; and Integrative learning.

Readership: Educators in higher education, academics, teachers, and all those who wish to develop their techniques to more effectively reach the Net Generation will find this book useful. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of tables and figure
List of abbreviations
Acknowledgments Preface
About the editors
About the contributors

Part 1: Writing, Research, and Information Fluency
ch. 1 Writing for Wikipedia: co-constructing knowledge and writing for a public audience (Lori L. Britt)
ch. 2 Organizing with Pinterest and Delicious (Melanie L. Bufington)
ch. 3 Students' inadequate exposure to learning technology: overcoming the pedagogical challenge using wikis (Linzi J. Kemp)
ch. 4 Collecting and analyzing primary sources (Lisa M. Lane)
ch. 5 Unraveling the research process: social bookmarking and collaborative learning (Caroline Sinkinson, and Alison Hicks)

Part 2: Communication and Collaboration
ch. 6 Using Wimba Voice Board to facilitate foreign language conversation courses (Silvia U. Baage)
ch. 7 Web conferencing and peer feedback (Kevin Garrison)
ch. 8 Learning through YouTube (J. Jacob Jenkins, and Patrick J. Dillon)
ch. 9 Wiki-workshopping: using Wikispaces for peer writing workshops (Hans C. Schmidt)
ch. 10 Using persistent wikis as a pedagogical resource (Evan D. Bradley)
ch. 11 Social media and public speaking: student-produced multimedia informative presentations (Paul E. Mabrey III, and Juhong "Christie" Liu)
ch. 12 Collaborative presentations using Google Docs (Michael S. Mills)
ch. 13 Cooperative study blog (Amanda Evelyn Waldo)

Part 3: Critical Thinking and Creativity
ch. 14 Using Facebook to apply social learning theory (Michelle Kilbum)
ch. 15 Technology as a tool to develop problem-solving skills in general chemistry (Madhu Mahalingam, and Elisabeth Morlino)
ch. 16 Communicating experimental learning through an online portfolio in Tumblr (Aaron J. Moore)
ch. 17 The Biology Taboo Wiktionary: a tool for improving student comprehension of key terminology in introductory biology courses (Jeffrey T. Olimpo, and Patricia A. Shields)
ch. 18 Mobile digital storytelling in the second language classroom (Apostolos Koutropoulos, David Hattem, and Ronda Zelezny-Green)
ch. 19 Creating a video dialogue with streaming video clips (Sandra L. Miller)
ch. 20 Remix as an educational activity (Christopher Shamburg, Kate Mazzetti-Shamburg, and John Shamburg)
ch. 21 Using Twitter to assist students in writing a concise nut graph (Tia C. M. Tyree)

Part 4: Integrative Learning
ch. 22 Using simulation, video sharing, and discussion threads for practice-based skills (Lindsay B. Curtin, and Laura A. Finn)
ch. 23 Using Facebook Mobile as a tool to create a virtual learning community for pre-service teachers (Erkkie Haipinge)
ch. 24 Using social software tools to facilitate peer e-mentoring and self-reflection among students on practicum
ch. 25 Using opinion leaders on Twitter to amplify PR and marketing messages (Sarah H. VanSlette)

Index
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Leading the e-Learning Transformation of Higher Education: Meeting the Challenges of Technology and Distance Education

Book
Miller, Gary; Benke, Meg; Chaloux, Bruce; Ragan, Lawrence C.; Schroeder, Raymond; Smutz, Wayne; and Swan, Karen
2014
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB 2395.7.M55 2014
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Written by pioneers in the field of online learning, Leading the e-Learning Transformation of Higher Education is a professional text that offers insights and guidance to the rising generation of leaders in the field of higher education. It explains how to integrate online learning into an institution during a period of rapid social and institutional change.

This important volume:

• ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Written by pioneers in the field of online learning, Leading the e-Learning Transformation of Higher Education is a professional text that offers insights and guidance to the rising generation of leaders in the field of higher education. It explains how to integrate online learning into an institution during a period of rapid social and institutional change.

This important volume:

• Shares success stories, interviews, cases and insights from a broad range of leadership styles
• Reviews how technology is transforming higher education worldwide
• Provides an overview of how distance education is organized in a range of institutional settings
• Breaks down current leadership challenges in both unit operations and institutional policy

This volume launches the new Stylus series that is aimed at the online learning and distance education market. It offers readers the opportunity to benefit from the collective experience and expertise of top leaders in the field. All of the contributors have held leadership roles in national and international distance education organizations. Five of the contributors have been recognized as Sloan Consortium Fellows in 2010 and they have all collaborated with the Institute for Emerging Leaders in Online Learning. These contributors have helped pave the way and now share their insights, advice, and broad vision with the future leaders of the field. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

Part One: Leading Change: Making the Match Between Leadership and Institutional Culture
ch. 1 E-Learning and the Transformation of Higher Education (Bruce Chaloux and Gary Miller)
ch. 2 The Impact of Organizational Context (Bruce Chaloux and Gary Miller)
ch. 3 Leading Change in the Mainstream: A Strategic Approach (Gary Miller)
ch. 4 Leadership Is Personal (Wayne Smutz)

Part Two: Ensuring Operational Excellence
ch. 5 Enhancing e-Learning Effectiveness (Karen Swan)
ch. 6 Supporting Faculty Success in Online Learning: Requirements for Individual and Institutional Leadership (Lawrence C. Ragan and Raymond Schroeder and Gary Miller)
ch. 7 Optimizing Student Success (Meg Benke and Gary Miller)
ch. 8 Moving Into the Technology Mainstream (Raymond Schroeder and Gary Miller)
ch. 9 Operational Leadership: Moving From Operations to Strategy (Raymond Schroeder)
Part Three: Sustaining the Innovation
ch. 10 Policy Leadership in e-Learning (Bruce Chaloux)
ch. 11 Leading Beyond the Institution (Meg Benke and Gary Miller)
ch. 12 Foreseeing an Actionable Future
(Gary Miller, Meg Brooke, Bruce Chaloux, Lawrence C. Ragan, Wayne Smutz, and Karen Swan)
Contributors
Index
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Essentials for Blended Learning: A Standards-Based Guide

Book
Stein, Jared; and Graham, Charles R.
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LB 1028.5.S715 2014
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Essentials for Blended Learning: A Standards-Based Guide provides a practical, streamlined approach for creating effective learning experiences by blending online activities and the best of face-to-face teaching.

This guide is:

Easy to use: Clear, jargon-free writing; illustrations; and references to online resources help readers understand concepts.

Streamlined: A simple but effective design process focuses on creating manageable activities for the right environment.

...
Additional Info:
Essentials for Blended Learning: A Standards-Based Guide provides a practical, streamlined approach for creating effective learning experiences by blending online activities and the best of face-to-face teaching.

This guide is:

Easy to use: Clear, jargon-free writing; illustrations; and references to online resources help readers understand concepts.

Streamlined: A simple but effective design process focuses on creating manageable activities for the right environment.

Practical: Real-world examples from different subject areas help teachers understand principles in context.

Contemporary: The variety of modern, connected technologies covered in the guide addresses a range of teaching challenges.

Forward-Looking: The approach bridges the gap between formal classroom learning and informal lifelong learning.

Standards-based: Guidelines and standards are based on current research in the field, relevant learning theories, and practitioner experiences.

Effective blended learning requires significant rethinking of teaching practices and a fundamental redesign of course structure. Essentials for Blended Learning: A Standards-Based Guide simplifies these difficult challenges without neglecting important opportunities to transform teaching. This guide is suitable for teachers in any content area. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Orientation to Blended Teaching and Learning
ch. 2 Elements of Blended Courses: A Tour
ch. 3 Engaging Learners in a Blended Course
ch. 4 Designing Blended Courses
ch. 5 Planning Your Course from Goals and Outcomes
ch. 6 Blending Assessment and Feedback for Learning
ch. 7 Blending Content-Driven Learning Activities
ch. 8 Blending Community-Driven Learning Activities
Additional Info:
Many faculty are beginning to experiment with social media, incorporating Facebook, Twitter, and other services into their classes. What are the legal implications of the use of social media in teaching? What should faculty know before trying them out?
Additional Info:
Many faculty are beginning to experiment with social media, incorporating Facebook, Twitter, and other services into their classes. What are the legal implications of the use of social media in teaching? What should faculty know before trying them out?
Web cover image

MOOC Case Study

Web
McFarland, Daniel
Topics: Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This website provides a case analysis of a Massive, Open, Online Course (MOOC) taught at Stanford University. The professor wanted to provide high quality course content, engage students, offer free and discounted readings, enable peer evaluation of term papers and study the course to improve it.
Additional Info:
This website provides a case analysis of a Massive, Open, Online Course (MOOC) taught at Stanford University. The professor wanted to provide high quality course content, engage students, offer free and discounted readings, enable peer evaluation of term papers and study the course to improve it.
Cover image

A Guide to Online Course Design: Strategies for Student Success

Book
Stavredes, Tina; and Herder, Tiffany
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1044.87.S73 2014
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book offers a much-needed resource for faculty and professional staff to build quality online courses by focusing on quality standards in instructional design and transparency in learning outcomes in the design of online courses. It includes effective instructional strategies to motivate online learners, help them become more self-directed, and develop academic skills to persist and successfully complete a program of study online. ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book offers a much-needed resource for faculty and professional staff to build quality online courses by focusing on quality standards in instructional design and transparency in learning outcomes in the design of online courses. It includes effective instructional strategies to motivate online learners, help them become more self-directed, and develop academic skills to persist and successfully complete a program of study online. It also includes a more in-depth understanding of instructional design principles to support faculty as they move their face-to-face courses to the online environment.

Table Of Content:
Exhibits and Figures
Preface
About the Authors

Authors: Tina Stavredes, Tiffany Herder
Part 1 An Introduction to Persistence and Quality Design
ch. 1 Quality Design to Support Learner Persistence
ch. 2 The Instructional Design Process

Part 2 Analysis of Learners and Learning Outcomes
ch. 3 Analysis of Online Learner Characteristics and Needs
ch. 4 Analysis of Learning Outcomes and Competencies

Part 3 Design of Course Assessments and Sequence
ch. 5 Design of Course Assessments
ch. 6 Sequence of Instruction

Part 4 Design of Instructional Strategies
ch. 7 Foundations of Transformative Learning
ch. 8 Selection of Instructional Materials
ch. 9 Design of Effective Course Activities

Part 5 Development of Instruction
ch. 10 Development of Instructional Materials
ch. 11 Organizing the Course Environment

Part 6 Implementation and Evaluation
ch. 12 Course Evaluations and Maintenance

Final Remarks
References
Index
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Motivating and Retaining Online Students: Research-Based Strategies That Work (Jossey-Bass Guides to Online Teaching and Learning)

Book
Lehman, Rosemary M.; Conceicao, Simone C. O.
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2395.7.L46 2014
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
Finally, the first research-based book of sound strategies and best practices to help instructors motivate students to complete their online courses.

Although studies support the effectiveness of learning online, students often fail to complete online courses. Some studies have found that as many as 50–70% drop out of their online courses or programs. Retention is not only a growing expectation and imperative, but it is also as opportunity for ...
Additional Info:
Finally, the first research-based book of sound strategies and best practices to help instructors motivate students to complete their online courses.

Although studies support the effectiveness of learning online, students often fail to complete online courses. Some studies have found that as many as 50–70% drop out of their online courses or programs. Retention is not only a growing expectation and imperative, but it is also as opportunity for faculty members to take the lead in innovating, researching, and implementing new strategies while demonstrating their effectiveness.

Designed for instructors and instructional designers, Motivating and Retaining Online Students is filled with empirical research from the authors’ study of motivation and retention strategies that can reduce online learner dropout. Focusing on the most important issues instructors face, such as course design; student engagement and motivation; and institutional, instructional, and informal student support strategies, the book provides effective online strategies that help minimize student dropout, increase student retention, and support student learning.

While helping to improve the overall retention rates for educational institutions, the strategies outlined in the book also allow for student diversity and individual learner differences. Lehman and Conceição’s proven model gives instructors an effective approach to help students persist in online courses and succeed as learners. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables, Exhibits, and Figure
Preface
The Focus of This Book
Who Can Benefit from This Book
Our Beliefs About Learning and Teaching
How This Book Is Organized
Acknowledgments
About the Authors

ch. 1 Concerns and Opportunities for Online Student Retention
Evolving Concepts of Presence, Communication, and Interaction
Redefining the Characteristics of the Higher Education Learner
New Ways of Learning
Causes for Increased Enrollment
The State of Higher Education and Online Learning
Concerns for Online Student Retention
Reasons Online Students Drop Out
Factors for Student Persistence in Online Education
Opportunities for Online Education
New Learner Behaviors and Skills in the 21st Century
Filling the Gap: Strategies for Online Persistence

ch. 2 Design Strategies for Retaining Online Students
Intentional Design for Online Courses
Design Elements and Strategies to Help Students Stay Motivated Online
Creating the Learning Environment
Planning for the Teaching Process
Predicting Learners’ Needs
The Impact of Intentional Design for Online Course Success
Design Strategies for Retaining Online Students

ch. 3 Student Strategies for Staying Motivated Online
Pathway and Strategies for Staying Motivated in Online Courses
Self-Awareness
Self-Efficacy
A Purpose for Taking a Course
Means to Achieve Goals
Rewards for Achieving Goals
Explaining Study Findings from a Motivational Perspective
Incorporating Student Strategies into Course Design

ch. 4 Support Strategies for Helping Online Students Persist
Types of Support Perceived as Important by Students
Human Resource Support
Institutional Support
Self-Care
Support Strategies for Helping Online Students Persist
Instructional Support Strategies
Institutional Support Strategies
Self-Care Strategies

ch. 5 Pulling the Strategies Together
Established Findings Related to Online Student Retention
Major Contributions from Our Study
New Ways of Th inking About Learning and Teaching
Persistence Model for Online Student Retention
Student-Centered Model
Strategies for Helping Students Persist in an Online Course
Times of Change for Learning in the 21st Century
Instructors’ Skills for Meeting Students’ 21st-Century Fluencies
Implications and Conclusions for Learning and Teaching Online

Glossary
References
Appendix 1
Appendix 2
Index
Web cover image

Adjunct versus Full-Time Faculty: Comparison of Student Outcomes in the Online Classroom

Web
Mueller, Brian; Mandernach, B. Jean; and Sanderson, Kelly
Topics: Online Learning   |   Adjuncts   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The Journal of Online Teaching and Learning (JoLT) publishes the detailed results of a study. Briefly: student outcomes are better across the board when taught by FT faculty over adjunct faculty.
Additional Info:
The Journal of Online Teaching and Learning (JoLT) publishes the detailed results of a study. Briefly: student outcomes are better across the board when taught by FT faculty over adjunct faculty.
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Ed offers a time line, with links, of the controversial resignation and reinstatement of University of Virginia's president Teresa Sullivan. At the heart of the controversy is disagreement between the school's Board of Visitors and President Sullivan regarding the pace and manner of adopting online learning.
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Ed offers a time line, with links, of the controversial resignation and reinstatement of University of Virginia's president Teresa Sullivan. At the heart of the controversy is disagreement between the school's Board of Visitors and President Sullivan regarding the pace and manner of adopting online learning.
Cover image

Assuring Quality in Online Education: Practices and Processes at the Teaching, Resource, and Program Levels

Book
Shattuck, Kay, ed.
2014
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB1028.5.A745 2014
Topics: Online Learning   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Online distance education continues to grow at a fast pace, even outpacing the overall growth of U.S. higher education. Demands for quality are coming from all shareholders involved. As if caught by surprise, a patchwork response to quality is often the typical organizational response. The result can be inconsistent and uncoordinated levels of value to those invested in online learning. This often ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Online distance education continues to grow at a fast pace, even outpacing the overall growth of U.S. higher education. Demands for quality are coming from all shareholders involved. As if caught by surprise, a patchwork response to quality is often the typical organizational response. The result can be inconsistent and uncoordinated levels of value to those invested in online learning. This often promotes negative images of the educational experience and institution.

Comprised of highly regarded experts in the field, this edited volume provides a comprehensive overview of quality assurance, a snapshot of current practices and proven recommendations for raising standards of quality in online education.

Topics discussed include:

* Improving practices for teaching online
* Using educational analytics for quality assurance and improvement
* Accessibility: An important dimension of quality assurance
* Assuring quality in online course design
* Assuring quality in learner support, academic resources, advising and counseling
* The role and realities of accreditation

This text clearly answers the call for addressing quality from a broad, deep and coordinated understanding. It addresses the complexities of quality assurance in higher education and offers professionals top-shelf advice and support.

*This text is also appropriate for students enrolled in Educational Technology and Higher Education Administration Masters and PhD programs (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Foreword
Preface

Part One: Overview and Implications of Practices and Processes for Assuring Quality
ch. 1 Stakeholders of Quality Assurance in Online Education: Inputs and Outputs (Deborah Adair and Sebastian Diaz)
ch. 2 Cost, Access, and Quality: Breaking the Iron Triangle Through Disruptive Technology-Based Innovations (Stella C.S. Porto)
ch. 3 The Sloan Consortium Pillars and Quality Scorecard (Janet C. Moore and Kaye Shelton)
ch. 4 K–12 Online Learning: Recommendations for Assuring Quality (Susan Patrick, MAthhew Wicks, and Allison Powell)
ch. 5 Progress Toward Transparency and Quality Assurance (Cali Morrison, Karen Paulson, and Russell Poulin)

Part Two: Quality Assurance and Continuous Improvement at the Course Design and Teaching Levels
ch. 6 A Process to Improve Course Design: A Key Variable in Course Quality (Deborah Adair)
ch. 7 A Model for Determining the Effectiveness and Impact of Faculty Professional Development (Lawrence C. Ragan and Carol Ann McQuiggan)
ch. 8 The Power of a Collaborative, Collegial Approach to Improving Online Teaching and Learning (Leonard Bogle, Scott Day, Daniel Matthews, and KAren Swan)
ch. 9 Engaging Online Faculty and Administrators in the Assessment Process (Jennifer Stephens-Helm, Karan Powell, and Julie Atwood)
ch. 10 Disability and Accessibility: Proactive Strategies to Improve Quality (Barbara A. Frey and Lorna R. Kearns)
ch. 11 Assuring Quality for an Expanding Population of Culturally Diverse Students (Kay Shattuck, Jennifer A. Linder-VanBerschot, Janice Maloney Migh, Carrie Main, and Donlad Black)

Part Three: Processes for Assuring Quality at Resource and Program Levels
ch. 12 Ethics Matters: Assuring Quality at the Academic Program Level (Melody M. Thompson and Gary W. Kuhne)
ch. 13 Academic Advising: A Link to a Quality Experience for Students (Heather L. Chakiris)
ch. 14 Learning Analytics: A Tool for Quality Assurance ( Phillip Ice, Mellissa Layne, and Wallace Boston)
ch. 15 Using Principles of Knowledge Management for Educational Quality Assurance ( Sebastian Diaz, Wallace Boston, Melissa LAyne , and Phillip Ice)
ch. 16 An Adaptive Model for Calculating Contact Hours in Distance-Education Courses (Karan Powell, Jennifer Stephens-Helm, Melissa Layne, and Phillip Ice)
ch. 17 The Role and Realities of Accreditation: A Practical Guide for Programs and Institutions Preparing for an Accreditation Visit (Susan Biro, Christine Mullins, and Jean Runyon)

Part Four: Final Thoughts
ch. 18 Saying “Quality Assurance” When We Mean Something Else (Julie Porosky Hamlin)
ch. 19 Bumblebees Can’t Fly! (John Sener)

Editor and Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
Describes an online writing course for adult learners. Argues that adult learners have different needs than “traditional 18-22-year olds” in online spaces. Discusses the importance of creating online community for adult learners. Stresses the differences in faculty workload in teaching online courses rather than providing face-to-face instruction.
Additional Info:
Describes an online writing course for adult learners. Argues that adult learners have different needs than “traditional 18-22-year olds” in online spaces. Discusses the importance of creating online community for adult learners. Stresses the differences in faculty workload in teaching online courses rather than providing face-to-face instruction.
Additional Info:
A site to build interactive video teaching lessons. Ideal for online teaching. Build and share interactive video lessons. Time-link student activities as lecture progresses.
Additional Info:
A site to build interactive video teaching lessons. Ideal for online teaching. Build and share interactive video lessons. Time-link student activities as lecture progresses.
Additional Info:
Frost and Stommel capture a 14-minute YouTubevideo of a collaborative writing session on Google Docs (now Google Drive). In the accompanying blog post, they offer suggestions for assigning collaborative writing to students, along with persuasive arguments about the pedagogical goods of collaborative writing.
Additional Info:
Frost and Stommel capture a 14-minute YouTubevideo of a collaborative writing session on Google Docs (now Google Drive). In the accompanying blog post, they offer suggestions for assigning collaborative writing to students, along with persuasive arguments about the pedagogical goods of collaborative writing.
Additional Info:
For this piece, at least half of the action is in the comments section. The author, a long advocate of online student collaborative writing, finds himself "sick of student blogging." He carefully describes the several kinds of student blogging he has assigned in the past, and turns the question over to his commenters: What might he do to "reignite [his] sense of discovery and excitement about student blogging"?
Additional Info:
For this piece, at least half of the action is in the comments section. The author, a long advocate of online student collaborative writing, finds himself "sick of student blogging." He carefully describes the several kinds of student blogging he has assigned in the past, and turns the question over to his commenters: What might he do to "reignite [his] sense of discovery and excitement about student blogging"?
Additional Info:
In an attempt to build a better "intensive course," Torma "does the math" on credit hours, student-directed learning, and instructor-directed learning. This piece provides a helpful framework for anyone working through "seat hour" issues regarding fully online courses, blended/hybrid courses, face-to-face "intensives," or other game-changing learning contexts.
Additional Info:
In an attempt to build a better "intensive course," Torma "does the math" on credit hours, student-directed learning, and instructor-directed learning. This piece provides a helpful framework for anyone working through "seat hour" issues regarding fully online courses, blended/hybrid courses, face-to-face "intensives," or other game-changing learning contexts.
Additional Info:
This pdf is an entire 200 page book published by Parlor Press, Anderson, South Carolina 2014). It contains twenty-three chapters, by different authors, exploring the benefits and disadvantages of the recent educational phenomenon known as Massive Open Online Courses (acronym, MOOC). 
Additional Info:
This pdf is an entire 200 page book published by Parlor Press, Anderson, South Carolina 2014). It contains twenty-three chapters, by different authors, exploring the benefits and disadvantages of the recent educational phenomenon known as Massive Open Online Courses (acronym, MOOC). 

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Building on the Tradition of CCK08 (Charles Lowe)

ch. 1 MOOCology 1.0 (Glenna L. Decker)
ch. 2 Framing Questions about MOOCs and Writing Courses (James E. Porter)
ch. 3 A MOOC or Not a MOOC: ds106 - Questions the Form (Alan Levine)
ch. 4 Why We Are Thinking About MOOCs (Jeffrey T. Grabill)
ch. 5 The Hidden Costs of MOOCs (Karen Head)
ch. 6 Coursera: Fifty Ways to Fix the Software (with apologies to Paul Simon) (Laura Gibbs)
ch. 7 Being Present in a University Writing Course: A Case Against MOOCs (Bob Samuels)
ch. 8 Another Colonialist Tool? (Aaron Barlow)
ch. 9 MOOCversations: Commonplaces as Argument (Jeff Rice)
ch. 10 MOOC Feedback: Pleasing All the People? (Jeremy Knox, Jen Ross, Christine Sinclair, Hamish Macleod, and Siân Bayne)
ch. 11 More Questions than Answers: Scratching at the Surface of MOOCs in Higher Education (Jacqueline Kauza) ch. 12 Those Moot MOOCs: My MOOC Experience (Melissa Syapin)
ch. 13 MOOC Assigned (Steven D. Krause)
ch. 14 Learning How to Teach ... Differently: Extracts from a MOOC Instructor’s Journal (Denise K. Comer)
ch. 15 MOOC as Threat and Promise (Edward M. White)
ch. 16 A MOOC With a View: How MOOCs Encourage Us to Reexamine Pedagogical Doxa (Kay Halasek, Ben McCorkle, Cynthia L. Selfe, Scott Lloyd DeWitt, Susan Delagrange, Jennifer Michaels, and Kaitlin Clinnin)
ch. 17 Putting the U in MOOCs: The Importance of Usability in Course Design (Heather Noel Young)
ch. 18 “I open at the close”: A Post-MOOC Meta-Happening Reflection and What I’m Going to Do About That (Elizabeth D. Woodworth)
ch. 19 Here a MOOC, There a MOOC (Nick Carbone)
ch. 20 Writing and Learning with Feedback Machines (Alexander Reid)
ch. 21 Learning Many-to-Many: The Best Case for Writing in Digital Environments (Bill Hart-Davidson)
ch. 22 After the Invasion: What’s Next for MOOCs? (Steven D. Krause)

Contributors
Index
Web cover image

Moodle

Web
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Course Management System (CMS) that helps you create an on-line learning site.
Additional Info:
Course Management System (CMS) that helps you create an on-line learning site.
Additional Info:
Great for student group-work projects. Share docs, have virtual meetings, share calendar, send emails, and create websites all through this one site.
Additional Info:
Great for student group-work projects. Share docs, have virtual meetings, share calendar, send emails, and create websites all through this one site.
Additional Info:
Doe Daughtrey talks to Kevin Whitesides about online communications technologies that provide new opportunities and challenges for the creation of alternative learning environments and how they differ in significant ways from traditional face-to-face environments.
Additional Info:
Doe Daughtrey talks to Kevin Whitesides about online communications technologies that provide new opportunities and challenges for the creation of alternative learning environments and how they differ in significant ways from traditional face-to-face environments.
Tactics cover image

Critical Thinking with Sally Student

Tactic
Ayayo, Karelynne
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 3 (2014): 221
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 3
Topics: Online Learning   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: teaching critical thinking skills by interpreting real-life ethical issues.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: teaching critical thinking skills by interpreting real-life ethical issues.
Tactics cover image

Option-Based Final Projects for Creative Online Learners

Tactic
Conley, Aaron D.
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 3 (2014): 222
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 3
Topics: Online Learning   |   Learning Designs   |   Student Portfolios

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: final projects for an online course.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: final projects for an online course.
Tactics cover image

Creating Knowledge in Hybrid Format

Tactic
Withrow, Lisa
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 3 (2014): 225
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 3
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Online Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: student preparation of reading material to increase comprehension and engagement with each other and the topic.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: student preparation of reading material to increase comprehension and engagement with each other and the topic.
Tactics cover image

Making the Online Classroom Feel Like a “Classroom”

Tactic
Strickland, Michael
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 3 (2014): 226
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 3
Topics: Online Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: encouraging more thoughtful engagement with online discussion boards.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: encouraging more thoughtful engagement with online discussion boards.
TTR cover image

Forum: A New Culture of Learning

TTR
Hess, Mary E.; Gallagher, Eugene V.; and Turpin, Katherine
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 3 (2014): 227-246
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 3
Topics: Online Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
These brief essays by Mary Hess, Eugene Gallagher, and Katherine Turpin are solicited responses from three different contexts to the provocative book by Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown, The New Culture of Learning (2011). Mary Hess writes from a seminary context, providing a critical summary of the authors' major concepts and their ramifications, positive and negative, for theological education and the church. Eugene Gallagher writes from a liberal arts setting, ...
Additional Info:
These brief essays by Mary Hess, Eugene Gallagher, and Katherine Turpin are solicited responses from three different contexts to the provocative book by Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown, The New Culture of Learning (2011). Mary Hess writes from a seminary context, providing a critical summary of the authors' major concepts and their ramifications, positive and negative, for theological education and the church. Eugene Gallagher writes from a liberal arts setting, identifying characteristics of the face-to-face classroom that would go missing in a careless adoption of online learning environments. Finally, Katherine Turpin reports from the classroom, chronicling her experience in a course she redesigned for a graduate theological setting to employ some of the authors' pedagogical principles and strategies. Together, these responses offer critical appreciation and constructive critique of the work Thomas and Seely Brown have done – and point the conversation forward.
TTR cover image

Virtual Empathy? Anxieties and Connections Teaching and Learning Pastoral Care Online

TTR
Sharp, Melinda McGarrah; and Morris, Mary Ann
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 3 (2014): 247-263
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 3
Topics: Online Learning   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Is it possible to teach pastoral care online? McGarrah Sharp and Morris describe their process of transforming a residential on-campus pastoral care course into the first online offering of the course at their seminary. They begin by describing a series of pedagogical choices made with the intent of facilitating dynamic movement between peer-to-peer, small group, and whole class discussions throughout the semester. Before and during the course, anxieties arose at ...
Additional Info:
Is it possible to teach pastoral care online? McGarrah Sharp and Morris describe their process of transforming a residential on-campus pastoral care course into the first online offering of the course at their seminary. They begin by describing a series of pedagogical choices made with the intent of facilitating dynamic movement between peer-to-peer, small group, and whole class discussions throughout the semester. Before and during the course, anxieties arose at many levels of instruction for the professor, teaching assistant, and students. Anecdotes and examples from the online course show how the online course design and facilitation was able to name and respond to anxieties as part of integrating pastoral care course content and practice – a key learning goal for the course. The authors are persuaded that online pedagogy can help identify how anxieties create space for developing empathy as much, if not more than, a traditional on-campus format.
TTR cover image

A Begrudging, Recalcitrant Academic Observes What She's Learning: Distance Learning in Leadership Formation

TTR
Hess, Lisa M.
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 3 (2014): 264-271
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 3
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Neither advocacy nor condemnation of distance learning, this essay offers observations and critical reflection on four years' longitudinal engagement with distance learning pedagogies for formation in higher theological education. Instead, readers are invited to curiosity, communal-institutional discernment, and intense ambivalence. Theological, pedagogical, contextual, and ethical concerns are examined, as well as potential opportunities for innovation amidst age-old practical theological challenges. A moral imperative emerges for those within and outside historic ...
Additional Info:
Neither advocacy nor condemnation of distance learning, this essay offers observations and critical reflection on four years' longitudinal engagement with distance learning pedagogies for formation in higher theological education. Instead, readers are invited to curiosity, communal-institutional discernment, and intense ambivalence. Theological, pedagogical, contextual, and ethical concerns are examined, as well as potential opportunities for innovation amidst age-old practical theological challenges. A moral imperative emerges for those within and outside historic faith traditions, and some plausible impacts on educational and communal life are explored, especially faculty grief.
Additional Info:
A multi-page tutorial from Virginia Commonwealth University’s Center for Teaching Excellence, to help you rethink your teaching for effective online teaching. Topics include: course design, teaching practices, managing online classes, and assessment.
Additional Info:
A multi-page tutorial from Virginia Commonwealth University’s Center for Teaching Excellence, to help you rethink your teaching for effective online teaching. Topics include: course design, teaching practices, managing online classes, and assessment.
Additional Info:
Annual list of software, online learning tools, apps, and other technology used in teaching. Compiled by Jane Hart from the votes of learning professionals worldwide. Some are obvious. Some are obscure. Includes brief overviews of each tool.
Additional Info:
Annual list of software, online learning tools, apps, and other technology used in teaching. Compiled by Jane Hart from the votes of learning professionals worldwide. Some are obvious. Some are obscure. Includes brief overviews of each tool.
Additional Info:
Highly accessible list, with several paragraphs to flesh out and develop each item, and a brief bibliography at the end. 
Additional Info:
Highly accessible list, with several paragraphs to flesh out and develop each item, and a brief bibliography at the end. 
Additional Info:
University of Tennessee (Knoxville) site with a “course design chart” to guide you through the instructional design steps of analyzing, designing, developing delivering, and evaluating an online course. Plus a compendium of teaching tools and a glossary of definitions.
Additional Info:
University of Tennessee (Knoxville) site with a “course design chart” to guide you through the instructional design steps of analyzing, designing, developing delivering, and evaluating an online course. Plus a compendium of teaching tools and a glossary of definitions.
Additional Info:
A user-friendly and practical tool to assist faculty in planning and implementing online courses. Based on the principles of teaching and learning proposed by Chickering & Gamson (1987): Student-Faculty Contact, Cooperation Among Students, Active Learning, Prompt Feedback, Time on Task, High Expectations, and Diverse Talents and Ways of Learning. 
Additional Info:
A user-friendly and practical tool to assist faculty in planning and implementing online courses. Based on the principles of teaching and learning proposed by Chickering & Gamson (1987): Student-Faculty Contact, Cooperation Among Students, Active Learning, Prompt Feedback, Time on Task, High Expectations, and Diverse Talents and Ways of Learning. 
Cover image

Theory and Practice of Online Learning

Book
Anderson, Terry; and Elloumi, Faithi, eds.
2014
Athabasca University, 2004
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
Useful tools for online instruction, but also theory, administration, and methods of design. The contents of the entire book is available free online through pdf download. 
Additional Info:
Useful tools for online instruction, but also theory, administration, and methods of design. The contents of the entire book is available free online through pdf download. 

Table Of Content:
Contributing Authors
Foreword (Dominique Abrioux)
Introduction (Terry Anderson & Fathi Elloumi)

Part 1 - Role and Function of Theory in Online Education Development and Delivery
ch. 1 Foundations of Educational Theory for Online Learning (Mohamed Ally)
ch. 2 Toward a Theory of Online Learning (Terry Anderson)
ch. 3 Value Chain Analysis: A Strategic Approach to Online Learning (Fathi Elloumi)

Part 2 - Infrastructure and Support for Content Development
ch. 4 Developing an Infrastructure for Online Learning (Alan Davis)
ch. 5 Technologies of Online Learning (e-Learning) (Rory McGreal & Michael Elliott)
ch. 6 Media Characteristics and Online Learning Technology (Patrick J. Fahy)

Part 3 - Design and Development of Online Courses
ch. 7 The Development of Online Courses (Dean Caplan)
ch. 8 Developing Team Skills and Accomplishing Team Projects Online (Deborah C. Hurst & Janice Thomas)
ch. 9 Copyright Issues in Online Courses: A Moment in Time (Lori-Ann Claerhout)
ch. 10 Value Added—The Editor in Design and Development of Online Courses (Jan Thiessen & Vince Ambrock)

Part 4 - Delivery, Quality Control, and Student Support of Online Courses
ch. 11 Teaching in an Online Learning Context (Terry Anderson)
ch. 12 Call Centers in Distance Education (Andrew Woudstra, Colleen Huber, & Kerri Michalczuk)
ch. 13 Supporting Asynchronous Discussions among Online Learners (Joram Ngwenya, David Annand & Eric Wang)
ch. 14 Library Support for Online Learners: e-Resources, e-Services, and the Human Factors (Kay Johnson, Houda Trabelsi, & Tony Tin)
ch. 15 Supporting the Online Learner (Judith A. Hughes)
ch. 16 The Quality Dilemma in Online Education (Nancy K. Parker)
Journal cover image

Translating Religion Courses to an Online Format: Introduction

Journal Issue
Posman, Ellen, and Locklin, Reid B., eds.
2013
Spotlight on Teaching, May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. In this issue of Spotlight, contributors suggest that the shift to online education involves a complex process of translation. Not unlike language translation, translation from traditional educational models to online environments requires a greater or lesser reconceptualization of education itself. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. In this issue of Spotlight, contributors suggest that the shift to online education involves a complex process of translation. Not unlike language translation, translation from traditional educational models to online environments requires a greater or lesser reconceptualization of education itself. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Translating Religion Courses to an Online Format: Introduction (Ellen Posman, and Reid B. Locklin)
ch. 2 Rethinking Online Education (Sandie Gravett)
ch. 3 Introducing Religion to Cyberstudents (Erica Hurwitz Andrus)
ch. 4 Diversity in Online Education (Andrew T. Arroyo)
ch. 5 Hybrid or Blended Teaching Formats: What and Why (John T. Strong)
ch. 6 Dancing Online with Your Students (Marla J. Selvidge)
ch. 7 The Challenge of Online Education (John Baumann)
ch. 8 The Internet Is Not a Classroom: Online Education and the Challenges of Socialization (Annie Blazer, and Brandi Denison)
ch. 9 Navigating the Sea of Cyberspace (Justin Arft)
ch. 10 Translating Religion Courses to an Online Format: Suggested Resources
Cover image

Minds Online: Teaching Effectively with Technology

Book
Miller, Michelle D.
2014
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB1028.5.M548 2014
Topics: Online Learning   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: From wired campuses to smart classrooms to massive open online courses (MOOCs), digital technology is now firmly embedded in higher education. But the dizzying pace of innovation, combined with a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of new tools and programs, challenges educators to articulate how technology can best fit into the learning experience. Minds Online is a concise, nontechnical guide for academic ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: From wired campuses to smart classrooms to massive open online courses (MOOCs), digital technology is now firmly embedded in higher education. But the dizzying pace of innovation, combined with a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of new tools and programs, challenges educators to articulate how technology can best fit into the learning experience. Minds Online is a concise, nontechnical guide for academic leaders and instructors who seek to advance learning in this changing environment, through a sound scientific understanding of how the human brain assimilates knowledge.

Drawing on the latest findings from neuroscience and cognitive psychology, Michelle Miller explores how attention, memory, and higher thought processes such as critical thinking and analytical reasoning can be enhanced through technology-aided approaches. The techniques she describes promote retention of course material through frequent low‐stakes testing and practice, and help prevent counterproductive cramming by encouraging better spacing of study. Online activities also help students become more adept with cognitive aids, such as analogies, that allow them to apply learning across situations and disciplines. Miller guides instructors through the process of creating a syllabus for a cognitively optimized, fully online course. She presents innovative ideas for how to use multimedia effectively, how to take advantage of learners’ existing knowledge, and how to motivate students to do their best work and complete the course.

For a generation born into the Internet age, educational technology designed with the brain in mind offers a natural pathway to the pleasures and rewards of deep learning, (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Is Online Learning Here to Stay?
ch. 2 Online Learning: Does It Work?
ch. 3 The Psychology of Computing
ch. 4 Attention
ch. 5 Memory
ch. 6 Thinking
ch. 7 Incorporating Multimedia Effectively
ch. 8 Motivating Students
ch. 9 Putting It All Together

Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
Cover image

The Teaching Professor, Volume 29, Number 3

Journal Issue
2015
Magna Publications Inc., March
LB1025.3.T436
Topics: Online Learning   |   Adjuncts   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
A Quiz That Promotes Discussion and Active Learning in Large Classes (Patricia L. Stan)
Designing Homework: That Enhances Learning
The Unquiz: An Enjoyable Way to Job Students' Memories
Motivating Students: Highlights from Minds Online
Fun: What Does It Do for Learning?
A Cover Letter Responding to Feedback
Active Learning: Endorsed but Not Used
Clickers or Hand Raising?
A Blog Assignment with Results
Cover image

Teaching Online: A Guide to Theory, Research, and Practice

Book
Major, Claire Howell
2015
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB1044.87.M245 2015
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: It is difficult to imagine a college class today that does not include some online component—whether a simple posting of a syllabus to course management software, the use of social media for communication, or a full-blown course offering through a MOOC platform. In Teaching Online, Claire Howell Major describes for college faculty the changes that accompany use of such technologies and offers ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: It is difficult to imagine a college class today that does not include some online component—whether a simple posting of a syllabus to course management software, the use of social media for communication, or a full-blown course offering through a MOOC platform. In Teaching Online, Claire Howell Major describes for college faculty the changes that accompany use of such technologies and offers real-world strategies for surmounting digital teaching challenges.

Teaching with these evolving media requires instructors to alter the ways in which they conceive of and do their work, according to Major. They must frequently update their knowledge of learning, teaching, and media, and they need to develop new forms of instruction, revise and reconceptualize classroom materials, and refresh their communication patterns. Faculty teaching online must also reconsider the student experience and determine what changes for students ultimately mean for their own work and for their institutions.

Teaching Online presents instructors with a thoughtful synthesis of educational theory, research, and practice as well as a review of strategies for managing the instructional changes involved in teaching online. In addition, this book presents examples of best practices from successful online instructors as well as cutting-edge ideas from leading scholars and educational technologists. Faculty members, researchers, instructional designers, students, administrators, and policy makers who engage with online learning will find this book an invaluable resource. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Teaching Online as Instructional Change
ch. 2 Faculty Knowledge
ch. 3 Views of Learning
ch. 4 Course Structure
ch. 5 Course Planning
ch. 6 Intellectual Property
ch. 7 Instructional Time
ch. 8 Teacher Persona
ch. 9 Communication
ch. 10 Student Rights
ch. 11 Student Engagement
ch. 12 Community

Conclusion
Notes
References
List of Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
A brief list of research findings matched with implications for specific recommended practices for  effective online learning.
Additional Info:
A brief list of research findings matched with implications for specific recommended practices for  effective online learning.
Additional Info:
One of the chief tenets for a successful and engaging online course is the development of an effective system that provides ongoing student interaction. Short essay with concrete suggestions for creating, sustaining, and assessing students’ online threaded discussions.
Additional Info:
One of the chief tenets for a successful and engaging online course is the development of an effective system that provides ongoing student interaction. Short essay with concrete suggestions for creating, sustaining, and assessing students’ online threaded discussions.
Additional Info:
Podcast Series. A podcast exploring conversations of Critical Digital Pedagogy, listening for ways to empower students and champion learning. It’s hosted by Chris Friend from Saint Leo University. It’s the aural side of Hybrid Pedagogy—a digital journal of learning, teaching, and technology.
Additional Info:
Podcast Series. A podcast exploring conversations of Critical Digital Pedagogy, listening for ways to empower students and champion learning. It’s hosted by Chris Friend from Saint Leo University. It’s the aural side of Hybrid Pedagogy—a digital journal of learning, teaching, and technology.
Journal cover image

Assessing Online Learning: Strategies, Challenges and Opportunities

Journal Issue
2009
Magna Publication: Faculty Focus Online Classroom, May
Topics: Online Learning   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
A special report featuring 12 articles from Online Classroom examining methods of online assessment and common assessment mistakes to avoid.
Additional Info:
A special report featuring 12 articles from Online Classroom examining methods of online assessment and common assessment mistakes to avoid.

Table Of Content:
Four Typical Online Learning Assessment Mistakes
Authentic Experiences, Assessment Develop Online Students’ Marketable Skills
Assessing Whether Online Learners Can DO: Aligning Learning Objectives with Real-world Applications
Strategies for Creating Better Multiple-Choice Tests
Assessing Student Leaning Online: It’s More Than Multiple Choice
To Plan Good Online Instruction, Teach to the Test
Using Self-Check Exercises to Assess Online Learning
Assessment for the Millennial Generation
Self-Assessment in Online Writing Course Focuses Students on the Learning Process
Using Online Discussion Forums for Minute Papers
Cover image

Best Practices in Online Program Development: Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Book
King, Elliot; and Alperstein, Neil
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2395.7.K56 2015
Topics: Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Best Practices in Online Program Development is a practical, hands-on guide that provides the concrete strategies that academic and administrative departments within institutions of higher learning need to develop in order to create and maintain coherent and effective online educational programs. Unlike individual courses, an online education program requires a comprehensive, inter-departmental effort to be integrated into the ongoing educational project of a ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Best Practices in Online Program Development is a practical, hands-on guide that provides the concrete strategies that academic and administrative departments within institutions of higher learning need to develop in order to create and maintain coherent and effective online educational programs. Unlike individual courses, an online education program requires a comprehensive, inter-departmental effort to be integrated into the ongoing educational project of a college or university. This book focuses on the:

Integration of online education into the institutional mission
Complex faculty-related issues including recruiting, training, and teaching
Multifaceted support required for student retention and success
Need for multilayered assessment at the course, program, technical, and institutional levels
Challenges posed to governance and by the need to garner resources across the institution
Model to insure ongoing, comprehensive development of online educational programs

Best Practices in Online Program Development covers the above topics and more, giving all the stakeholders in online educational programs the building blocks to foster successful programs while encouraging them to determine what role online education should play in their academic offerings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Series Editor Introduction

ch. 1 The Online Challenge in Higher Education
ch. 2 The First Step Now
ch. 3 Issues and Challenges Facing Faculty
ch. 4 Issues and Challenges Facing Students
ch. 5 Institutional Issues and Challenges
ch. 6 The Generational Model for Online Program Development

Index
Tactics cover image

Establishing Community in Hybrid Courses

Tactic
Johnson, Ella
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 233
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: student activities in the initial face-to-face gathering help establish community in an online course.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: student activities in the initial face-to-face gathering help establish community in an online course.
Cover image

eService-Learning: Creating Experiential Learning and Civic Engagement Through Online and Hybrid Courses

Book
Strait, Jean R.; and Nordyke, Katherine, eds.
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC220.5.E74 2015
Topics: Online Learning   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book serves as an introduction to using online teaching technologies and hybrid forms of teaching for experiential learning and civic engagement. Service-learning has kept pace neither with the rapid growth in e-learning in all its forms nor with the reality that an increasing number of students are learning online without exposure to the benefits of this powerful pedagogy.

Eservice-learning (electronic ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book serves as an introduction to using online teaching technologies and hybrid forms of teaching for experiential learning and civic engagement. Service-learning has kept pace neither with the rapid growth in e-learning in all its forms nor with the reality that an increasing number of students are learning online without exposure to the benefits of this powerful pedagogy.

Eservice-learning (electronic service-learning) combines service-learning and on-line learning and enables the delivery of the instruction and/or the service to occur partially or fully online. Eservice-learning allows students anywhere, regardless of geography, physical constraints, work schedule, or other access limitations, to experience service-learning. It reciprocally also equips online learning with a powerful tool for engaging students.

In eservice-learning, the core components of service, learning, and reflection may take a different form due to the online medium—for example, reflection often occurs through discussion board interactions, journals, wikis, or blogs in an eservice-learning course. Moreover, the service, though still community-based, creates a world of opportunities to connect students with communities across the globe—as well as at their very own doorstep.

This book introduces the reader to the four emerging types of eservice-learning, from Extreme EService-Learning (XE-SL) classes where 100% of the instruction and 100% of the service occur online, to three distinct forms of hybrid where either the service or the instruction are delivered wholly on-line – with students, for instance, providing online products for far-away community partners – or in which both are delivered on-site and online. It considers the instructional potential of common mobile technologies – phones, tablets and mobile reading devices. The authors also address potential limitations, such as technology challenges, difficulties sustaining three-way communication among the instructor, community partner, and students, and added workload.

The book includes research studies on effectiveness as well as examples of practice such drafting grants for a community partner, an informational technology class building online communities for an autism group, and an online education class providing virtual mentoring to at-risk students in New Orleans from across the country. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreward (Andrew Furco)
Acknowledgements (Katherine Nordyke and Jean Strait)
Introduction (Katherine Nordyke)

Part I: Essentials/Components / Nuts and Bolts of eService-Learning
ch. 1 Pedagogy of Civic Engagement, High Impact Practices, and eService-learning (Jean Strait, Jane Turk and Katherine Nordyke)
ch. 2 eService-Learning: Breaking Through the Barrier (Leora Waldner)
ch. 3 Developing an eService-learning Course (Katherine Nordyke)
ch. 4 Supporting eService-Learning Through Technology (Jean Strait)

Part II: Models of eService-Learning
ch. 5 Hybrid I: Missouri State University Embraces eService-learning (Katherine Nordyke)
ch. 6 Hybrid II: A Model Design for Web Development (Pauline Mosley)
ch. 7 Hybrid III: Each One Teach One Lessons from the Storm (Jean Strait)
ch. 8 Hybrid IV: Extreme eService-learning: Online Service-Learning in an Online Course (Sue McGorry)
ch. 9 Mixed Hybrid: Investigating the Influence of Online Components on Service-Learning Outcomes at the University of Georgia Hybrid I and III E-Service-Learning (Paul Matthews)

Part III: Next Steps and Future Directions
ch. 10 Community Engagement and Technology for a More Relevant Higher Education (John Hamerlinck)
ch. 11 Conclusions and Future Directions (Jean Strait)

Editors and Contributors
Index
Cover image

Culture and Online Learning: Global Perspectives and Research

Book
Jung, Insung; and Gunawardena, Charlotte Nirmalani, eds.
2014
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC5803.C65 C85 2014
Topics: Online Learning   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
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Abstract: Culture plays an overarching role that impacts investment, planning, design, development, delivery, and the learning outcomes of online education. This groundbreaking book remedies a dearth of empirical research on how digital cultures and teaching and learning cultures intersect, and offers grounded theory and practical guidance on how to integrate cultural needs and sensibilities with the innovative opportunities offered by online learning.

...
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Abstract: Culture plays an overarching role that impacts investment, planning, design, development, delivery, and the learning outcomes of online education. This groundbreaking book remedies a dearth of empirical research on how digital cultures and teaching and learning cultures intersect, and offers grounded theory and practical guidance on how to integrate cultural needs and sensibilities with the innovative opportunities offered by online learning.

This book provides a unique analysis of culture in online education from a global perspective, and offers:

* An overview of the influences that culture has on teaching, online learning, and technology

* Culture-sensitive instructional design strategies and teaching guidelines for online instructors and trainers

* Facilitation and support strategies for online learners from different cultures

* An overview on issues of design, development, communication, and support from a cross-cultural perspective

* An overview of how online education is perceived, planned, implemented, and evaluated differently in various cultural contexts

Written by international experts in the field of online learning, this text constitutes with a comprehensive comparative introduction to the role of culture in online education. It offers essential guidance for practitioners, researchers, instructors, and anyone working with online students from around the world.

This text is also appropriate for graduate-level Educational Technology and Comparative and International Learning programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Foreword (Michael Grahame Moore)

ch. 1 Perspectives on Culture and Online Learning (Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena and Insung Jung)
ch. 2 Cultural Influences on Online Learning (Insung Jung)
ch. 3 Culture and Technology (Insung Jung)
ch. 4 Online Identity and Interaction (Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena)
ch. 5 Emerging Visual Culture in Online Learning Environments (Ilju Rha)
ch. 6 Accounting for Culture in Instructional Design (Casey Frechette, Ludmila C. Layne, and Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena)
ch. 7 Facilitating Online Learning and Cross-Cultural E-Mentoring (Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena and Buddhini Gayathri Jayatilleke)
ch. 8 Supporting Diverse Online Learners (Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena)
ch. 9 Diversity in Expectations of Quality and Assessment (Albert Sangrà, Stella Porto, and Insung Jung)
ch. 10 Developing Global Digital Citizens: A Professional Development Model (Chih-Hsiung Tu and Marina Stock McIsaac)
ch. 11 Leadership Challenges in Transcultural Online Education (Michael F. Beaudoin)
ch. 12 Gender Issues in Online Learning (Colin Latchem)
ch. 13 Transformative Learning Through Cultural Exchanges in Online Foreign Language Teaching (Kerrin Ann Barrett)
ch. 14 International Interpretations of Icons and Images Used in North American Academic Websites (Eliot Knight, Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena, Elena Barbera, and Cengiz Hakan Aydin)
ch. 15 An Analysis of Culture-Focused Articles in Open, Distance, and Online Education Journals (Aisha S. Al-Harthi)
ch. 16 Many Faces of Confucian Culture: Asian Learners’ Perceptions of Quality Distance Education (Li Chen, Xinyi Shen, Aya Fukuda, and Insung Jung)
ch. 17 Looking Ahead: A Cultural Approach to Research and Practice in Online Learning (Insung Jung and Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena)

About the Editors and Contributors
Index
Cover image

MOOCs, High Technology, and Higher Learning

Book
Rhoads, Robert A.
2015
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB1044.87.R495 2015
Topics: Online Learning

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Character Formation in Online Education: A Guide for Instructors, Administrators, and Accrediting Agencies

Book
Jung, Joanne J.
2015
Zondervan, Grand Rapids, MI
LB1044.87.J845 2015
Topics: Online Learning   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
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Abstract: The unfortunate reputation of online education today is one of little or no effort on the professor's part and little or no learning on the student's part. A missing element in much online education is the kind of mutual engagement between student and instructor that provides not only a higher level of learning but also lasting character formation within the student.

...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: The unfortunate reputation of online education today is one of little or no effort on the professor's part and little or no learning on the student's part. A missing element in much online education is the kind of mutual engagement between student and instructor that provides not only a higher level of learning but also lasting character formation within the student.

Character Formation in Online Education stems from author Joanne Jung's years of experience teaching online courses with the aim of improving the teaching environment for professors and the learning environment for students. By replicating, customizing, and incorporating the best and most effective practices of what a great professor does in on-campus classes, reimagined for an online delivery system, Jung shows how a higher level of learning and transformation can be achieved through online learning communities.

Handy and practical, this user-friendly book provides guidance, helpful tools, and effective suggestions for growing learning communities in online courses that are marked by character growth in students—the kind of growth that is central to the mission of Christian higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
To the Reader
Foreword by David Nystrom
Introduction: Rising to the Challenge

Part One: Rising to the Challenge
ch. 1 Log On to Learn: Inspiring Students through and Online Course
ch. 2 Charting a Course: Basics to Developing an Online Course
ch. 3 Partnerships That Deliver: Tag-Teaming with a Course Designer

Part Two: Elements of Online Character Formation
ch. 4 Taking Online Classroom Technology to Greater Depths: The Heart and Community
ch. 5 Conversation Friendly: Collaborative Learning Tools
ch. 6 Premium Blend: The Hybrid Course
ch. 7 But I Teach Math! Integrating Faith and Learning
ch. 8 Social Media: Forming Character with 140 Characters

Part Three: Building Better Outcomes
ch. 9 Assessment: It’s about Stewardship

Appendix A: Coming to Terms with Terms
Appendix B: iFLIP catalog
Gratitudes
Notes
Cover image

Issues in Distance Education: New Directions for Higher Education, Number 173

Book
Andrade, Maureen Snow
2016
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5800.I87 2016
Topics: Online Learning

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Abstract: In this environment of disruptive technological change, higher education institutions must determine whether they will develop and offer technology-supported, hybrid, or online courses and degrees, which courses and degrees, how many, for whom, and for what purpose. They must make decisions about development models and design, processes, costs, and student and faculty support.

In this volume, the authors explore the current ...
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Abstract: In this environment of disruptive technological change, higher education institutions must determine whether they will develop and offer technology-supported, hybrid, or online courses and degrees, which courses and degrees, how many, for whom, and for what purpose. They must make decisions about development models and design, processes, costs, and student and faculty support.

In this volume, the authors explore the current and future practice of distance education in higher education institutions, including:

- developing an initial infrastructure to support course design and development,
- revitalizing existing structures and processes for distance education, and
- cutting-edge practices that innovate and lead the field.

These topics help guide decision makers as they determine appropriate responses to distance learning opportunities.

This is the 173rd volume of the Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Higher Education. Addressed to presidents, vice presidents, deans, and other higher education decision makers on all kinds of campuses, it provides timely information and authoritative advice about major issues and administrative problems confronting every institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Maureen Snow Andrade)

ch. 1 Issues in Distance Education: A Primer for Higher Education Decision Makers (Michael Beaudoin)
This chapter presents an overview of current issues related to distance learning in higher education. It identifies central questions, issues, challenges, and opportunities that must be addressed by decision makers, as well as key attributes of effective leaders.

ch. 2 Theories of Distance Education: Why They Matter (Farhad Saba)
This chapter presents an overview of theories of distance education and discusses their implications for future policy making and practice in institutions of higher education.

ch. 3 Effective Organizational Structures and Processes: Addressing Issues of Change (Maureen Snow Andrade)
This chapter describes organizational structures and processes at the institutional and project levels for the development and support of distance learning initiatives. It addresses environmental and stakeholder issues and explores principles and strategies of effective leadership for change creation and management.

ch. 4 The Course Development Plan: Macro-Level Decisions and Micro-Level Processes (Karen Franker, Dennis James)
A key step in distance learning project management is the creation of a course development plan. The plan should account for decisions related to materials, curriculum, delivery methods, staffing, technology applications, resources, reporting lines, and project management—issues that may require administrator involvement and support, particularly for evolving distance learning programs.

ch. 5 Writing Materials: Insights Into Course Design and Writing Processes (Aubrey Olsen Bronson)
This chapter explores how course designers and content writers engage with each other, develop materials, and determine a design model, course components, and supporting technology.

ch. 6 Learner and Faculty Support (Sharon Guan, Daniel Stanford)
This chapter identifies effective ways to address learner and faculty support. It introduces methods for building a successful learner support system by providing sufficient resources and proactively addressing learner motivation. It also addresses effective faculty support through institutional policies, resources, training, and course development.

ch. 7 Global Expansion and English Language Learning (Maureen Snow Andrade)
Demand for higher education is global. As institutions extend opportunities beyond their borders, English language proficiency must be considered. This chapter focuses on considerations related to global expansion, with an emphasis on the role of distance English language courses and the distinct considerations in their development.

8. Innovation and Global eLearning: A Case Study at Brigham Young University–Idaho (Alan L. Young)
This chapter provides a case study of innovation using online learning in higher education. The case study shows how one university made system-wide organizational and procedural changes to create low-cost, open-access distance learning opportunities on a global level in response to student needs and opportunities.

9. On the Cutting Edge: Movements and Institutional Examples of Technological Disruption (Marjorie Roth Leon, Todd Alan Price)
This chapter describes technological disruptions in higher education that pose challenges and offer opportunities to college and university students, faculty, and administrators. It provides examples of innovative responses being explored by 2-year and 4-year higher education institutions.

Index
Cover image

Visual Design for Online Learning

Book
Davis, Torria
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1044.87.D384 2015
Topics: Online Learning

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Abstract: Update the visual design of your course in pedagogically sound ways

Visual Design for Online Learning spotlights the role that visual elements play in the online learning environment. Written for both new and experienced instructors, the book guides you in adding pedagogically relevant visual design elements that contribute to effective learning practices. The text builds upon three conceptual frameworks: active learning, ...
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Abstract: Update the visual design of your course in pedagogically sound ways

Visual Design for Online Learning spotlights the role that visual elements play in the online learning environment. Written for both new and experienced instructors, the book guides you in adding pedagogically relevant visual design elements that contribute to effective learning practices. The text builds upon three conceptual frameworks: active learning, multiple intelligences, and universal design for learning. This resource explores critical issues such as copyright, technology tools, and accessibility and includes examples from top Blackboard practitioners which are applicable to any LMS. Ultimately, the author guides you in developing effective visual elements that will support your teaching goals while reinforcing the learning materials you share with your students.

There has been a steady increase of over 10% in online enrollment for higher education institutions since 2002, yet the visual look of online courses has not changed significantly in the last ten years. Adapting to the needs of students within online classes is critical to guiding your students toward success—and the right visual elements can play an integral role in your students' ability to learn and retain the information they need to thrive in their chosen programs. In fact, visual elements have been shown to increase student participation, engagement, and success in an online course.

- Leverage the best practices employed by exemplary Blackboard practitioners
- Explore three foundational conceptual frameworks: active learning, multiple intelligences, and universal design for learning
- Increase student retention and success

Visual Design for Online Learning is an essential reference for all online educators--both new and experienced. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

ch. 1 How Do I Begin?
ch. 2 How Do I Include Images and Video?
ch. 3 How Do I Facilitate Instruction and Interaction?
ch. 4 How Do I Integrate Multimedia?
ch. 5 How Do I Visually Design a Course?
ch. 6 How Do I Support Learners Online?

Appendix A: Syllabus Review Script
Appendix B: Course Welcome and Orientation Script
References
Index
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The Blended Course Design Workbook: A Practical Guide

Book
Linder, Kathryn E.
2017
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1028.5.L56 2017
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

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Blended (also called hybrid) classrooms, in which face-to-face interaction is intentionally combined with online activities to aid student learning, are becoming more and more common. Most recently, “flipped” classrooms have become a popular method for teaching because more time for active learning in-class can be gained by moving content delivery such as lecture to outside-of-class homework using technology tools such as video or lecture ...
Additional Info:
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Blended (also called hybrid) classrooms, in which face-to-face interaction is intentionally combined with online activities to aid student learning, are becoming more and more common. Most recently, “flipped” classrooms have become a popular method for teaching because more time for active learning in-class can be gained by moving content delivery such as lecture to outside-of-class homework using technology tools such as video or lecture capture. The blended model is proving to be an environment that provides more self-directed, technology-mediated learning experiences for students who will be incorporating technology more and more into their professional lives post-college.

The Blended Course Design Workbook meets the need for a user-friendly resource that provides faculty members and administrators with instructions, activities, tools, templates, and deadlines to guide them through the process of revising their traditional face-to-face course into a blended format.

Providing a step-by-step course design process that emphasizes active learning and student engagement, this book will help instructors adapt traditional face-to-face courses to a blended environment by guiding them through the development of course goals and learning objectives, assignments, assessments, and student support mechanisms with technology integration in mind. It will also help instructors choose the right technologies based on an instructor’s comfort level with technology and their specific pedagogical needs. The book will help each instructor who uses the text to develop a unique course by making choices about their course design based on student learning needs for their chosen topic and discipline. Every component of the workbook has been piloted with faculty designing and implementing blended courses and then revised to better meet the needs of faculty across a range of comfort levels with technology use.

The Blended Course Design Workbook includes detailed instructions for each stage of course design alongside specific activities that the reader can complete. The book is unique because it facilitates a step-by-step process for blended course design with specific templates and tools that can be used across disciplines. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Tables, Figures and Boxes
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Why Blended, Why Now?
ch. 1 Fundamentals of Blended Teaching and Learning
ch. 2 Writing Course Goals and Learning Objectives--With Danny Fontaine
ch. 3 Assessing Student Learning in Your Blended Course
ch. 4 Online Assessment Tools--With Linda Bruenjes
ch. 5 Designing Effective Learning Activities
ch. 6 Mapping Your Blended Course
ch. 7 Getting to Know Your Learning Management System--With Sarah Smith
ch. 8 Creating Social Presence in Your Blended Course--With Victoria Wallace
ch. 9 Finding Resources Online
ch. 10 Creating Multimedia Resources
ch. 11 Mobile Devices, Apps, and Social Media--With Victoria Wallace
ch. 12 The Blended Course Syllabus
ch. 13 Preparing Your Students for Success

Conclusion: Getting Ready to Launch
Glossary
Appendices
References
About the Contributors
Index
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

Principles for Effective Asynchronous Online Instruction in Religious Studies

TTR
McGuire, Beverley
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 1 (2017): 28-45
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 1
Topics: Online Learning   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Asynchronous online instruction has become increasingly popular in the field of religious studies. However, despite voluminous research on online learning in general and numerous articles on online theological instruction, there has been little discussion of how to effectively design and deliver online undergraduate courses in religious studies. Drawing on recent research, experiences teaching and learning online, and interviews with colleagues, this paper discusses key principles of effective online instruction. It ...
Additional Info:
Asynchronous online instruction has become increasingly popular in the field of religious studies. However, despite voluminous research on online learning in general and numerous articles on online theological instruction, there has been little discussion of how to effectively design and deliver online undergraduate courses in religious studies. Drawing on recent research, experiences teaching and learning online, and interviews with colleagues, this paper discusses key principles of effective online instruction. It recommends instructors focus on humanizing their course website, “chunking” their course content, making their approach to the study of religion clear, structuring and monitoring online discussions, prioritizing prompt and constructive feedback, and making course material relevant to learners.
Tactics cover image

Safely Discussing What Cannot Be Said Out Loud

Tactic
Jung, Patricia Beattie
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 2 (2017): 149
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: scaffolded short, "in character" writing assignments in an online course, to foster critical reflection on different sides of an argument.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: scaffolded short, "in character" writing assignments in an online course, to foster critical reflection on different sides of an argument.
Cover image

Social Presence in Online Learning - Multiple Perspectives on Practice and Research

Book
Whiteside, Aimee L.;Garrett Dikkers, Amy; Swan, Karen
2017
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB1044.87.S6178 2017
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
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Social presence continues to emerge as a key factor for successful online and blended learning experiences. It is commonly described as the degree to which online participants feel connected to one another. Understanding social presence with its critical connections to community-building, retention, and learning outcomes allows faculty and instructional designers to better support and engage students. This volume, Social Presence in Online Learning, addresses ...
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Social presence continues to emerge as a key factor for successful online and blended learning experiences. It is commonly described as the degree to which online participants feel connected to one another. Understanding social presence with its critical connections to community-building, retention, and learning outcomes allows faculty and instructional designers to better support and engage students. This volume, Social Presence in Online Learning, addresses the evolution of social presence with three distinct perspectives, outlines the relevant research, and focuses on practical strategies that can immediately impact the teaching and learning experience. These strategies include creating connections to build community, applying content to authentic situations, integrating a careful mix of tools and media, leveraging reflective and interactive opportunities, providing early and continuous feedback, designing with assessment in mind, and encouraging change in small increments. Because student satisfaction and motivation plays a key role in retention rates and because increased social presence often leads to enriched learning experiences, it is advantageous to mindfully integrate social presence into learning environments.

Social Presence in Online Learning brings together eminent scholars in the field to distinguish among three different perspectives of social presence and to address how these viewpoints immediately inform practice. This important volume:

• Provides an overview of the evolution of social presence, key findings from social presence research, and practical strategies that can improve the online and blended learning experience

• Differentiates three distinct perspectives on social presence and explains the ideas and models that inform these perspectives

• Explores specific ways in which social presence relates to course satisfaction, retention, and outcomes

• Offers practical implications and ready-to-use techniques that are applicable to multiple disciplines

• Introduces current research on social presence by prominent researchers in the field with direct inferences to the practice of online and blended learning

• Looks at future directions for social presence

Social Presence in Online Learning is appropriate for practitioners, researchers and academics involved in any level of online learning program design, course design, instruction, support, and leadership as well as for graduate students studying educational technology, technology-enhanced learning, and online and blended learning. It brings together multiple perspectives on social presence from the most influential scholars in the field to help shape the future of online and blended learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword (Michael Grahame Moore, Series Editor)
Foreword (Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena)
Acknowledgements

Part One: Introduction to Social Presence in Online Learning
ch. 1. Multiple Perspectives on Social Presence in Online Learning: An Introduction to This Volume (Karen Swan)
ch. 2. Social Presence: Understanding Connections Among Definitions, Theory, Measurements, and Practice (Amy Garrett Dikkers,; Aimee L. Whiteside; Bethany Tap

Part Two: Understanding Social Presence as Technologically Facilitated
ch. 3. Understanding Social Presence as Technologically Facilitated: Introduction to Part Two (Karen Swan) ch. 4. Social Presence and Communication Technologies: Tales of Trial and Error (Patrick Lowenthal; Dave Mulder)
ch.. 5. Evolvements of Social Presence in Open and Networked Learning Environments (Chih-Hsiung Tu)

Part Three: Understanding Social Presence as Learners' Perceptions ch. 6. Understanding Social Presence as Learners’ Perceptions: Introduction to Part Three (Karen Swan)
ch. 7. Social Presence and the Community of Inquiry Framework (Karen Swan; Jennifer C. Richardson)
ch. 8. Social Presence and Student Success: Retention, Satisfaction, and Evolving Expectations (Phil Ice; Melissa Layne; Wally Boston)
ch. 9. Instructor Social Presence: Learners' Needs and a Neglected Component of the Community of Inquiry Framework (Jennifer C. Richardson; Patrick Lowenthal)
ch. 10. Creating Social Cues through Self-Disclosures, Stories, and Paralanguage: The Importance of Modeling High Social Presence Behaviors in Online Courses (Jessica Gordon)
ch. 11. Cultural Perspectives on Social Presence: Research and Practical Guidelines for Online Design (Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena)

Part Four: Understanding Social Presence as a Critical Literacy
ch. 12. Understanding Social Presence as a Critical Literacy: Introduction to Part Four (Aimee L. Whiteside)
ch. 13. Making Learning Relevant and Meaningful: Integrating Social Presence into Faculty Professional Development Programs (Aimee L. Whiteside)
ch. 14. Blending Face-to-Face and Online Instruction to Disrupt Learning, Inspire Reflection, and Create Space for Innovation (Amy Garrett Dikkers; Aimee L. Whiteside; Somer Lewis)
ch. 15. Personalized Learning to Meet the Needs of Diverse Learners (Somer Lewis; Amy Garrett Dikkers; Aimee L. Whiteside)
ch. 16. Overcoming Isolation Online: Strategies to Enhance Social Presence in Practice (Aimee L. Whiteside; Amy Garrett Dikkers; Somer Lewis)

Section V: Concluding Thoughts ch. 17. Future Directions for Social Presence: Shared Metacognition, Emerging Technologies, and the New Educational Ecosystem (Jason C. Vickers; Peter Shea)
ch. 18. The Future of Social Presence: Advancing Research, Uniting the Perspectives, and Allowing for Innovation in Practice (Aimee L. Whiteside; Karen Swan; Amy Garrett Dikkers)

Editors and Contributors
Index
Cover image

Jump-Start Your Online Classroom: Mastering Five Challenges in Five Days

Book
Stein, David S.; Wanstreet, Constance E.
2017
Stylus Publishing, Llc.
LB1044.87.S83 2017
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

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Every year, more online or technology-enhanced learning experiences are added to the landscape of education, and the number of students taking online courses on residential campuses continues to grow. In addition, new instructional tools are creating environments that are mobile, interactive, and collaborative. These trends present challenges to the online classroom, and this book will help instructors meet those challenges.

Jump-Start Your ...
Additional Info:
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Every year, more online or technology-enhanced learning experiences are added to the landscape of education, and the number of students taking online courses on residential campuses continues to grow. In addition, new instructional tools are creating environments that are mobile, interactive, and collaborative. These trends present challenges to the online classroom, and this book will help instructors meet those challenges.

Jump-Start Your Online Classroom prepares a first-time online instructor to successfully manage the first few weeks of a course, including activities to help instructors plan, manage, and facilitate online instruction; and provides resources helpful during the beginning weeks of class. Each chapter is developed around the immediate challenges instructors face when teaching online. The authors address everyday problems and suggest solutions informed by their extensive research and experience. The five challenges, which are designed to be addressed in five days, are to:
• Make the transition to online teaching
• Build online spaces for learning
• Prepare students for online learning
• Manage and facilitating the online classroom
• Assess learner outcomes in an online classroom

The book is based on the authors’ design and facilitation model that identifies five elements comprising an online learning environment: digital tools, participants, social practices, learning community, and outcomes. The book shows how each of those aspects influences instructional practices and interacts to create an environment for a meaningful online educational experience. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch 1. The Online Environment

First Challenge: Making the Transition to Online Teaching
ch 2. Are You Ready to Teach Online?
ch 3. Addressing Concerns About Teaching Online
ch 4. Thinking and Acting Like an Online Instructor

Second Challenge: Building Online Spaces for Learning
ch 5. Building Spaces and Places for Learning

Third Challenge: Preparing Students for Online Learning
ch 6. Preparing Your Students for Online Learning

Fourth Challenge: Managing and Facilitating the Online Classroom
ch 7. Managing and Facilitating the Online Classroom

Fifth Challenge: Assessing Learner Outcomes
ch 8. Assessing Learning in the Online Classroom
ch 9. Reflecting on Your Experience
ch 10. Challenge for the Future: Building Knowledge

Appendices
References
About the Authors
Index
Cover image

Going Online: Perspectives on Digital Learning

Book
Ubell, Robert
2017
Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group
LB1028.5.U28 2017
Topics: Online Learning   |   Learning Designs   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In Going Online, one of our most respected online learning leaders offers insights into virtual education―what it is, how it works, where it came from, and where it may be headed. Robert Ubell reaches back to the days when distance learning was practiced by mail in correspondence schools and then leads us on a tour behind the screen, touching on a wide array of topics along the way, including ...
Additional Info:
In Going Online, one of our most respected online learning leaders offers insights into virtual education―what it is, how it works, where it came from, and where it may be headed. Robert Ubell reaches back to the days when distance learning was practiced by mail in correspondence schools and then leads us on a tour behind the screen, touching on a wide array of topics along the way, including what it takes to teach online and the virtual student experience. You’ll learn about:

-how to build a sustainable online program;
-how to create an active learning online course;
-why so many faculty resist teaching online;
-how virtual teamwork enhances digital instruction;
-how to manage online course ownership;
-how learning analytics improves online instruction.

Ubell says that it is not technology alone, but rather unconventional pedagogies, supported by technological innovations, that truly activate today's classrooms. He argues that innovations introduced online―principally peer-to-peer and collaborative learning―offer significantly increased creative learning options across all age groups and educational sectors. This impressive collection, drawn from Ubell's decades of experience as a digital education pioneer, presents a powerful case for embracing online learning for its transformational potential.

Table Of Content:
Foreword by Katepalli R. Sreenivasan

Acknowledgements

Part I. Virtual Classes

Ch 1. Dewey Goes Online
Ch 2. Virtual Team Learning
Ch 3. Active Learning: Interaction, Diversity and Evolution in Online Learning (John Vivolo)
Ch 4. What You Can Do Online, But Not on Campus
Ch 5. Why Faculty Don’t Want to Teach Online
Ch 6. Blind Scores in a Graduate Test: Conventional Compared with Online Outcomes With M. Hosein Fallah

Part II. Migrating Online
Ch 7. Migrating Online with A. Frank Mayadas
Ch 8. Who Owns What? Unbundling Online Course Property Rights
Ch 9. The Road Not Taken: Divergence of Corporate and Academic Online Instruction
Ch 10. Engineers Turn to Online Learning
Cover image

(Not) Being There - Online Distance Theological Education

Journal Issue
Miller, Sharon L. and Scharen, Christian
2017
Auburn Studies, No. 23 (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY Fall 2017)
BV4070.A8A1 2017 no.23
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This Auburn Studies report highlights the changing features of online distance education (ODE) within theological schools. Distance education is not a new phenomenon, particularly within the broader field of higher education, and yet the “disruptive innovation” of the internet, as Clayton Christensen and others have argued, has only recently begun to change theological education.[i] While in some respects the impact of the internet is dramatic and new, many faith ...
Additional Info:
This Auburn Studies report highlights the changing features of online distance education (ODE) within theological schools. Distance education is not a new phenomenon, particularly within the broader field of higher education, and yet the “disruptive innovation” of the internet, as Clayton Christensen and others have argued, has only recently begun to change theological education.[i] While in some respects the impact of the internet is dramatic and new, many faith traditions have deep experience with the sort of mediated presence distinctive of ODE.

For many world religions, the embodied presence of their founders—Moses, Jesus, Mohammad, Buddha, and others—was brief. For most of the histories of these great traditions, “not being there” has been normative. Take, for example, the story of Jesus’ post-resurrection appearance to the disciples in the Gospel of John. All the disciples were there, save Thomas, who would not believe Jesus was truly alive without “being there” to see and touch Jesus. Lucky for him, a week later Jesus appeared to Thomas as well. But note what Jesus said: “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and have come to believe.” This is the case for millions of believers today, whose experience of the holy is through a mediating presence, holy objects, or rituals, and perhaps, most profoundly, through scriptures understood as God’s presence, voice, or word.

It is then not an unfamiliar world at all for people of faith to teach and learn at a distance, using mediated relationships to do so—even when the technology affording the connection is indeed new. While this report outlines our research findings, we also hope to offer resources for thinking in creative and hopeful ways in a time of change. The report takes stock of a generation of change in theological education driven by what is often called the “digital revolution.” We highlight three key findings:

First, ODE is growing rapidly, pushing the boundaries of who typically attends theological school. Over the past decade, enrollment at member schools of The Association of Theological Schools (ATS) dropped by 11%; in the same period, online enrollment rose almost 200%. Broader cultural patterns regarding spirituality are surely at play as we see the democratizing force of the internet opening theological exploration to a much wider—and, it turns out, quite interested—audience. Given the success of ODE, many schools suddenly find themselves with too large and expensive a physical plant for the educational needs.

Second, ODE student outcomes are equal to or better than those of traditional residential classes. Many critics—even now—harbor doubts that anything but students and a professor in a room together can achieve the desired educational outcomes. Yet the evidence shows this is not true. ODE provokes pedagogical innovation, shifting the focus from teacher to learner, and the power of the contexts in which the student learns. For both faculty and students, it is powerful to take seriously the “real world” context where student learning and daily work dynamically interrogate one another. Ironically, we found, while ODE takes more time and effort, remarkably few resources are currently dedicated to training and supporting faculty as they learn this new medium.

Third, the integrated reality of digital life is quickly making the old divide between “traditional” and “online” classes—and hybrid courses or programs, which toggle between the two—obsolete. ODE creates an identity crisis for many schools that value highly the formative power of “being there” in classroom, chapel, and community life. Yet the question the disruption of the internet raises is “where” does education actually happen? It is clearly wherever the student lives, works, and learns, including in virtual spaces and through digitally mediated access to human and material resources.

Table Of Content:
Executive Summary

I. Introduction
II. Overview of Literature
----Case Study: Bethel Seminary
III. Whats, Whys, and Hows of Online Distance Education
----Case Study: Luther Seminary
IV. Why Say Yes to ODE?
----Case Study: Central Baptist Theological Seminary
V. Challenges for ODE
----Case Study: Columbia Theological Seminary
VI. How to Jumpstart ODE
VII. Conclusions
Sage Advice: How to Do it Well
Data Sources

About the Authors, Funding and Support
Cover image

Essentials of Online Teaching: A Standards-Based Guide

Book
McCable, Margaret Foey, and González-Flores, Patricia
2017
Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group
LB1044.87.F65 2017
Topics: Online Learning

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Teachers’ active online participation and engagement with students are critical factors to the success of online courses. Essentials of Online Teaching is a standards-based, straightforward guide to teaching online in higher education, high school and vocational training, or corporate learning environments. This brief but powerful book encourages immediate application of concepts with the help of real-world examples, technical insights, and professional advice.

...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Teachers’ active online participation and engagement with students are critical factors to the success of online courses. Essentials of Online Teaching is a standards-based, straightforward guide to teaching online in higher education, high school and vocational training, or corporate learning environments. This brief but powerful book encourages immediate application of concepts with the help of real-world examples, technical insights, and professional advice.

The guide includes:

- a practical approach informed by, but not about, relevant learning theories;

- clear models and examples from a wide variety of online courses;

- teachers’ reflections about their online practice;

- a checklist of standards to help guide teaching decisions; and

- an accompanying website (www.essentialsofonlineteaching.com) with additional resources.

Essentials of Online Teaching addresses key instructional challenges in online teaching and presents the reader with practical solutions for each phase of a course—preparation, beginning, middle, and end. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

Foreword

About the Authors

Introduction to this Guide

Ch 1. Orientation to Online Teaching
Ch 2. Factors that Influence Online Teaching
Ch 3. Teaching with Digital Tools and Resources
Ch 4. Preparing to Teach Online
Ch 5. The Beginning Weeks: Launching an Online Course
Ch 6. The Middle Weeks: Facilitating Online Learning
Ch 7. The Ending Weeks: Synthesizing and Extending Learning
Ch 8. Online Collaboration
Ch 9. Online Assessment
Ch 10. Pulling It All Together: An Online Teacher in Action

Appendix A: Using the Standards Checklist

Index
Cover image

Teaching the World: Foundations for Online Theological Education

Book
Cartwright, John; Etzel, Gabriel; Jackson, Chris; Jones, Timothy
2017
B & H Academic
BV4020 .J66 2017
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
More and more seminaries, Christian universities, and Bible colleges are opting to train future ministers and missionaries online.What happens when the movement toward online education is shaped by pragmatic or financial concerns instead of Scripture and theology? Ministry training can be reduced to a mere transfer of information as institutions lose sight of their calling to shape the souls of God-called men and ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
More and more seminaries, Christian universities, and Bible colleges are opting to train future ministers and missionaries online.What happens when the movement toward online education is shaped by pragmatic or financial concerns instead of Scripture and theology? Ministry training can be reduced to a mere transfer of information as institutions lose sight of their calling to shape the souls of God-called men and women in preparation for effective ministry.How might online ministry training look different if biblical and theological foundations were placed first? Teaching the World brings together educators from a wide range of backgrounds and from some of the largest providers of online theological education in the world. Together, they present a revolutionary new approach to online theological education, highly practical and yet thoroughly shaped by Scripture and theology.

Table Of Content:
Forward

Preface

Acknowledgements

Ch 1. Past Patterns and Present Challenges in Online Theological Education

Section I: Better Foundations for Online Learning
Ch 2. Paul and the Possibility of Absent Presence
Ch 3. Social Presence and Theological Education
Ch 4. Controversy and Common Ground

Section II: Better Faculty for Online Learning
Ch 5. Online Faculty and the Image of God
Ch 6. Online Faculty and Theological Competency
Ch 7. Shaping the Spiritual Lives of Online Faculty

Section III: Better Practices in the Classroom
Ch 8. Best Practices for Online Learning
Ch 9. Best Practices for Online Ministry Training
Ch 10. The Advantage of Ministry Training in Context

Conclusion: To Teach, to Delight and to Persuade
TTR cover image

Online Teaching and Biblical Studies

TTR
Ascough, Richard; Barreto, Eric D.; Birch, Bruce C.; Calderón Pilarski, Ahida; Reese, Ruth Anne
2018
Teaching Theology and Religion 21, no. 2 (2018): 120-137
BL41.T4 v.21 no. 2
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
This Forum emerges from a session initiated by the Professional Development Committee at the 2017 conference of the Society of Biblical Literature in Boston. A panel of five Bible scholars, from both theological education and undergraduate contexts, provide brief descriptions and analyses of a specific course they have taught online. They describe creative assignments such as role play, online field trips, evaluating web sites, and staged debates. They analyze the opportunities ...
Additional Info:
This Forum emerges from a session initiated by the Professional Development Committee at the 2017 conference of the Society of Biblical Literature in Boston. A panel of five Bible scholars, from both theological education and undergraduate contexts, provide brief descriptions and analyses of a specific course they have taught online. They describe creative assignments such as role play, online field trips, evaluating web sites, and staged debates. They analyze the opportunities for developing undergraduates' critical thinking skills as well as seminarians' formation for ministry. A comparison of online and face‐to‐face teaching contexts reveals shifts in our understanding of how learning happens and our own identities as teachers. The Forum concludes with questions from the floor, which turn the conversation toward institutional support for pedagogical and technological hurdles.