Technology and Teaching

Grants - Topic: Technology and Teaching - 70 results

Select an item by clicking its checkbox
Grants cover image

Nurturing ACT’s Vision

Awarded Grant
Saunders, Stanley
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This grant will support a planning session of current officers and other key leaders of the Association for Case Teaching, including selected members from each major region of the country to meet for three goals: 1) the revision of the organizational structure in order to facilitate regional offerings of workshops; 2) the development of a strategic plan for increasing ACT’s visibility and recruitment of potential workshop participants; and 3) the refinement of ...
Proposal abstract :
This grant will support a planning session of current officers and other key leaders of the Association for Case Teaching, including selected members from each major region of the country to meet for three goals: 1) the revision of the organizational structure in order to facilitate regional offerings of workshops; 2) the development of a strategic plan for increasing ACT’s visibility and recruitment of potential workshop participants; and 3) the refinement of case study curricula.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a gathering of the executive committee of the Association for Case Teaching, in order to revision their organizational structure, to develop a strategic plan for reaching a wider constituency, and to refine their curricula for varied expressions of the case study workshop. The discussion was organized around the following topics: Learnings (revisiting Future Search goals), Leanings (rearticulating vision and establishing priorities), Landings (strategies and proposals regarding structure, leadership and funding), and Leaps (assigned responsibilities).
In order to nurture their vision for increased presence and workshops offerings regionally, they agreed to offer advanced training in the Case Method in conjunction with the annual workshops. They also created criteria for matching their organization to an appropriate home base, and developed improved Board procedures. Finally, they continued to develop ways of making their resources available electronically.
Grants cover image

The Sacred Sites of Asia: A Georeferenced Multimedia Instructional Resource

Awarded Grant
Holdrege, Barbara
University of California - Santa Barbara
Undergraduate School
2000
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Design and construction of a geospatially-referenced, multimedia World Wide Web site for the study of sacred sites in Asia that will provide an important instructional resource that can be utilized in a range of undergrad and grad courses on the religions of Asia in depts. of religion and theology in U.S.
Proposal abstract :
Design and construction of a geospatially-referenced, multimedia World Wide Web site for the study of sacred sites in Asia that will provide an important instructional resource that can be utilized in a range of undergrad and grad courses on the religions of Asia in depts. of religion and theology in U.S.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to design and construct a "geospacially-referenced, multimedia World Wide Web site" for the study of 20 sacred sites in Asia. It sought to create a website with a network of interwoven map layers and multimedia resources to allow student interaction from a variety of perspectives.
The team of researchers was able to develop the website database, to develop the website architecture and user interfaces, to maintain and support the website, to collect field data, to collect archival and library data, to inventory and prepare multimedia resources, to design course lessons, and to develop guidebooks and student evaluation procedures.
Grants cover image

Remodeling our Teaching: A New Model for a New Curriculum

Awarded Grant
Fraser, Elouise|DiRaddo, Colleen
Palmer Theological Seminary - Eastern Univ
Theological School
2000
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
A three year project to do intensive theological, philosophical and practical work on a pedagogy that will undergird and guide their incorporation of technology into teaching and learning at the seminary. This project involves new themes, areas of study, and assessment tools for a new competency-based curriculum.
Proposal abstract :
A three year project to do intensive theological, philosophical and practical work on a pedagogy that will undergird and guide their incorporation of technology into teaching and learning at the seminary. This project involves new themes, areas of study, and assessment tools for a new competency-based curriculum.

Learning Abstract :
From this grant we have learned the following principles. There must be commitment to the curriculum vision at the top level of administration followed by support of faculty to facilitate learning to teach in a new way. Even with these present, change occurs slower than anticipated. Changing the way one thinks about teaching from what has been experienced in theological education requires support, time and a willingness to see small incremental change. Faculty learn from each other by having regular scheduled opportunities to talk together about teaching. Thus individual work with one faculty member is multiplied by scheduling "Faculty Show & Tells" - sharing what has and has not worked and problem solving together. Finally, each time a new faculty member joins the community is an opportunity to intentionally orient and train someone in the Seminary's way of designing and teaching courses for an integrated curriculum that informs what is taught.
Grants cover image

Studying the Impact of Distance Learning on Learning, Quality and Community

Awarded Grant
Laughner, Thomas
University of Notre Dame
Undergraduate School
2000
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Three goals. Determine whether students taking online courses that are offered many miles from them are able to learn material presented to them via WebCT? Does the manner in which online materials are provided affect how students process them? Determine if a sense of community can be provided on-line.
Proposal abstract :
Three goals. Determine whether students taking online courses that are offered many miles from them are able to learn material presented to them via WebCT? Does the manner in which online materials are provided affect how students process them? Determine if a sense of community can be provided on-line.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to study the quality of instruction provided to participants in the Institute for Church Life's distance education program, as well as help to understand the implications of Notre Dame's efforts to implement a distance education program. The goals were to assess the course delivery method and interface design, and to determine if a sense of community can be built online between the class and the instructor and each other.
Researchers found that with few exceptions users found the interface easy to use and well-organized. In terms of the creation of community, they found 12 key factors that contributed to a sense of community in the online course. The most important of these were small group chat sessions and online biographies and photos. In general, any strategy that added a personal, human component was well-received and contributed to a sense of community in the online classroom.

Grants cover image

Putting Bible 105 on Solid Ground: Strengthening Messiah College by Improving its Basic Bible Class

Awarded Grant
Cosby, Michael
Messiah College
Undergraduate School
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Faculty workshop to explore and develop a pedagogical philosophy, structure, and resources for improving the required introductory Bible class at Messiah College.
Proposal abstract :
Faculty workshop to explore and develop a pedagogical philosophy, structure, and resources for improving the required introductory Bible class at Messiah College.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funding for a faculty conference aimed at improving the content and delivery of the basic Bible course. This included developing a consistent methodological approach, a statement of philosophy and expectations, the construction of web pages for biblical resources for teaching, and the development of computer-generated visual aids for instruction. An important outcome they hoped to achieve was the assessment and mentoring of adjunct biblical faculty.
The faculty conference enabled curriculum standardization. The remainder of the project focused on evaluating and mentoring the Bible teachers in the school, especially the adjunct professors. A high quality of teaching was observed and individualized mentoring had the effect of affirming teaching and strengthening morale. A website was developed and used to great benefit by the faculty.


Grants cover image

The Virtual World Project: Creating a Virtual World of the Bible and The Early Church

Awarded Grant
O’Keefe, John|Simkins, Ronald
Creighton University
Undergraduate School
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for modern computer imaging technology to create virtual tours of ancient sites for use in teaching biblical studies and history of Christianity.
Proposal abstract :
Support for modern computer imaging technology to create virtual tours of ancient sites for use in teaching biblical studies and history of Christianity.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to use computer imaging technology to create virtual towns of ancient sites for use in the teaching and learning of students of the Bible and early Christianity. They hoped to make the archeological remains of the ancient world more accessible. They also hoped to link those images to interactive maps, photographs of the excavations and artifacts, voice narrations, and samples of ancient texts.
The project directors were able to visit and photograph ten archeological sites in Turkey and six sites in Greece. They produced nearly 8000 photographs, 500 of which are "stand alone" photos depicting details from the various sites visited. The remaining photos were in the process of being assembled into approximately 750 Quick Time Virtual Reality movies of the sites. They also continued development of the Virtual World website, found at http://www.virtualworldproject.org/
Grants cover image

Teaching the Bible: How the History and Culture of Biblical Interpretation in the Bible Belt has Influenced Teaching and Learning in Theology

Awarded Grant
Bonilla, Max
University of St. Thomas (MN)
Undergraduate School
2002
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
To make explicit the cultural assumptions of the Bible Belt that affect teaching and learning in biblical studies by videotaping interviews with Southern pastors, students, and teachers; to develop web resources from the data collected for exploring the formational aspects of learning.
Proposal abstract :
To make explicit the cultural assumptions of the Bible Belt that affect teaching and learning in biblical studies by videotaping interviews with Southern pastors, students, and teachers; to develop web resources from the data collected for exploring the formational aspects of learning.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to understand how teaching trends contributed to the development of hermeneutical and theological assumptions concerning the Bible in the "Bible Belt." Through interviews with pastors, students and professors, the research hoped to discern primarily the role that "Bible Belt" culture plays in the teaching and learning process, as well as the influence of the teaching process directly on the "Bible Belt" cultural perception of the Bible. Hoped for results included a website of collected data and a course on the topic.
Research data collected was put into a website as www.biblebeltresearch.org. The course that emerged was well attended and included a variety of pedagogical strategies including field research and multimedia presentations. Important outcomes of the research also included a paper entitled, "Hermeneutics of the Bible Belt: Struggles in Interpretation" and various talks to local churches to raise awareness of the culture and cultural dynamics of their context.
Grants cover image

Teaching Seminars at the Hebrew Union College

Awarded Grant
Dallaire, Hélène
Hebrew Union College - New York Jewish Institute of Religion
Undergraduate School
2002
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for a guest speaker on Teaching Biblical Hebrew for the faculty’s monthly teaching seminar.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a guest speaker on Teaching Biblical Hebrew for the faculty’s monthly teaching seminar.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a consultant who specializes in Biblical Hebrew instruction to work with their teaching assistants and private tutors who instruct their rabbinical and graduate students in Biblical, Rabbinic and Modern Hebrew.
The consultant, Dr. David Levenson of Florida State University, gave a three-hour presentation on the teaching of Biblical Hebrew. Following the session, the students engaged Dr. Levenson over lunch with more specific questions, including scenarios from their classroom experience. The project director reported positive feedback from participants and that the teaching seminar served as springboard for further discussion on the use of technology in teaching Biblical Hebrew.
Grants cover image

Analytikon: A Web Based New Testament Greek Grammar Review Tool

Awarded Grant
McDonough, Sean|Keazirian, Edward
Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, MA
Theological School
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Development of a free access Web site where users with prior knowledge of basic New Testament Greek could review basic grammar and vocabulary, and also refresh their skills in parsing, translating, and grammatical analysis through drilling, self-assessment, and remedial instruction.
Proposal abstract :
Development of a free access Web site where users with prior knowledge of basic New Testament Greek could review basic grammar and vocabulary, and also refresh their skills in parsing, translating, and grammatical analysis through drilling, self-assessment, and remedial instruction.

Learning Abstract :
Analytikon is a free-access website where users with prior knowledge of basic New Testament Greek can review basic grammar and vocabulary, and also refresh their skills in parsing, translation, and grammatical analysis through drilling, self-assessment, and remedial instruction. Students from all over the world can now make use of a professionally designed, interactive web tool that takes them step by step through the essentials of New Testament Greek. The site should be especially attractive to instructors of Greek at the undergraduate and graduate level, who can direct their students to an easy-to-use, no cost site where the lessons from the classroom can be reinforced by structured exercises. At a time when many schools are considering whether teaching Greek, while theoretically desirable, may be impractical, Analytikon demonstrates that modern technological tools can help make learning ancient languages a manageable and fulfilling task. http://www.analytikon.org/
Grants cover image

Reading Hebrew: A Biblical Hebrew Web Course

Awarded Grant
Bandstra, Barry
Hope College
Undergraduate School
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
To create Reading Hebrew which will be a complete first-year Biblical Hebrew language course of instruction that will be available over the Internet at no cost to students or their institution; it will include course management tools for instructors.
Proposal abstract :
To create Reading Hebrew which will be a complete first-year Biblical Hebrew language course of instruction that will be available over the Internet at no cost to students or their institution; it will include course management tools for instructors.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to create a web-based introductory course of instruction for Biblical Hebrew, including course management tools for instructors. The course hoped to provide a complete Biblical Hebrew learning package for individual students of biblical literature who may not have access to college or seminary instruction.
The project director reports that the course was successfully developed and can be found online at http://readinghebrew.org The program was demonstrated in the Pedagogy section of the 2003 international meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature at Cambridge University in England. This setting provided valuable scholarly evaluation and feedback on the work.
Grants cover image

Using Technology to Teach Byzantine Sacred Chant

Awarded Grant
Marangos, Frank
Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Sch of Theology
Theological School
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of an interactive Web Site and accompanying CD-Rom of Greek Orthodox liturgical hymns for the purpose of helping theological students preparing for ordination to the priesthood learn the theological content and musical notation of Byzantine sacred music.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of an interactive Web Site and accompanying CD-Rom of Greek Orthodox liturgical hymns for the purpose of helping theological students preparing for ordination to the priesthood learn the theological content and musical notation of Byzantine sacred music.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to support theological students preparing for ordination to the priesthood learn the theological content and musical notation of Byzantine Sacred Music through developing an interactive web site and accompanying CD-ROM of Greek Orthodox liturgical hymns.
The site was developed and can be found at http://chant.hchc.edu# . The program includes 21 Byzantine hymns representing the major feast days of the Orthodox Church. Hymns can be heard in both English and Greek and are sung by both men and women. The site also allows for viewing the words to the hymns and both Western and Byzantine notation for the hymn. The project director reports, "perhaps most significantly, the marriage of the latest presentation technology with centuries-old tradition resulted in serious challenges. Among these were disagreements over the interpretation and usage of the Byzantine notation itself, as well as its conversion into Western notation and interpretation."
Grants cover image

Multimedia Resources in Teaching Worship: Teaching the Process of Pastoral Discernment

Awarded Grant
Johnson, Todd
Loyola University Chicago
Undergraduate School
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for the analysis and development of a pedagogy used in teaching worship, moving it from a product of theological abstraction, to a process of pastoral engagement. This grant also supports the development of digital multimedia resources (Web Site and CD-Roms) for professors who teach worship.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the analysis and development of a pedagogy used in teaching worship, moving it from a product of theological abstraction, to a process of pastoral engagement. This grant also supports the development of digital multimedia resources (Web Site and CD-Roms) for professors who teach worship.

Learning Abstract :
Although this grant did not proceed as hoped, there were many positive outcomes that resulted. First, at both Loyola and North Park, I was able to engage the question of technology and teaching, specifically how we do distance learning. I was also able to raise the question of contextual teaching and pastoral theology pedagogy. These conversations continue at both institutions and will be a key component to the development of Fuller's PhD in liturgy, which I am developing. The central question I have is how can we develop doctoral students who are both solid scholars and thorough the creative teaching.

Second, I have been able to engage scholar/teachers from numerous disciplines in the discussion of the use of media in teaching. Beyond presentations to various groups of liturgists beyond my two focus groups, I have engaged those involved in congregational studies, sociology of religion, ritual studies, homiletics, and liturgical music. In these conversations I saw possibilities for these resources that I had not seen before.

Third, I have seen students over the past two years engage in pastoral questions about worship in greater detail than I ever had before. Students began seeing the implementation of various rites and liturgies as being done not in a general way but with a specific community of people, with unique likes and dislikes and a distinct history. This has helped our discussion about worship move from issues of personal preference to issues of pastoral concern. This has been the most successful part of being able to bring pieces of a community's liturgical life into the classroom as a text used for our learning. It has also improved the quality of the student's participant-observation of liturgies.
Grants cover image

www.HolyLandPhotos.org Development Project

Awarded Grant
Rasmussen, Carl
Bethel College
Undergraduate School
2003
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to redevelop, expand, and maintain a web site that provides free, hi-resolution, and PowerPoint-ready images of biblical sites in Greece, Turkey, Israel, and other places.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to redevelop, expand, and maintain a web site that provides free, hi-resolution, and PowerPoint-ready images of biblical sites in Greece, Turkey, Israel, and other places.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to redevelop, expand and maintain a web site that provides free, Hi-Resolution and Power Point ready images of biblical sites in Greece, Turkey, Israel, Jordan, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq and Iran.
The site developed can be found at http://www.holylandphotos.org/ As a result of the grant, the site was redesigned to be more functional, the database more flexible, the search engine more powerful and the user interface more attractive. A new "build your own collection" feature was added. Also, they selected, posted and linked over 1000 new images and associated maps. As of the project report the site held 1782 images. The site grew from registering 3,000 views per day to 15,000 – 20,000 per day.
Grants cover image

The Distributed Seminary: Approaches and Issues

Awarded Grant
Delamarter, Steve
Portland Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that will identify the approaches seminaries are taking to distributed teaching and learning and to understand how they are addressing challenges related to 1) delivery systems, 2) academic content, 3) "non-academic" content (professional skills, character and spiritual formation), and 4) assessment.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that will identify the approaches seminaries are taking to distributed teaching and learning and to understand how they are addressing challenges related to 1) delivery systems, 2) academic content, 3) "non-academic" content (professional skills, character and spiritual formation), and 4) assessment.

Learning Abstract :
This study leave project sought to identify the approaches seminaries are taking to distributed teaching and learning and distance education. It also hoped to understand how these programs address challenges related to delivery systems, academic content, "non-academic" content related to professional skills, character and spiritual formation, and assessment.
The project director reports that data was gathered from 85 interviews on technology and theological education with representatives of 43 seminaries. The schools represented made up 46% of the population of ATS schools. The interviews consisted of in-person interviews, site visits to 11 seminaries, and phone interviews. This developed a "snapshot" of attitudes toward and uses of technology by theological educators at the time of the study (2003), resulting in 5 articles on the topic for both Teaching Theology and Religion and Theological Education.
Grants cover image

The Disseminary

Awarded Grant
Adam, A.K.|Bechtel, Trevor
Bexley Hall Seabury - Western Theological Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that will begin the work of putting digital media to its fullest use as a different mode of broadening the conversations that build up theological education. The Disseminary domain will be established as a locus for experimental teaching, learning, and publishing via digital media.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that will begin the work of putting digital media to its fullest use as a different mode of broadening the conversations that build up theological education. The Disseminary domain will be established as a locus for experimental teaching, learning, and publishing via digital media.

Learning Abstract :
We have shown the technological feasibility of our proposal, and have learned from implementing our proposed projects. We have learned pitfalls and promises in developing a rich-media environment for theological teaching in digital technology -- chiefly, that the difference between the theological academy and the broader technological landscape requires that innovators demonstrate prominent, explicit support in a recognizable extant institution (be it publisher, academy, or foundation), devote considerable extra time to cultivating willing collaborators, and the initiative to bring great ideas to fulfillment. The most significant learning from this project is that any commitment to rich-media technology demands intense investments of time, money and institutional support in order to harness rather than succumb to the power of disruptive change.
Grants cover image

The Sacred Sites of Asia: A Georeferenced Multimedia Instructional Resource

Awarded Grant
Holdrege, Barbara
University of California - Santa Barbara
Undergraduate School
2003
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of a georeferenced multimedia Web site for the study of sacred sites in Asia that can be utilized as an instructional resource in a range of undergraduate and graduate courses on Asian religions and cultures at educational institutions throughout the world.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of a georeferenced multimedia Web site for the study of sacred sites in Asia that can be utilized as an instructional resource in a range of undergraduate and graduate courses on Asian religions and cultures at educational institutions throughout the world.

Learning Abstract :
The grant funded ongoing collaborative interdisciplinary work at the University of California at Santa Barbara to continue development of The Sacred Sites of Asia Project. It is hoped that this project will revolutionize the way in which courses on Asian religions and cultures are taught by studying the various sacred spaces of these religions. The collaborators during this phase of the grant were Barbara Holdrege (Hindu), William Power (Chinese Religions and Buddhist traditions), Juan Campo (Islamic traditions) and Jose Cabezon (Tibetan Buddhist traditions). This project was concerned with expanding the instructional applications of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and technologies beyond the earth sciences and social sciences into the humanities.

Students were generally very enthusiastic in their responses to the website, emphasizing the value of this instructional resource in facilitating their understanding of key terms and concepts and enhancing their ability to assimilate and integrate the course material.

When copyright issues are settled, the Sacred Sites of Asia website modules will be made available through the Alexandria Digital Library to faculty, students, and the wider public as broad-based instructional resources that can be adapted to fulfill the pedagogical objectives of a range of courses on Asian religions and cultures – not only at UC campuses but also at other educational institutions throughout the world.
Grants cover image

Leading a Writing Workshop on Technology and Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Delamarter, Steve
Portland Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
A two-week writing workshop for a small number of faculty to produce publications on the subject of improved teaching and learning in theological education through the strategic uses of technology.
Proposal abstract :
A two-week writing workshop for a small number of faculty to produce publications on the subject of improved teaching and learning in theological education through the strategic uses of technology.

Learning Abstract :
The grant proposal sought support for the preparation and execution of a writing workshop on theological education with a group of my colleagues. The workshop was held on six days between June 30 and July 11, 2003 with the project director and three colleagues. Four papers were completed during the workshop and sent to the journals, Theological Education and Teaching Theology and Religion.
Grants cover image

Developing a Teaching Center for Church Administration and Leadership

Awarded Grant
Frank, Thomas
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological School
2003
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
A consulting team of five teachers, experienced practitioners, and an assistant skilled in information technology will develop an on-line center for teaching and learning in church leadership and administration, providing resources for adjunct or part-time teachers as well as students at Candler and other theological schools.
Proposal abstract :
A consulting team of five teachers, experienced practitioners, and an assistant skilled in information technology will develop an on-line center for teaching and learning in church leadership and administration, providing resources for adjunct or part-time teachers as well as students at Candler and other theological schools.

Learning Abstract :
The grant provided for the development of an on-line "Leadership and Administration Resource Center (LARC). www.candler.emory.edu/ABOUT/faculty/FRANK/The purpose of this virtual center is mainly to provide teaching resources for persons who are teaching courses in church administration, religious leadership, congregational studies, or related subjects. The site offers them teaching ideas, pedagogical tools from syllabi to readings to exams, and web links that will help them construct and execute useful courses in the field.

A secondary purpose is to provide resources for students and for practitioners in church and non-profit agencies.

The project went much more slowly than anticipated in large part because of difficulties in deciding on the best web format amid rapidly changing technology and in part because of the challenge of finding assistants who could help in the construction of the site.

The grant covered the expense of three consultations with teachers and practitioners in religious leadership and administration. The first two helped generate and evaluate case studies that would be useful in teaching. At the last consultation a small group of teachers from Atlanta theological schools were introduced to the site. They were quite enthused and stated their intention to use the site and contribute material for it.

Grants cover image

Biblical Hebrew Language Resource Project

Awarded Grant
Richards, Kent
Society of Biblical Literature
Non-Degree Agency
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for development of an electronic Biblical Hebrew language resource tool designed for ease of adoption and adaptation by colleges, seminaries and translation training programs along with the necessary bibliographic resource database.
Proposal abstract :
Support for development of an electronic Biblical Hebrew language resource tool designed for ease of adoption and adaptation by colleges, seminaries and translation training programs along with the necessary bibliographic resource database.

Learning Abstract :
The grant supported a larger project of the SBL to develop a resource to facilitate the teaching of Biblical Hebrew through web-based technology. This resource would include the following modules: basic Hebrew dictionary, grammar and syntax, vocabulary and translation exercises, audio file pronunciation guide, video presentations of each segment of the grammar, and a database of books, articles and reference works related to the study of Hebrew. The grant would cover digitizing expenses, along with salary replacement funds for a professor to work on the project.
The project director reports that the money was used as proposed and that great progress was made toward the completion of the resource.
Grants cover image

Into the New Testament: An Interactive Workbook to Develop Skills in New Testament Interpretation

Awarded Grant
Hinkle Shore, Mary
Luther Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of a free web resource for teaching and learning several close reading skills necessary for New Testament exegesis.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of a free web resource for teaching and learning several close reading skills necessary for New Testament exegesis.

Learning Abstract :
My discovery of Problem-Based Learning was the most dramatic learning for me and has changed the way I teach even those courses that do not use "Into the New Testament" directly. I learned about project management - and the dreaded "scope creep" of projects - by working on this site. I also learned a great deal about web design, including a variety of ways to make my own course web sites easier to navigate, cleaner in design, and more interactive than they had been.
Grants cover image

Connecting Local History with National and Global Themes

Awarded Grant
Strobel, Johannes|Callahan, Richard
University of Missouri - Columbia
Undergraduate School
2003
Topics: Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support to design an exemplary class including the design of activities for the students and the teacher, implementation of appropriate technologies, assessment and evaluation.
Proposal abstract :
Support to design an exemplary class including the design of activities for the students and the teacher, implementation of appropriate technologies, assessment and evaluation.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to design a model class with a constructivist learning environment to support teaching and learning the history of religion in post-Civil War America. The design centered on a hyper text system, which contained the course content, rearranged around cases, perspectives and themes.
The project directors report the activities of the grant in the areas of instructional design, system development and content development. The class (with 65 enrolled) was redesigned to be "case-based oriented instead of coverage oriented". New assessment instruments were developed to fit the design. Also, system software was developed to link cases, perspectives and themes together for critical examination. Finally, the grant supported the development of model cases for use in the "crisscrossing" environment that the technology created. Researchers found that after initial conceptual adjustment by the students, the quality of their papers improved over time in this new learning environment.
Grants cover image

The Dancing Church Around the World

Awarded Grant
Kane, Thomas
Weston Jesuit School of Theology
Theological School
2003
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for the production of a two-disc DVD that will provide teachers with visual educational materials about liturgy and culture and to design liturgical/theological methodologies with teaching strategies for using digital material in the classroom and for students to use in independent projects.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the production of a two-disc DVD that will provide teachers with visual educational materials about liturgy and culture and to design liturgical/theological methodologies with teaching strategies for using digital material in the classroom and for students to use in independent projects.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a two-disk DVD that would provide teachers with visual educational materials about liturgy and culture for use with teaching strategies for the application of digital materials in the classroom and in independent projects. This would be accomplished through the transfer of the three existing Dancing Church documentaries to the DVD format, as well as adding newly edited material. Finally, it sought to design and develop web-based materials providing teachers with teaching methods and strategies for using video material in the classroom, and students with strategies for using the materials independently.
The project director reports that all goals were met and a two –disk DVD was produced entitled, The Dancing Church Around the World. A web site was developed with an order form, study guides, bibliographies and teaching strategies. It can be found at www.thedancingchurch.com
Grants cover image

Andragogy and Technology Workshop

Awarded Grant
Mahfood, Sebastian
Kenrick-Glennon Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a summative faculty workshop to help interpret the meaning of their investment in resources over the past three years from the Lilly grant and to discuss future directions they will take in the use of educational technologies to support their teaching and learning environment. The workshop will be led by James Rafferty from the MN Consortium of Theological Schoools.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a summative faculty workshop to help interpret the meaning of their investment in resources over the past three years from the Lilly grant and to discuss future directions they will take in the use of educational technologies to support their teaching and learning environment. The workshop will be led by James Rafferty from the MN Consortium of Theological Schoools.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a one-day faculty workshop with an outside speaker to assess the meaning of their investment in educational technologies over the previous three years, as well as to discuss future directions for the use of these technologies in their teaching-learning environment. In particular, they hoped to engage the subject of student motivation and learning styles, and how teachers can engage students through available technologies.
The project director reports that in the workshop the questions they explored involved what they were communicating and how effective it was in a student population with a very different profile from which they as a faculty were trained. These new students do not come with graduate level skills in reading, writing and speaking, and do not have previous exposure to philosophy, theology or history. These core skills must be taught in the curriculum. Also, they must be taught for parish work, not academic work. Thus, they needed to determine how to best contextualize their teaching strategies.
Grants cover image

Training and Equipping Faculty and Teaching Assistants with New Technological Tools for Distribution Learning

Awarded Grant
Viktora, Jan|Abel, Robert
Minnesota Consortium of Theological Schools
Non-Degree Agency
2004
Topics: Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for fostering better use of technology for good teaching and learning with the MN Consortium of Theological Schools. Specific attention will be given to modeling and providing leadership to other seminaries in the use of technology for good theological teaching and learning.
Proposal abstract :
Support for fostering better use of technology for good teaching and learning with the MN Consortium of Theological Schools. Specific attention will be given to modeling and providing leadership to other seminaries in the use of technology for good theological teaching and learning.

Learning Abstract :
This grant supported the ongoing work that an original Lilly Technology Grant to each of the schools had begun. The five schools in the Minnesota Consortium are Bethel Seminary, Luther Seminary, Saint John's School of Theology, Saint Paul Seminary, and United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities. Through a series of summer computer camps ('04 and '05), a podcasting seminar, a "Developing Online Groups" seminar, a faculty salon (virtual gathering of Church History faculty from the consortium), and individual grants to faculty to help them move toward a more pedagogically strong on-line teaching environment, the staff and faculty of the five schools (and invited guests from around the country) worked to enhance their teaching through digital technology. The various groups processed pedagogical questions about technology and teaching/learning best practices as they moved forward in the reality of increased use of technology. The computer camp at Luther used a multimedia-equipped classroom and student and faculty labs with special software and hardware for faculty to play and explore how they might change their classroom approaches to teaching in the seminaries.
Grants cover image

Overview and Evaluation of Course Management Systems for Teaching Theology

Awarded Grant
Rafferty, Jim
Minnesota Consortium of Theological Schools
Non-Degree Agency
2004
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Course Management Systems (CMS) are becoming commonplace in the teaching of theology and religion. Following up on an overview of courseware options I presented at InfoTech in August, 2003 (http://www.mncts.org/workshops/infotechcourseware.htm) I propose to update and expand the overview, explore the impact of some of these sytems, and point to some promsing alternatives for the future.
Proposal abstract :
Course Management Systems (CMS) are becoming commonplace in the teaching of theology and religion. Following up on an overview of courseware options I presented at InfoTech in August, 2003 (http://www.mncts.org/workshops/infotechcourseware.htm) I propose to update and expand the overview, explore the impact of some of these sytems, and point to some promsing alternatives for the future.

Learning Abstract :
Learning Management systems like Blackboard are impacting how one trains for ministry. The grant provided an opportunity to interview LMS pioneer and founder of Fisher's Net Tom Walker who discussed the history of LMS in seminaries and shared what he thinks about its future. Additionally there was an opportunity to build on a list of resources to further explore what's happening in LMS and what it means for ministry training. Questions that remained at the end of the project were: 1) Are there better tools and techniques out there? 2) Open source software offers tools like Moodle or Nicenet as low cost alternatives to Blackboard but are they good choices? 3) Is academic based LMS software event the right model for people training for parish ministry?
Grants cover image

Revolutionaries Come to Life: Using Technology for Active Shared Learning

Awarded Grant
Oliver, Dianne
University of Evansville
Undergraduate School
2004
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to enhance teaching and learning by creating an active, shared learning environment through the use of web-based, interactive, student generated materials and discussion forums rather than only traditional papers evaluated exclusively by the professor. Specifically, the project includes development of assignments and the necessary technological foundations and evaluative mechanisms for student work to be done in a communal, shared setting on the web.
Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to enhance teaching and learning by creating an active, shared learning environment through the use of web-based, interactive, student generated materials and discussion forums rather than only traditional papers evaluated exclusively by the professor. Specifically, the project includes development of assignments and the necessary technological foundations and evaluative mechanisms for student work to be done in a communal, shared setting on the web.

Learning Abstract :
The project developed a course utilizing technology to create an active, shared learning environment where assignments themselves and the evaluation of student learning occurred mainly in a more public, communal space online to enhance its "active" nature. Project learnings included: 1) requirements for students to share their work and to interact helps create learning community, even for a general education class where students are not always open to the course goals and content; in addition, requiring students to interact with the course materials and with one another regularly online helps develop critical and analytical thinking skills; 2) making assignments more "public" creates a different ownership of the learning process and allows students to learn from and with one another; 3) software and hardware used to create websites and to do online discussion are becoming ubiquitous enough that using these tools as a mechanism for student learning doesn't require significant training.
Grants cover image

Effective Use of Digital Media to Enhance Theological Education at Eastern Seminary (Palmer Theological Seminary)

Awarded Grant
Fraser, Elouise|Kebaetse, Masego
Palmer Theological Seminary - Eastern Univ
Theological School
2004
Topics: Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The project entails a multi-session workshop in which faculty acquire skills they will implement in the design or redesign of their presentation tools. The workshop will address how digital video and graphics are processed cognitively during the learning process and the best ways to present them for maximum learning outcomes, focusing on the instructional design issues and application of underlying learning theory to teaching and learning rather than on the ...
Proposal abstract :
The project entails a multi-session workshop in which faculty acquire skills they will implement in the design or redesign of their presentation tools. The workshop will address how digital video and graphics are processed cognitively during the learning process and the best ways to present them for maximum learning outcomes, focusing on the instructional design issues and application of underlying learning theory to teaching and learning rather than on the development of technical skills per se. This approach and emphasis equips faculty with the knowledge and skills that will enable them to select the most effective pedagogical strategies relevant to their teaching style and content area.

Learning Abstract :
The Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CMTL) provides a useful basis for framing multimedia design by grounding it in learning theory. The principles of CTML can be applied to interface design, the facilitation of various cognitive methods, and instructional strategies. Integrating digital media into teaching ought to be a holistic approach to teaching and learning that includes both choosing appropriate instructional design strategies and varying such strategies to facilitate effective learning. When faculty members understand principles of effective integration of digital media, they seem to apply them. However, for most faculty members, the process seems to be progressive, more evolutionary than revolutionary. Ultimately, integrating digital media effectively cannot just be about teaching but it should equally, and most importantly, be about learning.
Grants cover image

Theology and Pedagogy in Cyberspace II: New Frontiers in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Kalantzis, George
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
With this grant we want to bring together theological educators from across North America to share their experiences on the intersection of educational technologies and theological teaching and learning, and to explore new challenges – such as the proliferation of online and distance education-the digital culture presents to traditional concepts of theological education and spiritual formation.
Proposal abstract :
With this grant we want to bring together theological educators from across North America to share their experiences on the intersection of educational technologies and theological teaching and learning, and to explore new challenges – such as the proliferation of online and distance education-the digital culture presents to traditional concepts of theological education and spiritual formation.

Learning Abstract :
The conference was hosted jointly by Garrett-Evangelical and Kenrick-Glennon Seminary and sought to bring theological educators together to explore how to engage digital technologies (so prevalent in our society) in an ethical manner that invites seminary students to become proficient, adept end users and responsible decision-makers. An open invitation was sent to over 150 colleagues and theological institutions inviting their input and experience both as participants and as presenters to explore the influence of the digital culture on traditional models of theological education and spiritual formation to concepts of creation and creativity in technoculture and the virtual theology of cyberspace. A website for participants was established. The schedule for the conference was reduced from a Friday – Sunday format to a Friday – Saturday format. This move proved to be a miscalculation as it shortened the time for interaction between sessions and forced the scheduling of events too close to each other. Evaluations were done in the form of emails – giving participants time to reflect on the overall effect of the conference. There was a consensus of the respondents that it would probably be best to continue these conversations on an annual basis, though opinion varied as to where. The goals of the project were met and the discussion among the participants and their respective institutions will continue far beyond the confines of the conference.
Grants cover image

Faculty Delivered Student Support in Online Seminary

Awarded Grant
Nysse, Richard
Luther Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project is focused on addressing the need for a sense of connectedness and support for students in online seminary courses. The project will examine and test what can be done by faculty within their courses without unduly adding to faculty workload to meet the student need.
Proposal abstract :
This project is focused on addressing the need for a sense of connectedness and support for students in online seminary courses. The project will examine and test what can be done by faculty within their courses without unduly adding to faculty workload to meet the student need.

Learning Abstract :
This project, as designed and proposed, sought to develop, implement and evaluate a set of options for faculty to provide (or enhance) efficient and effective student support within the structure of online seminary classes.

The project was a successful learning experience, but not in the way envisioned. As a result of my close observation of my own practice, I would now suggest that a set of procedures is not the fundamental need to hold down the strain on faculty workload in online courses. The primary need is to reframe faculty and student understanding of the dynamics afforded by the online environment. "Efficiency" is gained by abandoning the replication of face-to-face classroom roles and procedures and reframing the teaching and learning roles and procedures in a manner that maximizes what the online environment afford us.

The project significantly reinforced two trajectories or principles that I have worked for in developing online classes at Luther Seminary. (1) We are not replicating and distributing the face-to-face classroom. That changes both the expectations for support and the character of the support given. (2) We are working down the middle of our programs, not forming an auxiliary program. That has caused the growing pains that led to this project. The project did not immediately alleviate those pains, but it did press the need for the regular support personnel to be present and did support Luther Seminary's switch to a digital system that integrates the Course Management System with the administrative system. The administrative support is no longer as remote from the work of teachers.
Grants cover image

Achieving Excellence in Online Teaching and Learning at Meadville Lombard

Awarded Grant
Barker, Lee
Meadville Lombard Theological School
Theological School
2004
Topics: Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to help the faculty of Meadville Lombard address issues of teaching and learning in an online environment. Three goals will be addressed: 1.) To identify and learn from good models of online teaching and learning, 2.) To gain knowledge and skill in how to create a community of discourse online, and 3.) To adapt classroom-teaching methods to an online format, while retaining creativity and academic rigor and appealing to ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to help the faculty of Meadville Lombard address issues of teaching and learning in an online environment. Three goals will be addressed: 1.) To identify and learn from good models of online teaching and learning, 2.) To gain knowledge and skill in how to create a community of discourse online, and 3.) To adapt classroom-teaching methods to an online format, while retaining creativity and academic rigor and appealing to various student learning styles.

Learning Abstract :
This project sought to assist the faculty in brining the seminary's pedagogical philosophy, culture and style into the online classroom. In launching online classes they have witnessed the way the school's culture can be transmitted by including students who have previously taken the traditional classroom courses. Having even a few such students enrolled in an online class can provide the critical mass that promotes the culture. The philosophy and style, however, will be transmitted through the establishment of clear educational goals, learning objectives, and assessment tools. Additionally it requires a faculty wide commitment to applying these objectives and tools to online courses. This will happen only when the faculty has an online literacy, which consists of an understanding of online classroom dynamics and methods of instruction.
Grants cover image

Facilitating a Strategic Planning Process for Technology and Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Delamarter, Steve
Portland Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The goals of the grant program are to plan and execute a three-day strategic planning experience that will: 1) give the participants a clearer idea of the need for distance theological education in the Pacific Northwest; 2) build strategic alliances toward this end, and 3) develop a specific plan. Execution of the plan is not guaranteed, but through the planning process, the participants will be in a much better position to know how ...
Proposal abstract :
The goals of the grant program are to plan and execute a three-day strategic planning experience that will: 1) give the participants a clearer idea of the need for distance theological education in the Pacific Northwest; 2) build strategic alliances toward this end, and 3) develop a specific plan. Execution of the plan is not guaranteed, but through the planning process, the participants will be in a much better position to know how to go about it and what the need is.

Learning Abstract :
During the grant project all aspects of the proposal were carried out and the goals were fulfilled. Several lessons were learned. There is a lot of value in thorough research and in an iterative process over time. There is a lot of value in listening to consultants from the Church. There is a lot of value to a faculty-driven technology planning process. The ‘strategic' in strategic planning is all about finding just the right combination of models. In summary, the grant provided a giant boost to the technology planning process. It put the participants in a position to develop and refine a working model whose concept could be proposed to university administrators and on which could be started the work of developing a full proposal for implementation. The strong beginning to the planning process moved the participants well down the path in their overarching process and accelerated that process by many months.
Grants cover image

Teaching with Technology: One Seminary’s Experience in Purposeful Dialogue and Guided Preparation

Awarded Grant
Kinney, John |McChesney-Young, Mary
Virginia Union University
Theological School
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The Samuel Proctor School of Theology (STVU) is a vibrant theological community whose educational task is being stretched in many ways. One of which is the matter of responding to an ever-growing non-residential student population who are desirous of online course offerings. This proposal is an attempt to engender extensive faculty discussions about teaching with technology, explore some online course offerings, and integrate findings from those courses into the overall ...
Proposal abstract :
The Samuel Proctor School of Theology (STVU) is a vibrant theological community whose educational task is being stretched in many ways. One of which is the matter of responding to an ever-growing non-residential student population who are desirous of online course offerings. This proposal is an attempt to engender extensive faculty discussions about teaching with technology, explore some online course offerings, and integrate findings from those courses into the overall curriculum revision process.

Learning Abstract :
While not all of the faculty members understood how they could enhance their courses through the use of technology, they were open to exploring ways to do it. They believe that the huge classes we have can certainly be better served by some aspects of technology. They are also keely aware of the fact that our student demographics have changed and that students come to seminary with a good deal of technological experience. Though the faculty members are not allowing the mad rush to online learning evidenced in many theological institutions to influence their thinking and decision making, they are genuinely open to ways in which the technology can best serve the student and the institution. This is a very healthy place to be for any institution seeking to integrate technology into the curriculum.
Grants cover image

Using Interactive, Asynchronous Video Technologies in the Advancement of Seminary Globalization Initiatives

Awarded Grant
Mahfood, Sebastian
Kenrick-Glennon Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Catholic theological institutions and seminaries are seeking ways to address the mismatch between the perceived needs of older students and the comprehensive education package of the institution. One way to resolve this is to provide ongoing and continuous education programs through the online databasing of 60-second asynchronous videos.
Proposal abstract :
Catholic theological institutions and seminaries are seeking ways to address the mismatch between the perceived needs of older students and the comprehensive education package of the institution. One way to resolve this is to provide ongoing and continuous education programs through the online databasing of 60-second asynchronous videos.

Learning Abstract :
In the creation of theophony.org, we have learned from its successes and disappointments both that developing an online video archive for an institutional globalization initiative is useful for engendering dialogue with stakeholders and that the management of its development will be less challenging the closer to the living reality of the institution one keeps it. By way of contribution to the expanding conversation on teaching and learning, we anticipate the idea of intentionally addressing global vision initiatives, such as evangelization/inculturation, ecumenism/unity, interfaith dialogue, and authentic human development, will be strengthened as engagement in theological course materials is constantly brought back to the level of practical applications in ministerial settings. We also anticipate a greater sense of interdisciplinary engagement as the database we have created helps learners draw connections between systematics, history, scripture, pastoral theology and moral theology. We feel our investment in energy and resources has been useful and meaningful.
Grants cover image

Deeper into Ancient Cyberspace

Awarded Grant
Royalty, Robert
Wabash College
Undergraduate School
2004
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this grant is to review, index, and revise existing web-based teaching materials produced at Wabash College from 1999 - 2003; to supplement these sites with additional digital resources; to make these materials more accessible to students and scholars of ancient Judaism and early Christianity; and to evaluate the pedagogical implications of digital rather than traditional research assignments in teaching the social history of religion at the college level.
Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this grant is to review, index, and revise existing web-based teaching materials produced at Wabash College from 1999 - 2003; to supplement these sites with additional digital resources; to make these materials more accessible to students and scholars of ancient Judaism and early Christianity; and to evaluate the pedagogical implications of digital rather than traditional research assignments in teaching the social history of religion at the college level.

Learning Abstract :
The work on this grant changed over the course of three years. The original proposal focused more on improving the project director's own sites, particularly the "Asia Minor" course developed with students after travel to Turkey in March 2003 and the websites of other courses taught prior to that time. As the project evolved, it became more important for the project director to add the various components, resources, and documents he used and to have narrative descriptions of the "whys" and "why nots" regarding his decisions about including various pieces so that other teachers could see how the course worked pedagogically. This "narrative syllabus" is a model for a transparent approach to putting courses on the web. The insights gleaned from this project go far beyond the teaching of ancient religion or biblical studies and extends to folks teaching in a liberal arts college as well.
Grants cover image

Theological Education, Priestly Formation, and Distance Learning Strategies

Awarded Grant
Stratman, Bernard
National Catholic Educational Assoc. (NCEA)
Non-Degree Agency
2006
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a workshop on uses of technology for priest formation.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a workshop on uses of technology for priest formation.

Learning Abstract :
What we have learned from pursuing this project is that there is a great deal of interest in the use of appropriate technologies to promote teaching and learning in Catholic seminaries, and a number of academic deans are ready to spearhead a Catholic Distance Learning Network in which member schools will be able to offer their courses online and receive enrollments of students from any other member school at no cost to the students or member institutions. One of the ways in which this initiative will contribute is in the potential this kind of collaborative interaction has for both intercultural and interdisciplinary studies as students from different regions engage one another and ongoing courses within the consortium begin to support one another. Another lies in the conversations on pedagogy and adult learning that will likely occur as faculties begin to respond to the changing social realities of the third millennium.
Grants cover image

Celebrating the Past, Engaging the Future: Creating a Cohesive Faculty in a School in Transition

Awarded Grant
Mangum, R. Todd
Biblical Theological Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The primary goal of this project is to integrate a significant number of new faculty into Biblical Theological Seminary’s faculty community and lay a broad foundation for success in their vocation. Faculty will engage in activities that develop community and promote understanding of vocation; instill institutional vision; and increase competence in pedagogy and technology. These activities include workshops/retreats, reading, peer mentoring, team teaching, and technology training and development.
Proposal abstract :
The primary goal of this project is to integrate a significant number of new faculty into Biblical Theological Seminary’s faculty community and lay a broad foundation for success in their vocation. Faculty will engage in activities that develop community and promote understanding of vocation; instill institutional vision; and increase competence in pedagogy and technology. These activities include workshops/retreats, reading, peer mentoring, team teaching, and technology training and development.

Learning Abstract :
This project was designed to develop a new faculty community by implementing a mentoring program by which junior faculty were assimilated into the faculty team and where faculty in general were given the opportunity, training, and encouragement to develop their pedagogical skills through the use of technology and focused attention to teaching and learning. The grant funded whole-school events by which practical implications of the mission and vision of the school could be engaged, contemplated, and discussed by the community as a whole and by the faculty team in particular. It is no exaggeration to say that the Wabash grant has changed our school profoundly by allowing us to implement real and tangible steps to make aspirations a reality.
Grants cover image

A Sustained Workshop on Pedagogy and Hybrid Models of Distance Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Delamarter, Steve
Portland Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Our proposal calls for a sustained (six semester) workshop among our faculty to research, test, and refine the best pedagogical strategies we can for the delivery of a hybrid program of theological education. The proposal asks for stipends for writing workshops aimed at capturing and disseminating the lessons learned. The proposal has the full support of the dean of the seminary who believes that it will help the seminary live ...
Proposal abstract :
Our proposal calls for a sustained (six semester) workshop among our faculty to research, test, and refine the best pedagogical strategies we can for the delivery of a hybrid program of theological education. The proposal asks for stipends for writing workshops aimed at capturing and disseminating the lessons learned. The proposal has the full support of the dean of the seminary who believes that it will help the seminary live out its values of continued excellence, increased relevance, and increased accessibility.

Learning Abstract :
What the Wabash Workshops have enabled us to do is to work past our faulty first instincts about how to do online/hybrid teaching learning. In retrospect it is obvious to us that many of our first instincts were wrong: 1) that we would develop either online courses or face to face courses (the subtleties of thinking in terms of a hybrid course were beyond us); 2) that the development of a program would proceed by adding one after another online course (the subtleties of thinking in terms of a hybrid program were beyond us); 3) that programs would be developed a course at a time (rather than by conceiving the program as a whole in this new environment), etc. But the problem is that most institutions-ourselves included-are so under the gun that we do not have time to think things through adequately to see the shallowness of our first instincts. Instead, we leap and in so doing we instantiate those ideas into the structures of the program. Once they are built into a program, they are very difficult and time-consuming to change. The Wabash Workshops have given us space and time to think things through and develop our programs on a second and third generation of thinking and not on the first.

Further, we have become a community of thoughtful reflection about issues pedagogical, especially as they relate to the use of technology. We are no longer in any danger of being swept off our feet by some glitzy technology that is creating a lot of buzz. We cut pretty quickly to the heart of the matter: how can this technology be harnessed for the teaching learning process, and is the payoff worth the bother? If we are fuzzy on the first answer we will not look further. And even if we judge that a technology could have some value, if the price (literally and figuratively) is too high, we won't commit to it. Often this means that simpler technology is better. Then too, there is often no necessary correlation between the sophistication of the technology and the robustness of the social processes it can create and support.

Once we have come to see the issues clearly we have not had to waste any time or energy on some of the discussions and fears that plague some institutions: will it destroy our face to face environment? Won't students adopt false personae? Won't we lose our sense of community? How can this be done without 90% of our time spent face to face? These are not the sorts of questions that plague us. Instead, our attention can be focused on issues that are, in the end, much more rich in terms of their focus on student learning and much more strategic in terms of institutional viability, student success, and faculty sustainability.
Grants cover image

Seeing Through a Glass Darkly: A Three Year Consultation on Student Spiritual Formation in Theological Distance Education

Awarded Grant
Lowe, Stephen
Erskine Theological Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
The growth of distance education in seminaries has generated an intense intramural debate among theological educators regarding the legitimacy of distance education for clergy preparation – in particular, spiritual formation. Hence, this project will tackle issues associated with nurturing spiritual formation among seminary students in a variety of contexts through a series of consultations over three years. Members of the consultations will come from Protestant ATS member schools representing those who ...
Proposal abstract :
The growth of distance education in seminaries has generated an intense intramural debate among theological educators regarding the legitimacy of distance education for clergy preparation – in particular, spiritual formation. Hence, this project will tackle issues associated with nurturing spiritual formation among seminary students in a variety of contexts through a series of consultations over three years. Members of the consultations will come from Protestant ATS member schools representing those who currently use distance education and those who have resisted using it. A position paper will serve as a catalyst for dialogue and reflection at the first consultation. The second consultation will build on the first by suggesting ways in which spiritual formation can be facilitated through pedagogical strategies. The final consultation will continue the work of the previous two years and work toward creation of a working model for assessing spiritual formation in distance education. Project Goals. 1) Arrive at a consensus among consultation participants regarding a shared core of spiritual formation concepts that resonate across Protestant denominational and theological traditions, 2) Identify specific and unique problems posed by distance education regarding spiritual formation, 3) Propose specific pedagogical strategies that demonstrate spiritual formation in distance education, 4) Construct a preliminary assessment model that seeks to measure the impact of learning in distance education on the spiritual formation of students, 5) Disseminate findings and proposals through written essays, and 6) Create an online conference room for participants to engage in ongoing conversation about the topic.

Learning Abstract :
This consultation was able to produce a final working document for publication entitled "Spiritual Formation in Theological Distance Education: An Ecosystems Model." This document reflected the shared consensus of the group regarding the concept of spiritual formation and its application to online theological education. It also identified the two major problems of community formation and creating dialogue that could foster and sustain student spiritual formation regardless of course content and modes of delivery. Specific pedagogical strategies and a preliminary assessment tool were constructed and will be tested in future work. Dissemination of our findings can be found in publications and presentations available online and in periodicals.
Grants cover image

A Catholic Distance Learning Network: Joining the Academic Programs of 60 NCEA Seminaries and Theological Schools through For-Credit Courses Freely Offered between Member Institutions of the NCEA

Awarded Grant
Mahfood, Sebastian|Stratman, Bernard
National Catholic Educational Assoc. (NCEA)
Non-Degree Agency
2007
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The NCEA’s Seminary Department provides a number of services to its member institutions, including an annual convention, a biennial institute for the preparation of seminary formation staff, ad hoc consultation, special gatherings, various research projects, and the publication of the Seminary Journal. The goal of this project is to extend the range of NCEA services into providing coordination between seminaries through a distributed learning network qualifying professors in member ...
Proposal abstract :
The NCEA’s Seminary Department provides a number of services to its member institutions, including an annual convention, a biennial institute for the preparation of seminary formation staff, ad hoc consultation, special gatherings, various research projects, and the publication of the Seminary Journal. The goal of this project is to extend the range of NCEA services into providing coordination between seminaries through a distributed learning network qualifying professors in member schools to teach courses online to students enrolled in member schools. In doing this, NCEA hopes to strengthen the process by which member schools share human and material resources with one another. It is NCEA’s expectation that this will not only offer learning opportunities not currently available to students, but that it will also improve the quality of teaching through a combination of the principles of adult learning and the use of appropriate technologies to establish student-oriented learning environments.

Learning Abstract :
The Catholic Distance Learning Network was established for the purpose of providing coordination among seminaries to teach courses online to students enrolled in member schools, and this made necessary the development of a training program to certify seminary faculty in online teaching and learning. We also sought to improve the overall quality of teaching based on the principles of adult learning and the use of appropriate technologies to establish student-oriented teaching and learning environments. In pursuit of our mission, we accomplished our primary goals, certifying by the spring of 2010 44 faculty members in seventeen Catholic seminaries and theological institutes. In our working directly with seminary faculty and developing onsite faculty and student workshops on the campuses of participating seminaries, we also set in motion a process by which these schools could pursue the issues raised by the CDLN within their own communities. Half a dozen of the participating seminaries did, in fact, exchange students so that all students and faculty participating in these exchanges engaged one another's institutional cultures in pursuit of areas of study that faculty might not otherwise have had the opportunity to teach and students the opportunity to learn.

What we learned in the three years of funding by the Wabash Institute is that the CDLN could provide a meaningful hub for seminaries and theological institutes interested in sharing their courses with one another but that for such an organization to meaningfully fulfill its purpose, it needs the support of institutions that already have a strong infrastructure in distance learning. Most Catholic seminaries and theological institutes do not yet have such an infrastructure. While the training of a given faculty member from a given institution in the use of exemplary tools and practices is good, it may not be the most effective way to go about helping the institution realize its mission. For that reason, the CDLN has to also be proactive in helping entire academic programs retool themselves on the use of appropriate technologies for face-to-face or online instruction. Only when the individual infrastructures of the member seminaries and theological institutes are developed will a structured network like the CDLN be fully able to realize its broader vision of helping them share their human and material resources with one another.

To that end, the CDLN retooled itself in the spring of 2010 to provide a fee-based training program for faculty interested in receiving certification in online teaching and learning and a fee-based consultation and workshop program for academic departments interested in transforming their teaching and learning communities through the use of appropriate technologies. It also placed all of its training materials on its website at www.catholicdistance.org for the free and unrestricted use of those interested in learning the essential elements of online teaching and learning. In addition to providing the essential elements necessary for a successful online teaching experience, the certification program materials offer a solid pedagogical foundation for those desiring to pursue additional studies in the use of technology in face-to-face teaching.
Grants cover image

Introduction to the Study of Religion and E-folios

Awarded Grant
Kim, Nami|Karim, Jamillah
Spelman College
Undergraduate School
2007
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
The project will enable the project directors to offer two half-day workshops on E-folios Management. This workshop will teach faculty members in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies the basic concepts and skills of e-folios management, as well as ways to use e-folios to meet learning expectations effectively. The grant will help faculty members to create an opportunity to become better equipped in assigning e-folios in the proposed course, ...
Proposal abstract :
The project will enable the project directors to offer two half-day workshops on E-folios Management. This workshop will teach faculty members in the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies the basic concepts and skills of e-folios management, as well as ways to use e-folios to meet learning expectations effectively. The grant will help faculty members to create an opportunity to become better equipped in assigning e-folios in the proposed course, which will enhance the learning outcomes of course material.

Learning Abstract :
From this highly useful project, we have learned the importance of collaborating with colleagues who also aspire towards more effective teaching and learning. We also learned the value of securing the expertise of consultants who share innovative best practices and teaching methods. We have learned that trying out new methods in the classroom creates new levels of excitement and enthusiasm that further enhances the teaching processes and learning outcomes. From the logistical dimensions of this project, i.e., setting up accounts for our budget and arranging various programming aspects, we have learned patience and key administrative skills. Key items that will contribute to the expanding conversation on teaching and learning are how to most effectively use e-folios and other tools in a context in which the Internet plays a significant role in students' learning outside the classroom and how to create a standard syllabus that represents the interests and passions of all of the professors who teach the course.
Grants cover image

Proleptic Pedagogy: Teaching from the Future to Distance, Disability, and Race

Awarded Grant
Howell, Nancy
Saint Paul School of Theology
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Saint Paul School of Theology proposes a three-year project to attend to three distinct pedagogical challenges for the future of theological education. First, instead of fitting new technologies into old pedagogies, how are teaching and learning transformed by shifting needs of students who are “digital natives” or “digital immigrants” and/or distance learners? Second, instead of relying on note-takers and extended deadlines, what pedagogies virtually eliminate the need for “accommodations” ...
Proposal abstract :
Saint Paul School of Theology proposes a three-year project to attend to three distinct pedagogical challenges for the future of theological education. First, instead of fitting new technologies into old pedagogies, how are teaching and learning transformed by shifting needs of students who are “digital natives” or “digital immigrants” and/or distance learners? Second, instead of relying on note-takers and extended deadlines, what pedagogies virtually eliminate the need for “accommodations” for students with learning disabilities because courses are designed flexibly with resources and opportunities open to diverse learning styles and needs? Third, instead of engaging student diversity with the tools of the 1960s, what new teaching and learning strategies anticipate future student racial/ethnic demographics and interracial educational experiences? Proleptic pedagogical strategies reflect the praxis and prophetic goals expressed in the seminary’s mission and values, which challenge faculty to make theological education accessible and transformative for the next generations of seminarians.

Learning Abstract :
Saint Paul School of Theology developed a grant project entitled "Pedagogy: Teaching from the Future to Distance, Disability, and Race." The faculty learned that diversifying our teaching/learning resources makes us more agile in responding to diverse students, classroom contexts, educational opportunities, as well as the needs of the church. We have learned to be more astute observers of students and their contexts, which compels us to be more skilled and flexible in pedagogy that responds to concrete and changing social locations and cultural experiences affecting the teaching and learning environment. Our proleptic pedagogy depends on attentiveness to changes in teaching resources and contexts - pedagogy is rooted in praxis and cultivation of imagination in teaching and learning.
Grants cover image

Consultation on New Media for Professors of Christian Education

Awarded Grant
Dawson, Kathy
Columbia Theological Seminary
Theological School
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
We find ourselves constantly striving to stay current with the means and opportunities of new media. We propose to bring new media specialists into dialogue with Christian education faculty of four theological seminaries in Atlanta to create a space where faculty can envision ways to advance teaching and learning about theology and religion in a media literate culture. By understanding how new media and technologies are developing and how they ...
Proposal abstract :
We find ourselves constantly striving to stay current with the means and opportunities of new media. We propose to bring new media specialists into dialogue with Christian education faculty of four theological seminaries in Atlanta to create a space where faculty can envision ways to advance teaching and learning about theology and religion in a media literate culture. By understanding how new media and technologies are developing and how they will impact the way future generations communicate, collaborate, socialize, do research, persuade, teach and learn, we expect to improve the ways in which we meet the needs of younger seminarians. The rapidity and pervasiveness of the change challenges professors of Christian education to new networks of learning. The consultation we propose will open for us new knowledge and new networks of learning.

Learning Abstract :
The intention behind this small grant was to bring together Christian education professors from the four Atlanta area theological schools: Candler School of Theology at Emory University, MacAfee School of Theology at Mercer University, Interdenominational Theological Center, and Columbia Theological Seminary to discuss with cutting age new media developers and educators the latest trends in online education. This meant coordinating many schedules of many different institutions and individuals. To some extent the event that was held on May 2, 2009 was a success as we had representatives from both the academic community and the technology sages, although not as many as we hoped. The evaluations were positive and participants learned a lot about virtual worlds, electronic textbooks, and other social internet media. We hope to continue this learning through an electronic social media site with Christian education professors in other locations.
Grants cover image

Teaching through the Senses: Updating REL 220 Religion in the United States to Include Sound, Sight, and Movement

Awarded Grant
DeRogatis, Amy
Michigan State University
Undergraduate School
2009
Topics: Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project to include sensory learning in my survey course was inspired by conversations with members of the Mid-Career Colloquy. Over five weeks I plan to read theory about the pedagogical use of sight, sound, and movement in teaching and to refashion 25 PowerPoint lectures to include music and film clips. I also intend to craft 12 short movement exercises to link physical movement with learning once per week in this class. ...
Proposal abstract :
This project to include sensory learning in my survey course was inspired by conversations with members of the Mid-Career Colloquy. Over five weeks I plan to read theory about the pedagogical use of sight, sound, and movement in teaching and to refashion 25 PowerPoint lectures to include music and film clips. I also intend to craft 12 short movement exercises to link physical movement with learning once per week in this class. To do this I will learn how to “rip” film and embed them in PowerPoint slides. My goal is to reinvigorate this course to engage students through multiple sensory experiences and reach students on multiple levels of intelligence. I will evaluate the success of sensory inclusion through student surveys and conversations with other faculty who teach a similar course. I will disseminate my findings through discussions with colleagues and in a teaching note submitted to Teaching Theology & Religion (spring 2010).

Learning Abstract :
I devoted five weeks during the summer of 2009 to reading theory about the pedagogical use of sight, sound, and movement in teaching. After I completed the reading I restructured 25 PowerPoint lectures to include music and film clips and I also crafted 12 short movement exercises to link physical movement with learning. My goal was to engage students through multiple sensory experiences and levels of intelligence. The students evaluated the success of sensory inclusion through informal surveys and self-reflective writing assignments. I evaluated the success of the project by comparing the students' ability to recall and synthesize information on exam questions related to sensory exercises with questions unrelated to sensory exercises. After teaching the course this past semester, I found that at 2/3rds of the students performed better on exam questions that corresponded to sensory exercises and over 75% acknowledged in their final self-evaluation that the sensory components were critical to their learning in the course. The only drawback to the inclusion of sensory exercises was that I did not always allow for enough class time for the students to reflect on the meaning and purpose of each activity.
Grants cover image

Tweet-agogy 101: New Social Media and Pedagogy Colloquium

Awarded Grant
Drescher, Elizabeth
Church Divinity School of the Pacific
Theological School
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
New social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube along with a number of RSS feeds, search aggregators, and blogging portals have dramatically changed the way information is shared and knowledge is developed. Students under 40 - the so-called “Net Generation” that came of age along with internet technology-increasingly rely on social media as an integral part of a mode of participatory, collaborative learning that educators can productively engage when ...
Proposal abstract :
New social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube along with a number of RSS feeds, search aggregators, and blogging portals have dramatically changed the way information is shared and knowledge is developed. Students under 40 - the so-called “Net Generation” that came of age along with internet technology-increasingly rely on social media as an integral part of a mode of participatory, collaborative learning that educators can productively engage when they better understand how social media works at the level of epistemology, identity-formation, pedagogy, and practical classroom use. To support instructors efforts to understand and utilize social media for pedagogical purposes, CDSP and the GTU library are collaborating on a two-part colloquium which provide an overview of the new social media landscape and its pedagogical implication and provide opportunities for practice with social networking tools and expert feedback.

Learning Abstract :
The objectives of the workshop were to introduce participants to shifts in social consciousness associated with changes in social media and to familiarize them with the major social media tools that are participating in this shift. While the workshop was not a "how to" session in the sense that learners were not instructed on the ins and outs of various tools, participants did work with tools such as Facebook, YouTube, Twiter, and Wikipedia by way of experimenting with ways of integrating both the tools themselves and emerging modes of participative collaborative learning in the context of theological education.
Grants cover image

Investigating Best Practices in Seminary Distance Education

Awarded Grant
Jost, Lynn
Fresno Pacific Univ Biblical Seminary
Theological School
2010
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary has become convinced of both the need for and the potential of hybrid and online course offerings to serve our dispersed constituencies. We need further training in implementing these technologies and pedagogies, so that we can choose wisely when and how to use distance technologies to help us reach our institutional goals, and so that we can do so effectively. To follow up a consultation that ...
Proposal abstract :
Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary has become convinced of both the need for and the potential of hybrid and online course offerings to serve our dispersed constituencies. We need further training in implementing these technologies and pedagogies, so that we can choose wisely when and how to use distance technologies to help us reach our institutional goals, and so that we can do so effectively. To follow up a consultation that Wabash funded just over a year ago, we will visit several schools that can help us learn their best practices in distance education.

Learning Abstract :
The aim of this project was to advance our discussion about the development of online and/or hybrid degree programs by engaging in site visits to institutions already engaged in offering such programs. During a four-day trip in August, 2010, two members of our faculty were provided an opportunity to learn about various models of distance-based and limited-residency seminary programs through site visits to five institutions in Indiana. Conversations with presidents, deans, faculty, educational technologists, and other leaders within these institutions provided a thorough, holistic picture of the strengths, challenges, and resource implications associated with their respective program designs. Furthermore, these conversations provided insight into the theological, philosophical, contextual, and institutional factors that motivated each school to decide upon its specific strategy. Since this trip, our faculty has benefitted considerably from exploring the relevance of the insights generated during this trip for our own efforts in the area of distance learning.
Grants cover image

Libraries, Technology and Learning: Linking the Three - Phase 1

Awarded Grant
Hunt, Alice
Chicago Theological Seminary
Theological School
2010
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The prospective move by CTS to a new building and the design of a new library space offer a unique opportunity to re-imagine the provision of bibliographic resources for theological education in the context of the contemporary reality of these resources and the tools for managing, sharing, and accessing them. This grant will help bring a specialist to work with the faculty as they prepare to move to a new ...
Proposal abstract :
The prospective move by CTS to a new building and the design of a new library space offer a unique opportunity to re-imagine the provision of bibliographic resources for theological education in the context of the contemporary reality of these resources and the tools for managing, sharing, and accessing them. This grant will help bring a specialist to work with the faculty as they prepare to move to a new model for theological education. This specialist will help the faculty understand the pedagogical benefits of employing the full power of technology in teaching and learning.

Learning Abstract :
The grant allowed us to concretize questions about the pedagogical benefits of employing the full power of technology in teaching and learning, resulting in the following questions which will be reflected on over the next year: 1) What is the essence of a CTS education? 2) How can we offer a CTS-quality curriculum using emerging tools such as digital technology and online formats? 3) As we start to incorporate these tools, how do we notice and reflect upon the pedagogical issues that emerge? 4) How do we capitalize on our ethos as a community of learners? 5) In particular, how can we incorporate life-long learning skills into the very shape of our learning community?
Grants cover image

Preparing Hispanic Theological Educators for Effective Online Teaching: Extending Hispanic Theological Perspective to Present and Future Church Leaders in the USA

Awarded Grant
Perea, Stan
Asociación para la Educación Teológica Hispana (AETH)
Non-Degree Agency
2011
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The overarching purpose of this project is to make available to seminaries in ATS and to bible institutes in AETH a cohort of Hispanic theological educators who, through effective online pedagogical principles and practices, can teach courses on their theological disciplines from their particular Hispanic perspective. One outcome of this project is for AETH to generate a first group of professors across theological disciplines capable of extending their teaching to ...
Proposal abstract :
The overarching purpose of this project is to make available to seminaries in ATS and to bible institutes in AETH a cohort of Hispanic theological educators who, through effective online pedagogical principles and practices, can teach courses on their theological disciplines from their particular Hispanic perspective. One outcome of this project is for AETH to generate a first group of professors across theological disciplines capable of extending their teaching to ATS member institutions that, for different reasons, do not have Hispanic professors as part of their faculty. Another outcome is for AETH to establish a group of Hispanic “online faculty” capable of teaching courses culturally and socially relevant to its member institutions as they strive to prepare the present and future pastors of the growing Hispanic church in the USA.

Learning Abstract :
The implementation of the phases of the project proved to be helpful for achieving the goal of training Hispanic/Latino Faculty to create and teach courses online. But in light of the realities of seminary faculty in general, and of the Hispanic/Latino faculty in particular, for whom the demands on their time during the school year makes really difficult putting aside time and energy to do something that may not have an immediate impact in their theological academic career, a change in the time frame for the implementation of project may be needed. That is, to move from completing the project during a calendar year to implement it in concentrated and intensive 4-5 day time frame. Theological institutions interested in attracting Hispanic students and/or in teaching courses from a variety of theological disciplines with a Hispanic perspective will greatly benefit from the availability of Hispanic/Latino faculty trained for teaching online.
Grants cover image

Blended Learning Initiative

Awarded Grant
Grosz, Tanya
Northwestern College
Undergraduate School
2011
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Northwestern College is creating a format in which faculty members can explore their pedagogical approaches. In recent months, NWC has been investigating the advantages and disadvantages of blended learning. Blended learning is a pedagogical approach that integrates online technology with face-to-face techniques to create an optimal learning experience. Through training, NWC will focus on faculty’s exploration and inquiry of blended learning and how it may or may not be ...
Proposal abstract :
Northwestern College is creating a format in which faculty members can explore their pedagogical approaches. In recent months, NWC has been investigating the advantages and disadvantages of blended learning. Blended learning is a pedagogical approach that integrates online technology with face-to-face techniques to create an optimal learning experience. Through training, NWC will focus on faculty’s exploration and inquiry of blended learning and how it may or may not be incorporated in their teaching. The adoption of blended learning is an open question rather than a resolved question. Six to eight professors in the Biblical and Theological Studies and Christian Ministries Departments will participate in a two-week intensive period of inquiry followed by ongoing support as they incorporate their newly-acquired knowledge in existing religious courses. This project will contribute to the larger scholarly community’s understanding of best practices in technology and pedagogy, instructor training, and technology’s impact on student engagement.

Learning Abstract :
Northwestern College created a two-week blended learning workshop as a professional development opportunity during which faculty members could explore their pedagogical approaches and consider the use of a blended learning format. Blended learning is a pedagogical approach that integrates online technology with face-to-face techniques to create an optimal learning experience. Through training, NWC focused on faculty members' exploration and inquiry of blended learning and how it may or may not be incorporated in their teaching. Six professors in the Biblical and Theological Studies and Christian Ministries Departments participated in a two-week intensive period of training and inquiry followed by ongoing support as they incorporated their newly-acquired knowledge about blended learning into courses that they redesigned. This project contributed to the larger scholarly community's understanding of best practices in technology and pedagogy, instructor training, and technology's impact on student engagement.
Grants cover image

Lay Ministry Formation for Hybrid Pedagogy: Building a Quality Formation Opportunity for Students at a Distance

Awarded Grant
Love, Marian
Aquinas Institute of Theology
Theological School
2012
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
We wish to develop a formation program for an increasing number of non-cohort students in the Masters in Pastoral Studies who live at a distance and take courses according to a hybrid formula of online work in combination with mid-course intensive face-to-face seminars. Our priorities include 1) consistent and frequent experience of community, 2) affirmation and critical feedback with prayer and discussion, and 3) formative experiences that will be meaningful to individual online ...
Proposal abstract :
We wish to develop a formation program for an increasing number of non-cohort students in the Masters in Pastoral Studies who live at a distance and take courses according to a hybrid formula of online work in combination with mid-course intensive face-to-face seminars. Our priorities include 1) consistent and frequent experience of community, 2) affirmation and critical feedback with prayer and discussion, and 3) formative experiences that will be meaningful to individual online students while being expressive of community. Working with the American Bishops’ document on formation for lay ecclesial ministry, Co-Workers in the Vineyard, we will ensure that all four areas of formation—spiritual, human, intellectual, and pastoral—are addressed. We seek to gather information about best practices, engage a knowledgeable dialogue partner with whom our Director of Lay Spiritual Formation can develop the formation activities, and launch a pilot program in academic years 2013–2014 and 2014–2015.

Learning Abstract :
As we realized the prohibitive expense of traveling to St Louis for intensive seminars in a hybrid MAPS, the faculty acquired IT resources and did Quality Matters training in online pedagogy to allow distant students to study synchronously with other students in the classroom—enhancing enrollment and fostering community and critical class discussion. The faculty also engaged in learning conversation about leadership formation with the National Leadership Roundtable on Church Management. Wabash grant priorities were renegotiated, allowing comprehensive review of human and spiritual formation for all MAPS and MDiv students. Formation directors for lay students, Dominican friars, and health care mission students are working with faculty on curriculum mapping of the MAPS and MDiv in which human and spiritual formation and pastoral formation work in tandem with a goal of leadership formation. We also are in dialogue with two Dominican provinces and the Leadership Roundtable about continuing leadership formation of alumni into their first years of ministry.
Grants cover image

Born Digital: Negotiating Formation in the Hybrid/Online Classroom

Awarded Grant
Turpin, Katherine|Creamer, Deborah
Iliff School of Theology
Theological School
2012
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to explore the unique capacities of the digital environment to support intellectual and professional formation of ministry students with divergent religious and cultural backgrounds, vocational goals, and institutional locations. The collaborative and constructive nature of the online/hybrid classroom may provide unique solutions to the negotiations of student formation in such a rapidly changing context. Faculty members of the Iliff School of Theology will engage in internal ...
Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to explore the unique capacities of the digital environment to support intellectual and professional formation of ministry students with divergent religious and cultural backgrounds, vocational goals, and institutional locations. The collaborative and constructive nature of the online/hybrid classroom may provide unique solutions to the negotiations of student formation in such a rapidly changing context. Faculty members of the Iliff School of Theology will engage in internal faculty collaboration and experimentation concerning hybrid/online pedagogical strategies and their relationship to the diverse intellectual and professional formation of students. Through this process, the faculty will shift from translation of residential pedagogical thinking to transformed pedagogy germane to the capacities of the online environment.

Learning Abstract :
Faculty members from the Iliff School of Theology gathered in retreat format to explore the unique capacities of the digital environment to support intellectual and professional formation of ministry students with divergent religious and cultural backgrounds, vocational goals, and institutional locations. By engaging in internal faculty collaboration and experimentation over a year concerning hybrid/online pedagogical strategies, participants began to identify unique solutions to the negotiations of student formation in such a rapidly changing context. By addressing faculty fears about student commitment and engagement, by identifying ways to have more spontaneous and complex forms of interaction between students and course content, and by increasing links between the online classroom and the external world, faculty began to shift from translation of residential pedagogical thinking to transformed pedagogy germane to the capacities of the online environment.
Grants cover image

Polishing our Pedagogy: Teaching Theology at a Distance

Awarded Grant
Derrenbacker, Robert
Thorneloe University, School of Theology
Undergraduate School
2013
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Thorneloe College School of Theology (TCST) at Thorneloe University is coordinating a weekend workshop for its faculty members, all of whom teach by distance education and are spread across Ontario. This would bring, for the first time, all the faculty members together to explore the opportunities and challenges that are brought to bear through teaching theology at a distance. This workshop would focus on the methods and tools that work ...
Proposal abstract :
Thorneloe College School of Theology (TCST) at Thorneloe University is coordinating a weekend workshop for its faculty members, all of whom teach by distance education and are spread across Ontario. This would bring, for the first time, all the faculty members together to explore the opportunities and challenges that are brought to bear through teaching theology at a distance. This workshop would focus on the methods and tools that work best for undergraduate distance teaching in theology, particularly in the rural and remote contexts that many of TCST’s students experience in northern Ontario and other similar locations in Canada. What could result from this workshop is a greater sense of cohesion and cooperation from among the faculty, the development of faculty capacities for assessment of students learning at a distance, a greater appreciation for a common pedagogy, and a shared sense of vision for the teaching of theology at TCST.

Learning Abstract :
The Workshop funded by a Small Grant from the Wabash Center brought together, for the first time, faculty members teaching Theology courses at a distance at Thorneloe University, as well as students enrolled in its programs. As a result, the Administration of the University has learned of the value and importance of scheduling such get-togethers on a regular basis. As well, the Faculty and Administration have learned directly from students about the rewards and frustrations of taking a Theology program almost exclusively by distance education. And finally, we have identified those areas in our Theology curriculum in need of updating, revision and administrative attention. These results and learning outcomes from the Workshop would benefit anyone teaching Theology at a distance, particularly through an institution located outside of a main urban center in Canada that serves a diverse and diffused student population spread across the expanses of Ontario and Canada.
Grants cover image

Aligning and Adopting a Model of Blended Learning

Awarded Grant
Johnson, Aaron
Denver Seminary
Theological School
2014
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Denver Seminary is a thriving community with a distinct mission and character, reflected in both its faculty and its student body. Our overarching goal is to translate the seminary’s distinctives into a blended learning initiative. We posit that blended learning that is well aligned with institutional values and student realities will be more fully and quickly adopted by faculty and students. Therefore, the specific goals of this project are ...
Proposal abstract :
Denver Seminary is a thriving community with a distinct mission and character, reflected in both its faculty and its student body. Our overarching goal is to translate the seminary’s distinctives into a blended learning initiative. We posit that blended learning that is well aligned with institutional values and student realities will be more fully and quickly adopted by faculty and students. Therefore, the specific goals of this project are to design a model of blended learning that is uniquely fit to the institutional character of Denver Seminary and to our profiles of our students, to support that model with corresponding pedagogies, and to foster the adoption of blended learning throughout our community. A faculty committee and a Blended Learning Community of Practice will implement the project through faculty dialogue and development, course design and execution, and established institutional policies and protocols.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to discover how to align a new blended learning initiative with student needs and institutional values. Additionally, the project endeavored to promote faculty adoption of blended learning pedagogies and best practices.
The grant supported the work of a Faculty Blended Learning Community of Practice that met regularly to discuss their challenges and successes in developing and teaching blended courses. A faculty committee, formed from several of these same instructors, explored the tacit teaching and learning values of the institution, articulated those values, then crafted specific guidelines and protocols for blended courses. Course evaluations, focus groups, instructor debriefs, and surveys were used to gather the feedback used to improve scheduling options and teaching and learning strategies. The most significant lessons learned include: factors that positively influence faculty adoption of innovations (interim report), student adoption of blended learning, and insights into best practices for blended learning.
Grants cover image

Andragogy of Spiritual Formation and Online Community Building in a Distance Education Program

Awarded Grant
Brown, Charles S.
Payne Theological Seminary
Theological School
2014
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
At Payne Theological Seminary over 90 percent of the student population is enrolled in the distance education M.Div. program. Payne’s core faculty of six teaches over 90 percent of the online courses. Payne faculty has learned spiritual formation andragogy and online learning community building practices in two online and learning certificate programs. Implementation of learning is critical and is the focus of this exploration on how well Payne faculty are ...
Proposal abstract :
At Payne Theological Seminary over 90 percent of the student population is enrolled in the distance education M.Div. program. Payne’s core faculty of six teaches over 90 percent of the online courses. Payne faculty has learned spiritual formation andragogy and online learning community building practices in two online and learning certificate programs. Implementation of learning is critical and is the focus of this exploration on how well Payne faculty are utilizing new technology mediums to support the teaching of student spiritual formation and development of rich online learning communities. Payne faculty will review relevant spiritual formation frameworks and identify concrete ways to strengthen spiritual formation andragogy throughout the M.Div program and deepen online community building using cutting-edge field models. Andragogical changes and online community building strategies will be implemented and assessed through two years. Lessons learned and field implications will be shared with the broader theological community through publications.

Learning Abstract :
Payne faculty reviewed relevant spiritual formation frameworks and identified concrete ways to strengthen spiritual formation andragogy throughout the M.Div program and deepen online community building using cutting-edge field models. Andragogical changes and online community building strategies were implemented and assessed through two years. Faculty took various approaches in their individual courses with varying degrees of progress toward the goals and priority of the grant project. All, however, open the door for a deeper and broader view of the liberative and community building resources available for spiritual formation in the Payne Theological Seminary context.
Grants cover image

Enhanced Strategies and Methods for Communal Formation in Online Teaching and Learning

Awarded Grant
Nessan, Craig
Wartburg Theological Seminary
Theological School
2015
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Wartburg Theological Seminary faculty members are engaged in online instruction for both degree and certificate programs. We are accredited by both ATS and HLC for delivery of comprehensive distance education programs. Our church body, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), has both Masters level and Certificate tracks toward ordination. We are seeking support for the honorarium of a consultant (2 days @ $500 per day = $1000) to help us develop and implement new ...
Proposal abstract :
Wartburg Theological Seminary faculty members are engaged in online instruction for both degree and certificate programs. We are accredited by both ATS and HLC for delivery of comprehensive distance education programs. Our church body, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), has both Masters level and Certificate tracks toward ordination. We are seeking support for the honorarium of a consultant (2 days @ $500 per day = $1000) to help us develop and implement new and enhanced online teaching and learning strategies and methods focused on communal formation of our students, who are engaged in online teaching and learning. We propose for the consultant to provide two workshops for faculty members, full time instructors and adjunct instructors. We are asking the consultant to offer an introductory workshop on Tuesday, November 3, 2015 and an advanced workshop on Wednesday, November 4, 2015. This proposal follows the format of the very successful workshop provided by the Wabash Center Consultant Program in October 2014. We are also requesting $1500 for the purchase of textbooks to be used by workshop participants.

Learning Abstract :
Wartburg Theological Seminary faculty members are engaged in online instruction for both degree and certificate programs. This project provided a consultant and reading materials for a two day workshop. The workshop had three goals: 1) To provide new and creative strategies and methods for extending the communal and relational ethos of our seminary in the online teaching environment that are coherent with the mission statement, learning outcomes, and curriculum of our school; 2) To provide ongoing instruction in online teaching and learning for new or recent instructors in striving toward excellence in online teaching and learning; 3) To build and promote excellence in the overall online teaching and learning initiatives of the school. The workshop was most effective in introducing new faculty to effective practices of teaching and learning online. The workshop also gave instruction and encouragement to all faculty to implement new methods for engaging students in asynchronous teaching and learning.
Grants cover image

The Hebrew Learning Project

Awarded Grant
Seow, Choon-Leong
Princeton Theological Seminary
Theological School
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Provide learning-focused opportunities for reflection on, conversation about, and experimentation with Hebrew language pedagogy, especially related to uses of electronic media.
Proposal abstract :
Provide learning-focused opportunities for reflection on, conversation about, and experimentation with Hebrew language pedagogy, especially related to uses of electronic media.

Learning Abstract :
Project sought to fund a research seminar for both professors and graduate students on the teaching of the Hebrew language. It sought to reflect upon, dialogue about and experiment with Hebrew language pedagogy that focused on learning. Other goals included exploring the ways in which electronic media might foster interactive learning and to create an archive of effective teaching and learning aides.

Grant funding resulted in the creation of a CD-ROM with PowerPoint presentation of Hebrew grammar that allows for class interactivity. Also, the group developed an innovative vocabulary learning program called "Living Words", which teaches Hebrew vocabulary through pictures and Hebrew words occurring in the contexts of the Hebrew Bible. The project had an immediate impact at the seminary, prompting the Bible department to discuss changes and the language programs and its overall curriculum.
Grants cover image

Arampur: A Virtual Indian Village on the World Wide Web

Awarded Grant
Schmalz, Mathew|Gottschalk, Peter
College of the Holy Cross
Undergraduate School
2000
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for creation of a virtual Indian village on the World Wide Web to engage students in the exploration of issues of religious and cultural difference through the specificity of North Indian rural life.
Proposal abstract :
Support for creation of a virtual Indian village on the World Wide Web to engage students in the exploration of issues of religious and cultural difference through the specificity of North Indian rural life.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to engage students in the exploration of religious and cultural differences through a website designed to be a virtual tour of a North Indian rural village. As a teaching aide it sought to introduce students to religious life in rural North India, to engage students in the examination of the relationship between religion and society and to provide instructional support for courses considering South Asian civilization and issues of cross-cultural understanding.
The Virtual Village website was developed and can be found at: http://virtualvillage.wesleyan.edu/
The researchers found the experience formative for themselves as teacher-scholars. Their research showed how their investigative techniques developed, and showed them their ability to work collaboratively with each other and with the residents of the village upon whom the site is based. The website design required awareness of the diverse learning styles of students and the pedagogies needed to match those styles. The open structure of the website reflects for them their commitment to develop their teaching further.
Grants cover image

Faculty Formation for Technologically Enhanced Instruction in Theology

Awarded Grant
Bouchard, Charles
Aquinas Institute of Theology
Theological School
1999
Topics: Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Enhance faculty’s effective pedagogical use of technology by providing training and support with an on-site instructional technology coordinator, two pilot distant learning courses, a series of workshops on teaching and information technology, and a strategic plan to improve institutional infrastructure for new technology.
Proposal abstract :
Enhance faculty’s effective pedagogical use of technology by providing training and support with an on-site instructional technology coordinator, two pilot distant learning courses, a series of workshops on teaching and information technology, and a strategic plan to improve institutional infrastructure for new technology.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to support the development of faculty in their use of technology in teaching at Aquinas Institute. Specifically, their goals were 1) to develop a program of faculty formation to help faculty find technology suited to their discipline; 2) to develop a pilot distance learning course; 3) to provide teaching and technology workshops; 4) to develop a strategic plan for infrastructure improvement so as to take advantage of new technologies.
They were able to fund five faculty development seminars in technology. They developed two distance learning course models, one in Ecclesiology and one in Moral Theology. They built course web-pages beyond the two pilot courses. From their work, five professors began developing course web-pages. Their experience in developing these courses helped them to define a hardware standard that would go into effect throughout the institution.
Grants cover image

Teaching Theology in the Contemporary Media Culture

Awarded Grant
Pence, Nadine
Bethany Theological Seminary
Theological School
1999
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Study the pedagogical and epistemological changes that are implied with the use of contemporary visual media (films, videos, TV, computer imaging) in teaching the discipline of theology.
Proposal abstract :
Study the pedagogical and epistemological changes that are implied with the use of contemporary visual media (films, videos, TV, computer imaging) in teaching the discipline of theology.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to study the "pedagogical and epistemological changes that implied with the use of contemporary visual media (films, video, tv, computer imaging) in teaching the discipline of theology." The goal would be to understand the changes in a theological course and curriculum when these modes of learning and teaching are engaged.
The study found that "the use of digitalized images and media in the theological classroom could well expand the world of the students and their approach to the scriptural and interpretive texts such that the students were able to see with new eyes what might be possible." However, it does not replace the basic relationship between the teacher and the student which is central in a learning experience. Thus, she concludes the following: "contemporary media cannot itself a class session make, only a teacher can do that. The task of helping students in the theological construction of meaning is at the center of the theological classroom. Whatever media is chosen, it must be serviced to this goal, not any other."
Grants cover image

Conference on Religion in the South and Electronic Media

Awarded Grant
Laderman, Gary
Emory University
Undergraduate School
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Three day conference to promote discussion between scholars across disciplines (theology, religious studies, history) about teaching religions in the American South, emphasizing the uses of electronic media.
Proposal abstract :
Three day conference to promote discussion between scholars across disciplines (theology, religious studies, history) about teaching religions in the American South, emphasizing the uses of electronic media.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund an interdisciplinary, multimedia conference entitled "Religion in the American South: Toward a renewed scholarship." They hoped to promote discussion between scholars in theology, religious studies and history about teaching religion in the American South with emphasis on electronic media.
The project director reports that the conference reinvigorated scholarly interest in religions in the South and emphasized the potential of the web for research and teaching in this area. It also promoted the exchange of ideas about teaching among conference participants.
Grants cover image

Collaboration on a Religion and Culture Course

Awarded Grant
Denzey, Nicola
Skidmore College
Undergraduate School
1999
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Three religion faculty collaborate to shape a new introductory course with an emphasis on team-teaching, multimedia presentations, an interactive website with course resources and databases, and an honors section.
Proposal abstract :
Three religion faculty collaborate to shape a new introductory course with an emphasis on team-teaching, multimedia presentations, an interactive website with course resources and databases, and an honors section.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to shape a new introduction to religion course with hopes of it invigorating the new religion major at the school. The course would be team taught by scholars of religion with different specializations and would involve creation of a course website with resource and databases. The course would also have an additional, jointly taught session for students in the Skidmore Honors Forum.
Grant money allowed them to bring in outside resources to the course and include a field trip for religion majors. Changes in the required faculty load made it impractical to include an extra Honors Forum section. They incorporated that work into the course instead. The major success of the course was the development of website of resources including online syllabi, course assignments and readings, religion links, an online image database and a glossary of course terms.
Grants cover image

Digitized Resources in the History of Christianity: A Model for the Use of Information Technologies as Supplements in Classroom Teaching and Learning

Awarded Grant
Kalantzis, George
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
Theological School
1999
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Creation of browser-based digital collection of the instructional material and other resources used in the first of the sequence of History of Christianity courses offered at the seminary.
Proposal abstract :
Creation of browser-based digital collection of the instructional material and other resources used in the first of the sequence of History of Christianity courses offered at the seminary.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to create an internet-based digital collection of the instructional materials and resources for use in Garrett's introductory History of Christianity courses. It also hoped to create a better understanding of the issues of interactive and visual learning, to demonstrate the viability of interpreting digitized resources in theological education, to provide an interdisciplinary model for using information technology, and to investigate the use of alternative research methods.
A substantial amount of the project was able to be completed. Though, unforeseen elements involving the rapid technological changes of this work slowed down some progress. Changes in hardware and software were not always compatible with student computers. The transfer of primary texts worked well and allowed all students to share one common version of text and pagination which facilitated classroom discussion. Secondary sources on the database required debate and clarification over copyright rules. Overall, the project allowed the courses to use the potential of the instruction as a repository of information and presentation.
Grants cover image

Teaching for the Sake of Learning

Awarded Grant
Byer, Glenn
Kenrick-Glennon Seminary
Theological School
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Fund a facilitator to work with faculty in a year-long conversation on teaching, to include the nature of the seminary’s students, current trends in teaching and learning, instructional technology, and the relationship between the subject matter and the person teaching the subject.
Proposal abstract :
Fund a facilitator to work with faculty in a year-long conversation on teaching, to include the nature of the seminary’s students, current trends in teaching and learning, instructional technology, and the relationship between the subject matter and the person teaching the subject.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a facilitator and a retreat for faculty development in the areas of teaching, learning and pedagogy. They hoped to become more knowledgeable of current research on teaching and learning, to incorporate them into their pedagogy and to develop a community of scholars dedicated to excellence in teaching.
Working with Dr. Victor Klimoski of St. John's University, Collegeville, MN, they developed a process of meeting that allowed them to think in creative terms about how they taught as well as the paradox of teaching and learning at their seminary. They were able to focus on Parker Palmer's, The Courage to Teach, with specific emphasis on its pertinence to seminary work. They learned that ongoing discussion on pedagogy was needed on their faculty. This culminated in a faculty retreat on the redevelopment of their syllabi to make them more in line with the teaching excellence mission of the school. This created a more consistent approach across their curriculum.
Grants cover image

The Church as a Community of Practice

Awarded Grant
Pauw, Amy
Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological School
1999
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Develop a seminary course to better support students’ ministry by making vivid the centrality of practices in the life of the church, using Powerpoint to draw in the images and sounds of ritual, music, nurture, and outreach, and exploring Internet and media resources for teaching theology.
Proposal abstract :
Develop a seminary course to better support students’ ministry by making vivid the centrality of practices in the life of the church, using Powerpoint to draw in the images and sounds of ritual, music, nurture, and outreach, and exploring Internet and media resources for teaching theology.

Learning Abstract :
Project sought to teach ecclesiology in a new way by focusing on the Christian church as a community of practice and by the use of the computer assisted instruction to teach those practices.
Students responded positively to this new approach to teaching ecclesiology. They felt that it "helped them to link historical study and theological reflection with contemporary church life." Several learnings were reported on the use of computer technology for teaching theology. One reflection involved the amount of time needed in order to teach with computer technology, both in its preparation and implementation. The second point involved the discipline specific nature of technology and teaching. It appears most useful for courses with visual and material examples as a central component. Finally, it was learned that computer technology cannot replace reading, lecturing, discussing texts and writing papers. Rather, it is a useful supplement to these approaches.
Grants cover image

A Model of Seminary Cooperation for Learner-Centered Education

Awarded Grant
Zabel, Sue|Waldkoenig, Gilson
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
Theological School
1999
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
LTSG and Wesley Seminary collaborate to produce a learner-centered and technologically equipped course, “Rural and Small Church Ministries.” The course will be enhanced by research and development of an on-line set of additional resources from multiple traditions, multi-disciplinary faculty, and an innovative combination of classroom and on-line teaching.
Proposal abstract :
LTSG and Wesley Seminary collaborate to produce a learner-centered and technologically equipped course, “Rural and Small Church Ministries.” The course will be enhanced by research and development of an on-line set of additional resources from multiple traditions, multi-disciplinary faculty, and an innovative combination of classroom and on-line teaching.

Learning Abstract :
The project was implemented in the spring of 2001. We (Waldkoenig at LTSG and Zabel at Wesley Theological Seminary) had designed what we hoped would be a learner-centered course on rural ministry. Our hope was to include technology in the teaching and learning process to allow for various learning styles of the students and to provide new ways to reflect upon rural contexts. The course had three different sections: one in the classroom at Wesley and two online sections. These were the first pilots of online courses at either school. All three sections of our course enjoyed ample discussion times in response to an array of resources including presentations, readings and guest practitioners. The presentations included graphics of rural art, photos, statistical charts and outlines of ideas that had not been readily available. The grant supported the development of the presentations, their delivery online, sustaining the online discussion through Blackboard course web pages and the collaboration of project directors Zabel and Waldkoenig.
Grants cover image

Teaching and Learning Workshop for Wartburg Theological Seminary Faculty

Awarded Grant
Priebe, Duane
Wartburg Theological Seminary
Theological School
1999
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Support for a teaching and learning workshop for Wartburg Theological Seminary Faculty, to be led by a Wabash Center consultant.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a teaching and learning workshop for Wartburg Theological Seminary Faculty, to be led by a Wabash Center consultant.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a workshop on teaching and learning conducted by Wabash center faculty, reproducing for single faculty the process used for the Wabash Teaching Workshops. This included focus on one's vocation as a teacher, exploring teaching methods, teaching assessment, grading teachers as mentors, diversity among students, technology, collegiality of teachers and accountability in teaching.
They found that the workshop significantly expanded their use of educational technology in teaching. They describe it as having had "a major and lasting, transforming effect on the teaching of several courses." Their discussions on curriculum were fruitful, highlighting several contended areas that required extended work in a future workshop. The discussions on their common work as Wartburg faculty were very positive and useful. Finally, they found the outside facilitators connected to the Wabash Center to be excellent.
Grants cover image

Database of Texts and Images for Teaching the New Testament

Awarded Grant
Attridge, Harold
Yale University
Undergraduate School
1998
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Create a structured, web-searchable database of texts and images related to the study of the New Testament. The database will augment Yale’s existing Ad Hoc Digital Library that supports the teaching of church history.
Proposal abstract :
Create a structured, web-searchable database of texts and images related to the study of the New Testament. The database will augment Yale’s existing Ad Hoc Digital Library that supports the teaching of church history.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to create a structured, web-searchable database of texts and images to support the teaching of courses in the New Testament. The distinctiveness of this site would be its connection to the extensive resources of Yale University. The material in this database can help to place New Testament studies into the context of the worlds in which it was written and in which it came to be accepted as authoritative. Thus, the focus of the project was to use electronic resources to help integrate the study of the New Testament, both in its immediate context and in the context of the history of Christianity.
The project goals were met with the creation of the Eikon Image Database for Biblical Studies, an online resource with immediate impact on the teaching of New Testament at Yale Divinity School. In the grant period the conceptual framework and interlocking structure of the database were put in place. A great deal of content was added, with more to be completed. They learned a great deal about the potential and problems of creating digital resources.
Grants cover image

Preparation of Graduate Students for Careers as Teachers

Awarded Grant
Hodgson, Peter
Vanderbilt University
Undergraduate School
1996
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Preliminary and implementation grants to develop a seminar on teaching with visiting speakers, a teaching fellow, training in the use of technology and faculty conversation about pedagogy.
Proposal abstract :
Preliminary and implementation grants to develop a seminar on teaching with visiting speakers, a teaching fellow, training in the use of technology and faculty conversation about pedagogy.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to improve its seminar on the teaching of religion required of all first year doctoral candidates. The grant funded several guest speakers to the seminar: two recent Ph.D. graduates in their first teaching position and guest speakers from Vanderbilt's Center for Research on Human Development and Vanderbilt's Peabody College of Education and Human Development.
As a result of this project they found that they made better use of the Center for Teaching in the College of Arts and Sciences. Also, they discovered ways to use the student orientation program to encourage discussion of teaching religion. A faculty member in the Divinity School took on a newly created faculty development role for ongoing faculty renewal of pedagogy. Finally, they were able to strengthen doctoral students' use of technology in the classroom.
Grants cover image

Bible in Pop Culture: Developing a Multimedia CD-ROM for Teaching in Biblical Studies

Awarded Grant
Beal, Timothy|Linafelt, Tod
Eckerd College
Undergraduate School
1998
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Develop an interactive multimedia CD-ROM textbook supplement on the Bible in contemporary media--particularly music, film and graphic arts.
Proposal abstract :
Develop an interactive multimedia CD-ROM textbook supplement on the Bible in contemporary media--particularly music, film and graphic arts.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to produce an interactive, hypertextual CD_ROM for teaching biblical studies. Specific educational goals were to facilitate teaching biblical literature to undergraduates by highlighting the ways in which it is a powerful influence in contemporary media; to encourage close textual reading by asking students to make specific textual connections; to encourage critical analysis of the relation between Bible, popular culture and new media.
Collecting and evaluating examples of biblical idiom in popular culture, they were able to produce a "demo disk." Also, during the grant period, the technology began a shift from the CD-ROM format to web-based formats. By the end of the project, the project planners were deciding whether to transfer the work to a website.
Grants cover image

Imagining, Designing, and Evaluating 'Shared-Hybrid' Courses for Local and Distance Students

Awarded Grant
Brunner, Daniel|Nam, Roger
Portland Seminary
Theological School
2016
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
George Fox Evangelical Seminary serves both a local, commuter learning community and a hybrid community that combines online coursework with face-to-face intensives. A recent decline in local students led to the creation of a revised curriculum that will bring greater parity between the two learning communities. At the heart of this curriculum is the “shared-hybrid” course, with a population of both local and online students. This project explores the pedagogy ...
Proposal abstract :
George Fox Evangelical Seminary serves both a local, commuter learning community and a hybrid community that combines online coursework with face-to-face intensives. A recent decline in local students led to the creation of a revised curriculum that will bring greater parity between the two learning communities. At the heart of this curriculum is the “shared-hybrid” course, with a population of both local and online students. This project explores the pedagogy of this new delivery method. It revolves around three workshops. During the first two-day, retreat-style workshop, a professional facilitator will help the seminary assess its current pedagogy and practice and then imagine the challenges and opportunities in shared-hybrid courses. In the second workshop, nine months later, we will expand pedagogical dialogue to include course design. The focus of the final workshop, after a year of implementation, will be evaluation, with an eye toward improvement and then dissemination of our learnings.

Learning Abstract :
Grants cover image

Implementing Effective Teaching and Learning Practices Employing Interactive Video

Awarded Grant
Nessan, Craig
Wartburg Theological Seminary
Theological School
2016
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
The Wartburg Theological Seminary faculty is engaged in online instruction both for degree and certificate programs. We are accredited by both ATS and HLC for comprehensive distance education programs. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America has both Masters and Certificate tracks toward ordination. In fall semester we are implementing a new Master of Divinity curriculum to be delivered employing interactive video. This new approach needs to combine the best teaching ...
Proposal abstract :
The Wartburg Theological Seminary faculty is engaged in online instruction both for degree and certificate programs. We are accredited by both ATS and HLC for comprehensive distance education programs. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America has both Masters and Certificate tracks toward ordination. In fall semester we are implementing a new Master of Divinity curriculum to be delivered employing interactive video. This new approach needs to combine the best teaching and learning practices from both residential classroom and asynchronous online courses. We are seeking a consultant to help us develop and implement new and enhanced teaching and learning strategies and methods focused on course design, course development, and implementation of new pedagogy for effective use of interactive video. This proposal is to assist in equipping our faculty for an entirely new mode of teaching, employing video streaming, something we have never done before.

Learning Abstract :
Wartburg Theological Seminary (WTS) faculty members are engaged in online instruction for both degree and certificate programs. We are accredited by both A TS and HLC for delivery of comprehensive distance education programs. Our church body, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), has both a Masters level and a Certificate track, Theological Education for Emerging Ministries (TEEM) toward ordination. In fall semester we are implementing a new Master of Divinity curriculum that will be delivered employing interactive video. This new approach needs to combine the best of teaching and learning practices from both residential classroom and asynchronous online courses. We received from the Wabash Center this grant for a consultant to help us develop and implement new and enhanced teaching and learning strategies and methods focused on course design, course development, and implementation of new pedagogy for effective use of interactive video. The faculty had initial introduction to the challenges of this pedagogy at our faculty retreat in May 2016. This grant has assisted us in equipping our faculty for an entirely new mode of teaching, employing video streaming.
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!