Teaching in Specific Contexts

Grants - Topic: Teaching in Specific Contexts - 96 results

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Teologia en Conjunto: Hispanic Perspectives in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Sellers, Diana|Barton, Paul
Seminary of the Southwest
Theological Schools
2000
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Support to develop a program designed to train seminary faculty in Hispanic perspectives by directly working with Hispanic theologians to foster culturally inclusive courses for the M. Div. curriculum.
Proposal abstract :
Support to develop a program designed to train seminary faculty in Hispanic perspectives by directly working with Hispanic theologians to foster culturally inclusive courses for the M. Div. curriculum.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to provide support for seminary faculty in their efforts to include Hispanic perspectives and issues in the design and implementation of their courses. They hoped to increase faculty awareness of the experiences and worldviews of Latino/Latinas; to increase the library's Hispanic texts and resources; to increase their social justice awareness of the church's mission; to graduate competent multi-cultural ministers; and to establish ongoing relationships between seminary faculty and Hispanic scholars in each discipline.
The project director reports that significant learning included the following: awareness that cultural differences generate serious discomfort at times between scholars; doing theology in community challenges traditional approaches to theological education; doing theological education in community requires an interdisciplinary approach; theological education curricula need to highlight the cultural dimensions of theology and ministry; multiculturalism in theological education is an expensive concept, and finally, a multicultural curriculum entails political implications.
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Teaching Theological Bibliography in the Internet Age: Comparative Approaches in Three Theological Libraries

Awarded Grant
Lincoln, Timothy
Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2000
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
To study user training practices that librarians use to teach theological bibliography in the libraries of Brite Divinity, Epis. Theo. Sem. of the SW, and Univ. of St. Thomas Grad. Sch of Theo.
Proposal abstract :
To study user training practices that librarians use to teach theological bibliography in the libraries of Brite Divinity, Epis. Theo. Sem. of the SW, and Univ. of St. Thomas Grad. Sch of Theo.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funding for research to study user training practices in the libraries of three ATS schools in Texas. Using quantitative methods, the project sought "to identify commonalities in practice with a view toward improving user training."
The project director's first goal was to let each library articulate its own contextual reality, and then secondly to seek comparisons in the sites. Two significant themes emerged from the data: the relationship between formal evaluation and satisfaction, and the effectiveness of mandatory training.
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Ethnicity and Pedagogy in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Priest, Robert|Tienou, Tite
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological Schools
2000
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Faculty interested in the implications of ethnicity/race for theo. ed. and for ministry in congregational settings will meet 15 times for lunch/discussion and have guest speakers to address these issue.
Proposal abstract :
Faculty interested in the implications of ethnicity/race for theo. ed. and for ministry in congregational settings will meet 15 times for lunch/discussion and have guest speakers to address these issue.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather faculty weekly over lunch on the topic of the implications of ethnicity/race for theological education and for ministry in congregational settings.
Their gatherings were successful in forging and strengthening the relationships among the faculty. A rich conversation on ethnicity and theological education was carried out. Faculty felt the lunches were safe spaces to explore difficult issues that were seldom, if ever, discussed in a larger faculty setting. A result of these meetings was the commitment of the group to engage in a joint writing project focusing on ethnicity and race as a way of bringing the conversation more to the center of institutional life at the school.
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Teaching the Bible for Leadership in the United Church of Canada

Awarded Grant
Ascough, Richard|Vaage, Leif
Queen's University
Colleges/Universities
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
A three-year consultation of all teachers of biblical studies from the different theological faculties of the United Church of Canada (UCC) on how biblical studies are taught.
Proposal abstract :
A three-year consultation of all teachers of biblical studies from the different theological faculties of the United Church of Canada (UCC) on how biblical studies are taught.

Learning Abstract :
Through the gathering of Bible from the seminaries of the United Church of Canada we helped one another define and articulate who we are as teachers, what we do in the classroom, how we contribute to the church, particularly the UCC, and how we can further develop this identify, both individually and collectively. We grew from a dispersed bunch of individuals linked only by larger institutional connections to become a ‘community of practice' centered on teaching the Bible for leadership in the church. We learned that the nurturing of such a community takes time and energy, but that this investment will "pay-off" through the development of reflective teachers who are engaged in the construction of deep learning. While full agreement on core values may constantly elude the group, healthy debate and frank exchanges leads to an atmosphere of trust where participants can learn from one another how to become better teachers.
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Through Hispanic Eyes: A Seminar for Non-Hispanic Faculty

Awarded Grant
González, Justo
Asociación para la Educación Teológica Hispana (AETH)
Agencies
2000
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Support for 15 non-Hispanic faculty of theological seminaries to attend a Faculty Seminar on teaching Latinos/as in the various fields of theology and ministry.
Proposal abstract :
Support for 15 non-Hispanic faculty of theological seminaries to attend a Faculty Seminar on teaching Latinos/as in the various fields of theology and ministry.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to support a group of non-Hispanic faculty from theological seminaries to attend a faculty seminar on teaching Latinos/as in the various fields of theology and ministry. This seminar of the Hispanic Summer Program would be held at the Oblate School of Theology in San Antonio, TX.
The group included a total of 22 participants from many areas of the theological curriculum. The largest number of participants was from the areas of Biblical studies, ethics and practical theology. Participants reported their desire to take steps so that similar seminars can take place in their own institutions for their faculty. Others reported their plans to rewrite their course syllabi with Hispanic perspectives included more intentionally. Several felt that through the experience they had found new ways to support and encourage Hispanic students and colleagues.
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The Vocation of Teaching Theologians in the ELCA: A Pair of Programmatic Consultations

Awarded Grant
Strandjord, Jonathan
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
Agencies
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Teaching theologians, church leaders, and bishops will gather for two consultations between their regular biennial meetings to develop, identify and promote practices in pedagogy that are congruent with the theology of the ELCA.
Proposal abstract :
Teaching theologians, church leaders, and bishops will gather for two consultations between their regular biennial meetings to develop, identify and promote practices in pedagogy that are congruent with the theology of the ELCA.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather together teaching theologians of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and church leaders to clarify their vocation as teachers and to strengthen their roles in the life of the church. They hoped to develop ways of thinking and to initiate practices that better express and embody their vocation as teaching theologians. They also hoped to promote pedagogical practices congruent with the theology of the church.
The first consultation focused on the vocation of the teaching theologian in the ELCS. While no clear relationship between Lutheran theology and pedagogy was established, clear understanding of "Lutheran Leanings" in scholarship and teaching was articulated. It especially affirmed its character as requiring teachers to "teach in an ecclesially public manner." The second consultation focused on Evangelical theology and oversight in a pluralistic society. This allowed both bishops and teaching theologians to develop better common purpose and understanding of each other. An important outcome of the consultation was the proposal of a new association of teaching theologians in the ELCA who will meet regularly.
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The All Seminaries’ Faculties Conference of the Episcopal Church on Theological Teaching

Awarded Grant
Lemler, James
Bexley Hall Seabury - Western Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Two-day meeting of faculty from the eleven seminaries of the Episcopal Church to focus on theological pedagogy and the vocation of seminary educators. Leader of the event will be Parker Palmer.
Proposal abstract :
Two-day meeting of faculty from the eleven seminaries of the Episcopal Church to focus on theological pedagogy and the vocation of seminary educators. Leader of the event will be Parker Palmer.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather together members of the faculties of all the seminaries of the Episcopal Church for a conference on issues of pedagogy and vocation fro teachers in theological seminaries. They hoped to begin a conversation about issues of teaching and vocation among Episcopal seminary teachers, which would then be continued in the individual seminaries. They also hoped to build collegiality, solidarity, collaboration and cooperation among Episcopal educators and seminaries.
Virtually the entire faculties of the 11 Episcopal seminaries attended for a total of 110 participants. The conference was led by Parker Palmer. The final report indicates, "The agenda was intensive, and the focus clear. In the evaluations, many participants noted that the conference exceeded our original expectations and was the occasion of the highest quality for learning about these issues." Participants expressed a deeper sense of their vocation as teachers as a result of the conference. Individual seminaries report ongoing conversation as a result of the conference.
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Teaching “Race and Ethnic Relations” in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Priest, Robert|Tienou, Tite|Fernandez, Enrique
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological Schools
2001
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
A year-long program of interdisciplinary, inter-ethnic seminars, a two-day workshop, team teaching, and a national meeting on teaching race and ethnic relations.
Proposal abstract :
A year-long program of interdisciplinary, inter-ethnic seminars, a two-day workshop, team teaching, and a national meeting on teaching race and ethnic relations.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds for an interdisciplinary and inter-ethnic network of scholars with shared interests in ethnicity and race in relation to theological studies, classroom pedagogy and congregational life. Activities included: faculty seminars on race and ethnicity; a workshop with a guest lecturer on the topic of reconciliation; a required, team-taught course on race and ethnic relations; a gathering of scholars who teach courses in seminary on race and ethnic relations; and a faculty retreat on the topic of culture, race and ethnicity in theological education. Wabash funds were part of larger funding received.
Project directors report the following learning: the importance of "sustained vision and intentionality" among parties; the importance of strategic partnerships across race in "co-constructing conversational initiatives"; the importance of creating safe spaces with empathetic and critical listening; a commitment of all parties to being "learners together"; the importance of a shared vocational and theological core to pull together the diversity of the group: the value of external sources of funding to bring visibility and respect for the project; "the value of keeping one's own faculty at the center of every initiative, empowering and treating them as professionals"; the value of networking with and including external scholars; the value of networking with and dialoguing with denominational and church leaders who have experience of diversity in congregational settings.
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Chicago Forum on Pedagogy and the Study of Religion

Awarded Grant
Pick, Lucy
University of Chicago Divinity School
Theological Schools
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
A three year forum of plenary talks, panel discussions and graduate student workshops on issues surrounding the teaching of the academic subject of religion to undergraduates in a liberal arts environment.
Proposal abstract :
A three year forum of plenary talks, panel discussions and graduate student workshops on issues surrounding the teaching of the academic subject of religion to undergraduates in a liberal arts environment.

Learning Abstract :
The project was designed as a three-year forum of plenary talks (Wabash Center lectures), conferences, and graduate student workshops on issues surrounding the teaching of the academic subject of religion to undergraduates in a liberal arts environment. Each year a theme was identified in order to prompt extended discussion in the forum and promote ongoing conversation about specific topics. Two goals were identified as primary aims for the forum. The first was to start a discussion within the University of Chicago community about specific challenges and opportunities associated with teaching undergraduate students about religion. The second goal involved providing a locus for graduate students to consider questions highlighted during the forums in an "inspiring, practical, and meaningful way."

Through the grant, participants were able to reflect on and practice different design methods and models for teaching and learning. Topics and issues included: teaching and diversity, portfolio development, comparative methods and teaching religion, teaching an introductory course in religious studies, self as teacher, student religious experience in the classroom, etc. The series of forums, conferences, workshops, and meetings aided fellows involved with the Forum to develop skills as critically reflective teachers. Graduate students regarded the experience of involvement as highly beneficial. In addition, a number of additional outcomes have emerged from the grant – formation of a discussion panel on pedagogy at the 2004 Midwest AAR meeting, publication of a special issue of Criterion http://marty-center.uchicago.edu/fellows/chicagoforum.shtml, and an ongoing student developed workshop on pedagogy.
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Teaching and Learning in a Multicultural Setting

Awarded Grant
Bain - Selbo, Eric
Lebanon Valley College of PA
Colleges/Universities
2001
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Assist a one-year research project on the teaching of Maori religion and culture in New Zealand colleges and universities to develop a pedagogy for teaching and learning in a multicultural setting.
Proposal abstract :
Assist a one-year research project on the teaching of Maori religion and culture in New Zealand colleges and universities to develop a pedagogy for teaching and learning in a multicultural setting.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund research investigating the ways Maori religion and culture is taught in New Zealand colleges and universities today. Goals included understanding how Maori-Pakeha (white) relations are played out in college classrooms and curricula; to broaden an understanding of how we should teach about "the other" in classrooms and through curricula in the United States.
Through faculty interviews, library research and classroom learning at the University of Waikato he was able to think carefully about teaching in a multicultural context. First, he had to overcome assumptions about the British model of higher education and about "the myth of racial harmony that is present in New Zealand society today." Fundamentally, in regards to the teaching and learning, he discerned the necessity of teaching Maori culture as a cooperative effort among Maori and Pakeha faculty.
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Attendance at Anti-Racism Training the Trainers Seminars

Awarded Grant
Ramsay, Nancy
Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2001
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Attendance at three anti-racism programs to observe and compare evolving methods for their application to seminary education.
Proposal abstract :
Attendance at three anti-racism programs to observe and compare evolving methods for their application to seminary education.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to extend an inadequately budgeted item in a prior grant (WC 2000 008), a study leave grant concerning anti-racism research, including training sessions, in relation to teaching and learning in theological education. Training sessions for the grant period included The National Coalition Building Institute (NCBI), the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and personal consultations with an anti-racism training specialist.
Attending the workshops and engaging the consultant helped her to complete her research goals of directly observing current approaches and doing comparative analysis of each in order to develop proposals for seminary based experiences.
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Mining the Motherlode: Teaching and Learning African American Religious Life

Awarded Grant
McNary-Zak, Bernadette|Aponte, Edwin
Perkins School of Theology Southern Methodist University
Theological Schools
2001
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for three meetings of seventeen faculty to develop and distribute materials that explore methods for teaching about African American religious traditions.
Proposal abstract :
Support for three meetings of seventeen faculty to develop and distribute materials that explore methods for teaching about African American religious traditions.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather a group to develop and distribute materials that explore methods of teaching and learning about African American religious traditions. They hoped to discuss issues related to teaching and learning, and to examine innovative ways to engage African American students, in particular, and all students, in general, in the study of African American religious traditions. The result of their gathering and work together would be a book on the topic. The group members were all participants of the 1999-2000 AAR Teaching and Learning Workshop, "Mining the Mother Load of African American Religious Life."
The project directors report that the group met three times between November, 2001 and October, 2002. The manuscript was written through a collaborative process of dialogue and engagement which the formal gatherings made possible. The completed work was accepted for publication at Oxford University Press.
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Faculty Development for Teaching and Learning in Drew’s Culturally Diverse Community

Awarded Grant
Westfield, Nancy
Drew Theological School
Theological Schools
2001
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Two weekend faculty retreats that will enhance teaching theory and skills specifically for a racially/culturally diverse seminary population.
Proposal abstract :
Two weekend faculty retreats that will enhance teaching theory and skills specifically for a racially/culturally diverse seminary population.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to engage the theological faculty in two retreats to enhance their teaching theory and skills specifically for their racially/culturally diverse seminary population. They hoped to be able to become more aware of and responsive to the complexity of their current and future student body and their diverse learning style needs due to their cultural and racial diversity. In addition, they hoped to reflect deeply on their teaching practices in such a diverse context.
The project director reports that the project goals were met. The faculty expressed appreciation of the uninterrupted time in consultation together. They also felt that the consultant proved to be "invaluable" to the process of learning. They report that their conversation raised their level of awareness and demonstrated to them the complexity of teaching in diversity. One outcome of the retreats was the creation of a "peer development system," a voluntary system of pairing faculty peers together for ongoing conversation and mentoring on issues of teaching and learning, as well as classroom visitations with constructive feedback.
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Developing Androgogy for Minority Instruction at Majority Institutions

Awarded Grant
Gray, Richard|Pannell, William
Asbury Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2001
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Funding for two symposiums for African-American faculty to explore androgogy from the perspective of black faculty who teach majority students and/or teach courses from a minority perspective in majority institutions.
Proposal abstract :
Funding for two symposiums for African-American faculty to explore androgogy from the perspective of black faculty who teach majority students and/or teach courses from a minority perspective in majority institutions.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather together African American professors of the Christian College Coalition Graduate Fellows program to address their experiences and frustrations as minority faculty, with the goal of developing positive responses to their location in majority white institutions. Participants hoped to develop andragogy from the perspective of black faculty who teach majority students from a minority perspective within these institutions.
Participants report that the symposium successfully gathered together African American instructor of Christian Colleges. In their meetings they were able to share insights and techniques they had gained which made it easier to survive their minority status in their respective institutions.
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Knowledge, Power and Wisdom: Transforming Biblical Studies

Awarded Grant
Schüssler Fiorenza, Elisabeth
Harvard University
Colleges/Universities
2002
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Research and writing to develop intellectual frameworks, methodological practices, educational measures and institutional analyses to rethink biblical doctoral studies as regards the rhetorics and ethics of biblical inquiry.
Proposal abstract :
Research and writing to develop intellectual frameworks, methodological practices, educational measures and institutional analyses to rethink biblical doctoral studies as regards the rhetorics and ethics of biblical inquiry.

Learning Abstract :
The project is a study leave work that is part of an overarching project to rethink the standard educational methods and framework of Biblical Studies in order to address "the uneasy relationship between church and critical biblical scholarship" and "the political functions of Biblical Studies in the face of increasing global fundamentalism and Scriptural literalism."
During the study leave two types of work were engaged: "further research on the issues and initiation of public discussion on how to reshape graduate biblical education in general and doctoral education in particular." A total of four articles on the research topic were published during the study leave period.
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Teaching Religion in a Secular Setting

Awarded Grant
Maffly-Kipp, Laurie
University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Colleges/Universities
2002
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Preparing graduate students to teach religious studies in a variety of contexts including the public school environment through installation of a religious studies head TA and ongoing training for TAs.
Proposal abstract :
Preparing graduate students to teach religious studies in a variety of contexts including the public school environment through installation of a religious studies head TA and ongoing training for TAs.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to accomplish three interrelated goals through a series of monthly seminars: 1) improve undergraduate education through 2) expanded training of graduate students for 3) diverse professional experiences. The primary goals promulgated additional related goals: "enhancing networks of knowledge and collegiality among graduate students and between students and faculty members, initiating a formal dialogue about pedagogical issues specific to religious studies, fostering conversations across narrow field specializations, preparing graduate students for the job market, clarifying the role of Teaching Assistants, and encouraging individuals to develop their own teaching methods and styles by participating in ongoing reflection about pedagogy."

Those involved with the program affirmed that they had been able to meet and exceed their stated goals by "revolutionizing the quality of pedagogical training, levels of engagement and collegiality among students and faculty, and the extent of reflection about the rights and roles of graduate students in the department." In addition, they determined that the project also enhanced and increased discussion and cooperation among teaching assistants and professors. It also was considered to be a success in the manner by which the professional development of graduate students was appreciably improved.
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Teaching the Bible: How the History and Culture of Biblical Interpretation in the Bible Belt has Influenced Teaching and Learning in Theology

Awarded Grant
Bonilla, Max
University of St. Thomas (MN)
Colleges/Universities
2002
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
To make explicit the cultural assumptions of the Bible Belt that affect teaching and learning in biblical studies by videotaping interviews with Southern pastors, students, and teachers; to develop web resources from the data collected for exploring the formational aspects of learning.
Proposal abstract :
To make explicit the cultural assumptions of the Bible Belt that affect teaching and learning in biblical studies by videotaping interviews with Southern pastors, students, and teachers; to develop web resources from the data collected for exploring the formational aspects of learning.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to understand how teaching trends contributed to the development of hermeneutical and theological assumptions concerning the Bible in the "Bible Belt." Through interviews with pastors, students and professors, the research hoped to discern primarily the role that "Bible Belt" culture plays in the teaching and learning process, as well as the influence of the teaching process directly on the "Bible Belt" cultural perception of the Bible. Hoped for results included a website of collected data and a course on the topic.
Research data collected was put into a website as www.biblebeltresearch.org. The course that emerged was well attended and included a variety of pedagogical strategies including field research and multimedia presentations. Important outcomes of the research also included a paper entitled, "Hermeneutics of the Bible Belt: Struggles in Interpretation" and various talks to local churches to raise awareness of the culture and cultural dynamics of their context.
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Constructing a Theological Vocation Across the Religious/Secular Divide

Awarded Grant
Priest, Robert
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological Schools
2002
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Ethnographic interviews with Christian anthropologists working in seminary settings in order to develop a broader understanding of how they construct their vocation as theological educators and examining how this relates to broader questions of vocation in academic settings.
Proposal abstract :
Ethnographic interviews with Christian anthropologists working in seminary settings in order to develop a broader understanding of how they construct their vocation as theological educators and examining how this relates to broader questions of vocation in academic settings.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to interview Christian anthropologists who teach, or who have formally taught in theological seminaries. This work was part of research by the grantee related to a larger project of the "Wabash Center Consultation on Vocation: A Career in Theological Scholarship."
The project director was able to conduct 20 interviews during the time of the grant. He reports that the grant funds supported a "significant block of research," helped to redirect his interviewing more toward the topic of vocation, and clarify the importance of seminary "as a crucial social location" in which Christians struggle to integrate various forms of knowledge."
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Curriculum and Teaching

Awarded Grant
Seymour, Jack
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2002
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The intent of the project is to connect curriculum to teaching practices through examination and analysis of selected seminary mission statements in relation to curriculum design and teaching practices.
Proposal abstract :
The intent of the project is to connect curriculum to teaching practices through examination and analysis of selected seminary mission statements in relation to curriculum design and teaching practices.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to examine the interface between seminary mission statements, curricula and its implications for teaching in theological school curricula. This would be accomplished through interviews at selected seminaries.
The project director reports that the grant provided the opportunity to visit face-to-face with 25 persons at 12 seminaries, and by phone with another 5 persons at 5 additional seminaries. He consulted deans, assessment officers, faculty members and researchers in theological education. In his work he discovered that "a culture of learning and teaching within the institution can be fueled by curricular conversation itself, or by faculty development efforts where the content and methods of courses are shared and clarifications made about how these courses fit into a whole pattern."
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Achieving More Effective Biblical Preaching Through Interdisciplinary Teaching of Contemporary Biblical Interpretation in a Catholic M.Div. Curriculum

Awarded Grant
Heille, Gregory
Aquinas Institute of Theology
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a gathering of up to twenty M.Div faculty in biblical studies and homiletics for two meetings to identify and discuss collaborative approaches for effectively teaching biblical interpretation for preaching.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a gathering of up to twenty M.Div faculty in biblical studies and homiletics for two meetings to identify and discuss collaborative approaches for effectively teaching biblical interpretation for preaching.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to design and implement a collaborative Biblical Studies and Homiletics curriculum, capable of developing preachers with hermeneutical and rhetorical skill to effectively bring the biblical text and the contemporary world into dialogue. This would be accomplished through two gatherings of scholars from Roman Catholic schools of theology to discuss and identify collaborative approaches. They hoped to identify best practices and pedagogical approaches and to integrate them in the curriculum through syllabi development.
A total of 27 scholars from 11 Roman Catholic schools participated in the project. The consultations were held in September, 2003, and February, 2004, with ongoing work occurring through a common website. Four syllabi were developed and engaged as models to be used in curricular integration. The project director reports, "The unifying thread in the grant syllabi and the organizing principle by which the grant is being taken forward in course and curriculum design and writing and speaking is contemplō – studēo - praedico." He believes that this hermeneutical process, which means I contemplate – I study – I preach, "shows potential to be a significant Roman Catholic contribution to homiletics theory and pedagogy."
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The Role of the Religious Studies Introductory Course in Supporting the Jesuit Mission in Catholic Higher Education in the 21st Century

Awarded Grant
McGinn, Sheila
John Carroll University
Colleges/Universities
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave grant to improve religious and theological education at the 28 Jesuit Catholic colleges and universities in the United States by structuring a conversation among the institutions concerning how their current introductory Religious Studies/Theology courses can better support the Jesuit mission in higher education in the current environment of religious pluralism, technological innovation, and a developing global culture in the 21st century.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave grant to improve religious and theological education at the 28 Jesuit Catholic colleges and universities in the United States by structuring a conversation among the institutions concerning how their current introductory Religious Studies/Theology courses can better support the Jesuit mission in higher education in the current environment of religious pluralism, technological innovation, and a developing global culture in the 21st century.

Learning Abstract :
The primary points I learned from the data-collection and analysis phases of this project were that a) collecting and analyzing survey data takes at least five times more time and energy than projected, and (b) faculty and administrators are not nearly as responsive to a colleague's request for data as one might like.

1. Mail-in surveys have a notoriously low rate of return, so it takes considerable effort to follow up with recipients if you want a substantial response to the survey. We resorted to email, telephone calls, and even personal visits to certain key respondents in order to get a broad response to the questionnaires.

2. Collating the results - including generating the schema for collating the responses to the open-ended questions-took somewhat less time than anticipated, but the tremendous learning curve for using SPSS to analyze the student data more than compensated for this. I relied heavily on a colleague in the Psychology department for both a tutorial on how to use the program and suggestions about which kinds of analyses to run.

My success with the course re-design phase of the project reinforced for me the idea that it is essential to lay a solid foundation for collaboration if you want to gain a consensus on a key decision, particularly in the abbreviated time frame of a grant project. This project was designed to include consultation with a wide range of individuals and interest groups, and this consultation was key to achieving the final result of changing the course design in ways that all the faculty could support.
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Pedagogy for Culturally Relevant Theological Education in Historically Black Seminaries

Awarded Grant
Roberson, James
Shaw University Divinity School
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Support for research project to bring together scholars from each of the six ATS accredited HBCU seminaries in critical reflection and dialogue on the academic purpose, content, and methodology, currently used by these institutions to prepare leaders for the African American Church and community.
Proposal abstract :
Support for research project to bring together scholars from each of the six ATS accredited HBCU seminaries in critical reflection and dialogue on the academic purpose, content, and methodology, currently used by these institutions to prepare leaders for the African American Church and community.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather together in consultation scholars from historically Black colleges and universities (HBCU) to examine the pedagogy used to prepare clergy and laity to "translate" the ideas of the theological academy to the issues of the African American church community. A working paper would be developed and then responded to by representatives of each of the 6 ATS accredited HBCU seminaries.
The consultation was held in July, 2003 at the Shaw Divinity School. Participating seminaries included: the Divinity School of Shaw University, Hood Theological Seminary, Howard University Divinity School, the Interdenominational Theological Seminary, and Samuel De Witt Proctor School of Theology. The project director reports that as a result of the consultation dialogue, the group developed "a new commitment to stay together in order to engage in common work around a flexible and experimental, but growing and consistent focus on Black Issues in Theological Education."
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Consultation on Teaching Religion 121: The bible in Culture and Community

Awarded Grant
Odell, Margaret|Langerquist, L. DeAne
St. Olaf College
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for a 2-day workshop for faculty devoted to enhancement of teaching and learning in The Bible in Culture and Community. Goals for the project include: enhancing student learning in The Bible in Culture and Community course, exploring modes of instruction appropriate to first year students and to biblical materials with the goal of developing students' abilities as interpreters of biblical materials, and to increase interaction and collaboration between instructors ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a 2-day workshop for faculty devoted to enhancement of teaching and learning in The Bible in Culture and Community. Goals for the project include: enhancing student learning in The Bible in Culture and Community course, exploring modes of instruction appropriate to first year students and to biblical materials with the goal of developing students' abilities as interpreters of biblical materials, and to increase interaction and collaboration between instructors of the course.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to hold a two-day workshop for specific St. Olaf faculty devoted to enhancing the teaching and learning in their required first-year course in Biblical and Theological Studies, called the Bible in Culture and Community.
With a strong turnout, almost ¾ of the faculty who teach this course attended the workshop. The project director reports as particularly useful, "a long conversation about what sorts of interpretive assignments are appropriate to the particular set of students in these courses." Another goal was to explore modes of instruction. This was met with examples provided by an outside consultant. Enhancing student learning was a goal, and it could not be evaluated until used in classes. However, they planned to evaluate the new techniques upon use to determine effectiveness. Finally, informed follow-up appeared to be occurring as colleagues reported results to each other. More formal sessions were planned for ongoing critique and evaluation.
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Retreat for building Department Relations and Fostering the Sharing of Teaching and Learning Resources

Awarded Grant
Ross, Susan
Loyola University Chicago
Colleges/Universities
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Support for a departmental retreat to clarify faculty responsibilities and share resources as teachers of undergraduate and graduate students, to specify the role of Theology in undergraduate curriculum and how Loyola religion department faculty might best contribute to a revised core curriculum, to foster a sense of corporate identity as a department, and to continue exploring the nature of theology in relation to the requirement for the mandatum.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a departmental retreat to clarify faculty responsibilities and share resources as teachers of undergraduate and graduate students, to specify the role of Theology in undergraduate curriculum and how Loyola religion department faculty might best contribute to a revised core curriculum, to foster a sense of corporate identity as a department, and to continue exploring the nature of theology in relation to the requirement for the mandatum.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather faculty from the department of theology for a retreat to reflect upon the enormous changes and challenges of their new context within the university structure and to address these challenges effectively. Specifically, they hoped to share teaching and learning resources for their new situation in the university, specify the role of theology in the university's revised curriculum, and to foster a sense of corporate identity as a department.
The faculty retreat was held in 2003 before the beginning of the new academic year. The project director highlights the following successes of the retreat: the department was able to reconnect personally; they were able to hold "serious conversations about teaching and techniques for classroom management," and they were able to set priorities for future work together. As a result, "the department has been working towards a renewed sense of its identity and mission."
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Writing Theology Well

Awarded Grant
YaghFjian, Lucretia
Weston Jesuit School of Theology
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a book project aimed at the development of a text, "Writing Theology Well: A Theological Writer's Rhetoric," that will provide a discipline driven introduction to theological writing and research for students enrolled in theological schools and seminaries, writing instructors and tutors, and theological faculty.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a book project aimed at the development of a text, "Writing Theology Well: A Theological Writer's Rhetoric," that will provide a discipline driven introduction to theological writing and research for students enrolled in theological schools and seminaries, writing instructors and tutors, and theological faculty.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a semester's leave to research and write a text on theological writing. The text, Writing Well: a Theological Writer's Rhetoric, is adapted from materials developed from the Episcopal Divinity School/Weston Jesuit Theological Seminary WRITE program.
Speaking from her strengths,the project director would encourage applicants to design proposals that emerge from writing and research they are already doing, for such proposals will be grounded in the "already" as they imagine and articulate the "not yet." Secondly, the project should be important enough to undertake even if it doesn't get funded; and if it is important, there is a high probability that it will get funded. Finally, travel to other institutions can contribute significantly to a project, and expand one's imagination of its intended "audience." Speaking from hindsight, one thing the project director would do differently is request a longer grant period. However, given most people's natural tendency to underestimate the time required to complete a project, she would advise aspirants to expect to have more work to do when the grant concludes, because there is never enough time to do everything one had hoped to do. But if, like her, they look forward to finishing the work, then the "grant" will continue to support, inspire and encourage its recipients, long after its termination date.
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Teaching Theology Students at the Masters Level in Institutions Affiliated with a University

Awarded Grant
MacLachlan, David
Atlantic School of Theology
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Support for a dean to travel and meet with deans, students and faculty at selected schools in the U.S. and Canada that offer the M Div degree, and other theological programs at the masters level that have had to affiliate their theological school with a major university to remain viable. Discussions will include use of internet courses in ministerial programs, faith formation in versions of the M. Div that ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a dean to travel and meet with deans, students and faculty at selected schools in the U.S. and Canada that offer the M Div degree, and other theological programs at the masters level that have had to affiliate their theological school with a major university to remain viable. Discussions will include use of internet courses in ministerial programs, faith formation in versions of the M. Div that use significant off campus teaching and the deployment of theological and religious study faculty.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to examine ministerial programs in institutions of theological education that are affiliated with universities. The project director hoped to speak to the deans of 18 institutions to discuss their theological programs, and the teaching and learning issues involved that are particular to their relationship to a secular university.
The project director reports fruitful conversations with all 18 schools visited. He observes that while many theological schools are affiliated with universities, the M.Div. program generally "has been kept unto itself with its own concerns and agenda in the curriculum, more or less free from interfaith or other institutional connections." In these settings it is viewed primarily as a professional degree for work in churches. He believes this is a result of ATS standards, along with church expectations that determine curriculum requirements. He hopes to continue his research in schools where the university connected is "professed to be strong and workable."
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Teaching and Learning Longitudinal Project Planning

Awarded Grant
Lose, David
Luther Seminary
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Support for a planning group to further develop some related initiatives for making theological education more responsive to the changing pedagogical needs of multiculturally diverse student populations, and the increasingly globalized contexts in which the future students will minister.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a planning group to further develop some related initiatives for making theological education more responsive to the changing pedagogical needs of multiculturally diverse student populations, and the increasingly globalized contexts in which the future students will minister.

Learning Abstract :
The project proposed a follow-up to a Wabash center workshop for pre-tenured theological faculty. The purpose of the grant was to enable 4 members of the group to plan, write, and propose a larger grant to the Wabash Center related to issues and concrete strategies of institutional transformation that the group identified as being crucial for theological education in the 21st century.
Project director reports that the group met at October 2003 to work on the grant proposal. A draft was authored later in the fall, was critically reviewed by group members and outside contacts, and submitted to the Wabash Center in January 2004.
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Information Literacy in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Graham, M. Patrick|Gragg, Douglas
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to review bibliographic instruction programs in select theological libraries, formulate a more systematic approach for such instructional programs in terms of information literacy, and introduce this as a collaborative program for American Theological Library Association (ATLA) libraries.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to review bibliographic instruction programs in select theological libraries, formulate a more systematic approach for such instructional programs in terms of information literacy, and introduce this as a collaborative program for American Theological Library Association (ATLA) libraries.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought "to review bibliographic instructional programs in select theological libraries, formulate a systematic approach for such instructional programs in terms of information literacy, and introduce this as a collaborative program for American Theological Association (ATLA) libraries."
The project director reports that he completed a review of research on information literacy programs, interviewed four leading figures in the movement, and visited some of the leading theological libraries to discuss their instructional programs. He also visited the ATLA offices and four premiere academic libraries that have information literacy programs. He received an "overwhelmingly positive" response from faculty in his attempt to develop an information literacy program based in the large core courses at Candler. As a result of this project, he will be working with 19 courses to develop the students' information literacy.
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Integrating Visually Impaired Students into the MDiv Program

Awarded Grant
Walls, Neal
Wake Forest University Divinity School
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to conduct a feasibility study and initial planning for a comprehensive program to successfully integrate students with visual impairments into the M.Div. degree program at the Wake Forest University Divinity School.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to conduct a feasibility study and initial planning for a comprehensive program to successfully integrate students with visual impairments into the M.Div. degree program at the Wake Forest University Divinity School.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to conduct a "feasibility study and initial planning" for a comprehensive program to integrate students with visual impairments into the M.Div. degree program. They hoped to gather information about currently available library and technological resources to aid blind and visually impaired students, to determine which components of their curriculum required modification, and to seek out financial resources for special scholarships to support students with visual impairments.
The project director reports that information and resources were gathered in the following areas: university disability services, current technology resources, and current library resources. In regards to curriculum, the following areas were highlighted for modification: biblical languages, field education internships and library research resources. Finally, scholarship possibilities were highlighted, as well as agencies to advertise in to attract qualified students with visual impairments. In conclusion, as a result of the project, the school finds itself in an "excellent position" to integrate visually impaired students into the M.Div. program in a comprehensive manner.
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Supplemental Funding for Training Seminarians to Minister in Rural Contexts and Crises: Research in Effective Teaching Strategies

Awarded Grant
Harder, Cameron
Lutheran Theological Seminary, (SK)
Theological Schools
2004
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave grant to research institutions that train students in rural contexts in order to develop strategies for teaching that would equip seminarians and clergy for ministry in increasingly stressed rural communities.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave grant to research institutions that train students in rural contexts in order to develop strategies for teaching that would equip seminarians and clergy for ministry in increasingly stressed rural communities.

Learning Abstract :
I rediscovered the value of a Trinitarian theology for congregational mission focused on community development. I found several excellent community-building tools (appreciative inquiry, asset-mapping and intergenerational dialogue) that I am training my students to use with their congregations on internship and after graduation. I have become convinced of the urgent necessity, fruitfulness and potential difficulties of doing interdisciplinary training for clergy. And from the last segment of the project I have learned the value of a well-designed and maintained website as a way of networking with folks who, in Canadian rural settings, are often far dfstant from one another
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Meeting the Challenge of Teaching Religion in Community Colleges (A Collegial Consultation)

Awarded Grant
Everist, Burton
Northeast Iowa Community College
Colleges/Universities
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Support for a consultation to address the challenges, discern resources, and develop collegial support for teaching religion in community college contexts. Goals include: clarifying the tasks of teachers of religion; sharing insights and resources; developing communications focused on teaching religion in community colleges; and planning an annual community college activity in conjunction with the AAR and the Religious Education Association.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a consultation to address the challenges, discern resources, and develop collegial support for teaching religion in community college contexts. Goals include: clarifying the tasks of teachers of religion; sharing insights and resources; developing communications focused on teaching religion in community colleges; and planning an annual community college activity in conjunction with the AAR and the Religious Education Association.

Learning Abstract :
The consultation sought: 1) to undergird the critical task of teaching about religion in community colleges. It did! 2) to share information about the courses being offered in community colleges: the course guidelines that establish course transferability to other institutions, the syllabi, and the texts currently in use. Clearly the evaluations said this happened. 3) to learn about the successes and the challenges the teachers and colleges encounter. Evaluations affirmed this. 4) through the process of the consultation, to model adult teaching/learning modes and thereby enhance teaching skills. Participants appreciated the open process. 5) to develop a collegial network, with a listserv, a web presence, and, if desired, future conferences. This will continue, but remains to be accomplished. People are working on the field trip and all have expressed interest in the AAR Regional. 6) to link teachers to extant collegial resources such as the American Academy of Religion (both nationally and regionally) and to the Religious Education Association together with the Association of Professors and Researchers in Religious Education. More needs to be done here, perhaps providing a year's membership in these two organizations as well as following up the AAR Midwest regional.
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Congregational Studies: A Cross-Disciplinary Approach to Contextualize Teaching in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Mercer, Joyce
San Francisco Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2004
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that concerns the intersections between congregational studies and teaching-learning in theological education. The purpose of the project is to explore the use of congregational studies as an important and valuable tool for teaching and learning across the disciplines in theological education, contributing to a broader conversation about teaching-learning issues among seminary faculties, and offering new possibilities for contextual education in theology.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that concerns the intersections between congregational studies and teaching-learning in theological education. The purpose of the project is to explore the use of congregational studies as an important and valuable tool for teaching and learning across the disciplines in theological education, contributing to a broader conversation about teaching-learning issues among seminary faculties, and offering new possibilities for contextual education in theology.

Learning Abstract :
This study leave project examined the intersections between congregational studies and teaching-learning issues in theological education. Congregational studies offers opportunities to contextualize such teaching and learning by locating it in the interstices between particular contexts of ministry (congregations and other settings), the processes by which learners analyze these contexts, and the larger questions of theology, biblical studies, history, ethics, leadership, etc. that go beyond any one particular setting or context. Instead of studying the issues and questions that make up the explicit curriculum of theological education in the abstract, a congregational studies-based pedagogy allows particular ministry settings to operate as "case studies" for teaching and learning. Because a congregational studies approach apprentices learners in the practices of "reading" congregational contexts, it invites them into the "community of practice" made up of public theologians/church leaders able to understand such contexts and think theologically without reducing the scope of their concern to a single case. Such practices are portable across contexts for ministry.
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Teaching Theological Literacy through Scriptures in a LaSallian Tune

Awarded Grant
Windley-Daoust, Susan
St. Mary's University of Minnesota
Colleges/Universities
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Support for a two day workshop to address the pedagogical issues involving teaching theological literacy through Scriptures to first year students.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a two day workshop to address the pedagogical issues involving teaching theological literacy through Scriptures to first year students.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to support a two-day workshop in the summer of 2004 to address the pedagogical issues involved in teaching theological literacy through Scripture to their first year students. It was their hope that the workshop would help them to better articulate the pedagogical vision in the courses, to problem-solve some teaching and learning issues particular to their contexts, and to cultivate a language for presenting the method to the liberal arts community of learner in their university.
The project director reports very engaged and useful conversation was held around four key sets of questions:
- What is our vision for the experience, engagement, and lifelong learning in theology offered by these courses? How do our course goals flow from our vision?
- What are the primary pedagogical issues in presenting scriptural materials to different first year audiences? How do we address these issues?
- How is our teaching in this set of first year courses "La Sallian Catholic"?
- How may we best present these materials to students and other faculty that will facilitate the liberal arts emphasis of the St. Mary's University campus?

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Building Bridges, Crossing Borders: Modeling Connectivity in the Theological Classroom

Awarded Grant
McArver, Susan|Cascante, Fernando|Sharp, Carolyn
Union Presbyterian Seminary
Theological Schools
2004
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for development of pedagogical practices in theological classrooms that encourage intentional connections across disciplines, cultures, and discourses, in order to better equip students for more fully integrated ministries in the Church and the world.
Proposal abstract :
Support for development of pedagogical practices in theological classrooms that encourage intentional connections across disciplines, cultures, and discourses, in order to better equip students for more fully integrated ministries in the Church and the world.

Learning Abstract :
Purpose: to develop pedagogical practices that foster connections across disciplines, cultures, and discourses, in order to equip our students for more fully integrated ministries. Twelve educators began; four discontinued because of changes in professional or family circumstances. Positive outcomes: 1) our conversations were extraordinarily rich and important for our development as teachers; 2) interdisciplinary and multicultural programming was carried out in six theological schools; 3) an article on multiculturalism was published in Theological Education. Challenges: 1) The loss of four colleagues required that we drop the public-voice dimension of our work: many factors can hamper the effectiveness or commitment even of participants who start out with great enthusiasm and vision. 2) Neither of two planned collaborative articles was completed, despite carefully structured timelines and significant work.
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A Study of the Impact of the Culture of the Seminary on Theological Education and Ministry Formation

Awarded Grant
Stratman, Bernard
National Catholic Educational Assoc. (NCEA)
Agencies
2004
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study on the impact of the culture of the seminary on theological education and ministry formation. Particular attention will be given to the increasingly culturally diverse student population's impact on theological education and ministry formation.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study on the impact of the culture of the seminary on theological education and ministry formation. Particular attention will be given to the increasingly culturally diverse student population's impact on theological education and ministry formation.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to convene a task force to plan a study of the impact of the culture of the seminary on theological education and ministry formation. This study would be part of a larger effort by the NCEA Seminary Department to develop resources for Roman Catholic theological schools and college seminaries to effectively address issues of cultural diversity that impact the institutional aspects of the seminary program, classroom teaching, pedagogy and interpersonal relationships.
The planning meeting was held successfully in June, 2004, with a proposal developed as an outcome. The project director reports: "The planning grant was essential for the preparation of the proposal. Without it the Seminary Department would not have been able to convene the planning meetings … These conversations underscored both the potential value and the complexity of the proposal initiative."
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The Teaching of World Religions in the Community Colleges of Kansas: Colleagues’ Colloquium

Awarded Grant
Turner, Regina |Costin, June
Butler Community College
Colleges/Universities
2005
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Support for a two-day collegial conference with invited faculty of world religions from across the state of Kansas. Participants in the conference will share information about courses taught, learn adult teaching methodologies, develop a collegial network, and discover resources for teaching world religions.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a two-day collegial conference with invited faculty of world religions from across the state of Kansas. Participants in the conference will share information about courses taught, learn adult teaching methodologies, develop a collegial network, and discover resources for teaching world religions.

Learning Abstract :
Two colloquia were held last year to discuss the teaching of world religions in the community colleges of Kansas. A total of twenty different individuals from nine different community colleges attended. The other colleges, though invited, were unable to send a representative. Of the 14 participants (along with the project co-directors) who attended the second meeting, 11 were repeat attendees, thus affirming the value of our gathering. We were in agreement that teaching courses in the field of world religions presents a number of challenges in today's socio-cultural context. Some of these challenges are inherent in teaching within any area that touches on personal beliefs and traditions. Others can be attributed to ever-changing current events and rhetoric. Our colloquia demonstrated that we can provide each other not only with printed resources (such as syllabi, text suggestions, and methodological techniques), but also with colleagues with whom we can discuss these resources in our specific socio-cultural context.
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Teaching Biblical Exegesis in Theological Schools

Awarded Grant
Roy Yoder, Christine|Skinner, Matthew
Luther Seminary
Theological Schools
2005
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Teaching biblical exegesis to students preparing for religious professions poses significant challenges in this era marked by, among other things, pervasive biblical illiteracy, methodological pluralism, and institutional and pedagogical commitments to diversity in our classrooms. This two-year consultation, comprised of twelve North American seminary and divinity school professors of Bible, aims to revision the goals and strategies of teaching exegesis in these contexts. Participants will consider: (a) the role of ...
Proposal abstract :
Teaching biblical exegesis to students preparing for religious professions poses significant challenges in this era marked by, among other things, pervasive biblical illiteracy, methodological pluralism, and institutional and pedagogical commitments to diversity in our classrooms. This two-year consultation, comprised of twelve North American seminary and divinity school professors of Bible, aims to revision the goals and strategies of teaching exegesis in these contexts. Participants will consider: (a) the role of biblical exegesis in theological education and its placement within curricula; (b) understandings of what constitutes good exegesis and, accordingly, the exegetical habits we seek to engender in students; (c) pedagogical strategies that foster those habits; (d) available resources and what may be needed; and (e) means of assessing student learning. Participants will apply and evaluate the consultation’s findings in their classrooms. The consultation will share its outcomes through publications, formal and informal conversations, and strategic planning within the participants’ institutions.

Learning Abstract :
As a result of our participation in the consultation "Teaching Biblical Exegesis in Theological Schools," we are: (a) more aware of how the diversity of our teaching contexts and our students informs our pedagogies and the goals of our courses; (b) inclined to describe the work of teaching biblical exegesis less in terms of introducing interpretive methodologies and more in terms of cultivating certain hermeneutical habits and dispositions in our students, and (c) more intentional about helping our students appropriate the fruits of their exegetical study wisely and creatively for their ministerial contexts.
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Teaching Faith and Diversity: How a Jesuit University Approaches Conflicting Religious Traditions in Islam and Christianity

Awarded Grant
Ryscavage, Richard
Fairfield University
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to focus on the following goals: 1) Develop an enhanced model of teaching religion that includes rhetorical training, providing Fairfield undergraduates with the experience and the tools to engage in religious dialogue focused on different social issues; 2) Research and evaluate the teaching methodology used for the designated classes and adapt the system for other courses that deal with difficult issues; and 3) Guide and engage students in discovering ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to focus on the following goals: 1) Develop an enhanced model of teaching religion that includes rhetorical training, providing Fairfield undergraduates with the experience and the tools to engage in religious dialogue focused on different social issues; 2) Research and evaluate the teaching methodology used for the designated classes and adapt the system for other courses that deal with difficult issues; and 3) Guide and engage students in discovering relationships between academic disciplines that have different methods of inquiry and different bodies of knowledge essential to the holistic Jesuit approach to humanistic-based higher education.

Learning Abstract :
Fairfield University set out to understand how a Jesuit university, rooted in a specific Christian tradition, could teach students how to enter into difficult conversations with Islamic believers, while maintaining their own core beliefs. Fairfield's Center for Faith and Public Life took the lead on facilitating this work engaging broadly with students, faculty, Campus Ministry, and Student Services.

Their efforts to engage participants in inter-religious and inter-cultural dialogue took shape through various formats and in different settings. Cluster courses, guest speakers, the Axis of Evil Comedy Tour, and the Interfaith Youth Core student/faculty workshops all provided an array of learning experiences for members of the campus community. Additionally, a student learning outcomes rubric was developed for the cluster course and the workshop which provided important data on these learning experiences.

An unanticipated outcome of this project was the formation of two student led programs including a Fairfield University Chapter of the Muslim Student Association and the Student Living and Learning Community on Interfaith Religious Literacy. They were especially enthusiastic about this development because it provides tangible evidence that students have taken ownership of the topic and are working in creative ways to continue to realize an enhanced interfaith dialogue on campus.
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Summer 2006 Workshop: Teaching Theological Core to Upper Class Students

Awarded Grant
Windley-Daoust, Susan|Daily, Eileen
St. Mary's University of Minnesota
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a workshop to explore how a theology department at a Catholic University structures an upper-division general education course (or collection of courses) to teach the Roman Catholic Tradition.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a workshop to explore how a theology department at a Catholic University structures an upper-division general education course (or collection of courses) to teach the Roman Catholic Tradition.

Learning Abstract :
Five members of our department met over fourteen hours to discuss how they might more effectively teach upper-division general education courses in basic Catholic Christian theology. One of the best outcomes of these workshops was that we came to a greater self-understanding about the possibilities and limits within "Faith Traditions 2" courses, as we teach them in theology. We assessed the reality of the Gen Ed student's exposure to Church tradition. We are going to adjust some language to accommodate a better sense of student preparedness and liberal arts content. We discovered ways to encourage critical thinking/analysis in our courses, and decided to continue focusing and brainstorming on how to do this effectively. We decided to adjust some course offerings to better address the reality of our mix of students. And overall, the big picture is clearer to all of us. We as a teaching community have a stronger basis on which to understand and present what has felt in the past like an amorphous set of classes. Brian McDermott's essay on theological literacy was helpful: when he defines theological literacy as having to do with "learning new ways to learn, with developing a new, more complex form of consciousness; and with taking responsibility for, and trusting what one has come to know. It is helpful to be reminded that what we are about is inviting students to an informed conscience, where they take responsibility for their own beliefs. If we can teach students this kind of theological literacy - through presenting the tradition, analyzing it, and encouraging dispositions of appreciation - we will have succeeded in our work.
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Teaching Religious Studies Courses at a State University in Pennsylvania

Awarded Grant
Holm, Tawny
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to address the specific questions involved in teaching religious studies courses from an academic perspective in a secular state university in Pennsylvania. We propose a series of symposia with invited speakers, both from world religions in Pennsylvania and pedagogical experts, together with Religious Studies faculty from across the state to be hosted by our Department of Religious Studies at IUP. Our goals are to reflect on what ...
Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to address the specific questions involved in teaching religious studies courses from an academic perspective in a secular state university in Pennsylvania. We propose a series of symposia with invited speakers, both from world religions in Pennsylvania and pedagogical experts, together with Religious Studies faculty from across the state to be hosted by our Department of Religious Studies at IUP. Our goals are to reflect on what is working in our current pedagogical strategies, interact and share problems and successes with faculty of other Pennsylvania universities (especially those in the state system to which we belong), and incorporate new pedagogical methods as learned through this reflection and interaction with all participants. Our culminating activity will be to compose a resource handbook on teaching Religious Studies in Pennsylvania.

Learning Abstract :
Our three annual symposia in 2007-2009 were organized under three separate sub-themes meant to stoke creative thinking about how to teach students about religion and religions at PA state universities (many of which do not have a religiously diverse student population): Critical Thinking on Women and Religion; Religion and Media; and Religion and Violence, and the Response of the Public Intellectual. We were able to invite faculty across Pennsylvania, as well as three guest speakers in different religions each year, in addition to two pedagogical experts in years one and two. In addition to learning new teaching strategies and topics for our constituency via our interactions with each other, our concrete results included influencing two of our sister state universities to offer new courses in Religious Studies as well as to begin new minor programs. We are also still working on a resource handbook to be published online.
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Rethinking the Christian Studies Classroom: Mapping the Hidden (and Not So Hidden) Dynamics of Teaching Religion in the South

Awarded Grant
Hulsether, Mark|Medine, Carolyn|Gravett, Sandra
Southeastern Commission for the Study of Religion (SECSOR)
Agencies
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support is requested to enable a group of professors with responsibilities for teaching Christianity in large public universities in the south to gather during a two-year process in which they reflect critically upon the place of Christian Studies in religious studies in large public universities, develop new models for teaching Christian Studies in this context, and disseminate their results (both successes and remaining or emerging tensions). The proposed gatherings will ...
Proposal abstract :
Support is requested to enable a group of professors with responsibilities for teaching Christianity in large public universities in the south to gather during a two-year process in which they reflect critically upon the place of Christian Studies in religious studies in large public universities, develop new models for teaching Christian Studies in this context, and disseminate their results (both successes and remaining or emerging tensions). The proposed gatherings will be held in association with the 2007 and 2008 annual meeting of the Southeastern Commission for the Study of Religion (SECSOR), and the grant will be administered by SECSOR.

Learning Abstract :
"Rethinking the Religious Studies Classroom: Mapping the Hidden (and Not So Hidden) Dynamics of Teaching Religion in the South," discussed two main themes. First, Christianity shapes how our students understand the world, whether they are practitioners or not. Their understandings are informed by personal orientations to Christianity, by social groups such as Life Teen, and by a general sense of growing up with the historical legacies of the South. Thus, students bring forms of identity that we as teachers may threaten, as well as a language for talking about them that is in tension with academic discourse. Developing strategies for unpacking and bridging these differences is key. Second, we came to see that, as Religious Studies departments expand to address religions from a global perspective, two results are gaps in the curriculum on Christianity and a proliferation of methods and discourses that may lead to a breakdown in communication with students and within departments. Developing departmental learning goals becomes crucial, so that we can meet the needs of students, satisfy the many constituents of public universities, and fulfill our mandate to contribute to an informed and critical public discourse.
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Who Are Our Students? And What Does that Mean for Our Teaching - Joint Project with Connecticut College (Eugene Gallagher)

Awarded Grant
Anderson, Carol
Kalamazoo College
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
This project aims to develop substantial quantitative and qualitative data about the attitudes, expectations, and interests of students involved in the academic study of religion at two liberal arts colleges, Connecticut College and Kalamazoo College.
Proposal abstract :
This project aims to develop substantial quantitative and qualitative data about the attitudes, expectations, and interests of students involved in the academic study of religion at two liberal arts colleges, Connecticut College and Kalamazoo College.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop substantial data about the attitudes, expectations, and interests of students involved in the academic study of religion at two liberal arts colleges, Connecticut College and Kalamazoo College. Reduced to an in-depth study at Kalamazoo College, we surveyed four different courses over three years. We used a very useful methodology: a two page open-ended survey, analysis of the survey results, and follow-up focus groups with volunteers from each course. Our findings were largely unanticipated: students have a relatively sophisticated sense of what they want to learn in their courses in Religion, including the intersections between religion and culture, the role of religion in people's lives (and in their own), how religions develop, and the variation in religious beliefs around the world, both what kind of diversity and why that diversity exists. However, students were less articulate when it came to explaining why it was important to them to know this - not an unexpected result. We are interested in expanding the survey tool to other institutions.
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Who Are Our Students? And What Does that Mean for Our Teaching - Joint Project with Kalamazoo College (Carol Anderson)

Awarded Grant
Gallagher, Eugene
Connecticut College
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
This project aims to develop substantial quantitative and qualitative data about the attitudes, expectations, and interests of students involved in the academic study of religion at two liberal arts colleges, Connecticut College and Kalamazoo College.
Proposal abstract :
This project aims to develop substantial quantitative and qualitative data about the attitudes, expectations, and interests of students involved in the academic study of religion at two liberal arts colleges, Connecticut College and Kalamazoo College.

Learning Abstract :
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Assessing Religion Assessment Tools in Kansas Community Colleges: Colloquium III

Awarded Grant
Turner, Regina |Costin, June
Butler Community College
Colleges/Universities
2007
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
This project will support a colloquium with selected religion teachers from Kansas community colleges to discuss the following questions: 1) How do the teachers of religion in the community colleges of Kansas assess student learning in their classrooms? 2) Is there incorporation of belief structures in course content and/or assessment? 3) What quantitative and qualitative testing methods are employed? 4) Are there additional assessment tools that teachers should utilize? 5) What is the role ...
Proposal abstract :
This project will support a colloquium with selected religion teachers from Kansas community colleges to discuss the following questions: 1) How do the teachers of religion in the community colleges of Kansas assess student learning in their classrooms? 2) Is there incorporation of belief structures in course content and/or assessment? 3) What quantitative and qualitative testing methods are employed? 4) Are there additional assessment tools that teachers should utilize? 5) What is the role of the institution’s assessment requirements? The primary goal is to increase awareness of the importance of assessment and to offer increased skills in the development of classroom assessment tools.

Learning Abstract :
We assess student learning in religion classes in a variety of ways allowing room for student creativity and personal engagement. Although personal beliefs are part of the conversation, the conclusion was that testing should require the student to present the facts/teachings of course texts. The process design of the meeting generated a list of quantitative and qualitative assessment methods. If there is one area that represents the greatest area of learning in this colloquium, it is to be flexible and open to variety.

The two exciting outcomes of this colloquium are discussed above. One is the formalization of Association for Kansas Community College Teachers of Religious Studies and the other is the possibility of an additional state colloquium and organization for the future. The only disappointing aspect of the meeting was that a number of possible participants had last minute conflicts and were unable to attend.
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Teaching Exegesis in Historically Black Theological Schools

Awarded Grant
Ashmore, James|Mbuvi, Andrew
Shaw University Divinity School
Theological Schools
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
This project will examine the unique dimensions of teaching Biblical exegesis in Historically Black Theological Schools (HBTS). The faculty who teach Biblical Studies in select schools (Hood, Howard, ITC, Payne, Proctor, and Shaw) will meet for a conference to discuss the unique needs of their students and the expectations of the African American Church, to share best practices in teaching, and to formulate one or more approaches for teaching exegesis ...
Proposal abstract :
This project will examine the unique dimensions of teaching Biblical exegesis in Historically Black Theological Schools (HBTS). The faculty who teach Biblical Studies in select schools (Hood, Howard, ITC, Payne, Proctor, and Shaw) will meet for a conference to discuss the unique needs of their students and the expectations of the African American Church, to share best practices in teaching, and to formulate one or more approaches for teaching exegesis within their contexts. These approaches will be tested in classes at all six schools. After testing the approaches in the classroom at the institutions, a second conference will be held to evaluate the approaches, summarize the findings, and plan for future collaboration.

Learning Abstract :
We gathered scholars who teach in Biblical Studies at six Historically Black Theological Schools, selected methods of teaching biblical interpretation, tested those methods in the classroom, and evaluated the results. The faculty who gathered had to share best practices in teaching, and to learn from each other. The two conferences we held produced enthusiastic responses from the participants. They also highlighted a general lack of agreement about what it means to teach biblical interpretation. Although there was general agreement that teaching Historical Critical methods and teaching biblical interpretation as a prelude to preaching are not good models, there was very little agreement about what we should teach. We also recognized that insufficient attention has been paid to correlating teaching methods to the skills we want students to gain.
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Introducing Whom to What? Purposes and Practices of Teaching Introductory Bible Courses as a Non-Major Requirement at Select CCCU Schools

Awarded Grant
Kirkpatrick, Shane
Anderson University
Colleges/Universities
2007
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
A lot of the colleges that are members of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) require that all students, regardless of their major, take courses in Bible. Though this practice is common, it is not without its pedagogical challenges. To focus reflection upon the teaching of such courses, this project pursues three interrelated questions. The first is a question of purpose: Why are introductory Bible courses required for ...
Proposal abstract :
A lot of the colleges that are members of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) require that all students, regardless of their major, take courses in Bible. Though this practice is common, it is not without its pedagogical challenges. To focus reflection upon the teaching of such courses, this project pursues three interrelated questions. The first is a question of purpose: Why are introductory Bible courses required for non-majors? The second is a question of practice: Depending upon the stated purpose, how are such courses taught? The third is a question of assessment: How are such courses assessed? Gathering the instructors of introductory Bible courses at select midwestern CCCU schools can result not only in opportunities for pedagogical reflection and coordination among the faculty at each school but also in the gathering of comparative data to further enrich the reflection on these questions.

Learning Abstract :
Part of the success of this project was realized already in the gathering of faculty members who teach these challenging introductory Bible courses; the opportunity-rarely experienced-to share with and find support from others who face similar pedagogical challenges was empowering and encouraging. The question of why such courses are required was generally answered with reference to the institutional history, identity, and context of the particular school and its constituency. The question of how they are taught involved the identity of the instructors, who draw upon their own strengths and preparation in relation to that institutional context. The third question found that formal or large-scale assessment measures are generally not well developed but are the focus of increasing interest and attention. Instructors of these courses work to design an experience that can be educationally, developmentally, and vocationally valuable for their particular students.
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Facilitation of Gathering of Faculty of Saskatoon Theological Union

Awarded Grant
Balas, Laura
St. Andrew's College
Theological Schools
2007
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
This project will utilize an outside consultant to work with about 20 Faculty from the three schools of the Saskatoon Theological Union, St. Andrew’s College (United Church of Canada), College of Emmanuel, St. Chad (Anglican Church), and Lutheran Theological Seminary, to focus on issues associated with institutional and Faculty teaching and learning interrelationships. As the Union the three schools represent the largest mainline Theological Schools in Western Canada and therefore ...
Proposal abstract :
This project will utilize an outside consultant to work with about 20 Faculty from the three schools of the Saskatoon Theological Union, St. Andrew’s College (United Church of Canada), College of Emmanuel, St. Chad (Anglican Church), and Lutheran Theological Seminary, to focus on issues associated with institutional and Faculty teaching and learning interrelationships. As the Union the three schools represent the largest mainline Theological Schools in Western Canada and therefore cooperation associated with pedagogical concerns is regarded as essential for training ministry personnel in much of Canada. Hence the project hopes to tackle issues of cooperative teaching, institutional stresses related to three different administrations and denominations, and matters pertaining to joint policies and agreements.

Learning Abstract :
We held two day-long retreats for all Faculty, a retreat in each semester. We hired an outside consultant skilled in enabling people to reach a depth of conversation that was conducive to cooperation. The first session barely scratched the surface of our relationships, but the second one fostered a much stronger sense of trust among the faculty. There were some interesting facts came to light during the time together, for instance, 80% of the faculty members will retire at the same time, so how do we plan for continuity in our cooperation? It is difficult to have a joint calendar with different expectations of the three denominations, about who teaches which classes (some can only be taught by professors in their own denomination). It seems like the breaking of things is actually God's opportunity, we have regrouped and are renewed. We intend to provide quality and innovative theological education together. We need to have our policies collected and written down in a standard handbook for all three Colleges. The feeling of all concerned is that we must have a retreat like this every semester to keep the communication open and active.
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How Can You Say That? Choosing Challenging Conversations

Awarded Grant
House, Renee
New Brunswick Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2007
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
A two-year faculty project to study when, where, and how difficult conversations about race, racism, and ecclesial formation occur at New Brunswick Theological Seminary and to research and implement strategies for facilitating such conversations through the use of Appreciative Inquiry and Theatre of the Oppressed in and outside of the classroom. A final, summative forum will be held with invited guests from area seminaries.
Proposal abstract :
A two-year faculty project to study when, where, and how difficult conversations about race, racism, and ecclesial formation occur at New Brunswick Theological Seminary and to research and implement strategies for facilitating such conversations through the use of Appreciative Inquiry and Theatre of the Oppressed in and outside of the classroom. A final, summative forum will be held with invited guests from area seminaries.

Learning Abstract :
We have learned to identify difficult conversations - what they are, when and how they occur, and when and how they might be suppressed. We have learned and implemented strategies for encouraging difficult conversations to happen, and, to be less anxious and more hopeful about the possibilities that these conversations offer. We have experimented with ways of navigating difficult conversations - Appreciative Inquiry, Theatre of the Oppressed, and triad experiments - and are in the process of developing strategies and locations to assess difficult conversations after they have occurred. This grant has made a difference in our life at New Brunswick Theological Seminary. Faculty, administrators and students have learned how to have difficult conversations, more often, and with more skill. We know that this will continue to be a gift for the Seminary's faculty, for our students, and for the communities we serve.
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Seeking Theological and Cultural Diversity in a Liberal Seminary

Awarded Grant
Tan, Sharon
United Theological Seminary of Twin Cities
Theological Schools
2008
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
This project aims to develop a statement articulating a theology of theological diversity, attentive to racial, ethnic, and class issues, which can guide implementation of curricula and a culture of theological diversity in the seminary learning environment. The difficult conversation at United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities (UTS) arises both from its ecumenical nature, and its simultaneous commitments to gender justice, racial justice, and cultural diversity. Students, faculty, and ...
Proposal abstract :
This project aims to develop a statement articulating a theology of theological diversity, attentive to racial, ethnic, and class issues, which can guide implementation of curricula and a culture of theological diversity in the seminary learning environment. The difficult conversation at United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities (UTS) arises both from its ecumenical nature, and its simultaneous commitments to gender justice, racial justice, and cultural diversity. Students, faculty, and staff, have differing theological commitments, which often reflect racial and cultural differences, leading to tensions in dialogue over difficult issues. The project seeks to construct a theology of theological diversity and to train the faculty to facilitate dialogue and provide an atmosphere of theological and cultural diversity in the classroom through syllabi content and classroom conversation and conduct. It ends with evaluations and findings that will form the basis of an article on teaching theology in a theologically diverse setting.

Learning Abstract :
In a project that was admittedly ambitious, we set out to develop a "theology of theological diversity" that would inform the learning environment of a liberal seminary that would prepare it for the cultural and racial diversity that it seeks. We articulated our hopes in several ways, for example, that students could be theologically multilingual, or would embrace and not simply tolerate theological diversity of experiences, beliefs and expressions. We realized that because of the impact of our null curriculum, we have to be very intentional about welcoming theological diversity and cultivating dialogue. To this end, several professors have added books and/or course objectives to their syllabus to promote and guide classroom learning and discussion.

Obstacles that we encountered in the first (main) portion of our project we were able to address with some success in the extension period. We learned to write course objectives, goals, and assessments. We had extended substantive theological discussions within the faculty, and a substantive discussion on the purposes of theological diversity. We modeled our new confidence and ease with diversity to our students and staff.

Students have responded positively to changes that have been made. There has been much appreciation of the ability and encouragement to express differing theological beliefs and experiences. There is a desire to continue theological diversity discussions.

There is much future learning to do. We have started down a path that is vital to our mission and viability as an institution of theological education. We need to continue down this path. We need to continue growing in our embrace of theological diversity. We need to grow in our ability to use course objectives to articulate and thus achieve an atmosphere of welcome in the classroom. We need to continue modeling this for the students, both old and new.

This grant has made a significant impact on the theological atmosphere at United, and we are very grateful.
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Conversations on Teaching about Religion in an Interdisciplinary, Interdepartmental Context

Awarded Grant
Kilde, Jeanne|Waltner, Ann
University of Minnesota
Colleges/Universities
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Designing Courses   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
In Fall 2008 we will implement a new interdepartmental religious studies major that requires students to take courses from a variety of departments. Given the potential for students to come away from this program with a fragmented understanding of the study of religion—as they are exposed to a variety of approaches to religion and methods for studying it—we aim to develop coherence in the major by developing deeper intellectual ...
Proposal abstract :
In Fall 2008 we will implement a new interdepartmental religious studies major that requires students to take courses from a variety of departments. Given the potential for students to come away from this program with a fragmented understanding of the study of religion—as they are exposed to a variety of approaches to religion and methods for studying it—we aim to develop coherence in the major by developing deeper intellectual and collegial relationships among those who will be teaching in it. We seek to learn about one another’s approaches to religion, to discuss and reflect upon strategies for interdisciplinary teaching, and to develop ways to foster students’ experience of a coherent, unified degree program. Toward these ends, we will hold a four-day workshop in June 2008, preceded by a planning meeting in March; create a formal collaborative group; make information available on the web; and confer with invited scholars.

Learning Abstract :
This project, developed in anticipation of the launching of a new interdepartmental major in Religious Studies, was intended to foster new relationships and connections among the faculty, coming from several different departments, who would be teaching our courses, in an effort to ensure that students' learning in the new program would be coherent. The centerpiece of the project was a three- and one-half day summer workshop, whose content was developed by the participants in spring planning meetings. The workshop was highly successful in fostering intellectual community among the participants and instilling a commitment to self-reflection and innovation in teaching about religion in the context of the interdepartmental program. A second one day conference was held the following summer which involved religion faculty from other schools in the area. The community that developed from the project has been apparent in and beneficial to both the functioning of the steering committee which guides the new Religious Studies Program and in the monthly workshops, attended by both faculty and students.
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Developing Learning Objectives and Core Competencies

Awarded Grant
Stivers, Laura
Pfeiffer University
Colleges/Universities
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this grant is to facilitate reflection among the faculty members of the Pfeiffer University School of Religion about learning objectives and core competencies for our vocational and academic programs in religion, as well as implementation and assessment of our learning objectives and core competencies.
Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this grant is to facilitate reflection among the faculty members of the Pfeiffer University School of Religion about learning objectives and core competencies for our vocational and academic programs in religion, as well as implementation and assessment of our learning objectives and core competencies.

Learning Abstract :
At the start of our project we did not know if we were on the same page in how we envisioned our programs, but found that through discussion that we had unanimous agreement on all of our learning goals and competencies. We learned that having learning goals and competencies in writing gives us a foundation for developing our programs and our syllabi, and gives us a standard by which to assess our teaching practices and other activities that we promote in our department. Articulating these goals and competencies also gives our students a better picture of what is expected of them in their learning. We hope to meet again to pursue how we can better connect our learning goals and competencies to our teaching philosophies and strategies, and to have discussion about innovative ways we can design our learning environment.
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Ministerial Formation in Non-Academy Settings

Awarded Grant
Boda, Mark
McMaster Divinity College
Theological Schools
2008
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to learn from emerging models of theological education within non-formal academic institutional settings, whether local churches or parachurch contexts. It is particularly interested in models found in the emerging Pentecostal and Charismatic traditions of Christianity. These will be compared and contrasted with the model used within my present formal university context.
Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to learn from emerging models of theological education within non-formal academic institutional settings, whether local churches or parachurch contexts. It is particularly interested in models found in the emerging Pentecostal and Charismatic traditions of Christianity. These will be compared and contrasted with the model used within my present formal university context.

Learning Abstract :
The experience of three non-formal ministry formation contexts has highlighted the need for continued development of an integrated approach to ministry formation that involves knowing, being, and doing, that gives attention to gaining greater knowledge, deepening personal character and clarifying vocational identity, and acquiring ministry skills. The genius of these non-formal contexts was that this integration was seen not just in the program as a whole (as is typical of seminary), but also in the individual classes and in the lives of those who were forming the students. While there was concern over decreased attention to a breadth and depth of theological knowledge in these non-formal settings, this allowed for greater attention to the dimensions of being and knowing. This experience has prompted me to seek for greater integration of knowing/being/doing within seminary courses and curricula and within seminary professors both present and future.
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Fostering a Bicultural, Bilingual Approach to Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Furst, Renata
Assumption Seminary
Agencies
2008
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
This workshop explores the use of bi-cultural/bi-literate pedagogy in the teaching of theology. This approach to education heightens a teacher’s awareness of the importance of language structures, skills, or functions that are characteristic of different content areas. Awareness of these structures, skills and functions can then be used to enhance the academic progress of students coming from other cultures, as well as helping non-cultural students learn in a ...
Proposal abstract :
This workshop explores the use of bi-cultural/bi-literate pedagogy in the teaching of theology. This approach to education heightens a teacher’s awareness of the importance of language structures, skills, or functions that are characteristic of different content areas. Awareness of these structures, skills and functions can then be used to enhance the academic progress of students coming from other cultures, as well as helping non-cultural students learn in a second language setting. This is particularly important in a seminary setting where the student population is culturally very diverse. We hope that the insights generated from this workshop can then be adopted by other theological schools.

Learning Abstract :
The grant funded a project to explore the use of techniques in bi-lingual/bi-cultural education in the teaching of theology. A workshop on this subject was led by Dr. Howard Smith from the Department of Bi-literate/Bi-cultural education at the University of Texas at San Antonio. His presentation sparked interaction among faculty from Oblate School of Theology, Assumption Seminary and the Mexican American Catholic College. Together these institutions provide training for ministry to populations which are between 60-80% Hispanic. The content of the workshop addressed the following questions: 1) What do we mean by bi-cultural/bi-literate education? Is it enough just to speak two languages in order to teach in this style? 2) What are some of the methods and techniques that can be used in the classroom for people who are second language learners? 3) What are some of the results or outcomes from teaching in a bi-cultural/bi-literate style? Participants will have the opportunity to work some of the concepts taught at the workshop into course syllabi at a second workshop projected for the spring of 2009.
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Enriching Pedagogical Intersections: Teaching Worship as Ethics

Awarded Grant
Laytham, D. Brent
North Park Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2008
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
This project develops two pedagogical dimensions of ‘worship as ethics’ pedagogy (associated with Stanley Hauerwas). First, it reworks the course design, content and pedagogy of an introductory course in Christian Ethics to fit a student body that is evangelical and multi-ethnic. It seeks to overcome the pedagogical limits of conceiving worship ‘liturgically,’ and to utilize the pedagogical potential of diverse forms and traditions of worship. Second, it conveys to teaching ...
Proposal abstract :
This project develops two pedagogical dimensions of ‘worship as ethics’ pedagogy (associated with Stanley Hauerwas). First, it reworks the course design, content and pedagogy of an introductory course in Christian Ethics to fit a student body that is evangelical and multi-ethnic. It seeks to overcome the pedagogical limits of conceiving worship ‘liturgically,’ and to utilize the pedagogical potential of diverse forms and traditions of worship. Second, it conveys to teaching colleagues the pedagogical potential and limits of the worship as ethics approach, and invites them to consider whether worship might offer a pedagogically fruitful intersection with their discipline as well. The results and learnings of the project will be written up for a teaching journal and will be presented to colleagues in Christian ethics.

Learning Abstract :
Even where the study body is quite diverse and how to worship is strongly contested, a teacher can guide students to discover the intrinsic relationships between worship and ethics. It is not the teacher, however, but the students themselves who best serve as guides to the particularities of diverse worship traditions and cultures. The greatest pedagogical challenge is neither managing diversity nor dethroning white privilege, but embracing judgment, inasmuch as most students think worship expresses their preferences rather than embodies normative claims.

Most theological educators include classroom worship in each class session, and many do so with a strong and sophisticated rationale, and a careful and creative enactment. Yet classroom worship remains largely unexamined and unheralded as a powerful pedagogical practice and a significant implied curriculum. In addition, most theological educators engage worship as classroom content, regardless of the course's topic or the teacher's discipline. Thus, worship forms and integrates.
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Developing a Holistic Academic Environment for International Students in a Seminary Graduate Program : Cross-cultural Advising, Support and Classroom Pedagogy.

Awarded Grant
Grafton, David
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia
Theological Schools
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
In its 2003 Proposal to ATS to implement a new PhD program, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP) seminary stated: LTSP is fully committed in all its programs to explicitly dealing with issues of globalization and with gender, race, and ethnic concerns. The PhD program will also serve to further issues of justice and quality, as students engage theology on issues in the public arena. This grant seeks to help ...
Proposal abstract :
In its 2003 Proposal to ATS to implement a new PhD program, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP) seminary stated: LTSP is fully committed in all its programs to explicitly dealing with issues of globalization and with gender, race, and ethnic concerns. The PhD program will also serve to further issues of justice and quality, as students engage theology on issues in the public arena. This grant seeks to help LTSP live into this commitment by addressing the role in which its teachers both teach and advise Graduate students who are from different cultural backgrounds. This grant will provide opportunities for LTSP professors to help them recognize the different cultural modes of communication and styles of learning of International Students, be conscious of the different social locations of International Students both within the classroom as well as in the seminary community, and develop different pedagogical tools for teaching in such an environment. Through this process, LTSP will develop an academic environment that will allow the gifts and abilities of International Students to be respected and encouraged, so that they might flourish and grow academically.

Learning Abstract :
This grant has been an extremely valuable "first step" as our faculty strives to be intentional about being effective teachers in multi-cultural classrooms. The grant allowed the faculty to meet and begin a public conversation about these issues. Having several outside professionals speak to the faculty provided authoritative voices about the general needs and practical methods in teaching and advising International Students. It was our hope that the grant would publicly raise the awareness and provide tools, and in this regard the grant succeeded. The question is now, where do we go from here? Currently, a plan has been submitted to the administration to lay out a plan for an "international Student Office" where the seminary could continue to be intentional about providing both holistic support for International Students as well as continued learning opportunities for faculty to address pedagogical issues when teaching in multi-cultural classrooms.
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Service Learning, Experiential Learning and Biblical Studies: Alternatives to Violence Project Workshops as a Test Case

Awarded Grant
Newheart, Michael
Howard University School of Divinity
Theological Schools
2009
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
This fellowship will fund research, writing, and a bibliography about service learning and experiential learning in the context of the use of the Alternatives to Violence Project in New Testament Introductory courses.
Proposal abstract :
This fellowship will fund research, writing, and a bibliography about service learning and experiential learning in the context of the use of the Alternatives to Violence Project in New Testament Introductory courses.

Learning Abstract :
Through my project I learned that a great amount of literature exists concerning service-learning in higher education. In my discussions of pedagogy, however, both at Howard and at Wabash, I have never witnessed a discussion of service-learning. I also learned that service-learning is largely absent in theological education in general and in biblical studies in particular. Service-learning seems particularly appropriate at Howard Divinity because the motto of Howard University is "Veritas et Utilitas (Truth and Service)." Furthermore the Divinity School used to require a "prophetic Ministry" requirement in which one credit hour was tacked onto a three-hour course such as "The Historical Jesus" or "Women in the Hebrew Bible." This practice was discontinued a few years ago, and "Prophetic Ministry" became a stand-alone course. Integrating service-learning in Div School courses, especially in my New Testament Introduction courses, would reinstitute the spirit of that requirement.
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Teaching Sense: The Arts in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Cameron, Euan
Union Theological Seminary, NY
Theological Schools
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Pedagogy in religion and theology has traditionally concentrated on a narrow range of cognitive-centered learning styles, neglecting a wider range of “ways of knowing” that, on a day to day basis, structure the educational experiences of students and teachers alike. The proposal “Teaching Sense” expresses a desire to open the teaching-door onto a broader world of learning—the world of touch, smell, emotional knowing, visual/spatial engagement, and so on, ...
Proposal abstract :
Pedagogy in religion and theology has traditionally concentrated on a narrow range of cognitive-centered learning styles, neglecting a wider range of “ways of knowing” that, on a day to day basis, structure the educational experiences of students and teachers alike. The proposal “Teaching Sense” expresses a desire to open the teaching-door onto a broader world of learning—the world of touch, smell, emotional knowing, visual/spatial engagement, and so on, by asking the question: how might learning be enriched by a fuller appreciation for the ways in which learning engages all the senses? The proposal uses art to bring pedagogy into classrooms across the curriculum. To this end, the project will take a two-pronged approach that alternates between disrupting and provoking traditional pedagogy by engaging in partnerships with “sense practitioners” (professional artists), and by consolidating and stabilizing the pedagogical shifts through four all-faculty workshops over the course of an academic year.

Learning Abstract :
Participation in Teaching Sense provided an opportunity for faculty to discuss both the obstacles to and benefits of partnering with non-seminary professionals in the classroom and generated important reflection on teaching styles and approaches across the seminary curriculum. The partnerships with artists provided unique discussions about pedagogical practice, teaching and learning styles, and the role of sensory-based education in traditional seminary disciplines. Out of conversations about their artist-partnerships, faculty discovered similar challenges in the classroom and were able to share strategies as teachers that created common ground across disciplines. As a result, the participating faculty committed to creating an ad-hoc group that will continue to meet and discuss innovative pedagogy and share teaching experiences. Reflection also prompted a commitment to collaboration among faculty participants and a commitment to greater use and awareness of the resources of city artists and the New York urban environment.
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Space, Place, and Religious Meaning in the Classroom: A Workshop on Teaching Strategies

Awarded Grant
Primiano, Leonard
Cabrini College
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Professors of religious studies and theology successfully integrate textual study, social history, ethnography, and other approaches into their classrooms, but a sensitivity to and sensibility of religious constructions of space and place - central components to religious experience - are often neglected. This workshop challenges us to add the study of space and place to our courses.
Proposal abstract :
Professors of religious studies and theology successfully integrate textual study, social history, ethnography, and other approaches into their classrooms, but a sensitivity to and sensibility of religious constructions of space and place - central components to religious experience - are often neglected. This workshop challenges us to add the study of space and place to our courses.

Learning Abstract :
The Wabash grant funded this American Academy of Religion pre-meeting workshop on space, place, and religious meaning. The workshop re-affirmed that there is an interest among religious studies faculty and graduate students in not only developing a sensitivity to religious space and place, but in addressing the question of how to employ such ideas in the classroom to make the religions being taught come alive, whether in historical or contemporary perspective. This workshop worked on the pedagogical development of the study of religious space and place by including an introduction to theoretical leaders in the field and a panel discussion by teacher/scholars who already employ such techniques in their classrooms. Workshop facilitators learned that there is an even greater need in such a context for hands-on examples and development of teaching strategies relevant to those teaching about religious traditions, and that we should consider offering such a workshop in the future, as well as continue to work on the development of a suitable Handbook on Religious Space and Place which would be an asset for all teachers of religion.
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Helping Faculty to Build Community in the Classroom

Awarded Grant
Wong, Arch
Ambrose University
Colleges/Universities
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
This project will bring a number of professors together from the Faculty of Theology at Ambrose University College to reflect, discuss, and implement ways to better build community in the classroom. The focus will be the pedagogical issues that professors face in their own classrooms as it relates to community building, and the teaching and learning activities that they have and will use to build and improve community in order ...
Proposal abstract :
This project will bring a number of professors together from the Faculty of Theology at Ambrose University College to reflect, discuss, and implement ways to better build community in the classroom. The focus will be the pedagogical issues that professors face in their own classrooms as it relates to community building, and the teaching and learning activities that they have and will use to build and improve community in order to help students learn.

Learning Abstract :
What does it mean to live in pedagogical community? Six professors met together to have conversations about creating community in the classroom. We discovered that in order to build classroom community we have to live in community ourselves as a "community of scholars." As we live as a "community of scholars," we can have deeper conversations around teaching and learning strategies that will facilitate learning in the classroom and discuss the challenges we face in the classroom. We also discovered together that there are tensions between institutional goals and the art of teaching that need to be resolved so that pedagogical community can genuinely happen.
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Latino Pedagogy: Seeking a Liberative Design for an Urban Faith-Based Two Year College

Awarded Grant
Conde-Frazier, Elizabeth
Esperanza College
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Freire’s pedagogy has been used as a theoretical basis for education among minority communities. However, on the practical level a practical design of an institution has not been seen at an institution in the United States. Creating a course that seeks to exemplify a few aspects of a liberative pedagogy does not truly represent a liberative pedagogy because it demands an entire institutional design. This project seeks to explore ...
Proposal abstract :
Freire’s pedagogy has been used as a theoretical basis for education among minority communities. However, on the practical level a practical design of an institution has not been seen at an institution in the United States. Creating a course that seeks to exemplify a few aspects of a liberative pedagogy does not truly represent a liberative pedagogy because it demands an entire institutional design. This project seeks to explore and begin the implementation of a liberative institutional design. The student population at the school is over 90% Latin@ and 60% of the professors are Latin@. The staff is 80% Latin@. A liberative pedagogy in this setting will begin with a definition of a Latin@ pedagogy specific for this educational setting. This project will facilitate a way for faculty, students and staff to discuss the development of a libertive institutional design and to create a plan for implementation over the next 5 years. The information will then be discussed with the provost and with the collegium of deans with the purpose of stimulating a discussion that will inform the curriculum on the main campus.

Learning Abstract :
The project helped us to identify our educational philosophy and to determine the type of context that is necessary for establishing a Freirian teaching learning environment. We were also able to identify our Latinidad in the teaching learning process. Mostly, the project gave us an opportunity to begin to document and determine the reasons for our success with non-traditional, first generation to college minority students. This is important as we continue to evaluate it. One example of this is our graduation rate is 64% while the other major community colleges in the city have graduation rates that range from 6% to 23%. The project helped us begin to determine the reasons for the success and to discuss ways that we might improve this.
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Reading en conjunto: Strategies for Teaching Biblical Studies Intercontextually

Awarded Grant
Ruiz, Jean-Pierre
St. John's University (Queens)
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
What does it mean to teach biblical studies latinamente and what difference might it make in teaching undergraduate students who themselves represent a broad range of ethnic and religious diversity? This project will foreground four characteristics of latino/a pedagogies, namely: (1) explicit contextuality; (2) communal construction of knowledge (trabajo en conjunto); (3) inclusivity of other voices and perspectives; and (4) interdisciplinarity. Implemented in the undergraduate Introduction to the Bible course, this will provide ...
Proposal abstract :
What does it mean to teach biblical studies latinamente and what difference might it make in teaching undergraduate students who themselves represent a broad range of ethnic and religious diversity? This project will foreground four characteristics of latino/a pedagogies, namely: (1) explicit contextuality; (2) communal construction of knowledge (trabajo en conjunto); (3) inclusivity of other voices and perspectives; and (4) interdisciplinarity. Implemented in the undergraduate Introduction to the Bible course, this will provide a framework for introducing students to a field of study that has itself become increasingly complex, interdisciplinary, and intentionally contextual.

Learning Abstract :
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Introduction to the Bible: Learning and Teaching in Critical Perspective

Awarded Grant
Penner, Todd
Austin College
Colleges/Universities
2009
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
In this proposed project, some of the basic pedagogical and educational premises of an Introduction to the Bible course in a liberal arts context will be examined. In particular, to what degree do such introductory courses mesh with the larger missions of liberal arts colleges, especially with respect to the fostering of critical-thinking and the nurturing of civic engagement. In addition, some of the learning objectives reflected in the content ...
Proposal abstract :
In this proposed project, some of the basic pedagogical and educational premises of an Introduction to the Bible course in a liberal arts context will be examined. In particular, to what degree do such introductory courses mesh with the larger missions of liberal arts colleges, especially with respect to the fostering of critical-thinking and the nurturing of civic engagement. In addition, some of the learning objectives reflected in the content of some of the current textbooks used in introductory courses will be studied alongside the learning objectives in the classes that use these texts in the liberal art schools to clarify some of the basic issues at stake related to learning and teaching in introductory Bible courses.

Learning Abstract :
This project enabled me to learn a tremendous amount about my field in terms of its teaching of the Bible to undergraduates. I have learned that the textbook industry is in many respects driving our curriculum. I have learned that our teaching aims and goals, despite our best efforts, are often co-opted, without our knowing, by our slavish reliance on textbooks in the classroom. Pedagogies of the Bible are still relatively based on a seminary-model, since that is the model that has formed graduate training of the Bible. There is little reflection being given on teaching to undergraduates within a liberal arts context beyond rather general observations, often by people who are not even in the field of religion. In particular, it has become clear that a critical appraisal of the textbooks themselves has to be made before the question of their utility can be engaged. As far as I have discerned so far, critical pedagogy has paid relatively little attention to the textbook. It has focused by in large on the contextual nature of teaching itself (in the relationship of teacher, student, and outside world). These are elements I am currently invested in exploring further.
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Assessing Teaching and Learning in Terminal M.A. Programs in Religious Studies

Awarded Grant
Berkwitz, Stephen
Missouri State University
Colleges/Universities
2009
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Terminal M.A. programs in Religious Studies offer advanced coursework to a diverse range of students in the field. Balancing the interests of students seeking specialized knowledge to pursue doctoral degrees and other students seeking general knowledge for other careers and for personal development, these programs must often develop courses of graduate study for diverse student constituencies with more limited resources than in institutions that grant Ph.D.s in ...
Proposal abstract :
Terminal M.A. programs in Religious Studies offer advanced coursework to a diverse range of students in the field. Balancing the interests of students seeking specialized knowledge to pursue doctoral degrees and other students seeking general knowledge for other careers and for personal development, these programs must often develop courses of graduate study for diverse student constituencies with more limited resources than in institutions that grant Ph.D.s in Religious Studies. This grant proposal seeks to facilitate the intentional assessment of teaching and learning in terminal M.A. programs at a two and a half day workshop for graduate program directors or appropriate substitutes to engage in focused and collaborative discussions on the pedagogical goals and methods in terminal M.A. programs in Religious Studies. The anticipated outcomes of this workshop include the formation and assessment of effective learning goals and teaching strategies to enhance graduate education at the Masters level in the field.

Learning Abstract :
The workshop titled "Assessing Teaching and Learning in Terminal M.A. Programs in Religious Studies" and sponsored by the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion enabled faculty from twelve different M.A. programs to meet and discuss our shared interests and challenges in enhancing the educational experience for terminal M.A. students. The goal of helping faculty to assess the curricula and pedagogy in their own M.A. programs alongside other programs like theirs was clearly met. The sharing of ideas and perspectives on how to teach diverse student constituencies and how to meet the educational goals of such students was stimulating and helpful. The discussions regarding teaching gateway courses, independent study courses, and split-level courses produced practical ideas for all participants to try out and share with their respective colleagues. And the conversation we had about exit rituals encouraged each of us to assess how our own departments link degree requirements with the larger goal of effective teaching and learning throughout a student's Master's program. Despite the many differences to be found across our programs, we found many more commonalities that gave us a basis for sharing advice, encouragement, and even sympathy with each other.
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Global Theological Education Initiative: Intercultural Learning in a World Church, Phase II

Awarded Grant
McGann, Mary|Kiesler, John
Franciscan School of Theology
Theological Schools
2010
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The Franciscan School of Theology, aims to prepare students for full participation in a global church. Our theological tradition and educational pedagogy underscore the importance of intercultural learning and formation in relationships of mutuality, respect and justice. The Global Theological Initiative aims to heighten our ability to prepare globally conscious leaders by engaging the faculty in a series of intercultural and contextual teaching and learning experiments - local encounters, national ...
Proposal abstract :
The Franciscan School of Theology, aims to prepare students for full participation in a global church. Our theological tradition and educational pedagogy underscore the importance of intercultural learning and formation in relationships of mutuality, respect and justice. The Global Theological Initiative aims to heighten our ability to prepare globally conscious leaders by engaging the faculty in a series of intercultural and contextual teaching and learning experiments - local encounters, national and international immersions - that enable faculty and students to experience first-hand the interconnectedness of peoples, cultures, and issues in our global society and church. Phase I of the initiative enabled faculty to identify the pedagogical issues and formulate a preliminary plan for the program. Phase II moves conversation to experimentation, engaging faculty in the design, implementation, and assessment of several immersion experiences that relate directly to the pedagogical and formational goals of our curriculum.

Learning Abstract :
The Franciscan School of Theology, aims to prepare students for full participation in a global church. Our theological tradition and educational pedagogy underscore the importance of intercultural learning and formation in relationships of mutuality, respect and justice. The Global Theological Initiative heightened our ability to prepare globally conscious leaders by engaging the faculty in a series of intercultural and contextual teaching and learning experiments - local encounters, national and international immersions. Students experienced ministry in a variety of contexts in the US, Mexico, and Vietnam. Further, faculty discussed and reflected on how to adapt pedagogies in the light of these experiential learning experiences. We more sensitive to bringing in multi-cultural dimensions of the global Church into our classroom and there is a strong consensus to continue and expand these ‘immersion' experiences.
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Libraries, Technology and Learning: Linking the Three - Phase 1

Awarded Grant
Hunt, Alice
Chicago Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2010
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The prospective move by CTS to a new building and the design of a new library space offer a unique opportunity to re-imagine the provision of bibliographic resources for theological education in the context of the contemporary reality of these resources and the tools for managing, sharing, and accessing them. This grant will help bring a specialist to work with the faculty as they prepare to move to a new ...
Proposal abstract :
The prospective move by CTS to a new building and the design of a new library space offer a unique opportunity to re-imagine the provision of bibliographic resources for theological education in the context of the contemporary reality of these resources and the tools for managing, sharing, and accessing them. This grant will help bring a specialist to work with the faculty as they prepare to move to a new model for theological education. This specialist will help the faculty understand the pedagogical benefits of employing the full power of technology in teaching and learning.

Learning Abstract :
The grant allowed us to concretize questions about the pedagogical benefits of employing the full power of technology in teaching and learning, resulting in the following questions which will be reflected on over the next year: 1) What is the essence of a CTS education? 2) How can we offer a CTS-quality curriculum using emerging tools such as digital technology and online formats? 3) As we start to incorporate these tools, how do we notice and reflect upon the pedagogical issues that emerge? 4) How do we capitalize on our ethos as a community of learners? 5) In particular, how can we incorporate life-long learning skills into the very shape of our learning community?
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Contextual Education for Leaders of the Missional Church

Awarded Grant
Hahn, Roger
Nazarene Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2011
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Nazarene Theological Seminary seeks to be “a missional seminary serving a missional church.” This requires that we do a better job of moving out of the “ivory tower” into ministry contexts. This project seeks to develop a process through which we can more fully explore the options and find ways to integrate contextual education into our ministry degree programs. A consultant will be invited to lead a faculty workshop to ...
Proposal abstract :
Nazarene Theological Seminary seeks to be “a missional seminary serving a missional church.” This requires that we do a better job of moving out of the “ivory tower” into ministry contexts. This project seeks to develop a process through which we can more fully explore the options and find ways to integrate contextual education into our ministry degree programs. A consultant will be invited to lead a faculty workshop to facilitate the exploration of the theories and models of contextual education and to coach the development of learning and teaching strategies for contextual education. Goals for the project include: (1) to assess what we have learned through various experiments in recent years, (2) to survey theories and models of contextual education, (3) to explore effective learning and teaching strategies in contextual education, and (4) to formulate core practices common to the various contextual education endeavors at NTS.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to equip faculty and adjunct professors to better formulate contextual learning strategies in the preparation of leaders for the missional church. Resource persons provided instruction in theoretical frameworks for contextual education and led experiential sessions to introduce learning strategies. In the semester following the instruction, professors reported an increased use of contextual elements in course assignments. The project might have been strengthened by interacting with students and congregations in at least one of the sessions. Next steps include the development of fully contextualized courses and program revision.
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Developing a Womanist Signature Pedagogy for Educating Black Clergy

Awarded Grant
Floyd-Thomas, Stacey
Vanderbilt University/The Divinity School
Theological Schools
2011
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Educating Clergy   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project proposes a process for constructing a womanist signature pedagogy for educating Black clergy. In particular, we are seeking a year-long consultative initiative among the nation’s premier womanist seminary/religious studies professors to develop a pedagogy that is aware of the impact that race-class-gender disparity has on the formation of the Black Church in general and Black clergy’s theological formation in particular. In anticipation of this long ...
Proposal abstract :
This project proposes a process for constructing a womanist signature pedagogy for educating Black clergy. In particular, we are seeking a year-long consultative initiative among the nation’s premier womanist seminary/religious studies professors to develop a pedagogy that is aware of the impact that race-class-gender disparity has on the formation of the Black Church in general and Black clergy’s theological formation in particular. In anticipation of this long awaited reflective context and workshop, 29 womanist theological educators and religious leaders have committed to work towards a womanist signature pedagogy that aligns with the logos of theological education, the pathos of transformative education, the ethos of womanist thought and the theos of Black religious traditions.

Learning Abstract :
This project grant sought to develop best practices, teaching resources, and pedagogical strategies to assist womanist theological faculty in transmitting womanist thought for practical implementation for the ongoing process of educating Black clergy. Due to racist assumptions, unreflective sexism, and underlying obstacles caused by economic strife, Black clergy are in need of womanist insight in their work to engender social and spiritual empowerment in their congregations. The project hoped that developing a womanist signature pedagogy would stimulate and support a mutually relational learning community for Black clergy. Via in depth interviews, consultations, collaborations and nation-wide conference between womanist scholars and religious leaders/activists, this initiative not only assessed operative distortions that create a gap between the classroom and the church, but also analyzed how bridging the gap could positively shape and revive Black Protestantism. In addition, this project encouraged and empowered its greatest asset, Black church women and clergy.
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Dominican Teaching And Dominican Tradition in The Liberal Arts Studies Core Seminars

Awarded Grant
Raab, Joseph
Siena Heights University
Colleges/Universities
2012
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
We seek funding to support a three day workshop and follow up conversations for faculty teaching in the new, innovative Liberal Arts Studies (LAS) core seminar courses. These seminars explicitly aim to engage students and faculty in the conversation, or the dialogue, that characterizes Dominican pedagogy and to develop understanding of Dominican tradition and its values of community, truth, contemplation and justice. This workshop will allow faculty to explore and ...
Proposal abstract :
We seek funding to support a three day workshop and follow up conversations for faculty teaching in the new, innovative Liberal Arts Studies (LAS) core seminar courses. These seminars explicitly aim to engage students and faculty in the conversation, or the dialogue, that characterizes Dominican pedagogy and to develop understanding of Dominican tradition and its values of community, truth, contemplation and justice. This workshop will allow faculty to explore and discover the unique ways that major figures and events from the Dominican tradition engage and elucidate these general values. More importantly, it will allow faculty members who will be teaching LAS core seminar courses to explore distinctive dimensions of Dominican pedagogy and to consider ways of integrating those into their own teaching. Participants will be afforded the space and time to discuss syllabi construction for the Liberal Arts Core seminars, and teaching strategies for effectively engaging students in the Dominican tradition and its values.

Learning Abstract :
The faculty participants in the workshops funded by the Wabash Center grant learned a great deal about the history and personalities that comprise the Dominican tradition and developed a deeper appreciation for it. Furthermore, by reflecting on the tradition's values, and the order's governance model and the role of disputatio within the tradition, teachers were able to explore and develop ways that the tradition could inform their teaching strategies and course design. Those same teachers were then able to collaborate on the construction of new seminar courses built around themes drawn from Dominican tradition that comprise the new Liberal Arts core curriculum at Siena Heights University. The project initiated what we expect to be a fruitful and sustainable conversation germane to our institutional mission and identity.
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Religion, Place, and Pedagogy: Establishing a Bio-Regional Network of Teacher-Scholars in Religion and Ecology

Awarded Grant
Patterson, Barbara|Ayres, Jennifer|Labrecque, Cory
Emory University
Colleges/Universities
2013
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
How can religious and theological learning be deepened by sustained attention to and engagement with the particular place in which education is happening—and with an ecological context more broadly? And what challenges and opportunities greet teachers of religion and theology who seek this kind of deepened engagement through place-based pedagogies and other models of teaching and learning? This project will establish a network of inquiry-driven scholars and teachers who ...
Proposal abstract :
How can religious and theological learning be deepened by sustained attention to and engagement with the particular place in which education is happening—and with an ecological context more broadly? And what challenges and opportunities greet teachers of religion and theology who seek this kind of deepened engagement through place-based pedagogies and other models of teaching and learning? This project will establish a network of inquiry-driven scholars and teachers who are interested in the powers and stories of particular places, histories, geographies, and cultures shaped by – and shaping – religious experiences and expressions in the South. The project is primed to advance existent place-conscious pedagogical approaches at the intersection of religion and ecology in response to today’s crises in sustainable living.

Learning Abstract :
A pilot group of faculty interested in resources, uses, and assessments of place-based pedagogies initiated a Southern Bio-Regional Network. Committed to building a collegial community interested in a range of place-based pedagogy models and exercises, this initial group met over a three-day consultation, sharing specific approaches they had used in their classrooms, experimenting with each other's teaching-learning exercises, and discovering a shared purpose to implement this Network. An additional gathering at the national AAR/SBL meeting drew additional faculty and graduate student interests creating a broader cohort now better leveraged through a live blog committed to the use, expansion, and research of pedagogies of place in the Southern Bio-Region. The blog is found at: http://religionplacepedagogy.wordpress.com/ Committed to establishing a diverse network of scholar teachers from a range of settings and fields, this Network addresses issues ranging widely from food and agriculture to narratives and meanings of place.
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Polishing our Pedagogy: Teaching Theology at a Distance

Awarded Grant
Derrenbacker, Robert
Thorneloe University, School of Theology
2013
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Thorneloe College School of Theology (TCST) at Thorneloe University is coordinating a weekend workshop for its faculty members, all of whom teach by distance education and are spread across Ontario. This would bring, for the first time, all the faculty members together to explore the opportunities and challenges that are brought to bear through teaching theology at a distance. This workshop would focus on the methods and tools that work ...
Proposal abstract :
Thorneloe College School of Theology (TCST) at Thorneloe University is coordinating a weekend workshop for its faculty members, all of whom teach by distance education and are spread across Ontario. This would bring, for the first time, all the faculty members together to explore the opportunities and challenges that are brought to bear through teaching theology at a distance. This workshop would focus on the methods and tools that work best for undergraduate distance teaching in theology, particularly in the rural and remote contexts that many of TCST’s students experience in northern Ontario and other similar locations in Canada. What could result from this workshop is a greater sense of cohesion and cooperation from among the faculty, the development of faculty capacities for assessment of students learning at a distance, a greater appreciation for a common pedagogy, and a shared sense of vision for the teaching of theology at TCST.

Learning Abstract :
The Workshop funded by a Small Grant from the Wabash Center brought together, for the first time, faculty members teaching Theology courses at a distance at Thorneloe University, as well as students enrolled in its programs. As a result, the Administration of the University has learned of the value and importance of scheduling such get-togethers on a regular basis. As well, the Faculty and Administration have learned directly from students about the rewards and frustrations of taking a Theology program almost exclusively by distance education. And finally, we have identified those areas in our Theology curriculum in need of updating, revision and administrative attention. These results and learning outcomes from the Workshop would benefit anyone teaching Theology at a distance, particularly through an institution located outside of a main urban center in Canada that serves a diverse and diffused student population spread across the expanses of Ontario and Canada.
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The Bible and the Big Questions at PC(USA) Liberal Arts Colleges: Toward Pedagogies of Values Identification, Critical Thinking, and Civic Engagement

Awarded Grant
Lopez, Davina
Eckerd College
2013
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The Bible has historically comprised a core component of the Humanities at PC(USA) liberal arts colleges, given the latter’s indebtedness to Judeo-Christian traditions. Herein a challenge for biblical studies teachers resides in contestations over content, method, and interpretive authority, alongside the Bible’s disputed importance in college curricula. At the same time, the Bible is a potential resource for helping students to ask “big questions.” This project will ...
Proposal abstract :
The Bible has historically comprised a core component of the Humanities at PC(USA) liberal arts colleges, given the latter’s indebtedness to Judeo-Christian traditions. Herein a challenge for biblical studies teachers resides in contestations over content, method, and interpretive authority, alongside the Bible’s disputed importance in college curricula. At the same time, the Bible is a potential resource for helping students to ask “big questions.” This project will bring together biblical studies teachers at five PC(USA) liberal arts colleges for three workshops over the next year, wherein we aim to develop a collaborative, supportive atmosphere and think about ways to understand similarities and differences between our teaching personae and practices. Rather than rehearse oppositions between “faith” and “intellect” in teaching biblical studies, we will embrace three intersecting sites for exploring pedagogical dilemmas and strategies: values identification and spiritual life, critical thinking and interconnectedness of knowledge, and community-integrative education and civic engagement.

Learning Abstract :
This project aimed to consider a range of questions facing teachers of biblical studies at PC(USA) liberal arts colleges, including: a) what specific resources the Presbyterian higher-educational heritage offers for contemporary biblical-studies pedagogies; b) how teachers of biblical literature at PC(USA) liberal arts colleges might overcome dichotomous understandings of biblical studies pedagogies as being either rooted in "seminary" or "university" models; c) how teaching the Bible with undergraduates at PC(USA) liberal arts colleges can be enhanced through challenging supposed oppositions ("faith"/"intellect," "believers"/"non-believers"); d) how the Bible, which historically has occupied a central place in liberal arts curricula, might be best encountered in a contemporary liberal arts setting - with contemporary students; and e) how teachers of biblical literature in these settings might learn from each other and clarify our own pedagogical orientation to the material that we share, embracing a holistic vision of what teaching the Bible can be and do.
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Religious Commitments in the Albion College Classroom

Awarded Grant
McWhirter, Jocelyn
Albion College
Colleges/Universities
2013
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This grant project was conducted in the context of the Wabash Center’s
2013-14 Colloquy on Religious Commitments in the Undergraduate Classroom.
Do students at a small, church-affiliated liberal arts college think that classroom discussions about religious commitments cohere with its academic mission? How comfortable are traditional undergraduates with such discussions? How do they perceive their religious obligations in the classroom? How do they handle those obligations? This ...
Proposal abstract :
This grant project was conducted in the context of the Wabash Center’s
2013-14 Colloquy on Religious Commitments in the Undergraduate Classroom.
Do students at a small, church-affiliated liberal arts college think that classroom discussions about religious commitments cohere with its academic mission? How comfortable are traditional undergraduates with such discussions? How do they perceive their religious obligations in the classroom? How do they handle those obligations? This project will answer these questions, helping to chart the water for instructors seeking to navigate religious commitments in the undergraduate classroom. It will also give four college seniors a way to interact with the issues, both personally and as they affect other students. Activities include the creation, administration, and analysis of a student survey, conversation among religious studies students and faculty, a presentation to the College community, reflection and evaluation by the project director, and consideration by the Wabash Center 2013-14 Teaching and Learning Colloquy on Religious Commitments in the Undergraduate Classroom.

Learning Abstract :

Do students at a small, church-affiliated liberal arts college think that classroom discussions about religious commitments cohere with its academic mission? How comfortable are traditional undergraduates with such discussions? How do they perceive their religious obligations in the classroom? How do they handle those obligations? A survey of 95 Albion College religious studies students indicates that most are comfortable discussing religious commitments in class, especially when someone else initiates the conversation. They are willing to talk about their own beliefs as well as the beliefs of others. Most think that discussing personal beliefs enhances their education. While some report that their religion obligates them to reject certain academic claims, only a few felt strongly that they should speak up about their beliefs in the classroom. Tellingly, 38% compartmentalize academic and personal views about religion. These results suggest that Albion College professors have an opportunity to help students integrate religious studies with personal beliefs.



Religious Commitments in the Albion College Classroom (mp4)

Powerpoint slideshow reviewing the project (pdf)

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Integrating Student-Centered Inquiry for Transformational Learning among Diverse Students

Awarded Grant
Elness-Hanson, Beth
Trinity Lutheran College
2014
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Trinity is in the crucible of change. However, this kairos-time provides the opportunity to strategically innovate—integrating “student-centered inquiry"—for stronger learning outcomes among a wonderfully-diverse student body. The past eight years have seen changes from a traditional Bible college to a “biblically-centered liberal arts college” with new majors beyond traditional ministry. The changes of campus location, president, academic dean, Biblical Studies chair, new majors, and adding athletic programs has ...
Proposal abstract :
Trinity is in the crucible of change. However, this kairos-time provides the opportunity to strategically innovate—integrating “student-centered inquiry"—for stronger learning outcomes among a wonderfully-diverse student body. The past eight years have seen changes from a traditional Bible college to a “biblically-centered liberal arts college” with new majors beyond traditional ministry. The changes of campus location, president, academic dean, Biblical Studies chair, new majors, and adding athletic programs has resulted in a vastly different student body— with 42% people of color, almost half are athletes, and approximately 7% are non-Christian—a radical change from a decade ago. Thus, the faculty seeks to engage the diversity of ethnicity, faith traditions, and learning styles by integrating the “gracious space” provided through student-centered inquiry. We seek to develop our capacity to empower active, responsible participants in their own learning in ways which respects diversity while engaging meaningfully in exploring the Christian world view.

Learning Abstract :
Trinity Lutheran College faculty and administrative staff were able, over the short period of the grant, to "develop our capacity to empower active, responsible participants in their own learning in ways which respects diversity while engaging meaningfully in exploring the Christian worldview," as well as identify limitations of our ability to accomplish these aims. After baseline measures and post-test comparisons, as well as trainings for faculty, Trinity applied changes to our core religious curriculum. Further, the grant made obvious that while change in syllabi and pedagogical practices can indeed make a small impact on how students learn, the "who" students work with is an equally important question that needs to be asked and addressed. The need to diversify the faculty profile is paramount to student success in biblically centered curriculum.
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Religious Studies Inside Prison Walls: A Regional Workshop

Awarded Grant
Lloyd, Vincent
Syracuse University
Colleges/Universities
2015
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
What are the most effective means of teaching religious studies inside a prison? To address this question, we propose a workshop exploring two dominant secular paradigms in prison education. What can religious studies scholars learn from these pedagogical paradigms, and how might these paradigms need to be inflected based on the particular experience of religious studies educators? While there has been an increase in the number of prison education programs ...
Proposal abstract :
What are the most effective means of teaching religious studies inside a prison? To address this question, we propose a workshop exploring two dominant secular paradigms in prison education. What can religious studies scholars learn from these pedagogical paradigms, and how might these paradigms need to be inflected based on the particular experience of religious studies educators? While there has been an increase in the number of prison education programs with religious studies faculty involvement, there has been relatively little discussion of the unique pedagogical issues raised for religious studies professors teaching in prisons. We have identified a group of ten scholars (including both theologians and secular religious studies scholars) who have expertise in this area who will gather to share best practices, build mentoring relationships, and explore connections between teaching and research.

Learning Abstract :
What are the most effective means of teaching religious studies inside a prison? While there has been an increase in the number of prison education programs with religious studies faculty involvement, there has been relatively little discussion of the unique pedagogical issues raised for religious studies professors teaching in prisons. These questions guided the workshop that we convened at the University of Montreal on May 3, 2015.
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Resilience and Vulnerability in Theological and Religious Leadership Studies

Awarded Grant
Hogue, Michael|Bell, Dean
Spertus Institute for Jewish Learning and Leadership and Meadville Lombard Theological School
2015
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project will develop a course that engages the interdisciplinary discourse of vulnerability and resilience as a way to equip seminarians and other religious professionals with concepts, skills, and strategies that will help them to become more creative, agile, and effective leaders in contexts of change and uncertainty.
Proposal abstract :
This project will develop a course that engages the interdisciplinary discourse of vulnerability and resilience as a way to equip seminarians and other religious professionals with concepts, skills, and strategies that will help them to become more creative, agile, and effective leaders in contexts of change and uncertainty.

Learning Abstract :
We used our Wabash Center small grant to design and teach a course that explored the relevance of theories of vulnerability and resilience to the tasks of religious leadership and social change. We believed (and still do) that these theories are essential to the formation of religious leaders and institutions capable of working creatively with the pace of change and the depths of uncertainty in contemporary life. We sought to develop pedagogically effective strategies for teaching theories of vulnerability and resilience in ways that students could apply to the diverse cultural contexts of their professional work. We employed a wide range of teaching strategies, from interactive lectures, paired learning (chavruta study), small group discussion, case study analysis and development, and world cafe conversations. Our goal was to find a way to teach these theories so that students were not only learning "about" them but also learning to think with them and to put them to use.
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Teaching Religious Studies to Undergraduate Students in Health-Related Fields

Awarded Grant
Berkwitz, Stephen|Schmalzbauer, John
Missouri State University
Colleges/Universities
2015
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Many undergraduate students pursuing degrees and careers in health-related fields will eventually discover that a knowledge of religious diversity and the interrelations between religion, spirituality, and health would be extremely useful for their work. We propose to develop a coherent curriculum made up of Religious Studies courses and internships to increase the cultural competence of students in health and human services programs. By discovering and communicating how Religious Studies can ...
Proposal abstract :
Many undergraduate students pursuing degrees and careers in health-related fields will eventually discover that a knowledge of religious diversity and the interrelations between religion, spirituality, and health would be extremely useful for their work. We propose to develop a coherent curriculum made up of Religious Studies courses and internships to increase the cultural competence of students in health and human services programs. By discovering and communicating how Religious Studies can enhance the education of these students, we aim to develop a capacity to teach about the many ways that Religion and Health intersect, and build meaningful interdisciplinary collaborations between Religious Studies and Health programs at Missouri State University. These goals will be accomplished through meetings with stakeholders on campus and in the health professions, symposia and consultations with outside experts, and collaborative curriculum development projects undertaken by faculty.

Learning Abstract :
Our grant research and activities taught us that Religious Studies courses can contribute in meaningful ways to the education of students in pre-professional health-related fields. By engaging students, faculty, and staff from the College of Health and Human Services in conversations about the interests and needs of future health professionals, we learned that we could design courses in areas where the humanities and the health sciences converge. Our faculty worked in collaboration to develop courses that explore the relationships between religion and health, enhance student understanding about religious diversity, and provide practical knowledge for students who plan to work with patients and clients. While creating a curricular focus on religion and health to complement our department's other offerings, we developed a clearer rationale for explaining the relevance and usefulness of Religious Studies coursework to students seeking an education in health and human services fields.
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Anti-Racism Resources for Practical Theological Instruction

Awarded Grant
Ramsay, Nancy
Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2000
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Study leave grant to support development of theological teaching resources and strategies for stimulating and supporting proactive commitment to an anti-racist, inclusive vision for community for seminarians and others in theological education.
Proposal abstract :
Study leave grant to support development of theological teaching resources and strategies for stimulating and supporting proactive commitment to an anti-racist, inclusive vision for community for seminarians and others in theological education.

Learning Abstract :
The study leave project sought to develop teaching resources and strategies to assist white theological faculty and seminarians to deconstruct unreflective racist assumptions underlying white racial identity and to develop teaching practices and resources that stimulate and support a mutually relational learning community. The project hoped to assess operative distortions shaping race relations in North American mainline Protestantism, critically assess anti-racism programs, and identify resources that might contribute to deconstructing white racism.
Her hypothesis that white religious leaders hold inadequate tools for analyzing and responding to racism proved true. She was struck by the pervasive difficulty of white religious leaders to adequately understand the scope and depth of racism. Anti-racism training experiences and resources proved helpful in developing new teaching strategies. She was able to engage a wide variety of works on race from many disciplinary perspectives that proved invaluable for her revision of her courses.
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Teaching Religious and Theological Texts in an Integrated Freshman Core

Awarded Grant
Niedner, Frederick
Valparaiso University
Colleges/Universities
2000
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Study leave grant to support study of teaching and learning issues involved in the integration of religious and theological texts into core curriculum, including faculty resistance to such topics of study.
Proposal abstract :
Study leave grant to support study of teaching and learning issues involved in the integration of religious and theological texts into core curriculum, including faculty resistance to such topics of study.

Learning Abstract :
This study leave project sought to study ways of assisting the teaching and enhancing the learning of theological texts in the Valparaiso University's Freshman Core course. He sought to examine and reflect upon reasons why both students and teachers find the study of religious and theological texts more problematic than the study of other kinds of texts. He also hoped to provide training for faculty who would teach the core, and to develop materials that could assist in recruitment of faculty instructors.
A significant learning gained from discussion with faculty concerned their own feelings of uneasiness and inadequacy when handling religious texts, particularly sacred or canonical texts. These instructors concluded that their uneasiness must have surely affected the nature of the class discussions and contributed to student uneasiness. Speaking at length with faculty in the area of Literature helped him to see that these instructors treat all texts as sacred and thus model for other faculty and students a "religious reading" of text. This is a useful stance to bring to the core course.
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Consultation on the Vocation of the Presbyterian Teacher

Awarded Grant
Ferguson, Duncan|Weston, William
Association of Presbyterian Colleges & Universities
Agencies
1999
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Consultation to bring together Presbyterian teachers and others from Presbyterian Church (USA) institutions to reflect on how Presbyterian understanding can inform the ideals and practices of teaching.
Proposal abstract :
Consultation to bring together Presbyterian teachers and others from Presbyterian Church (USA) institutions to reflect on how Presbyterian understanding can inform the ideals and practices of teaching.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a consultation of Presbyterian teachers and other teachers from PC(USA) institutions who are strongly engaged in the Reformed tradition of higher education to reflect on how Presbyterian understanding can inform the ideals and practices of teaching.
One learning revolved around "the question of whether or not institution's Presbyterian element could be strengthened in the face of generally secular trend of the academy. While some were optimistic that so much might be done to strengthen Presbyterian related colleges, others felt that other colleges, especially those in the historical category, did not have enough Presbyterian identity left to strengthen." On the issue of pedagogical practice, they noted that while historically Presbyterian pedagogy was informed by the doctrine of the sovereignty of God and the lecture format, they teach students that struggle with that doctrine and prefer "a general approach of concerned teaching and active learning over lecture."
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The Teaching of Worship in Roman Catholic Seminaries: Examining the Interplay of Theory and Practice

Awarded Grant
Foley, Edward
Catholic Theological Union of Chicago
Theological Schools
1999
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Research project to examine the ways in which the foundational theology, theological reflection, and practical skills for worship leadership are taught in selected Roman Catholic Seminaries in the U.S. so as to discover what pedagogies, curricular designs, deployment of personnel or other factors might contribute to this integration in Roman Catholic seminarians.
Proposal abstract :
Research project to examine the ways in which the foundational theology, theological reflection, and practical skills for worship leadership are taught in selected Roman Catholic Seminaries in the U.S. so as to discover what pedagogies, curricular designs, deployment of personnel or other factors might contribute to this integration in Roman Catholic seminarians.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought "to examine the ways in which the foundational theology, theological reflection and practical skills for worship leadership courses are taught in selective Roman Catholic seminaries in the U.S. so as to discover what pedagogies, curricula designs, deployment of personnel or other factors might contribute to this integration in Roman Catholic seminaries." This would be accomplished through site visits, interviews with professors, and feedback from students and recently ordained graduates.
From this study the researchers learned that for the group study the total environment of the institution, as well as the openness of the student contributed most to the acquisition of integration skills. Faculty mentoring and modeling of holistic integration also proved to be important. The researcher assumed that curriculum pedagogy issues would dominate his findings, but discovered that environment and personal openness were more important.
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Research for Book on Theological Teaching

Awarded Grant
Foster, Charles
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological Schools
1999
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Funding for theological-school-based research project on theological teaching which will form the basis for a book.
Proposal abstract :
Funding for theological-school-based research project on theological teaching which will form the basis for a book.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to research the concept of theological teaching by examining six different professors in different disciplines of theology. The project hoped to reveal "the diversity of their approaches as practitioners of theological teaching and the convergence of their shared efforts in forming a theological community of teaching and learning."
Six faculty members from Candler representing the fields of Old testament, New Testament, Historical theology, World Christianity, Church and Community and religion and Education participated. Field notes from interviews, observations of classroom teaching and focus group conversations with the faculty became the basis of the research. This work will be integrated into a larger study on teaching practices in theological education sponsored by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.
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Consultation on Bible in the General Education Curricula

Awarded Grant
Giles, Terry
Gannon University
Colleges/Universities
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Series of four full-day meetings that gather representatives from regional institutions that have introductory courses on Bible in the general education curriculum. Topics will consist of the rationale for the presence of such courses, the use of new communication technologies and evaluation/assessment in such courses, and consideration of the future cultural role of biblical studies.
Proposal abstract :
Series of four full-day meetings that gather representatives from regional institutions that have introductory courses on Bible in the general education curriculum. Topics will consist of the rationale for the presence of such courses, the use of new communication technologies and evaluation/assessment in such courses, and consideration of the future cultural role of biblical studies.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to bring together representatives of colleges and universities from the Eastern Great Lakes region for a series of four consultations on the Bible and general education curriculum. The purpose of the consultation was to assess the rationale for those courses and to evaluate various methodologies used in teaching them. Ultimately, it hoped to examine and articulate the role of Biblical studies in the core curriculum of an
American university at the commencement of the 21st century.

They found that there is no one normative approach to Biblical texts in general educational curriculum. Rather, the curriculum should be learner centered, focusing on helping students to discover their own answers. Biblical courses will remain key to curriculum in the 21st century because of the ways in which Biblical literacy helps to create an historical reality by which to evaluate immediate experience. Also, it helps students read primary texts. Computer technology and the internet are key resources for teaching Bible in the 21st century.
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Critical Introduction of Multicultural Pedagogical Approaches to Selected Required Courses in a Master of Divinity Degree Program

Awarded Grant
Caldwell, Elizabeth|Daniels, David
McCormick Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
To redesign the pedagogy of a selected group of required courses through the critical introduction of multicultural teaching methods
Proposal abstract :
To redesign the pedagogy of a selected group of required courses through the critical introduction of multicultural teaching methods

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to redesign the pedagogy of a select group of courses through the critical introduction of multicultural teaching methods. The goals of the project were to introduce multicultural pedagogical methods to the faculty, to redesign a specific set of M. Div. courses, and to reflect upon and evaluate their experiences of experimenting with different approaches to multicultural teaching.
A group of eleven faculty participated in the project. They held workshops on intercultural communication, multicultural pedagogy (facilitated by outside consultant Eric Law), learning styles and multiple intelligences theory. They learned that small group learning is effective in certain introductory courses, that Law's mutual invitation method and "photolanguage" method is useful for small group dialogue, and the use of open-ended sentences as a teaching method for all students, not just those with limited English speaking abilities.
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Towards an Infusion Model of Experiential Learning

Awarded Grant
Holmes, Barbara|Dekar, Paul
Memphis Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
1999
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Develop a team-taught course as a pilot program for an institutional alliance in the Mississippi Delta region to appropriate the rich and diverse religious, educational and cultural options in the region. The course will identify and share speakers, artistic, historic, and cultural resources and multimedia products with the seminary and wider community.
Proposal abstract :
Develop a team-taught course as a pilot program for an institutional alliance in the Mississippi Delta region to appropriate the rich and diverse religious, educational and cultural options in the region. The course will identify and share speakers, artistic, historic, and cultural resources and multimedia products with the seminary and wider community.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a course that would identify and incorporate wider issues of cultural diversity through an infusion educational model that emphasized experiential learning at the local level. This pilot project sought to create institutional alliances with the diverse religious, educational and cultural options in the region
The experiential learning of the course enriched urban and cross-cultural ministry training. Students discovered ways to become pastors who exegete the diversity of their local communities well. Also, the course helped the students and faculty to build community relationships that may endure. Finally, they looked for ways to develop a track in the M.Div. and D.Min. programs that attended to diversity issues in ministry. Overall, the course helped both students and faculty "to discover and reflect upon the changing face of diversity at the local community level."
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A National Urban Theological Educators Consultation: On Teaching and Learning Urban Ministry

Awarded Grant
Dennis, Warren
New Brunswick Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Consultation to engage in public pedagogical dialogue on urban theological education, focusing on the best methods for teaching and learning in urban ministry.
Proposal abstract :
Consultation to engage in public pedagogical dialogue on urban theological education, focusing on the best methods for teaching and learning in urban ministry.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds for a consultation of 40 theological educators on pedagogical issues of urban theological education. They sought specifically to focus their attention on highlighting the best methods of teaching and learning strategies in the area of urban ministry. This included community partnerships, interdisciplinary analysis, cross-cultural engagement and mentoring. The consultation was jointly sponsored by New Brunswick Theological Seminary and the Association of Urban Theological Education and Ministry (AUTEM).
They highlighted a "growing interest to bridge the connection between teaching and learning, faith and practice, by implementing faith commitments through public participation in the academy, church and society, particularly with respect to the plight of poor and oppressed communities." Participants came to see that the combination of formal and non-formal teaching methods called for radically new partnerships between the seminary and the community, and challenged seminaries to be more inclusive theologically to match the constituencies with whom they work in an urban context. Also discussed was the importance of modeling the ministers/scholars they sought to train. Finally, rather than standardization of teaching strategies, they proposed a holistic frame of values.
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Consultation for Learning Bible at Seattle Pacific University

Awarded Grant
Wall, Robert |Steele, Les
Seattle Pacific University
Colleges/Universities
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Two departmental retreats with outside professional consultants, the first to consider the pedagogy of a Scripture course intended for the traditional college sophomore, and the second to reflect on and assess the teaching of that course during the prior year.
Proposal abstract :
Two departmental retreats with outside professional consultants, the first to consider the pedagogy of a Scripture course intended for the traditional college sophomore, and the second to reflect on and assess the teaching of that course during the prior year.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a consultation on learning Bible at Seattle Pacific University in order to develop new strategies for teaching scripture as a required course. This would be accomplished through faculty retreats with nationally known scholars of teaching, as well as conversations with student focus groups.
The project director reports that the consultation was provocative and successful in accomplishing the stated goals. They reported the following implications of the consultation on the future of the Bible course: 1. develop a process to train and utilize advanced students as participant observers; 2. use of the "clearness meeting" to engage in formative faculty conversations regarding teaching and vocation; 3. to develop longitudinal surveys to evaluate long-term student learning; 4. to support and encourage writing and consultation on issues related to the course; 5. use of teaching portfolios for faculty teaching this course.
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Toward a More Racially Inclusive Curriculum and Pedagogy

Awarded Grant
Pressler, Carolyn
United Theological Seminary of Twin Cities
Theological Schools
1999
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Two workshops, an alumni focus group, and expert consultants to assist the faculty in revising curricula, syllabi and teaching strategies to create a more inclusive learning environment.
Proposal abstract :
Two workshops, an alumni focus group, and expert consultants to assist the faculty in revising curricula, syllabi and teaching strategies to create a more inclusive learning environment.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop faculty workshops and consultations dedicated to revising curricula, syllabi and teaching strategies to create a more inclusive learning environment. The workshops were in the area of understanding and dismantling racism and teaching in a multicultural environment. Consultations with faculty in the major areas of the curriculum would be held with educational consultants. They would also consult with a focus group of alumni/ae students of color.
From this work faculty have re-structured classes to incorporate anti-racism training, as well as incorporating more culturally diverse learning resources and theoretical models. They feel that they developed more useful skills to bring to curriculum revision. The faculty agreed that anti-racism training should be a required part of the revised curriculum.
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Charlotte-Area Regional Consultation on Teaching the New Testament

Awarded Grant
Carey, Greg
Winthrop University
Colleges/Universities
1998
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Series of three workshops involving biblical scholars who teach in colleges, universities, and seminaries in the Charlotte area to explore methods, models, and resources for teaching the New Testament.
Proposal abstract :
Series of three workshops involving biblical scholars who teach in colleges, universities, and seminaries in the Charlotte area to explore methods, models, and resources for teaching the New Testament.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop consultation on teaching and learning with Biblical scholars from the Charlotte-Rockhill area. The goal would be to explore methods, models and resources for teaching the New Testament, especially the introductory level course.
The project met the group's expectations with its emphasis on practical, classroom oriented discussions. One of the most positive benefits of the consultation was the opportunity for new teachers to have an informal opportunity to share strategies and information with one another and to be mentored by more senior colleagues.
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Summer Grants for Course Development

Awarded Grant
Cavadini, John
University of Notre Dame
1998
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Matching funds to provide summer grants to faculty members for creating new versions of the first required course in theology, especially fostering a new pedagogy in the teaching of the Bible to first-year undergraduates.
Proposal abstract :
Matching funds to provide summer grants to faculty members for creating new versions of the first required course in theology, especially fostering a new pedagogy in the teaching of the Bible to first-year undergraduates.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to provide summer grants to faculty members who were interested in creating new versions of the department's first required course in theology. This course, largely centered on the Bible, needed to be revised to include a more theologically oriented perspectives and pedagogy. Grant money would fund release time for faculty from summer teaching so as to engage in this research and revisioning.
The program was very successful in creating new models for the foundations course. The new models have become prototypes encouraging other members of the faculty to take new initiative with the course. The faculty who received these grants expressed willingness to work with a teaching workshop for graduate students. Faculty found it intellectually stimulating and pedagogically useful to learn ways to combine historical and theological approaches.
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Regional Consultation on Teaching and Learning in Biblical, Historical, Systematic and Moral Theology from an Evangelical Perspective

Awarded Grant
Padgett, Alan|Gasque, W. Ward
Pacific Association for Theological Studies
Agencies
1998
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Four-day consultation of representatives of ten evangelical schools in the Northwestern United States to compare programs, share resources, and discuss other aspects of teaching and learning.
Proposal abstract :
Four-day consultation of representatives of ten evangelical schools in the Northwestern United States to compare programs, share resources, and discuss other aspects of teaching and learning.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a consultation on teaching and learning in Biblical, historical, systematic and moral theology from an evangelical perspective, focusing on schools in the geographic region of the Pacific Northwest. Their goals were to bring seminary teachers together to discuss redesigning their introductory courses, share syllabi, reflect on issues of technology and teaching and learning style, to reflect upon the resources of American evangelical theology and Christian wisdom and to bring pastors into discussion about seminary formation.
The group that gathered found it useful to be with other evangelical scholars and that it was an aid to their common dialogue about teaching theology better. The most helpful session involved sharing introductory course syllabi. They also found the discussions on teaching theology to adult learners in the use of art in teaching theology to be extremely profitable.
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Roots and Development of Modern Cultures and Values

Awarded Grant
Tilley, Terrence
University of Dayton
Colleges/Universities
1998
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Summer workshop for faculty who teach religion and theology in university-wide core integrated studies curriculum.
Proposal abstract :
Summer workshop for faculty who teach religion and theology in university-wide core integrated studies curriculum.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop an innovative approach to core introductory courses in religious studies, philosophy and history. This involved delivering the three disciplines in one highly integrated course on Western Civilization that moved beyond a multi-disciplinary approach and focused on commonalities.
Overall, this project was a highly successful pilot project in interdisciplinary course development and teaching. The six faculty who team-taught the course found the intensive planning time over the summer to be stimulating and productive. Faculty also found it helpful to understand content beyond the confines of their own disciplines. Student reaction to the course was overwhelmingly positive.
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Talking about Teaching: Why Higher Education Needs Christian Theology to Survive

Awarded Grant
Webb, Stephen
Wabash College
1999
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
A study leave grant to write a book on the role of Christian theology in higher education.
Proposal abstract :
A study leave grant to write a book on the role of Christian theology in higher education.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought replacement funds for a study leave for the researcher to write a book on the role of Christian theology in higher education.
Results of the study can be found in the author's completed manuscript entitled Taking Religion to School: Christian Theology and Secular Education (Brazos, 2000)
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Developing Teaching Materials and Instructional Strategies for Teaching Asian and Asian American/Canadian Women’s Theologies in North America

Awarded Grant
Ng, Wenh-In
Emmanuel College
Theological Schools
1998
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
A project to develop teaching materials and strategies to meet the special needs of Asian, Asian American, and Asian Canadian women students of religion. These funds will enable three university faculty to join the ATS funded project.
Proposal abstract :
A project to develop teaching materials and strategies to meet the special needs of Asian, Asian American, and Asian Canadian women students of religion. These funds will enable three university faculty to join the ATS funded project.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop teaching materials and instructional strategies for teaching Asian and Asian American/ Canadian women's theologies in North America. The integrated project team would gather in Cambridge Mass. to create a text for use in the academy.
The report was created, including three sample syllabi. The report included the following topics: 1. the teaching of Asian and Asian North American theologies in the U.S. and Canada; 2. teaching materials and instructional strategies for teaching Asian and Asian North American theologies; 3. Asian and Asian North American women as faculty and students; and recommendations to institution.
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Consultation on Teaching Bible, Theology, and Religion in Evangelical Colleges Related to the Presbyterian Church (USA)

Awarded Grant
McClanahan, James
King College
Colleges/Universities
1998
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Weekend consultation of representatives from the religion departments of six Presbyterian colleges to compare programs, share resources, and discuss other aspects of teaching and learning.
Proposal abstract :
Weekend consultation of representatives from the religion departments of six Presbyterian colleges to compare programs, share resources, and discuss other aspects of teaching and learning.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to create a consultation on teaching Bible, theology and religion in evangelical colleges related to the Presbyterian Church (USA). The purpose of the consultation would be to investigate, discuss, and clarify the purposes, goals, curricula and place of the departments of Bible/religion/theology in evangelical Presbyterian liberal arts colleges. The consultation would consider the importance and place of these departments for Christian higher education, focusing on their necessity for Presbyterian/Reformed college education.
The response of the participants were very positive. The project director reports that the discussions were thought provoking, new friendships and networks were made, and each participant was affirmed in his teaching vocation. An affinity was gained though participants also recognized the diversity and uniqueness of each school.
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Voice & Vocation: Women Finding a Middle Way in Theology

Awarded Grant
Crysdale, Cynthia
Catholic University of America
Theological Schools
1998
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
3-day meeting of women professional theologians to expand and develop a conversation about theological vocation, including mentors and mentoring, identity of the theologian, and the scholar’s relation to Christian tradition.
Proposal abstract :
3-day meeting of women professional theologians to expand and develop a conversation about theological vocation, including mentors and mentoring, identity of the theologian, and the scholar’s relation to Christian tradition.

Learning Abstract :
Project sought to explore issues that face women who are dedicated to a life of faith within the Christian church yet who also work within an academic theological context. The conversation would be developed through a three-day conference. They hope to generate a vocabulary to make such discussions easier, as well as to discover and share resources for the integration of voice and vocation.
From the conference, the group discovered several "middles ways" that they need to negotiate. One involved the role of their personal spiritual lives in relation to their academic professional lives, particularly represented in the religious studies discourse. Another negotiated middle involved radical and conservative ideologies in regards to feminist sensibilities. Other issues involved generational distinctions, social location, and secular contexts.
Grants cover image

The Formation of Theological Educators: One School’s Reflections

Awarded Grant
Martin, Robert
Yale University
Colleges/Universities
1997
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Planning grant for collaborative project to produce a book on the vocation and practical methods of theological teachers.
Proposal abstract :
Planning grant for collaborative project to produce a book on the vocation and practical methods of theological teachers.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to expand the current literature on ‘Theological teaching" through the writing of a book entitled, The Formation of the Theological Educator. The book would focus on two concerns: the nature of the educative vocation in a theological school and the various contexts within which faculty find themselves working as "theological teachers." They hoped to combine narratives of common everyday experiences of teaching with more general reflections on the teaching vocation. The work would be intended as a tool for all teachers of religion in general, but especially for junior level faculty.
The project leaders felt that the reflective process that the grant supported generated "an inventive and substantive conceptual framework" for the book. They found that the book could advance the contemporary debate on theological education by suggesting an original framework by which to construe theological education.