Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Grants - Topic: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach - 54 results

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Teaching Religious Studies: Teaching Development Seminar and Religious Studies Head TA

Awarded Grant
Gamble, Harry
University of Virginia
Colleges/Universities
2000
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Train graduate students in teaching Religious Studies and promote excellence in undergraduate teaching through the continuation and enrichment of the department’s Teaching Assistant (TA) development seminar and through the appointment of a Religious Studies Head TA
Proposal abstract :
Train graduate students in teaching Religious Studies and promote excellence in undergraduate teaching through the continuation and enrichment of the department’s Teaching Assistant (TA) development seminar and through the appointment of a Religious Studies Head TA

Learning Abstract :
The project was designed to assist with the ongoing implementation of a Teaching Assistant training seminar program that emerged from a successful pilot program. This program included meetings, guest speakers, development of a Teaching Assistant handbook, resources for a religious studies teaching library, and involvement with teaching conferences. As a result graduate students and faculty enhanced their ability for pedagogical reflection and discourse through involvement in the program. Teaching Assistant skills have been improved and some are involved with extensive mentoring projects with specific faculty. In addition, the grant provided for the development of enhanced seminars on teaching skills and issues, the development of a Teaching Assistant handbook, and improved mentoring practices - classroom observations, individual consultations, etc.
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The Teaching Fellows Program: Mentoring Religion Graduate Students for Careers as Teachers

Awarded Grant
Parsons, Mikeal|Beck, Rosalie
Baylor University
Colleges/Universities
2000
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
To mentor graduate students in the craft of teaching by a variety of experiences which engage student and teacher alike, including instruction and critical reflection on pedagogy, supervised teaching experiences, and team-teaching experiences with faculty members.
Proposal abstract :
To mentor graduate students in the craft of teaching by a variety of experiences which engage student and teacher alike, including instruction and critical reflection on pedagogy, supervised teaching experiences, and team-teaching experiences with faculty members.

Learning Abstract :
The project had six components that included: 1) a workshop, 2) four colloquies, 3) bi-weekly meetings, 4) a weekend conference, 5) mentoring and teaching critiques, and 6) ongoing project assessment. The workshop was focused on the development of skills in the use of various digital technologies, syllabi development, increased understanding of the Baylor University system, and teaching practice sessions. The colloquies provided a venue for conversation among 20 graduate students and a host of faculty about specific texts related to teaching and learning in theology and religion. Peer-led sessions in bi-weekly meetings were designed to promote conversation among students on the "nuts and bolts" of teaching. The sole weekend conference was dedicated to a presentation and discussion about the pros and cons of technology in the classroom. The project director also engaged graduate students in one-to-one conversations about their teaching after observing a class session. The evaluation of the project was ongoing and involved exit interviews with participants in the project.
The results included the following. Student participants in the project ranged in classroom teaching experience and skill. Graduate students regarded the entire experience as helpful for their development as teachers. Enthusiasm ran high among participants and has encouraged other Ph.D. students to consider involvement with a similar course. The response to the project has been overwhelmingly positive. So much so that the department of religion of Baylor University is considering making the colloquy a requirement for all of their Ph.D. students.
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Chicago Forum on Pedagogy and the Study of Religion

Awarded Grant
Pick, Lucy
University of Chicago Divinity School
Theological Schools
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
A three year forum of plenary talks, panel discussions and graduate student workshops on issues surrounding the teaching of the academic subject of religion to undergraduates in a liberal arts environment.
Proposal abstract :
A three year forum of plenary talks, panel discussions and graduate student workshops on issues surrounding the teaching of the academic subject of religion to undergraduates in a liberal arts environment.

Learning Abstract :
The project was designed as a three-year forum of plenary talks (Wabash Center lectures), conferences, and graduate student workshops on issues surrounding the teaching of the academic subject of religion to undergraduates in a liberal arts environment. Each year a theme was identified in order to prompt extended discussion in the forum and promote ongoing conversation about specific topics. Two goals were identified as primary aims for the forum. The first was to start a discussion within the University of Chicago community about specific challenges and opportunities associated with teaching undergraduate students about religion. The second goal involved providing a locus for graduate students to consider questions highlighted during the forums in an "inspiring, practical, and meaningful way."

Through the grant, participants were able to reflect on and practice different design methods and models for teaching and learning. Topics and issues included: teaching and diversity, portfolio development, comparative methods and teaching religion, teaching an introductory course in religious studies, self as teacher, student religious experience in the classroom, etc. The series of forums, conferences, workshops, and meetings aided fellows involved with the Forum to develop skills as critically reflective teachers. Graduate students regarded the experience of involvement as highly beneficial. In addition, a number of additional outcomes have emerged from the grant – formation of a discussion panel on pedagogy at the 2004 Midwest AAR meeting, publication of a special issue of Criterion http://marty-center.uchicago.edu/fellows/chicagoforum.shtml, and an ongoing student developed workshop on pedagogy.
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Teaching Mentor Program

Awarded Grant
Bounds, Elizabeth|Laderman, Gary|Tipton, Steven
Emory University
Colleges/Universities
2001
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Matching funds to support 3 pedagogically gifted and experienced ABD doctoral students as teaching mentors for beginning doctoral students who are TAs. Includes supervision by and consultation with faculty, peer observation, small groups, and workshops.
Proposal abstract :
Matching funds to support 3 pedagogically gifted and experienced ABD doctoral students as teaching mentors for beginning doctoral students who are TAs. Includes supervision by and consultation with faculty, peer observation, small groups, and workshops.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop doctoral students as teaching assistants to work in the teacher training program of the Graduate Division of Religion. These teaching mentors would work primarily with the required division seminar on teaching religion. Specifically, they would assist in the planning and execution of the teaching seminar, lead small working groups of students from the class, observe each student from the class in a teaching setting and provide feedback, and organize teaching workshops for all students in the Graduate Division of Religion.
The project proceeded as described above and was very successful. The division came to see "the challenge of developing a self-sustaining program." The teaching mentor position was extremely valuable to both those who have been mentors and those who have been mentored, but the cost could not be maintained within their structures of funding. They ended the program seeking ways to maintain some of the program's strengths within available university funding parameters.
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Teaching Religion in a Secular Setting

Awarded Grant
Maffly-Kipp, Laurie
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Colleges/Universities
2002
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Preparing graduate students to teach religious studies in a variety of contexts including the public school environment through installation of a religious studies head TA and ongoing training for TAs.
Proposal abstract :
Preparing graduate students to teach religious studies in a variety of contexts including the public school environment through installation of a religious studies head TA and ongoing training for TAs.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to accomplish three interrelated goals through a series of monthly seminars: 1) improve undergraduate education through 2) expanded training of graduate students for 3) diverse professional experiences. The primary goals promulgated additional related goals: "enhancing networks of knowledge and collegiality among graduate students and between students and faculty members, initiating a formal dialogue about pedagogical issues specific to religious studies, fostering conversations across narrow field specializations, preparing graduate students for the job market, clarifying the role of Teaching Assistants, and encouraging individuals to develop their own teaching methods and styles by participating in ongoing reflection about pedagogy."

Those involved with the program affirmed that they had been able to meet and exceed their stated goals by "revolutionizing the quality of pedagogical training, levels of engagement and collegiality among students and faculty, and the extent of reflection about the rights and roles of graduate students in the department." In addition, they determined that the project also enhanced and increased discussion and cooperation among teaching assistants and professors. It also was considered to be a success in the manner by which the professional development of graduate students was appreciably improved.
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Teaching Seminars at the Hebrew Union College

Awarded Grant
Dallaire, Hélène
Hebrew Union College - New York Jewish Institute of Religion
Colleges/Universities
2002
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for a guest speaker on Teaching Biblical Hebrew for the faculty’s monthly teaching seminar.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a guest speaker on Teaching Biblical Hebrew for the faculty’s monthly teaching seminar.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a consultant who specializes in Biblical Hebrew instruction to work with their teaching assistants and private tutors who instruct their rabbinical and graduate students in Biblical, Rabbinic and Modern Hebrew.
The consultant, Dr. David Levenson of Florida State University, gave a three-hour presentation on the teaching of Biblical Hebrew. Following the session, the students engaged Dr. Levenson over lunch with more specific questions, including scenarios from their classroom experience. The project director reported positive feedback from participants and that the teaching seminar served as springboard for further discussion on the use of technology in teaching Biblical Hebrew.
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Northeast Colloquium on Teaching Theology

Awarded Grant
Kelsey, David
Yale Divinity School
Theological Schools
2002
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Gather faculty and doctoral students in theology to discuss a cluster of practical and theoretical issues related to the teaching of theology in academic contexts, issues which are often not adequately addressed by formal academic training.
Proposal abstract :
Gather faculty and doctoral students in theology to discuss a cluster of practical and theoretical issues related to the teaching of theology in academic contexts, issues which are often not adequately addressed by formal academic training.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather faculty and doctoral students in theology to discuss practical and theoretical issues related to the teaching of theology in academic contexts. The goal was to help prepare graduate students to be teachers through facilitating conversations about the teaching of theology in various types of academic institutions.
A total of four schools participated in the colloquium: Harvard University, Princeton Theological Seminary, Union Theological Seminary, and Yale University. The group met four times, once at each academic institution. They felt that despite all of the differences they had between all of the institutions, they were able to engage in a "shared intellectual enterprise" of "training and being trained to teach theology." The diversity of their group made them aware of "the variety of decisions, commitments, and assumptions that form and orient one's guiding vision and concrete practices of teaching theology."
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Teaching through Oral History: Phase Two of the Oral History Project: Composing A Life- Women Changing the Church & Society

Awarded Grant
Moore, Mary Elizabeth
Emory University
Colleges/Universities
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to engage students with women who have potential to inspire and guide, to uncover realities of Christian tradition as embodied in diverse lives and contexts. Specific pedagogical goals include: teaching the art of oral history; teaching the art of hermeneutics with living texts; teaching the art of discerning dynamics and patterns of religious life; creating a collection of teaching resources; and teaching through oral history in ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to engage students with women who have potential to inspire and guide, to uncover realities of Christian tradition as embodied in diverse lives and contexts. Specific pedagogical goals include: teaching the art of oral history; teaching the art of hermeneutics with living texts; teaching the art of discerning dynamics and patterns of religious life; creating a collection of teaching resources; and teaching through oral history in extra-curricular and public venues.

Learning Abstract :
The project director and associates learned the power of teaching through oral history, especially the inspiration and wisdom that emanates from people's lives when others listen with care. In particular, they learned the many different ways by which oral history can contribute to teaching and learning. It can be especially effective in the following forms: 1) Central focus of pedagogical content and method, as in the Prophetic Pioneers course that draws heavily upon biography and life story; 2) Case studies that reveal how human lives interact with a particular subject or issue in religion and theology; 3) Source for contextual or theological analysis, revealing complexities in social and theological movements in different times and places; 4) Enrichment of textual analysis, especially when combining textual interpretation with an author interview; 5) Methodological tool for developing skills, especially skills in significant conversation, active listening, and interpreting human lives.
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Enhancement of the Teaching Profession Workshop

Awarded Grant
Hurteau, Robert
Fuller Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for a “Teaching Profession Workshop” for thirty Ph.D. and Th.M. students. The workshop attempts to address both pedagogical and pragmatic matters for prospective professors and will include two outside consultant-led sessions on teaching methods, a session on academic job searches and a session on publishing.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a “Teaching Profession Workshop” for thirty Ph.D. and Th.M. students. The workshop attempts to address both pedagogical and pragmatic matters for prospective professors and will include two outside consultant-led sessions on teaching methods, a session on academic job searches and a session on publishing.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund Teaching Profession workshops, open to both masters and doctoral level students. The program attempts to address teaching methods, academic job searches, and publishing. Funds for the program would support its operation, along with research that would develop and grow the program for the future.
With the support of the grant they were able to enhance the workshops by providing speaker stipends and food at the workshops. They also used the funds to research the best ways to develop the program by analyzing evaluations, researching similar initiatives in 16 other institutions, and proposing a plan for the future. Changes proposed include the following: expanding the topics covered, developing a two-stage program (one for pre-exam students and one for ABD students), monitoring student interest more effectively, the use of web pages for job and publishing information, and more involvement with academic placement.
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Peer Evaluation and Teaching Portfolio Development for Doctoral Students in the Graduate Division of Religion, Emory University

Awarded Grant
Bounds, Elizabeth|Patterson, Barbara
Emory University
Colleges/Universities
2004
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Project Purpose. To strengthen the teaching training program for doctoral students in religion at Emory University by revising the evaluation process in two ways: 1) reframe the overall process of evaluation to focus on producing a teaching portfolio; 2) develop a peer evaluation process as part of the second year teaching experience. Project Goals. Primary Goal: Revise process for evaluating doctoral teaching in order to improve skills and to promote self- sustenance ...
Proposal abstract :
Project Purpose. To strengthen the teaching training program for doctoral students in religion at Emory University by revising the evaluation process in two ways: 1) reframe the overall process of evaluation to focus on producing a teaching portfolio; 2) develop a peer evaluation process as part of the second year teaching experience. Project Goals. Primary Goal: Revise process for evaluating doctoral teaching in order to improve skills and to promote self- sustenance of program. Secondary Goals: 1) Begin to devise an overall evaluation process which will enable doctoral students to compile a teaching portfolio; 2) Revise written evaluation process by which faculty evaluate doctoral students as part of their portfolio; 3) Develop a peer evaluation process which will contribute to the students' learning and which can continue to be sustained, regardless of financial support; 4) Offer a workshop in peer evaluation that will train students and a select group of faculty in peer evaluation skills.

Learning Abstract :
The project's main goal was to "revise the process for evaluating doctoral teaching in order to improve skills and to promote self-sustenance of program." The project was centered on the development of graduate student teaching through use of peer teaching reviews.

Graduate students were equipped with basic skills for peer mentoring. They collectively worked with the project directors to enhance skills in peer mentoring, develop their abilities to reflect on how the experience can improve teaching, and to discuss future training needs. The program was mutually regarded as a positive experience and they shared a hope for future training. Ongoing work also involves specific attention to development of knowledge and skills in teaching religious practices and expansion of knowledge about teaching and learning resources.
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Preparing PhD Students for Careers as Teachers Through Collaborative Experiments with Pedagogies of Intercultural Service-Learning

Awarded Grant
Priest, Robert
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological Schools
2004
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for a three-year project designed to give PhD students in Intercultural Studies supervised experience as teachers who will prepare future pastors to acquire appropriate cross-cultural skills and understandings. The focus will be on a pedagogy of intercultural service-learning, organized around "short-term mission trips," and designed to integrate theory and practice, school and community, experimentation and in preparing pedagogical materials. Research on program design and educational outcomes will accompany each ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a three-year project designed to give PhD students in Intercultural Studies supervised experience as teachers who will prepare future pastors to acquire appropriate cross-cultural skills and understandings. The focus will be on a pedagogy of intercultural service-learning, organized around "short-term mission trips," and designed to integrate theory and practice, school and community, experimentation and in preparing pedagogical materials. Research on program design and educational outcomes will accompany each stage of the project.

Learning Abstract :
This several year project was focused on service-learning within the framework of MDiv student mission trips to Peru (and to urban Chicago). As doctoral students helped with research, filming, and with designing pedagogical exercises, a great deal of enthusiasm was generated, motivating several to do their PhD dissertations on the topic. Both doctoral students and the project director published articles related to this. An educational DVD on mission trips was produced. Our team came to appreciate the importance of clearly identifying intended learning outcomes, and incorporating into our learning exercises 1) appropriate biblical texts and theological themes; 2) relevant experiences of intercultural service and learning; 3) attention to the voices of Christians in destination sites; and 4) active efforts at understanding. The value of a learning community of PhD students, faculty, and visiting scholars (who attended conferences we hosted), where all were focused on service-learning mission trips, came to be deeply appreciated.
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Mentoring Doctoral Students

Awarded Grant
Crysdale, Cynthia
Catholic University of America
Theological Schools
2004
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that engages more full time faculty in the work of mentoring doctoral students and support for a committee to review professional development of doctoral students in a mentoring program.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that engages more full time faculty in the work of mentoring doctoral students and support for a committee to review professional development of doctoral students in a mentoring program.

Learning Abstract :
The School of Theology and Religious Studies received a small grant in the 2005-6 academic year. With this money we conducted several focus groups with our doctoral students and had discussions with the entire faculty as to how we could improve our pedagogical training for our graduate students. Our most important learning was that we need to train our faculty as well as our students. We plan to implement a training program for faculty who supervise our Teaching Assistants. We want to develop more mentoring skills amongst our full time faculty.
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GTU Mentoring and Modeling Effective Teaching in Religious Studies

Awarded Grant
Holder, Arthur
Graduate Theological Union
Theological Schools
2005
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of doctoral students as teachers in religious studies. The project seeks to model effective doctoral-level study by highlighting the exemplary work of advanced doctoral students to their peers.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of doctoral students as teachers in religious studies. The project seeks to model effective doctoral-level study by highlighting the exemplary work of advanced doctoral students to their peers.

Learning Abstract :
With this grant the Professional Development Program was able to offer a series which was first called "First Friday Teaching Talks." In this series, eight advanced doctoral students with teaching experience presented interactive lectures on innovative approaches to teaching and learning in undergraduate and graduate religious studies and theology classrooms. The lectures were generally well-attended by both GTU faculty and students, providing an important occasion for the modeling of effective doctoral-level study by highlighting the exemplary work of advanced teaching and learning in religious studies and theology. Indeed, the series was considered such a significant learning opportunity, as well as an occasion to honor the achievements of doctoral students, that is has been institutionalized as the GTU Teaching Scholars Awards.

Overall, the grant has enabled the GTU's Professional Development Program to enrich the conversation about teaching and learning among both doctoral students and faculty. It has further enabled us to recognize exemplary teaching among doctoral students as they move more fully into the profession, and it has served as the anchor for a now-institutionalized program that will allow GTU to continue the conversation.
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Preparing PhD Students for Teaching in Seminaries and University Religion Departments

Awarded Grant
Krych, Margaret
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia
Theological Schools
2005
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
The goals for this project are: (1) to design and carry out a program that will prepare ThD students to be quality teachers of courses in seminaries and university religious studies programs; (2) to develop resources so that the program will be self-sustaining beyond the three years of the initial project; (3) to equip ThD students for the vocation of teaching by engaging them in a required seminary in which the focus will ...
Proposal abstract :
The goals for this project are: (1) to design and carry out a program that will prepare ThD students to be quality teachers of courses in seminaries and university religious studies programs; (2) to develop resources so that the program will be self-sustaining beyond the three years of the initial project; (3) to equip ThD students for the vocation of teaching by engaging them in a required seminary in which the focus will be theory, observation, and practice teaching at college and seminary levels; (4) to continue to equip ThD students for the vocation of teaching through required monthly seminars throughout their second, third, and fourth semesters of the program; (5) to equip ThD students for the vocation of teaching by having them engage in teaching assistant roles under an experienced professor; and (6) to equip ThD students for the vocation of teaching by having them develop a teaching portfolio.

Learning Abstract :
The new PhD program at the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia has, as a required component, the preparation of PhD students to be teachers in seminaries and university religion departments. This project included the design and carrying out of the first three years (2006 through 2008) of the required program of teacher preparation. The PhD teacher preparation program comprises theory, observation, and practice teaching with evaluation. The program begins with a seminar (36 contact hours) in January of the student's first academic year, and continues through the second, third, and fourth semesters of the program with monthly teaching workshops, required teaching assistance, observation, and mentoring by an experienced professor. During these 18 months, the students develop a teaching portfolio. The project also included the developing of resources so that the teacher preparation program will be self-sustaining beyond the three years of the initial project.
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Mentoring Graduate Students Into the Teaching Role

Awarded Grant
Medine, Carolyn
University of Georgia
Colleges/Universities
2005
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to mentor two MA students who will teach their own courses - the introductory course in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The students will learn how to craft lectures, construct the syllabus, develop tests and do all the work of a teacher of record.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to mentor two MA students who will teach their own courses - the introductory course in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The students will learn how to craft lectures, construct the syllabus, develop tests and do all the work of a teacher of record.

Learning Abstract :
Mentoring graduate students into the role of teachers of record is as difficult a task as mentoring them in their role as scholars. There are a number of tasks that seasoned faculty do automatically - whether we do them well or not: construct a syllabus, plan daily work, develop examinations, and keep assessment going in the classroom, either formally or informally. These are the things on which I worked with two students. What I found is that the syllabus is often thought of, initially, as a list of books to read and activities to perform for grades. Teaching a new teacher that a syllabus is a design of intellectual experience and that each day contributes to that design is the most important thing I think I communicated. This is somewhat necessarily difficult to grasp for young teachers who are trying to figure out what material should be covered and how, but once the idea is communicated that "coverage" is not the real task, but learning, these young teachers begin to find their own teaching styles. I learned that mentoring new teachers is very labor intensive. Our, and I doubt few, departments do enough in this regard. One disappointment I had was learning that the demands of a research one institution, such as mine, leaves little time for students and professors to gather informally. Those informal settings often are the places that another form of education and mentoring takes place. I want to make more room in my day for such encounters.
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Training Doctoral Students to Teach

Awarded Grant
Crysdale, Cynthia|Nolan, Lucinda
Catholic University of America
Theological Schools
2005
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to enhance the training of its doctoral students in teaching skills and to better prepare them for teaching careers in theology and religious studies. Project Goals. 1) to refine and improve the training that we give to both sets of graduate students through course offerings and workshops, 2) to train current faculty as supervisors of Teaching Assistants and to recruit and train mentors/supervisors for the Teaching Fellows, 3) to ...
Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to enhance the training of its doctoral students in teaching skills and to better prepare them for teaching careers in theology and religious studies. Project Goals. 1) to refine and improve the training that we give to both sets of graduate students through course offerings and workshops, 2) to train current faculty as supervisors of Teaching Assistants and to recruit and train mentors/supervisors for the Teaching Fellows, 3) to develop evaluation mechanisms for both professors and students involved in such programs and , 4) to create a network of contacts for teaching opportunities for our students from beyond the university itself.

Learning Abstract :
The Wabash grant for mentoring doctoral students has allowed the School of Theology and Religious Studies of the Catholic University of America to be more intentional in its efforts to prepare graduate students for teaching careers in theology and religious studies. Through coursework, workshops, guest lectures and seminars made possible by the grant, pedagogical issues have been brought to the forefront. The primary learning experiences from this grant project are a developed awareness of the necessity for such intentionality as well as the recognition of the dual importance of the engagement and preparation of both faculty mentors and students in the process.

The collegiality and personal guidance that results from the cooperation and conversation among faculty mentors and their proteges ads to the theoretical and practical learning experienced by the teaching assistants and teaching fellows. The grant additionally allowed us to concentrate on pedagogical concerns that are unique to the discipline of theology and religious studies and has been an added benefit.
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GTU Learning and Teaching Academy (LTA) for Future Faculty

Awarded Grant
Donahue, James|Maloney, Maureen
Graduate Theological Union
Theological Schools
2006
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Two two-week intensive intersession courses which prepare students for two semesters of supervised assisting and direct teaching experience with experienced faculty mentors. Throughout the two year project, students and faculty mentors will participate in teaching and learning forums designed to encourage ongoing collegial dialogue and cooperation.
Proposal abstract :
Two two-week intensive intersession courses which prepare students for two semesters of supervised assisting and direct teaching experience with experienced faculty mentors. Throughout the two year project, students and faculty mentors will participate in teaching and learning forums designed to encourage ongoing collegial dialogue and cooperation.

Learning Abstract :
As the Graduate Theological Union attempted to deepen their practical commitment to engagement with the most pressing questions of meaning and value facing communities and the world today, it became clear to them that developing their doctoral students as engaged teaching scholars was critical. It likewise became clear that traditional models of doctoral student mentoring which focus primarily on career development and advancement or on disciplinary development were not entirely helpful. Rather, they undertook to develop institutionally-supported practices of vocational development focused on practical classroom engagement with questions of meaning and value across the disciplines of religion and theology. Their project showed the importance of active, experiential learning across multiple matrices of significant professional relationships-those with faculty mentors, colleagues, and administrators. Negotiating these complex professional relationships, while also planning and teaching courses that emphasize "big question" learning, allowed Fellows to live the role of junior faculty member in very practical ways that pressed on easy philosophical or ideological approaches to learning and teaching.

The GTU Preparing Future Faculty Project also invited them, as an institution, to consider the ways in which they can systematically encourage and support effective mentoring toward vocations of teaching scholarship. The impact of this is, they believe, both challenging and encouraging, pressing for a change in academic culture that will allow the GTU to function more fully as a place "where religion meets the world."

The significance of the Teagle Wabash Project cannot be underestimated in terms of what is has meant to the GTU. The cultivation of a nucleus of graduate students and faculty committed to excellent teaching has created a hub of conversation, research and collaboration that has enlivened their already stimulating academic environment. One of the goals of the GTU is to become a national center of excellence for the training of future generations of teachers in theological and religious studies. They believe, with the funding from the Teagle Foundation and the Wabash Center that they are on their way to achieving this.
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A Guided Solo Flight: Nurturing Reflective Teaching Practice through Teaching Experience, Peer Reflection, and Mentoring

Awarded Grant
Robbins, Gregory|Turpin, Katherine
Iliff School of Theology
Theological Schools
2006
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
This grant will fund a three-year extended preparation for teaching faculty to educate and mentor Ph.D. students in relation to the teaching task at the University and graduate school level. A cohort of student teaching fellows drawn from students in the Joint Doctoral Program of the University of Denver and the Iliff School of Theology will be mentored by a group of faculty. Student participants will engage in solo ...
Proposal abstract :
This grant will fund a three-year extended preparation for teaching faculty to educate and mentor Ph.D. students in relation to the teaching task at the University and graduate school level. A cohort of student teaching fellows drawn from students in the Joint Doctoral Program of the University of Denver and the Iliff School of Theology will be mentored by a group of faculty. Student participants will engage in solo or fully team-taught instruction of a course, peer reflection seminar, preparatory workshops, and a mentoring relationship with a faculty member. Faculty mentors will be recruited from the Joint Ph.D. faculty of each school, and trained to provide peer-supported mentoring for selected Ph.D. students.

Learning Abstract :
We learned many things about the professional development of emerging teachers during their graduate school years. First, we learned that one-to-one mentoring for teaching, particularly at the course development stage, was enormously useful for beginning teachers. Second, we found that Faculty Mentors enjoyed mentoring into the profession of teaching, but they had to be reminded that this was an important part of their work. Third, we found that attention to the development of teaching in this one program prompted our students to advocate for and gain teaching opportunities outside of the Fellows program within our institutional context. Fourth, we learned that the mutual observation and reflection moments between Fellows and Mentors could cause a great deal of anxiety for the student Fellows and needed careful introduction, guidelines, and attention to the power differential between Fellows and Mentors. Fifth, we learned that sharing critical incidents requires a fair amount of coaching to allow them to be a useful tool for honest reflection on teaching practice. Sixth, we learned that doctoral students offering electives needed special and strategic marketing for their courses, help in defining courses that would appeal to a wide range of potential students, and help in translating their highly specialized vocabulary into welcoming course descriptions and syllabi for their undergraduate and M.Div. students. Seventh, we learned that the resources of the broader university for new faculty orientation and training were very useful for doctoral students. Finally, in leading the Peer Reflection Group, we found that having a common text (John C. Bean, Engaging Ideas) and a theme (integrating writing with critical thinking and active learning) served to provide both structure and added purpose to the conversations with Teaching Fellows, in addition to the free-ranging discussions that arose out of the concrete teaching experiences. Through the process of introducing the norm of collaboration and mutual reflection on teaching practice early in the professional development of our graduate students as teachers, we have actively sought to avoid pedagogical isolationism in another generation of academic professionals.
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The Challenge of Religious History: Improving Undergraduate and Graduate Education in a Public University

Awarded Grant
Sterk, Andrea|Caputo, Nina
University of Florida
Colleges/Universities
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
This project aims to promote more effective teaching of religious history, with a focus on the Abrahamic traditions of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. A 16-month multi-layered series will foster sustained conversation among those who teach in this area. Over the course of three semesters prominent scholar-teachers with specializations from antiquity to modern America will engage faculty and students on three levels: 1) a broader public lecture; 2) a smaller seminar on pedagogy ...
Proposal abstract :
This project aims to promote more effective teaching of religious history, with a focus on the Abrahamic traditions of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. A 16-month multi-layered series will foster sustained conversation among those who teach in this area. Over the course of three semesters prominent scholar-teachers with specializations from antiquity to modern America will engage faculty and students on three levels: 1) a broader public lecture; 2) a smaller seminar on pedagogy for faculty and graduate students; and 3) informal discussion over meals. They will address new methodologies in teaching and research, the benefits as well as the limitations of the secular setting, and the overlapping identities of both historical religious communities and contemporary religious historians in the postmodern university. While the primary target audience is faculty and graduate students at the University of Florida, a volume of essays is intended for those who teach religious history at other institutions.

Learning Abstract :
Despite both the practical and conceptual challenges involved, we learned that an extended, multi-layered series is an effective means of generating and sustaining dialogue on a circumscribed theme. Though a large public university, the University of Florida is somewhat off the beaten track of many very prominent academics. In organizing this series, we were careful to invite scholars who not only lectured, but engaged in individual and group meetings with faculty and graduate students. This truly fostered the development of an intellectual community and ongoing conversation. We were very pleased that a core group of approximately 20 graduate students attended lectures and seminars presented by twelve different scholars over the course of three semesters. This project, then, was ultimately successful in promoting teaching and learning about religion in history and in shaping those who engage in this endeavor at the University of Florida and at other institutions.
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Introducing the Bible to Seminarians: A Faculty and Graduate Student Workshop to Develop Practices and Enhance Skills for Teaching Biblical Introduction and Exegesis

Awarded Grant
Fewell, Danna
Drew University
Colleges/Universities
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
We envision a 1.5 day workshop that will 'jump-start' a more sustained effort to incorporate into our graduate program in biblical studies increased attention to pedagogical issues and practices. This initial gathering of faculty and PhD students is designed to provide an opportunity for current and future teachers to reflect critically upon the challenges of introducing critical biblical study to first year seminarians. This structured time together will: 1) give new and ...
Proposal abstract :
We envision a 1.5 day workshop that will 'jump-start' a more sustained effort to incorporate into our graduate program in biblical studies increased attention to pedagogical issues and practices. This initial gathering of faculty and PhD students is designed to provide an opportunity for current and future teachers to reflect critically upon the challenges of introducing critical biblical study to first year seminarians. This structured time together will: 1) give new and continuing faculty an opportunity to review and refine our current goals and practices in our biblical introduction courses at Drew; 2) give graduate students the opportunity to engage faculty on the topic of teaching the Bible to students new to the critical study of religious texts; 3) begin to ready doctoral students for teaching assistantships for the coming academic year. In addition to analytical discussion among faculty and students about the learning needs to seminarians and ways these might be met in the classroom, the workshop will also provide "hands-on" session in which the students will work on their practical skills as teachers of exegesis.

Learning Abstract :
The workshop was a productive occasion for critical reflection and conversation about teaching and learning both in broad terms and with focus on particular issues. It provided a rare opportunity for Drew graduate students to engage committed faculty about the ideologies and practicalities of teaching. Among the insights that emerged were the students' expressed desire and need 1) for more "practice" teaching experiences that involve faculty and peer feedback; 2) for occasions to collaborate with peers in preparing courses, classroom activities, and means of assessment; and 3) for further opportunities to hone teaching skills related to discussion group leadership, interactive lecturing, negotiating conflict in the classroom, and developing teaching strategies that appeal to different types of learners. The central challenge facing Drew, as with many academic institutions in the current economic crisis, remains how to improve teacher training in the GDR in an environment of reduced personnel and financial resources.
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Challenges and Resources for Teaching Catholic Theology in the Teens: A Consultation of Graduate and Undergraduate Educators

Awarded Grant
Ashley, J. Matthew
University of Notre Dame
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Theological Pedagogy must respond to the audiences of church, society, and academy. As the first decade of the new millennium comes to a close, all three of these audiences are in flux for Catholic theological education. The general question that this consultation will take up is how graduate theological education in Catholic theology can better prepare its graduates to respond to the changing scene when they take up positions that ...
Proposal abstract :
Theological Pedagogy must respond to the audiences of church, society, and academy. As the first decade of the new millennium comes to a close, all three of these audiences are in flux for Catholic theological education. The general question that this consultation will take up is how graduate theological education in Catholic theology can better prepare its graduates to respond to the changing scene when they take up positions that involve undergraduate teaching. It will do so by brining together directors of Catholic graduate programs in theology, a select group of chairs of undergraduate programs in Catholic theology, teachers of theology, current doctoral students and recent graduates, to discuss the changing scene in Catholic theological education from their different institutional contexts. The goal is to give directors of graduate programs valuable information for assessing the effectiveness of their curricula and programs in professional development and pedagogy, and to give chairs and directors of undergraduate programs a better knowledge of the educational contexts from which they are drawing new faculty.

Learning Abstract :
The consultation clearly demonstrated the fruitfulness of conversations between teachers of theology from diverse institutional settings. The impact of context on challenges and resources for teaching clearly emerged as well as common concerns and a common love of teaching and theology that united the participants despite their differences. Surveying members in advance and allowing their feedback to set the agenda paid dividends. The mixture of plenary addresses, small-group sessions and concluding plenary discussions (with "informal conversation time" too) worked well. The diversity of viewpoints was very useful for the reasons just stated. A further useful element (if time had allowed) would have been to have participants meet who had the same institutional setting, so that they could further the conversation and suggest some best practices to take back with them. Having underestimated the amount of work for follow-up, I would budget and plan for additional assistance after the consultation.
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Graduate Program in Religious Studies

Awarded Grant
Wood, Charles
Southern Methodist University
Colleges/Universities
2008
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
The Graduate Program in Religious Studies at Southern Methodist University proposes a short research project looking into the design, operation, and support of programs that prepare graduate students to be effective teachers in religious and theological studies. The aim of the project is to gather information and then to craft a project design and a related proposal for support for a pilot project of their own that will build on ...
Proposal abstract :
The Graduate Program in Religious Studies at Southern Methodist University proposes a short research project looking into the design, operation, and support of programs that prepare graduate students to be effective teachers in religious and theological studies. The aim of the project is to gather information and then to craft a project design and a related proposal for support for a pilot project of their own that will build on best practices at other institutions while taking advantage of the particular conditions and opportunities at SMU.

Learning Abstract :
The project confirmed our initial basic judgment as to the sort of program that is likely to succeed in our context, expanded our repertoire of promising issues to be explored in preparing graduate students to teach in these fields, and presented some good possibilities for program format. It also alerted us to some hidden problems to be avoided, and underscored the importance of tailoring a program initiative to the distinctive ethos and resources of the institution.
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Global Feminist Theologies in Postcolonial Space: An Immersion Based Pedagogy Model for Theology Doctoral Students

Awarded Grant
Ross, Susan
Loyola University Chicago
Colleges/Universities
2009
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Within graduate Theology programs there are few opportunities for doctoral students to immerse themselves in another culture. Yet this boundary-crossing process could provide a significant pedagogical lens for new teachers in diverse classrooms. This project addresses this concern by advancing a model of immersion pedagogy specifically for advanced doctoral students. The goal of the program is for participants to experience intercultural pedagogy while their learning curve is high and they ...
Proposal abstract :
Within graduate Theology programs there are few opportunities for doctoral students to immerse themselves in another culture. Yet this boundary-crossing process could provide a significant pedagogical lens for new teachers in diverse classrooms. This project addresses this concern by advancing a model of immersion pedagogy specifically for advanced doctoral students. The goal of the program is for participants to experience intercultural pedagogy while their learning curve is high and they have not yet become settled in teaching methods and curricula. This will be accomplished through three phases: 1) intercultural coursework and fieldwork in Nairobi, Kenya, 2) a listening symposium providing pedagogical reflection on the experience, and 3) a resulting academic volume of inter-regionally co-authored essays. This proposal seeks funding for the listening symposium, which will form participants’ pedagogical working skills in light of feminist/womanist and postcolonial concerns while testing a new model for graduate immersion pedagogy.

Learning Abstract :
The goal of the Kenya immersion project was to experience cross-cultural education and pedagogy by having students and faculty work together in courses, fieldwork and service and to apply these experiences in the classroom. We learned that cross-cultural communication should begin at the earliest stages of planning, that students in different cultures respond to challenges differently, and that both listening in respectful silence and speaking out at appropriate moments are necessary for real communication to take place. The success of the project can be seen in how both US. and Kenyan participants continue to be in touch and how this learning is being applied in increasingly diverse classrooms. The disappointments were in the missed opportunities early on that would have addressed these issues. The real contributions are that there is no substitute for face-to-face experience, and that women scholars face common issues in their educational experiences.
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First-Time Teachers

Awarded Grant
Sweeney, Meghan
Boston College
Colleges/Universities
2009
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Doctoral students in theology will be mindful throughout their careers of their vocations as theological teachers, and not only as scholars, when they learn at an early career stage the benefit and necessity of critically reflective teaching. Consequently, the Theology Department of Boston College seeks to work with a Wabash facilitator. This facilitator will lead advanced theology doctoral students (all ABD) who are Teaching Fellows in discussion about the vocation ...
Proposal abstract :
Doctoral students in theology will be mindful throughout their careers of their vocations as theological teachers, and not only as scholars, when they learn at an early career stage the benefit and necessity of critically reflective teaching. Consequently, the Theology Department of Boston College seeks to work with a Wabash facilitator. This facilitator will lead advanced theology doctoral students (all ABD) who are Teaching Fellows in discussion about the vocation of teaching theology. Additionally, the facilitator would help Teaching Fellows to explore their own individual teaching philosophy and teaching persona, especially as these relate to theology courses. Finally, the facilitator would help Teaching Fellows to explore ways to structure courses that enact pedagogical beliefs and hopes.

Learning Abstract :
Three workshops for teaching fellows and teaching assistants were held over 13 months. Participants came prepared with written work. Dr. Joseph Favazza, the workshop facilitator, adeptly set a tone, facilitated exercises, and presented ideas, as well as actively listened to and engaged with workshop participants and their comments and concerns. Although some participants questioned the workshop processes and goals, suspect of the need for focused attention to teaching, the time and effort required to do so, and the various exercises to enable this, generally participants deepened their awareness of the dynamics and complexities of teaching theology, and came to better understand their identity and vocation as theology teachers and scholars. Many participants expressed genuine gratitude for the opportunity to engage in critical reflection on something so important to both theology and to themselves. Many participants commented that revising their philosophy of teaching statement became more difficult after the workshops because they became more aware of issues of metaphor, teaching identity, religious and academic location, and coherence between pedagogical goal and method. The Theology Department at Boston College aims to build from and upon these workshops to create future in-service programs in order to critically reflect upon the vocation of teaching theology.
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Conversations on Pedagogy and the Teaching Vocation

Awarded Grant
Marshall, Bruce
Southern Methodist University
Colleges/Universities
2009
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The pilot program funded by this grant will involve all first- and second-year Ph.D. students in an ongoing series of monthly presentations and discussions on pedagogy and related matters, along with an independent student forum for further reflection on the issues raised. These experiences would offer more structured and comprehensive preparation for practice teaching (normally undertaken in the third or fourth year) than students presently receive, and would better ...
Proposal abstract :
The pilot program funded by this grant will involve all first- and second-year Ph.D. students in an ongoing series of monthly presentations and discussions on pedagogy and related matters, along with an independent student forum for further reflection on the issues raised. These experiences would offer more structured and comprehensive preparation for practice teaching (normally undertaken in the third or fourth year) than students presently receive, and would better equip students for their subsequent teaching careers. The program would draw upon resources from the university’s Center for Teaching Excellence and the Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility as well as from the Graduate Program in Religious Studies (GPRS) itself, enabling students to relate issues in the teaching of theology and religion to broader concerns within higher education generally.

Learning Abstract :
The Graduate Program in Religious Studies at SMU has been able, with the support of its grant from the Wabash Center, to establish an ongoing two year program of monthly conversations among faculty and students on the practice and theory of teaching in theology and religious studies. Our "Conversations on Teaching and Learning" have become a fully integrated part of the student experience in our doctoral program. The very enthusiastic response of Ph.D. students to this program shows that it meets a deeply felt need among future faculty members for substantial training in pedagogy as part of their graduate education. The success of the program has made it a high priority for us, and we have found the resources needed to continue it.
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Moving to the Other Side of the Desk: Deepening the Pedagogical Knowledge of Doctoral Students

Awarded Grant
Boys, Mary|Machado, Daisy
Union Theological Seminary, NY
Theological Schools
2010
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Our proposal centers on providing a seminar for more extensive study of the teaching-learning process for Union’s doctoral students who serve as Teaching Fellows. We hope not only to improve their pedagogical competence and thereby enrich our own course offerings, but also to prepare them more intentionally for their professional lives. This proposal complements the required course for Teaching Fellows and involves informal conversation with faculty members on subjects ...
Proposal abstract :
Our proposal centers on providing a seminar for more extensive study of the teaching-learning process for Union’s doctoral students who serve as Teaching Fellows. We hope not only to improve their pedagogical competence and thereby enrich our own course offerings, but also to prepare them more intentionally for their professional lives. This proposal complements the required course for Teaching Fellows and involves informal conversation with faculty members on subjects such as syllabi construction, cross-cultural issues, grading, and legal matters (e.g., learning disabilities). On a broader institutional level, this project will also engage the faculty in discussion about the roles that Teaching Fellows play in their own teaching.

Learning Abstract :
Our seminar gathered 17 Teaching Fellows (doctoral students who are paid to work as teaching assistants in varied ways) for lunch and discussion on 8 occasions over the course of the 2010-11 academic year. Each meeting centered on a topic intended to enhance their professional development as teachers. Among the most important outcomes of our seminar were: 1) a heightened sense of community among doctoral students; 2) more extensive knowledge about the range of issues that teachers need to consider (e.g., cultural diversity, learning disabilities, communication skills); 3) reconsideration among faculty about Union's practices and policies about Teaching Fellows.
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Virginia Graduate Colloquium on Theology, Ethics, and Culture

Awarded Grant
Mathewes, Charles
University of Virginia
Colleges/Universities
2011
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Teaching religion in post-secondary classrooms provides distinct challenges to young faculty. Faculty face questions of how to present primary theological and religious texts, including how best to promote deep learning among students who often hold normative claims about the course matter. This colloquium will bring together graduate students and faculty for reflection on teaching religion in today’s pluralistic classroom. Students will present research on confessional commitments in pluralistic societies ...
Proposal abstract :
Teaching religion in post-secondary classrooms provides distinct challenges to young faculty. Faculty face questions of how to present primary theological and religious texts, including how best to promote deep learning among students who often hold normative claims about the course matter. This colloquium will bring together graduate students and faculty for reflection on teaching religion in today’s pluralistic classroom. Students will present research on confessional commitments in pluralistic societies and will engage in roundtable discussions on teaching persona and course design. UVA faculty who have wide experience teaching a religiously, and otherwise, diverse group of students will moderate discussions with graduate students who will soon teach in a variety of pluralistic settings. A grant from the Wabash Center will enable funding of travel stipends for participants from a variety of programs and meals at which participants will be encouraged to continue discussions between faculty and graduate students.

Learning Abstract :
Thirty graduate students and seven faculty members from seven colleges and universities participated in the Virginia Graduate Colloquium on Theology, Ethics, and Culture. Participants presented current research on the topic "Confessional Commitments in Pluralistic Publics" and discussed practical approaches to teaching religious texts in a pluralistic classroom. An associate of the University of Virginia Teaching Resource Center facilitated round-table discussions on Perry's stages of intellectual questioning and commitments addressing how undergraduate students engage texts in theology and religious studies courses and how students integrate authors' perspectives with the beliefs, questions, and skepticisms they bring into the classroom. Considering sample syllabi and classroom situations, discussants shared best practices for facilitating deep learning of religious subject matter, handling diverse reactions to course material, and designing courses and syllabi to encourage student learning. Participants gave particular attention to the way students in religious studies courses interact with texts, instructors, and fellow students.
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Preparing Graduate Students to Teach Religion in Canadian Post-Secondary Institutions

Awarded Grant
Benn, James
McMaster University
Colleges/Universities
2012
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Teaching religion in post-secondary institutions in Canada poses unique challenges in the North American academic environment. Because of the large size of many Canadian institutions and low faculty to student ratios in Humanities and Social Sciences, most undergraduate teaching in Religious Studies takes the form of large lecture courses—possibly as many as 300–400 students in first-year courses, maybe reaching 50–100 at the third year, and small classes only in the fourth ...
Proposal abstract :
Teaching religion in post-secondary institutions in Canada poses unique challenges in the North American academic environment. Because of the large size of many Canadian institutions and low faculty to student ratios in Humanities and Social Sciences, most undergraduate teaching in Religious Studies takes the form of large lecture courses—possibly as many as 300–400 students in first-year courses, maybe reaching 50–100 at the third year, and small classes only in the fourth year. Graduate students in Religious Studies need to be prepared to teach effectively in these large courses, to deploy with confidence in-class materials, assignments, online elements, etc., and to utilize any support in the form of TAs or markers. We propose a workshop that will explore the challenges facing the new undergraduate teacher of religion and will devise a set of best practices that could be adopted in training teachers as part of their graduate education.

Learning Abstract :
Teaching religion in post-secondary institutions in Canada poses unique challenges in the North American academic environment. Because of the large size of many Canadian institutions and low faculty to student ratios in Humanities and Social Sciences, most undergraduate teaching in Religious Studies takes the form of large lecture courses - possibly as many as 300-400 students in first-year courses, maybe reaching 50-100 at the third year, and small classes only in the fourth year. Graduate students in Religious Studies need to be prepared to teach effectively in these large courses, to deploy with confidence in-class materials, assignments, online elements, etc., and to utilize any support in the form of TAs or markers. Preparing students to become effective teachers of religion requires developing best practices in three areas: the training and support for new and current TAs; professional development; and the departmental culture of teaching and learning.
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Training Tomorrow’s Teachers: Pedagogy and Practical Teaching Skills for Graduate Students

Awarded Grant
Schwartz, Shuly|Kohn, Shira
Jewish Theological Seminary of America
Colleges/Universities
2012
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
The Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) prepares doctoral students for teaching positions in a variety of settings upon graduation, including college and university departments of Religious Studies and/or Jewish Studies, seminaries, and public institutions such as museums. While we encourage PhD candidates to serve as teaching assistants or course instructors during their course of study, they could be more effective if they were trained uniformly for these roles. Building on ...
Proposal abstract :
The Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) prepares doctoral students for teaching positions in a variety of settings upon graduation, including college and university departments of Religious Studies and/or Jewish Studies, seminaries, and public institutions such as museums. While we encourage PhD candidates to serve as teaching assistants or course instructors during their course of study, they could be more effective if they were trained uniformly for these roles. Building on a prior Wabash Center grant, we will create a training series for doctoral students through which they examine various pedagogic models and their practical application in the classroom. The format will entail programs and workshops facilitated by JTS faculty, alumni, and outside specialists in pedagogy and education, mentoring sessions, and peer working groups. Students will gain practical skills and exposure to excellent models and strategies for effective teaching, making them stronger educators in their post-doctoral careers.

Learning Abstract :
Our efforts to develop a first-rate teacher-training program enabled us to more deeply anchor pedagogical training, faculty mentoring and alumni involvement into the fabric of The Jewish Theological Seminary's Kekst Graduate School. As a result, a focus on pedagogy and mentoring is now intrinsic to the identity of the doctoral program, an essential part of messaging in our recruitment strategy, and a growing part of our alumni relations.
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Mentoring through Team-Taught Introduction to Theology

Awarded Grant
Masson, Robert
Marquette University
Colleges/Universities
2012
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
A new team-taught section of Theo 1001 will be offered starting in the fall 2013 and spring 2014 to develop graduate students’ teaching capacity by involving them in all phases of designing, teaching, and assessing a first-level course in theology. The proposed team-taught sections will include 4 faculty and 8 graduate students per year. Through creating the opportunity each semester for the faculty to explicitly reflect with graduate students on the design and implementation of ...
Proposal abstract :
A new team-taught section of Theo 1001 will be offered starting in the fall 2013 and spring 2014 to develop graduate students’ teaching capacity by involving them in all phases of designing, teaching, and assessing a first-level course in theology. The proposed team-taught sections will include 4 faculty and 8 graduate students per year. Through creating the opportunity each semester for the faculty to explicitly reflect with graduate students on the design and implementation of the first course, the team-taught sections will make the graduate students’ initiation into the craft of teaching more programmatic, intentional, and graduated. Each year new graduate students will rotate into the course and faculty will rotate on and off the course. These rotations will provide ongoing opportunities each semester for reflection, cooperation, and revision. After the initial year, these team-taught sections will be sustainable without external grants or additional costs to the University.

Learning Abstract :
The initiation of a team-taught section of the introduction to theology in 2013-2014 demonstrated the viability of collaborative teaching as a model for a more programmatic, intentional, and graduated introduction to the craft of teaching. The collaboration between five full-time faculty and eight graduate students on all phases of design, teaching, and assessment provided an invaluable occasion for reflecting and sharing best practices among the faculty and graduate student participants. It was a significant improvement in the preparation of our graduate students for teaching. The inherent pedagogical challenges of team-teaching proved to be an asset in so far as these focused the team's attention on helping undergraduates discern the coherence of the course's narrative, line of argumentation, readings, and exercises. This initiative has prompted a broader consideration in the department about the possibility of establishing analogous collaborative models as part of our program for all Ph.D. students.
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Assessing the Training of Graduate Teaching Assistants in the Religion Department at the University of Georgia

Awarded Grant
Medine, Carolyn
University of Georgia
Colleges/Universities
2013
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
This grant will be used to assess the practices I have instituted in my classes for training graduate students to take leadership roles in the classroom, particularly to analyze data gathered from Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) and to support a gathering of the GTAs and you over dinner to discuss the results. I will work with four students who have been my graduate assistants for a year to understand whether ...
Proposal abstract :
This grant will be used to assess the practices I have instituted in my classes for training graduate students to take leadership roles in the classroom, particularly to analyze data gathered from Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) and to support a gathering of the GTAs and you over dinner to discuss the results. I will work with four students who have been my graduate assistants for a year to understand whether the pedagogy I put in place - designing the Friday workshop sessions, for example - was one that they could transfer to their own classes as teachers of record.

Learning Abstract :
Carefully designing and structuring active learning activities for breakout sessions in large classes makes the classroom a safe space for beginning teachers, giving them transportable teaching skills, including how to design class discussions, how to engage undergraduate students in critical thinking activities, and how to scaffold the learning elements of ideas (the information that students must learn) with connections (learning the relationship between kinds of information), and extensions (the movement beyond rote learning and comparison/contrast to critical thinking). The structuring, which also serves the students well, acts like playing scales, the basic activity of music, on which the young teacher can improvise as his or her confidence in the classroom grows.
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Developing Your Craft: Creativity in the Formation of the Religious Education Scholar

Awarded Grant
Hess, Mary
Religious Education Association
Agencies
2014
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The REA proposes to host two events at its 2014 annual meeting under the aegis of the Wabash Center. The first is a daylong pre-conference event for students, teachers, and practitioners that will unfold in two parts. Participants can choose to be present for one part or both parts of the day. The second event is the Ph.D. student breakfast, traditionally sponsored by the Wabash Center, which provides a setting ...
Proposal abstract :
The REA proposes to host two events at its 2014 annual meeting under the aegis of the Wabash Center. The first is a daylong pre-conference event for students, teachers, and practitioners that will unfold in two parts. Participants can choose to be present for one part or both parts of the day. The second event is the Ph.D. student breakfast, traditionally sponsored by the Wabash Center, which provides a setting at the Annual Meeting where students gather to hear from senior scholars on thriving as a teaching scholar inside and outside the academy. Both events will address particular ways that scholars can equip themselves to address the changing contexts of teaching and learning through creative expansion of their repertoire of teaching practices and partnerships.

Learning Abstract :
This small grant was focused on inviting faculty and doctoral students in the field of religious education into engagement with the ecology of digital scholarship and teaching, while nurturing their vocational development. A series of workshops on digital culture and pedagogy which stressed issues of a scholar's "digital presence" and "teaching with experience using digital tools" were offered as a pre-conference event just prior to the 2014 Annual REA meeting. A breakfast seminar for doctoral students was also held during the convention, at which Dr. Willie James Jennings offered the language of artistry as a rich resource for sustaining the vocation of a scholar/teacher in this complex and rapidly transforming scholarly field. In particular he invited doctoral students to consider the adaptive challenges and opportunities the field of religious education poses to them, and he offered the generative framework of being an artist as a strategy for engaging such challenges.
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Teaching Theology and Religion in the Twenty-First Century: Challenges, Prospect, and the Ph.D.

Awarded Grant
Mathewes, Charles
University of Virginia
Colleges/Universities
2014
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
We seek funding to host a two-day workshop, in consultation with the Wabash Center, which will evaluate the role of U.Va’s Ph.D. program in the formation of teachers of religion and theology. While we intend to use this opportunity to assess the efficacy of the various elements of the Ph.D. program, we will focus especially on gauging the preparedness of our graduates for teaching duties in ...
Proposal abstract :
We seek funding to host a two-day workshop, in consultation with the Wabash Center, which will evaluate the role of U.Va’s Ph.D. program in the formation of teachers of religion and theology. While we intend to use this opportunity to assess the efficacy of the various elements of the Ph.D. program, we will focus especially on gauging the preparedness of our graduates for teaching duties in the academy. To these ends, the workshop will gather information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of the graduate experience at U.Va using first-person data from graduates in recent years. This data will enable U.Va to consider how best to structure its Ph.D. program in years to come; it will also provide a case study from which other institutions may profit.

Learning Abstract :
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Fostering Inquiry-based Learning in Undergraduate Theology Courses

Awarded Grant
Born, Christopher|Benson, Joshua
Catholic University of America
Theological Schools
2014
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
This project has two closely related goals. We first seek to identify how to revamp our introductory undergraduate theology course (TRS 201: Faith Seeking Understanding) so it can serve both as a gateway course to later theology and religious studies courses, and, more importantly, an engaging, inquiry-based course more focused on active student learning. Second, we seek to train all our undergraduate instructors in practices that make their courses more inquiry-based. ...
Proposal abstract :
This project has two closely related goals. We first seek to identify how to revamp our introductory undergraduate theology course (TRS 201: Faith Seeking Understanding) so it can serve both as a gateway course to later theology and religious studies courses, and, more importantly, an engaging, inquiry-based course more focused on active student learning. Second, we seek to train all our undergraduate instructors in practices that make their courses more inquiry-based. The project allows The Catholic University of America to train full-time faculty mentors who can continue forming doctoral students in best practices related to inquiry-based learning. Additionally, through continued implementation and evaluation of the new pedagogical practices, we can spread the model to other undergraduate courses across our school. The process will enhance the undergraduate experience within these courses, effectively train graduate students to incorporate this model in future positions, and enrich the teaching experiences of current full-time faculty.

Learning Abstract :
We set out to introduce undergraduate instructors to the inquiry-based teaching model to more effectively engage undergraduate students and connect theology and religious studies to their lives and other fields of study. Starting with "big questions" and other issues aligned with students' interests, instructors used authors and theories in theology and religious studies as effective routes to consider these larger concerns. Challenges arose in moving from the theoretical to the practical with regard to the design and delivery of inquiry-based learning activities. Additionally, we recognized the importance of assessing how and whether including the types of activities in undergraduate courses actually increase student engagement. In the end, we were most successful when instructors gathered and discussed how to implement specific in-class or out-of-class activities related to the inquiry-based model. Peer observations and subsequent conversations were also effective to illustrate utilization of the inquiry-based method in tangible activities and exercises.
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Difficult Conversations: A Pedagogy Initiative for Graduate Students in Religious Studies at the University of Virginia

Awarded Grant
Halvorson-Taylor, Martien|Jenkins, Willis
University of Virginia
Colleges/Universities
2015
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
We propose to develop pedagogical mentoring for doctoral students learning to teach religious studies in the midst of community confrontations with social violence. Responding specifically to recent campus inquiries into sexual violence, and extending to address economic inequality and racism, we will develop an initiative organized around a series of conversations between student teachers and faculty mentors focused on specific techniques for teaching into difficult questions and community crises of ...
Proposal abstract :
We propose to develop pedagogical mentoring for doctoral students learning to teach religious studies in the midst of community confrontations with social violence. Responding specifically to recent campus inquiries into sexual violence, and extending to address economic inequality and racism, we will develop an initiative organized around a series of conversations between student teachers and faculty mentors focused on specific techniques for teaching into difficult questions and community crises of social violence.

Learning Abstract :
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Graduate Program Teaching Initiative Workshop to Assess the Preparation of PhD Students for Teaching Appointments

Awarded Grant
Kujawa-Holbrook, Sheryl
Claremont School of Theology
Theological Schools
2015
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Proposal abstract :


Learning Abstract :
The purpose of this project was to bring together PhD alums and faculty of the Claremont School of Theology to reflect on the art of teaching in our context, our own history and practices of teaching, and how we want to transform our teaching in the future. We are gifted with a diverse array of exemplary teachers, however, we do not have much reflective time or space, thus this grant gave us the opportunity and accountability to do this work. Some of the subjects raised by the project include, supporting conversations among faculty on teaching beyond content-delivery; supporting teaching assistants and doctoral students in their development as teachers, and, examining our educational priorities and ethos in the context of teaching and learning. Lastly, what are the unique contributions which CST can make to the field of teaching through the work of our faculty and alumni?
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Graduate Program Teaching Initiative Workshop to Assess the Preparation of PhD Students for Teaching Appointments

Awarded Grant
Pennington, Jonathan
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2015
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Proposal abstract :


Learning Abstract :
Through the generous grant of the Wabash GPTI program we were able to reconnect with many of our graduates and gather valuable feedback regarding their training at SBTS and their subsequent experience as teachers. Through the on-campus consultation we learned that while we have done a generally good job of training our graduates to be skilled in their specific fields of study, we have not provided them knowledge of or training with regards to the challenges of teaching at the undergraduate level, which is what most are actually doing. This GPTI has given us the impetus and data to pursue ongoing evaluation of our PhD program and to effect changes that will directly impact how we train our PhD students as teachers.
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Two Year Pilot Project for Directed Program of Pedagogical Training

Awarded Grant
Meyers, Eric
Duke Divinity School
Theological Schools
2000
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for pedagogical instruction and formal supervision and mentoring for Ph.D. students.
Proposal abstract :
Support for pedagogical instruction and formal supervision and mentoring for Ph.D. students.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a pilot program on the training of graduate students for teaching careers, with primary emphasis on providing a Director of Pedagogical Training. This would locate the instruction under the direction of a master teacher from the program, provide formal supervision of Graduate Instructor teaching, and institutionalize Duke's pedagogical training activities.
The program allowed for many important aspects of graduate instructor training, such as, expansion of the job placement library, mock interviews, sample cv's and job application letters, outside teaching consultants, instructional technology workshops and training sessions.
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Case Book on the Teaching of Religion

Awarded Grant
Eckel, David
Boston University
Colleges/Universities
1999
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Renewal of 1997 grant to extend a book of case studies about real-life classroom situations for use in training doctoral students and teaching fellows, focusing on the religious dimension of their work in the classroom.
Proposal abstract :
Renewal of 1997 grant to extend a book of case studies about real-life classroom situations for use in training doctoral students and teaching fellows, focusing on the religious dimension of their work in the classroom.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to continue the work begun two years earlier which involved creating a book of case studies about real-life classroom situations. The book would emerge from seminars for doctoral students on teaching, using an adapted version of the case study method developed at the Harvard Business School. With this second grant they hoped to create cases focusing on the religious dimensions of their classroom work, as well as expand its audience to include the teaching fellows of the Boston University School of Theology.
The manuscript, Casebook for College and University Instructors of Religion, was created. The project director reports that their teaching fellows found it both exciting and useful to reflect upon their teaching using this method, and that it made them "far more thoughtful and effective teachers."
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Training Future Teachers of Christian Thought for Diverse Institutional Settings

Awarded Grant
Hauerwas, Stanley |Rogers, Eugene
University of Virginia
Colleges/Universities
1999
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Start a two-year series of annual symposia for faculty and graduate students at the University of Virginia and Duke University, alternating yearly between the two schools, to promote better teaching of Christian thought among graduate students.
Proposal abstract :
Start a two-year series of annual symposia for faculty and graduate students at the University of Virginia and Duke University, alternating yearly between the two schools, to promote better teaching of Christian thought among graduate students.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop an ongoing series of annual symposia at the University of Virginia and Duke University, alternating yearly between Charlottesville and Durham, to promote better teaching of Christian thought among graduate students.
The focus of the gatherings was on graduate students presenting sample job talks. They chose this model because of the difficulty of this type of presentation, which has a dual audience and purpose. Also, holding the symposia at two different institutions allowed graduate students to experience different contexts in which theology and religious studies is taught. The project directors report that the symposia were well attended and were extremely useful to the graduate students in their professional development.
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Preparation of Graduate Students for Careers as Teachers

Awarded Grant
TeSelle, Eugene
Vanderbilt University
Colleges/Universities
1999
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Enhancement of required seminars for first-year Ph.D. students through “apprentice” relationships with Master Teaching Fellow, recent graduates in first teaching positions, and the wider community of scholars in the field of religion.
Proposal abstract :
Enhancement of required seminars for first-year Ph.D. students through “apprentice” relationships with Master Teaching Fellow, recent graduates in first teaching positions, and the wider community of scholars in the field of religion.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought "enhancement of required seminars for first-year Ph.D. students through ‘apprentice' relationships with Master Teaching Fellow, recent graduates in first teaching positions, and the wider community of scholars in the field of religion." The project built upon earlier funded projects by The Wabash Center.
They felt that this follow-up grant helped them to "sustain and refine" their training program. The project director reports that the program is viewed by both faculty and students as a major asset of the department and that it is frequently cited by the Vanderbilt Center for Teaching as a model program among the graduate departments of the university.
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Theological Pedagogy

Awarded Grant
Szarek, Gene
Loyola University Chicago
Colleges/Universities
1999
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
The Theology Department will develop a practicum to initiate a formal program to train graduate students in the methodologies of student learning, teaching styles, teaching strategies, and a coherent, underlying philosophy of teaching.
Proposal abstract :
The Theology Department will develop a practicum to initiate a formal program to train graduate students in the methodologies of student learning, teaching styles, teaching strategies, and a coherent, underlying philosophy of teaching.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a program to train doctoral students in methodologies of student learning, teaching styles, teaching strategies, and to develop a coherent philosophy of teaching. This would be achieved through a non-credit course for doctoral students.
The program was successful in its attempt to train teachers. The project director reports that there appeared to be differing expectations among students about whether the course should lean toward pedagogical theory or toward a teaching practicum.
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Preparation of Graduate Students for Careers as Teachers

Awarded Grant
TeSelle, Eugene
Vanderbilt University
Colleges/Universities
1997
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Preliminary and implementation grants to develop a seminar on teaching with visiting speakers, a teaching fellow, training in the use of technology, and faculty conversation about pedagogy.
Proposal abstract :
Preliminary and implementation grants to develop a seminar on teaching with visiting speakers, a teaching fellow, training in the use of technology, and faculty conversation about pedagogy.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop their seminar on the teaching of religion. Building upon an earlier Wabash grant, they planned to expand several areas developed in the seminar: visiting speakers, supporting a Master Teaching Fellow in Religion, training in the use of technology in teaching, and faculty development.
One of the most helpful features of the project involved inviting recent Ph.D. graduates who are teaching full-time to discuss their experiences with students and faculty. This provided a useful "reality check" to the seminar students. They also discovered that there was little need for technology training, since most of the graduate students came with a great deal of computer literacy. Finally, one of the most successful aspects of the project was the faculty seminars on teaching under the leadership of Bonnie Miller-McLemore. Faculty members shared course syllabi, discussed teaching experiences and evaluated possible changes in curriculum. This work provided a crucial grounding for future curricular revision.
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Enhancement of Teaching Skills and Professional Preparation for Graduate Students

Awarded Grant
Meyers, Eric
Duke University
Colleges/Universities
1998
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Prepare graduate students for teaching through workshops and colloquia for teaching assistants and ABD’s, mentoring and supervision, with the help of a program administrator.
Proposal abstract :
Prepare graduate students for teaching through workshops and colloquia for teaching assistants and ABD’s, mentoring and supervision, with the help of a program administrator.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to create a program to enhance teaching skills and professional preparation for graduate students in the Department of Religion. The program would consist of instructional workshops on teaching, syllabi construction sessions, colloquia on the interaction of research and teaching, and mentoring and supervision.
The program functioned well as it was proposed. The sessions on syllabi construction were especially useful for students attempting to devise course syllabi for history classes and introductory courses in religious studies. The colloquia were especially helpful in teaching students to present their specialized dissertation material in a comprehensive way to those in diverse areas of religious studies.
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Preparing Outstanding Teachers of Theology

Awarded Grant
Duffey, Michael
Marquette University
Colleges/Universities
1998
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Prepare doctoral students to teach theology through a course in teaching, mentoring activities and teaching opportunities.
Proposal abstract :
Prepare doctoral students to teach theology through a course in teaching, mentoring activities and teaching opportunities.

Learning Abstract :
The university sought to develop a program to train theology doctoral students as future teachers. Their goals were to establish a new graduate course on the teaching of theology and religion, establish a systematic mentoring program for graduate teaching assistants, to create new teaching fellowship opportunities in neighboring institutions.
The grant enabled them to formalize and institutionalize a program to prepare graduate students for teaching careers. They also developed a stable mentoring program. They were unable to develop a program to create new teaching opportunities in a neighboring school because of financial and administrative concerns within the neighboring school. The overall effect of the program was the enhancement of the quality of undergraduate teaching among their teaching staff.
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Improvement in Professional Skills for Future Undergraduate Teachers of Religion

Awarded Grant
Loewe, William
Catholic University of America
Theological Schools
1997
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Faculty workshops and a faculty advisor to improve preparation of graduate students to teach.
Proposal abstract :
Faculty workshops and a faculty advisor to improve preparation of graduate students to teach.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to improve the professional skills of future undergraduate teachers of religion. The program included supervisory skills workshops, release time for a faculty member to supervise graduate teaching assistants, workshops on pedagogy and curriculum, and media workshops.
They were able to offer the following workshops: supervisory skills for faculty and teaching assistants, media workshops in the area of Powerpoint and website/list serve usage for courses, multiple intelligences theory, service learning, effective discussion skills, and teaching writing in religious studies.
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Preparation of Graduate Students for Careers as Teachers

Awarded Grant
Hodgson, Peter
Vanderbilt University
Colleges/Universities
1996
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Preliminary and implementation grants to develop a seminar on teaching with visiting speakers, a teaching fellow, training in the use of technology and faculty conversation about pedagogy.
Proposal abstract :
Preliminary and implementation grants to develop a seminar on teaching with visiting speakers, a teaching fellow, training in the use of technology and faculty conversation about pedagogy.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to improve its seminar on the teaching of religion required of all first year doctoral candidates. The grant funded several guest speakers to the seminar: two recent Ph.D. graduates in their first teaching position and guest speakers from Vanderbilt's Center for Research on Human Development and Vanderbilt's Peabody College of Education and Human Development.
As a result of this project they found that they made better use of the Center for Teaching in the College of Arts and Sciences. Also, they discovered ways to use the student orientation program to encourage discussion of teaching religion. A faculty member in the Divinity School took on a newly created faculty development role for ongoing faculty renewal of pedagogy. Finally, they were able to strengthen doctoral students' use of technology in the classroom.
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Project to Train Graduate Students in Undergraduate Teaching

Awarded Grant
Callaway, Mary
Fordham University
Colleges/Universities
1997
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Development of graduate courses on the vocation of teaching and faculty discussion on teaching religion, facilitated by educational consultants.
Proposal abstract :
Development of graduate courses on the vocation of teaching and faculty discussion on teaching religion, facilitated by educational consultants.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to train graduate students in the undergraduate teaching. They focused on three areas of attention: the practice of teaching, the development of academic professional identity, and an exploration of the teaching profession as vocation. This was pursued through a course entitled, "The Vocation of Teaching Theology" and through informed faculty discussion about teaching theology.
The process of designing and implementing the course involved important faculty discussion about pedagogy in a formal and disciplined way. The department found great value in having a professional in the field of education lead faculty workshops. Also, receiving a grant brought attention of the administration who were then willing to contribute financial support. As a result, the course was made a permanent part of the curriculum. From this point, each teaching fellow will be assigned a faculty mentor for advisement. The faculty expressed a strong desire to continue discussions and workshops on teaching. In general there was an interest in developing the program further.
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Project on Excellence in Teaching

Awarded Grant
Nielsen, Bruce
Jewish Theological Seminary of America
Colleges/Universities
1997
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
A program of workshops, seminars, and individual consultations to prepare graduate students to teach.
Proposal abstract :
A program of workshops, seminars, and individual consultations to prepare graduate students to teach.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a program to prepare students for careers as teaching scholars, entitled The Excellence in Teaching Program. It included the following components: workshops on teaching, a teaching colloquium meeting five times in the academic year, micro-teaching sessions for peer evaluation of the student's teaching instruction, and an individual teaching consultation for the student consisting of the observation of two faculty members.
Through the grant the Seminary was able to establish a position of Director of the Excellence in Teaching Program to administer the program and assist Teaching Assistants. Also, they established teaching colloquia each semester, on for students and one for faculty, which was extremely profitable. Out of this voluntary colloquia developed a required course for teaching assistants on teaching and learning. Individual teaching consultations proved to be one of the most important components of the program. It encouraged both students and professors to be critically reflective of their teaching.
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Project to Develop a Case Book for Teaching in Religion

Awarded Grant
Eckel, David
Boston University
Colleges/Universities
1997
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Development of a case book for use in teaching religion comparable to the case studies about real-life classroom situations developed at Harvard Business School.
Proposal abstract :
Development of a case book for use in teaching religion comparable to the case studies about real-life classroom situations developed at Harvard Business School.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a case book for teaching in religion, based on the model of case studies on teaching developed by the Harvard-Danforth Center for Teaching and Learning. With this tool they hoped to stimulate the quality of teaching at Boston University's religion program, to enhance the professional growth of their graduate students, and to develop a resource that would be useful to programs in graduate schools, divinity schools and liberal arts colleges.
A case book was developed entitled, Where Magic Dwells: A Teaching Casebook for Instruction of Religion in the University. The book includes twelve cases, written and presented by ten different graduate students. Some cases are distinctive to the study of religion and philosophy; other cases are more general to university teaching. The seminar on teaching and case studies became the central location of teacher training in the department. While beginning as an experimental program, it became required in the department.
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The Educational Foundation of Student Assistants in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Caldwell, Elizabeth
McCormick Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
1998
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Design, implementation and evaluation of an integrative seminar for senior students who serve as Educational Assistants in seminary courses.
Proposal abstract :
Design, implementation and evaluation of an integrative seminar for senior students who serve as Educational Assistants in seminary courses.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to design and implement an integrative seminar for senior students who are invited by faculty to serve as Educational Assistants in seminary courses. The goal for the student group involved training in teaching methodology, reading pedagogical literature, learning about adult education theory and multicultural issues, and relating the work to an understanding of the pastor as teacher. The goal for faculty involved evaluating the use of educational assistants in their courses, developing a faculty manual for the use of EAs, and developing a formal faculty discussion on teaching and learning.
The EA seminar was accomplished through a weekend retreat and meetings during the school year. The retreat format facilitated space and time for critical reflection on teaching. Faculty goals were overly ambitious; however, they were able to analyze use of EAs both in their seminary and in both Presbyterian seminaries and Chicago area schools. Faculty teaching and learning discussions were able to take place on two occasions.
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Conflict and Conversation in Religious Studies Classroom Settings: A Workshop at Southern Methodist University

Awarded Grant
DeTemple, Jill
Southern Methodist University
Colleges/Universities
2016
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This grant will fund a two-day workshop on facilitating dialogue across difference for faculty and graduate students in the Graduate Program in Religious Studies at Southern Methodist University. Workshop participants will learn communication and pedagogical techniques to assist them as teachers and participants in creating conditions for constructive conversations about issues many find contentious, divisive, and polarizing especially at the intersection of identity, belief and world view in religious studies ...
Proposal abstract :
This grant will fund a two-day workshop on facilitating dialogue across difference for faculty and graduate students in the Graduate Program in Religious Studies at Southern Methodist University. Workshop participants will learn communication and pedagogical techniques to assist them as teachers and participants in creating conditions for constructive conversations about issues many find contentious, divisive, and polarizing especially at the intersection of identity, belief and world view in religious studies classrooms.

Learning Abstract :
This grant funded a two-day workshop on facilitating dialogue across difference for faculty and graduate students in the Graduate Program in Religious Studies at Southern Methodist University, based on the methodology of Reflective Structured Dialogue as used by Essential Partners, a non-profit that specializes in conflict management. Workshop participants learned communication and pedagogical techniques to assist them as teachers and participants in creating conditions for constructive conversations about issues many find contentious, divisive, and polarizing, especially at the intersection of identity, belief, and world views in religious studies classrooms. Specific topics included making "safe enough" spaces for difficult conversations, thinking of teachers as facilitators, the importance of preparation for dialogue, what makes a good dialogue question, the potential uses of dialogue on campus, and the biological roots of polarization.
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Utilizing Directed Peer Groups to Enhance Teaching Fellow Effectiveness

Awarded Grant
Born, Christopher|Gregory, Bradley
Catholic University of America
Theological Schools
2017
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Following up on a previous grant from the Wabash Center to develop an inquiry-based model of learning across undergraduate theology and religious studies courses, Catholic University’s School of Theology and Religious Studies proposes to further its work in peer mentoring among graduate student teaching fellows. The primary goal of this project is to identify the specific learning activities that are most effective in enhancing student engagement on a variety ...
Proposal abstract :
Following up on a previous grant from the Wabash Center to develop an inquiry-based model of learning across undergraduate theology and religious studies courses, Catholic University’s School of Theology and Religious Studies proposes to further its work in peer mentoring among graduate student teaching fellows. The primary goal of this project is to identify the specific learning activities that are most effective in enhancing student engagement on a variety of religious and theological topics and to implement those activities more widely among faculty and teaching fellows. Secondly, we will catalog the most effective learning activities among graduate teaching fellows as they witness, identify, and incorporate new activities into their own courses. The final goal is to enhance the undergraduate experience by encouraging teaching fellows to utilize best practices or activities related to the array of theology and religious studies topics.

Learning Abstract :
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Forming Rooted, Innovative, and Courageous Teachers

Awarded Grant
Johnson-DeBaufre, Melanie|Kendall, Susan
Drew Theological School
Theological Schools
2017
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The doctoral program at Drew Theological School has a reputation for adventurous transdisciplinarity and social engagement, training scholars for the critical and creative transformation of the disciplines, the academy, and the society. This two-year grant project aims to align the pedagogical and professional mentoring practices of the PhD program with this transformational curricular ethos, cultivating both students and faculty as rooted, innovative, and courageous teacher-scholars. Through structured curricular workshops, teaching ...
Proposal abstract :
The doctoral program at Drew Theological School has a reputation for adventurous transdisciplinarity and social engagement, training scholars for the critical and creative transformation of the disciplines, the academy, and the society. This two-year grant project aims to align the pedagogical and professional mentoring practices of the PhD program with this transformational curricular ethos, cultivating both students and faculty as rooted, innovative, and courageous teacher-scholars. Through structured curricular workshops, teaching colloquia, and collaborative learning projects, we seek to initiate a culture shift in PhD mentoring toward co-learning and collaboration among Drew’s vibrantly diverse faculty and student body. At the end of the project, students will have developed a robust teaching portfolio and faculty will have identified next steps for embedding mentoring for contextually adaptive, interactive, and transformational teaching and learning throughout the PhD curriculum.

Learning Abstract :