Theological School

Grants - Type: Theological School - 316 results

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Developing a Shared Vision of Teaching & Learning in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Anderson, Ron
Christian Theological Seminary
Theological School
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support sustained faculty conversation on teaching and learning that develops a shared understanding of vocation as teachers and that nurtures collegial communal reflection on practices as theological educators.
Proposal abstract :
Support sustained faculty conversation on teaching and learning that develops a shared understanding of vocation as teachers and that nurtures collegial communal reflection on practices as theological educators.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to sponsor a sustained conversation within the faculty on teaching and learning that would develop a shared understanding of their vocation as teachers, and reflection upon their teaching practices.
The faculty found the conversation quite challenging in that they discovered the many ways that they were unable to articulate a consensus about the character of the community and its affect on teaching and learning.
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Teologia en Conjunto: Hispanic Perspectives in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Sellers, Diana|Barton, Paul
Seminary of the Southwest
Theological School
2000
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Support to develop a program designed to train seminary faculty in Hispanic perspectives by directly working with Hispanic theologians to foster culturally inclusive courses for the M. Div. curriculum.
Proposal abstract :
Support to develop a program designed to train seminary faculty in Hispanic perspectives by directly working with Hispanic theologians to foster culturally inclusive courses for the M. Div. curriculum.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to provide support for seminary faculty in their efforts to include Hispanic perspectives and issues in the design and implementation of their courses. They hoped to increase faculty awareness of the experiences and worldviews of Latino/Latinas; to increase the library's Hispanic texts and resources; to increase their social justice awareness of the church's mission; to graduate competent multi-cultural ministers; and to establish ongoing relationships between seminary faculty and Hispanic scholars in each discipline.
The project director reports that significant learning included the following: awareness that cultural differences generate serious discomfort at times between scholars; doing theology in community challenges traditional approaches to theological education; doing theological education in community requires an interdisciplinary approach; theological education curricula need to highlight the cultural dimensions of theology and ministry; multiculturalism in theological education is an expensive concept, and finally, a multicultural curriculum entails political implications.
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Teaching Theological Bibliography in the Internet Age: Comparative Approaches in Three Theological Libraries

Awarded Grant
Lincoln, Timothy
Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological School
2000
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
To study user training practices that librarians use to teach theological bibliography in the libraries of Brite Divinity, Epis. Theo. Sem. of the SW, and Univ. of St. Thomas Grad. Sch of Theo.
Proposal abstract :
To study user training practices that librarians use to teach theological bibliography in the libraries of Brite Divinity, Epis. Theo. Sem. of the SW, and Univ. of St. Thomas Grad. Sch of Theo.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funding for research to study user training practices in the libraries of three ATS schools in Texas. Using quantitative methods, the project sought "to identify commonalities in practice with a view toward improving user training."
The project director's first goal was to let each library articulate its own contextual reality, and then secondly to seek comparisons in the sites. Two significant themes emerged from the data: the relationship between formal evaluation and satisfaction, and the effectiveness of mandatory training.
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Ethnicity and Pedagogy in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Priest, Robert|Tienou, Tite
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological School
2000
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Faculty interested in the implications of ethnicity/race for theo. ed. and for ministry in congregational settings will meet 15 times for lunch/discussion and have guest speakers to address these issue.
Proposal abstract :
Faculty interested in the implications of ethnicity/race for theo. ed. and for ministry in congregational settings will meet 15 times for lunch/discussion and have guest speakers to address these issue.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather faculty weekly over lunch on the topic of the implications of ethnicity/race for theological education and for ministry in congregational settings.
Their gatherings were successful in forging and strengthening the relationships among the faculty. A rich conversation on ethnicity and theological education was carried out. Faculty felt the lunches were safe spaces to explore difficult issues that were seldom, if ever, discussed in a larger faculty setting. A result of these meetings was the commitment of the group to engage in a joint writing project focusing on ethnicity and race as a way of bringing the conversation more to the center of institutional life at the school.
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Learning With/In Communities: A Workshop on Experiential Learning

Awarded Grant
Bounds, Elizabeth|Pippin, Tina|Patterson, Barbara|Snarr, Melissa
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological School
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
1/2 day pre-conference (AAR/SBL) workshop to discuss classroom integration of experiential and academic knowledge and practices by utilizing the resources of the Peabody School at Vanderbilt Univ. and a team from Belmont Univ. The participants will evaluate the impact of experiential learning by publishing their findings and a bibliography and by creating a Listserv and/or Website.
Proposal abstract :
1/2 day pre-conference (AAR/SBL) workshop to discuss classroom integration of experiential and academic knowledge and practices by utilizing the resources of the Peabody School at Vanderbilt Univ. and a team from Belmont Univ. The participants will evaluate the impact of experiential learning by publishing their findings and a bibliography and by creating a Listserv and/or Website.

Learning Abstract :
The grant sought funding for a pre-conference meeting before the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion on the topic of experiential learning and service learning. They hoped to solidify a network of academics in religion and theology involved in community-based, experiential or service learning teaching. They also hoped to explore further issues related to the integration of experiential and academic knowledge in the classroom.
One part of the workshop focused on evaluation of service learning, led by Dwight Giles, professor at the Peabody School at Vanderbilt University. Another topic considered the nature of community partnerships. One key insight from this session was a discussion on understanding that community-based learning is demanding and not for all teachers. It is important that the teacher do the work along with the student. Finally, a faculty-librarian partnership discussed their work with students in a school that serves a poor neighborhood. As a result of the workshop further work in service learning was planned for the next AAR annual meeting.
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Remodeling our Teaching: A New Model for a New Curriculum

Awarded Grant
Fraser, Elouise|DiRaddo, Colleen
Palmer Theological Seminary - Eastern Univ
Theological School
2000
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
A three year project to do intensive theological, philosophical and practical work on a pedagogy that will undergird and guide their incorporation of technology into teaching and learning at the seminary. This project involves new themes, areas of study, and assessment tools for a new competency-based curriculum.
Proposal abstract :
A three year project to do intensive theological, philosophical and practical work on a pedagogy that will undergird and guide their incorporation of technology into teaching and learning at the seminary. This project involves new themes, areas of study, and assessment tools for a new competency-based curriculum.

Learning Abstract :
From this grant we have learned the following principles. There must be commitment to the curriculum vision at the top level of administration followed by support of faculty to facilitate learning to teach in a new way. Even with these present, change occurs slower than anticipated. Changing the way one thinks about teaching from what has been experienced in theological education requires support, time and a willingness to see small incremental change. Faculty learn from each other by having regular scheduled opportunities to talk together about teaching. Thus individual work with one faculty member is multiplied by scheduling "Faculty Show & Tells" - sharing what has and has not worked and problem solving together. Finally, each time a new faculty member joins the community is an opportunity to intentionally orient and train someone in the Seminary's way of designing and teaching courses for an integrated curriculum that informs what is taught.
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Learning to Integrate Theory & Practice: A Faculty Seminar on Interdisciplinary and Contextual Pedagogy

Awarded Grant
Cummings, George
American Baptist Seminary of the West
Theological School
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Designing Courses   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Faculty will meet at monthly seminars to support and develop courses for the new curriculum proposed for 2001. At the center of the new design is a commitment to the integration of theory and practice to develop spiritual leaders for the changing churches of the new century.
Proposal abstract :
Faculty will meet at monthly seminars to support and develop courses for the new curriculum proposed for 2001. At the center of the new design is a commitment to the integration of theory and practice to develop spiritual leaders for the changing churches of the new century.

Learning Abstract :
The funds from the Wabash grant enabled us to develop and implement our seminar on interdisciplinary and contextual pedagogy. By all measures the project has been successful. We have met the first three goals of the project: 1) To engage faculty in a collegial process of new course design for implementation of a new M.Div. curriculum; 2) To improve the teaching competency of the faculty focused particularly on contextualization and interdisciplinary teaching; 3) To facilitate faculty integration of theory and practice in the design and teaching of core courses in the ABSW M.Div. curriculum. We are continuing to work on the implementation of the remaining three goals which focus on evaluation and training. We are making good progress on the following: 1) To develop an evaluation process for monitoring faculty growth in teaching and course design; 2) To develop an evaluation process for newly designed contextual and interdisciplinary courses; 3) To institutionalize teacher training into the life of the ABSW faculty.
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Special Meeting on the Development of Children's Ministry Leadership

Awarded Grant
Cannell, Linda
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological School
2001
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Four faculty from graduate schools will meet to develop materials and guidelines for the preparation of leaders of children's ministry in congregations.
Proposal abstract :
Four faculty from graduate schools will meet to develop materials and guidelines for the preparation of leaders of children's ministry in congregations.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a special meeting of four faculty members from four different graduate schools who have invested in the development of children's ministry leadership. The project had three goals: to discuss the nature of resources that are needed to inform seminaries and graduate schools about the development of academic programs for church ministry leaders; to create a working plan for a book on children's ministry in congregations; to create a preliminary outline of criteria and describe a model that can be used in the design of learning and worship experiences for children.
The book developed through the project had a working title: Being the People of God: Only When Children Are Present. The book intends to engage the topics of the principles of children's ministry, historical themes and perspectives, understanding community and cultural context, and implications for leadership and ministry development. They conceptualized a consortium of schools concerned with children's ministry development among 14-15 seminaries and graduate schools interested in developing children's ministry leaders.
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Rural Ministry Education: A Conference for Seminary Teachers

Awarded Grant
Waldkoenig, Gilson|Goreham, Gary
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
Theological School
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
A conference in which individuals who are currently teaching rural ministry courses in accredited seminary programs can compare teaching and learning methods and resources.
Proposal abstract :
A conference in which individuals who are currently teaching rural ministry courses in accredited seminary programs can compare teaching and learning methods and resources.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather together seminary professors who teach in the area of rural ministry. For the purpose of comparing teaching and learning methods and resources, and to work together on significant teaching and learning issues common to rural ministry education.
The Rural Ministry Education Conference was held over six days at a retreat center in rural Minnesota, with 19 in attendance. One learning of the conference was recognition of the high level of creativity and qualification among the professors in this specialization. Other learning acknowledged the marginality of this specialization within theological education. This is significant due to the contradictory reality that the majority of seminarians come from suburban churches, yet the majority of first calls are to rural and small town churches. The conference helped to create a network of practitioners in this area for sharing resources and for collaborating.
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The All Seminaries’ Faculties Conference of the Episcopal Church on Theological Teaching

Awarded Grant
Lemler, James
Bexley Hall Seabury - Western Theological Seminary
Theological School
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Two-day meeting of faculty from the eleven seminaries of the Episcopal Church to focus on theological pedagogy and the vocation of seminary educators. Leader of the event will be Parker Palmer.
Proposal abstract :
Two-day meeting of faculty from the eleven seminaries of the Episcopal Church to focus on theological pedagogy and the vocation of seminary educators. Leader of the event will be Parker Palmer.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather together members of the faculties of all the seminaries of the Episcopal Church for a conference on issues of pedagogy and vocation fro teachers in theological seminaries. They hoped to begin a conversation about issues of teaching and vocation among Episcopal seminary teachers, which would then be continued in the individual seminaries. They also hoped to build collegiality, solidarity, collaboration and cooperation among Episcopal educators and seminaries.
Virtually the entire faculties of the 11 Episcopal seminaries attended for a total of 110 participants. The conference was led by Parker Palmer. The final report indicates, "The agenda was intensive, and the focus clear. In the evaluations, many participants noted that the conference exceeded our original expectations and was the occasion of the highest quality for learning about these issues." Participants expressed a deeper sense of their vocation as teachers as a result of the conference. Individual seminaries report ongoing conversation as a result of the conference.
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Integration Working Group Meeting in Chicago

Awarded Grant
Anderson, Herbert
Catholic Theological Union of Chicago
Theological School
2001
Topics: Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
A meeting to explore various models for and theologies of the integration of theory and practice in the preparation of ministers.
Proposal abstract :
A meeting to explore various models for and theologies of the integration of theory and practice in the preparation of ministers.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather the members of a working group from the Wabash Consultation on Teaching and the Practices of Ministry. The topic of the group was Integration as an element of ministry formation. They looked to use the gathering to prepare their presentation at the final Consultation meeting.
The group reported a conversation "sustained at a spiritual level from beginning to end." Results included the following: 1) a framework was developed for presenting their reflections on integration for the final Consultation; 2) deciding to participate in a study of Lutheran theological education; 3) a commitment to developing a publication on the theme of integration in theological education.
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Making the Grade: Enhancing Learning through Evaluation

Awarded Grant
Holeman, Toddy (Virginia) |Green, Joel
Asbury Theological Seminary
Theological School
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
A session each semester and a 3-day workshop on using formative and summative evaluation of students as a way to enhance teaching through ongoing critical reflection. Methods will include Classroom Assessment Techniques, Bloom’s Mastery for Learning, and individual and group critical reflection on teaching.
Proposal abstract :
A session each semester and a 3-day workshop on using formative and summative evaluation of students as a way to enhance teaching through ongoing critical reflection. Methods will include Classroom Assessment Techniques, Bloom’s Mastery for Learning, and individual and group critical reflection on teaching.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to employ aspects of mastery learning to prepare faculty to use formative and summative evaluation as a way to improve teaching and ultimately enhance student learning. They hoped to help faculty learn to differentiate between formative and summative evaluation, as well as to learn to use it positively and effectively in their teaching.
The project consisted of a Readiness Phase, which included two guest presentations to the faculty related to teaching, evaluation and classroom assessment techniques. In the second phase, a Mastery Learning Institute was held, led by a nationally known leader in the topic. The participants worked these new techniques into their classes over the following semester and were evaluated by the workshop consultant. Participants reported that they found ways to customize the usage of the techniques in ways that enhanced their teaching effectiveness.
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Consultation on Baptist Vocations and Identity in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Oliver, Dianne|Leonard, Bill
Wake Forest University Divinity School
Theological School
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Fifteen leaders from the various Baptist traditions will hold two five-day consultations around issues of Baptist identity and the vocation of the theological teacher within theological education.
Proposal abstract :
Fifteen leaders from the various Baptist traditions will hold two five-day consultations around issues of Baptist identity and the vocation of the theological teacher within theological education.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather a group of Baptist theological educators around issues of Baptist identity and the vocation of the theological teacher within theological education. It worked to facilitate dialogue among Baptist scholars regarding their vocation and identity amid transitions in denominational and congregational life, to discuss ways of teaching Baptist heritage and identity to theological students who do not know or appreciate that heritage, and to develop networks for connecting new theological centers of Baptist studies and identity. The second phase of the project expanded to include educators at Baptist undergraduate institutions. The group was able to highlight distinctly Baptist approaches to education and vocation and to publish learnings in these areas in various venues. Creating important relationships and networks among teachers over how teaching and curricula are dealt with in the sometimes difficult climate of current Baptist education was one of the most important outcomes.
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Two-day meeting on Interdisciplinarity

Awarded Grant
Holeman, Toddy (Virginia) |Green, Joel
Asbury Theological Seminary
Theological School
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Two-day meeting of faculty to focus on methods for co-teaching interdisciplinary courses.
Proposal abstract :
Two-day meeting of faculty to focus on methods for co-teaching interdisciplinary courses.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funding for a day-long faculty workshop for those involved in teaching two new interdisciplinary core courses for the seminary. The purpose of the meeting was to enable faculty to think in a disciplinary way, so that they can teach in an interdisciplinary fashion and model "interdisciplinarity" for their students. It was hoped that this would help students to embrace interdisciplinarity as an organizing principle of their seminary and ongoing education.
Participant evaluations confirmed that the workshop successfully helped faculty understand a range of new models of interdisciplinarity. In addition, faculty were able to clearly differentiate between "co-teaching and serial teaching." The one-day format allowed for faculty discussion on the creation of a new course module reflecting interdisciplinarity from two core Integrative Studies courses. While this was helpful, participants requested more concrete modeling of such a module in future gatherings. Overall, they felt the Wabash grant provided an important start in the development of their understanding of interdisciplinarity.
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Teaching “Race and Ethnic Relations” in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Priest, Robert|Tienou, Tite|Fernandez, Enrique
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological School
2001
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
A year-long program of interdisciplinary, inter-ethnic seminars, a two-day workshop, team teaching, and a national meeting on teaching race and ethnic relations.
Proposal abstract :
A year-long program of interdisciplinary, inter-ethnic seminars, a two-day workshop, team teaching, and a national meeting on teaching race and ethnic relations.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds for an interdisciplinary and inter-ethnic network of scholars with shared interests in ethnicity and race in relation to theological studies, classroom pedagogy and congregational life. Activities included: faculty seminars on race and ethnicity; a workshop with a guest lecturer on the topic of reconciliation; a required, team-taught course on race and ethnic relations; a gathering of scholars who teach courses in seminary on race and ethnic relations; and a faculty retreat on the topic of culture, race and ethnicity in theological education. Wabash funds were part of larger funding received.
Project directors report the following learning: the importance of "sustained vision and intentionality" among parties; the importance of strategic partnerships across race in "co-constructing conversational initiatives"; the importance of creating safe spaces with empathetic and critical listening; a commitment of all parties to being "learners together"; the importance of a shared vocational and theological core to pull together the diversity of the group: the value of external sources of funding to bring visibility and respect for the project; "the value of keeping one's own faculty at the center of every initiative, empowering and treating them as professionals"; the value of networking with and including external scholars; the value of networking with and dialoguing with denominational and church leaders who have experience of diversity in congregational settings.
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Chicago Forum on Pedagogy and the Study of Religion

Awarded Grant
Pick, Lucy
University of Chicago Divinity School
Theological School
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
A three year forum of plenary talks, panel discussions and graduate student workshops on issues surrounding the teaching of the academic subject of religion to undergraduates in a liberal arts environment.
Proposal abstract :
A three year forum of plenary talks, panel discussions and graduate student workshops on issues surrounding the teaching of the academic subject of religion to undergraduates in a liberal arts environment.

Learning Abstract :
The project was designed as a three-year forum of plenary talks (Wabash Center lectures), conferences, and graduate student workshops on issues surrounding the teaching of the academic subject of religion to undergraduates in a liberal arts environment. Each year a theme was identified in order to prompt extended discussion in the forum and promote ongoing conversation about specific topics. Two goals were identified as primary aims for the forum. The first was to start a discussion within the University of Chicago community about specific challenges and opportunities associated with teaching undergraduate students about religion. The second goal involved providing a locus for graduate students to consider questions highlighted during the forums in an "inspiring, practical, and meaningful way."

Through the grant, participants were able to reflect on and practice different design methods and models for teaching and learning. Topics and issues included: teaching and diversity, portfolio development, comparative methods and teaching religion, teaching an introductory course in religious studies, self as teacher, student religious experience in the classroom, etc. The series of forums, conferences, workshops, and meetings aided fellows involved with the Forum to develop skills as critically reflective teachers. Graduate students regarded the experience of involvement as highly beneficial. In addition, a number of additional outcomes have emerged from the grant – formation of a discussion panel on pedagogy at the 2004 Midwest AAR meeting, publication of a special issue of Criterion http://marty-center.uchicago.edu/fellows/chicagoforum.shtml, and an ongoing student developed workshop on pedagogy.
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Attendance at Anti-Racism Training the Trainers Seminars

Awarded Grant
Ramsay, Nancy
Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological School
2001
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Attendance at three anti-racism programs to observe and compare evolving methods for their application to seminary education.
Proposal abstract :
Attendance at three anti-racism programs to observe and compare evolving methods for their application to seminary education.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to extend an inadequately budgeted item in a prior grant (WC 2000 008), a study leave grant concerning anti-racism research, including training sessions, in relation to teaching and learning in theological education. Training sessions for the grant period included The National Coalition Building Institute (NCBI), the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and personal consultations with an anti-racism training specialist.
Attending the workshops and engaging the consultant helped her to complete her research goals of directly observing current approaches and doing comparative analysis of each in order to develop proposals for seminary based experiences.
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Mining the Motherlode: Teaching and Learning African American Religious Life

Awarded Grant
McNary-Zak, Bernadette|Aponte, Edwin
Perkins School of Theology Southern Methodist University
Theological School
2001
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for three meetings of seventeen faculty to develop and distribute materials that explore methods for teaching about African American religious traditions.
Proposal abstract :
Support for three meetings of seventeen faculty to develop and distribute materials that explore methods for teaching about African American religious traditions.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather a group to develop and distribute materials that explore methods of teaching and learning about African American religious traditions. They hoped to discuss issues related to teaching and learning, and to examine innovative ways to engage African American students, in particular, and all students, in general, in the study of African American religious traditions. The result of their gathering and work together would be a book on the topic. The group members were all participants of the 1999-2000 AAR Teaching and Learning Workshop, "Mining the Mother Load of African American Religious Life."
The project directors report that the group met three times between November, 2001 and October, 2002. The manuscript was written through a collaborative process of dialogue and engagement which the formal gatherings made possible. The completed work was accepted for publication at Oxford University Press.
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Faculty Development for Teaching and Learning in Drew’s Culturally Diverse Community

Awarded Grant
Westfield, Nancy
Drew Theological School
Theological School
2001
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Two weekend faculty retreats that will enhance teaching theory and skills specifically for a racially/culturally diverse seminary population.
Proposal abstract :
Two weekend faculty retreats that will enhance teaching theory and skills specifically for a racially/culturally diverse seminary population.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to engage the theological faculty in two retreats to enhance their teaching theory and skills specifically for their racially/culturally diverse seminary population. They hoped to be able to become more aware of and responsive to the complexity of their current and future student body and their diverse learning style needs due to their cultural and racial diversity. In addition, they hoped to reflect deeply on their teaching practices in such a diverse context.
The project director reports that the project goals were met. The faculty expressed appreciation of the uninterrupted time in consultation together. They also felt that the consultant proved to be "invaluable" to the process of learning. They report that their conversation raised their level of awareness and demonstrated to them the complexity of teaching in diversity. One outcome of the retreats was the creation of a "peer development system," a voluntary system of pairing faculty peers together for ongoing conversation and mentoring on issues of teaching and learning, as well as classroom visitations with constructive feedback.
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Developing Androgogy for Minority Instruction at Majority Institutions

Awarded Grant
Gray, Richard|Pannell, William
Asbury Theological Seminary
Theological School
2001
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Funding for two symposiums for African-American faculty to explore androgogy from the perspective of black faculty who teach majority students and/or teach courses from a minority perspective in majority institutions.
Proposal abstract :
Funding for two symposiums for African-American faculty to explore androgogy from the perspective of black faculty who teach majority students and/or teach courses from a minority perspective in majority institutions.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather together African American professors of the Christian College Coalition Graduate Fellows program to address their experiences and frustrations as minority faculty, with the goal of developing positive responses to their location in majority white institutions. Participants hoped to develop andragogy from the perspective of black faculty who teach majority students from a minority perspective within these institutions.
Participants report that the symposium successfully gathered together African American instructor of Christian Colleges. In their meetings they were able to share insights and techniques they had gained which made it easier to survive their minority status in their respective institutions.
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Pearls and Treasure: Pearls of Wisdom; Stewardship of Treasure

Awarded Grant
Easter, Opal
Catholic Theological Union of Chicago
Theological School
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Pilot program to prepare students for the administrative dimensions of effective pastoral leadership, including presentations by pastors and professionals from the community; create an implementation handbook for other seminaries.
Proposal abstract :
Pilot program to prepare students for the administrative dimensions of effective pastoral leadership, including presentations by pastors and professionals from the community; create an implementation handbook for other seminaries.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to develop a program to train students in church administration for Christian ministry. A series of six workshops in the area of styles of leadership, a formulation and evaluation of budgets, financial reporting, public relations, fundraising, conflict resolution and personnel management. They hoped to develop the program as a model for school in the Association of Chicago Theological Schools.
The program name changed to "Pearls and Treasures: Pearls of Wisdom, Stewardship of Treasure" in order to communicate to students the need to gain wisdom about the stewardship aspect of a call to ministry. They saw as key component of the program the enlisting of professionals from the corporate community, experienced pastors in the field, and other outside experts. This helped the educational experience to become a partnership, "mutually benefiting the student through interaction with experienced professionals, and helping experienced professionals develop confidence in the next generation of pastoral leaders who can work with them in a collaborative manner."
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Embedding Dialogue as a Learning Outcome in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Markham, Ian
Hartford Seminary
Theological School
2002
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Educating the faculty through a conference and two consultants on the pedagogical issues of authentic dialogical engagement and reviewing/assessing the curriculum for its adherence to the ‘interfaith‘(Muslim/Christian) dialogue concept.
Proposal abstract :
Educating the faculty through a conference and two consultants on the pedagogical issues of authentic dialogical engagement and reviewing/assessing the curriculum for its adherence to the ‘interfaith‘(Muslim/Christian) dialogue concept.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to reflect on the theory and practice of dialogue, within the context of inter-religious experience, with a goal of embedding this pedagogical process into the curriculum. Through a conference of seminary representatives who are most involved in diversity and dialogue, along with a faculty retreat, they hoped to ensure that a broad understanding of dialogue would become an integral part of all their degree programs.
Organizers confirm that the grant "facilitated a key and defining theme for the Seminary." Activities included a conference of nineteen professors, all engaged in teaching inter-religious dialogue, a retreat with faculty facilitated by outside consultants, and a conference on the topic of "teaching dialogue" between Muslims and Christians. As a result of these efforts, the Mission and Values statements of the Seminary had explicit reference to the goal of dialogue, a new core course on dialogue became part of their revised MA program, and an issue of Muslim World was developed on the theme of Christian-Muslim dialogue.
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Assessment of the Revised Master of Divinity Degree Program

Awarded Grant
Sachs, John |Kane, Thomas
Weston Jesuit School of Theology
Theological School
2002
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Following a major curriculum revision, Weston is interested in assessing and evaluating the effectiveness of the teaching, learning and formation in the three years of the new M.Div. program.
Proposal abstract :
Following a major curriculum revision, Weston is interested in assessing and evaluating the effectiveness of the teaching, learning and formation in the three years of the new M.Div. program.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to assess student learning that occurred as a result of their new M.Div. curriculum. They sought to contract with Interaction Associates (an internationally known consulting firm, who helped them develop and implement the revised M.Div. program) to plan and execute a process of evaluation and development.
The project directors report that the chief issues and concerns that were raised of the teaching and learning in the new curriculum focused on several new areas: the first year Ministry and Vocation seminars, the second year Theological Synthesis course, the third year Integrative seminar, the overall flexibility of the program, and the needs of the students preparing for either lay or ordained ministry. As a result of the study, several recommendations were made: eliminate the Ministry and Vocation seminar, reduce the Theological Synthesis course to less credit hours, continue the Integrative Seminar with the inclusion of case study work and a final evaluation by the whole faculty, increase electives, and decrease departmental requirements.
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An Exploration of Communicative Language Learning for Seminary Training in Biblical Hebrew

Awarded Grant
Overland, Paul
Ashland Theological Seminary
Theological School
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Project to increase retention of Hebrew literacy skills by taking advantage of discoveries in the field of Second Language Acquisition in order to develop communicative competence among students, establish an immersion environment of instruction, and facilitate retention by instructional songs and tutorial CD.
Proposal abstract :
Project to increase retention of Hebrew literacy skills by taking advantage of discoveries in the field of Second Language Acquisition in order to develop communicative competence among students, establish an immersion environment of instruction, and facilitate retention by instructional songs and tutorial CD.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to explore theories of communicative learning in the area of Second Language Acquisition, with the aim of enhancing literacy in Biblical Hebrew. Goals for the project included developing communicative competence among students, establishing an emersion environment of instruction, facilitating retention through instructional song, targeting relaxation as a conscious goal, and learning via Total Physical Response.

The project director reports that from his course work using these methods, ancient language acquisition students using communicative methods may achieve linguistic skills equivalent to those achieved in a non-communicative classroom. Learning needs of more students are better met via a communicative classroom than a traditional classroom. A student's ability to carry a language course to its completion may be enhanced by use of communicative instruction. Finally, he discovered that interactive computer tutorials find eager reception among students, especially when combined with instructional song.
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Analytikon: A Web Based New Testament Greek Grammar Review Tool

Awarded Grant
McDonough, Sean|Keazirian, Edward
Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, MA
Theological School
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Development of a free access Web site where users with prior knowledge of basic New Testament Greek could review basic grammar and vocabulary, and also refresh their skills in parsing, translating, and grammatical analysis through drilling, self-assessment, and remedial instruction.
Proposal abstract :
Development of a free access Web site where users with prior knowledge of basic New Testament Greek could review basic grammar and vocabulary, and also refresh their skills in parsing, translating, and grammatical analysis through drilling, self-assessment, and remedial instruction.

Learning Abstract :
Analytikon is a free-access website where users with prior knowledge of basic New Testament Greek can review basic grammar and vocabulary, and also refresh their skills in parsing, translation, and grammatical analysis through drilling, self-assessment, and remedial instruction. Students from all over the world can now make use of a professionally designed, interactive web tool that takes them step by step through the essentials of New Testament Greek. The site should be especially attractive to instructors of Greek at the undergraduate and graduate level, who can direct their students to an easy-to-use, no cost site where the lessons from the classroom can be reinforced by structured exercises. At a time when many schools are considering whether teaching Greek, while theoretically desirable, may be impractical, Analytikon demonstrates that modern technological tools can help make learning ancient languages a manageable and fulfilling task. http://www.analytikon.org/
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Learning Communities: Pedagogies for Congregational Change

Awarded Grant
Nieman, James
Wartburg Theological Seminary
Theological School
2002
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this project is to assess and recommend pedagogical approaches for use in congregational studies that can effectively assist the move from congregational analysis and assessment to critical engagement, creative reform, and genuine change.
Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this project is to assess and recommend pedagogical approaches for use in congregational studies that can effectively assist the move from congregational analysis and assessment to critical engagement, creative reform, and genuine change.

Learning Abstract :
When congregations enter into intentional theological self-appraisal, they can still feel unclear how to turn these insights toward genuine reform. There are, however, vast resources in the literature of transformative community pedagogy (community organizing, critical pedagogy, reflective practitioners, adult education, and leadership development) for learning how to face and enact change. These resources can be effectively employed in congregations provided that key leaders have themselves participated in training events that model these approaches and how to introduce them to others in a broadly-owned process. At the same time, such leaders should be aware that these methods adopt views of confrontation, politics, responsibility, and change that may seem at odds with congregations theologically committed to conflict avoidance or social stability. Since such characterization of these pedagogies is inaccurate, leaders must clarify that these methods share with Christianity a commitment to mutuality in ministry and the gift of abundant life for all.
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Northeast Colloquium on Teaching Theology

Awarded Grant
Kelsey, David
Yale Divinity School
Theological School
2002
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Gather faculty and doctoral students in theology to discuss a cluster of practical and theoretical issues related to the teaching of theology in academic contexts, issues which are often not adequately addressed by formal academic training.
Proposal abstract :
Gather faculty and doctoral students in theology to discuss a cluster of practical and theoretical issues related to the teaching of theology in academic contexts, issues which are often not adequately addressed by formal academic training.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather faculty and doctoral students in theology to discuss practical and theoretical issues related to the teaching of theology in academic contexts. The goal was to help prepare graduate students to be teachers through facilitating conversations about the teaching of theology in various types of academic institutions.
A total of four schools participated in the colloquium: Harvard University, Princeton Theological Seminary, Union Theological Seminary, and Yale University. The group met four times, once at each academic institution. They felt that despite all of the differences they had between all of the institutions, they were able to engage in a "shared intellectual enterprise" of "training and being trained to teach theology." The diversity of their group made them aware of "the variety of decisions, commitments, and assumptions that form and orient one's guiding vision and concrete practices of teaching theology."
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Survey of Academic Support Services in Theological Schools in the United States and Canada

Awarded Grant
Reistroffer, Dianne|Mapes, Kathryn
Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological School
2002
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project will survey seminaries in the US and Canada regarding academic support services in their respective institutions in order to evaluate and disseminate information about the teaching/learning programs which faculty and administrators need as they seek to provide readiness and remedial education for students in theological schools.
Proposal abstract :
This project will survey seminaries in the US and Canada regarding academic support services in their respective institutions in order to evaluate and disseminate information about the teaching/learning programs which faculty and administrators need as they seek to provide readiness and remedial education for students in theological schools.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to survey seminaries in the US and Canada regarding academic support services in their institutions. The principle goal of the project was to gather information about academic support services and the teaching and learning strategies used to assist students in need of readiness and remedial support in seminaries. They hoped the research would provide a resource for developing academic support programs in theological education, as well as providing a faculty resource for course development and instruction.
The project director reports that 15 Canadian graduate theological institutions and 103 U.S. seminaries participated in the survey. The survey found that "while wishful thinking abounds, productive planning and implementation of comprehensive academic support programs range, except in a few notable exceptions, from meager to non-existent in most of the ATS schools."
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Constructing a Theological Vocation Across the Religious/Secular Divide

Awarded Grant
Priest, Robert
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological School
2002
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Ethnographic interviews with Christian anthropologists working in seminary settings in order to develop a broader understanding of how they construct their vocation as theological educators and examining how this relates to broader questions of vocation in academic settings.
Proposal abstract :
Ethnographic interviews with Christian anthropologists working in seminary settings in order to develop a broader understanding of how they construct their vocation as theological educators and examining how this relates to broader questions of vocation in academic settings.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to interview Christian anthropologists who teach, or who have formally taught in theological seminaries. This work was part of research by the grantee related to a larger project of the "Wabash Center Consultation on Vocation: A Career in Theological Scholarship."
The project director was able to conduct 20 interviews during the time of the grant. He reports that the grant funds supported a "significant block of research," helped to redirect his interviewing more toward the topic of vocation, and clarify the importance of seminary "as a crucial social location" in which Christians struggle to integrate various forms of knowledge."
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Curriculum and Teaching

Awarded Grant
Seymour, Jack
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
Theological School
2002
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The intent of the project is to connect curriculum to teaching practices through examination and analysis of selected seminary mission statements in relation to curriculum design and teaching practices.
Proposal abstract :
The intent of the project is to connect curriculum to teaching practices through examination and analysis of selected seminary mission statements in relation to curriculum design and teaching practices.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to examine the interface between seminary mission statements, curricula and its implications for teaching in theological school curricula. This would be accomplished through interviews at selected seminaries.
The project director reports that the grant provided the opportunity to visit face-to-face with 25 persons at 12 seminaries, and by phone with another 5 persons at 5 additional seminaries. He consulted deans, assessment officers, faculty members and researchers in theological education. In his work he discovered that "a culture of learning and teaching within the institution can be fueled by curricular conversation itself, or by faculty development efforts where the content and methods of courses are shared and clarifications made about how these courses fit into a whole pattern."
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Using Technology to Teach Byzantine Sacred Chant

Awarded Grant
Marangos, Frank
Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Sch of Theology
Theological School
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of an interactive Web Site and accompanying CD-Rom of Greek Orthodox liturgical hymns for the purpose of helping theological students preparing for ordination to the priesthood learn the theological content and musical notation of Byzantine sacred music.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of an interactive Web Site and accompanying CD-Rom of Greek Orthodox liturgical hymns for the purpose of helping theological students preparing for ordination to the priesthood learn the theological content and musical notation of Byzantine sacred music.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to support theological students preparing for ordination to the priesthood learn the theological content and musical notation of Byzantine Sacred Music through developing an interactive web site and accompanying CD-ROM of Greek Orthodox liturgical hymns.
The site was developed and can be found at http://chant.hchc.edu# . The program includes 21 Byzantine hymns representing the major feast days of the Orthodox Church. Hymns can be heard in both English and Greek and are sung by both men and women. The site also allows for viewing the words to the hymns and both Western and Byzantine notation for the hymn. The project director reports, "perhaps most significantly, the marriage of the latest presentation technology with centuries-old tradition resulted in serious challenges. Among these were disagreements over the interpretation and usage of the Byzantine notation itself, as well as its conversion into Western notation and interpretation."
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Teaching Public Leadership

Awarded Grant
Watkins, James|Newman, Harvey
Columbia Theological Seminary
Theological School
2002
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for consultations to increase the capacity of PC (USA) related theological schools and their professors to teach public leadership, to foster the creation of a cadre of faculty members in each seminary that are able to teach public leadership, and to foster the development of clergy and clergy-in-training to be public and ministerial leaders. The grant also supports the investigation of how best to learn and teach public leadership.
Proposal abstract :
Support for consultations to increase the capacity of PC (USA) related theological schools and their professors to teach public leadership, to foster the creation of a cadre of faculty members in each seminary that are able to teach public leadership, and to foster the development of clergy and clergy-in-training to be public and ministerial leaders. The grant also supports the investigation of how best to learn and teach public leadership.

Learning Abstract :
The series of Consultations on Teaching Public Leadership held by participating seminaries of the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. defined the meaning of the term public leadership-one of the stated goals of the Association of Theological Schools for the Master of Divinity degree. The Consultations developed measurable learning outcomes for M.Div. programs to equip theological students to become public leaders of congregations and agencies. New courses were developed and others revised that include the cultivation of public leadership skills as an important part of their learning objectives. An audit of best practices used by the participating seminaries to teach public leadership indicated an array of courses that address this issue throughout the curriculum of the institutions, but it also exposed a lack of recognition by many faculty of the importance of teaching public leadership as part of the mission of the schools.
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A Jointly-sponsored Symposium at Regent College - “The Bible and the Nations”

Awarded Grant
Smith, Gordon
Regent College
Theological School
2002
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Jointly-sponsored symposium held at Regent College to further understand how Scriptures are translated, read, interpreted, and taught differently across cultures and to foster dialogue between faculty in evangelical schools, third world theologians, Bible translators, and mission leaders engaged in teaching ministries.
Proposal abstract :
Jointly-sponsored symposium held at Regent College to further understand how Scriptures are translated, read, interpreted, and taught differently across cultures and to foster dialogue between faculty in evangelical schools, third world theologians, Bible translators, and mission leaders engaged in teaching ministries.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather international scholars for a symposium on how scriptures are translated, read and taught in different ways across cultures. They hoped to highlight the role of scriptures in Christian mission. They also hoped to develop a conversation between their faculty and mission leaders and theologians from around the world.
The project director reports two important learnings. First, they discovered a critical need to include World Religions training in their curriculum, and attention to this reality in ministry formation. Second, they discovered the need for intentional dialogue between scholars of developed countries and those of the developing world.
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Achieving More Effective Biblical Preaching Through Interdisciplinary Teaching of Contemporary Biblical Interpretation in a Catholic M.Div. Curriculum

Awarded Grant
Heille, Gregory
Aquinas Institute of Theology
Theological School
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a gathering of up to twenty M.Div faculty in biblical studies and homiletics for two meetings to identify and discuss collaborative approaches for effectively teaching biblical interpretation for preaching.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a gathering of up to twenty M.Div faculty in biblical studies and homiletics for two meetings to identify and discuss collaborative approaches for effectively teaching biblical interpretation for preaching.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to design and implement a collaborative Biblical Studies and Homiletics curriculum, capable of developing preachers with hermeneutical and rhetorical skill to effectively bring the biblical text and the contemporary world into dialogue. This would be accomplished through two gatherings of scholars from Roman Catholic schools of theology to discuss and identify collaborative approaches. They hoped to identify best practices and pedagogical approaches and to integrate them in the curriculum through syllabi development.
A total of 27 scholars from 11 Roman Catholic schools participated in the project. The consultations were held in September, 2003, and February, 2004, with ongoing work occurring through a common website. Four syllabi were developed and engaged as models to be used in curricular integration. The project director reports, "The unifying thread in the grant syllabi and the organizing principle by which the grant is being taken forward in course and curriculum design and writing and speaking is contemplō – studēo - praedico." He believes that this hermeneutical process, which means I contemplate – I study – I preach, "shows potential to be a significant Roman Catholic contribution to homiletics theory and pedagogy."
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Teaching Youth Ministry: A Consultation

Awarded Grant
Kirkham Hawkins, Faith
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological School
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a consultation to bring together professors of youth ministry from various mainline Protestant seminaries, divinity schools, and schools of theology in order to a) determine current curricula and pedagogical practices in teaching youth ministry and b) enhance the teaching of youth ministry through sharing resources, approaches, and discussing pedagogical and theological commitments underlying the teaching of youth ministry.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a consultation to bring together professors of youth ministry from various mainline Protestant seminaries, divinity schools, and schools of theology in order to a) determine current curricula and pedagogical practices in teaching youth ministry and b) enhance the teaching of youth ministry through sharing resources, approaches, and discussing pedagogical and theological commitments underlying the teaching of youth ministry.

Learning Abstract :
The project director reports that the consultation was held in October of 2003 with 18 participants. The topics that most significantly affected their teaching as professors of youth ministry were the following: 1) the youth culture that is "technology-driven multitasking" requires teaching practices that "engage multiple levels of thought simultaneously"; 2) the need to teach youth ministry "as a means of laying foundation for a lifetime of formation" in theological reflection; and 3) the need to recognize a "theology from youth perspectives" and therefore, "teach forms of youth ministry that problematize the questions of youth rather than assuming we know what those questions and answers are."
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The Distributed Seminary: Approaches and Issues

Awarded Grant
Delamarter, Steve
Portland Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that will identify the approaches seminaries are taking to distributed teaching and learning and to understand how they are addressing challenges related to 1) delivery systems, 2) academic content, 3) "non-academic" content (professional skills, character and spiritual formation), and 4) assessment.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that will identify the approaches seminaries are taking to distributed teaching and learning and to understand how they are addressing challenges related to 1) delivery systems, 2) academic content, 3) "non-academic" content (professional skills, character and spiritual formation), and 4) assessment.

Learning Abstract :
This study leave project sought to identify the approaches seminaries are taking to distributed teaching and learning and distance education. It also hoped to understand how these programs address challenges related to delivery systems, academic content, "non-academic" content related to professional skills, character and spiritual formation, and assessment.
The project director reports that data was gathered from 85 interviews on technology and theological education with representatives of 43 seminaries. The schools represented made up 46% of the population of ATS schools. The interviews consisted of in-person interviews, site visits to 11 seminaries, and phone interviews. This developed a "snapshot" of attitudes toward and uses of technology by theological educators at the time of the study (2003), resulting in 5 articles on the topic for both Teaching Theology and Religion and Theological Education.
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The Architectonics of the Foundational Course: The Prior Question of Audience

Awarded Grant
Green, Barbara|Stortz, Martha
Graduate Theological Union
Theological School
2003
Topics: Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that is focused on planning, executing, and evaluating the pedagogy of two foundational courses (Old Testament Foundations and Introduction to Christian History), so that the revised courses communicate basic material, addresses diverse audiences, and include appropriate means of assessment.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that is focused on planning, executing, and evaluating the pedagogy of two foundational courses (Old Testament Foundations and Introduction to Christian History), so that the revised courses communicate basic material, addresses diverse audiences, and include appropriate means of assessment.

Learning Abstract :
We embarked on this grant ready to unlock the secrets of teaching to the increasingly diverse student populations we find in our foundational courses,'Old Testament Foundations' and 'Introduction to Christian History.' We armed ourselves with books on multiple intelligences, articles on multiculturalism and diversity in the classroom, convinced that with our fine consultants and hard work we would be able to recraft our courses to address a real need.

As we moved into the literature, however, we became only more confused. We caught ourselves critiquing analyses on the basis of our own experience; we found ourselves challenging authors who -- we were certain! -- would have written differently had they known our classrooms. Only when we turned to crafing our sylabi did we find what we had been looking for.

In sum, our learning is two-fold: It is possible and desirable to create a common culture of teaching and learning in the classroom through the syllabus. And Assessment is more that a briefcase of tools to emply in a course. It is possible and desirable to create a culture of assessment, so that assessing what is going on becomes second nature to both the instructor and the students.

Finally, it was a great pleasure to work together, and we would wish every mid-career professor had the opportunity to work with another colleague of her cohort. Older faculty are often paired with new faculty for the laudable purpose of mentoring. But it is also important for older and mid-career faculty to collaborate together across disciplinary lines, particularly when all parties are seasoned teachers of excellence. Old dogs can learn new tricks!"
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Training Seminarians to Minister in Rural Contexts and Crises: Research in Effective Teaching Strategies

Awarded Grant
Harder, Cameron
Lutheran Theological Seminary, (SK)
Theological School
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave grant to research institutions that train students in rural contexts in order to develop strategies for teaching that would equip seminarians and clergy for ministry in increasingly stressed rural communities.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave grant to research institutions that train students in rural contexts in order to develop strategies for teaching that would equip seminarians and clergy for ministry in increasingly stressed rural communities.

Learning Abstract :
I rediscovered the value of a Trinitarian theology for congregational mission focused on community development. I found several excellent community-building tools (appreciative inquiry, asset-mapping and intergenerational dialogue) that I am training my students to use with their congregations on internship and after graduation. I have become convinced of the urgent necessity, fruitfulness and potential difficulties of doing interdisciplinary training for clergy. And from the last segment of the project I have learned the value of a well designed and maintained website as a way of networking with folks who, in Canadian rural settings, are often far distant from one another.
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The Disseminary

Awarded Grant
Adam, A.K.|Bechtel, Trevor
Bexley Hall Seabury - Western Theological Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that will begin the work of putting digital media to its fullest use as a different mode of broadening the conversations that build up theological education. The Disseminary domain will be established as a locus for experimental teaching, learning, and publishing via digital media.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that will begin the work of putting digital media to its fullest use as a different mode of broadening the conversations that build up theological education. The Disseminary domain will be established as a locus for experimental teaching, learning, and publishing via digital media.

Learning Abstract :
We have shown the technological feasibility of our proposal, and have learned from implementing our proposed projects. We have learned pitfalls and promises in developing a rich-media environment for theological teaching in digital technology -- chiefly, that the difference between the theological academy and the broader technological landscape requires that innovators demonstrate prominent, explicit support in a recognizable extant institution (be it publisher, academy, or foundation), devote considerable extra time to cultivating willing collaborators, and the initiative to bring great ideas to fulfillment. The most significant learning from this project is that any commitment to rich-media technology demands intense investments of time, money and institutional support in order to harness rather than succumb to the power of disruptive change.
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Pedagogy for Culturally Relevant Theological Education in Historically Black Seminaries

Awarded Grant
Roberson, James
Shaw University Divinity School
Theological School
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Support for research project to bring together scholars from each of the six ATS accredited HBCU seminaries in critical reflection and dialogue on the academic purpose, content, and methodology, currently used by these institutions to prepare leaders for the African American Church and community.
Proposal abstract :
Support for research project to bring together scholars from each of the six ATS accredited HBCU seminaries in critical reflection and dialogue on the academic purpose, content, and methodology, currently used by these institutions to prepare leaders for the African American Church and community.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather together in consultation scholars from historically Black colleges and universities (HBCU) to examine the pedagogy used to prepare clergy and laity to "translate" the ideas of the theological academy to the issues of the African American church community. A working paper would be developed and then responded to by representatives of each of the 6 ATS accredited HBCU seminaries.
The consultation was held in July, 2003 at the Shaw Divinity School. Participating seminaries included: the Divinity School of Shaw University, Hood Theological Seminary, Howard University Divinity School, the Interdenominational Theological Seminary, and Samuel De Witt Proctor School of Theology. The project director reports that as a result of the consultation dialogue, the group developed "a new commitment to stay together in order to engage in common work around a flexible and experimental, but growing and consistent focus on Black Issues in Theological Education."
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A Healing Path: Toward an Understanding of the Historical, Spiritual and Worldview Encounters between Cree and Non-Aboriginal Peoples of Canada

Awarded Grant
Gobbett, Brian|Taylor, Don
Briercrest College & Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice

Proposal abstract :
Support for project to introduce faculty and students to the historic and contemporary encounter between Plains Cree and non-aboriginal peoples, identifying and discussing pedagogical and theological models and methods to enhance intercultural communication.
Proposal abstract :
Support for project to introduce faculty and students to the historic and contemporary encounter between Plains Cree and non-aboriginal peoples, identifying and discussing pedagogical and theological models and methods to enhance intercultural communication.

Learning Abstract :
By hosting conferences, for both faculty and the public, we have raised awareness and the profile of 1st nation's issues in our community and we have gained new access to information and human resources. As a learning community we built new relationships with aboriginal people and gained a greater sense of their worldview and needs. We discovered the value of interactive and experiential learning as an essential component to cross cultural education. We learned that education needs to encompass, in some way, the whole person: mind, body, and soul; and, that teachers need to model this wholeness to the students. We must listen to students, so as to understand their inner and social worlds, so that we can be relevant educators and teach students based on their prior social, cultural, and intellectual knowledge. Cultural discovery and curiosity must be ongoing to be effective in First Nations and cross-cultural education.
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Pedagogies for Teaching Diversity Within Diversity: Theological Education in a World of Overlapping Cultures

Awarded Grant
Miles, Rebekah|Parker, Evelyn|Baker-Fletcher, Karen
Perkins School of Theology Southern Methodist University
Theological School
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution

Proposal abstract :
A series of luncheon meetings for faculty to discuss recent literature in multi-cultural pedagogy, to share ways of improving syllabi, and to plan dissemination of the information through featured lectures workshop.
Proposal abstract :
A series of luncheon meetings for faculty to discuss recent literature in multi-cultural pedagogy, to share ways of improving syllabi, and to plan dissemination of the information through featured lectures workshop.

Learning Abstract :
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Teaching Biblical Exegesis More Effectively

Awarded Grant
Brown, William
Union Presbyterian Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
A department retreat and year-end follow-up session to develop a common exegetical method and effective ways of teaching it.
Proposal abstract :
A department retreat and year-end follow-up session to develop a common exegetical method and effective ways of teaching it.

Learning Abstract :
The grant effectively enabled the biblical department at Union - PSCE to review and improve how the department teaches biblical exegesis, particularly in its core courses (i.e., Introduction to the Old Testament and Introduction to the New Testament). The biblical faculty had noticed throughout recent years a decline in the quality of exegesis papers and in the passing rate on the Bible ordination exams of the Presbyterian Church (USA). Many students felt that the various faculty members were teaching exegesis in different ways and expressed the need for more uniformity in method and expectations.

Following an all-day retreat in the fall, the use of a new exegetical guide in the introductory courses during the year, and new strategies of teaching exegesis throughout the school year, the biblical faculty met again at the end of the school year to assess both the new guide and the teaching strategies in light of the goal of improving students' exegetical skills.
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Cultivating Faculty Interchange Around Teaching and Learning

Awarded Grant
Carr, David
Union Theological Seminary, NY
Theological School
2003
Topics: Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
A series of luncheon meetings to discuss issues surrounding teaching and learning, to experiment with a process of peer observation and evaluation of teaching, and to plan a workshop with an outside consultant to address teaching and learning issues that have emerged in the colloquium.
Proposal abstract :
A series of luncheon meetings to discuss issues surrounding teaching and learning, to experiment with a process of peer observation and evaluation of teaching, and to plan a workshop with an outside consultant to address teaching and learning issues that have emerged in the colloquium.

Learning Abstract :
This project has reinforced our sense of the importance of structuring learning about teaching into a faculty's life. Overall, the workshop on teaching during a required "day of work" for the faculty, though more expensive in time and money, was more successful in reaching a broad group of faculty and having sustained discussion about teaching, than the optional, periodic lunches, though focusing such lunches around specific topics can be helpful. Having the right resource person from outside the faculty can be important too. Not only are the skills of the person important, but having them present adds an extra sense of purpose and focus to the discussion of teaching. It was very difficult, however, to move forward on peer observation of teaching as envisioned by the grant.
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Leading a Writing Workshop on Technology and Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Delamarter, Steve
Portland Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
A two-week writing workshop for a small number of faculty to produce publications on the subject of improved teaching and learning in theological education through the strategic uses of technology.
Proposal abstract :
A two-week writing workshop for a small number of faculty to produce publications on the subject of improved teaching and learning in theological education through the strategic uses of technology.

Learning Abstract :
The grant proposal sought support for the preparation and execution of a writing workshop on theological education with a group of my colleagues. The workshop was held on six days between June 30 and July 11, 2003 with the project director and three colleagues. Four papers were completed during the workshop and sent to the journals, Theological Education and Teaching Theology and Religion.
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Developing a Teaching Center for Church Administration and Leadership

Awarded Grant
Frank, Thomas
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological School
2003
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
A consulting team of five teachers, experienced practitioners, and an assistant skilled in information technology will develop an on-line center for teaching and learning in church leadership and administration, providing resources for adjunct or part-time teachers as well as students at Candler and other theological schools.
Proposal abstract :
A consulting team of five teachers, experienced practitioners, and an assistant skilled in information technology will develop an on-line center for teaching and learning in church leadership and administration, providing resources for adjunct or part-time teachers as well as students at Candler and other theological schools.

Learning Abstract :
The grant provided for the development of an on-line "Leadership and Administration Resource Center (LARC). www.candler.emory.edu/ABOUT/faculty/FRANK/The purpose of this virtual center is mainly to provide teaching resources for persons who are teaching courses in church administration, religious leadership, congregational studies, or related subjects. The site offers them teaching ideas, pedagogical tools from syllabi to readings to exams, and web links that will help them construct and execute useful courses in the field.

A secondary purpose is to provide resources for students and for practitioners in church and non-profit agencies.

The project went much more slowly than anticipated in large part because of difficulties in deciding on the best web format amid rapidly changing technology and in part because of the challenge of finding assistants who could help in the construction of the site.

The grant covered the expense of three consultations with teachers and practitioners in religious leadership and administration. The first two helped generate and evaluate case studies that would be useful in teaching. At the last consultation a small group of teachers from Atlanta theological schools were introduced to the site. They were quite enthused and stated their intention to use the site and contribute material for it.

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Teaching, Racial Identity, The Seminary, and The Church

Awarded Grant
Marshall, Joretta
Eden Theological Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
A faculty retreat to examine the vocation of teaching as it relates to racial identity, an outside consultant to help faculty address issues of racial identity in the classroom and in the seminary, and a faculty-led retreat for students to help future church leaders and teachers think critically about what it means to teach as it relates to racial identity.
Proposal abstract :
A faculty retreat to examine the vocation of teaching as it relates to racial identity, an outside consultant to help faculty address issues of racial identity in the classroom and in the seminary, and a faculty-led retreat for students to help future church leaders and teachers think critically about what it means to teach as it relates to racial identity.

Learning Abstract :
Several strengths of this project can be identified. First, the project engaged various constituents within the seminary, by focusing all on issues of teaching and learning. The resources put into faculty development are paying off as faculty continue to struggle with the impact of racial identity in their teaching and in their courses. Similarly, students are more aware of the need to become effective pastor teachers in the context of the church. The ability to draw persons from the larger community for the workshops and the roundtables engaged others outside the seminary in ways that were helpful to all.

The largest weakness of this initiative came in the need to extend the time period beyond the life of the grant and to shift some of the resources from an original part into faculty development. Although extending the life of the grant had incredible advantages, there might have been a better way to imagine the whole of the initiative were it to have been considered in a larger time frame from the beginning.

A few observations about the learning that has occurred in the midst of this grant follow. 1) It can be very difficult to maintain intentional and meaningful conversations about teaching and learning in the midst of institutional chaos or crisis. The years this grant covered coincide with some important institutional years of struggle. 2) Involving faculty in the design and assessment of a grant such as this was extremely important. While the Academic Dean or other administrative leaders can provide some of the initial impetus for a particular initiative, the results will have a greater impact if faculty are involved in every step of the process from the vision to the assessment. 3) Shaping an institutional ethos and an agenda takes more than one academic year. The extension provided the institution - its faculty and students, in particular - greater opportunity to deepen their conversations and their implementation of actual programs.
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Teaching and Learning about Judaism and Jewish-Christian Relations at the Christian Seminary

Awarded Grant
Menn, Esther
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago
Theological School
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
A one-day consultation involving two parallel core groups of faculty (Chicago- area faculty and ELCA denominational faculty and staff) who will discuss and plan a comprehensive program of guest lectures, evening lectures, brown bag discussions and workshops, to educate seminarians on Judaism and Jewish Christian relations.
Proposal abstract :
A one-day consultation involving two parallel core groups of faculty (Chicago- area faculty and ELCA denominational faculty and staff) who will discuss and plan a comprehensive program of guest lectures, evening lectures, brown bag discussions and workshops, to educate seminarians on Judaism and Jewish Christian relations.

Learning Abstract :
Learning and teaching about subjects vital for Christian leadership today such as Jewish-Christian relations can take place in and around the existing seminary curriculum, if one identifies faculty partners and takes creative measures. Activities proven to be especially effective at highlighting Jewish-Christian relations include public lectures by Jewish guest speakers scheduled during core course meetings, events such as Shabbat experiences at a local synagogue that fulfill existing institutional requirements, and lunch-hour discussions about current events related to Jewish-Christian relations. Strong connections with other seminaries, synagogues, and local institutions can generate enthusiasm and build momentum, especially when funds are limited. Persistence and tailoring offerings to reflect the strengths of local Christian faculty and Jewish scholars and leaders are keys to success. Collaboration among seminaries in planning a conference on Jewish Christian relations can draw attention to the subject and establish working relationships that promise to bear additional fruit in the future.
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Antiracism and Multicultural Education at Episcopal Divinity School

Awarded Grant
Kwok, Pui Lan
Episcopal Divinity School
Theological School
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
A faculty retreat and focus groups will seek to evaluate and consolidate the work on antiracism and multi cultural education at EDS by engaging faculty, students and alumni in critical dialogues.
Proposal abstract :
A faculty retreat and focus groups will seek to evaluate and consolidate the work on antiracism and multi cultural education at EDS by engaging faculty, students and alumni in critical dialogues.

Learning Abstract :
The project enabled EDS to evaluate and consolidate the work on antiracism and multicultural education at EDS by engaging faculty in critical dialogues through a retreat and faculty colloquia. A consultant was invited to lead a faculty discussion in the spring, and resources on multicultural pedagogy and theological education were gathered and provided to faculty.
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Bringing Peace Into the Room: A Pedagogical Model Based on the Theory and Practice of Transformative Meditation

Awarded Grant
Riggs, Marcia
Columbia Theological Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Ten seminary colleagues of differing race, ethnicity, and gender will be invited to join in a process of reflection and analysis of their character and practice as teachers by participating in two workshops based upon the pedagogical model of transformative mediation.
Proposal abstract :
Ten seminary colleagues of differing race, ethnicity, and gender will be invited to join in a process of reflection and analysis of their character and practice as teachers by participating in two workshops based upon the pedagogical model of transformative mediation.

Learning Abstract :
This project was designed as a collaborative investigation of the applicability of the theory of transformative mediation to teaching in the seminary classroom. To that end, the project director invited nine colleagues to participate in two workshops during the fall and spring semesters of the 2003-2004 academic year and to complete weekly exercises for self-reflection and self-assessment during the fall semester.

Participants expressed appreciation for the opportunity to reflect on their teaching both individually and with a small group of colleagues. The single consistent criticism was difficulty with finding time every week to write out responses to the weekly exercises on-line. If this project were undertaken in the future, the participants might be organized in dialogue dyads or triads bi-weekly to discuss the impact of the theory's insights on their teaching.
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CTS Faculty Seminar Retreat for Intensive Teaching Pedagogies

Awarded Grant
Schneider, Laurel
Chicago Theological Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Outside consultant-led retreats to prepare the faculty to teach new, intensive, upper-level theology or biblical courses. The retreats will include generative time on classroom strategies, issues of coverage, syllabus design, student expectations and evaluations.
Proposal abstract :
Outside consultant-led retreats to prepare the faculty to teach new, intensive, upper-level theology or biblical courses. The retreats will include generative time on classroom strategies, issues of coverage, syllabus design, student expectations and evaluations.

Learning Abstract :
This grant-funded process allowed faculty to learn from one another regarding a new area of teaching (Intensives) that causes many of us anxiety. By spending time to generate questions about teaching intensives in an organic way, and then analyzing the syllabi and experiences of those already engaged in this teaching, and finally by spending time to generate specific suggestions for incorporating new models into the intensive classroom, the faculty developed itself as a resource on teaching. The retreats revealed a deeper need on the faculty to spend time talking together about our teaching. Faculty meetings are too full of other business. Because faculty members struggle (as do almost all faculties in small institutions) with the challenge of their own research and writing, it is difficult to find ways to support learning about teaching from one another in a sustained way. This process modeled that possibility by mining the existing wisdom over two years' meetings in a critical but supportive way.
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The Seminary as Apostolate: Reflecting upon Practices of Teaching in Seminaries Who Have as Their Central Vision Equipping People for Mission in the North American Context

Awarded Grant
Tiede, David|Hess, Mary
Luther Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Educating Clergy   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a 2-meeting consultative process in which faculty members from four seminaries, representing a diverse array of traditions (evangelical, reformed, Catholic, and Lutheran) explore together how their actual practices of teaching have changed in relation to curriculum shifts undertaken in response to the changing context of the church in North America.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a 2-meeting consultative process in which faculty members from four seminaries, representing a diverse array of traditions (evangelical, reformed, Catholic, and Lutheran) explore together how their actual practices of teaching have changed in relation to curriculum shifts undertaken in response to the changing context of the church in North America.

Learning Abstract :
The four schools involved in this grant found the project so helpful in large part because it gave them room to create and practice reflection that was deliberately appreciative, and thus primarily generative in character. Such processes are neither short, nor easily assessed in quantitative terms--they are also largely shunned or marginalized within academic practice. Given that the central thrust of a seminary organized to support an apostolate requires a teaming approach, and given that few faculty have had experiences of teaming in teaching (true teaming, as opposed to "parallel play"), it becomes all the more necessary to create room for this kind of faculty development. The pressures and exigencies of contemporary theological education work against the kind of space and time an "abbey" or "monastic" approach to theological education might make possible. Given that reality, finding ways to support faculty development through shared approaches to teaching is a highly fruitful and generative investment.
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Nurturing a Racially and Culturally Inclusive Teaching and Learning Environment

Awarded Grant
Ramsay, Nancy|Hester, David
Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for the faculty of Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary (LPTS) to engage in a series of consultations with expert educators in order to prepare the faculty to construct more effective teaching and learning environments with racially and culturally diverse students.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the faculty of Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary (LPTS) to engage in a series of consultations with expert educators in order to prepare the faculty to construct more effective teaching and learning environments with racially and culturally diverse students.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop an antiracist and multicultural environment for teaching and learning at Louisville Seminary. This project actively involved the board of trustees, faculty and students in antiracism training in order to aid the seminary in becoming a racially and culturally inclusive learning environment. The trustees engaged in a day-long workshop and the faculty and students engaged in a day-long "teach-in" experience oriented toward the aims of the project.

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Pearls and Treasure: Pearls of Wisdom; Stewardship of Treasure

Awarded Grant
Easter, Opal
Catholic Theological Union of Chicago
Theological School
2003
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Designing Courses   |   Educating Clergy   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Support for the initiation of a teaching program in church administration at Catholic Theological Union that is specifically focused on the training of theology students in functions of church administration activities.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the initiation of a teaching program in church administration at Catholic Theological Union that is specifically focused on the training of theology students in functions of church administration activities.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to continue the work of the Wabash center grant received in 2002 (WC 2002-003) in order to bring it to its completion. The grant sought to fund an innovative course delivery for a seminary curriculum in church administration in partnership with the corporate community, experienced pastors in the field and other outside experts. The current request would fund resources for the publication and marketing of a teaching manual on the curriculum to be distributed to other schools of theology for implementation.
During the period of the grant the project director reports the following accomplishments: the Implementation Handbook was completed and distribution begun; enrollment in the program increased; and the program became a permanent part of the curriculum in the fall of 2004.
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A Thing That Cannot and Can be Changed: Teaching A Practical Theology of Cancer

Awarded Grant
Hummel, Leonard
Vanderbilt University/The Divinity School
Theological School
2003
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support to analyze the results of a focus group of fifteen clergy and lay leaders representing churches from around the United States that met to discuss: 1)the primary experiences and responses to cancer in their church and community; and 2) what learning processes or methods of teaching should be included in a course on the practical theology of cancer. The results will be incorporated into a course at Vanderbilt to help ...
Proposal abstract :
Support to analyze the results of a focus group of fifteen clergy and lay leaders representing churches from around the United States that met to discuss: 1)the primary experiences and responses to cancer in their church and community; and 2) what learning processes or methods of teaching should be included in a course on the practical theology of cancer. The results will be incorporated into a course at Vanderbilt to help future pastors comprehend the basic issues of contemporary cancer (science, prevention, diagnosis, treatment and outcome) and a practical theological perspective to bear on the phenomenon of cancer.

Learning Abstract :
This study examined the results of a qualitative focus group conducted with fourteen pastoral care givers who were asked to discuss these two questions: 1) Would you describe the primary experiences of and responses to (concerning) cancer in your church congregation and the surrounding community:" 2) "Given your experiences, what would a course in the practical theology of cancer contain?" A discussion of the findings of these groups indicates the following about their experiences of cancer: (1) the ministries of their congregations are central to their experience; (2) a variety of fears appear to pervade the experience of both those with cancer and of those who care for them to such an extent that the word ‘cancer' itself is so frightening; (3) these fears are fueled primarily by the many uncertainties that accompany the illness throughout its trajectory; (4) the suffering of those with cancer is often compounded by stigmas attached to the disease; (5) the absence of just and equitable access to healthcare also compounds the suffering of cancer patients; (6) both those with cancer and the pastors themselves have many questions about the causes of cancer.

A discussion of the findings of these groups indicates the following about their recommendations for a course on cancer: (1) such a course should contain information about the basic science of cancer so that pastors may be more empathic with those suffering from it; (2) the course should assist religious care givers to have a better understanding of their own emotional responses to cancer; (3) various educational media – including novels and movies – should be included, as well as presentations by medical experts; (4) the course should include directions for education that may provide pastors and those for whom they care with hope in the face of cancer; (5) the course should assist pastors in understanding the general coping and religious coping processes that occur throughout the trajectory of the illness; (6) theological reflection on the meaning of the disease is crucial for a helpful and effective course. The study concludes by noting its own limitations, and by suggesting further qualitative focus group studies, as well as other research projects to develop and evaluate this course.
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Writing Theology Well

Awarded Grant
Yaghjian, Lucretia
Weston Jesuit School of Theology
Theological School
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a book project aimed at the development of a text, "Writing Theology Well: A Theological Writer's Rhetoric," that will provide a discipline driven introduction to theological writing and research for students enrolled in theological schools and seminaries, writing instructors and tutors, and theological faculty.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a book project aimed at the development of a text, "Writing Theology Well: A Theological Writer's Rhetoric," that will provide a discipline driven introduction to theological writing and research for students enrolled in theological schools and seminaries, writing instructors and tutors, and theological faculty.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a semester's leave to research and write a text on theological writing. The text, Writing Well: a Theological Writer's Rhetoric, is adapted from materials developed from the Episcopal Divinity School/Weston Jesuit Theological Seminary WRITE program.
Speaking from her strengths,the project director would encourage applicants to design proposals that emerge from writing and research they are already doing, for such proposals will be grounded in the "already" as they imagine and articulate the "not yet." Secondly, the project should be important enough to undertake even if it doesn't get funded; and if it is important, there is a high probability that it will get funded. Finally, travel to other institutions can contribute significantly to a project, and expand one's imagination of its intended "audience." Speaking from hindsight, one thing the project director would do differently is request a longer grant period. However, given most people's natural tendency to underestimate the time required to complete a project, she would advise aspirants to expect to have more work to do when the grant concludes, because there is never enough time to do everything one had hoped to do. But if, like her, they look forward to finishing the work, then the "grant" will continue to support, inspire and encourage its recipients, long after its termination date.
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Into the New Testament: An Interactive Workbook to Develop Skills in New Testament Interpretation

Awarded Grant
Hinkle Shore, Mary
Luther Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of a free web resource for teaching and learning several close reading skills necessary for New Testament exegesis.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of a free web resource for teaching and learning several close reading skills necessary for New Testament exegesis.

Learning Abstract :
My discovery of Problem-Based Learning was the most dramatic learning for me and has changed the way I teach even those courses that do not use "Into the New Testament" directly. I learned about project management - and the dreaded "scope creep" of projects - by working on this site. I also learned a great deal about web design, including a variety of ways to make my own course web sites easier to navigate, cleaner in design, and more interactive than they had been.
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Teaching Theology Students at the Masters Level in Institutions Affiliated with a University

Awarded Grant
MacLachlan, David
Atlantic School of Theology
Theological School
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Support for a dean to travel and meet with deans, students and faculty at selected schools in the U.S. and Canada that offer the M Div degree, and other theological programs at the masters level that have had to affiliate their theological school with a major university to remain viable. Discussions will include use of internet courses in ministerial programs, faith formation in versions of the M. Div that ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a dean to travel and meet with deans, students and faculty at selected schools in the U.S. and Canada that offer the M Div degree, and other theological programs at the masters level that have had to affiliate their theological school with a major university to remain viable. Discussions will include use of internet courses in ministerial programs, faith formation in versions of the M. Div that use significant off campus teaching and the deployment of theological and religious study faculty.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to examine ministerial programs in institutions of theological education that are affiliated with universities. The project director hoped to speak to the deans of 18 institutions to discuss their theological programs, and the teaching and learning issues involved that are particular to their relationship to a secular university.
The project director reports fruitful conversations with all 18 schools visited. He observes that while many theological schools are affiliated with universities, the M.Div. program generally "has been kept unto itself with its own concerns and agenda in the curriculum, more or less free from interfaith or other institutional connections." In these settings it is viewed primarily as a professional degree for work in churches. He believes this is a result of ATS standards, along with church expectations that determine curriculum requirements. He hopes to continue his research in schools where the university connected is "professed to be strong and workable."
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Enhancement of the Teaching Profession Workshop

Awarded Grant
Hurteau, Robert
Fuller Theological Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for a “Teaching Profession Workshop” for thirty Ph.D. and Th.M. students. The workshop attempts to address both pedagogical and pragmatic matters for prospective professors and will include two outside consultant-led sessions on teaching methods, a session on academic job searches and a session on publishing.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a “Teaching Profession Workshop” for thirty Ph.D. and Th.M. students. The workshop attempts to address both pedagogical and pragmatic matters for prospective professors and will include two outside consultant-led sessions on teaching methods, a session on academic job searches and a session on publishing.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund Teaching Profession workshops, open to both masters and doctoral level students. The program attempts to address teaching methods, academic job searches, and publishing. Funds for the program would support its operation, along with research that would develop and grow the program for the future.
With the support of the grant they were able to enhance the workshops by providing speaker stipends and food at the workshops. They also used the funds to research the best ways to develop the program by analyzing evaluations, researching similar initiatives in 16 other institutions, and proposing a plan for the future. Changes proposed include the following: expanding the topics covered, developing a two-stage program (one for pre-exam students and one for ABD students), monitoring student interest more effectively, the use of web pages for job and publishing information, and more involvement with academic placement.
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Teaching and Learning Longitudinal Project Planning

Awarded Grant
Lose, David
Luther Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Support for a planning group to further develop some related initiatives for making theological education more responsive to the changing pedagogical needs of multiculturally diverse student populations, and the increasingly globalized contexts in which the future students will minister.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a planning group to further develop some related initiatives for making theological education more responsive to the changing pedagogical needs of multiculturally diverse student populations, and the increasingly globalized contexts in which the future students will minister.

Learning Abstract :
The project proposed a follow-up to a Wabash center workshop for pre-tenured theological faculty. The purpose of the grant was to enable 4 members of the group to plan, write, and propose a larger grant to the Wabash Center related to issues and concrete strategies of institutional transformation that the group identified as being crucial for theological education in the 21st century.
Project director reports that the group met at October 2003 to work on the grant proposal. A draft was authored later in the fall, was critically reviewed by group members and outside contacts, and submitted to the Wabash Center in January 2004.
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Reading and Teaching the Bible as Asian, Black and Latino/a Scholars in the U.S.

Awarded Grant
Liew, Tat-siong Benny|Segovia, Fernando|Bailey, Randall
Interdenominational Theological Center
Theological School
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a two-year consultation of a selected group of Asian, Black, and Latino/a teachers of biblical studies in the U.S. on how the Bible is read within these racial/ethnic communities and taught as an Asian, Black, or Latino/a faculty, as well as how these findings can be incorporated into the teaching of biblical studies by faculty members not of these groups.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a two-year consultation of a selected group of Asian, Black, and Latino/a teachers of biblical studies in the U.S. on how the Bible is read within these racial/ethnic communities and taught as an Asian, Black, or Latino/a faculty, as well as how these findings can be incorporated into the teaching of biblical studies by faculty members not of these groups.

Learning Abstract :
The main goal of providing a forum for careful and critical discussion on how to read and teach the Bible from the perspectives of Black/Asian and Latino/a communities was met. The various sessions gave the participants a unique experience of inter-racial/ethnic communication and great strides were made in the group's ability to communicate effectively. It was very helpful to use the first of three sessions to give autobiographical introductions and deliberations on racial/ethnic studies before tackling the goal in the second session of sharing drafts of papers on race/ethnicity/nation and biblical studies. By discussing syllabi, lesson plans and choices for student assignments, the group engaged pedagogical issues involved with race and ethnicity course offerings across the curriculum from undergraduate courses through seminary courses to doctoral courses. Presentations at an international conference and at a national conference, along with a book and plans for future meetings of these some of the alums helped to disseminate some of the groups' work as well as gave opportunities for feedback from others outside the group.
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Information Literacy in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Graham, M. Patrick|Gragg, Douglas
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological School
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to review bibliographic instruction programs in select theological libraries, formulate a more systematic approach for such instructional programs in terms of information literacy, and introduce this as a collaborative program for American Theological Library Association (ATLA) libraries.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to review bibliographic instruction programs in select theological libraries, formulate a more systematic approach for such instructional programs in terms of information literacy, and introduce this as a collaborative program for American Theological Library Association (ATLA) libraries.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought "to review bibliographic instructional programs in select theological libraries, formulate a systematic approach for such instructional programs in terms of information literacy, and introduce this as a collaborative program for American Theological Association (ATLA) libraries."
The project director reports that he completed a review of research on information literacy programs, interviewed four leading figures in the movement, and visited some of the leading theological libraries to discuss their instructional programs. He also visited the ATLA offices and four premiere academic libraries that have information literacy programs. He received an "overwhelmingly positive" response from faculty in his attempt to develop an information literacy program based in the large core courses at Candler. As a result of this project, he will be working with 19 courses to develop the students' information literacy.
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The Dancing Church Around the World

Awarded Grant
Kane, Thomas
Weston Jesuit School of Theology
Theological School
2003
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for the production of a two-disc DVD that will provide teachers with visual educational materials about liturgy and culture and to design liturgical/theological methodologies with teaching strategies for using digital material in the classroom and for students to use in independent projects.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the production of a two-disc DVD that will provide teachers with visual educational materials about liturgy and culture and to design liturgical/theological methodologies with teaching strategies for using digital material in the classroom and for students to use in independent projects.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a two-disk DVD that would provide teachers with visual educational materials about liturgy and culture for use with teaching strategies for the application of digital materials in the classroom and in independent projects. This would be accomplished through the transfer of the three existing Dancing Church documentaries to the DVD format, as well as adding newly edited material. Finally, it sought to design and develop web-based materials providing teachers with teaching methods and strategies for using video material in the classroom, and students with strategies for using the materials independently.
The project director reports that all goals were met and a two –disk DVD was produced entitled, The Dancing Church Around the World. A web site was developed with an order form, study guides, bibliographies and teaching strategies. It can be found at www.thedancingchurch.com
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Integrating Visually Impaired Students into the MDiv Program

Awarded Grant
Walls, Neal
Wake Forest University Divinity School
Theological School
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to conduct a feasibility study and initial planning for a comprehensive program to successfully integrate students with visual impairments into the M.Div. degree program at the Wake Forest University Divinity School.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to conduct a feasibility study and initial planning for a comprehensive program to successfully integrate students with visual impairments into the M.Div. degree program at the Wake Forest University Divinity School.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to conduct a "feasibility study and initial planning" for a comprehensive program to integrate students with visual impairments into the M.Div. degree program. They hoped to gather information about currently available library and technological resources to aid blind and visually impaired students, to determine which components of their curriculum required modification, and to seek out financial resources for special scholarships to support students with visual impairments.
The project director reports that information and resources were gathered in the following areas: university disability services, current technology resources, and current library resources. In regards to curriculum, the following areas were highlighted for modification: biblical languages, field education internships and library research resources. Finally, scholarship possibilities were highlighted, as well as agencies to advertise in to attract qualified students with visual impairments. In conclusion, as a result of the project, the school finds itself in an "excellent position" to integrate visually impaired students into the M.Div. program in a comprehensive manner.
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Andragogy and Technology Workshop

Awarded Grant
Mahfood, Sebastian
Kenrick-Glennon Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a summative faculty workshop to help interpret the meaning of their investment in resources over the past three years from the Lilly grant and to discuss future directions they will take in the use of educational technologies to support their teaching and learning environment. The workshop will be led by James Rafferty from the MN Consortium of Theological Schoools.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a summative faculty workshop to help interpret the meaning of their investment in resources over the past three years from the Lilly grant and to discuss future directions they will take in the use of educational technologies to support their teaching and learning environment. The workshop will be led by James Rafferty from the MN Consortium of Theological Schoools.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a one-day faculty workshop with an outside speaker to assess the meaning of their investment in educational technologies over the previous three years, as well as to discuss future directions for the use of these technologies in their teaching-learning environment. In particular, they hoped to engage the subject of student motivation and learning styles, and how teachers can engage students through available technologies.
The project director reports that in the workshop the questions they explored involved what they were communicating and how effective it was in a student population with a very different profile from which they as a faculty were trained. These new students do not come with graduate level skills in reading, writing and speaking, and do not have previous exposure to philosophy, theology or history. These core skills must be taught in the curriculum. Also, they must be taught for parish work, not academic work. Thus, they needed to determine how to best contextualize their teaching strategies.
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Generative Congregations for Theological Field Education

Awarded Grant
Carroll, R. Leon
Columbia Theological Seminary
Theological School
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that seeks to identify critical qualities of teaching congregations that distinguish them as generative centers for theological field education.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that seeks to identify critical qualities of teaching congregations that distinguish them as generative centers for theological field education.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to identify critical qualities of teaching congregations that distinguish them as "generative centers of theological education." The research would be done as a "modest congregational studies project, involving in an analysis of five to six congregations."
One could argue that these fourteen habits and virtues of generative congregations (future oriented, theologically grounded, missionally focused, worship-centered, contextually savvy, publicly engaged, cooperatively linked, shared leadership, personally hospitable, grace-fully managed, programmatically balanced, missional resources, highly participatory, and spiritually nurturing) are merely a personal description of the "ideal church," and there are grounds for such a critique. However, it is important to note that numerous qualities of the ideal church did not make their way onto this list. For example, no one theological perspective was found to be a common characteristic. These congregations range from moderately evangelical-conservative to relatively liberal. Likewise, no one political ideology was found. Some congregations are predominately Republican; others are largely Democratic - with all of the customary partisan views about war, abortion, taxation, welfare and other issue. Also, fewer than half of these congregations see themselves as having strong programs of ministry with children and youth. And numerous other qualities that one might expect on a personal "wish list" do not appear on this list of habits and virtues.

One characteristic not on the list is assumed - but should be acknowledged. All of these congregations are obviously deeply faithful to God, and this faith commitment profoundly influences the identity and mission of each church. While different congregations may emphasize different aspects of the Christian Gospel, all of them live out their faith in ways that have integrity with their understanding of their vocation as Christian disciples.

It was suggested earlier that a critical element of any pastoral internship is the supervising pastor. And this premise is borne out with each of these five congregations. Without exception, there is a strong and able supervisor who is a careful mentor with personal enthusiasm for working with theological students. Without this commitment, even the most generative of congregations would probably struggle as a teaching partner in theological education.

Perhaps the ultimate test of congregational generativity has to do with the competencies cultivated by an intern in the field setting. The following is my own minimal list of competencies that one might hope an intern will address in a pastoral internship: Constructive theological reflection, self-knowledge, authentic personal piety or spirituality, healthy interpersonal relationships, leadership, insightful contextual analysis, pastoral skills, and vocational clarity.

While there are no guarantees that an intern and congregational placement will experience the chemistry needed to develop a constructive internship, there is an interesting correlation between this list of pastoral competencies and the characteristics of generative congregations. One might easily conclude that congregations with the habits and virtues described in this report are positioned to contribute significantly to the personal growth and professional development of students in ministry.
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Supplemental Funding for Training Seminarians to Minister in Rural Contexts and Crises: Research in Effective Teaching Strategies

Awarded Grant
Harder, Cameron
Lutheran Theological Seminary, (SK)
Theological School
2004
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave grant to research institutions that train students in rural contexts in order to develop strategies for teaching that would equip seminarians and clergy for ministry in increasingly stressed rural communities.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave grant to research institutions that train students in rural contexts in order to develop strategies for teaching that would equip seminarians and clergy for ministry in increasingly stressed rural communities.

Learning Abstract :
I rediscovered the value of a Trinitarian theology for congregational mission focused on community development. I found several excellent community-building tools (appreciative inquiry, asset-mapping and intergenerational dialogue) that I am training my students to use with their congregations on internship and after graduation. I have become convinced of the urgent necessity, fruitfulness and potential difficulties of doing interdisciplinary training for clergy. And from the last segment of the project I have learned the value of a well-designed and maintained website as a way of networking with folks who, in Canadian rural settings, are often far dfstant from one another
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Congregational Studies: A Cross-Disciplinary Approach to Contextualize Teaching in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Mercer, Joyce
San Francisco Theological Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that concerns the intersections between congregational studies and teaching-learning in theological education. The purpose of the project is to explore the use of congregational studies as an important and valuable tool for teaching and learning across the disciplines in theological education, contributing to a broader conversation about teaching-learning issues among seminary faculties, and offering new possibilities for contextual education in theology.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that concerns the intersections between congregational studies and teaching-learning in theological education. The purpose of the project is to explore the use of congregational studies as an important and valuable tool for teaching and learning across the disciplines in theological education, contributing to a broader conversation about teaching-learning issues among seminary faculties, and offering new possibilities for contextual education in theology.

Learning Abstract :
This study leave project examined the intersections between congregational studies and teaching-learning issues in theological education. Congregational studies offers opportunities to contextualize such teaching and learning by locating it in the interstices between particular contexts of ministry (congregations and other settings), the processes by which learners analyze these contexts, and the larger questions of theology, biblical studies, history, ethics, leadership, etc. that go beyond any one particular setting or context. Instead of studying the issues and questions that make up the explicit curriculum of theological education in the abstract, a congregational studies-based pedagogy allows particular ministry settings to operate as "case studies" for teaching and learning. Because a congregational studies approach apprentices learners in the practices of "reading" congregational contexts, it invites them into the "community of practice" made up of public theologians/church leaders able to understand such contexts and think theologically without reducing the scope of their concern to a single case. Such practices are portable across contexts for ministry.
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Teaching as a Practice of Cross-Cultural Encounter

Awarded Grant
Riggs, Marcia
Columbia Theological Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that will seek to develop a pedagogical model that makes connections between religion, culture, and conflict. The model will integrate theories of the social construction of difference, cultural analysis of religion and conflict, communicative ethics, transformative mediation, and intercultural communication for use in both academic and congregational contexts.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that will seek to develop a pedagogical model that makes connections between religion, culture, and conflict. The model will integrate theories of the social construction of difference, cultural analysis of religion and conflict, communicative ethics, transformative mediation, and intercultural communication for use in both academic and congregational contexts.

Learning Abstract :
The goals of my study leave grant were five fold. (1) To complete the research for and writing of a manuscript on a theory of ethics as cross-cultural encounter and the practice of religious ethical mediation and to translate that theory and practice into a pedagogical model. I have completed most of the research for the manuscript but have not completed writing the book yet. Additional theory work needed to be done prior to the writing. (2) To develop this pedagogical model for use in both academic and congregational contexts. (3) To develop a bibliography of audio-video resources and fiction that will supplement the use of traditional textual sources in this model of teaching and learning. (4) To redesign the required ethics course in the seminary's M.Div. curriculum using this pedagogical model and bibliography. Goals two, three, and four were linked. The bibliography has been completed and will be used in two ethics courses. The course syllabi will be submitted to the AAR Syllabus Project. (5) To design a workshop for clergy and lay leadership development that teaches the theory and practice of teaching as a practice of cross-cultural encounter for the continuing education program of the seminary. I hope to do a workshop next year. I have delayed presenting workshops on the material until after the book manuscript is completed.
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Effective Use of Digital Media to Enhance Theological Education at Eastern Seminary (Palmer Theological Seminary)

Awarded Grant
Fraser, Elouise|Kebaetse, Masego
Palmer Theological Seminary - Eastern Univ
Theological School
2004
Topics: Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The project entails a multi-session workshop in which faculty acquire skills they will implement in the design or redesign of their presentation tools. The workshop will address how digital video and graphics are processed cognitively during the learning process and the best ways to present them for maximum learning outcomes, focusing on the instructional design issues and application of underlying learning theory to teaching and learning rather than on the ...
Proposal abstract :
The project entails a multi-session workshop in which faculty acquire skills they will implement in the design or redesign of their presentation tools. The workshop will address how digital video and graphics are processed cognitively during the learning process and the best ways to present them for maximum learning outcomes, focusing on the instructional design issues and application of underlying learning theory to teaching and learning rather than on the development of technical skills per se. This approach and emphasis equips faculty with the knowledge and skills that will enable them to select the most effective pedagogical strategies relevant to their teaching style and content area.

Learning Abstract :
The Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CMTL) provides a useful basis for framing multimedia design by grounding it in learning theory. The principles of CTML can be applied to interface design, the facilitation of various cognitive methods, and instructional strategies. Integrating digital media into teaching ought to be a holistic approach to teaching and learning that includes both choosing appropriate instructional design strategies and varying such strategies to facilitate effective learning. When faculty members understand principles of effective integration of digital media, they seem to apply them. However, for most faculty members, the process seems to be progressive, more evolutionary than revolutionary. Ultimately, integrating digital media effectively cannot just be about teaching but it should equally, and most importantly, be about learning.
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Theology and Pedagogy in Cyberspace II: New Frontiers in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Kalantzis, George
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
With this grant we want to bring together theological educators from across North America to share their experiences on the intersection of educational technologies and theological teaching and learning, and to explore new challenges – such as the proliferation of online and distance education-the digital culture presents to traditional concepts of theological education and spiritual formation.
Proposal abstract :
With this grant we want to bring together theological educators from across North America to share their experiences on the intersection of educational technologies and theological teaching and learning, and to explore new challenges – such as the proliferation of online and distance education-the digital culture presents to traditional concepts of theological education and spiritual formation.

Learning Abstract :
The conference was hosted jointly by Garrett-Evangelical and Kenrick-Glennon Seminary and sought to bring theological educators together to explore how to engage digital technologies (so prevalent in our society) in an ethical manner that invites seminary students to become proficient, adept end users and responsible decision-makers. An open invitation was sent to over 150 colleagues and theological institutions inviting their input and experience both as participants and as presenters to explore the influence of the digital culture on traditional models of theological education and spiritual formation to concepts of creation and creativity in technoculture and the virtual theology of cyberspace. A website for participants was established. The schedule for the conference was reduced from a Friday – Sunday format to a Friday – Saturday format. This move proved to be a miscalculation as it shortened the time for interaction between sessions and forced the scheduling of events too close to each other. Evaluations were done in the form of emails – giving participants time to reflect on the overall effect of the conference. There was a consensus of the respondents that it would probably be best to continue these conversations on an annual basis, though opinion varied as to where. The goals of the project were met and the discussion among the participants and their respective institutions will continue far beyond the confines of the conference.
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Faculty Delivered Student Support in Online Seminary

Awarded Grant
Nysse, Richard
Luther Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project is focused on addressing the need for a sense of connectedness and support for students in online seminary courses. The project will examine and test what can be done by faculty within their courses without unduly adding to faculty workload to meet the student need.
Proposal abstract :
This project is focused on addressing the need for a sense of connectedness and support for students in online seminary courses. The project will examine and test what can be done by faculty within their courses without unduly adding to faculty workload to meet the student need.

Learning Abstract :
This project, as designed and proposed, sought to develop, implement and evaluate a set of options for faculty to provide (or enhance) efficient and effective student support within the structure of online seminary classes.

The project was a successful learning experience, but not in the way envisioned. As a result of my close observation of my own practice, I would now suggest that a set of procedures is not the fundamental need to hold down the strain on faculty workload in online courses. The primary need is to reframe faculty and student understanding of the dynamics afforded by the online environment. "Efficiency" is gained by abandoning the replication of face-to-face classroom roles and procedures and reframing the teaching and learning roles and procedures in a manner that maximizes what the online environment afford us.

The project significantly reinforced two trajectories or principles that I have worked for in developing online classes at Luther Seminary. (1) We are not replicating and distributing the face-to-face classroom. That changes both the expectations for support and the character of the support given. (2) We are working down the middle of our programs, not forming an auxiliary program. That has caused the growing pains that led to this project. The project did not immediately alleviate those pains, but it did press the need for the regular support personnel to be present and did support Luther Seminary's switch to a digital system that integrates the Course Management System with the administrative system. The administrative support is no longer as remote from the work of teachers.
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Achieving Excellence in Online Teaching and Learning at Meadville Lombard

Awarded Grant
Barker, Lee
Meadville Lombard Theological School
Theological School
2004
Topics: Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to help the faculty of Meadville Lombard address issues of teaching and learning in an online environment. Three goals will be addressed: 1.) To identify and learn from good models of online teaching and learning, 2.) To gain knowledge and skill in how to create a community of discourse online, and 3.) To adapt classroom-teaching methods to an online format, while retaining creativity and academic rigor and appealing to ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to help the faculty of Meadville Lombard address issues of teaching and learning in an online environment. Three goals will be addressed: 1.) To identify and learn from good models of online teaching and learning, 2.) To gain knowledge and skill in how to create a community of discourse online, and 3.) To adapt classroom-teaching methods to an online format, while retaining creativity and academic rigor and appealing to various student learning styles.

Learning Abstract :
This project sought to assist the faculty in brining the seminary's pedagogical philosophy, culture and style into the online classroom. In launching online classes they have witnessed the way the school's culture can be transmitted by including students who have previously taken the traditional classroom courses. Having even a few such students enrolled in an online class can provide the critical mass that promotes the culture. The philosophy and style, however, will be transmitted through the establishment of clear educational goals, learning objectives, and assessment tools. Additionally it requires a faculty wide commitment to applying these objectives and tools to online courses. This will happen only when the faculty has an online literacy, which consists of an understanding of online classroom dynamics and methods of instruction.
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Facilitating a Strategic Planning Process for Technology and Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Delamarter, Steve
Portland Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The goals of the grant program are to plan and execute a three-day strategic planning experience that will: 1) give the participants a clearer idea of the need for distance theological education in the Pacific Northwest; 2) build strategic alliances toward this end, and 3) develop a specific plan. Execution of the plan is not guaranteed, but through the planning process, the participants will be in a much better position to know how ...
Proposal abstract :
The goals of the grant program are to plan and execute a three-day strategic planning experience that will: 1) give the participants a clearer idea of the need for distance theological education in the Pacific Northwest; 2) build strategic alliances toward this end, and 3) develop a specific plan. Execution of the plan is not guaranteed, but through the planning process, the participants will be in a much better position to know how to go about it and what the need is.

Learning Abstract :
During the grant project all aspects of the proposal were carried out and the goals were fulfilled. Several lessons were learned. There is a lot of value in thorough research and in an iterative process over time. There is a lot of value in listening to consultants from the Church. There is a lot of value to a faculty-driven technology planning process. The ‘strategic' in strategic planning is all about finding just the right combination of models. In summary, the grant provided a giant boost to the technology planning process. It put the participants in a position to develop and refine a working model whose concept could be proposed to university administrators and on which could be started the work of developing a full proposal for implementation. The strong beginning to the planning process moved the participants well down the path in their overarching process and accelerated that process by many months.
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Teaching with Technology: One Seminary’s Experience in Purposeful Dialogue and Guided Preparation

Awarded Grant
Kinney, John |McChesney-Young, Mary
Virginia Union University
Theological School
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The Samuel Proctor School of Theology (STVU) is a vibrant theological community whose educational task is being stretched in many ways. One of which is the matter of responding to an ever-growing non-residential student population who are desirous of online course offerings. This proposal is an attempt to engender extensive faculty discussions about teaching with technology, explore some online course offerings, and integrate findings from those courses into the overall ...
Proposal abstract :
The Samuel Proctor School of Theology (STVU) is a vibrant theological community whose educational task is being stretched in many ways. One of which is the matter of responding to an ever-growing non-residential student population who are desirous of online course offerings. This proposal is an attempt to engender extensive faculty discussions about teaching with technology, explore some online course offerings, and integrate findings from those courses into the overall curriculum revision process.

Learning Abstract :
While not all of the faculty members understood how they could enhance their courses through the use of technology, they were open to exploring ways to do it. They believe that the huge classes we have can certainly be better served by some aspects of technology. They are also keely aware of the fact that our student demographics have changed and that students come to seminary with a good deal of technological experience. Though the faculty members are not allowing the mad rush to online learning evidenced in many theological institutions to influence their thinking and decision making, they are genuinely open to ways in which the technology can best serve the student and the institution. This is a very healthy place to be for any institution seeking to integrate technology into the curriculum.
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Using Interactive, Asynchronous Video Technologies in the Advancement of Seminary Globalization Initiatives

Awarded Grant
Mahfood, Sebastian
Kenrick-Glennon Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Technology and Teaching    |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Catholic theological institutions and seminaries are seeking ways to address the mismatch between the perceived needs of older students and the comprehensive education package of the institution. One way to resolve this is to provide ongoing and continuous education programs through the online databasing of 60-second asynchronous videos.
Proposal abstract :
Catholic theological institutions and seminaries are seeking ways to address the mismatch between the perceived needs of older students and the comprehensive education package of the institution. One way to resolve this is to provide ongoing and continuous education programs through the online databasing of 60-second asynchronous videos.

Learning Abstract :
In the creation of theophony.org, we have learned from its successes and disappointments both that developing an online video archive for an institutional globalization initiative is useful for engendering dialogue with stakeholders and that the management of its development will be less challenging the closer to the living reality of the institution one keeps it. By way of contribution to the expanding conversation on teaching and learning, we anticipate the idea of intentionally addressing global vision initiatives, such as evangelization/inculturation, ecumenism/unity, interfaith dialogue, and authentic human development, will be strengthened as engagement in theological course materials is constantly brought back to the level of practical applications in ministerial settings. We also anticipate a greater sense of interdisciplinary engagement as the database we have created helps learners draw connections between systematics, history, scripture, pastoral theology and moral theology. We feel our investment in energy and resources has been useful and meaningful.
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Building Bridges, Crossing Borders: Modeling Connectivity in the Theological Classroom

Awarded Grant
McArver, Susan|Cascante, Fernando|Sharp, Carolyn
Union Presbyterian Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for development of pedagogical practices in theological classrooms that encourage intentional connections across disciplines, cultures, and discourses, in order to better equip students for more fully integrated ministries in the Church and the world.
Proposal abstract :
Support for development of pedagogical practices in theological classrooms that encourage intentional connections across disciplines, cultures, and discourses, in order to better equip students for more fully integrated ministries in the Church and the world.

Learning Abstract :
Purpose: to develop pedagogical practices that foster connections across disciplines, cultures, and discourses, in order to equip our students for more fully integrated ministries. Twelve educators began; four discontinued because of changes in professional or family circumstances. Positive outcomes: 1) our conversations were extraordinarily rich and important for our development as teachers; 2) interdisciplinary and multicultural programming was carried out in six theological schools; 3) an article on multiculturalism was published in Theological Education. Challenges: 1) The loss of four colleagues required that we drop the public-voice dimension of our work: many factors can hamper the effectiveness or commitment even of participants who start out with great enthusiasm and vision. 2) Neither of two planned collaborative articles was completed, despite carefully structured timelines and significant work.
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Guidelines for Theological Field Education in Presbyterian Church (USA) Theological Schools

Awarded Grant
Johnson, David
Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a meeting to discuss revising the guidelines for Theological Field education in Presbyterian Church (USA) Theological Schools.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a meeting to discuss revising the guidelines for Theological Field education in Presbyterian Church (USA) Theological Schools.

Learning Abstract :
The Guidelines for Theological Field Education in Master of Divinity Programs at Presbyterian Church (USA) Theological Seminaries provides a framework for theological field education programs incorporating the Association of Theological Schools Standards for the M.Div. degree. These guidelines follow legal requirements and expectations, and define the contexts and conditions under which students can acquire the experience and competencies necessary for the practice of ministry. While these guidelines emerge from a Presbyterian Church (USA) context, they can serve as a model for other denominations and theological schools in developing their own programs for theological field education.
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Theological Education in a Multicultural Environment: Identifying and Evaluating Best Practices for Empowerment. Part I - Research and Planning

Awarded Grant
Lee, Cameron
Fuller Theological Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The Joint Faculty Multiethnic Concerns Committee of Fuller Theological Seminary proposes a four-stage evaluation of student perceptions of classroom practices. The proposal is conceived as the first part of a larger planning initiative to further policymaking and pedagogy which will support the culturally diverse ministries of our student body. Stage 1 uses focus group methods to elicit from ethnically representative student groups their perceptions of how well current classroom practices empower ...
Proposal abstract :
The Joint Faculty Multiethnic Concerns Committee of Fuller Theological Seminary proposes a four-stage evaluation of student perceptions of classroom practices. The proposal is conceived as the first part of a larger planning initiative to further policymaking and pedagogy which will support the culturally diverse ministries of our student body. Stage 1 uses focus group methods to elicit from ethnically representative student groups their perceptions of how well current classroom practices empower them to minister in their intended cultural settings. Stage 2 utilizes this data to construct a quantitative survey instrument to be distributed to the entire student body. In Stage 3, an initial report of the foregoing results will be submitted to outside consultants for their feedback and response. In the final stage, the report and the consultants’ responses will be distributed to faculty, staff, and students campus-wide, as an empirical base for planning and evaluation discussions.

Learning Abstract :
An empirical study of full-time students at Fuller Seminary was begun in 2005 to address issues of pedagogy and climate related to empowering a culturally diverse body of students. Initial qualitative data were used to construct a questionnaire that was completed by 298 students. A preliminary report of the findings was then circulated to external consultants and student focus groups for comment. Survey results indicated that pedagogical concerns were secondary to those of campus climate. Student focus groups responses raised significant concerns with implicit and explicit racism in the classroom. Overall, the study suggests that the empowerment of an increasingly diverse population of seminary students requires specific attention to the ways in which the classroom and campus environment may be experienced as unsafe and disempowering.
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Preparing PhD Students for Careers as Teachers Through Collaborative Experiments with Pedagogies of Intercultural Service-Learning

Awarded Grant
Priest, Robert
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological School
2004
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for a three-year project designed to give PhD students in Intercultural Studies supervised experience as teachers who will prepare future pastors to acquire appropriate cross-cultural skills and understandings. The focus will be on a pedagogy of intercultural service-learning, organized around "short-term mission trips," and designed to integrate theory and practice, school and community, experimentation and in preparing pedagogical materials. Research on program design and educational outcomes will accompany each ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a three-year project designed to give PhD students in Intercultural Studies supervised experience as teachers who will prepare future pastors to acquire appropriate cross-cultural skills and understandings. The focus will be on a pedagogy of intercultural service-learning, organized around "short-term mission trips," and designed to integrate theory and practice, school and community, experimentation and in preparing pedagogical materials. Research on program design and educational outcomes will accompany each stage of the project.

Learning Abstract :
This several year project was focused on service-learning within the framework of MDiv student mission trips to Peru (and to urban Chicago). As doctoral students helped with research, filming, and with designing pedagogical exercises, a great deal of enthusiasm was generated, motivating several to do their PhD dissertations on the topic. Both doctoral students and the project director published articles related to this. An educational DVD on mission trips was produced. Our team came to appreciate the importance of clearly identifying intended learning outcomes, and incorporating into our learning exercises 1) appropriate biblical texts and theological themes; 2) relevant experiences of intercultural service and learning; 3) attention to the voices of Christians in destination sites; and 4) active efforts at understanding. The value of a learning community of PhD students, faculty, and visiting scholars (who attended conferences we hosted), where all were focused on service-learning mission trips, came to be deeply appreciated.
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Faculty Retreat/Workshop: Translating Departmental Outcomes Assessment Into Institutional Effectiveness

Awarded Grant
Golubov, Alexander
St. Tikhon's Orthodox Theological Seminary
Theological School
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Support for a faculty retreat/workshop to translate departmental outcomes assessment into institutional effectiveness.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a faculty retreat/workshop to translate departmental outcomes assessment into institutional effectiveness.

Learning Abstract :
The project has enabled the Seminary to make significant progress in its development of a comprehensive institutional assessment plan, which will provide an objective basis for the betterment of theological teaching and learning being accomplished by our school; the improvement of courses and programs for effective curriculum revision; feed the results into an overall strategic planning process; and provide objective measures of institutional effectiveness.

To a significant degree, the project enabled us to: 1) Focus on institutional improvement efforts; 2) Define and document effective educational practices both in the general field of theological education, and in the particular guilds of academic theological inquiry (e.g., Church History, Pastoral Arts and Praxis, Patristics, Scripture, Spirituality, and Theology); 3) Understand and elaborate effective educational practices to promote student learning in theology, and improve institutional effectiveness as a school of professional formation and theological education; and 4) Steer in-house professional discourse about educational assessment and evaluation in the teaching and learning of theology and religion.
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A Wholistic Assessment Process for a Multiracial-Multicultural Seminary

Awarded Grant
Russell, Keith|Flesher, LeAnn
American Baptist Seminary of the West
Theological School
2004
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project with the following aims: 1. Re-education of faculty about wholistic assessment practices; 2. Creation of outcome-based learning objectives; 3. Creation of an assessment process and resources to assess curriculum, student learning, faculty effectiveness and institutional well-being; 4. Construction of an assessment process that adequately reflects a multiracial-multicultural theological educational institution.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project with the following aims: 1. Re-education of faculty about wholistic assessment practices; 2. Creation of outcome-based learning objectives; 3. Creation of an assessment process and resources to assess curriculum, student learning, faculty effectiveness and institutional well-being; 4. Construction of an assessment process that adequately reflects a multiracial-multicultural theological educational institution.

Learning Abstract :
Through a process of reeducation around evaluation and assessment of the seminary MDiv curriculum, the faculty members of ABSW have come to understand that the measure of a student's learning is in essence an evaluation of pedagogical effectiveness. The tables have been turned. We, the faculty of ABSW, no longer understand our role primarily as one of assessing student performance; rather, we have knowingly created a process that will measure our effectiveness as educators. And, we hope to get high marks!
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Mentoring Doctoral Students

Awarded Grant
Crysdale, Cynthia
Catholic University of America
Theological School
2004
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that engages more full time faculty in the work of mentoring doctoral students and support for a committee to review professional development of doctoral students in a mentoring program.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that engages more full time faculty in the work of mentoring doctoral students and support for a committee to review professional development of doctoral students in a mentoring program.

Learning Abstract :
The School of Theology and Religious Studies received a small grant in the 2005-6 academic year. With this money we conducted several focus groups with our doctoral students and had discussions with the entire faculty as to how we could improve our pedagogical training for our graduate students. Our most important learning was that we need to train our faculty as well as our students. We plan to implement a training program for faculty who supervise our Teaching Assistants. We want to develop more mentoring skills amongst our full time faculty.
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Writing-across-the-Curriculum in Theology Education: Faculty Development Workshop to facilitate implementation in new curriculum

Awarded Grant
Mawhorter, Jennifer
Claremont School of Theology
Theological School
2005
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for a faculty development two-day faculty workshop to facilitate implementation of new curriculum involving writing across the curriculum for first-year master of Divinity classes.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a faculty development two-day faculty workshop to facilitate implementation of new curriculum involving writing across the curriculum for first-year master of Divinity classes.

Learning Abstract :
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GTU Mentoring and Modeling Effective Teaching in Religious Studies

Awarded Grant
Holder, Arthur
Graduate Theological Union
Theological School
2005
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of doctoral students as teachers in religious studies. The project seeks to model effective doctoral-level study by highlighting the exemplary work of advanced doctoral students to their peers.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of doctoral students as teachers in religious studies. The project seeks to model effective doctoral-level study by highlighting the exemplary work of advanced doctoral students to their peers.

Learning Abstract :
With this grant the Professional Development Program was able to offer a series which was first called "First Friday Teaching Talks." In this series, eight advanced doctoral students with teaching experience presented interactive lectures on innovative approaches to teaching and learning in undergraduate and graduate religious studies and theology classrooms. The lectures were generally well-attended by both GTU faculty and students, providing an important occasion for the modeling of effective doctoral-level study by highlighting the exemplary work of advanced teaching and learning in religious studies and theology. Indeed, the series was considered such a significant learning opportunity, as well as an occasion to honor the achievements of doctoral students, that is has been institutionalized as the GTU Teaching Scholars Awards.

Overall, the grant has enabled the GTU's Professional Development Program to enrich the conversation about teaching and learning among both doctoral students and faculty. It has further enabled us to recognize exemplary teaching among doctoral students as they move more fully into the profession, and it has served as the anchor for a now-institutionalized program that will allow GTU to continue the conversation.
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Ethnicity in Interpreting and Teaching the New Testament

Awarded Grant
Wan, Sze-kar
Andover Newton Theological School
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project to extend methods and agendas developed by biblical scholars for the study of ethnicity to the teaching and learning of the Bible. Specifically, this project aims at accomplishing the following goals: 1) to study how ethnicity is incorporated in introductory courses to the Bible both as a method of interpreting the biblical text and as a pedagogical instrument to involve students of diverse racial and ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project to extend methods and agendas developed by biblical scholars for the study of ethnicity to the teaching and learning of the Bible. Specifically, this project aims at accomplishing the following goals: 1) to study how ethnicity is incorporated in introductory courses to the Bible both as a method of interpreting the biblical text and as a pedagogical instrument to involve students of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds. This is to be accomplished by means of a survey of Bible courses that stress the importance of ethnicity; 2) to learn from scholars who are most successful in incorporating issues of race and ethnicity into their teaching of the Bible through team-teaching with them; 3) to pool together resources developed by others to help scholars better handle the issue of race and ethnicity in Bible courses.

Learning Abstract :
Insofar as teaching and learning the Bible occupies center stage in a theological curriculum, how to do it will continue to be contested. This project convinces me that the most effective pedagogy is one that begins by engaging the students' construction of self and ends with the students' bringing their identities into dialogue with the biblical text. The text is not conveyed merely as a value-free object but filtered through the students' own identities. By the same token, the students' self-understanding is not simply affirmed but is brought into a dialogue with the text. An enduring question is how to reconcile this dialogical model of learning with the current orthodoxy of objective learning. These two sets of ideal are not inherently contradictory, but to bridge them requires creative and sustained collaboration with other teachers. What is true with teaching and learning the Bible is eminently true in other theological and religious disciplines as well.
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Traveling Theological Knowledges: A Faculty Project Exploring Teaching Practices that Contribute to Theological Fluency

Awarded Grant
Graham, Larry|Turpin, Katherine
Iliff School of Theology
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for the faculty of Iliff School of Theology to engage in sustained reflection on the ecology of their teaching practices, with an eye towards shifting that ecology towards the desired outcome of increased theological fluency among graduating students. "Theological Fluency" will serve as a generative metaphor to broadly identify the imaginative capacity to draw on interdisciplinary forms of theological wisdom in professional practice. Faculty participants will work to identify ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for the faculty of Iliff School of Theology to engage in sustained reflection on the ecology of their teaching practices, with an eye towards shifting that ecology towards the desired outcome of increased theological fluency among graduating students. "Theological Fluency" will serve as a generative metaphor to broadly identify the imaginative capacity to draw on interdisciplinary forms of theological wisdom in professional practice. Faculty participants will work to identify their characteristic pedagogical approaches, their intended student learning outcomes, and the ecology of approaches across the faculty. After careful reflection on the relationship of various pedagogical approaches to the learning outcome of theological fluency, the faculty will work to shift their pedagogical ecology to better support this kind of student learning. Faculty will pay special attention to the role of cultural background, age, and learning styles of students as they reflect on their pedagogical approaches.

Learning Abstract :
We learned that enormous diversity characterizes our teaching methods, subject matter, and desired outcomes. While sharing various general commitments to specific subject content, critical thinking, personal integrity, social relevance, and functional skills, we learned that there is considerable difference in how these are understood, embodied, and communicated. We also learned that having sustained conversations about our pedagogy created a sense of cohesiveness among the faculty. We were able to devise new strategies to help various forms of knowledge travel throughout the curriculum and between our disciplines, and to gain a better sense of what theological fluency might be for our students and alums. Finally, we learned that in addition to specific knowledge and skills traveling with more or less degree of fluency in our students, that Iliff's central message travels in a variety of formal and informal ways throughout all of our more structured and formal pedagogical practices.
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Teaching Political Engagement

Awarded Grant
Broadway, Mikael
Shaw University Divinity School
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that will examine better ways to teach church-state relations and political engagement in order to help students (a) more accurately understand the changing context of church and state in the contemporary setting, (b) creatively and constructively lead congregations to engage political institutions and structures in accord with ecclesiological and other theological convictions; and (c) rethink political engagement so that it reaches to the level ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that will examine better ways to teach church-state relations and political engagement in order to help students (a) more accurately understand the changing context of church and state in the contemporary setting, (b) creatively and constructively lead congregations to engage political institutions and structures in accord with ecclesiological and other theological convictions; and (c) rethink political engagement so that it reaches to the level of everyday practices of churches and local community organizations. The research will include gathering information, through interviews and focus groups, on how churches and church-related organizations understand and teach political and social engagement. A particular focus will be the practices of teaching and formation which enable African American churches to engage social and political structures in their communities. A conference will bring together seminary teachers with other practitioners and teachers to articulate methods of teaching political engagement in seminary classes on theology and ethics.

Learning Abstract :
This project provided valuable opportunities for scholarly interaction with leaders of exemplary churches through interviews. The interviews produced useful data in audio form which will bear fruit for analysis and reflection. The focus groups with Black church leaders will provide data both for comparison with the interviews and for the body of data about Black churches in North Carolina. The information on teaching and learning processes employed in exemplary churches is already influencing professors' teaching.
Providing financial assistance to students did not always cohere with the technical skills needed for the project. A Project schedule requires clarity about how long it will take to initiate basic institutional paperwork and processes.
This project contributes to the discussion of integrating core theological, biblical, and historical courses with day-to-day practices of churches. It also contributes to using church practice-based models of teaching and learning as sources for course design in theological education.
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Preparing PhD Students for Teaching in Seminaries and University Religion Departments

Awarded Grant
Krych, Margaret
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia
Theological School
2005
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
The goals for this project are: (1) to design and carry out a program that will prepare ThD students to be quality teachers of courses in seminaries and university religious studies programs; (2) to develop resources so that the program will be self-sustaining beyond the three years of the initial project; (3) to equip ThD students for the vocation of teaching by engaging them in a required seminary in which the focus will ...
Proposal abstract :
The goals for this project are: (1) to design and carry out a program that will prepare ThD students to be quality teachers of courses in seminaries and university religious studies programs; (2) to develop resources so that the program will be self-sustaining beyond the three years of the initial project; (3) to equip ThD students for the vocation of teaching by engaging them in a required seminary in which the focus will be theory, observation, and practice teaching at college and seminary levels; (4) to continue to equip ThD students for the vocation of teaching through required monthly seminars throughout their second, third, and fourth semesters of the program; (5) to equip ThD students for the vocation of teaching by having them engage in teaching assistant roles under an experienced professor; and (6) to equip ThD students for the vocation of teaching by having them develop a teaching portfolio.

Learning Abstract :
The new PhD program at the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia has, as a required component, the preparation of PhD students to be teachers in seminaries and university religion departments. This project included the design and carrying out of the first three years (2006 through 2008) of the required program of teacher preparation. The PhD teacher preparation program comprises theory, observation, and practice teaching with evaluation. The program begins with a seminar (36 contact hours) in January of the student's first academic year, and continues through the second, third, and fourth semesters of the program with monthly teaching workshops, required teaching assistance, observation, and mentoring by an experienced professor. During these 18 months, the students develop a teaching portfolio. The project also included the developing of resources so that the teacher preparation program will be self-sustaining beyond the three years of the initial project.
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Other Voices: Learning From Those of Other Faith Perspectives in the Theology and Religious Studies Classroom

Awarded Grant
Kollar, Nathan
St. Bernard's School of Theology & Ministry
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project will develop curricular and pedagogical tools for bringing views oppositional to students' faith life into the classroom. Administrators, faculty, and students from five diverse faith institutions (three schools of theology and two religious studies departments) will describe, review, and critique what is currently happening in their institutions in order to design, test, and evaluate curricula and pedagogies that foster inter and intra religious knowledge and relationships.
Proposal abstract :
This project will develop curricular and pedagogical tools for bringing views oppositional to students' faith life into the classroom. Administrators, faculty, and students from five diverse faith institutions (three schools of theology and two religious studies departments) will describe, review, and critique what is currently happening in their institutions in order to design, test, and evaluate curricula and pedagogies that foster inter and intra religious knowledge and relationships.

Learning Abstract :
Others interested in how to include the "religious other" in their classes may obtain from us nine pedagogies and the syllabi within which they are included, institutional principles that should be adopted to encourage learning about the religious other, and a review, critique, and suggestions as to coaching, crisis management, and creating a safe space for dealing with "religious others." Several institutions were reluctant to survey their students, to allow some or any expression of religious diversity oppositional to their institutional identity, and move beyond the status quo. These institutions, or subsets within the institution, demonstrate the necessity of continuing the project in some form.
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Training Doctoral Students to Teach

Awarded Grant
Crysdale, Cynthia|Nolan, Lucinda
Catholic University of America
Theological School
2005
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to enhance the training of its doctoral students in teaching skills and to better prepare them for teaching careers in theology and religious studies. Project Goals. 1) to refine and improve the training that we give to both sets of graduate students through course offerings and workshops, 2) to train current faculty as supervisors of Teaching Assistants and to recruit and train mentors/supervisors for the Teaching Fellows, 3) to ...
Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to enhance the training of its doctoral students in teaching skills and to better prepare them for teaching careers in theology and religious studies. Project Goals. 1) to refine and improve the training that we give to both sets of graduate students through course offerings and workshops, 2) to train current faculty as supervisors of Teaching Assistants and to recruit and train mentors/supervisors for the Teaching Fellows, 3) to develop evaluation mechanisms for both professors and students involved in such programs and , 4) to create a network of contacts for teaching opportunities for our students from beyond the university itself.

Learning Abstract :
The Wabash grant for mentoring doctoral students has allowed the School of Theology and Religious Studies of the Catholic University of America to be more intentional in its efforts to prepare graduate students for teaching careers in theology and religious studies. Through coursework, workshops, guest lectures and seminars made possible by the grant, pedagogical issues have been brought to the forefront. The primary learning experiences from this grant project are a developed awareness of the necessity for such intentionality as well as the recognition of the dual importance of the engagement and preparation of both faculty mentors and students in the process.

The collegiality and personal guidance that results from the cooperation and conversation among faculty mentors and their proteges ads to the theoretical and practical learning experienced by the teaching assistants and teaching fellows. The grant additionally allowed us to concentrate on pedagogical concerns that are unique to the discipline of theology and religious studies and has been an added benefit.
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Modern Methods for an Ancient Language: A Workshop on Second Language Acquisition and Biblical Hebrew

Awarded Grant
Overland, Paul
Ashland Theological Seminary
Theological School
2005
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The overarching goal is collaboratively to advance pedagogy of Biblical Hebrew by 1) exploring strategies for adapting to Hebrew the insights uncovered in Second Language Acquisition (including Communicative Language Teaching), b) to train a pilot-group of teachers who will field-test communicative methods in their Hebrew classrooms, and c) to asses these methods’ effectiveness with a view to extending their use among both English-speaking and non-English-speaking students of Hebrew.
Proposal abstract :
The overarching goal is collaboratively to advance pedagogy of Biblical Hebrew by 1) exploring strategies for adapting to Hebrew the insights uncovered in Second Language Acquisition (including Communicative Language Teaching), b) to train a pilot-group of teachers who will field-test communicative methods in their Hebrew classrooms, and c) to asses these methods’ effectiveness with a view to extending their use among both English-speaking and non-English-speaking students of Hebrew.

Learning Abstract :
What we learned - As to product: Second Language Acquisition principles generate genuine benefit for students of ancient languages. Adaptation and implementation of these principles to Hebrew is achievable.
As to process: a group of cordial, competent, and dedicated strangers will foster a synergy escorting all to achievements none could have imagined alone. Also, to generate a complex, novel, and cohesive written tool requires uncommon forethought and considerable dedication.
Recommendations for teaching and learning: 1) import skills from experts in parallel fields; 2) collaborate, forming teams reaching beyond known networks; 3) when unearthing fresh pedagogy, plot not only to inform but actually to train teachers; 4) arrange to field test discoveries; 5) maximize any design efforts by asking early, "How could this be ‘wrapped' for easiest access in a non-English context?"; 6) state any technology-for-teaching as a second layer, after primary content is solidly in place.
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Class and Anti-Racism Education at Episcopal Divinity School

Awarded Grant
Yee, Gale
Episcopal Divinity School
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution

Proposal abstract :
This grant will assist in educating the faculty at EDS on the latest theoretical research and pedagogical praxis on issues of economic and social class as it intersects with race, gender, and religion. The grant will support hiring an expert consultant on class issues who will direct a workshop retreat for EDS faculty, securing books and other resources on class, and focus group follow-up which will evaluate the success of ...
Proposal abstract :
This grant will assist in educating the faculty at EDS on the latest theoretical research and pedagogical praxis on issues of economic and social class as it intersects with race, gender, and religion. The grant will support hiring an expert consultant on class issues who will direct a workshop retreat for EDS faculty, securing books and other resources on class, and focus group follow-up which will evaluate the success of faculty members in incorporating class issues in their courses.

Learning Abstract :
A workshop on economic class, classism and anti-racism education was held in the fall and a faculty colloquium in the spring. The "Next Steps" hand-out from the fall meeting helped to shape the discussion in the spring and also helped participants report on what they had been doing since the fall on two levels - the "personal" level (reading from an extensive bibliography and being more aware of class intersections with race and gender); and the "institutional" level (incorporating class into teaching, dealing with the invisible wedges between the faculty and the staff, particularly in terms of benefits, and working more intentionally with their board of trustees). The conclusion of the workshop yielded the evaluation that it was clear that the work on class had only begun. There needs to be an ongoing effort to learn more about the power of dynamics of class and alliances need to be built across class lines in the EDS community.
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Workshops for Pedagogies of Empowerment in Racially and Ethnically Diverse Classrooms

Awarded Grant
McClintock Fulkerson, Mary
Duke Divinity School
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This grant will provide seminars for Duke Divinity junior faculty and Ph.D. students in religion to aid in their development of “pedagogies of empowerment” for racially and ethnically diverse classrooms. It will fund an education expert who will consult with the seminars on issues of teaching and diversity, provide feedback on participants’ own teaching styles, and offer the opportunity for participants to work together developing new strategies and testing ...
Proposal abstract :
This grant will provide seminars for Duke Divinity junior faculty and Ph.D. students in religion to aid in their development of “pedagogies of empowerment” for racially and ethnically diverse classrooms. It will fund an education expert who will consult with the seminars on issues of teaching and diversity, provide feedback on participants’ own teaching styles, and offer the opportunity for participants to work together developing new strategies and testing their adequacy with racially and ethnically diverse student populations.

Learning Abstract :
The project consisted of four workshops over the course of the academic year, 2005-2006. Two different groups -- eight PhD students and four pre-tenure faculty from the Divinity School -- participated in the workshops. Dr. Mathew Ouellet led the first and third workshops with the project director's help, and the project director led the second and fourth workshops. The workshops included: resources for understanding participants' social location and its effect on teaching; conversations about how pedagogies empower or disempower diverse students; and ways for each participant to identify and develop educational strategies for her/his own courses to enhance the learning of students from different racial and ethnic contexts. The groups generated particular concerns and issues that have also been the focus of subsequent workshops.
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Nurturing a Racially and Culturally Inclusive Teaching and Learning Environment

Awarded Grant
Mullen,
St. John's Seminary in CA
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The faculty desiring to be proactive, agrees that further attention is needed to enable ourselves to construct more effective teaching and learning environments with students culturally different from ourselves and from each other. In organizational development terms, we are exploring a transition from being a “non-discriminating” organization toward an intentionally “multicultural” organization that is seeking ways to ensure the full inclusion of all.
Proposal abstract :
The faculty desiring to be proactive, agrees that further attention is needed to enable ourselves to construct more effective teaching and learning environments with students culturally different from ourselves and from each other. In organizational development terms, we are exploring a transition from being a “non-discriminating” organization toward an intentionally “multicultural” organization that is seeking ways to ensure the full inclusion of all.

Learning Abstract :
I faced my greatest difficulty up front when first investigating if the faculty was willing to examine white privilege. Some suspected that my proposal of a two day workshop on that subject was a judgment, perhaps even an indictment, of the seminary. Convincing them otherwise was the most important work I did as it led to whole hearted participation by most of them during the two day process, and a strong commitment to continue examining institutionalized white privilege. The focus forced all of us to reconsider how we manage the classroom moment, and the necessity of empowering students of color to participate in ways respectful to their culture of origin for the sake of their learning.

A small portion of the faculty found this subject painful to address because of their personal histories. It was important to acknowledge and respect their pain.
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Engaging Diversity: Developing Faculty Capacities in Teaching and Institutional Vision

Awarded Grant
Legge, Marilyn
Emmanuel College
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This grant aims to build an Interdisciplinary Faculty Diversity Group to develop and deepen capacities to engage diversity in teaching and learning. It aims for institutional change that welcomes and negotiates complex diversity. This project, with the support of the Principal, will involve six (half) of the Faculty in a three stage process, concluding junior and mid-career faculty in co-operative and individual work on diversity and “whiteness” dynamics in Canada, ...
Proposal abstract :
This grant aims to build an Interdisciplinary Faculty Diversity Group to develop and deepen capacities to engage diversity in teaching and learning. It aims for institutional change that welcomes and negotiates complex diversity. This project, with the support of the Principal, will involve six (half) of the Faculty in a three stage process, concluding junior and mid-career faculty in co-operative and individual work on diversity and “whiteness” dynamics in Canada, in the United Church, and in our classrooms. Professors of Christian Education, Christian Ethics, History of Christianity, Old Testament, Theology, and Worship will undertake this project in six sessions plus interim work from Fall 2005 to Fall 2006.

Learning Abstract :
Overall, the project contributed to fostering the agenda of Emmanuel College to be "contextual" and integrative in its theological education outcomes. A workshop on diversity was conducted with outside consultant, Dr. Matt Ouellett. The project was a starting point to build upon for future groups and constituencies which include the United Church of Canada, Aboriginal Christians/communities, Curriculum Review folks, Lexington Seminar participants, and more members of the faculty.
A list of resources by consultant Professor Wenh-In Ng (expert in racial justice and education for contextual ministries) was created for the group. The group did not get as much reading done as they had hoped in the original plan but new knowledge about themselves and their students was generated. Discussions were held regularly on content and methods from their different disciplines and experiences and syllabi were shared and discussed. All participants said the project was personally and institutionally worthwhile.
Many faculty members are committed to exploring and implementing the value and practices of "diversity" in some concrete ways. The faculty has been energized by talking about what it loves to do - teach! The Wabash grant made possible space and resources for gathering, reflecting, engaging and connecting to consider some tough issues relating to "diversity." In the process, the faculty involved became a trusting and collegial team who want to teach and learn in their various classrooms and institutional arrangements with diversity and justice as a living, connective tissue.
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The Creative Writing Workshop as Pedagogical Practice for Biblical Studies in a Multi-Cultural Environment

Awarded Grant
Wiles, Virginia
New Brunswick Theological Seminary
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for the exploration of the use of the Creative Writing Workshop as a pedagogical practice for teaching Biblical Studies in a multi-cultural, postmodern environment.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the exploration of the use of the Creative Writing Workshop as a pedagogical practice for teaching Biblical Studies in a multi-cultural, postmodern environment.

Learning Abstract :
The primary success of this project was in the ways that it opened up students to their own creative possibilities. The primary disappointments related to the discovery of how much the academic process of seminary (and, undoubtedly, earlier schooling) had instilled a certain "fear" in the students about getting things "right." They were very afraid of doing the "wrong" thing. The course also demonstrated how difficult it is for students to deal with questions of point of view. This is especially crucial in a multi-cultural context where cross-cultural perception and conversation is valued. Wider conversation with faculty in relation to this grant project indicated that much more conversation and exploration is needed in the areas of how one can incorporate associational thinking into a seminary curriculum and how we can better communicate our differing teaching methodologies across disciplines so that students have a more coherent educational experience.
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Intercultural Training for JSTB Professors

Awarded Grant
Fernández, Eduardo
Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara University
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this grant is to enable 4 faculty members of the JSTB to attend a week’s workshop to be held from January 2-6th, 2006 in the Los Angeles area, designed to train people in intercultural teaching and ministry.
Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this grant is to enable 4 faculty members of the JSTB to attend a week’s workshop to be held from January 2-6th, 2006 in the Los Angeles area, designed to train people in intercultural teaching and ministry.

Learning Abstract :
Among the most valuable things we learned in this project is that personal input and stories are indispensable to achieve this type of learning. Culture is much too complex to be studied at only the level of theory or presented in lectures. Since all the participants have worked interculturally with groups of various kinds, they brought that experience with them to the overall process. Another factor which surfaced was the need to distribute power at the level of leadership. Composition of planning and leadership groups, therefore, is key to greater involvement at all levels. Several of the fruits of this project which will contribute to our expanding conversation on teaching and learning are 1) the fact that ALL people have and act out of a culture and an awareness of that culture is essential for teaching, research, and ministry; 2) that if they are to respond to the needs of those they serve, institutions which are trying to become more diverse must make some changes and not expect that it is only the students who have to "get with the program"; and 3) interactive, dialogical, process-centered, socio-constructivist approaches to intercultural training, judging from our experience, seem to be the best method available to date.
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Care of Diverse Souls: Culturally Responsive Education in Pastoral Care and Counseling

Awarded Grant
Greider, Kathleen
Claremont School of Theology
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This grant supports and advances efforts underway in the Pastoral Care and Counseling Program at Claremont School of Theology to develop faculty resources for the provision of education that is culturally responsive.
Proposal abstract :
This grant supports and advances efforts underway in the Pastoral Care and Counseling Program at Claremont School of Theology to develop faculty resources for the provision of education that is culturally responsive.

Learning Abstract :
In the effort to increase effective pedagogy in racially and culturally diverse contexts, there is no substitute for a teaching staff that is culturally and racially diverse. Students learn from the particular identities and perspectives of the instructors and also from observing and participating in the instructors' teamwork. Our capacity to provide pedagogy responsive to the cultural and racial diversity of our students and the communities they serve was greatly enhanced when we reached beyond the academic community to persons and agencies providing direct service to diverse communities in need of assistance. The grant writers were aware that building professional relationships that will yield cultural and racial diversity within an organization is accomplished very slowly. Even knowing this, we overestimated what we would be able to accomplish during the period of the grant.
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A Three-Stage Workshop Model for Multicultural Infusion in a Theological Institution

Awarded Grant
Cascante, Fernando
Union Presbyterian Seminary
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution

Proposal abstract :
This project consists of a series of three educational opportunities for a selected group of faculty, staff, and students at Union-PSCE to intentionally read about, reflect upon and decide on issues of cultural diversity as they apply to its academic and institutional life. The twofold purpose of the project is to train a representative group in fundamental concepts and practices of cultural diversity and to generate the conditions to establish ...
Proposal abstract :
This project consists of a series of three educational opportunities for a selected group of faculty, staff, and students at Union-PSCE to intentionally read about, reflect upon and decide on issues of cultural diversity as they apply to its academic and institutional life. The twofold purpose of the project is to train a representative group in fundamental concepts and practices of cultural diversity and to generate the conditions to establish institutional and academic policies that will move Union to become a more effective multicultural theological institution.

Learning Abstract :
This project, with important modifications that resulted from the dialogical and democratic process it engendered, was successful in achieving its twofold purpose, that is, to train a representative group from the Union-PSCE community in fundamental concepts and practices of cultural diversity and, on the other hand, to generate the conditions to establish institutional and academic policies that will move Union-PSCE to become a more effective multicultural theological institution. It is now clear that there is a significant group of students, staff and faculty convinced of the need for Union-PSCE to pay serious attention to issues of diversity in general and multicultural diversity in particular. Nevertheless, more needs to be done in a more sustained and extended manner in regards to the first part of this purpose.

During Workshop III, Dr. Maxine Beach, our guest speaker, affirmed that with the work done through this project, Union-PSCE has begun an important process that respects all parts of our institution as having something to offer to the conversation about multicultural diversity. Dr. Beach said that given the special circumstances currently at Union-PSCE (e.g. in the process of a Curriculum Review, working on a new Strategic Plan, and with a new president beginning this year) "Union-PSCE has a great opportunity to stop and be able to make some decisions about whether or not this is something {we} want to embrace fully, as a priority, and not something that would be nice to do if we have the time and money."

The challenge now, especially for those with "decision-making" power in our institution, is to discern where, how and when to implement those changes (institutional, academic, etc.) that will enable us to become a more effective multicultural theological institution. The good news is that decisions have already been made, as Appendix E shows, that point to the fact that the challenge has been assumed and that the work done in this project will continue to bear fruit in the near future.
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Dismantling Racism & Building Cross-Cultural Competence

Awarded Grant
Matsuoka, Fumitaka|Walker, Randi
Pacific School of Religion
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Educating Clergy   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
As a result of an audit on racial inclusiveness in 2004, the recommendations of the audit will be implemented to better prepare students to lead churches in diverse cultural contexts. One of the key tasks is to design new curricula and educational programs, including a required course on dismantling racism and developing cultural competency.
Proposal abstract :
As a result of an audit on racial inclusiveness in 2004, the recommendations of the audit will be implemented to better prepare students to lead churches in diverse cultural contexts. One of the key tasks is to design new curricula and educational programs, including a required course on dismantling racism and developing cultural competency.

Learning Abstract :
The project of dismantling racism and creating cross-cultural competence is carried out at present in several venues. 1) The Roundtable program of the Center of Lesbian and Gay Studies in Religion and Ministry, the African American Roundtable, and the Asian American Roundtable discussions each concerns the intersection of race, gender identity and sexual orientation. 2) The work of the Dismantling Racism Committee provides forums and other educational venues for the discussion of race issues at PSR. 3) A course has been developed for all students to learn about the issues of color prejudice, systemic racism, and strategies for creating racial justice, particularly in the churches, but in the larger community as well. 4) Students engage in short and long term contextual educational opportunities and at the end of their courses they engage in days of theological reflection with faculty.

Looking forward to the fall of 2009, the PSR faculty will hold a semester-long seminar to learn more about how to teach toward building racial justice at PSR and in the larger community.
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Nurturing Effective Teaching and Learning in Racially and Culturally Diverse Classrooms

Awarded Grant
Ramsay, Nancy
Brite Divinity School at TCU
Theological School
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This proposal describes a process for enhancing the capacity of the faculty and administrative staff for nurturing effective teaching and learning in culturally and racially diverse classrooms. The project will involve shared reading and expert leadership in 3 faculty seminars during the spring 2006 fall 2006 semesters to develop competencies in pedagogical resources and practices that support effective teaching and learning in diverse settings.
Proposal abstract :
This proposal describes a process for enhancing the capacity of the faculty and administrative staff for nurturing effective teaching and learning in culturally and racially diverse classrooms. The project will involve shared reading and expert leadership in 3 faculty seminars during the spring 2006 fall 2006 semesters to develop competencies in pedagogical resources and practices that support effective teaching and learning in diverse settings.

Learning Abstract :
The Faculty and administrators directly related to degree programs committed to a combination of reading and workshop participation led by an expert educator in the area of diversity and pedagogy, Dr. Christine Stanley. We were able to purchase and read selectively from a recent edited volume, Teaching Inclusively: Resources for Course, Department, and Institutional Change in Higher Education, Edited by Dr. Mathew Ouellett. We focused on two areas: effective pedagogical strategies in diverse classrooms and constructing multicultural syllabi. In the first workshop we addressed issues such as attention to the racial and cultural social locations of faculty as well as students, familiarity with different learning preferences across and within various racial and cultural groups, and inclusion of clear and diverse assessment strategies.
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Teaching Biblical Exegesis in Theological Schools

Awarded Grant
Skinner, Matthew|Yoder, Christine
Luther Seminary
Theological School
2005
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
Teaching biblical exegesis to students preparing for religious professions poses significant challenges in this era marked by, among other things, pervasive biblical illiteracy, methodological pluralism, and institutional and pedagogical commitments to diversity in our classrooms. This two-year consultation, comprised of twelve North American seminary and divinity school professors of Bible, aims to revision the goals and strategies of teaching exegesis in these contexts. Participants will consider: (a) the role of ...
Proposal abstract :
Teaching biblical exegesis to students preparing for religious professions poses significant challenges in this era marked by, among other things, pervasive biblical illiteracy, methodological pluralism, and institutional and pedagogical commitments to diversity in our classrooms. This two-year consultation, comprised of twelve North American seminary and divinity school professors of Bible, aims to revision the goals and strategies of teaching exegesis in these contexts. Participants will consider: (a) the role of biblical exegesis in theological education and its placement within curricula; (b) understandings of what constitutes good exegesis and, accordingly, the exegetical habits we seek to engender in students; (c) pedagogical strategies that foster those habits; (d) available resources and what may be needed; and (e) means of assessing student learning. Participants will apply and evaluate the consultation’s findings in their classrooms. The consultation will share its outcomes through publications, formal and informal conversations, and strategic planning within the participants’ institutions.

Learning Abstract :
As a result of our participation in the consultation "Teaching Biblical Exegesis in Theological Schools," we are: (a) more aware of how the diversity of our teaching contexts and our students informs our pedagogies and the goals of our courses; (b) inclined to describe the work of teaching biblical exegesis less in terms of introducing interpretive methodologies and more in terms of cultivating certain hermeneutical habits and dispositions in our students, and (c) more intentional about helping our students appropriate the fruits of their exegetical study wisely and creatively for their ministerial contexts.
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Developing a Framework for Assessing Seminarian Progress in the Master of Divinity Degree Program (M. Div.) at Roman Catholic Seminaries

Awarded Grant
Latcovich, Mark
St. Mary Seminary and Graduate School of Theology
Theological School
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Educating Clergy   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to: develop consensus across member seminaries of the Midwest Association of Theological Schools (MATS) about assessment processes and products related to the major responsibilities of a newly ordained priest; bring to MATS seminaries current best practices and current research related to the development of professional workers in other fields; and create broadly validated assessment tools that will be integrated into practice by MATS seminaries and shared ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to: develop consensus across member seminaries of the Midwest Association of Theological Schools (MATS) about assessment processes and products related to the major responsibilities of a newly ordained priest; bring to MATS seminaries current best practices and current research related to the development of professional workers in other fields; and create broadly validated assessment tools that will be integrated into practice by MATS seminaries and shared with seminaries across the nation.

Learning Abstract :
The project enabled a group of seminary educators to collectively design a framework for integrating the formational components of the Program for Priestly Formation (e.g. human, intellectual, spiritual and pastoral dimensions) into specific outcomes, behaviors and performance tasks. This was accomplished in the design of the DACUM. The DACUM provides for us a realistic perspective of what students should know and be able to do at the completion of the program through specific duties, tasks and behaviors. The challenge for the group is to create further rubrics and performance actions that will allow students and faculty to assess the integration of the skills, knowledge and affect integrated by students for their future ministry. (Seminaries have adopted Shulman's idea that a student's learning of the theological dimensions of leadership and ministry is not ultimately gauged by knowledge of the concept, but by the ability to exercise leadership through performance actions.) The seminaries that participated in this project are now ready to apply the DACUM to their curricula. One model that we hope to develop with future funding is the portfolio that will designate specific rubrics, performance evaluations, and select written work from across the M.Div curriculum to demonstrate the student's engagement and motivation, knowledge and understanding, performance and action, reflection and critique. One year was beneficial in meeting the primary goal of the grant. However, we realize that it will take two years for the dissemination of our work to begin to be utilized within the classroom.
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Research Project: Integrative Seminars in Field Education

Awarded Grant
Drummond, Sarah
Andover Newton Theological School
Theological School
2006
Topics: Designing Courses   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a research project related to the redesign process for the required practicum. The research project will focus on the central question: What should practicum become in order to meet its loftiest goal, which is to facilitate the integration of ministerial theory and practice among seminary students?
Proposal abstract :
Support for a research project related to the redesign process for the required practicum. The research project will focus on the central question: What should practicum become in order to meet its loftiest goal, which is to facilitate the integration of ministerial theory and practice among seminary students?

Learning Abstract :
The purpose of the grant was to investigate the most effective options available for the on-campus component of a theological field education program. We used our grant to do the following: 1) Pay the stipend for the Director and a Research Fellow to lead and assist in a research project on this topic; 2) Provide hospitality for focus groups brought together to discuss the impact of a pilot integrative seminar at Andover Newton; 3) Fund the acquisition of appropriate journals and other research materials; and 4) To provide training materials for the first group of instructors who will teach in the seminary's new model for the integration of theory and practice in field education.

The products of this project take two forms: New knowledge and a new way of offering a field education course. As for new knowledge, we not only learned a great deal but have begun to share our learnings more broadly. Two articles are currently being reviewed for publication. Additionally, in the fall of 2007 we will offer a field education course unlike any we have seen or heard of elsewhere. This was possible because of our pilot course and our research project. The new model will fully involve the Faculty and reconnect the Field Education Program's infrastructure with the core of the curriculum.
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Transforming the Institutional Culture of United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities in relation to Racism and Cultural Diversity

Awarded Grant
Fernandez, Eleazar
United Theological Seminary of Twin Cities
Theological School
2006
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This grant will help transform the seminary’s corporate culture and institutional patterns from a more ‘passive’ and ‘symbolic’ affirmation of cultural diversity toward becoming a more fully inclusive institution in its identity and structures.
Proposal abstract :
This grant will help transform the seminary’s corporate culture and institutional patterns from a more ‘passive’ and ‘symbolic’ affirmation of cultural diversity toward becoming a more fully inclusive institution in its identity and structures.

Learning Abstract :
The year-long process (Fall 2006– Spring 2007) provided an opportunity for the various participants of the seminary life to come together as a community and to strongly express their commitment to make it a culturally diverse and racially just institution. The community realized that it is not nearly where it wants to be: a culturally diverse and just institution. It has become clear to the community that good intentions are not enough. The community believes that a major change in the ethos and environment must happen at United Seminary for cultural diversity and racial justice to happen in the classroom, for racial-ethnic minorities to come and feel at home in the seminary, and for the curriculum and strategic direction to embody cultural diversity and racial justice. The major change cannot, however, happen unless specific goals, actions and accountability are identified in light of the vision.
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Theological Education as Virtue Formation

Awarded Grant
Jinkins, Michael
Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for facilitating deeper and larger faculty conversations regarding theological education as virtue formation.
Proposal abstract :
Support for facilitating deeper and larger faculty conversations regarding theological education as virtue formation.

Learning Abstract :
A faculty retreat focused on the question, "What would it mean for theological education to be understood as the formation of virtues?" Wabash Center consultant Robert Pazmiño served as conversation facilitator. Six members of the faculty wrote essays on the topic of virtue. These formed the core of the conversations at the retreat. Additional relevant readings in theological education were provided in the form of a small anthology to help prepare the group for the retreat. The two goals of the retreat – to broaden the faculty's vision regarding the nature of the institution's educational mission in preparation for actual curriculum revision and to aid in the formation of a new faculty-were both realized. The conversation provided a chance for a bright and imaginative faculty to fundamentally rethink WHY they do WHAT they do.
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GTU Learning and Teaching Academy (LTA) for Future Faculty

Awarded Grant
Donahue, James|Maloney, Maureen
Graduate Theological Union
Theological School
2006
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Two two-week intensive intersession courses which prepare students for two semesters of supervised assisting and direct teaching experience with experienced faculty mentors. Throughout the two year project, students and faculty mentors will participate in teaching and learning forums designed to encourage ongoing collegial dialogue and cooperation.
Proposal abstract :
Two two-week intensive intersession courses which prepare students for two semesters of supervised assisting and direct teaching experience with experienced faculty mentors. Throughout the two year project, students and faculty mentors will participate in teaching and learning forums designed to encourage ongoing collegial dialogue and cooperation.

Learning Abstract :
As the Graduate Theological Union attempted to deepen their practical commitment to engagement with the most pressing questions of meaning and value facing communities and the world today, it became clear to them that developing their doctoral students as engaged teaching scholars was critical. It likewise became clear that traditional models of doctoral student mentoring which focus primarily on career development and advancement or on disciplinary development were not entirely helpful. Rather, they undertook to develop institutionally-supported practices of vocational development focused on practical classroom engagement with questions of meaning and value across the disciplines of religion and theology. Their project showed the importance of active, experiential learning across multiple matrices of significant professional relationships-those with faculty mentors, colleagues, and administrators. Negotiating these complex professional relationships, while also planning and teaching courses that emphasize "big question" learning, allowed Fellows to live the role of junior faculty member in very practical ways that pressed on easy philosophical or ideological approaches to learning and teaching.

The GTU Preparing Future Faculty Project also invited them, as an institution, to consider the ways in which they can systematically encourage and support effective mentoring toward vocations of teaching scholarship. The impact of this is, they believe, both challenging and encouraging, pressing for a change in academic culture that will allow the GTU to function more fully as a place "where religion meets the world."

The significance of the Teagle Wabash Project cannot be underestimated in terms of what is has meant to the GTU. The cultivation of a nucleus of graduate students and faculty committed to excellent teaching has created a hub of conversation, research and collaboration that has enlivened their already stimulating academic environment. One of the goals of the GTU is to become a national center of excellence for the training of future generations of teachers in theological and religious studies. They believe, with the funding from the Teagle Foundation and the Wabash Center that they are on their way to achieving this.
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A Guided Solo Flight: Nurturing Reflective Teaching Practice through Teaching Experience, Peer Reflection, and Mentoring

Awarded Grant
Robbins, Gregory|Turpin, Katherine
Iliff School of Theology
Theological School
2006
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
This grant will fund a three-year extended preparation for teaching faculty to educate and mentor Ph.D. students in relation to the teaching task at the University and graduate school level. A cohort of student teaching fellows drawn from students in the Joint Doctoral Program of the University of Denver and the Iliff School of Theology will be mentored by a group of faculty. Student participants will engage in solo ...
Proposal abstract :
This grant will fund a three-year extended preparation for teaching faculty to educate and mentor Ph.D. students in relation to the teaching task at the University and graduate school level. A cohort of student teaching fellows drawn from students in the Joint Doctoral Program of the University of Denver and the Iliff School of Theology will be mentored by a group of faculty. Student participants will engage in solo or fully team-taught instruction of a course, peer reflection seminar, preparatory workshops, and a mentoring relationship with a faculty member. Faculty mentors will be recruited from the Joint Ph.D. faculty of each school, and trained to provide peer-supported mentoring for selected Ph.D. students.

Learning Abstract :
We learned many things about the professional development of emerging teachers during their graduate school years. First, we learned that one-to-one mentoring for teaching, particularly at the course development stage, was enormously useful for beginning teachers. Second, we found that Faculty Mentors enjoyed mentoring into the profession of teaching, but they had to be reminded that this was an important part of their work. Third, we found that attention to the development of teaching in this one program prompted our students to advocate for and gain teaching opportunities outside of the Fellows program within our institutional context. Fourth, we learned that the mutual observation and reflection moments between Fellows and Mentors could cause a great deal of anxiety for the student Fellows and needed careful introduction, guidelines, and attention to the power differential between Fellows and Mentors. Fifth, we learned that sharing critical incidents requires a fair amount of coaching to allow them to be a useful tool for honest reflection on teaching practice. Sixth, we learned that doctoral students offering electives needed special and strategic marketing for their courses, help in defining courses that would appeal to a wide range of potential students, and help in translating their highly specialized vocabulary into welcoming course descriptions and syllabi for their undergraduate and M.Div. students. Seventh, we learned that the resources of the broader university for new faculty orientation and training were very useful for doctoral students. Finally, in leading the Peer Reflection Group, we found that having a common text (John C. Bean, Engaging Ideas) and a theme (integrating writing with critical thinking and active learning) served to provide both structure and added purpose to the conversations with Teaching Fellows, in addition to the free-ranging discussions that arose out of the concrete teaching experiences. Through the process of introducing the norm of collaboration and mutual reflection on teaching practice early in the professional development of our graduate students as teachers, we have actively sought to avoid pedagogical isolationism in another generation of academic professionals.
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Team-Teaching in a Diverse and Changing World: Pedagogical Innovations for Progressive Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Liew, Tat-siong Benny
Pacific School of Religion
Theological School
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
In the fall of 2004, Pacific School of Religion inaugurated a newly revised M.Div. curriculum to reflect four core values: critical thinking, contextuality, leadership/spiritual formation, and partnerships with faith communities. In order to embody our core values, foundational courses of the curriculum were reconfigured into integrative, interdisciplinary, team-taught courses. As we begin to “live into” this new curriculum, important pedagogical issues emerge which require intentional and sustained exploration by ...
Proposal abstract :
In the fall of 2004, Pacific School of Religion inaugurated a newly revised M.Div. curriculum to reflect four core values: critical thinking, contextuality, leadership/spiritual formation, and partnerships with faith communities. In order to embody our core values, foundational courses of the curriculum were reconfigured into integrative, interdisciplinary, team-taught courses. As we begin to “live into” this new curriculum, important pedagogical issues emerge which require intentional and sustained exploration by the entire faculty - most important of which are issues related to interdisciplinarity in research and team-teaching. This proposal presents our plan to create structured ways of engaging in conversation, documentation, and assessment of pedagogical theories and practices, especially as related to team-teaching, which are vital for the implementation of our M.Div. curriculum.

Learning Abstract :
We learned that working in teams in teaching is one way to encourage greater confidence in faculty in dealing with sensitive and powerful issues like race/ethnicity. We also learned that, in times of economic struggles, team-teaching is a luxury we cannot often afford. Short of team-teaching, having a faculty discuss with each other and work on actual syllabi is helpful. We also learned that diversity issues in theological education should be engaged by not only faculty who teach, but also the entire community (including students, staff, administrators, and trustees).
Beyond all the strengths this Wabash Grant has enabled us to develop in our faculty and community, its very presence as a source of funding for diversity issues in teaching has allowed PSR to keep its commitments to diversity fresh, relevant, and at the forefront of our work together as a theological community.
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Critical Reading, Writing, and Reflection: Developing Colloquies for First Year Seminary Students

Awarded Grant
Strom, Jonathan|O’Day, Gail
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological School
2006
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Candler seeks support to design a pedagogical model to enhance critical thinking and disciplined theological reflection among first year seminary students. As students tend to find their first year courses to be especially challenging, both intellectually and emotionally, this program will allow students an opportunity to appropriate the material in writing and in small group discussions.
Proposal abstract :
Candler seeks support to design a pedagogical model to enhance critical thinking and disciplined theological reflection among first year seminary students. As students tend to find their first year courses to be especially challenging, both intellectually and emotionally, this program will allow students an opportunity to appropriate the material in writing and in small group discussions.

Learning Abstract :
This grant played a key role in shaping the pedagogical culture at Candler. It provided invaluable supervised teaching experience for doctoral students in the Graduate Division of Religion, and enabled Candler faculty and students to achieve greater clarity about the teaching and learning of critical theological thinking and of the place of those skills in ministerial formation. It was a major pedagogical and curricular undertaking. The proposal had a one-year planning period, but one of the biggest learnings in this project was that all the real planning and pedagogical work could only take place once MDiv students were actually taking the classes. The coordinators and faculty were able to identify key issues and emphases in advance, but how they played out in the curriculum could not be anticipated. The new curricular element challenged faculty and graduate teaching assistants to be better teachers, more intentional about pedagogy, and more attuned to the connections between meeting course learning goals and the types of assignments given. One of the goals of the grant was for the colloquy model to promote more focused training for doctoral students and to provide them with more intensive teaching experience to better prepare them for their careers as teachers. In this area, the "Teaching Through Theological Education" (TTTE) has been an unqualified success. An unexpected learning from the project is that ways were discovered in which TTTE can be used as a key element of MDiv program assessment. Assessment protocols linked to TTTE will continue to be developed in subsequent years.
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Educating Clergy: Integration Across the Curriculum

Awarded Grant
Huber, Donald
Trinity Lutheran Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Educating Clergy   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Support for a one day faculty workshop to discuss the book Educating Clergy and to strengthen the formation of clergy through discussion courses designed to enhance integration between the courses in various disciplines, integration between coursework and contextual experience, and attention to progression from students’ first year to the final year.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a one day faculty workshop to discuss the book Educating Clergy and to strengthen the formation of clergy through discussion courses designed to enhance integration between the courses in various disciplines, integration between coursework and contextual experience, and attention to progression from students’ first year to the final year.

Learning Abstract :
The project consisted of a one-day workshop/retreat, facilitated by Wabash consultant Dr. Kathy Talvacchia, for faculty members of Trinity Lutheran Seminary. In plenary and small group discussion we reflected on the "three apprenticeships" (cognitive, practical, identity/ethical) of professional education introduced in the book Educating Clergy as a means of analyzing vertical integration (progressive integration in which later courses and field experiences build upon early courses and experiences) and horizontal integration" (between the various courses and field experiences in each year of study) in the curriculum. We especially attended to "horizontal" integration, as faculty members were divided into groups according to which semester or year in the M.Div. program they had significant responsibilities for teaching core classes. Rich and fruitful conversation revealed ways our work can complement and reinforce one another's teaching across the disciplines. Recognizing the usefulness of further conversations attending to "horizontal integration," and the need for more conversation about "vertical integration," we committed ourselves to ongoing structured conversations on this topic.
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A Faculty Retreat: Clergy Education and Formation at LPTS

Awarded Grant
Hester, David
Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a faculty retreat to follow up on the Educating Clergy conference sponsored by the Wabash Center in Chicago, Il. The retreat will encourage faculty discussion about the potential impact of the conference on the Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary community life and formation of students for ministry.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a faculty retreat to follow up on the Educating Clergy conference sponsored by the Wabash Center in Chicago, Il. The retreat will encourage faculty discussion about the potential impact of the conference on the Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary community life and formation of students for ministry.

Learning Abstract :
Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary faculty met for a day and one half retreat for discussion about clergy formation at the seminary. Specific attention was given to issues related to seminary culture and identity. The conversation provided the impetus for subsequent ongoing conversations around issues of the diverse curricula that constitute seminary education, including intellectual formation, character formation, and the formation of reflective and competent practitioners. Dr. Barbara Wheeler served as a consultant for the retreat and aided the faculty in probing the seminary's identity and ethos in relation to formation questions. Faculty continue to reflect and converse about how to develop pastoral imagination in their students.
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Celebrating the Past, Engaging the Future: Creating a Cohesive Faculty in a School in Transition

Awarded Grant
Mangum, R. Todd
Biblical Theological Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The primary goal of this project is to integrate a significant number of new faculty into Biblical Theological Seminary’s faculty community and lay a broad foundation for success in their vocation. Faculty will engage in activities that develop community and promote understanding of vocation; instill institutional vision; and increase competence in pedagogy and technology. These activities include workshops/retreats, reading, peer mentoring, team teaching, and technology training and development.
Proposal abstract :
The primary goal of this project is to integrate a significant number of new faculty into Biblical Theological Seminary’s faculty community and lay a broad foundation for success in their vocation. Faculty will engage in activities that develop community and promote understanding of vocation; instill institutional vision; and increase competence in pedagogy and technology. These activities include workshops/retreats, reading, peer mentoring, team teaching, and technology training and development.

Learning Abstract :
This project was designed to develop a new faculty community by implementing a mentoring program by which junior faculty were assimilated into the faculty team and where faculty in general were given the opportunity, training, and encouragement to develop their pedagogical skills through the use of technology and focused attention to teaching and learning. The grant funded whole-school events by which practical implications of the mission and vision of the school could be engaged, contemplated, and discussed by the community as a whole and by the faculty team in particular. It is no exaggeration to say that the Wabash grant has changed our school profoundly by allowing us to implement real and tangible steps to make aspirations a reality.
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A Consultation on Strategies for Interfaith Education

Awarded Grant
Walls, Neal
Wake Forest University Divinity School
Theological School
2006
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for a consultation to develop strategies for how best to introduce students to the practice of interfaith dialogue.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a consultation to develop strategies for how best to introduce students to the practice of interfaith dialogue.

Learning Abstract :
The "Consultation on Strategies for Interfaith Education" was quite successful in building bridges between Wake Forest University faculty in Religion and Divinity and the local Jewish leadership through informal conversations over a series of common meals. We discussed strategies for introducing interfaith dialogue to undergraduate and Divinity students at Wake Forest University, with an emphasis on the value of studying books of the Hebrew Bible as scripture shared by Jews and Christians. We also laid the foundation for future collaborative efforts between the University and area Jewish congregations. When asked about their concerns in the training of Christian ministers, the Jewish representatives in the consultation expressed a consistent opinion on the importance of communicating to Divinity students (1) the importance of the formative period of Rabbinic Judaism (c.200 - 500 CE) and (2) the historical and theological importance of the Shoah and post-Holocaust theology and philosophy.
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Effective Teaching in the Diverse Theological Classroom: Faculty Development at Lancaster Theological Seminary

Awarded Grant
Carey, Greg
Lancaster Theological Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This grant will assist individual Lancaster Theological Seminary faculty members to develop resources and skills for teaching more effectively in their diverse classrooms and in their collaboration with one another. The grant includes an introductory workshop with an expert facilitator/consultant, periodic consultation between that consultant and individual faculty members, and a concluding workshop. Faculty participants will report and evaluate their experience in terms of what they have learned and ...
Proposal abstract :
This grant will assist individual Lancaster Theological Seminary faculty members to develop resources and skills for teaching more effectively in their diverse classrooms and in their collaboration with one another. The grant includes an introductory workshop with an expert facilitator/consultant, periodic consultation between that consultant and individual faculty members, and a concluding workshop. Faculty participants will report and evaluate their experience in terms of what they have learned and the degree to which this experience has affected their pedagogy.

Learning Abstract :
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Faculty Workshop in Integrated Pedagogies

Awarded Grant
Shenk, Sara|Stutzman, Ervin
Eastern Mennonite Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to solicit feedback from students about what makes for good teaching and to gather faculty to reflect on teaching practice, enhance collaborative conversation, discover tools and resources for improving teaching, and engage in conversation about a community-wide apprenticeship.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to solicit feedback from students about what makes for good teaching and to gather faculty to reflect on teaching practice, enhance collaborative conversation, discover tools and resources for improving teaching, and engage in conversation about a community-wide apprenticeship.

Learning Abstract :
Even though the retreat was held near the conclusion of the semester, the grant allowed the faculty to "come away" to reflect on their teaching and the change in venue proved to be a significant factor in freeing faculty to engage with good energy. The workshop focused on teaching effectiveness with some reference to the integrated pedagogies. Dr. Hawkins helped the faculty to construct a foundation for pedagogical reflection, with enhanced awareness of vocabulary and concepts that will inform ongoing discussion. The workshop was a culmination of a yearlong effort to invite faculty to reflect on their pedagogy. The workshop successfully elicited a communal conversation for better mutual understanding of pedagogical principals and practices. Individual faculty differences were affirmed even as each was shown ways to improve his/her craft. The faculty also began to make connections between pedagogy and the curriculum revision which will largely define their work for the next couple years.
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A Sustained Workshop on Pedagogy and Hybrid Models of Distance Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Delamarter, Steve
Portland Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Our proposal calls for a sustained (six semester) workshop among our faculty to research, test, and refine the best pedagogical strategies we can for the delivery of a hybrid program of theological education. The proposal asks for stipends for writing workshops aimed at capturing and disseminating the lessons learned. The proposal has the full support of the dean of the seminary who believes that it will help the seminary live ...
Proposal abstract :
Our proposal calls for a sustained (six semester) workshop among our faculty to research, test, and refine the best pedagogical strategies we can for the delivery of a hybrid program of theological education. The proposal asks for stipends for writing workshops aimed at capturing and disseminating the lessons learned. The proposal has the full support of the dean of the seminary who believes that it will help the seminary live out its values of continued excellence, increased relevance, and increased accessibility.

Learning Abstract :
What the Wabash Workshops have enabled us to do is to work past our faulty first instincts about how to do online/hybrid teaching learning. In retrospect it is obvious to us that many of our first instincts were wrong: 1) that we would develop either online courses or face to face courses (the subtleties of thinking in terms of a hybrid course were beyond us); 2) that the development of a program would proceed by adding one after another online course (the subtleties of thinking in terms of a hybrid program were beyond us); 3) that programs would be developed a course at a time (rather than by conceiving the program as a whole in this new environment), etc. But the problem is that most institutions-ourselves included-are so under the gun that we do not have time to think things through adequately to see the shallowness of our first instincts. Instead, we leap and in so doing we instantiate those ideas into the structures of the program. Once they are built into a program, they are very difficult and time-consuming to change. The Wabash Workshops have given us space and time to think things through and develop our programs on a second and third generation of thinking and not on the first.

Further, we have become a community of thoughtful reflection about issues pedagogical, especially as they relate to the use of technology. We are no longer in any danger of being swept off our feet by some glitzy technology that is creating a lot of buzz. We cut pretty quickly to the heart of the matter: how can this technology be harnessed for the teaching learning process, and is the payoff worth the bother? If we are fuzzy on the first answer we will not look further. And even if we judge that a technology could have some value, if the price (literally and figuratively) is too high, we won't commit to it. Often this means that simpler technology is better. Then too, there is often no necessary correlation between the sophistication of the technology and the robustness of the social processes it can create and support.

Once we have come to see the issues clearly we have not had to waste any time or energy on some of the discussions and fears that plague some institutions: will it destroy our face to face environment? Won't students adopt false personae? Won't we lose our sense of community? How can this be done without 90% of our time spent face to face? These are not the sorts of questions that plague us. Instead, our attention can be focused on issues that are, in the end, much more rich in terms of their focus on student learning and much more strategic in terms of institutional viability, student success, and faculty sustainability.
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Pedagogies for Interfaith Dialogue: Creating and Sharing Critical Case Studies of Six Seminary Courses

Awarded Grant
Hadsell, Heidi|Roozen, David
Hartford Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Given the increased necessity for and everyday practice of interfaith engagement, the typically “informational” nature of seminary courses in interreligious relations is inadequate. As a corrective, we propose to create and share a collection of six critical case studies of courses in interfaith dialogue that optimize the full range of dialogical practices and purposes, including the advancement of mutual understanding and appreciative relationships. Case studies will be written by a ...
Proposal abstract :
Given the increased necessity for and everyday practice of interfaith engagement, the typically “informational” nature of seminary courses in interreligious relations is inadequate. As a corrective, we propose to create and share a collection of six critical case studies of courses in interfaith dialogue that optimize the full range of dialogical practices and purposes, including the advancement of mutual understanding and appreciative relationships. Case studies will be written by a working group of three Hartford Seminary and three external faculties. Case writers will be assisted by critical engagement with consultants in educational pedagogy and interfaith relations, by funding to hire evaluators for their case courses, and by dialogue among themselves, with Hartford Seminary faculty, and with peers responding to draft cases during a conference for theological educators. The conference will serve as an initial vehicle for sharing the cases. Subsequently, revised cases will be published both electronically and in paper.

Learning Abstract :
The project's case studies and an integrative essay are available at: http://www.hartsem.edu/ All courses emphasized dialogue as a practice, therefore requiring a practicum experience. In the absence of multi-faith student bodies, creating the practicum experience requires extra-curricular connections to non-Christian constituencies and can be labor intensive. A wide variety of approaches are demonstrated in the cases. Practicum participants need to understand that dialogue is a mutual conversation, not a forum for promoting one's tradition. Teaching interfaith dialogue also demands a significant substantive component along at least two dimensions: 1) basic knowledge of faith traditions other than Christianity, and 2) a firm grounding in the theology of religions. Individual students will be challenged, a few inevitably to the point of discomfort, in their knowledge of their own tradition, beliefs and practices. Among the wide variety of pedagogical techniques employed in the cases, all six cases include spiritual disciplines.
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Consultation on Impacting the Pedagogical Imaginations of Faculty Members and the Formation of Student Learning Outcomes in Six Historically Black Theological Seminaries

Awarded Grant
Wimberly, Edward
Interdenominational Theological Center
Theological School
2006
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
The proposal is an effort to improve the instruction of faculty members in the six HBTS through the appropriation of disciplines of theological education and the skillful use of its signature practices. The end result of improving the instruction of faculty members is to improve the learning outcomes of students in a comprehensive range of pastoral responsibilities and skills outline by the Master of Divinity degree standards of the Association ...
Proposal abstract :
The proposal is an effort to improve the instruction of faculty members in the six HBTS through the appropriation of disciplines of theological education and the skillful use of its signature practices. The end result of improving the instruction of faculty members is to improve the learning outcomes of students in a comprehensive range of pastoral responsibilities and skills outline by the Master of Divinity degree standards of the Association of Theological schools (ATS).

Learning Abstract :
The most significant result of the Wabash HBTS conference is that each HBTS institution has come to the conclusion that institutional planning and evaluation are not impositions from external authorities designed to undermine and thwart the efforts of HBTS to survive. Rather, the emerging message being internalized and which undergirds the planning and evaluation processes is that the accrediting expectations not only facilitate survival, they also enable institutional thriving far into the future. In fact, the Wabash HBTS conference has helped to initiate in some cases and continue in other cases a new institutional ethos which fosters best practices for carrying out the institutions' mission and objectives.
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Best Practices for Adult Learning

Awarded Grant
Harty, Kathy
Sacred Heart Seminary and School of Theology
Theological School
2006
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to identify issues associated with adult learning and pedagogy, to survey adult learning theories and determine which are best for the Scared Heart School of Theology, and to develop faculty projects that will incorporate adult learning theories.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to identify issues associated with adult learning and pedagogy, to survey adult learning theories and determine which are best for the Scared Heart School of Theology, and to develop faculty projects that will incorporate adult learning theories.

Learning Abstract :
The survey of the issues raised the importance of personal responsibility and initiative in any teaching/learning enterprise (on the part of both students and professors), as well as the variety of learning cultures. The consultation made us aware of the need for explicitness in what we already do implicitly. The scripture professors began such a conversation after the fall sessions, and other academic divisions plan to continue this. In addition, it highlighted the need for the academic and human/spiritual formation departments to engage with each other in such discussions. The next year's faculty development sessions will build on the questions and ideas raised during these sessions.
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Continuing Conversations Between Undergraduate and Graduate Faculty on Teaching and Learning in Theology

Awarded Grant
Mathew, Thomson
Oral Roberts University School of Theology and Missions
Theological School
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for project to create a dialogue between undergraduate and graduate theological faculty regarding teaching and learning theology, discuss teaching based on the mission of the university and specific outcomes expected of students, and discuss teaching methods that emphasize relationship formation.
Proposal abstract :
Support for project to create a dialogue between undergraduate and graduate theological faculty regarding teaching and learning theology, discuss teaching based on the mission of the university and specific outcomes expected of students, and discuss teaching methods that emphasize relationship formation.

Learning Abstract :
The most helpful aspect of the workshop was the lively daylong discussion on identity, vocation and mission and the needs assessment that followed. The discussions produced a serious self-analysis about theological education at this particular school at this time.

The consultation assisted the faculty by giving them a sense of belonging as one faculty for the first time. It allowed individuals to reexamine their calling and purpose in terms of the mission of the school. It made all parties concerned aware of significant needs in the faculty. It opened up possibilities for further conversations. It featured the consultant as a model teacher of adults that participants can emulate. It gave hope of improving teaching and learning at Oral Roberts University School of Theology and Missions.
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Theology in the Seminary - Classroom Accountability and Excellence

Awarded Grant
Lilles, Anthony
St. John Vianney Theological Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Support for a faculty in-service program with specific training in writing instructional objectives in order to effectively integrate their specific theology course outcomes with the mission statements of their academic departments and the primary mission statement of the seminary.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a faculty in-service program with specific training in writing instructional objectives in order to effectively integrate their specific theology course outcomes with the mission statements of their academic departments and the primary mission statement of the seminary.

Learning Abstract :
The Wabash Center has substantially contributed to curriculum development and improvement of student learning, leading to accountability and excellence in teaching. Orienting faculty to learning outcomes and incorporating them into courses was one of the workshop objectives and is evidenced in syllabi now produced. Father Brennan surpassed expectations by presenting material in a compelling way to achieve faculty "buy-in". A review of departmental meeting minutes shows that this improved discussions on discerning the quality of student learning and teaching. The workshop moved the faculty toward excellence in teaching by effectively communicating an appropriate use of learning outcomes. Individual faculty have begun to think in terms of assessing individual student performance and the quality of overall student learning throughout the curriculum. In particular, the institutional self-study submitted to ATS for attaining accreditation reflects a greater awareness of the importance of degree program standards and outcomes, and developing strategic plans to promote and protect the quality of theological education offered at St. John Vianney Theological Seminary.
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Seeing Through a Glass Darkly: A Three Year Consultation on Student Spiritual Formation in Theological Distance Education

Awarded Grant
Lowe, Stephen
Erskine Theological Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
The growth of distance education in seminaries has generated an intense intramural debate among theological educators regarding the legitimacy of distance education for clergy preparation – in particular, spiritual formation. Hence, this project will tackle issues associated with nurturing spiritual formation among seminary students in a variety of contexts through a series of consultations over three years. Members of the consultations will come from Protestant ATS member schools representing those who ...
Proposal abstract :
The growth of distance education in seminaries has generated an intense intramural debate among theological educators regarding the legitimacy of distance education for clergy preparation – in particular, spiritual formation. Hence, this project will tackle issues associated with nurturing spiritual formation among seminary students in a variety of contexts through a series of consultations over three years. Members of the consultations will come from Protestant ATS member schools representing those who currently use distance education and those who have resisted using it. A position paper will serve as a catalyst for dialogue and reflection at the first consultation. The second consultation will build on the first by suggesting ways in which spiritual formation can be facilitated through pedagogical strategies. The final consultation will continue the work of the previous two years and work toward creation of a working model for assessing spiritual formation in distance education. Project Goals. 1) Arrive at a consensus among consultation participants regarding a shared core of spiritual formation concepts that resonate across Protestant denominational and theological traditions, 2) Identify specific and unique problems posed by distance education regarding spiritual formation, 3) Propose specific pedagogical strategies that demonstrate spiritual formation in distance education, 4) Construct a preliminary assessment model that seeks to measure the impact of learning in distance education on the spiritual formation of students, 5) Disseminate findings and proposals through written essays, and 6) Create an online conference room for participants to engage in ongoing conversation about the topic.

Learning Abstract :
This consultation was able to produce a final working document for publication entitled "Spiritual Formation in Theological Distance Education: An Ecosystems Model." This document reflected the shared consensus of the group regarding the concept of spiritual formation and its application to online theological education. It also identified the two major problems of community formation and creating dialogue that could foster and sustain student spiritual formation regardless of course content and modes of delivery. Specific pedagogical strategies and a preliminary assessment tool were constructed and will be tested in future work. Dissemination of our findings can be found in publications and presentations available online and in periodicals.
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A series of faculty retreats: Exploring “Theological Literacy"

Awarded Grant
Rodriguez, Jeanette|Moe-Lobeda, Cynthia
Seattle University
Theological School
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this project is to enable every Seattle University graduate to attain a level of “theological literacy” through one of many options for a required introductory level course in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies. The proposed project’s goals are: 1) to identify what theological literacy means as it pertains to graduates of this university, and 2) to determine the pedagogical implications of that understanding, and compile pedagogical ...
Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this project is to enable every Seattle University graduate to attain a level of “theological literacy” through one of many options for a required introductory level course in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies. The proposed project’s goals are: 1) to identify what theological literacy means as it pertains to graduates of this university, and 2) to determine the pedagogical implications of that understanding, and compile pedagogical resources to address those implications.

Learning Abstract :
In reflecting on the three faculty retreats, the co-directors have identified the following learnings: 1) Members of the department are hungry to talk about teaching and learning in our context, and in particular to strategize about what works and does not work well in our classrooms and why. 2) Having articulated clear learning objectives-through close collaborative effort-we share a strong desire to become more apt at assessing the extent to which these learning objectives are met. 3) We realized more deeply than before, the distinct characteristics of undergraduate theological education in the Pacific Northwest. Known as the most "unchurched" region of the nation, our regional culture includes a prevalent unfamiliarity with religion and a disdain for religious faith that must be accounted for in classroom teaching. 4) We have a great deal to learn from each other about teaching, and we have a deep sense of respect for one another as teachers. There is a delightful sense of shared receptivity for learning from each other.
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Pedagogies of Seminary Chapel

Awarded Grant
Lord, Jennifer
Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological School
2006
Topics: Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The primary goal of this project is to focus and enhance reflection about the pedagogies of seminary chapel. A secondary goal for this pre-meeting is to strategize ways in which persons serving as Dean of the Chapel can promote conversation in and among our schools concerning the intentional pedagogies of seminary chapel programs.
Proposal abstract :
The primary goal of this project is to focus and enhance reflection about the pedagogies of seminary chapel. A secondary goal for this pre-meeting is to strategize ways in which persons serving as Dean of the Chapel can promote conversation in and among our schools concerning the intentional pedagogies of seminary chapel programs.

Learning Abstract :
Pedagogies of Seminary Chapel was a conversation among persons in theological seminaries who serve as Dean of Chapel and who teach in liturgical studies. Seminary chapel programs may exist for many purposes including doxology, spiritual formation, and celebrations contextual to seminary life. Yet seminary chapel programs are pedagogical: worship forms us. Continuing tensions surrounding seminary chapel programs include whether or not chapel is understood to be a lab for experimentation or a place for students to see and practice the particulars of a tradition. Some will question whether or not certain worship traditions have ritual continuity that should be modeled. Adding to this are tensions accompanying increasing denominational diversity of a student body and the ways that this diversity is or is not reflected in chapel. Ongoing issues are the role of chapel in schools' mission and programming and seminaries' self-assessment of the integrative nature of theological education.
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A series of Faculty Meetings on the Pedagogical Challenges of Engaging Bioethical Issues across the Theological Curriculum

Awarded Grant
Kilner, John
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological School
2006
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Theological education has insufficiently equipped most church leaders to engage many crucial challenges to human life and dignity - largely due to pedagogical deficiencies connected to the compartmentalization of bioethics in the theological curriculum. The proposed initiative seeks to begin the process of correcting this insufficiency through a series of three meetings in early 2007 involving 12 Trinity faculty members. These meetings will be driven by a pedagogical purpose: to learn how ...
Proposal abstract :
Theological education has insufficiently equipped most church leaders to engage many crucial challenges to human life and dignity - largely due to pedagogical deficiencies connected to the compartmentalization of bioethics in the theological curriculum. The proposed initiative seeks to begin the process of correcting this insufficiency through a series of three meetings in early 2007 involving 12 Trinity faculty members. These meetings will be driven by a pedagogical purpose: to learn how a theological faculty can teach students most effectively to understand and engage crucial bioethical challenges.

Learning Abstract :
Once faculty members in every discipline of the curriculum are equipped to make the conceptual connections between their disciplines and bioethical challenges, they can become highly energized to develop appropriate pedagogical strategies for insuring that their courses help students to understand and engage vital bioethical challenges. This project mobilized such a team of teachers through readings, a set of three extended meetings, and a final reflection instrument that fostered further pedagogical strategizing. The project also uncovered a serious obstacle to classroom effectiveness. Teachers need better tools - case studies in particular-to bridge from their particular disciplines to bioethical issues. They need better understanding of how to mobilize the resources of their disciplines to address ethical case studies. And they need to be equipped to engage the unique pedagogical challenges involved in using highly inter-disciplinary bioethics case studies in class. A follow-up initiative is being developed to address these needs.
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Teaching Exegesis in Historically Black Theological Schools

Awarded Grant
Ashmore, James|Mbuvi, Andrew
Shaw University Divinity School
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
This project will examine the unique dimensions of teaching Biblical exegesis in Historically Black Theological Schools (HBTS). The faculty who teach Biblical Studies in select schools (Hood, Howard, ITC, Payne, Proctor, and Shaw) will meet for a conference to discuss the unique needs of their students and the expectations of the African American Church, to share best practices in teaching, and to formulate one or more approaches for teaching exegesis ...
Proposal abstract :
This project will examine the unique dimensions of teaching Biblical exegesis in Historically Black Theological Schools (HBTS). The faculty who teach Biblical Studies in select schools (Hood, Howard, ITC, Payne, Proctor, and Shaw) will meet for a conference to discuss the unique needs of their students and the expectations of the African American Church, to share best practices in teaching, and to formulate one or more approaches for teaching exegesis within their contexts. These approaches will be tested in classes at all six schools. After testing the approaches in the classroom at the institutions, a second conference will be held to evaluate the approaches, summarize the findings, and plan for future collaboration.

Learning Abstract :
We gathered scholars who teach in Biblical Studies at six Historically Black Theological Schools, selected methods of teaching biblical interpretation, tested those methods in the classroom, and evaluated the results. The faculty who gathered had to share best practices in teaching, and to learn from each other. The two conferences we held produced enthusiastic responses from the participants. They also highlighted a general lack of agreement about what it means to teach biblical interpretation. Although there was general agreement that teaching Historical Critical methods and teaching biblical interpretation as a prelude to preaching are not good models, there was very little agreement about what we should teach. We also recognized that insufficient attention has been paid to correlating teaching methods to the skills we want students to gain.
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Teaching for Transformation: Collaborative Teaching and Learning in Biblical Studies

Awarded Grant
Schüssler Fiorenza, Elisabeth
Harvard Divinity School
Theological School
2007
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
This research project seeks to explore the conditions and practices of collaborative teaching and learning in biblical studies. It is situated in the intersection of her work in feminist hermeneutics, biblical rhetorical studies and graduate biblical education. Cooperative education requires from faculty and students “reflective action,” that is context specific, recognizes differences, and bridges the gap between theory and practice. Such a collaborative pedagogy is concretized through an analysis of ...
Proposal abstract :
This research project seeks to explore the conditions and practices of collaborative teaching and learning in biblical studies. It is situated in the intersection of her work in feminist hermeneutics, biblical rhetorical studies and graduate biblical education. Cooperative education requires from faculty and students “reflective action,” that is context specific, recognizes differences, and bridges the gap between theory and practice. Such a collaborative pedagogy is concretized through an analysis of the didactic approach developed in Germany called Theme-Centered-Interaction (TCI) with its relation of group dynamics to a democratic goal of education. By focusing on the modes and conditions of collaborative learning and teamwork, the project seeks to develop the didactics of collaborative learning and teaching in biblical studies understood as critical rhetorical studies.

Learning Abstract :
I am very grateful to the Wabash Center for awarding me a faculty research grant which allowed me to continue my exploration of the need for transforming graduate education on the MA and PhD/ThD levels. The rich academic literature on collaborative teaching and learning seems to have had great impact on undergraduate teaching but seems not yet to have transformed the pedagogy of doctoral studies. Yet such a transformation is necessary not only because the discipline presently cultivates a great variety of methods, sub-fields and theoretical perspectives but also because doctoral students often no longer have comprehensive religious-theoretical or the logical training before entering the field. Whereas this situation is seen by many as one of crisis and fragmentation, it also provides an opportunity for rethinking graduate biblical studies. I hope that this project and its forthcoming publications will engender increased discussion of this important issue.
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Teaching Scholars, Changing Models: A Consultation with Women Activists in the Academy

Awarded Grant
Townes, Emilie|Leslie, Kristen
Yale Divinity School
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
A consultation in May 2007 will bring together women teaching/scholars of religion who are seeking to combine action for social change with their academic profession so that they can share models and create new models for educational transformation. The participants are already committed to changing from a predominantly lecture model to an interactive and collaborative pedagogy that involves the students in integrating what they learn with their own vocational life ...
Proposal abstract :
A consultation in May 2007 will bring together women teaching/scholars of religion who are seeking to combine action for social change with their academic profession so that they can share models and create new models for educational transformation. The participants are already committed to changing from a predominantly lecture model to an interactive and collaborative pedagogy that involves the students in integrating what they learn with their own vocational life goals. The consultation provides an opportunity for them to work together as an intergenerational, interracial and interfaith group to share their transformative strategies.

Learning Abstract :
The consultation succeeded in bringing together female teaching scholars of religion who seek to combine action for social change with their academic profession to share models and create new models for educational transformation. The consultation evoked lively debate and thoughtful reflection with specific action plans that will be fine-tuned by the participants. This kind of transformatory consultation required an engaged pedagogy that has a commitment to dialogue and critical reflection. Hence, the educational transformation we sought to discuss, addresses the structure of theological education and pedagogical strategies that will enhance teaching and learning such that students and teachers recognize that education is not a neutral enterprise, but a crucial vehicle for shaping broader societal values explicitly and implicitly.
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Developing an Effective and Visionary Signature Pedagogy for Brite Divinity School

Awarded Grant
Ramsay, Nancy
Brite Divinity School at TCU
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project proposes a process for critical assessment of Brite Divinity School’s operative Signature Pedagogy, consultation, faculty-led research, and intentional conversation to develop proposals based on current literature and best practices in pedagogies of Formation, Interpretation, Contextualization, and Performance. Such engagement and exploration will lead to the construction of a revised, effective, and visionary Signature Pedagogy for Brite.
Proposal abstract :
This project proposes a process for critical assessment of Brite Divinity School’s operative Signature Pedagogy, consultation, faculty-led research, and intentional conversation to develop proposals based on current literature and best practices in pedagogies of Formation, Interpretation, Contextualization, and Performance. Such engagement and exploration will lead to the construction of a revised, effective, and visionary Signature Pedagogy for Brite.

Learning Abstract :
This grant explored the usefulness of Educating Clergy and particularly the four interdependent pedagogies for deepening and enriching conversations surrounding curricular revision and the identification of an institution's Signature Pedagogy. Results are quite positive and include prompting a new appreciation for the integration of the four pedagogies across curricular categories. The concept of Signature Pedagogy proved useful in reconsidering and revising the institution's previously implicit Signature Pedagogy so that it is better aligned with its ethos and assessment of contemporary and future needs for theological education. Important secondary gains included improved appreciation for degree program assessment. In addition, there is new appreciation for and resources for supporting the integration of learning across the curriculum. Vertical and horizontal integration will be mapped and assessed in the new curriculum.
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Teaching the Bible: Toward Responsible Interpretation

Awarded Grant
Kirkham Hawkins, Faith
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological School
2007
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
A central argument of educational theorists - that focusing upon transferring information is less effective at promoting learning than focusing upon developing skills that use information - is the foundation for the project director’s conviction that teachers and students of the Bible are likely to benefit from pedagogical resources that help foster among students commitment to and skills for responsible interpretation of the Bible. Hence, this study leave project ...
Proposal abstract :
A central argument of educational theorists - that focusing upon transferring information is less effective at promoting learning than focusing upon developing skills that use information - is the foundation for the project director’s conviction that teachers and students of the Bible are likely to benefit from pedagogical resources that help foster among students commitment to and skills for responsible interpretation of the Bible. Hence, this study leave project is focused on research and development of approaches to teaching the Bible focused on responsible interpretation. The project aims to combine a scholar’s understanding of the Bible with a teacher’s understanding of the classroom. Specific attention will be given to study of an array of pedagogical theories and methods particularly germane to enhancing student learning in biblical studies courses.

Learning Abstract :
This project sought to research pedagogical theories in relation to a way of interpreting the Bible that would engage the students in their own questions and interpretations. Successful at surveying a selection of the pedagogical literature, there is much left to mine in the resources of problem based learnings and using case studies. Suggestions for future study leaves include structuring a learning community for the leave recipient.
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Designing a Student Portfolio for Assessing Seminarian Progress in the Master of Divinity Degree Program (M.Div.) at Roman Catholic Seminaries

Awarded Grant
Latcovich, Mark
St. Mary Seminary and Graduate School of Theology
Theological School
2007
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Educating Clergy   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
This project builds upon and extends work initiated last year to develop a framework for assessing student progress at Roman Catholic seminaries. A team of seminary educators and senior staff of Education Development Center will complete the design of an assessment model that integrates the major and minor occupational responsibilities of successful priests and the behavioral attributes called for in priestly formation. The team will then research, review and prioritize ...
Proposal abstract :
This project builds upon and extends work initiated last year to develop a framework for assessing student progress at Roman Catholic seminaries. A team of seminary educators and senior staff of Education Development Center will complete the design of an assessment model that integrates the major and minor occupational responsibilities of successful priests and the behavioral attributes called for in priestly formation. The team will then research, review and prioritize elements of student portfolios that are most applicable to the assessment model. They will then draft a design for a portfolio that can collect and display evidence of seminarian progress as measured by the assessment model.

Learning Abstract :
Outcome assessment tools for the depth and breadth of the Master of Divinity degree remains a complex challenge for most divinity schools. While successful academic performance is evaluated through capstone seminars and comprehensive exams, the overall assessment of a student's personal growth, pastoral skills, spirituality and leadership abilities are often clouded by reported ratings of only successful academic performance. Without specific examples of evidence in these other domains, the student's self-knowledge of the integration of formational elements may never be adequately assessed. Portfolios enable the measurement of multiple dimensions of student progress through the collection of different types of data and materials in order to achieve an integrated portrait.

The Midwest Association of Theological Schools represented in this project by the collaboration of eight Roman Catholic seminaries researched portfolio use and design. They incorporated the four pillars of priestly formation; human, spiritual, intellectual and pastoral with the DACUM of duties and tasks of ordained priests in order to create a portfolio template for seminaries.

The merits of this project demonstrate that an integrated portfolio for M.Div students is possible. Each school will need to adapt their current academic program and design portfolio components around their program outcomes and goals. A portfolio model requires the commitment of an institution and its faculty, the creation of an assessment-minded culture within the school, and graduated implementation and monitoring. Currently there are a few schools beginning to pilot this work for future implementation. Time commitment, facilitation of the portfolio process and ongoing monitoring of student performance remain challenges for seminaries with minimal human resources and budgets. Nevertheless, portfolios help bridge the gap between formation in seminaries and ongoing formation and continuing education of future church leaders.
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Facilitation of Gathering of Faculty of Saskatoon Theological Union

Awarded Grant
Balas, Laura
St. Andrew's College
Theological School
2007
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
This project will utilize an outside consultant to work with about 20 Faculty from the three schools of the Saskatoon Theological Union, St. Andrew’s College (United Church of Canada), College of Emmanuel, St. Chad (Anglican Church), and Lutheran Theological Seminary, to focus on issues associated with institutional and Faculty teaching and learning interrelationships. As the Union the three schools represent the largest mainline Theological Schools in Western Canada and therefore ...
Proposal abstract :
This project will utilize an outside consultant to work with about 20 Faculty from the three schools of the Saskatoon Theological Union, St. Andrew’s College (United Church of Canada), College of Emmanuel, St. Chad (Anglican Church), and Lutheran Theological Seminary, to focus on issues associated with institutional and Faculty teaching and learning interrelationships. As the Union the three schools represent the largest mainline Theological Schools in Western Canada and therefore cooperation associated with pedagogical concerns is regarded as essential for training ministry personnel in much of Canada. Hence the project hopes to tackle issues of cooperative teaching, institutional stresses related to three different administrations and denominations, and matters pertaining to joint policies and agreements.

Learning Abstract :
We held two day-long retreats for all Faculty, a retreat in each semester. We hired an outside consultant skilled in enabling people to reach a depth of conversation that was conducive to cooperation. The first session barely scratched the surface of our relationships, but the second one fostered a much stronger sense of trust among the faculty. There were some interesting facts came to light during the time together, for instance, 80% of the faculty members will retire at the same time, so how do we plan for continuity in our cooperation? It is difficult to have a joint calendar with different expectations of the three denominations, about who teaches which classes (some can only be taught by professors in their own denomination). It seems like the breaking of things is actually God's opportunity, we have regrouped and are renewed. We intend to provide quality and innovative theological education together. We need to have our policies collected and written down in a standard handbook for all three Colleges. The feeling of all concerned is that we must have a retreat like this every semester to keep the communication open and active.
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Pedagogies of Spiritual Formation and Professional Practice

Awarded Grant
Meyers, Ruth
Bexley Hall Seabury - Western Theological Seminary
Theological School
2007
Topics: Educating Clergy   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
At Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, fourteen worship services each week are a key component of spiritual formation and also provide opportunities for students to develop skills for clergy leadership. Faculty and ordained members of the seminary staff regularly lead these services, but they do not currently have a shared understanding of their role and authority in decisions about the services at which they preside and about the ongoing worship life of ...
Proposal abstract :
At Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, fourteen worship services each week are a key component of spiritual formation and also provide opportunities for students to develop skills for clergy leadership. Faculty and ordained members of the seminary staff regularly lead these services, but they do not currently have a shared understanding of their role and authority in decisions about the services at which they preside and about the ongoing worship life of the seminary. A one-day workshop for faculty and ordained members of the seminary staff will enable conversation about the pedagogical implications of worship and about the authority of faculty and ordained staff in shaping that worship.

Learning Abstract :
Seabury-Western Theological Seminary engaged in a one-day workshop for faculty and ordained members of the seminary staff in order to enable conversation about the pedagogical implications of worship. Particular attention was given to questions associated with the authority of faculty and ordained staff in shaping seminary worship in relation to issues of worship and student formation. At Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, fourteen worship services each week serve as key components for spiritual formation and also provide opportunities for students to develop skills for clergy leadership. Faculty and ordained members of the seminary staff regularly lead these services, but a common understanding about their role and authority in decisions about these services is mixed. Hence, the project sought to directly address pedagogical issues directly associated with community worship and student formation.

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Proleptic Pedagogy: Teaching from the Future to Distance, Disability, and Race

Awarded Grant
Howell, Nancy
Saint Paul School of Theology
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Saint Paul School of Theology proposes a three-year project to attend to three distinct pedagogical challenges for the future of theological education. First, instead of fitting new technologies into old pedagogies, how are teaching and learning transformed by shifting needs of students who are “digital natives” or “digital immigrants” and/or distance learners? Second, instead of relying on note-takers and extended deadlines, what pedagogies virtually eliminate the need for “accommodations” ...
Proposal abstract :
Saint Paul School of Theology proposes a three-year project to attend to three distinct pedagogical challenges for the future of theological education. First, instead of fitting new technologies into old pedagogies, how are teaching and learning transformed by shifting needs of students who are “digital natives” or “digital immigrants” and/or distance learners? Second, instead of relying on note-takers and extended deadlines, what pedagogies virtually eliminate the need for “accommodations” for students with learning disabilities because courses are designed flexibly with resources and opportunities open to diverse learning styles and needs? Third, instead of engaging student diversity with the tools of the 1960s, what new teaching and learning strategies anticipate future student racial/ethnic demographics and interracial educational experiences? Proleptic pedagogical strategies reflect the praxis and prophetic goals expressed in the seminary’s mission and values, which challenge faculty to make theological education accessible and transformative for the next generations of seminarians.

Learning Abstract :
Saint Paul School of Theology developed a grant project entitled "Pedagogy: Teaching from the Future to Distance, Disability, and Race." The faculty learned that diversifying our teaching/learning resources makes us more agile in responding to diverse students, classroom contexts, educational opportunities, as well as the needs of the church. We have learned to be more astute observers of students and their contexts, which compels us to be more skilled and flexible in pedagogy that responds to concrete and changing social locations and cultural experiences affecting the teaching and learning environment. Our proleptic pedagogy depends on attentiveness to changes in teaching resources and contexts - pedagogy is rooted in praxis and cultivation of imagination in teaching and learning.
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Expanding the School of the Prophets: A Vision of Multicultural Inclusion, Education, and Ministry

Awarded Grant
Hudnut-Beumler, James|Segovia, Fernando
Vanderbilt University/The Divinity School
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice

Proposal abstract :
The project seeks to move the Vanderbilt Divinity School, its units and programs, closer to the ideal vision of a multicultural organization. This is a vision that has been present from the beginning in the ideals and principles of the School, well captured in its self-designation as a School of the Prophets, and that presents itself as ever more pressing, given the profound social and cultural transformation at work in ...
Proposal abstract :
The project seeks to move the Vanderbilt Divinity School, its units and programs, closer to the ideal vision of a multicultural organization. This is a vision that has been present from the beginning in the ideals and principles of the School, well captured in its self-designation as a School of the Prophets, and that presents itself as ever more pressing, given the profound social and cultural transformation at work in the country and the churches alike. The project seeks to pursue this vision by focusing on theological education and its fundamental tasks of teaching and learning. Towards this end it proposes to introduce the problematic of race and ethnicity into the whole spectrum of its units and programs. Through such expansion of the School of the Prophets, its long-standing commitments and ideals, the project envisions a profound transformation of theological education in the 21st century.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to move the Vanderbilt Divinity School's programs and units closer to the ideal vision of a multicultural organization through faculty study, conversation, the use of academic and pedagogical consultants, and envisioning multicultural theological education across all disciplines. It was successful in its goal of carrying out faculty conversations and study, but was not able to engender the school-wide conversation and change it envisioned.
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Engaging the Pedagogy of Difficult Conversations

Awarded Grant
Holder Rich, Cynthia
Western Theological Seminary
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Western Theological Seminary has lived out its primary mission of preparing leaders for the Reformed Church in America for 141 years. This has led to a particular profile in faculty, administration, and enrolled students that lacks significant diversity. In recent years, the seminary has come to realize the need to engage the multicultural realities in the community and the church. We engage these conversations, knowing that this change will be both ...
Proposal abstract :
Western Theological Seminary has lived out its primary mission of preparing leaders for the Reformed Church in America for 141 years. This has led to a particular profile in faculty, administration, and enrolled students that lacks significant diversity. In recent years, the seminary has come to realize the need to engage the multicultural realities in the community and the church. We engage these conversations, knowing that this change will be both challenging and at times difficult; yet, we are committed to the journey. This grant will allow us to engage these difficult conversations and to further institutional moves we have already made in our approaches to theological education and formation for ministry, in a context of increasing community and institutional diversity.

Learning Abstract :
Through two years of difficult conversations, we in the Western Theological Seminary community have grown in understanding the challenge of diverse growth. Engaging the whole community in this discussion has been a challenge. Sometimes, we have met the challenge and found satisfaction in the ensuing conversation. At other times, for a variety of reasons, we have failed to find the space for the conversation to take place. The two twin challenges of engaging community members of the majority culture who have difficulty seeing the importance of the conversation, while supporting community members outside the majority culture in their growth and their sense of belonging in this context have seemed at times overwhelming. The grant encouraged leaders to continue the process and to seek ways to creatively address inevitable tensions that arise on this journey.
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International and Domestic Marginalized Racial/Ethnic Diversity and Development for Multicultural Pedagogy

Awarded Grant
Choi, Hee An|Andrews, Dale
Boston University School of Theology
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
A major interest of this grant project is to help us discover or diagnose important areas in our institution and teaching that compromise learning from diversity and therefore create impediments to diversity in our resources and pedagogy. Currently Boston University – School of Theology seeks to address a lack in domestic racial/ethnic diversity among faculty and students alike, which is a considerable departure from its historical legacy in theological education ...
Proposal abstract :
A major interest of this grant project is to help us discover or diagnose important areas in our institution and teaching that compromise learning from diversity and therefore create impediments to diversity in our resources and pedagogy. Currently Boston University – School of Theology seeks to address a lack in domestic racial/ethnic diversity among faculty and students alike, which is a considerable departure from its historical legacy in theological education for African American and women alumni-ae with graduate degrees. Considering this departure from our institutions’ legacy in theological education for multi-ethnic student body, this project will examine our current pedagogy and seek to develop critically new pedagogical strategies to teaching and create more inclusive multicultural and multiethnic global environment. The workshops will provide opportunities for faculty and administrators to engage in conversations of dismantling racism, sexism, and (neo-) colonialism. With several consultants and alumni/ae, faculty will investigate the dynamics of teaching international and domestic marginalized racial/ethnic students and will seek to develop multicultural pedagogy and curricular resources, which will include efforts at institutional reform in the School of Theology.

Learning Abstract :
This project designed workshops to address international and domestic, marginalized racial/ethnic diversity in theological education, but more specifically in our classrooms. These training and dialogical workshops underscored the convergence or overlapping nature of racism, sexism, and (neo)colonialism within our institutional life and our teaching culture. As our project progressed through these workshops, faculty and administrators explicitly pressed for more attention to teaching strategies for the classroom. We discovered a critical need to have workshop leaders devise exercises for this desired work that did not dismiss or sweep past the necessary critical reflection on systemic and cultural marginalization and how we might learn from diversity itself. This discovery involved institutional life and teaching practices that passively and sometimes actively privilege some voices and fail to bridge the gaps of resourcing and learning caused by dominance, neglect, or marginalization. In the end, we formed a new faculty leadership committee, which expands the previous work of the faculty's recent Cultural Competency Committee, to devise a long-term project (possibly three to five years) to continue our work on teaching and diversity.
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Developing Pedagogical Approaches that Foster Multicultural/ Multiracial/ Multiethnic Diversity

Awarded Grant
Martell-Otero, Loida
Palmer Theological Seminary - Eastern Univ
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
This project entails the formation of a core group that will examine pedagogical approaches that foster multicultural, multiracial and multiethnic diversity at Palmer Theological Seminary. This core group will, at the end of the year, become a standing committee that will aid other faculty in assessing their own pedagogical strategies as well as providing newer resources such as bibliographies and assessment tools. During the year of training, the core group ...
Proposal abstract :
This project entails the formation of a core group that will examine pedagogical approaches that foster multicultural, multiracial and multiethnic diversity at Palmer Theological Seminary. This core group will, at the end of the year, become a standing committee that will aid other faculty in assessing their own pedagogical strategies as well as providing newer resources such as bibliographies and assessment tools. During the year of training, the core group will further their insights and pedagogical abilities regarding approaches and resources that intentionally foster multicultural and multiethnic sensibilities. Specifically, the group will examine their syllabi, curriculum, bibliographies, and assessment tools to see how these take into consideration “difference” and how their classrooms aid the student in becoming aware of “difference” in their own learning and future ministries. An important aspect of this teaching self-evaluation is to factor in the reality of “embodiment”: how we assess and are assessed by others based on our physicality.

Learning Abstract :
The Diversity Colloquy at Palmer Theological Seminary provided me with the opportunity to dialogue with a group of exceptional and dedicated colleagues whose collective wisdom and experiences I have come to appreciate. Collectively, the experience allowed us to affirm the creative pedagogies we already practice in the classroom and to learn new strategies from each other. It gave us the courage to be more creative. It also heightened our awareness that to be a truly diverse institution is a complex and difficult enterprise. Everyone must be involved. I now teach students the skills I learned as the project's director about writing grants and their implementation. The single most important insight I gained was from a colleague who shared that the immigrant experience meant that one was "always careful of one's geography." Teaching in classrooms that foster diversity implies being respectful of others' geographies and appreciative of their gifts.
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How Can You Say That? Choosing Challenging Conversations

Awarded Grant
House, Renee
New Brunswick Theological Seminary
Theological School
2007
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
A two-year faculty project to study when, where, and how difficult conversations about race, racism, and ecclesial formation occur at New Brunswick Theological Seminary and to research and implement strategies for facilitating such conversations through the use of Appreciative Inquiry and Theatre of the Oppressed in and outside of the classroom. A final, summative forum will be held with invited guests from area seminaries.
Proposal abstract :
A two-year faculty project to study when, where, and how difficult conversations about race, racism, and ecclesial formation occur at New Brunswick Theological Seminary and to research and implement strategies for facilitating such conversations through the use of Appreciative Inquiry and Theatre of the Oppressed in and outside of the classroom. A final, summative forum will be held with invited guests from area seminaries.

Learning Abstract :
We have learned to identify difficult conversations - what they are, when and how they occur, and when and how they might be suppressed. We have learned and implemented strategies for encouraging difficult conversations to happen, and, to be less anxious and more hopeful about the possibilities that these conversations offer. We have experimented with ways of navigating difficult conversations - Appreciative Inquiry, Theatre of the Oppressed, and triad experiments - and are in the process of developing strategies and locations to assess difficult conversations after they have occurred. This grant has made a difference in our life at New Brunswick Theological Seminary. Faculty, administrators and students have learned how to have difficult conversations, more often, and with more skill. We know that this will continue to be a gift for the Seminary's faculty, for our students, and for the communities we serve.
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Educating Trustees for Dismantling Racism and Building Cross Cultural Competency

Awarded Grant
Liew, Tat-siong Benny
Pacific School of Religion
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice

Proposal abstract :
This one-day workshop aims to strengthen the capacity of the Pacific School of Religion Board of Trustees to govern the institution’s stated strategic goal, “to act boldly in equipping leaders with the values, skills, and commitment to cross-cultural competency necessary to build anti-racist institutions and dismantle systemic racism in society, and to model this commitment and work at PSR.” Education at the board level will assist in Dismantling Racism ...
Proposal abstract :
This one-day workshop aims to strengthen the capacity of the Pacific School of Religion Board of Trustees to govern the institution’s stated strategic goal, “to act boldly in equipping leaders with the values, skills, and commitment to cross-cultural competency necessary to build anti-racist institutions and dismantle systemic racism in society, and to model this commitment and work at PSR.” Education at the board level will assist in Dismantling Racism and Building Cross Cultural Competency at the institutional level and increase PSR’s capacity to implement the comprehensive action plan developed to meet this strategic plan goal. We need to help members of the Board of Trustees to increase their sensitization on cross-racial/cultural issues and communication, informing both their committee and board work.

Learning Abstract :
The initial intention was to conduct a one-day workshop on anti-racism training for our seminary's board of trustees. We have learned, however, that it is more effective to engage trustees in dialogue and reflection over a series of three meetings. It is also more effective to focus less on "training" but more on engaging the board in self-reflection and interaction with one another about issues of racism, white privilege, and their impacts on PSR as an institution. Involving trustees in learning activities and exercises that mirror what has been done with students, staff, and faculty also allow trustees to gain a greater understanding of what students and other members of the PSR community are learning even as they themselves are building up their individual and collective capacity for the work of dismantling racism.
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Seminar on Racial and Cultural Diversity for Faculty of Color

Awarded Grant
Andraos, Michel
Catholic Theological Union of Chicago
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution

Proposal abstract :
The main goal of the seminar would be to bring together a group of faculty of color to share about their personal work experience, develop a better analysis and understanding of the systemic issues of race, racism, and cultural diversity, dream about a vision of an anti-racist theological curriculum, classroom and institution, and build mutual, collegial relationships.
Proposal abstract :
The main goal of the seminar would be to bring together a group of faculty of color to share about their personal work experience, develop a better analysis and understanding of the systemic issues of race, racism, and cultural diversity, dream about a vision of an anti-racist theological curriculum, classroom and institution, and build mutual, collegial relationships.

Learning Abstract :
The collegiality and sense of new solidarity that developed among group members was a transformative and empowering experience that we all needed, both personally and professionally. The seminar was an opportunity for discovering the potential we had as a group of faculty of color for supporting each other and promoting institutional change. A significant outcome on the institutional level is the formation by the Dean and the Faculty Assembly of a faculty committee on anti-racism and diversity that will insure the institutional continuity of the work of the seminar. Most challenging in the process was organizing the schedule of the meetings for a group of eight busy members of the faculty over almost two years.
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Pursuing a Culture of Engaged Conversation for School and Church

Awarded Grant
Heille, Gregory|Garrido, Ann
Aquinas Institute of Theology
Theological School
2007
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
While neither Aquinas Institute of Theology nor the Catholic Church are alone in confronting hard or at times disruptive conversations in faculty meetings, class, or field supervision, our Dominican heritage of collaborative learning in pursuit of truth requires intentional commitment to meaningful difficult conversation. As a school, we propose to learn and practice the art of difficult conversation through a facilitated faculty study of the Harvard Negotiation Project’s book ...
Proposal abstract :
While neither Aquinas Institute of Theology nor the Catholic Church are alone in confronting hard or at times disruptive conversations in faculty meetings, class, or field supervision, our Dominican heritage of collaborative learning in pursuit of truth requires intentional commitment to meaningful difficult conversation. As a school, we propose to learn and practice the art of difficult conversation through a facilitated faculty study of the Harvard Negotiation Project’s book on Difficult Conversations and facilitated case studies of difficult conversations in our classrooms. By improving our difficult conversations in class, we intend to lay the groundwork for a successful all-school symposium on the neuralgic topic, “What is truth?” At grant’s end, we will publish on what we have learned and then take a further step by teaching the art of difficult education to others in the community who collaborate with us in the formation of our students, especially field education supervisors.

Learning Abstract :
From January 2008 – May 2009, the faculty of Aquinas Institute studied together the text Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most and then engaged in a series of exercises that involved practicing the approach advocated in the book within faculty meetings, classroom interactions, and a school-wide symposium. We learned that the "s" at the end of the book title is not accidental; one difficult conversation inevitably evokes many more. We discovered these conversations require a great deal of time and emotional energy, but also can create a culture of greater honesty within an institution as well as professional and spiritual growth within individuals. In the end, we recognized that increased understanding of each other is a true gift, but that understanding alone is not enough. We commit ourselves now to also studying and practicing skills for negotiation and group decision-making.
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Advancing the Development of a Seminary as a Multicultural Educational Institution Using Critical Incident Narratives

Awarded Grant
Litchfield, Randy
Methodist Theological School in Ohio
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution

Proposal abstract :
The project will advance the development of Methodist Theological School in Ohio (MTSO) as a multicultural educational institution and increase its capacity for engaging race and privilege in relation to student learning through initial assessment, equipping, and planning. Critical incident narratives will be created based upon MTSO learning situations where issues of race and privilege are evident. These will function as a resource for assessment, transformative reflection on pedagogy, and ...
Proposal abstract :
The project will advance the development of Methodist Theological School in Ohio (MTSO) as a multicultural educational institution and increase its capacity for engaging race and privilege in relation to student learning through initial assessment, equipping, and planning. Critical incident narratives will be created based upon MTSO learning situations where issues of race and privilege are evident. These will function as a resource for assessment, transformative reflection on pedagogy, and preparation of students for diversity in their seminary experience. Engagement with the narratives will be coupled with resources that provide frameworks and strategies for inclusive classrooms. A pilot anti-racism team will lead initial assessment work, creation of narratives, faculty and campus events, and planning the next phase of MTSO’s initiative. Success of the project will be evaluated through pre and post project surveys of faculty and review of syllabi.

Learning Abstract :
Good intentions about addressing race also require good skills, dialogue, and commitment. Faculty members need to be equipped for their leadership roles in creating inclusive classrooms. Students may want to talk about race but need to know how to do that safely. It is important to understand what students experience in the classroom and to recognize that students are willing to share their experiences in an environment that fosters truth-telling and respectful listening. Faculty members need to have open conversations about race among themselves as well. Raising consciousness and opening conversations about race also raises expectations for change, which if not met can lead to disillusionment and disengagement. When addressing an issue that is as systemic and broad as race it is easy to attempt too much and lose focus.
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Teaching Inclusively Amidst Intersecting Diversities

Awarded Grant
Ramsay, Nancy
Brite Divinity School at TCU
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution

Proposal abstract :
Brite Divinity School has identified the importance of exploring the way in which we construe and address diversity in our curricular and programmatic strategies. Currently we have created a curricular program that addresses racial, ethnic, and global issues. However, we are not giving the same institutional attention to other challenging forms of diversity presently difficult for church and culture such as gender and sexual orientation. We are seeking strategies that ...
Proposal abstract :
Brite Divinity School has identified the importance of exploring the way in which we construe and address diversity in our curricular and programmatic strategies. Currently we have created a curricular program that addresses racial, ethnic, and global issues. However, we are not giving the same institutional attention to other challenging forms of diversity presently difficult for church and culture such as gender and sexual orientation. We are seeking strategies that will assure both rich attention to the accrued force of the complex intersections of a range of stigmatized forms of diversity in church and culture as well as ongoing attention to the particular experience and needs of the marginalized communities represented by these various forms of diversity. We propose inviting a panel of distinguished colleagues in theological education to lead the faculty in a colloquy and students in a community conversation about these concerns.

Learning Abstract :
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Adapting a Model of Racial Identity Development for Under-Represented Minority Faculty in Mostly White Theological Institutions

Awarded Grant
Cascante, Fernando
Union Presbyterian Seminary
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to adapt a theoretical model for understanding racial/ethnic identity development as a valuable tool for under-represented minority (URM) faculty working in mostly white theological institutions. The primary purposes of this project are, first, to offer URM faculty in theological education a theoretical framework for them to define the personal and institutional significance of their belonging to a particular racial/ethnic group while working in a theological ...
Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to adapt a theoretical model for understanding racial/ethnic identity development as a valuable tool for under-represented minority (URM) faculty working in mostly white theological institutions. The primary purposes of this project are, first, to offer URM faculty in theological education a theoretical framework for them to define the personal and institutional significance of their belonging to a particular racial/ethnic group while working in a theological school with mostly white students and faculty; and second, to make available to white faculty and seminary officers a theoretical tool to better understand the institutional and academic implications of having URM as members of their faculties. The adapted model of racial identity development to be proposed will be based on documented shared experiences of URM faculty in theological education, bibliographic research on faculty of color in Higher Education, and the racial identity development theory developed by William E. Cross and analyzed by Beverly D. Tatum.

Learning Abstract :
Working in this project has been one of the most stimulating and rewarding academic experiences I have had during my almost ten years as a theological educator in North America. It allowed me to build upon my own experiences and the experiences of those in theological education who, like me, share two characteristics: one, that of belonging to a racial/ethnic minority (REMF); two, that of teaching in a predominantly white theological institution (PWTI). In conclusion, the quantitative and qualitative data of this study shows that discrimination based on race and ethnicity, which increases when gender and age are factored in, is very much an open and deep wound for the majority of REMF working at PWTIs. What is at stake is too serious to keep this reality concealed or unaddressed. It affects the present and the future well-being of the first and the present and future integrity of the mission of the latter. Theological institutions are called to mirror the values of God's reign and not those of society. Therefore, their leaders should commit themselves to the understanding and transformation of this reality for the sake of what is central to the theological enterprise: the church and its mission in the world.
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Vocational Conversations

Awarded Grant
Hiebert, Theodore
McCormick Theological Seminary
Theological School
2007
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Building on conversations about our vocations as teacher-scholars at mid-career in the summer 2007 Mid-Career Colloquy on Teaching and Learning in Theological Schools, participants during the fall semester will interview colleagues regarding their understanding of their vocations. Each participant will interview a junior colleague, a mid-career colleague, and a senior colleague to solicit their responses to three questions: 1) How do you understand your vocation within your institution at this stage of ...
Proposal abstract :
Building on conversations about our vocations as teacher-scholars at mid-career in the summer 2007 Mid-Career Colloquy on Teaching and Learning in Theological Schools, participants during the fall semester will interview colleagues regarding their understanding of their vocations. Each participant will interview a junior colleague, a mid-career colleague, and a senior colleague to solicit their responses to three questions: 1) How do you understand your vocation within your institution at this stage of your career? 2) From your perspective, what are the major factors in your school that support your sense of vocation, and what are the major factors that do not support your sense of vocation? 3) What action, practice, or strategy do you use to help you maintain a sense of your vocation and vocational commitments given the realities of life in your institution?

Learning Abstract :
Due to the success of these interviews, I would consider using them as a regular part of Wabash workshops and colloquies. Interviewing colleagues as a part of our colloquy provided the following contributions to our participants: 1) a larger perspective on the vocation of the theological educator, 2) a clearer view of their own understandings of themselves as theological educators, 3) an opportunity to build relationships with their own colleagues, 4) a better sense of their own institutional cultures, 5) and a fuller sense of the state of theological education today. While the nature of the interviews might vary from workshop to workshop, they provide a great source of information and learning for members of the workshop or colloquy.
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Exploring Miseducation and Embedded Theologies: Demystifying the Theological Formations of American Cultures

Awarded Grant
Toulouse, Mark|Floyd-Thomas, Stacey
Brite Divinity School at TCU
Theological School
2007
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Educating Clergy   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project supports the development of a research survey instrument, its subsequent use with theological students at the outset and completion of their Master of Divinity degree program, and an analysis of the data in order to identify the formative effects of various cultural factors that are believed to function alongside religious faith in shaping the religious formation of incoming theological students. The information gathered from the instrument will contribute ...
Proposal abstract :
This project supports the development of a research survey instrument, its subsequent use with theological students at the outset and completion of their Master of Divinity degree program, and an analysis of the data in order to identify the formative effects of various cultural factors that are believed to function alongside religious faith in shaping the religious formation of incoming theological students. The information gathered from the instrument will contribute to the development of the emerging signature pedagogy at Brite Divinity School. In particular the analysis of the results will shape the teaching/learning outcomes of the faculty in its efforts to nurture an effective 21st Century Christian identity for religious leaders as public theologians in the United States.

Learning Abstract :
Who are the seminarians that Brite teaches? What influences seminary students' religious development? How do they spend their time? To get an overview of these questions and others, a survey was administered to 131 seminary students at Brite Divinity School. The survey research revealed to the researchers that the students are far more complex than the faculty had previously imagined. It showed the faculty that culture trumps religion and that, to students, there's a fine line between the two. Religion, in fact, becomes changed by culture and is no longer about the normative rhetoric that is attached to communities of faith and their related institutions, and how they purportedly derive meaning from them. Rather, it is about "meaning-making," those things that actually end up providing the resources from which people gain meaningful understanding about themselves, others, and the world in which they live. Consequently, seminarians often derive more meaning from the "sacred" found in the supposedly "secular" arena rather than in traditionally religious locations. Professors and practitioners must become master participant-observers in both realms if their goal is to be relevant religious educators in a context in which religion is no longer the definitive realm for the sacred.
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Seeing Through Others’ Eyes: Privilege and Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Davison, Lisa
Lexington Theological Seminary
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project hopes to develop a one year (6 months of the academic year) program for seminary students in their second (”middler”) year that would help them identify the different aspects of privilege and how these influence one’s interpretation of others and the world. This program would be implemented during the 2007-2008 academic year.
Proposal abstract :
This project hopes to develop a one year (6 months of the academic year) program for seminary students in their second (”middler”) year that would help them identify the different aspects of privilege and how these influence one’s interpretation of others and the world. This program would be implemented during the 2007-2008 academic year.

Learning Abstract :
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Knowing Too Much, Understanding Too Little: Overcoming Alienation and Presumed Epistemic Privilege as Learning Barriers in Courses about the Black Christian Tradition

Awarded Grant
Ray, Stephen
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
This project will create a dialogue among African-American scholars around the problems of alienation and presumed epistemic privilege as impediments to learning for African-American students. Specifically, the dialogue will focus on the common classroom experience for many African-American theological teachers of teaching courses in Black religion in predominantly white institutions and finding the learning of their African-American students’ hampered by the students’ presumption that, in a curriculum from which many ...
Proposal abstract :
This project will create a dialogue among African-American scholars around the problems of alienation and presumed epistemic privilege as impediments to learning for African-American students. Specifically, the dialogue will focus on the common classroom experience for many African-American theological teachers of teaching courses in Black religion in predominantly white institutions and finding the learning of their African-American students’ hampered by the students’ presumption that, in a curriculum from which many feel alienated, these courses are “theirs” and consequently spaces of affirmation and not of serious intellectual exploration and learning. The questions framing this dialogue are: In what ways do students expectations shape/misshape students’ experience of learning?; What obstacles are presented when students wrongly presume that church “culture” will be the culture of the theological classroom?; What tools and strategies for African-American faculty teaching African-American students about the Black Christian tradition are available to make sure that learning happens?

Learning Abstract :
The major learning from the project was that the ecology of the institution created not only barriers to learning but also opportunities. With the idea of epistemic opportunity arising in our second meeting a major shift in our conversations happened. During the early parts of our conversations we focused largely on pedagogical strategies that might overcome barriers which our students brought to the class. However, when we happened upon this idea of epistemic opportunity as a goal for not our pedagogy but, also as a basis for creating mini-ecosystems in the larger ecology of our institutions, this was a breakthrough. For this changed the question for us to how is it that we can create space for students to bring themselves into the classroom (a broader idea than their stuff, e.g., culture). As we processed the case studies we began to grapple with the various questions of what it means for the students to not only bring the brokenness and alienation which arises in the general institutional ecology into the classroom but also the strength and creativity which empowered them to be in front of us, as teachers, in spite of that ecology. The shift was then from an investigation of the layers of barriers to learning to include substantial reflection on creativity that emerges precisely from navigating those barriers. This is the primary learning which all participants took away from our conversations and the one which may be helpful to others.
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A Reflection on the Meaning of “Forming Students” at Trinity Evangelical Divinity as it Relates to Issues Inherent to Effective Teaching and Learning in Critically Needed Racially and Culturally Diverse Classrooms

Awarded Grant
Fields, Bruce
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution

Proposal abstract :
The mission statement of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School can be summated by the University motto: “Forming Students to Transform the World Through Christ.” This project will address the need to reflect on the meaning and significance of this statement in light of its power to inspire reflection and activity in several critical areas, namely, vision for faculty and administration, curricular development, and pedagogy in the classroom. The working committee will ...
Proposal abstract :
The mission statement of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School can be summated by the University motto: “Forming Students to Transform the World Through Christ.” This project will address the need to reflect on the meaning and significance of this statement in light of its power to inspire reflection and activity in several critical areas, namely, vision for faculty and administration, curricular development, and pedagogy in the classroom. The working committee will seek to determine if they are pursuing all avenues needed to empower the construction of a theological community that remains faithful to its biblical and theological foundations, while “forming students” in a way that equips them to meet the theological, demographic and ministerial challenges presented by a growing diversification of voices and concerns in the United States as well as in the world along the lines of race and culture.

Learning Abstract :
This grant funded a series of conversations among faculty, administration, and current/past students on the minority presence at Trinity and Trinity's main mission as a divinity school. This groundwork emphasized the need for curricular, co-curricular, and substantial financial aid to recruit and retain racially diverse students. The Mosaic Learning Communities program was established that aims to assist M.Div. students prepare for their future work in multi-ethnic communities. The yearly program of the MLC consists of a fall retreat, guest speakers, formation work with faculty and fellow students, peer-mentoring, and local connections to churches in the area.

Through this project we learned that when you find others across the disciplines that share your interests and passion for a project, it may be the start of a journey whose end cannot be imagined yet.
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Teaching Teachers in the Faith & Health Initiative to Address Culturally Diverse Issues

Awarded Grant
Bridgeman , Valerie
Memphis Theological Seminary
Theological School
2007
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Memphis Theological Seminary has at the core of its history a commitment to diversity and ecumenical dialogue, as reflected in its mission statement. The seminary is immensely diverse in population (approximately 40% African American; 26 denominations, plus Jewish and Islamic presence, approximately 44% female, etc.). Recently, the seminary has positioned itself, in a joint mission with the Methodist Hospital System in Memphis, to build a learning model for Faith & Health. The initiative recognizes ...
Proposal abstract :
Memphis Theological Seminary has at the core of its history a commitment to diversity and ecumenical dialogue, as reflected in its mission statement. The seminary is immensely diverse in population (approximately 40% African American; 26 denominations, plus Jewish and Islamic presence, approximately 44% female, etc.). Recently, the seminary has positioned itself, in a joint mission with the Methodist Hospital System in Memphis, to build a learning model for Faith & Health. The initiative recognizes the role faith plays in people’s physical and emotional health. In the course of a “first-run,” two things became clear: The program needed to more intentionally address diverse population concerns; and pedagogy for teaching faith and health in a diverse setting needed to be explored more specifically. This proposal seeks to address both these issues.

Learning Abstract :
The Faith and Health pedagogical initiative was designed to get faculty and potential faculty members in the program "on the same page." Our objective for the project was to gather the primary faculty members who would participate in the teaching to see a common language as well as to ensure that we all knew what the other meant by "faith & health."

The event was viewed as a kick-off for ongoing assessment and training for professors in the faith and health doctorate of ministry and the MAR certificate. The D. Min. director and the dean of the seminary continue to provide thoughtful leadership and inspiration in the evolving program at MTS, as well as evaluate training for each layer of teachers.

Participants reported the time together fired them to work on the themes of the consultant led sessions as they prepared for their particular D. Min. Seminar. They acknowledged that our brief time together was not sufficient, and expressed a desire to continue such conversations, if only once or twice a year. The participants appreciated the metaphors that arose from the road to Emmaus conversation, especially those that suggested we come alongside people as they try to make sense of their lives and what has happened around them.
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Latinos in Hartford: A Seminar for Hartford Seminary Faculty

Awarded Grant
Agosto, Efrain
Hartford Seminary
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution

Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to build allies from among the Hartford Seminary faculty in order to better integrate Latino/a issues into the theological curriculum of the school. They will do so by introducing the large and diverse Latino/a community in the city of Hartford to a group of Hartford Seminary faculty. El Programa de Ministerios Hispanos (the Hispanic Ministries Program) of Hartford Seminary is a Saturday certificate program that ...
Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to build allies from among the Hartford Seminary faculty in order to better integrate Latino/a issues into the theological curriculum of the school. They will do so by introducing the large and diverse Latino/a community in the city of Hartford to a group of Hartford Seminary faculty. El Programa de Ministerios Hispanos (the Hispanic Ministries Program) of Hartford Seminary is a Saturday certificate program that up to now has not significantly impacted Hartford Seminary teaching, research or curriculum. Its director, Professor Efrain Agosto, is the only Latino and Spanish-speaking member of the faculty, and thus since the program is offered in Spanish, the only core faculty member of Hartford Seminary that works closely with the students of this program. This project seeks to explore the large Latino reality in the midst of the capital city of Hartford in ways that will have larger impact in the teaching and research agendas of the Seminary.

Learning Abstract :
This project taught us that building allies for a particular pedagogical aspect of theological education, in this case the Latino/a exemplum, is not an easy task in hard economic times when all programs and priorities are under close scrutiny, energies are taxed and nerves are frayed. Nonetheless, every little bit helps. In the case of this project, three faculty members out of a faculty of fifteen were exposed for the first time to a local Latino/a community, both its demographics and religious reality. In addition, several more faculty members engaged a Latino theologian from outside our community on the current state of Latino/a theological reflection, another new experience for many. Finally, most of the faculty experienced a workshop on multicultural theological pedagogy with a Latina religious educator, another rare experience at Hartford Seminary. Together these small experiences prepared the way for further exploration of Latino/a theology, religion and pedagogy at Hartford Seminary for years to come.
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A Study of Tacit Curriculum at Denver Seminary: Improving Teaching and Learning Through an Understanding of Institutional Culture

Awarded Grant
Payne, Don
Denver Seminary
Theological School
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
The need to explore Denver Seminary’s tacit curriculum emerges from several factors: fifty percent growth in the student body over the past five years, relocation to a new campus, redirection of the seminary’s vision ten years ago, and the transition from being a primarily denominational seminary to a multi-denominational seminary over the past twenty-five years. These changes have added challenges to the pursuit of our mission by complicating ...
Proposal abstract :
The need to explore Denver Seminary’s tacit curriculum emerges from several factors: fifty percent growth in the student body over the past five years, relocation to a new campus, redirection of the seminary’s vision ten years ago, and the transition from being a primarily denominational seminary to a multi-denominational seminary over the past twenty-five years. These changes have added challenges to the pursuit of our mission by complicating institutional self-understanding. This project is intended to identify factors in our institutional culture that have educational implications, assess the extent to which these factors correspond to our stated mission, provide to decision-making bodies data that will address incongruities, and identify the process involved when an institution attempts to explore and respond to its tacit curriculum. External consultants will immerse themselves in our culture to conduct ethnographic research and provide reports to decision-makers for integration into our assessment of student learning.

Learning Abstract :
In order to better understand the relationship between our tacit curriculum and our stated educational mission, our consultant made multiple campus visits, conducting an ethnographic study involving formal student interviews, informal faculty interviews, observations in chapel services, a faculty meeting, special events, time in students hangouts, and reading seminary publications.

Results of the study showed high overall student satisfaction with their seminary experience and particularly with the faculty. The most significant challenges surfaced by the study were that (1) our students do not value or engage each other well as learning resources, (2) our facilities and space often constrict the formation of meaningful relationships, and (3) some program structures work against our stated value of adult learning.

Reponses to the report have included consultation with an architect to redesign key student spaces, retention of a second consultant to assist our faculty with collaborative learning, and review of educationally cumbersome programs.
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Seeking Theological and Cultural Diversity in a Liberal Seminary

Awarded Grant
Tan, Sharon
United Theological Seminary of Twin Cities
Theological School
2008
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
This project aims to develop a statement articulating a theology of theological diversity, attentive to racial, ethnic, and class issues, which can guide implementation of curricula and a culture of theological diversity in the seminary learning environment. The difficult conversation at United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities (UTS) arises both from its ecumenical nature, and its simultaneous commitments to gender justice, racial justice, and cultural diversity. Students, faculty, and ...
Proposal abstract :
This project aims to develop a statement articulating a theology of theological diversity, attentive to racial, ethnic, and class issues, which can guide implementation of curricula and a culture of theological diversity in the seminary learning environment. The difficult conversation at United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities (UTS) arises both from its ecumenical nature, and its simultaneous commitments to gender justice, racial justice, and cultural diversity. Students, faculty, and staff, have differing theological commitments, which often reflect racial and cultural differences, leading to tensions in dialogue over difficult issues. The project seeks to construct a theology of theological diversity and to train the faculty to facilitate dialogue and provide an atmosphere of theological and cultural diversity in the classroom through syllabi content and classroom conversation and conduct. It ends with evaluations and findings that will form the basis of an article on teaching theology in a theologically diverse setting.

Learning Abstract :
In a project that was admittedly ambitious, we set out to develop a "theology of theological diversity" that would inform the learning environment of a liberal seminary that would prepare it for the cultural and racial diversity that it seeks. We articulated our hopes in several ways, for example, that students could be theologically multilingual, or would embrace and not simply tolerate theological diversity of experiences, beliefs and expressions. We realized that because of the impact of our null curriculum, we have to be very intentional about welcoming theological diversity and cultivating dialogue. To this end, several professors have added books and/or course objectives to their syllabus to promote and guide classroom learning and discussion.

Obstacles that we encountered in the first (main) portion of our project we were able to address with some success in the extension period. We learned to write course objectives, goals, and assessments. We had extended substantive theological discussions within the faculty, and a substantive discussion on the purposes of theological diversity. We modeled our new confidence and ease with diversity to our students and staff.

Students have responded positively to changes that have been made. There has been much appreciation of the ability and encouragement to express differing theological beliefs and experiences. There is a desire to continue theological diversity discussions.

There is much future learning to do. We have started down a path that is vital to our mission and viability as an institution of theological education. We need to continue down this path. We need to continue growing in our embrace of theological diversity. We need to grow in our ability to use course objectives to articulate and thus achieve an atmosphere of welcome in the classroom. We need to continue modeling this for the students, both old and new.

This grant has made a significant impact on the theological atmosphere at United, and we are very grateful.
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Exploring an Apprentice Model for Ph.D. Students in an Emerging Field: Incarnational Pedagogy for Teaching the Practices of Youth

Awarded Grant
Dean, Kenda
Princeton Theological Seminary
Theological School
2008
Topics: Study Leave Grants   |   Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Research suggests that approaching Ph.D. students as junior colleagues fosters intellectual—and in theological education, spiritual—communities in which teacher/scholars flourish. This project develops an “incarnational pedagogy” for the vocational formation of doctoral students in adolescent discipleship formation (i.e, “youth/young adult ministries”), emphasizing apprenticeship models and situated learning. Incarnational pedagogies seek to embody Christ in communities of practice where students: 1) experience learning in accountable Christian communities, 2) ...
Proposal abstract :
Research suggests that approaching Ph.D. students as junior colleagues fosters intellectual—and in theological education, spiritual—communities in which teacher/scholars flourish. This project develops an “incarnational pedagogy” for the vocational formation of doctoral students in adolescent discipleship formation (i.e, “youth/young adult ministries”), emphasizing apprenticeship models and situated learning. Incarnational pedagogies seek to embody Christ in communities of practice where students: 1) experience learning in accountable Christian communities, 2) model informal and situated learning approaches consistent with the practice of youth ministry, and 3) learn to match teaching with what is taught. This project approaches the field of adolescent discipleship formation as a community of practice that incorporates Ph.D. students through legitimate peripheral participation, and challenges dominant models of doctoral education by favoring informal and situated learning strategies alongside practices of spiritual and intellectual discernment to equip future teacher/scholars. I suggest that these practices will improve doctoral theological education, especially in emerging fields.

Learning Abstract :
The project explored the benefits of using "incarnational" pedagogies drawn from adolescent discipleship formation (youth ministry, emerging adult ministry, family ministries, campus ministries, etc.) for preparing doctoral students in these fields. By engaging youth ministry/practical theology doctoral students in cross-institutional "teaching colloquia" and incarnational teaching practices drawn from youth ministry (e.g., mentoring, learning communities, situated and transformative learning opportunities), and by examining research on and practices of informal learning, the project enabled reflection on apprenticeship education for future professors in adolescent discipleship formation. This model is currently being tested at Princeton Theological Seminary for Ph.D. students interested in teaching youth/young adult/family ministries, who submit to a program of intellectual, spiritual, and pedagogical formation during their academic program. The project also yielded several essays on previously unexplored relationships between informal teaching and youth ministry, and an article on "incarnational pedagogy" as a form of apprenticeship for theological education.
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Sustaining Change: Establishing Episcopal Divinity School as an Antiracist Institution

Awarded Grant
Bauer-Levesque, Angela|Martin, Joan
Episcopal Divinity School
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice

Proposal abstract :
For over a decade Episcopal Divinity School has explicitly and actively engaged in antiracism work across the curriculum and to some degree in institutional structures. This project seeks to further EDS’s work to establish contours of change toward an antiracist, institutional culture at EDS and strengthen and broaden practical ways to sustain commitments and foster community building skills across differences with students, faculty staff, administration. When appropriate, alums and ...
Proposal abstract :
For over a decade Episcopal Divinity School has explicitly and actively engaged in antiracism work across the curriculum and to some degree in institutional structures. This project seeks to further EDS’s work to establish contours of change toward an antiracist, institutional culture at EDS and strengthen and broaden practical ways to sustain commitments and foster community building skills across differences with students, faculty staff, administration. When appropriate, alums and trustees will be included.

Learning Abstract :
The "Sustaining Change" Project was an evaluative project focused on organic institutional change undergone over more than a decade. A major component of the twelve years of work was required training in antiracism, diversity, and multicultural skills by each constituency of the school - faculty, students, staff/administration, and trustees. The project evaluation included review of written student evaluations on the required course in antiracism/anti-oppression/diversity/multiculturalsim, "Foundations for Theological Praxis," and the ways in which faculty furthers such knowledge and skills for change throughout the curriculum. The project also sought to solicit from staff and administrators their experience of the anti-racism/anti-oppression training and its impact on a variety of institutional behaviors. Finally, the project evaluated how faculty had advanced and enlarged antiracism and anti-oppression learning into new areas. In addition to evaluative materials, the project encompassed meetings with each constituency, community meetings, and evaluation with the consulting organization of its work with the school over the long period of institutional change. Major results of this process indicated the following: (1) that students found the antiracism/anti-oppression education significant to their degree programs and ministry; (2) that this emphasis was a critical recruitment tool and reason for students to choose EDS; (3) that faculty doing this work together at the personal and cultural level for teaching enhancement, became a cohesive body that more effectively dealt with issues of ‘difference' even during institutional change and crises; (4) that through economic and institutional crisis the basic level of anti-racism/anti-oppression teaching and learning remained intact; (5) that when institutional economic resources become scarce, the critical priorities take precedent over antiracism and diversity training for staff/administration, and trustees; and thus (6) the institutional change for diversity and multiculturalism must be fortified and continually renewed to demonstrate the absolute need to address antiracism, diversity, and multiculturalism as a critical teaching/learning and institutional dimension of the theological education enterprise in the 21st century.
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Towards an Authentically Inclusive Institutional Ethos: Developing Sensitivity to Racial and Cultural Diversity in the Selection of Curricular Teaching Resources

Awarded Grant
Brooks, Gennifer
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Through a combination of workshop, forums and surveys, this project engages the faculty of Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary in their ongoing effort to consider the issue of racial and cultural diversity as a pedagogical issue. The focus of this project centers on the selection of teaching resources, specifically textbooks. It builds on work that the faculty began in 2007 and is aimed ultimately at influencing the ethos of the community in the ...
Proposal abstract :
Through a combination of workshop, forums and surveys, this project engages the faculty of Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary in their ongoing effort to consider the issue of racial and cultural diversity as a pedagogical issue. The focus of this project centers on the selection of teaching resources, specifically textbooks. It builds on work that the faculty began in 2007 and is aimed ultimately at influencing the ethos of the community in the area of diversity. The specific purpose of the project is to help move the seminary more closely in line with its stated identity of openness to racial and cultural diversity in all aspects of seminary life. The project is directed to faculty, a key center of influence in the seminary community. The intention is to enable faculty members to identify multi-cultural gaps in their teaching resources in a non-threatening and supportive way and move them to be intentionally inclusive both racially and culturally as they select curricular resources. Their active commitment to diversity in this area can be a catalyst to moving the seminary to achieve its goal of racial and cultural diversity.

Learning Abstract :
This project was directed at the faculty to alert them to the necessity of being proactive in meeting the requirements of multiculturalism that is intrinsic to the culture of the Garrett-Evangelical community. The project succeeded to the extent that the faculty conversations around the pedagogical implications of making racial and cultural diversity and inclusiveness a lived reality were rich and elicited renewed commitment on the part of the majority. The project succeeded in part because it was part of a larger, ongoing conversation and that the issue has been recognized as integral to the life and health of the seminary community. Thus, the conversation continues beyond the completion of this project. Sadly, a few faculty members dismissed the need for conversation but the faculty as a body recognized their responsibility to and influence on the racial and cultural ethos of the seminary and pledged to keep the conversation alive.
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Transforming Providence Theological Seminary Using Multicultural Organizational Development: Beginning Conversations & Planning

Awarded Grant
Nolasco, Rodolfo
Providence Theological Seminary
Theological School
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice

Proposal abstract :
Repositioning issues of community, diversity, and social justice from peripheral to central is a proactive step in the seminary’s attempt to respond to the challenges of multiculturalism. Specifically, the usual reactive stance and crisis-like response to subtle yet debilitating experiences of exclusion and injustice will be addressed using the theoretical framework of Multicultural Organization Development or MCOD (Jackson 1988). The principles and practices of MCOD offer an alternative route to ...
Proposal abstract :
Repositioning issues of community, diversity, and social justice from peripheral to central is a proactive step in the seminary’s attempt to respond to the challenges of multiculturalism. Specifically, the usual reactive stance and crisis-like response to subtle yet debilitating experiences of exclusion and injustice will be addressed using the theoretical framework of Multicultural Organization Development or MCOD (Jackson 1988). The principles and practices of MCOD offer an alternative route to a more welcoming, inclusive, and just system of structural and human relations. As well, the ensuing conversations and change initiatives this project champions gives the systemically transformed seminary a competitive advantage and a renewed commitment to heed the call of God (Micah 6:8).

Learning Abstract :
One of the most significant accomplishments that emerged from this endeavor is in the area of consciousness raising surrounding issues of social diversity and social justice in theological education. This proactive step exemplifies the seminary's continuing attempt to respond to the challenges of multiculturalism. Changes in attitudes, knowledge, and skills are beginning to take shape, albeit gradually.
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Cooperative Action Research as a Strategy for Developing a Cross-Professional, Cross-Disciplinary 008Pedagogy for Higher Education

Awarded Grant
Thornton, Sharon
Andover Newton Theological School
Theological School
2008
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Faculty in both theological schools and post-baccalaureate education programs need to be able to communicate across training differences, appreciate common educational and societal concerns, and learn cooperative practices to function as effective teachers of future leaders in church and society today. This project proposes a pedagogy of cooperative action research for seminary teachers and teachers of higher education in the university setting to foster a shared approach to teaching and ...
Proposal abstract :
Faculty in both theological schools and post-baccalaureate education programs need to be able to communicate across training differences, appreciate common educational and societal concerns, and learn cooperative practices to function as effective teachers of future leaders in church and society today. This project proposes a pedagogy of cooperative action research for seminary teachers and teachers of higher education in the university setting to foster a shared approach to teaching and learning around issues of common concern. The issue of common concern that will animate the action research pedagogy in our classrooms is “children at risk” in our respective communities. The action research proposed here is designed as a pilot project which will, hopefully, seed further adaptations of this pedagogy for higher education and community use.

Learning Abstract :
This project addressed the need for faculty in both theological schools and post-baccalaureate education programs to engage common educational and societal concerns and learn cooperative practices to function as effective teachers of future leaders in church and society today. Specifically this project explored a pedagogy of cooperative action research for seminary teachers and teachers of higher education in the university setting to this end. The issue of common concern that animated the action research was "children at risk" in our respective communities, urban Boston and rural Appalachia. Questions brought to this concern were: What is happening to children in our schools, communities, churches? What is at stake for their well-being? What roles do we play in their future?

In order to deepen and broaden a text approach to these questions we chose participatory social inquiry, a form of action research, as the pedagogical vehicle to both model and help students learn the skills to make the connections between what they are reading in our courses and how to apply that theory to the analysis of the research they conducted within their respective communities around these formative questions. And then, how to share their findings cross-professionally.
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The Communal Dynamics of Pedagogy as an Incarnational Experience in Residential Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Williams, Sarah|McLaurin, Jennie
Regent College
Theological School
2008
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The form in which content-based knowledge is communicated is as important to the learning experience as the incarnation is to Christian theology. We are concerned that the less tangible and subtle interplay between formative pedagogical factors wields a strong unrecognized influence on the outcome of educational experience. This project assists in understanding the relationship between pedagogical methods such as lecture style, syllabi construction and student compositional factors such as age, ...
Proposal abstract :
The form in which content-based knowledge is communicated is as important to the learning experience as the incarnation is to Christian theology. We are concerned that the less tangible and subtle interplay between formative pedagogical factors wields a strong unrecognized influence on the outcome of educational experience. This project assists in understanding the relationship between pedagogical methods such as lecture style, syllabi construction and student compositional factors such as age, prior educational and life experience, gender, denomination, and culture, alongside spatial setting. Through the creation and design of a diagnostic tool allowing us to research, identify, and determine the interplay of dynamic pedagogical factors, Regent College and the wider academic community will be able to analyze learning as it takes place in a complex cultural system within a distinct theological community. This will support best practices for theological education in residential and multicultural settings, while allowing local adaptations for other institutions.

Learning Abstract :
The form in which content-based knowledge is communicated is as important to the learning experience as the incarnation is to Christian theology. The less tangible and subtle interplay between formative pedagogical factors wields a strong unrecognized influence on the outcome of educational experience. As higher education is increasingly marketed as an autonomous individualized enterprise, it is becoming counter-cultural to gather theological students with professors and peers for the majority of their study period. An apologetic is necessary for the value of such communal learning environments in a culture of alternative choices. This project assists in understanding the relationship between pedagogical methods such as lecture style, syllabi construction, and spacial setting to student compositional factors such as age, prior educational and life experience, gender, denomination, and culture. By examining these relationships in light of the stated educational mission of Regent College, we were able to design and develop a diagnostic tool allowing us to research, identify, and determine the interplay of dynamic pedagogical factors. The tool is in three parts, recognizing the perspectives of faculty, staff, and students in the dynamic interplay of pedagogical factors. The form of education did indeed profoundly influence learning, such that ideas about personhood were found to be central to student learning. That is, the character, style and spirituality of individual professors were repeatedly valued as primary to understanding course content. Through such examination and synthesis, Regent College and the wider academic community are better able to analyze learning as it takes place in a complex cultural system within a distinct theological community. This will support best practices for theological education in residential and multicultural settings, while allowing local adaptations for other institutions.
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Teaching Spirituality Well: Teacher-Scholars Engaging Best Practices

Awarded Grant
Frohlich, Mary
Catholic Theological Union of Chicago
Theological School
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
A one-day consultation in October 2008, Teaching Spirituality Well, will bring together teacher-scholars of spirituality in order to explore “best practices” in teaching/learning spirituality and to develop potential strategies for the facilitation and support of those practices within educational institutions. Christian spirituality as a relatively new but established academic discipline is already committed to innovative teaching for the reciprocal integration of classical faith traditions and students’ vocational pursuits. The consultation ...
Proposal abstract :
A one-day consultation in October 2008, Teaching Spirituality Well, will bring together teacher-scholars of spirituality in order to explore “best practices” in teaching/learning spirituality and to develop potential strategies for the facilitation and support of those practices within educational institutions. Christian spirituality as a relatively new but established academic discipline is already committed to innovative teaching for the reciprocal integration of classical faith traditions and students’ vocational pursuits. The consultation will build on four years of annual pedagogical-learning sessions to address the increasing importance of teaching spirituality well for the greatest transformative impact on student learning.

Learning Abstract :
The most immediate impact of the consultation on participants was renewed collegiality and enhanced energy for constructive imagining of the future of SSCS as an association of teachers-scholars involved in transformative teaching-learning in spirituality. There was new appreciation of the founding voices, now clearly complemented by the next generation of leadership within the Society. New questions surfaced and some new conceptual voices entered the conversation. Greater interest in collaboration across constituencies and academic societies also emerged. The project is therefore affecting the Society for the Study of Christian Spirituality in some generative ways - i.e., future topics for shared investigation, renewed methodological inquiries across disciplines, clarification of methods for best teaching-learning practices within classroom settings, and broader inquiries into the impact of teaching-learning spirituality within the public domain.

Success for this consultation is defined largely by the clarity of focus, extent of leadership-membership contribution, and apparent bridging of scholarship-teaching concerns for "teaching spirituality well." Short-term success can be seen first in the successful focusing of attention on the three working theme-clusters. It was no mean feat to facilitate strong-minded scholars into just three working groups. Consultation participants clearly engaged the topics with energy and were able to provide leadership of the public session, facilitating contribution of insights by over 100 attendant voices. In both the day-long and public events, there was a good diversity between learner-centered issues and teacher-scholar-centered ones, suggesting the groups bridged the theory-practice split quite well. Long-term success of the venture remains to be demonstrated. A task force of the SSCS governing board is discerning next steps for deepening the conversation for the Society as a whole.
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A Study of the Experiences of Students of Color at ETSS: Exploring Ways to Foster Racial and Ethnic Diversity

Awarded Grant
Barton, Paul
Seminary of the Southwest
Theological School
2008
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution

Proposal abstract :
The study interviews present and past students of color from ETSS to learn how the seminary can make curricular, pedagogical, and administrative changes that respond to the particular needs of seminarians of color. The study will result in recommendations of ways the seminary can effectively address the unique life experiences and heritage of persons of color. Possible changes in curriculum might include course bibliographies that are inclusive of authors from ...
Proposal abstract :
The study interviews present and past students of color from ETSS to learn how the seminary can make curricular, pedagogical, and administrative changes that respond to the particular needs of seminarians of color. The study will result in recommendations of ways the seminary can effectively address the unique life experiences and heritage of persons of color. Possible changes in curriculum might include course bibliographies that are inclusive of authors from a variety of heritages, a two-day workshop on race and privilege that includes faculty and staff as well as students, and a faculty discussion on the effects of our privileged status on our teaching.

Learning Abstract :
The study interviewed present and past students of color from Seminary of the Southwest to learn how the seminary can make curricular, pedagogical, and administrative changes that respond to the particular needs of seminarians of color. The study resulted in recommendations of ways the seminary can effectively address the unique life experiences and heritage of persons of color. The final report was shared with the senior administration and all regular faculty, which led to significant discussion on diversity at the institution. The seminary created a task force on diversity to address the issues raised in the final report of the project.
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Theological Education in a Secular Age

Awarded Grant
Amesbury, Richard
Claremont School of Theology
Theological School
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution

Proposal abstract :
In his new book A Secular Age, Charles Taylor distinguishes several meanings of the term “secularity,” one of which involves not a loss of belief but a change in the conditions of belief, of what it is to believe. The aim of this conference is to bring together faculty to discuss the challenges of theological education in a secular age – i.e., in a context of increasing plurality, where shared ...
Proposal abstract :
In his new book A Secular Age, Charles Taylor distinguishes several meanings of the term “secularity,” one of which involves not a loss of belief but a change in the conditions of belief, of what it is to believe. The aim of this conference is to bring together faculty to discuss the challenges of theological education in a secular age – i.e., in a context of increasing plurality, where shared religious understandings cannot be assumed and no single point of view enjoys the status of a “default option.” Each participant has been asked to address the topic in the context of her or his teaching: e.g., “How does one teach religious ethics in a secular age?”; “What does it mean to study the Hebrew Bible in a secular age?”; “What does it mean to do spiritual formation in a secular age?”; “How does one train pastoral counselors for a secular age?”

Learning Abstract :
The aim of this conference was to bring together faculty and administrators to discuss the challenges of theological education, broadly conceived, in a secular age - i.e., in a context of increasing plurality, where shared religious understandings cannot be assumed. Although it was generally agreed that secularity presents a challenge with which theological educators must contend, not everyone agreed as to the nature of this challenge. Perhaps the most widely shared sentiment was that mainline Protestantism is no longer at its zenith as a cultural ethos, and that schools of theology must seek to engage other religious and non-religious perspectives in fresh, meaningful ways. It was also widely acknowledged that this will require significant changes in curricula, pedagogy, institutional organization and alignment, and faculty, with increasing attention given to the social construction of the category "religion"; representations of otherness; and inequalities of power and access.
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Ministerial Formation in Non-Academy Settings

Awarded Grant
Boda, Mark
McMaster Divinity College
Theological School
2008
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to learn from emerging models of theological education within non-formal academic institutional settings, whether local churches or parachurch contexts. It is particularly interested in models found in the emerging Pentecostal and Charismatic traditions of Christianity. These will be compared and contrasted with the model used within my present formal university context.
Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to learn from emerging models of theological education within non-formal academic institutional settings, whether local churches or parachurch contexts. It is particularly interested in models found in the emerging Pentecostal and Charismatic traditions of Christianity. These will be compared and contrasted with the model used within my present formal university context.

Learning Abstract :
The experience of three non-formal ministry formation contexts has highlighted the need for continued development of an integrated approach to ministry formation that involves knowing, being, and doing, that gives attention to gaining greater knowledge, deepening personal character and clarifying vocational identity, and acquiring ministry skills. The genius of these non-formal contexts was that this integration was seen not just in the program as a whole (as is typical of seminary), but also in the individual classes and in the lives of those who were forming the students. While there was concern over decreased attention to a breadth and depth of theological knowledge in these non-formal settings, this allowed for greater attention to the dimensions of being and knowing. This experience has prompted me to seek for greater integration of knowing/being/doing within seminary courses and curricula and within seminary professors both present and future.
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A Constructivist Approach to Teaching Theological Literacy

Awarded Grant
Vial, Theodore
Iliff School of Theology
Theological School
2008
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to re-conceive the second course in a series of three theology courses that are part of Sequence Four of the M.Div. at Iliff by using a genuinely “constructivist” pedagogy. The course, titled Theological Imagination and Construction I, helps students begin to find and take confidence in their own voice. Beyond the success of this one class, and the growth of my own pedagogy, the institutional effects ...
Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to re-conceive the second course in a series of three theology courses that are part of Sequence Four of the M.Div. at Iliff by using a genuinely “constructivist” pedagogy. The course, titled Theological Imagination and Construction I, helps students begin to find and take confidence in their own voice. Beyond the success of this one class, and the growth of my own pedagogy, the institutional effects could be significant since pedagogical reform is on the front burner at Iliff and this course is a linchpin in their curriculum.

Learning Abstract :
The most successful parts of the project (from the students' perspective) were the ones in which I already had greatest experience: lecturing and facilitating seminar-style discussion. The small group projects were more frustrating for the students, yet these form the core of the constructivist enterprise. I can make some adjustments as I gain skill in this pedagogy, but I am also willing to accept that the part of the course that most contributes to the formation of my students may never be the most popular, and that the results of this particular pedagogy will not be apparent in any immediately assessable way.
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Conversation on teaching and learning

Awarded Grant
Oden, Amy
Wesley Theological Seminary
Theological School
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Purpose: Establish a culture of conversation about teaching and learning within the Wesley faculty through an ongoing reading and discussion group over one academic year. Participants: The first year will limit the group to faculty within their first 6 years at Wesley. We will read selected portions of Stephen Brookfield’s, The Skillful Teacher. Each meeting will focus on a case study from our classroom experience. Meeting format: Gather for meal ...
Proposal abstract :
Purpose: Establish a culture of conversation about teaching and learning within the Wesley faculty through an ongoing reading and discussion group over one academic year. Participants: The first year will limit the group to faculty within their first 6 years at Wesley. We will read selected portions of Stephen Brookfield’s, The Skillful Teacher. Each meeting will focus on a case study from our classroom experience. Meeting format: Gather for meal and build community, share teaching high and low, discuss Brookfield reading and discuss participant's case study.

Learning Abstract :
Junior faculty members are open and eager to discuss their experiences and concerns as classroom teachers. Their struggles and questions are still relatively fresh, so they are motivated to share and learn. Without such conversation, these more junior faculty members can feel very alone in their teaching. One way to build confidence is through small-scale, junior faculty-only conversations as starting places. A safe, hospitable environment, perhaps off campus, allows open, honest sharing about difficult classroom experiences. This serves both to create space for each of these teachers to find their own teaching voice in conversation with colleagues as well as to form a cohort of faculty who are comfortable talking about classroom teaching. Lastly, it may serve well to have a senior teacher facilitate the group in order to encourage curiosity about classroom teaching, and provide structure for our meetings so that none of the participants are responsible for the logistics.
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Teaching Practices for the Integration of Psychology and Theology

Awarded Grant
Holeman, Toddy (Virginia)
Asbury Theological Seminary
Theological School
2008
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
The integration of psychology/theology has been written and discussed energetically during the last decade. These discussions focused on the question: Can one integrate these disciplines? This project extends this discussion beyond the philosophical by asking a different question: How does one teach towards the practice of integration? What teaching practices help counseling/psychology students know “how to do” integration when they are sitting with a client? Therefore this project ...
Proposal abstract :
The integration of psychology/theology has been written and discussed energetically during the last decade. These discussions focused on the question: Can one integrate these disciplines? This project extends this discussion beyond the philosophical by asking a different question: How does one teach towards the practice of integration? What teaching practices help counseling/psychology students know “how to do” integration when they are sitting with a client? Therefore this project will investigate teaching practices that promote the integration of psychology/counseling/ theology/biblical studies. Using qualitative methodology, through face to face interviews with professors of psychology/counseling and/or their students, and observation of class sessions when available, the lead investigator will discover how professors of psychology or counseling prepare counseling students to “think Christianly” when in session with a client. Journal articles, teaching resources, symposium at professional counseling conferences, and/or an edited book on teaching practices in integration will emerge from this project.

Learning Abstract :
Are students in counselor training programs as theologically competent as they are clinically competent? What teaching strategies promote a sophisticated level of integration? Integrating theological reflection with counseling practice is a skill that does not come intuitively to master level students. Beginning counseling students in theological settings want specific tools for their counseling integration toolbox. In contrast, graduating students view integration as something that happens primarily within the counselor as embodied in the "person of the counselor". Yet the depth and breadth of theological reflection remains in question. Faculty in counselor education programs tend to rely on texts written by other counselors which integrate theology into the presentation. Accessible and applicable theological resources written by theologians are lacking. Teaching practices related to the integration of counseling practice and theology must move beyond the theoretical and into the realm of application within the classroom as well as in field placement.
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Interdisciplinary Interpretive Issues

Awarded Grant
Liew, Tat-siong Benny
Pacific School of Religion
Theological School
2008
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
This project is a development of a course, “Interdisciplinary Interpretive Issues,” for GTU’s doctoral students in the area of Interdisciplinary Studies. Such a course will help me not only to teach students how to do interdisciplinary work, but also to think through how to do interdisciplinary teaching.
Proposal abstract :
This project is a development of a course, “Interdisciplinary Interpretive Issues,” for GTU’s doctoral students in the area of Interdisciplinary Studies. Such a course will help me not only to teach students how to do interdisciplinary work, but also to think through how to do interdisciplinary teaching.

Learning Abstract :
The goal here was to develop a course on "Interdisciplinary Interpretive Issues" for GTU's students in the area of Interdisciplinary Studies. Several key questions arose in designing this course. First, given the scope of the course and the amount of new materials students are likely to encounter, should such a course use mainly essays or books as assigned readings? Second, is such a course best taught by a team or by a single individual, and how would that decision impact our understanding of team teaching vis-a-vis interdisciplinarity? Third, within the context of a freestanding seminary, where would students "go" after taking such a course if they desire to go deeper into disciplines beyond the confines of theological studies? Fourth and finally, given the globalized, hybridized, and pluralistic world most of us live in today, is there a way to combine interdisciplinary studies with inter-religious conversations in a single course?
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Integration of Learning in the Master of Divinity Program

Awarded Grant
Woodward, Scott
Oblate School of Theology
Theological School
2008
Topics: Designing Courses   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Oblate School of Theology values integrative learning. However, faculty have reviewed and discussed the results of the final Integrating Seminar in the Master of Divinity program and have found the results were not what was desired. In particular, students have not adequately demonstrated integration of learning as measured by the Integrating Seminar. This project seeks to design and implement curricular and pedagogical changes based on articulated outcomes on integration of ...
Proposal abstract :
Oblate School of Theology values integrative learning. However, faculty have reviewed and discussed the results of the final Integrating Seminar in the Master of Divinity program and have found the results were not what was desired. In particular, students have not adequately demonstrated integration of learning as measured by the Integrating Seminar. This project seeks to design and implement curricular and pedagogical changes based on articulated outcomes on integration of learning.

Learning Abstract :
This project identified five particular skills related to integration of learning and where and how these skills were taught in the Master of Divinity curriculum at OST. Using the approach of backwards design, faculty have learned how to develop rubrics for specific assignments based upon competency-based skill rubrics. The intentional identification of pedagogical and curricular points of contact on each skill has resulted in a more consistent approach to teaching these skills. At the mid-point of the project, faculty and students report improvement in the use of all five skills. Faculty have begun the task of developing consistent and constant pedagogical approaches to be used with each skill throughout the curriculum. The use of competencies has demonstrably improved teaching and learning.
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MDiv Review: Capstone Course for Integration and Assessment

Awarded Grant
Hornbacker, Tara
Bethany Theological Seminary
Theological School
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
MDiv Review (F302), our current capstone course, has held varying degrees of relationship to the rest of the Ministry Formation sequence and the assessment of student learning. Course content depends on which of the three faculty members teach the course and differs in style and substance from year to year. Goals: 1) Determine overall course objectives coherent with Ministry Formation sequence. 2) Create a teaching model providing assessment of student learning according ...
Proposal abstract :
MDiv Review (F302), our current capstone course, has held varying degrees of relationship to the rest of the Ministry Formation sequence and the assessment of student learning. Course content depends on which of the three faculty members teach the course and differs in style and substance from year to year. Goals: 1) Determine overall course objectives coherent with Ministry Formation sequence. 2) Create a teaching model providing assessment of student learning according to new MDiv curricular objectives. 3) Implement a model for feedback for student learning assessment. Activities: Three faculty members will participate in collaborative research to create parallel syllabi for each venue in which F302 is taught. They will participate in retreat setting meetings to integrate the new curricular objectives toward individual assessment of student outcomes and programmatic assessment of curricular work in an ongoing manner. This group will initiate a feedback loop for assessment of integrative learning.

Learning Abstract :
The project group implemented familiar methods of action and reflection in reviewing curriculum and setting capstone course objectives to reflect curricular objectives. We created parallel syllabi for distance education and face-2-face course work with integrity for course goals and learning platforms. The capstone course both builds upon the foundational ministry formation courses in a coherent manner and helps to establish an assessment loop to the whole curriculum. Data gathered from analysis of MDiv Review portfolio, along with student and faculty evaluation can be fed back into the system for constant improvement. Best practices in assessment can lead the way to fulfilling excellence in teaching and learning while holding the distinctive character and educational ethos of the institution in the forefront. The project group modeled collegial participation and excellence in the four educational terms we hope to teach our students: Interpretation, Integration, Communication, and Anticipation.
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From Cordiality to Collegiality: A Faculty Reforming, Part II

Awarded Grant
Stortz, Martha
Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary
Theological School
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Increasingly, theological education turns to issues of formation. If curriculum focuses on what students study, and pedagogy hones in on how effective teaching and learning happens, then formation addresses the question: who do we want our graduates to be? That question raises another: who do we need to be as a faculty to guide our students, when we are ourselves in formation. Faculty formation is vital, on-going, and coterminous with ...
Proposal abstract :
Increasingly, theological education turns to issues of formation. If curriculum focuses on what students study, and pedagogy hones in on how effective teaching and learning happens, then formation addresses the question: who do we want our graduates to be? That question raises another: who do we need to be as a faculty to guide our students, when we are ourselves in formation. Faculty formation is vital, on-going, and coterminous with the formation we offer our students. Our faculty will meet monthly for a year to develop more fully our dimensions of faculty excellence and to encourage a culture of collegiality and hospitality among ourselves and with our GTU colleagues.

Learning Abstract :
Increasingly theological education turns to issues of "formation:" Who do we want our graduates to be? At Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, faculty addressed the question by pointing to eight dimensions of ministry excellence and identifying four implementing perspectives (http://www.plts.edu/how_we_teach2.html)

As we worked these into our common life, however, we found ourselves facing another question of formation: who do we need to be as a faculty to support this work?

As faculty, we most faithfully and effectively form our students, when we are in formation ourselves. Student and faculty formation are coterminous, and they are ongoing.

As a faculty we committed to meeting monthly and outside regularly scheduled faculty meetings, in order to develop more fully an engagement in formation and to engender a culture of collegiality and hospitality among ourselves and with our GTU colleagues. These meetings would open with prayer, then discussion of brief vocational autobiographies, which faculty prepared and disseminated in advance. Finally, we shared a meal together.
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Project Hermeneutics: Making 'Understanding' Count in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Moritz, Thorsten
Bethel Theological Seminary
Theological School
2008
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The late modern era has generated a particular tension in many Christian denominations and their training schools: Many believers are no longer satisfied with accepting Christian tradition(s) uncritically. On the other hand, there is a strong perception that theology has become so specialized that only theological schools and those trained professionally can make the intellectual connection between the theological disciplines and the faith of believers. This has major repercussions, ...
Proposal abstract :
The late modern era has generated a particular tension in many Christian denominations and their training schools: Many believers are no longer satisfied with accepting Christian tradition(s) uncritically. On the other hand, there is a strong perception that theology has become so specialized that only theological schools and those trained professionally can make the intellectual connection between the theological disciplines and the faith of believers. This has major repercussions, both ecclesiologically and for our seminaries. It is the latter that this project focuses on. There are significant and relatively recent philosophical and academic tools available to help bridge the chasm between 'experts' and 'believers'. I propose to study a small, but wide-ranging selection of seminaries across the country to establish how and to what extent these tools are being appropriated in student learning and what recommendations can be made to improve student learning by renewing our approaches to hermeneutics teaching.

Learning Abstract :
Based on visiting thirty ATS accredited schools, this project reports on the state of hermeneutics and integration in current M.Div. training in the USA. How are students helped to avoid unhealthy dissonance between different academic disciplines and what role does hermeneutics play to that effect? More specifically, to what extent are relatively recent advances in hermeneutical scholarship appropriated and disseminated in M.Div. programs? The report suggests that the state of hermeneutics could be significantly healthier and that major tools at our disposal are not yet being used for improving the student experience. It notes specific approaches that have the potential to facilitate integration. It also makes preliminary recommendations for improving the understanding and use of hermeneutics in theological training and suggests that ecumenical dialog about this state of affairs would be highly beneficial. The outcome report of twenty pages is available, and both critical and affirming feedback will be gratefully received by the author.
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Exploring Constructivist Pedagogies in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Danaher, William
Huron University College
Theological School
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
This project brings together professors teaching in religion and theology for a two-day workshop on constructivist pedagogies, in particular “learner-centered,” “inquiry-guided,” “problem-based,” or “community-based” approaches to teaching. Briefly, constructivism holds that learning occurs in a holistic (intellectual, affective, and social) way through developing an enlarged sense of the “whole.” Consequently, constructivist pedagogies emphasize strategies for problem-solving and dialogue so that students use their prior experience to acquire knowledge. They also ...
Proposal abstract :
This project brings together professors teaching in religion and theology for a two-day workshop on constructivist pedagogies, in particular “learner-centered,” “inquiry-guided,” “problem-based,” or “community-based” approaches to teaching. Briefly, constructivism holds that learning occurs in a holistic (intellectual, affective, and social) way through developing an enlarged sense of the “whole.” Consequently, constructivist pedagogies emphasize strategies for problem-solving and dialogue so that students use their prior experience to acquire knowledge. They also seek to harness students’ motivation and creativity in order to heighten the interaction within which learning optimally occurs. Participants in this project will develop familiarity with constructivist pedagogies and explore ways to incorporate its insights within the disciplines of theological education and religious studies. As a result, this project will help professors explore how constructivist pedagogies can provide an effective approach to teaching at an institution where students in different degree programs (M.Div., M.T.S., M.A., B.A., B.Th.) from different backgrounds, and with different life experiences, take many of the same classes.

Learning Abstract :
This project brought together professors teaching in religious studies and theology for a two-day workshop on constructivist pedagogies - in particular "learner-centered," "inquiry-guided," "problem-based," or "community-based" approaches to teaching - to explore the ways it can create synergy between theological education and religious studies at an institution where both disciplines are taught. As a result, this project helped professors develop more effective approaches to teaching students in different degree programs (M. Div., M.T.S., M.A., B.A., B. Th.) from different backgrounds, and with different life experiences.
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Enriching Pedagogical Intersections: Teaching Worship as Ethics

Awarded Grant
Laytham, D. Brent
North Park Theological Seminary
Theological School
2008
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
This project develops two pedagogical dimensions of ‘worship as ethics’ pedagogy (associated with Stanley Hauerwas). First, it reworks the course design, content and pedagogy of an introductory course in Christian Ethics to fit a student body that is evangelical and multi-ethnic. It seeks to overcome the pedagogical limits of conceiving worship ‘liturgically,’ and to utilize the pedagogical potential of diverse forms and traditions of worship. Second, it conveys to teaching ...
Proposal abstract :
This project develops two pedagogical dimensions of ‘worship as ethics’ pedagogy (associated with Stanley Hauerwas). First, it reworks the course design, content and pedagogy of an introductory course in Christian Ethics to fit a student body that is evangelical and multi-ethnic. It seeks to overcome the pedagogical limits of conceiving worship ‘liturgically,’ and to utilize the pedagogical potential of diverse forms and traditions of worship. Second, it conveys to teaching colleagues the pedagogical potential and limits of the worship as ethics approach, and invites them to consider whether worship might offer a pedagogically fruitful intersection with their discipline as well. The results and learnings of the project will be written up for a teaching journal and will be presented to colleagues in Christian ethics.

Learning Abstract :
Even where the study body is quite diverse and how to worship is strongly contested, a teacher can guide students to discover the intrinsic relationships between worship and ethics. It is not the teacher, however, but the students themselves who best serve as guides to the particularities of diverse worship traditions and cultures. The greatest pedagogical challenge is neither managing diversity nor dethroning white privilege, but embracing judgment, inasmuch as most students think worship expresses their preferences rather than embodies normative claims.

Most theological educators include classroom worship in each class session, and many do so with a strong and sophisticated rationale, and a careful and creative enactment. Yet classroom worship remains largely unexamined and unheralded as a powerful pedagogical practice and a significant implied curriculum. In addition, most theological educators engage worship as classroom content, regardless of the course's topic or the teacher's discipline. Thus, worship forms and integrates.
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Coaching Models for Guiding Faculty Work in Curriculum and Course Assessment

Awarded Grant
Reistroffer, Dianne
Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological School
2008
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
The dual purpose of this fellowship is to explore the connection between coaching and assessment in theological education as a means of guiding faculty work in educational evaluation and to investigate coaching models that will introduce faculty to program and course assessment in ways that lower their resistance to assessment activity, enhance their teaching, and strengthen the seminary’s overall educational mission.
Proposal abstract :
The dual purpose of this fellowship is to explore the connection between coaching and assessment in theological education as a means of guiding faculty work in educational evaluation and to investigate coaching models that will introduce faculty to program and course assessment in ways that lower their resistance to assessment activity, enhance their teaching, and strengthen the seminary’s overall educational mission.

Learning Abstract :
Theological faculty members are open to assessment activity when the work relates directly to teaching and learning in a seminary context, is rooted in collaborative, purposeful inquiry, draws upon and makes effective use of the personal-professional experiences of each participant, and is conducted in groups where one or more colleagues are willing to serve in a coaching or facilitating role.
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Greek in the Seminary Classroom: A Communicative Approach

Awarded Grant
Polaski, Sandra
Baptist Theological Seminary, Richmond
Theological School
2008
Topics: Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
The proposed project will explore communicative approaches to ancient language learning and contribute to the development of this effort by proposing strategies for teaching biblical (Koine) Greek in the seminary or divinity school setting. Communicative Language Learning (CLL) involves emphasis on communicative competence rather than emphasis on grammar and translation (known as the Grammar Translation Method). In CLL, classroom instruction is organized around linguistic functions rather than grammatical structures, and ...
Proposal abstract :
The proposed project will explore communicative approaches to ancient language learning and contribute to the development of this effort by proposing strategies for teaching biblical (Koine) Greek in the seminary or divinity school setting. Communicative Language Learning (CLL) involves emphasis on communicative competence rather than emphasis on grammar and translation (known as the Grammar Translation Method). In CLL, classroom instruction is organized around linguistic functions rather than grammatical structures, and grammar serves a supporting rather than central role. Current work in a CLL approach to biblical Hebrew suggests that instructors find the approach exciting and productive, and students experience a greater level of comprehension and a lower level of frustration than in typical language courses. I will develop a website with information on the use of communicative language teaching for Koine Greek, a first unit of classroom materials, and a draft table of contents for further units in an introductory course.

Learning Abstract :
Research shows that foreign language learning happens most effectively when language is presented in a meaningful context, as opposed to lists and paradigms. Most seminary language teaching does not yet follow principles of communicative language teaching (CLT). A promising effort in Hebrew has been launched by the Cohelet project (www.ashland.edu/cohelet), but no similar project has yet been completed in Koine Greek. This project was designed to take first steps toward such a course. As I researched CLT and imagined a course design, I realized that the process of fundamentally rethinking the way I teach Greek is an extraordinarily difficult one. Nonetheless I have sketched a course that has potential for a CLT approach to Koine Greek.

Expanding the conversation about CLT Koine teaching is the next step in this process. A complete course that can be "field-tested" with real students will be the proof of the validity of these theories.
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Consultation on New Media for Professors of Christian Education

Awarded Grant
Dawson, Kathy
Columbia Theological Seminary
Theological School
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
We find ourselves constantly striving to stay current with the means and opportunities of new media. We propose to bring new media specialists into dialogue with Christian education faculty of four theological seminaries in Atlanta to create a space where faculty can envision ways to advance teaching and learning about theology and religion in a media literate culture. By understanding how new media and technologies are developing and how they ...
Proposal abstract :
We find ourselves constantly striving to stay current with the means and opportunities of new media. We propose to bring new media specialists into dialogue with Christian education faculty of four theological seminaries in Atlanta to create a space where faculty can envision ways to advance teaching and learning about theology and religion in a media literate culture. By understanding how new media and technologies are developing and how they will impact the way future generations communicate, collaborate, socialize, do research, persuade, teach and learn, we expect to improve the ways in which we meet the needs of younger seminarians. The rapidity and pervasiveness of the change challenges professors of Christian education to new networks of learning. The consultation we propose will open for us new knowledge and new networks of learning.

Learning Abstract :
The intention behind this small grant was to bring together Christian education professors from the four Atlanta area theological schools: Candler School of Theology at Emory University, MacAfee School of Theology at Mercer University, Interdenominational Theological Center, and Columbia Theological Seminary to discuss with cutting age new media developers and educators the latest trends in online education. This meant coordinating many schedules of many different institutions and individuals. To some extent the event that was held on May 2, 2009 was a success as we had representatives from both the academic community and the technology sages, although not as many as we hoped. The evaluations were positive and participants learned a lot about virtual worlds, electronic textbooks, and other social internet media. We hope to continue this learning through an electronic social media site with Christian education professors in other locations.
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Teaching Worship from Global Perspectives

Awarded Grant
Kim, Eunjoo
Iliff School of Theology
Theological School
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Recognizing the significant change in the contemporary context for worship in a global and pluralistic culture, this project aims to develop a new paradigm for teaching worship as a way to help liturgics faculty become better equipped in their teaching. Two liturgics professors will be invited from different institutions and will work with me to construct new approaches to teaching liturgics courses by reconfiguring the nature and function of worship ...
Proposal abstract :
Recognizing the significant change in the contemporary context for worship in a global and pluralistic culture, this project aims to develop a new paradigm for teaching worship as a way to help liturgics faculty become better equipped in their teaching. Two liturgics professors will be invited from different institutions and will work with me to construct new approaches to teaching liturgics courses by reconfiguring the nature and function of worship in a global world, the image and role of worship leaders in a pluralistic culture of congregations, and an effective pedagogy that can help students stretch and broaden their knowledge and experience of worship. A one-day workshop will include three conversation sessions and demonstrations of teaching in an actual class setting. The project will be evaluated based on the students’ class evaluations and the participants’ self-reflection and feedback. Funding will support the participants’ travel and accommodation, reception, honoraria, stipend for the project director, and miscellaneous expenses for the event.

Learning Abstract :
The project seminar was useful for the participants. It helped us improve our teaching in many ways. By sharing and evaluating our course syllabi, we gained some insights into improving our courses from global perspectives; through the preparation and delivery of our lectures, we could challenge students to think about worship out of the box. The entire process of the project went well, as I had planned, and our lectures turned out to be invaluable resources to teach worship from global perspectives. However, offering three lectures for three-and-a-half hours did not allow sufficient time for discussing crucial issues emerging from the lectures at a deeper level. Perhaps, a panel discussion with one or two presentations in relation to multicultural worship in a global world might have been a more effective pedagogical strategy than giving three lectures to have enough conversation with students within the limited time.
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Developing a Holistic Academic Environment for International Students in a Seminary Graduate Program : Cross-cultural Advising, Support and Classroom Pedagogy.

Awarded Grant
Grafton, David
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia
Theological School
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
In its 2003 Proposal to ATS to implement a new PhD program, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP) seminary stated: LTSP is fully committed in all its programs to explicitly dealing with issues of globalization and with gender, race, and ethnic concerns. The PhD program will also serve to further issues of justice and quality, as students engage theology on issues in the public arena. This grant seeks to help ...
Proposal abstract :
In its 2003 Proposal to ATS to implement a new PhD program, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP) seminary stated: LTSP is fully committed in all its programs to explicitly dealing with issues of globalization and with gender, race, and ethnic concerns. The PhD program will also serve to further issues of justice and quality, as students engage theology on issues in the public arena. This grant seeks to help LTSP live into this commitment by addressing the role in which its teachers both teach and advise Graduate students who are from different cultural backgrounds. This grant will provide opportunities for LTSP professors to help them recognize the different cultural modes of communication and styles of learning of International Students, be conscious of the different social locations of International Students both within the classroom as well as in the seminary community, and develop different pedagogical tools for teaching in such an environment. Through this process, LTSP will develop an academic environment that will allow the gifts and abilities of International Students to be respected and encouraged, so that they might flourish and grow academically.

Learning Abstract :
This grant has been an extremely valuable "first step" as our faculty strives to be intentional about being effective teachers in multi-cultural classrooms. The grant allowed the faculty to meet and begin a public conversation about these issues. Having several outside professionals speak to the faculty provided authoritative voices about the general needs and practical methods in teaching and advising International Students. It was our hope that the grant would publicly raise the awareness and provide tools, and in this regard the grant succeeded. The question is now, where do we go from here? Currently, a plan has been submitted to the administration to lay out a plan for an "international Student Office" where the seminary could continue to be intentional about providing both holistic support for International Students as well as continued learning opportunities for faculty to address pedagogical issues when teaching in multi-cultural classrooms.
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Service Learning, Experiential Learning and Biblical Studies: Alternatives to Violence Project Workshops as a Test Case

Awarded Grant
Newheart, Michael
Howard University School of Divinity
Theological School
2009
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts

Proposal abstract :
This fellowship will fund research, writing, and a bibliography about service learning and experiential learning in the context of the use of the Alternatives to Violence Project in New Testament Introductory courses.
Proposal abstract :
This fellowship will fund research, writing, and a bibliography about service learning and experiential learning in the context of the use of the Alternatives to Violence Project in New Testament Introductory courses.

Learning Abstract :
Through my project I learned that a great amount of literature exists concerning service-learning in higher education. In my discussions of pedagogy, however, both at Howard and at Wabash, I have never witnessed a discussion of service-learning. I also learned that service-learning is largely absent in theological education in general and in biblical studies in particular. Service-learning seems particularly appropriate at Howard Divinity because the motto of Howard University is "Veritas et Utilitas (Truth and Service)." Furthermore the Divinity School used to require a "prophetic Ministry" requirement in which one credit hour was tacked onto a three-hour course such as "The Historical Jesus" or "Women in the Hebrew Bible." This practice was discontinued a few years ago, and "Prophetic Ministry" became a stand-alone course. Integrating service-learning in Div School courses, especially in my New Testament Introduction courses, would reinstitute the spirit of that requirement.
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Saskatoon Theological Union Retreat

Awarded Grant
Balas, Laura
St. Andrew's College
Theological School
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions

Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this grant is to build upon and broaden previous collaborative work done by the group concerning issues of pedagogy, student characteristics, curriculum, and vision in the three schools of the Saskatoon Theological Union that provide a majority of graduate education for the mainline churches of Western Canada.
Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this grant is to build upon and broaden previous collaborative work done by the group concerning issues of pedagogy, student characteristics, curriculum, and vision in the three schools of the Saskatoon Theological Union that provide a majority of graduate education for the mainline churches of Western Canada.

Learning Abstract :
The follow-up retreat was helpful for gathering faculty from the three institutions again to have discussion about collaborative teaching endeavors. The development of a curriculum committee appears to have been a good move. It looks like this group will serve an important role in aiding faculty at the three schools as they seek to cooperate and coordinate their teaching efforts. The establishment of faculty trust is rarely easy and even more complicated when faculty are involved with different institutional contexts. It looks like the grant has enabled significant steps forward toward forming a foundation of trust and cooperation.
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Global Theological Education Initiative: Intercultural Learning in a World Church

Awarded Grant
McGann, Mary
Franciscan School of Theology
Theological School
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this grant would be to enable a committee of Franciscan School faculty to spearhead the Global Theological Education Initiative by: 1) exploring the pedagogical structure and design of the program and how the new initiative would be integrated into the goals and mission of the Franciscan School; 2) framing the underlying pedagogical questions/issues that need to be wrestled with; 3) engaging the larger faculty in formulating how this initiative ...
Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this grant would be to enable a committee of Franciscan School faculty to spearhead the Global Theological Education Initiative by: 1) exploring the pedagogical structure and design of the program and how the new initiative would be integrated into the goals and mission of the Franciscan School; 2) framing the underlying pedagogical questions/issues that need to be wrestled with; 3) engaging the larger faculty in formulating how this initiative would affect the pedagogical formation of students to be globally conscious leaders; and 4) determining what a larger teaching-learning grant would look like.

Learning Abstract :
The Global Theological Education Initiative has engaged the Franciscan School faculty in valuable conversation about pedagogical strategies for accomplishing key aspects of our mission - to prepare students for full participation in a global church; to engage them in intercultural learning, and to form them in relationships of mutuality, respect and justice. We recognize that stretching our curriculum to include local, national, and international immersion experiences creates a whole new configuration of places, players, perspectives, and processes by which our theological education and ministerial formation take place. Based on the work this Wabash Grant has supported, we move now to a phase of experimentation during which faculty will be directly involved in planning/executing/evaluating specific immersion courses and reflecting together on the teaching-learning experiences that unfold.
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Designing an On-line Course in New Testament

Awarded Grant
Park, Eugene
San Francisco Theological Seminary
Theological School
2009
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
The grant will support a project to design an online course for New Testament Introduction (Gospels and Acts) by 1) composing a syllabus; 2) creating a Moodle site for the course; 3) creating lecture notes, a discussion room, a chat room, and mid-term exam and quizzes. Two colleagues will be consulted during the grant period to help with pedagogical issues and viability of the project as an actual online course offering.
Proposal abstract :
The grant will support a project to design an online course for New Testament Introduction (Gospels and Acts) by 1) composing a syllabus; 2) creating a Moodle site for the course; 3) creating lecture notes, a discussion room, a chat room, and mid-term exam and quizzes. Two colleagues will be consulted during the grant period to help with pedagogical issues and viability of the project as an actual online course offering.

Learning Abstract :
The activities of the fellowship included an updating of skills and tools used for online courses both in an onsite context as well as in a satellite class which addresses the various kinds of learners found in contemporary classrooms as well as a time of critical reflection on the pros and cons of a hybrid course that meets the requirements of the seminary.
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A Program for Enhancing the Teaching of Adjunct Faculty

Awarded Grant
Galindo, Israel
Baptist Theological Seminary, Richmond
Theological School
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond relies on qualified adjunct faculty to help meet the needs of the formal curriculum offered to students. Despite the practice of vetting adjuncts by the faculty end-of-course student evaluations for adjunct taught courses have historically been mixed. With the recent approval of two new concentrations in the M.Div. the seminary will rely more heavily on adjuncts to provide coverage of new courses. The proposed ...
Proposal abstract :
Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond relies on qualified adjunct faculty to help meet the needs of the formal curriculum offered to students. Despite the practice of vetting adjuncts by the faculty end-of-course student evaluations for adjunct taught courses have historically been mixed. With the recent approval of two new concentrations in the M.Div. the seminary will rely more heavily on adjuncts to provide coverage of new courses. The proposed adjunct faculty training program is intended to provide adjuncts necessary knowledge and skill in effective pedagogy in order to enhance the effectiveness of course offerings.

Learning Abstract :
The objective of this project was to enhance the quality of teaching among the adjunctive faculty at Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond (BTSR). The significance of the project was informed by two realities: (1) the seminary is making a major emphasis on rigorous assessment of student learning in response to its recent (2008-09) accreditation self-study, and (2) currently and for the foreseeable future, the seminary will continue to depend on its adjunctive faculty to help meet the needs of its curriculum. Enhancing the teaching performance and assessment skills of adjunctive faculty will have a direct impact on institutional effectiveness related to teaching and learning.

The activities for this grant project consisted of the development of three faculty development programmatic resources: (1) a published resource guide for all faculty, A Guide to Course Design & Assessment of Student Learning, Galindo; (2) a series of training workshops for adjunctive faculty; (3) the development of an online faculty resource site for teaching and learning curricular assessment.
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Enhancing Capacities for Diversity through Awareness, Knowledge and Skill Development

Awarded Grant
White, David
Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological School
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Many students come to seminary with a normalized sense of identity and worldview from their home communities. While seminary tends to destabilize these sensibilities, rarely are students challenged to appreciate the differences of other racial/ethnic groups. Because Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, like much of the contemporary United States, exists at the intersection of multiple ethnic cultures which congregations must navigate in light of Christian faith, it therefore seems imperative ...
Proposal abstract :
Many students come to seminary with a normalized sense of identity and worldview from their home communities. While seminary tends to destabilize these sensibilities, rarely are students challenged to appreciate the differences of other racial/ethnic groups. Because Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, like much of the contemporary United States, exists at the intersection of multiple ethnic cultures which congregations must navigate in light of Christian faith, it therefore seems imperative to recontextualize theological education in relation to diverse ethnicities/cultures. Thus, APTS intends to inaugurate a program to enhance diversity in theological education which will include faculty roundtable discussions, campus workshops and roundtable discussions, and consultations in course development. These programs will draw on the local expertise and experience of Dr. Michelle Guzman and the University of Texas’ department of diversity education. This grant proposal represents the first of a three stage, six-year initiative. These phases will be elaborated below, but for the purposes of this grant we are only requesting funding for the first phase. Other phases are elaborated to provide context for the requests of this first phase.

Learning Abstract :
In 2007 the faculty of Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary requested and received a grant to help the institution more faithfully navigate issues of race and diversity. We recognized that if diversity was to be an integral part of our curriculum, then we needed a more diverse faculty and staff. President Wardlaw convened a Commission on Diversity to oversee all matters of diversity across the life of the institution. We are close to achieving the commission's recommendation that the next 4 of 5 faculty hires be members of racial/ethnic minority groups and that 3 of these 5 should be women. The commission has also recommended targets for diversity on the board of trustees. We have instituted yearly staff training events and are strategizing about recruiting staff personnel from among minority communities. We are also learning how important it is to build for conversations rather than simply jumping into controversial topics. It may be frustrating for students to delay the satisfaction of combat, but in the long run it makes better conversations. When we conceived this project, we imagined designing interventions that would be immediately transformative. In reality, faculties are constantly juggling so many urgent issues that another project, even a very important one, is just one of many demands. However, it is not fair to say that diversity is not already deeply ingrained in their consciousness, since most have long embraced such commitments. I believe we may be learning that our faculty, and perhaps others, simply need concrete practical suggestions.
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Short-term Intercultural Immersion Experiences at ATS Seminaries: A Study of Pedagogical Practices Contributing to Transformative Learning and Cultural Competency

Awarded Grant
Tortorici, Joseph
Wesley Theological Seminary
Theological School
2009
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This two-year research project will research pedagogical practices of short-term intercultural immersion programs at eight ATS institutions. Analysis of program design, implementation, administration, and evaluation will seek to determine best practices in offering transformative learning experiences, cultivating intercultural competencies, and evoking affective outcomes. In an increasingly multicultural global reality, intercultural immersion programs are a critical element in seminary formation for ministerial leadership. It is anticipated research will contribute to an ...
Proposal abstract :
This two-year research project will research pedagogical practices of short-term intercultural immersion programs at eight ATS institutions. Analysis of program design, implementation, administration, and evaluation will seek to determine best practices in offering transformative learning experiences, cultivating intercultural competencies, and evoking affective outcomes. In an increasingly multicultural global reality, intercultural immersion programs are a critical element in seminary formation for ministerial leadership. It is anticipated research will contribute to an increase in both effectiveness of current programs as well as interest in establishing new programs.

Learning Abstract :
This research project supported the overall finding that schools need to be more intentional about the design and implementation of short term immersion programs. The elements that we identified that contribute to the success of these programs are: 1) Institutional leadership that is supportive of this curriculum component; 2) Faculty who are passionate about leading immersion trips; 3) Adequate funding for immersion programs; 4) Well designed pre-immersion components of readings, presentations, and discussions in order to prepare students for the actual cultural immersion experience; 5) Adequate evaluation instruments and procedures which ensure feedback and improvement of the program and the learning. An additional benefit to the study was the way in which even a modest research project in this area stimulates those being interviewed to look much more carefully at their pedagogy, design, and evaluation.
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Teaching Sense: The Arts in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Cameron, Euan
Union Theological Seminary, NY
Theological School
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Pedagogy in religion and theology has traditionally concentrated on a narrow range of cognitive-centered learning styles, neglecting a wider range of “ways of knowing” that, on a day to day basis, structure the educational experiences of students and teachers alike. The proposal “Teaching Sense” expresses a desire to open the teaching-door onto a broader world of learning—the world of touch, smell, emotional knowing, visual/spatial engagement, and so on, ...
Proposal abstract :
Pedagogy in religion and theology has traditionally concentrated on a narrow range of cognitive-centered learning styles, neglecting a wider range of “ways of knowing” that, on a day to day basis, structure the educational experiences of students and teachers alike. The proposal “Teaching Sense” expresses a desire to open the teaching-door onto a broader world of learning—the world of touch, smell, emotional knowing, visual/spatial engagement, and so on, by asking the question: how might learning be enriched by a fuller appreciation for the ways in which learning engages all the senses? The proposal uses art to bring pedagogy into classrooms across the curriculum. To this end, the project will take a two-pronged approach that alternates between disrupting and provoking traditional pedagogy by engaging in partnerships with “sense practitioners” (professional artists), and by consolidating and stabilizing the pedagogical shifts through four all-faculty workshops over the course of an academic year.

Learning Abstract :
Participation in Teaching Sense provided an opportunity for faculty to discuss both the obstacles to and benefits of partnering with non-seminary professionals in the classroom and generated important reflection on teaching styles and approaches across the seminary curriculum. The partnerships with artists provided unique discussions about pedagogical practice, teaching and learning styles, and the role of sensory-based education in traditional seminary disciplines. Out of conversations about their artist-partnerships, faculty discovered similar challenges in the classroom and were able to share strategies as teachers that created common ground across disciplines. As a result, the participating faculty committed to creating an ad-hoc group that will continue to meet and discuss innovative pedagogy and share teaching experiences. Reflection also prompted a commitment to collaboration among faculty participants and a commitment to greater use and awareness of the resources of city artists and the New York urban environment.
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St. Andrew's College Faculty Retreat

Awarded Grant
Calvert, Lorne
St. Andrew's College
Theological School
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
The grant will fund a day long retreat for the faculty of St. Andrew’s College. New faculty and a new principal will dialogue with established faculty to build community and study pedagogy and how it relates to curriculum at St. Andrew’s.
Proposal abstract :
The grant will fund a day long retreat for the faculty of St. Andrew’s College. New faculty and a new principal will dialogue with established faculty to build community and study pedagogy and how it relates to curriculum at St. Andrew’s.

Learning Abstract :
The faculty retreat was a good way to form collegial relationships and to begin heightening the importance of conversations about teaching and learning matters. The use of an outside facilitator also appears to have been a good move. Sharing of visions, hopes, and dreams could provide a solid foundation for subsequent discussions about what fuels individual faculty in their careers and teaching. The foundation will hopefully prove to be a touch stone to which faculty will return as they explore curriculum and assessment concerns over the next few years.
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Tweet-agogy 101: New Social Media and Pedagogy Colloquium

Awarded Grant
Drescher, Elizabeth
Church Divinity School of the Pacific
Theological School
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
New social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube along with a number of RSS feeds, search aggregators, and blogging portals have dramatically changed the way information is shared and knowledge is developed. Students under 40 - the so-called “Net Generation” that came of age along with internet technology-increasingly rely on social media as an integral part of a mode of participatory, collaborative learning that educators can productively engage when ...
Proposal abstract :
New social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube along with a number of RSS feeds, search aggregators, and blogging portals have dramatically changed the way information is shared and knowledge is developed. Students under 40 - the so-called “Net Generation” that came of age along with internet technology-increasingly rely on social media as an integral part of a mode of participatory, collaborative learning that educators can productively engage when they better understand how social media works at the level of epistemology, identity-formation, pedagogy, and practical classroom use. To support instructors efforts to understand and utilize social media for pedagogical purposes, CDSP and the GTU library are collaborating on a two-part colloquium which provide an overview of the new social media landscape and its pedagogical implication and provide opportunities for practice with social networking tools and expert feedback.

Learning Abstract :
The objectives of the workshop were to introduce participants to shifts in social consciousness associated with changes in social media and to familiarize them with the major social media tools that are participating in this shift. While the workshop was not a "how to" session in the sense that learners were not instructed on the ins and outs of various tools, participants did work with tools such as Facebook, YouTube, Twiter, and Wikipedia by way of experimenting with ways of integrating both the tools themselves and emerging modes of participative collaborative learning in the context of theological education.
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Teaching and Learning toward Eco-Justice: Where Sustainability and Social Justice Meet in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Moe-Lobeda, Cynthia
Seattle University
Theological School
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Funding will support the development of a three-day consultation exploring the pedagogical problems and possibilities that accompany theological education that connects ecology and social justice. This consultation will gather, from around the nation, ten professors in graduate level theological education who teach “ecology and theological studies” and who desire to expand “ecology” to “eco-justice.” (“Eco-justice” here refers to the convergence of ecological concerns and social justice concerns). Participants will collaborate ...
Proposal abstract :
Funding will support the development of a three-day consultation exploring the pedagogical problems and possibilities that accompany theological education that connects ecology and social justice. This consultation will gather, from around the nation, ten professors in graduate level theological education who teach “ecology and theological studies” and who desire to expand “ecology” to “eco-justice.” (“Eco-justice” here refers to the convergence of ecological concerns and social justice concerns). Participants will collaborate to: 1) identify pedagogical issues and challenges inherent in a curriculum linking environmental issues to social justice; 2) design questions for exploring these challenges; 3) construct knowledge for meeting these challenges; 4) broadly disseminate this knowledge within their professional communities; and 5) build local collegial support for teaching eco-justice. The group’s findings eventually will be summarized in an edited volume on teaching eco-justice in theological education, designed to give practical support for professors venturing into this little explored domain.

Learning Abstract :
This project catalyzed learning on varied levels. On a primary level participating faculty learned a great deal about challenges and possibilities that emerge in theological education when social justice issues (such as environmental racism and climate imperialism) are brought to bear on ecological issues. Moreover, we learned from one another a wealth of approaches to exploring the intersection of social justice and ecologic sustainability, and teaching in that nexus.
Participating faculty raised and led one another in exploring such issues as:
- Eco-justice as the framework for seeking to dismantle sexism and racism and to eradicate poverty.
- Using womanist methodology as the pedagogical basis for teaching eco-justice in theological education.
- The epistemological challenge of learning from voices of the Earth.
- How to prepare our students to forge paths toward sustainable earth-human relations that we have failed to forge.
On a secondary level, consultation planners gained tremendous insight into method and process for creating further venues in which faculty may collaboratively construct pedagogies that equip students to face the Earth crisis as a theological issue and a social justice, and to lead others in that venture.
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A Consultation on Spiritual Formation in Seminaries: Presbyterian Church (USA), United Church of Christ and United Methodist Church

Awarded Grant
Keely, Barbara Anne
United Theological Seminary of Twin Cities
Theological School
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this consultation is for representatives from seminaries of the PCUSA, UCC and UMC to gather and explore what is understood by “spiritual formation” and how the formation of students is being incorporated into the Master of Divinity program. Areas to be explored include the explicit goals for spiritual formation within the degree, courses being taught and the explicit spiritual formation experiences offered. In addition to these offerings, ...
Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this consultation is for representatives from seminaries of the PCUSA, UCC and UMC to gather and explore what is understood by “spiritual formation” and how the formation of students is being incorporated into the Master of Divinity program. Areas to be explored include the explicit goals for spiritual formation within the degree, courses being taught and the explicit spiritual formation experiences offered. In addition to these offerings, the seminary representatives will also present how spiritual formation is incorporated into the academic courses and community life of the Master of Divinity program as a whole. Drawing on the identified material, the consultation will discover how the field is being defined within the seminaries, identify what is similar or different in the represented programs, explore strengths and challenges for each program, and examine ways participants might strengthen their programs in this area.

Learning Abstract :
The purpose of this consultation was for twelve professors from seminaries of the Presbyterian Church (USA), United Church of Christ, and United Methodist Church to gather and explore what is understood by "spiritual formation" and how the spiritual formation of ministerial students is being incorporated into the academic programs at their schools. Although no definition of spiritual formation was decided upon, a few core descriptors became useful for the group in its conversations: identity formation; developing habits of head, heart & body; holistic way of living; developing relationship with God and creation; compassion; and justice. Some courses being offered focus on knowledge and understanding of spirituality and others emphasize spiritual formation through practices and experiences. As this project's focus was on students preparing for ordained ministry, this difference raised questions of what preparation is required for spiritual formation of the pastor and for pastors to be able to spiritually nurture the congregation. The area the participants desired more time to address was the academic assessment of spiritual formation of students.
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The Pedagogy of Transnational Education: Enhancing Faculty Creativity and Student Learning

Awarded Grant
Petersen, David|O’Day, Gail
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological School
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
At a time when the lines between global and local are fast disappearing, Candler School of Theology is committed to developing a fresh model for transnational theological education. In the past several years, Candler has evaluated the programs and services it offers to its international students, and is committed to a strategy of internationalizing across the curriculum. To achieve that goal, Candler seeks grant support over the next three years ...
Proposal abstract :
At a time when the lines between global and local are fast disappearing, Candler School of Theology is committed to developing a fresh model for transnational theological education. In the past several years, Candler has evaluated the programs and services it offers to its international students, and is committed to a strategy of internationalizing across the curriculum. To achieve that goal, Candler seeks grant support over the next three years to further its understanding of the effectiveness of current pedagogy and course curricula, reflect upon the pedagogical challenges and opportunities of the transnational context of theological education, and develop a new repertoire of courses that fully integrate into the Candler curriculum transnational perspectives on theological education and ministerial formation. After Candler measures the impact that the revised curriculum is having on both domestic and international students, it will share with other theological educators a fresh model for transnational theological education.

Learning Abstract :
Faculty began this project with different conceptions of transnational pedagogy. Some wanted to improve the way they teach courses about topics that are transnational in nature. Others intended to diversify course material to include more perspectives from around the globe. Some preferred to focus on pedagogical skills that improve learning in ethnically and culturally diverse classrooms. Clarifying the import and implications of these different conceptions was essential to faculty dialogue, just as integrating them was essential to the successful revision of courses. In addition to diversifying assigned readings, transnational pedagogy requires considerable reflection about how best to frame, order, and approach them. It requires pedagogical practices that help students engage actively with material that seems remote or other. It requires skillful facilitation to foster respectful listening, honest expression, and constructive critique. Finally, transnational pedagogy requires faculty colleagues willing to debate the important issues that accompany this kind of teaching.
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Adjusting North American Pedagogical Strategies to Effectively Teach Non-North Americans: Learning from our Alumni who are International Teachers

Awarded Grant
Geddert, Timothy
Fresno Pacific Univ Biblical Seminary
Theological School
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Pedagogical strategies that have proven effective in North America are not always optimally suited for international students with significantly different educational backgrounds and cultural contexts. Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary has trained many international scholars who now teach and lead in seminaries around the world. Our goal is to learn from them how best to train international leaders for the next generation. This project brings to our campus as consultants three ...
Proposal abstract :
Pedagogical strategies that have proven effective in North America are not always optimally suited for international students with significantly different educational backgrounds and cultural contexts. Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary has trained many international scholars who now teach and lead in seminaries around the world. Our goal is to learn from them how best to train international leaders for the next generation. This project brings to our campus as consultants three such international scholars (likely from Switzerland, Paraguay and India). Through public lectures and extensive dialog with us, they will help us devise strategies that maximize our effectiveness in training current and future international students. The entire faculty of Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary will be interacting with the three international scholars over a period of 7 - 10 days, examining case studies together, sharing best practices, reflecting on the pedagogical implications of diverse educational contexts, and formulating plans for improved educational strategies and outcomes.

Learning Abstract :
The "Consultation on Cross-Cultural Education" featured three international speakers who engaged in conversation regarding the way in which their engagement in international theological education was shaped by the cultures in which they ministered. Through lectures, case studies, and seminar presentations the learning community explored the challenges of the way in which differing learning styles, expectations, and values shaped the pedagogical process. Careful budgeting allowed for a second-stage of learning and for application of consultation outcomes through a gathering of scholars serving the Seminary's sponsoring denomination in Angola, Colombia, Congo, French- and English-speaking Canada, Germany, India, Paraguay, Switzerland, and US to write curriculum for online courses. While the curriculum project continues, the reinforcement of the notion of different learning styles and the significance of requiring assignments that involve not only such academic tasks as reading and writing but also practical ministry has been a significant pedagogical learning outcome.
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Learning and Teaching Womanist Religious Thought: Experiences from Third Wave Womanist Religious Scholars

Awarded Grant
Coleman, Monica
Claremont School of Theology
Theological School
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
In this historical moment of postmodernity, religious plurality, methodological diversity and shift from a politics of identity to those of ideology, there is an emerging “third wave” within womanist religious scholarship. Here religious scholars maintain womanist heritage and terminology while challenging the assumptions of a previous generation and exploring new areas of inquiry. This project invites a discussion on learning and teaching among established and emerging religious scholars who identify ...
Proposal abstract :
In this historical moment of postmodernity, religious plurality, methodological diversity and shift from a politics of identity to those of ideology, there is an emerging “third wave” within womanist religious scholarship. Here religious scholars maintain womanist heritage and terminology while challenging the assumptions of a previous generation and exploring new areas of inquiry. This project invites a discussion on learning and teaching among established and emerging religious scholars who identify their scholarship as being part of this “third wave” in womanist religious thought. Participants will discuss personal educational experiences of learning womanist religious thought, and share strategies, techniques and syllabi for teaching womanist religious thought. This will take place during a two and one-half day conference on “Third Wave Womanist Religious Thought” at the Claremont School of Theology in February 2010.

Learning Abstract :
We gathered fifteen scholars who identified all of or part of their work as
"third wave" womanist religious thought. In seeking data about how this new
wave is forming, we learned: 1) Context matters: how the information and
discourse is learned, transmitted, and mediated affects assumptions,
connections, and conclusions about the nature and meaning of womanist
religious thought (WRT). Most scholars learned WRT through written resources
in formal graduate education settings. 2) Mode of Transmission: paying
particular attention to the influences of WRT affects the impact that WRT
had on the formation of participants' own intellectual production. Most
scholars referenced the impact of the writings of Delores Williams and Alice
Walker, while expressing variations about the role of womanist mentors. 3)
Naming: feelings of exclusion in larger descriptions of womanist (around
race, gender and sexual identity) affect identification of one's work as
womanist. All scholars expressed respect for the tradition from whence the
third wave emerges while maintaining an eager passion to advance the field
in new and exciting ways. Participants shared syllabi and felt it helpful
for expanding their reading lists in terms of their own research and future
syllabus construction. Many of these syllabi will be posted online.
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Latin@ Pedagogies in Protestant/ Evangélica Theological Education in the USA

Awarded Grant
Martell-Otero, Loida
Palmer Theological Seminary - Eastern Univ
Theological School
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this project is to address the question of “Latin@ pedagogy.” Is there a distinctive set of pedagogies that can, in fact, be identified as Latin@? Are these pedagogical approaches influenced by religious culture; in other words, is there a distinctive Protestant/ evangélica pedagogy? If there is, can awareness and implementation of such pedagogies transcend the cultural/ ethnic/ racial background of theological educators; that is to say, ...
Proposal abstract :
The purpose of this project is to address the question of “Latin@ pedagogy.” Is there a distinctive set of pedagogies that can, in fact, be identified as Latin@? Are these pedagogical approaches influenced by religious culture; in other words, is there a distinctive Protestant/ evangélica pedagogy? If there is, can awareness and implementation of such pedagogies transcend the cultural/ ethnic/ racial background of theological educators; that is to say, can non-Latin@s learn such pedagogical practices such that they, along with their Latin@ colleagues, can create a learning environment that adequately responds to the needs of Latin@ students? It is the contention of this project that identifying such pedagogical approaches can begin to develop a curriculum that is culturally and religiously appropriate for Protestant Latin@s that will prepare them adequately for their work among Latin@ communities in the Unites States and abroad.

Learning Abstract :
This project was a two-fold event that sought to identify specific "Latina evangélica/o" pedagogical approaches. As a result of a morning roundtable conversation with core scholars and their subsequent afternoon gathering with grassroots evangélico/a (Protestant) leaders, preliminary findings were identified. For example, the group noted that: 1) Latina/o evangélicas bring to the classroom a multicontextual approach that seeks the intentional inclusion of nontraditional and marginalized voices. 2) They respect non-modern worldviews in an academic culture that privileges post-Enlightenment approaches to learning. 3) Latino/a evangélicas integrally link a spirituality that is part of the "everyday" (lo cotidiano) praxis with a profound sense of vocation (llamamiento). Spirituality and llamamiento, in turn, provide social capital and impact how evangélicas/os learn and teach. The group agreed that this project was only a preliminary step towards a larger conversation that needs to take place, which would entail historical and structural analyses of Latinas/os in the academy.
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Teaching New Testament Introduction Latinamente: An Exploration

Awarded Grant
Agosto, Efrain
Hartford Seminary
Theological School
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
This project will explore how New Testament scholars of Latin American descent in the United States teach New Testament Introduction or Survey classes. What kinds of resources do they use - a traditional introductory textbook or materials that explore more critical approaches to New Testament from diverse cultural, racial and ethnic perspectives? How do they teach New Testament Introduction in the classroom - do they explore traditional historical-critical questions about ...
Proposal abstract :
This project will explore how New Testament scholars of Latin American descent in the United States teach New Testament Introduction or Survey classes. What kinds of resources do they use - a traditional introductory textbook or materials that explore more critical approaches to New Testament from diverse cultural, racial and ethnic perspectives? How do they teach New Testament Introduction in the classroom - do they explore traditional historical-critical questions about each New Testament book, or are there more political, historical, literary and ethnic issues that inform the critical analysis of these ancient documents such that one can see a discernible difference because this or that professor is Latino or Latina? Do they use resources from Hispanic/Latino/a realities in the United States, be they biblical, theological, cultural, or historical? At the end we hope to know something more about what it means to teach, not just New Testament Studies in general, but the core or foundational experience that students in colleges or seminaries encounter when they take an introductory course in New Testament with a Latino or Latina professor. What are the discernible aspects of teaching New Testament Introduction Latinamente?

Learning Abstract :
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Teaching Theology in Spanglish: Toward a Latin@ Pedagogy for Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Nanko-Fernández, Carmen
Catholic Theological Union of Chicago
Theological School
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The identification of a spectrum of characteristics that can be categorized as distinctive to the doing of theology latinamente invites critical reflection with respect to pedagogy. The privileging of context, relationality, and the daily in a communal construction of knowledge is worth exploring in a teaching/learning media that require flexibility, creativity and interactivity. The content and methods of Latin@ theologies suggest pedagogical approaches that can also inform such areas ...
Proposal abstract :
The identification of a spectrum of characteristics that can be categorized as distinctive to the doing of theology latinamente invites critical reflection with respect to pedagogy. The privileging of context, relationality, and the daily in a communal construction of knowledge is worth exploring in a teaching/learning media that require flexibility, creativity and interactivity. The content and methods of Latin@ theologies suggest pedagogical approaches that can also inform such areas as distance education, field education and professional ministerial development.

Learning Abstract :
Among the many insights of Latino/a scholars is the privileging of the daily/lo cotidiano as source and ground of our theologies. This embrace of context also implies an awareness of the fluidity of nuestra vida cotidiana and an openness to the complexities, ambiguities, particularities and surprises that accompany serious engagement with daily living. So imagine my surprise to discover that my ambitious pedagogical agenda as outlined in my fellowship application would become a victim of the particularity of my daily reality.

During the grant period a trip to Puerto Rico allowed for a block of time for research and reading to create an upper level graduate course on sources and methods in Latin@' theologies. The choice of Puerto Rico was intentional because San Juan marks the beginning of the Catholic Church in what becomes the USA and its constellations of states and territories. This primal See is often neglected in Catholic histories of the US church. The venue provided access to historic churches as well as visual evidence of the impacts of hybridity and colonization, two prevalent themes in Latin@' theologies. Furthermore, a Caribbean focus illustrated the rich diversity of Latin@' roots, peoples, and perspectives, a necessary consideration since too often Latin@' experiences are conflated into Mexican and Mexican American categories. This trip also presented an opportunity to catch up with some of the more recent scholarship by Latin@' theologians with an eye toward how these resources might fit into a syllabus exploring sources and methods. Because of the online aspect of the proposed course and the Latin@' characteristics imagined for it, some time was spent digitally photographing a variety of images.

There were several unexpected outcomes that included opportunities to speak at the biennial consultation of the Association of Theological Field Educators and at the Center for Ministry Development utilizing some of these images in a manner that drew specific appreciation for their pedagogical value from participants at both meetings. In addition to developing two new proposed courses for doctoral students, I was able to integrate scholarship from Latin@' contexts and underscore the value and contribution of this theologizing for the greater academic and ecclesial contexts.
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The Borderlands of Imagination: Poetry as Catalyst for Theological Insight and Teaching

Awarded Grant
Burrows, Mark
Andover Newton Theological School
Theological School
2010
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This grant will facilitate a faculty development seminar which will bring together theological educators with established poets. The common work of this collaborative will explore poetry as a catalyst for theological insight and pastoral imagination, and the importance of poetics for teaching in the various fields represented by participating faculty.
Proposal abstract :
This grant will facilitate a faculty development seminar which will bring together theological educators with established poets. The common work of this collaborative will explore poetry as a catalyst for theological insight and pastoral imagination, and the importance of poetics for teaching in the various fields represented by participating faculty.

Learning Abstract :
Practicing poets were brought into direct conversation about the potential of poetry and the art of writing poetry as particular means toward reconceptualizing teaching in theological school contexts. Faculty reflected on how to invoke creativity in their teaching strategies and considered how the art of poetry, the practice of poetic writing, and the study of theological school topics might provoke deeper learning.
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Pedagogies of Multifaith Education in the American Seminary

Awarded Grant
Baird, Justus
Auburn Theological Seminary
Theological School
2010
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Designing Courses   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Increasingly, theological schools are training religious leaders to serve in a religiously diverse context. Most seminary faculty have moved beyond the framework of ‘world religions’ courses and are exploring various pedagogies to teach other faiths, such as interfaith dialogue, team teaching, mixed-student classrooms, clinical pastoral education (CPE), experiential site visits, travel learning programs, and field placements. Yet among seminary educators, there is little shared understanding about exactly how such pedagogies ...
Proposal abstract :
Increasingly, theological schools are training religious leaders to serve in a religiously diverse context. Most seminary faculty have moved beyond the framework of ‘world religions’ courses and are exploring various pedagogies to teach other faiths, such as interfaith dialogue, team teaching, mixed-student classrooms, clinical pastoral education (CPE), experiential site visits, travel learning programs, and field placements. Yet among seminary educators, there is little shared understanding about exactly how such pedagogies impact the formation of a religious leader. This project will survey 100 faculty involved in multifaith education at seminaries, then create a “brain trust” of seminary educators to explore and write about pedagogies of multifaith education. Participating faculty will prepare written reflections for publication and identify best practices in their context. The results of the survey, “brain trust,” and reflections (both written and streaming video) will form the content of a new web-based faculty resource.

Learning Abstract :
As multifaith education grows at seminaries across America, more attention should be paid to pedagogy. A wide variety of teaching methods are in use to teach other faiths to future religious leaders, and educators do not have shared understanding about their impact. From a diverse array of factors that affect learning, the theological and religious backgrounds of the learner appear to have a particularly strong impact on the learning process. American seminary faculty are engaging in a creative array of pedagogies, often with little knowledge of their colleagues' work. Favorite teaching methods may be linked to the passions and skills of the teacher more than the needs of the learner. Multifaith educators generally agree that studying another tradition ultimately sharpens and strengthens one's relationship with one's own tradition, except in the tiny minority of cases where such learning eventually leads to conversion or departure from the home faith.
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Teaching Religion, Conflict Transformation, and Peacebuilding; A Consultation of Educators in Theology and Religion

Awarded Grant
Moore, Mary Elizabeth
Boston University School of Theology
Theological School
2010
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The purpose of the project is to inspire and resource teaching and learning in religion, conflict transformation, and peacebuilding in higher education, especially schools of theology and religion. The project will bring together educators in theology and religion to: 1) consult on the state of teaching and research in religion, conflict transformation, and peacebuilding; 2) discern emerging pedagogies for teaching and learning in this field; 3) strategize how to institutionalize such teaching and ...
Proposal abstract :
The purpose of the project is to inspire and resource teaching and learning in religion, conflict transformation, and peacebuilding in higher education, especially schools of theology and religion. The project will bring together educators in theology and religion to: 1) consult on the state of teaching and research in religion, conflict transformation, and peacebuilding; 2) discern emerging pedagogies for teaching and learning in this field; 3) strategize how to institutionalize such teaching and learning in sustainable ways; and 4) strengthen networks for ongoing collaboration This project is being sponsored by Boston University School of Theology and its Religion and Conflict Transformation Program, in collaboration with the JustPeace Center for Mediation and Conflict Transformation of the United Methodist Church and The Boston Theological Institute.

Learning Abstract :
The Consultation, "Teaching Religion, Conflict Transformation, and Peacebuilding," revealed the healing contours of a relatively new movement in theological school and higher education. The movement studies the role of religion in stirring and sustaining conflict, and the simultaneous power of religion to inspire and guide the transformative work of forgiveness, restorative justice, trauma healing, and reconciliation. We discovered that many schools' mission statements support this emerging field with accents on social transformation; programs in the field have expanded significantly in the last decade; and effective pedagogies accentuate mentoring, narratives, pilgrimages, hard conversations, collaboration, meditation, and action-reflection. We also learned that, to advance the movement, we need to continue sharing our best pedagogies and programs. The conversation begun in this Consultation will continue through the creation of a support network and resource pool. An interfaith consultation is also being planned to expand the conversation within Abrahamic traditions.
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Investigating Best Practices in Seminary Distance Education

Awarded Grant
Jost, Lynn
Fresno Pacific Univ Biblical Seminary
Theological School
2010
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary has become convinced of both the need for and the potential of hybrid and online course offerings to serve our dispersed constituencies. We need further training in implementing these technologies and pedagogies, so that we can choose wisely when and how to use distance technologies to help us reach our institutional goals, and so that we can do so effectively. To follow up a consultation that ...
Proposal abstract :
Mennonite Brethren Biblical Seminary has become convinced of both the need for and the potential of hybrid and online course offerings to serve our dispersed constituencies. We need further training in implementing these technologies and pedagogies, so that we can choose wisely when and how to use distance technologies to help us reach our institutional goals, and so that we can do so effectively. To follow up a consultation that Wabash funded just over a year ago, we will visit several schools that can help us learn their best practices in distance education.

Learning Abstract :
The aim of this project was to advance our discussion about the development of online and/or hybrid degree programs by engaging in site visits to institutions already engaged in offering such programs. During a four-day trip in August, 2010, two members of our faculty were provided an opportunity to learn about various models of distance-based and limited-residency seminary programs through site visits to five institutions in Indiana. Conversations with presidents, deans, faculty, educational technologists, and other leaders within these institutions provided a thorough, holistic picture of the strengths, challenges, and resource implications associated with their respective program designs. Furthermore, these conversations provided insight into the theological, philosophical, contextual, and institutional factors that motivated each school to decide upon its specific strategy. Since this trip, our faculty has benefitted considerably from exploring the relevance of the insights generated during this trip for our own efforts in the area of distance learning.
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Global Theological Education Initiative: Intercultural Learning in a World Church, Phase II

Awarded Grant
McGann, Mary|Kiesler, John
Franciscan School of Theology
Theological School
2010
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The Franciscan School of Theology, aims to prepare students for full participation in a global church. Our theological tradition and educational pedagogy underscore the importance of intercultural learning and formation in relationships of mutuality, respect and justice. The Global Theological Initiative aims to heighten our ability to prepare globally conscious leaders by engaging the faculty in a series of intercultural and contextual teaching and learning experiments - local encounters, national ...
Proposal abstract :
The Franciscan School of Theology, aims to prepare students for full participation in a global church. Our theological tradition and educational pedagogy underscore the importance of intercultural learning and formation in relationships of mutuality, respect and justice. The Global Theological Initiative aims to heighten our ability to prepare globally conscious leaders by engaging the faculty in a series of intercultural and contextual teaching and learning experiments - local encounters, national and international immersions - that enable faculty and students to experience first-hand the interconnectedness of peoples, cultures, and issues in our global society and church. Phase I of the initiative enabled faculty to identify the pedagogical issues and formulate a preliminary plan for the program. Phase II moves conversation to experimentation, engaging faculty in the design, implementation, and assessment of several immersion experiences that relate directly to the pedagogical and formational goals of our curriculum.

Learning Abstract :
The Franciscan School of Theology, aims to prepare students for full participation in a global church. Our theological tradition and educational pedagogy underscore the importance of intercultural learning and formation in relationships of mutuality, respect and justice. The Global Theological Initiative heightened our ability to prepare globally conscious leaders by engaging the faculty in a series of intercultural and contextual teaching and learning experiments - local encounters, national and international immersions. Students experienced ministry in a variety of contexts in the US, Mexico, and Vietnam. Further, faculty discussed and reflected on how to adapt pedagogies in the light of these experiential learning experiences. We more sensitive to bringing in multi-cultural dimensions of the global Church into our classroom and there is a strong consensus to continue and expand these ‘immersion' experiences.
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Moving to the Other Side of the Desk: Deepening the Pedagogical Knowledge of Doctoral Students

Awarded Grant
Boys, Mary|Machado, Daisy
Union Theological Seminary, NY
Theological School
2010
Topics: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Our proposal centers on providing a seminar for more extensive study of the teaching-learning process for Union’s doctoral students who serve as Teaching Fellows. We hope not only to improve their pedagogical competence and thereby enrich our own course offerings, but also to prepare them more intentionally for their professional lives. This proposal complements the required course for Teaching Fellows and involves informal conversation with faculty members on subjects ...
Proposal abstract :
Our proposal centers on providing a seminar for more extensive study of the teaching-learning process for Union’s doctoral students who serve as Teaching Fellows. We hope not only to improve their pedagogical competence and thereby enrich our own course offerings, but also to prepare them more intentionally for their professional lives. This proposal complements the required course for Teaching Fellows and involves informal conversation with faculty members on subjects such as syllabi construction, cross-cultural issues, grading, and legal matters (e.g., learning disabilities). On a broader institutional level, this project will also engage the faculty in discussion about the roles that Teaching Fellows play in their own teaching.

Learning Abstract :
Our seminar gathered 17 Teaching Fellows (doctoral students who are paid to work as teaching assistants in varied ways) for lunch and discussion on 8 occasions over the course of the 2010-11 academic year. Each meeting centered on a topic intended to enhance their professional development as teachers. Among the most important outcomes of our seminar were: 1) a heightened sense of community among doctoral students; 2) more extensive knowledge about the range of issues that teachers need to consider (e.g., cultural diversity, learning disabilities, communication skills); 3) reconsideration among faculty about Union's practices and policies about Teaching Fellows.
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Hip-Hop Pedagogy: Best Practices for Incorporating Emerging Voices into the Theological Dialogue

Awarded Grant
Powe, F. Douglas
Saint Paul School of Theology
Theological School
2010
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This grant will fund a dialogue focused on methodologies and practices for incorporating hip-hop voices into the classroom. The dialogue will hopefully help move the field towards fostering a learning environment that challenges (and is challenged by) various ways of thinking theological that incorporate insights from hip-hop culture into theological education. To this end, a primary purpose of this dialogue is to think about pedagogical strategies for developing a conversation ...
Proposal abstract :
This grant will fund a dialogue focused on methodologies and practices for incorporating hip-hop voices into the classroom. The dialogue will hopefully help move the field towards fostering a learning environment that challenges (and is challenged by) various ways of thinking theological that incorporate insights from hip-hop culture into theological education. To this end, a primary purpose of this dialogue is to think about pedagogical strategies for developing a conversation between the hip-hop culture and various theological voices (e.g., liberation, womanist, etc.,).

Learning Abstract :
Thinking about a hip hop pedagogy helped those involved in this project to discover the ways in which hip hop can inform and be marginalized in academia. Hip hop is a term that gets used in a variety of ways from a cultural movement to simply meaning rap music. Creating a learning environment that navigates this spectrum (movement to simply meaning rap music) in a way that illumines the epistemological framework of hip hop requires thinking interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary. Hip hop is interdisciplinary in its commitment to living at the intersection of various disciplines (e.g., sociology, art and theology). It is multidisciplinary because no one discipline can completely capture its significance in American culture. Hip hop is transdisciplinary because for some it is a meaning making system. Thinking about hip hop pedagogically in these ways promotes an on-going dialogue that can alter the way we teach.
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Seeking Best Practices in Teaching Political Theology

Awarded Grant
Casey, Shaun
Wesley Theological Seminary
Theological School
2010
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This grant will enable a diverse cohort of teachers to assemble in Washington, DC to discuss their craft and to assess whether or not an ongoing conversation among scholars would be mutually beneficial to their research and teaching in political theology.
Proposal abstract :
This grant will enable a diverse cohort of teachers to assemble in Washington, DC to discuss their craft and to assess whether or not an ongoing conversation among scholars would be mutually beneficial to their research and teaching in political theology.

Learning Abstract :
Wesley Theological Seminary conducted a highly successful meeting of 14 scholars at our new site in downtown Washington, DC. Through sharing best teaching practices we learned that there is a profound need for political theologians to talk to each other about the craft of teaching our subject. There were many creative and challenging teaching strategies presented and all attendees identified new practices they would incorporate into their own teaching. We learned that we perceive a need to engage in deeper public discourse with political actors. We will work on finding and engaging political conversation partners in Washington, DC. And we learned that we want to keep meeting.
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Metacognition: The Key to Teaching Divinity Students How to Learn

Awarded Grant
Thompson, George
Interdenominational Theological Center
Theological School
2010
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Divinity Students enter graduate programs with widely varying past experiences, academic skills, and motivation levels. Faculty often lament that students are focused on attaining the degree,but do not want to invest much effort in learning. And many students think that memorizing information just before examinations is tantamount to learning, and therefore spend considerably less time studying than is commensurate with their grade expectations. This interactive workshop will help faculty ...
Proposal abstract :
Divinity Students enter graduate programs with widely varying past experiences, academic skills, and motivation levels. Faculty often lament that students are focused on attaining the degree,but do not want to invest much effort in learning. And many students think that memorizing information just before examinations is tantamount to learning, and therefore spend considerably less time studying than is commensurate with their grade expectations. This interactive workshop will help faculty understand why many of today’s students lack effective learning strategies and critical thinking skills, and will present cognitive science research based methods that can be used to enhance and assess student learning.

Learning Abstract :
In my roles as a professor and a mid-level administrator, I see the significance of this workshop positively and hopefully. It seems that broad-based collaboration does not come easily in higher education, and ITC is no exception. What I think we witnessed in this workshop is that most of our faculty are seriously interested in helping students learn. Hopefully, this interest has been piqued sufficiently that it moves us into the Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) project with a greater willingness to work together. The QEP design requires a level of collaboration that I have not seen sustained among the faculty. In other words, momentum is a challenge. In a time of transitions for American Higher education, this workshop experience suggests to me that it is fruitful to work step by step.
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Integrating Teaching and Learning Across the Curriculum

Awarded Grant
Ramsay, Nancy
Brite Divinity School at TCU
Theological School
2010
Topics: Designing Courses   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Brite Divinity School wishes to focus on enhancing integration of teaching and learning across its new M.Div. curriculum to be implemented this fall. Brite seeks funding to support the work of the faculty-student task force which will guide research; wide consultation with Brite students, alums, and faculty; and development of a five-year plan for enhancing integration. This grant is intended to support expert consultation for the task force and ...
Proposal abstract :
Brite Divinity School wishes to focus on enhancing integration of teaching and learning across its new M.Div. curriculum to be implemented this fall. Brite seeks funding to support the work of the faculty-student task force which will guide research; wide consultation with Brite students, alums, and faculty; and development of a five-year plan for enhancing integration. This grant is intended to support expert consultation for the task force and opportunities for faculty consultation during a retreat. The plan will include careful strategies for assessing the effectiveness of its efforts.

Learning Abstract :
Brite Divinity School has used a small grant to support its use of an expert consultant and the work of a select group of faculty and students to conceptualize and articulate a proposal for enhancing student's capacities for integrative learning across the MDiv curriculum. In particular Brite identified models that enhance integrative learning and pedagogical practices to support such learning. We developed a five year plan to implement our proposal. We developed formative and summative assessment strategies to support our goals. Brite used a highly consultative model for developing the proposal including four occasions for consultation with students, alums, and denominational partners as well as multiple consultations with faculty colleagues and periodic conversations with Board members. As a consequence of this work, there is widespread familiarity with and enthusiasm about this emphasis that accompanies a newly implemented MDiv curriculum.
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New Ways of Doing Theology: Developing a Visual Arts Methodology for Teaching and Learning

Awarded Grant
Deane, David
Atlantic School of Theology
Theological School
2010
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Our goal is to promote awareness of the role of visual art in theological studies and to facilitate integration of visual art into our curriculum. Our project is twofold: We will establish an artist in residence who will encourage pedagogical diversity by preparing faculty and students to engage visual art as a new way of doing theology. The proposed resident artist (CV included) has an extensive exhibition history as a ...
Proposal abstract :
Our goal is to promote awareness of the role of visual art in theological studies and to facilitate integration of visual art into our curriculum. Our project is twofold: We will establish an artist in residence who will encourage pedagogical diversity by preparing faculty and students to engage visual art as a new way of doing theology. The proposed resident artist (CV included) has an extensive exhibition history as a professional artist and holds an MTS degree, thus providing the needed interdisciplinary background and sensitivity for this project. She is in a position to arrange appropriate speakers for the lecture and workshop series, and to act as a liaison between artists and theologians, presenters and responders. In addition, by locating her art practice on campus for the residency period (1 year), she will be able to provide a continuing and immediate resource for faculty and students. We will organize a series of lectures and workshops (drawn from local, national and international expertise) for faculty which will address the relationship between visual art and contemporary theology. This will focus on how to do theology through the arts, equipping faculty to share this knowledge with the next generation of ministers and theologians being formed at AST. Considerable attention will also be given to preparing faculty to incorporate such ideas into their curriculum, including methodologies for grading student assignments which incorporate creative expression.

Learning Abstract :
In a rapidly evolving educational environment this project explored the use of the visual arts in both teaching and disseminating theological ideas. It examined whether new insights were possible when theological ideas were expressed in a form other than the essay form that has become hegemonic in the modern university. As Christian theology was expressed in the past through music, stained glass windows, paintings, architecture and so on, the possibility of adding to the forms of theology that have dominated in modernity was explored by giving students the opportunity and the tools to paint, rather than simply write, their theological expressions. This project explored and assessed the advantages and challenges presented by such an approach.
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Libraries, Technology and Learning: Linking the Three - Phase 1

Awarded Grant
Hunt, Alice
Chicago Theological Seminary
Theological School
2010
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The prospective move by CTS to a new building and the design of a new library space offer a unique opportunity to re-imagine the provision of bibliographic resources for theological education in the context of the contemporary reality of these resources and the tools for managing, sharing, and accessing them. This grant will help bring a specialist to work with the faculty as they prepare to move to a new ...
Proposal abstract :
The prospective move by CTS to a new building and the design of a new library space offer a unique opportunity to re-imagine the provision of bibliographic resources for theological education in the context of the contemporary reality of these resources and the tools for managing, sharing, and accessing them. This grant will help bring a specialist to work with the faculty as they prepare to move to a new model for theological education. This specialist will help the faculty understand the pedagogical benefits of employing the full power of technology in teaching and learning.

Learning Abstract :
The grant allowed us to concretize questions about the pedagogical benefits of employing the full power of technology in teaching and learning, resulting in the following questions which will be reflected on over the next year: 1) What is the essence of a CTS education? 2) How can we offer a CTS-quality curriculum using emerging tools such as digital technology and online formats? 3) As we start to incorporate these tools, how do we notice and reflect upon the pedagogical issues that emerge? 4) How do we capitalize on our ethos as a community of learners? 5) In particular, how can we incorporate life-long learning skills into the very shape of our learning community?
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Faculty Days of Reflection

Awarded Grant
Wlusek, Stevan
St. Peter's Seminary
Theological School
2010
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Dr. James Keating, from the Institute of Priestly Formation, Omaha, has been invited to lead days of reflection for St. Peter’s Seminary Faculty based on the ideas he presented in Resting on the Heart of Christ (IPF Publications: 2009). The days of reflection will be organized around talks and meditations on four sections of the book. The days will help faculty renew their personal identity in Christ, and build their ...
Proposal abstract :
Dr. James Keating, from the Institute of Priestly Formation, Omaha, has been invited to lead days of reflection for St. Peter’s Seminary Faculty based on the ideas he presented in Resting on the Heart of Christ (IPF Publications: 2009). The days of reflection will be organized around talks and meditations on four sections of the book. The days will help faculty renew their personal identity in Christ, and build their knowledge of how to integrate all aspects of formation - human and spiritual-into their instructional work, with a particular focus on the integration of spirituality with academic theology. The sessions will enhance the teaching skills of the seminary faculty as they practice and learn to model contemplative practices in their pedagogy, ultimately disseminating these practices to seminarians and lay students.

Learning Abstract :
Deacon James Keating led the faculty in an exploration of how to integrate spiritual and intellectual formation in his idea of the "saintly intellect". The faculty were encouraged to embrace a more contemplative model of teaching that integrates affective, prayerful, and spiritual dimensions within an approach that will remain intellectually rigorous. Emphasis was placed on the ultimate aim of all dimensions of formation to lead toward "an intimate and unceasing union with God". Reflection on the beauty of truth and especially the beauty of Christ on the cross is a key to this integration. Modeling a contemplative style of theology will inspire students to continue to pursue a reflective intellectual life in their future ministry.
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Akouete, Legete, Anaginōskete (Hear, Speak, Read)

Awarded Grant
Hutson, Christopher
Abilene Christian University Graduate School of Theology
Theological School
2011
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Four undergraduate Greek instructors at ACU are collaborating on designs to improve the ways we teach Greek at all levels, especially by using more inductive methods. This project will jump start a new engagement with techniques for teaching students to hear and speak Koine Greek, adapting methods from Second Language Acquisition theorists. We seek funding (a) to convene an on-campus workshop for all four of our instructors to interact with ...
Proposal abstract :
Four undergraduate Greek instructors at ACU are collaborating on designs to improve the ways we teach Greek at all levels, especially by using more inductive methods. This project will jump start a new engagement with techniques for teaching students to hear and speak Koine Greek, adapting methods from Second Language Acquisition theorists. We seek funding (a) to convene an on-campus workshop for all four of our instructors to interact with two outside resource persons in order to demonstrate, analyze, and discuss oral/aural teaching methods for language acquisition, and (b) to send one of our instructors to an 8-day immersion program in spoken Koine Greek, so that she can become our in-house expert to help us all improve the ways we use this method.

Learning Abstract :
Before this project, we were intrigued by the possibilities of teaching Greek using oral techniques. We had heard about colleagues in other institutions who were using Second Language Acquisition theories for teaching biblical languages, but we did not know how to begin. After the project, we ourselves can employ Total Physical Response and other oral and visual techniques within an overall inductive approach to Koiné Greek. Further, we have moved as a department away from the common Erasmian pronunciation system to Demotic and Reconstructed Koiné pronunciation that are more realistic representations of the way people spoke Greek in the first century. Early indications are that our students, who used to think of Greek as a drudge or a test of intellectual fortitude, are now approaching Greek with enthusiasm as a real language for communication. We think they are more likely to become better readers and life-long readers.
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Conducting a Faculty Study-Day for Articulating a Philosophy of Teaching and Learning in an Ethnically, Racially and Culturally Diverse Graduate School of Theology

Awarded Grant
Andraos, Michel
Catholic Theological Union of Chicago
Theological School
2011
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution

Proposal abstract :
Catholic Theological Union accepted an invitation from ATS to participate in the initiative of the Committee on Race and Ethnicity (CORE) in 2010-2012. From the topics proposed by CORE, CTU chose reframing teaching and learning in an ethnically, racially and culturally diverse school. The CTU faculty team that is organizing and facilitating this process, which includes the Academic Dean, has identified a need for a consultant/ facilitator to help engage ...
Proposal abstract :
Catholic Theological Union accepted an invitation from ATS to participate in the initiative of the Committee on Race and Ethnicity (CORE) in 2010-2012. From the topics proposed by CORE, CTU chose reframing teaching and learning in an ethnically, racially and culturally diverse school. The CTU faculty team that is organizing and facilitating this process, which includes the Academic Dean, has identified a need for a consultant/ facilitator to help engage the faculty in a structured conversation on this topic and dedicated the spring faculty study-day for this purpose. The main goal of the study-day would be to focus the conversation on analyzing the current philosophy/ies of teaching and learning, and develop a vision for the future that would take into consideration the issues of diversity mentioned above. Benny Liew, one of the Wabash Center consultants, agreed to be the facilitator for the day. The grant is intended to cover the facilitator's travel cost, honorarium, and other expenses for the day.

Learning Abstract :
Participants shared that diversity in its various forms is a gift that presents opportunities and challenges, not a problem to be solved. Student from different cultures bring a wealth of experience that needs to be honored, valued and brought into conversation with the content and goals of our courses and curriculum. The universal can only be encountered in and through mutual self-reflexive exchange of particularities, and that we all read, interpret, learn and teach from particular locations of knowledge. Power, privilege and colonial consciousness should be acknowledged in the classroom and the curriculum, and persons from the dominant U.S. culture have a great deal of privilege they take for granted. Teaching and learning from an intercultural perspective is not an option; it's the future of theological education. True intercultural perspectives require reflexivity and an ongoing process of transformation in thinking, being, and acting.
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Contextual Education for Leaders of the Missional Church

Awarded Grant
Hahn, Roger
Nazarene Theological Seminary
Theological School
2011
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Nazarene Theological Seminary seeks to be “a missional seminary serving a missional church.” This requires that we do a better job of moving out of the “ivory tower” into ministry contexts. This project seeks to develop a process through which we can more fully explore the options and find ways to integrate contextual education into our ministry degree programs. A consultant will be invited to lead a faculty workshop to ...
Proposal abstract :
Nazarene Theological Seminary seeks to be “a missional seminary serving a missional church.” This requires that we do a better job of moving out of the “ivory tower” into ministry contexts. This project seeks to develop a process through which we can more fully explore the options and find ways to integrate contextual education into our ministry degree programs. A consultant will be invited to lead a faculty workshop to facilitate the exploration of the theories and models of contextual education and to coach the development of learning and teaching strategies for contextual education. Goals for the project include: (1) to assess what we have learned through various experiments in recent years, (2) to survey theories and models of contextual education, (3) to explore effective learning and teaching strategies in contextual education, and (4) to formulate core practices common to the various contextual education endeavors at NTS.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to equip faculty and adjunct professors to better formulate contextual learning strategies in the preparation of leaders for the missional church. Resource persons provided instruction in theoretical frameworks for contextual education and led experiential sessions to introduce learning strategies. In the semester following the instruction, professors reported an increased use of contextual elements in course assignments. The project might have been strengthened by interacting with students and congregations in at least one of the sessions. Next steps include the development of fully contextualized courses and program revision.
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Can the Mainline Go Online?

Awarded Grant
Hunt, Alice
Chicago Theological Seminary
Theological School
2011
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The faculty of Chicago Theological Seminary seeks to reflect intentionally on its pedagogical practices and philosophy as it employs emerging educational tools. It seeks further to employ that reflection in enhancing the substance of the education experience offered by the seminary.
Proposal abstract :
The faculty of Chicago Theological Seminary seeks to reflect intentionally on its pedagogical practices and philosophy as it employs emerging educational tools. It seeks further to employ that reflection in enhancing the substance of the education experience offered by the seminary.

Learning Abstract :
This project sought to address our presenting questions which basically boiled down to these questions: 1) What is the essence of a CTS education? 2) How can we offer a CTS-quality curriculum using emerging tools such as digital technology and online formats? Our learnings include a greater confidence among our faculty that distance education does not need to be a generic online program but rather can incorporate the defining qualities of the CTS educational experience; greater exposure to a range of tools and strategies for teaching online; greater exposure to the experiences of faculty members and other employees of other ATS schools; increased attention to ‘para-curricular' elements of seminary life as a part of a student's overall learning experience; and clarification of the distinctions and relationships among program goals and outcomes, course goals and outcomes, and pedagogical strategies, allowing more faculty members to feel confident about using alternative strategies and formats.
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Cross-Cultural Theological Education in ACTS Schools: Beginning a Sustained Conversation

Awarded Grant
Esterline, David
McCormick Theological Seminary
Theological School
2011
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions

Proposal abstract :
Most theological schools have recognized the urgency of preparing graduates able to lead in culturally and racially diverse settings, to minister with specific racial and cultural groups, and to work against systemic racism. This grant will fund a series of conversations with colleagues from the Association of Chicago Theological Schools on the related issues of cross-cultural theological education. Participants will respond to questions like the following: How are African American ...
Proposal abstract :
Most theological schools have recognized the urgency of preparing graduates able to lead in culturally and racially diverse settings, to minister with specific racial and cultural groups, and to work against systemic racism. This grant will fund a series of conversations with colleagues from the Association of Chicago Theological Schools on the related issues of cross-cultural theological education. Participants will respond to questions like the following: How are African American students prepared for ministry in the Black church in your (predominantly white) seminary? How are all students formed for ministry in the racialized North American context? What form does anti-racist theological education take in your seminary? What are the student learning outcomes you have set for these issues? These conversations will result in enhanced awareness of alternative approaches to teaching and assessment of learning, awareness that will lead to concrete changes/improvements in our classrooms and the learning of our students.

Learning Abstract :
Many seminaries approach theological education from a cross-cultural perspective and recognize the urgency of preparing graduates able to lead in culturally and racially diverse settings, to minister with specific groups, and to work against systemic racism. This project has provided a way for the theological schools in Chicago to share their experiences and learning in cross-cultural and anti-racist education. "De-linking Eurocentrism" provided a conceptual framework for conversations that ranged through curriculum, pedagogy, institutional climate, and regularly returned to the need for strategic alliances between faculty and administration. The benefit of the project was at least as much in the discovery of allies in nearby schools, colleagues with similar commitments and concerns, as in the shared resources, experiments in pedagogy, and experience of the way values are reflected in institutional patterns.
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Teaching Theology in a Globalized and Transnational World

Awarded Grant
Dyrness, William|Kwok, Pui Lan|Hopkins, Dwight
Fuller Theological Seminary
Theological School
2011
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This project aims to bring together a small working group of theologians and scholars representing Catholic, Protestant Mainline, Pentecostal and evangelical theologians, for a pre-conference workshop on November 18, 2011 in San Francisco. Recognizing that theology is still largely taught in traditional ways, which privileges the European-American tradition, this workshop will seek to explore resources and possible pedagogies for teaching theology in a transnational and global manner and proposing further strategies for ...
Proposal abstract :
This project aims to bring together a small working group of theologians and scholars representing Catholic, Protestant Mainline, Pentecostal and evangelical theologians, for a pre-conference workshop on November 18, 2011 in San Francisco. Recognizing that theology is still largely taught in traditional ways, which privileges the European-American tradition, this workshop will seek to explore resources and possible pedagogies for teaching theology in a transnational and global manner and proposing further strategies for developing a pedagogy for teaching Global Theology. The project is co-led by Kwok Pui Lan, Dwight N. Hopkins, and William A. Dyrness, professors with different types of expertise and connections to the international theological communities.

Learning Abstract :
This working group of 8-10 teachers and scholars, in two meetings, explored the challenge of teaching theology in a globalized world. The group began by reviewing current practices via sharing of syllabi and classroom experiences, and by reflecting on current challenges in the academy. The latter include indifference and the inertia within current curriculum and teaching strategies. In imagining a possible pedagogy for global theology, members isolated experiential learning, historical revisioning, and inter-religious focus as central to effective learning, especially as these both reflect and challenge the identity and needs of current theological students. Outcomes included plans for an AAR seminar, an active blog http://teachingtheology.blogspot.com/2011/11/what-is-transnational-pedagogy.html, and projection of a book on the pedagogy of global theology for the AAR series on teaching.
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Deepening Our Work Together: How New Theological Work Should/Could Reshape Our Pedagogies with regard to Engaging Racism

Awarded Grant
Hess, Mary
Luther Seminary
Theological School
2011
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This proposal seeks to enhance and deepen an ongoing discussion of the pedagogical implications of new work on the origins of race as a category within theological inquiry. We propose to bring the author of the signally important new book, The Christian Imagination: Theology and the Origins of Race, to Luther’s campus for a discussion with a faculty book group which has been reading the book together, and for ...
Proposal abstract :
This proposal seeks to enhance and deepen an ongoing discussion of the pedagogical implications of new work on the origins of race as a category within theological inquiry. We propose to bring the author of the signally important new book, The Christian Imagination: Theology and the Origins of Race, to Luther’s campus for a discussion with a faculty book group which has been reading the book together, and for a faculty seminar in which we want to catalyze a deeper discussion of the pedagogical implications of this work for our curriculum.

Learning Abstract :
This grant helped faculty to explore the pedagogical implications of theological work which traces the social construction of race in the North American context. We identified three threads of discussion for our pedagogical work: 1) ideas vs. bodies: attention to "ideas" vs. "bodies" in Christian thought continues to have a huge impact on how Christian thought evolves and Christian faith is practiced; 2) desire vs. control: we need to cultivate desire to be in relationship as an intimate part of our knowledge of God, using "inquiry-driven" pedagogical models: and 3) violence: Christian intellectuals, even if they don't intend violence to happen, have a very high tolerance for a certain kind of violence in the name of protecting their theological narratives. Theological curricula should lead away from such a high tolerance for violence in the name of protecting orthodoxy, and lead towards humility and grace as a base for learning.
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Christian Heritage, Multi-Faith Community: Faculty Discernment on a Multi-Faith Future

Awarded Grant
Thornton, Sharon|Luti, Mary
Andover Newton Theological School
Theological School
2011
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution

Proposal abstract :
We seek funding to support a two-day retreat and two follow-up conversations designed to help the Andover Newton faculty explore the implications of faculty-led worship for teaching and learning in an ecumenical and multi-faith context. As the Andover Newton faculty - itself internally diverse - prepares to welcome to campus the Hebrew College and Rabbinical School faculty in the summer of 2012, the Faculty Development Committee, chaired by Professor Sharon Thornton, ...
Proposal abstract :
We seek funding to support a two-day retreat and two follow-up conversations designed to help the Andover Newton faculty explore the implications of faculty-led worship for teaching and learning in an ecumenical and multi-faith context. As the Andover Newton faculty - itself internally diverse - prepares to welcome to campus the Hebrew College and Rabbinical School faculty in the summer of 2012, the Faculty Development Committee, chaired by Professor Sharon Thornton, seeks to create opportunities for sacred reflection on the faculty’s dual commitment to Christian heritage and multi-faith hospitality. Using faculty-led ownership as a gateway topic into all matters related to teaching and learning, the proposed retreat will blend a specific challenge with a general need for reflection on teaching and learning. We wish to wrestle together with tensions among identity, particularity, boundaries, language, symbol, hospitality, inclusion, and generosity.

Learning Abstract :
Andover Newton Theological School's faculty engaged in a series of discussions on what it means to be an educator on a multi-faith campus (Jewish/Christian) with an increasingly theologically diverse student body (mainline Christian, Unitarian Universalist, evangelical Christian). The faculty-led, all-School Wednesday worship service served as the framing topic for the discussion. The faculty embraced a "Generous Christian" approach to worship on campus, which both names the school's Christian heritage and embraces a multi-faith campus and world. The faculty discovered the ways in which communal worship, prayer in the classroom, and pedagogy intersect in the formation of students and campus community life. The discussions brought to light theological diversity within the faculty that merits further exploration, as that diversity raises questions about what claims can be made about the theological position of the School as a whole.
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Developing a Womanist Signature Pedagogy for Educating Black Clergy

Awarded Grant
Floyd-Thomas, Stacey
Vanderbilt University/The Divinity School
Theological School
2011
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Educating Clergy   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project proposes a process for constructing a womanist signature pedagogy for educating Black clergy. In particular, we are seeking a year-long consultative initiative among the nation’s premier womanist seminary/religious studies professors to develop a pedagogy that is aware of the impact that race-class-gender disparity has on the formation of the Black Church in general and Black clergy’s theological formation in particular. In anticipation of this long ...
Proposal abstract :
This project proposes a process for constructing a womanist signature pedagogy for educating Black clergy. In particular, we are seeking a year-long consultative initiative among the nation’s premier womanist seminary/religious studies professors to develop a pedagogy that is aware of the impact that race-class-gender disparity has on the formation of the Black Church in general and Black clergy’s theological formation in particular. In anticipation of this long awaited reflective context and workshop, 29 womanist theological educators and religious leaders have committed to work towards a womanist signature pedagogy that aligns with the logos of theological education, the pathos of transformative education, the ethos of womanist thought and the theos of Black religious traditions.

Learning Abstract :
This project grant sought to develop best practices, teaching resources, and pedagogical strategies to assist womanist theological faculty in transmitting womanist thought for practical implementation for the ongoing process of educating Black clergy. Due to racist assumptions, unreflective sexism, and underlying obstacles caused by economic strife, Black clergy are in need of womanist insight in their work to engender social and spiritual empowerment in their congregations. The project hoped that developing a womanist signature pedagogy would stimulate and support a mutually relational learning community for Black clergy. Via in depth interviews, consultations, collaborations and nation-wide conference between womanist scholars and religious leaders/activists, this initiative not only assessed operative distortions that create a gap between the classroom and the church, but also analyzed how bridging the gap could positively shape and revive Black Protestantism. In addition, this project encouraged and empowered its greatest asset, Black church women and clergy.
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Exploring Incarnational Ministry Formation through Contextual Pedagogy

Awarded Grant
Hornbacker, Tara
Bethany Theological Seminary
Theological School
2012
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
This project will examine current and proposed ministry formation contexts to determine the best pedagogical strategies for encouraging personal, spiritual, and professional growth for an Incarnational education in the 21st century. A team of faculty will visit current and proposed ministry settings to discern the best pedagogical methods to form the reflective practitioner and well-formed minister. In light of primary contextual research, current readings in theological education, and a deep ...
Proposal abstract :
This project will examine current and proposed ministry formation contexts to determine the best pedagogical strategies for encouraging personal, spiritual, and professional growth for an Incarnational education in the 21st century. A team of faculty will visit current and proposed ministry settings to discern the best pedagogical methods to form the reflective practitioner and well-formed minister. In light of primary contextual research, current readings in theological education, and a deep concern for improved assessment of our distance MDiv program, the team will compose a definition of ministry formation in language coherent with our seminary’s new mission statement: Bethany Theological Seminary equips spiritual and intellectual leaders with an Incarnational education for ministering, proclaiming, and living out God's shalom and Christ's peace in the church and world.

Learning Abstract :
Our research indicates that skills in relationships, technology, and multicultural awareness are most important to current and proposed ministry settings in the formation of ministers in the 21st century. With the interviews being couched in terms of what is different from past education for ministry, most people in our interviews assumed competency in biblical studies, preaching, teaching, etc., and did not name them in their responses. Assessment for skills in relationship was embedded in the evaluation process for Bethany Theological Seminary's Ministry Formation and modeled in the teaching methods for learning in community. The curriculum structure and pedagogical strategies will need to be continually assessed to assure that we are teaching toward and assessing for these competencies in our offerings throughout the educational process and across the academic disciplines.
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Lay Ministry Formation for Hybrid Pedagogy: Building a Quality Formation Opportunity for Students at a Distance

Awarded Grant
Love, Marian
Aquinas Institute of Theology
Theological School
2012
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
We wish to develop a formation program for an increasing number of non-cohort students in the Masters in Pastoral Studies who live at a distance and take courses according to a hybrid formula of online work in combination with mid-course intensive face-to-face seminars. Our priorities include 1) consistent and frequent experience of community, 2) affirmation and critical feedback with prayer and discussion, and 3) formative experiences that will be meaningful to individual online ...
Proposal abstract :
We wish to develop a formation program for an increasing number of non-cohort students in the Masters in Pastoral Studies who live at a distance and take courses according to a hybrid formula of online work in combination with mid-course intensive face-to-face seminars. Our priorities include 1) consistent and frequent experience of community, 2) affirmation and critical feedback with prayer and discussion, and 3) formative experiences that will be meaningful to individual online students while being expressive of community. Working with the American Bishops’ document on formation for lay ecclesial ministry, Co-Workers in the Vineyard, we will ensure that all four areas of formation—spiritual, human, intellectual, and pastoral—are addressed. We seek to gather information about best practices, engage a knowledgeable dialogue partner with whom our Director of Lay Spiritual Formation can develop the formation activities, and launch a pilot program in academic years 2013–2014 and 2014–2015.

Learning Abstract :
As we realized the prohibitive expense of traveling to St Louis for intensive seminars in a hybrid MAPS, the faculty acquired IT resources and did Quality Matters training in online pedagogy to allow distant students to study synchronously with other students in the classroom—enhancing enrollment and fostering community and critical class discussion. The faculty also engaged in learning conversation about leadership formation with the National Leadership Roundtable on Church Management. Wabash grant priorities were renegotiated, allowing comprehensive review of human and spiritual formation for all MAPS and MDiv students. Formation directors for lay students, Dominican friars, and health care mission students are working with faculty on curriculum mapping of the MAPS and MDiv in which human and spiritual formation and pastoral formation work in tandem with a goal of leadership formation. We also are in dialogue with two Dominican provinces and the Leadership Roundtable about continuing leadership formation of alumni into their first years of ministry.
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Partners in Ministerial Formation: Shifting the Pedagogical Center (for the Expanding Ministry Formation into New Pedagogical Contexts RFP)

Awarded Grant
Senior, John
Wake Forest University Divinity School
Theological School
2012
Topics: Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This project proposes a new model for creating cooperative pedagogical spaces for ministry formation. Wake Forest University School of Divinity will convene a year-long seminar in 2012-13 for ministry leaders and theological educators to develop cooperative pedagogies of ministerial formation, which will be implemented in newly designed courses to be offered in the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 academic years. These courses will shift the conventional center of theological education pedagogies from ...
Proposal abstract :
This project proposes a new model for creating cooperative pedagogical spaces for ministry formation. Wake Forest University School of Divinity will convene a year-long seminar in 2012-13 for ministry leaders and theological educators to develop cooperative pedagogies of ministerial formation, which will be implemented in newly designed courses to be offered in the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 academic years. These courses will shift the conventional center of theological education pedagogies from the classroom to the ministry site, positioning faculty and clergy as partners in ministerial formation.

Learning Abstract :
Attentive to the changing landscapes of ministry, "Partners in Ministerial Formation: Shifting the Pedagogical Center" created five courses that explored emerging wisdom about the practice of ministry. Courses in public and nonprofit leadership, monastic spirituality, congregational narrative and identity, and African American culinary culture pushed the classroom out into the world, partnering with ministry practitioners and local ministry settings to explore course themes in conversation with lived religious experience. Some courses developed projects in local ministry settings that made a lasting impact in those communities. All of the courses excavated emerging wisdom about the life and work of ministry, making the seminary a public setting in which ministry leaders found space to reflect on their practice of ministry, and seminary students joined them in that journey.
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Bridging the 'Classical'/'Practical' Divide: Pitfalls and Possibilities of Seminary Partnered Teaching in Bible and Pastoral Theology

Awarded Grant
Hopkins, Denise|Koppel, Michael
Wesley Theological Seminary
Theological School
2012
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The unfortunate divide that still exists between the so-called ‘practical’ and ‘classical’ disciplines often leaves seminary students unable to integrate their curricular work and engage in effective ministry. Fragmented learning can all too easily lead to fragmented ministry. This project aims to encourage and develop a collegial model of sustained conversation between Bible and pastoral theology within a representative sampling of theological schools in the United States for colleagues who ...
Proposal abstract :
The unfortunate divide that still exists between the so-called ‘practical’ and ‘classical’ disciplines often leaves seminary students unable to integrate their curricular work and engage in effective ministry. Fragmented learning can all too easily lead to fragmented ministry. This project aims to encourage and develop a collegial model of sustained conversation between Bible and pastoral theology within a representative sampling of theological schools in the United States for colleagues who have previously engaged in or who are open to the exploration of partnered (i.e. team) teaching. In a retreat workshop, five faculty teams will share syllabi and one integrative teaching and learning exercise for partnered courses (already taught or envisioned). Each presentation will be followed by questions and critique. The retreat setting is meant to foster a think tank community of inquiry for partnered teaching. Participants will compile a ‘best practices’ list, create a support network for conversation, generate an evaluative tool, and compile resources for partnered teaching and learning.

Learning Abstract :
Because the unfortunate divide still exists between the so-called ‘practical' and ‘classical' disciplines, seminary students struggle to integrate their curricular work with their ministerial practice. Our project encouraged and developed a collegial model of sustained conversation between Bible and pastoral theology to address this divide. We invited colleagues from a representative sampling of theological schools in the United States who had previously engaged in or who were open to the exploration of partnered teaching. In a retreat workshop, five faculty teams shared syllabi and integrative teaching and