Teaching a Specific Subject

Grants - Topic: Teaching a Specific Subject - 132 results

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Consultations to Develop Teaching and Learning Strategies in Three New Areas (Pastoral Care, Administration and Catechetics) for the Graduate Program

Awarded Grant
Dwyer, Ruth Eileen
St. Mary-of-the-Woods College
Undergraduate School
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Consultations between graduate school faculty and current professionals working in one of three specific ministry areas will elicit strategies for better teaching and learning in pastoral administration, pastoral care ministries, and catechetics.
Proposal abstract :
Consultations between graduate school faculty and current professionals working in one of three specific ministry areas will elicit strategies for better teaching and learning in pastoral administration, pastoral care ministries, and catechetics.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund three consultations "to assist the College in its development of additional curricular options and directions in its Graduate Program in Pastoral Theology." The consultation process involves three dialogic sessions of three days duration each and included program administrators, faculty and recognized professionals in the examined areas of Pastoral Administration, Pastoral care and Catechesis.
Content was specified for the new program and priorities within specialty areas were clarified. An appropriate and potentially effective strategy was designed for curricular delivery. A pedagogical model was constructed and agreed upon. Potential compatible faculty was identified within the consultative process.
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The Sacred Sites of Asia: A Georeferenced Multimedia Instructional Resource

Awarded Grant
Holdrege, Barbara
University of California - Santa Barbara
Colleges/Universities
2000
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Design and construction of a geospatially-referenced, multimedia World Wide Web site for the study of sacred sites in Asia that will provide an important instructional resource that can be utilized in a range of undergrad and grad courses on the religions of Asia in depts. of religion and theology in U.S.
Proposal abstract :
Design and construction of a geospatially-referenced, multimedia World Wide Web site for the study of sacred sites in Asia that will provide an important instructional resource that can be utilized in a range of undergrad and grad courses on the religions of Asia in depts. of religion and theology in U.S.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to design and construct a "geospacially-referenced, multimedia World Wide Web site" for the study of 20 sacred sites in Asia. It sought to create a website with a network of interwoven map layers and multimedia resources to allow student interaction from a variety of perspectives.
The team of researchers was able to develop the website database, to develop the website architecture and user interfaces, to maintain and support the website, to collect field data, to collect archival and library data, to inventory and prepare multimedia resources, to design course lessons, and to develop guidebooks and student evaluation procedures.
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Teaching from a Community Context: The Role of the Field Educator in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
O’Gorman, Robert
Association for Theological Field Education
Agencies
2000
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
The project seeks to produce in manuscript form the findings of the Wabash Center funded consultation, “Teaching and Learning in Theological Field Education: The Role of the Field Educator,” held in Nashville in January 2000.
Proposal abstract :
The project seeks to produce in manuscript form the findings of the Wabash Center funded consultation, “Teaching and Learning in Theological Field Education: The Role of the Field Educator,” held in Nashville in January 2000.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funding to produce a manuscript from the findings of the Wabash Center funded consultation (990 010), "Teaching and Learning in Theological Education: the Role of the Field Educator," held in January 2000. In writing this manuscript the authors hoped to engage field education colleagues more broadly into the conversation that was begun at the consultation. They also hoped to contribute original scholarship in teaching and learning in the area of theological field education. Finally, they hoped to partner with the Association of Theological Schools in its work on contextualization in theological education.
The authors produced a major article published in Theological Education (Vol. 37, No. 2, 2001, 1-57), entitled "Teaching from a Community Context: The Role of the Field Educator in Theological Education." With this project they feel that they produced a major work on issues of teaching and learning in theological field education that will set standards for field educators as faculty in theological education. This will strengthen theological education in that it will challenge field educators to see their primary function as teachers, while understanding they must also function effectively as administrators.
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The Pedagogical Project of The Meaning and End of Religious Conflict: A Departmental Teaching and Learning Initiative

Awarded Grant
Patton, Laurie|Patterson, Barbara|Laderman, Gary|Smith, Theophus|Reinders, Eric
Emory University
Colleges/Universities
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
To develop a new pedagogical approach to religion and conflict by integrating Theory-Practice Learning, mediation skills, and the use of case studies.
Proposal abstract :
To develop a new pedagogical approach to religion and conflict by integrating Theory-Practice Learning, mediation skills, and the use of case studies.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a new pedagogical approach to the topic of religion and conflict. This approach would actively integrate Theory Practice Learning, mediation skills and the use of case studies. Specifically, they sought funding for four pedagogical projects: a teaching workshop for graduate students, mediation as a pedagogical skill, a theory-practice learning internship in the area of religion and conflict, and a pedagogy task force.
The department engaged in bi-weekly seminars on the topic, with outside speakers fueling their thinking and developing their perspectives. They were able to host seminars on religion and conflict in which pedagogical issues were discussed. They were able to develop internship sites on the topic and, also, were able to connect with other areas of the university on this issue. In the period of the grant, the events of 9/11/01 occurred and they were well-prepared to engage it in service to the Emory community. Specifically, they hosted a forum on religion and violence for the university that was attended by over 300 people. They felt that because of the work they had done, supported by the Wabash Center, they were able to help the community think about, react to, and assess the meaning of those events.
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Learning With/In Communities: A Workshop on Experiential Learning

Awarded Grant
Bounds, Elizabeth|Pippin, Tina|Patterson, Barbara|Snarr, Melissa
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological Schools
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
1/2 day pre-conference (AAR/SBL) workshop to discuss classroom integration of experiential and academic knowledge and practices by utilizing the resources of the Peabody School at Vanderbilt Univ. and a team from Belmont Univ. The participants will evaluate the impact of experiential learning by publishing their findings and a bibliography and by creating a Listserv and/or Website.
Proposal abstract :
1/2 day pre-conference (AAR/SBL) workshop to discuss classroom integration of experiential and academic knowledge and practices by utilizing the resources of the Peabody School at Vanderbilt Univ. and a team from Belmont Univ. The participants will evaluate the impact of experiential learning by publishing their findings and a bibliography and by creating a Listserv and/or Website.

Learning Abstract :
The grant sought funding for a pre-conference meeting before the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion on the topic of experiential learning and service learning. They hoped to solidify a network of academics in religion and theology involved in community-based, experiential or service learning teaching. They also hoped to explore further issues related to the integration of experiential and academic knowledge in the classroom.
One part of the workshop focused on evaluation of service learning, led by Dwight Giles, professor at the Peabody School at Vanderbilt University. Another topic considered the nature of community partnerships. One key insight from this session was a discussion on understanding that community-based learning is demanding and not for all teachers. It is important that the teacher do the work along with the student. Finally, a faculty-librarian partnership discussed their work with students in a school that serves a poor neighborhood. As a result of the workshop further work in service learning was planned for the next AAR annual meeting.
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Teaching the Bible for Leadership in the United Church of Canada

Awarded Grant
Ascough, Richard|Vaage, Leif
Queen's University
Colleges/Universities
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
A three-year consultation of all teachers of biblical studies from the different theological faculties of the United Church of Canada (UCC) on how biblical studies are taught.
Proposal abstract :
A three-year consultation of all teachers of biblical studies from the different theological faculties of the United Church of Canada (UCC) on how biblical studies are taught.

Learning Abstract :
Through the gathering of Bible from the seminaries of the United Church of Canada we helped one another define and articulate who we are as teachers, what we do in the classroom, how we contribute to the church, particularly the UCC, and how we can further develop this identify, both individually and collectively. We grew from a dispersed bunch of individuals linked only by larger institutional connections to become a ‘community of practice' centered on teaching the Bible for leadership in the church. We learned that the nurturing of such a community takes time and energy, but that this investment will "pay-off" through the development of reflective teachers who are engaged in the construction of deep learning. While full agreement on core values may constantly elude the group, healthy debate and frank exchanges leads to an atmosphere of trust where participants can learn from one another how to become better teachers.
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Learning to Integrate Theory & Practice: A Faculty Seminar on Interdisciplinary and Contextual Pedagogy

Awarded Grant
Cummings, George
American Baptist Seminary of the West
Theological Schools
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Designing Courses   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Faculty will meet at monthly seminars to support and develop courses for the new curriculum proposed for 2001. At the center of the new design is a commitment to the integration of theory and practice to develop spiritual leaders for the changing churches of the new century.
Proposal abstract :
Faculty will meet at monthly seminars to support and develop courses for the new curriculum proposed for 2001. At the center of the new design is a commitment to the integration of theory and practice to develop spiritual leaders for the changing churches of the new century.

Learning Abstract :
The funds from the Wabash grant enabled us to develop and implement our seminar on interdisciplinary and contextual pedagogy. By all measures the project has been successful. We have met the first three goals of the project: 1) To engage faculty in a collegial process of new course design for implementation of a new M.Div. curriculum; 2) To improve the teaching competency of the faculty focused particularly on contextualization and interdisciplinary teaching; 3) To facilitate faculty integration of theory and practice in the design and teaching of core courses in the ABSW M.Div. curriculum. We are continuing to work on the implementation of the remaining three goals which focus on evaluation and training. We are making good progress on the following: 1) To develop an evaluation process for monitoring faculty growth in teaching and course design; 2) To develop an evaluation process for newly designed contextual and interdisciplinary courses; 3) To institutionalize teacher training into the life of the ABSW faculty.
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Special Meeting on the Development of Children's Ministry Leadership

Awarded Grant
Cannell, Linda
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological Schools
2001
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Four faculty from graduate schools will meet to develop materials and guidelines for the preparation of leaders of children's ministry in congregations.
Proposal abstract :
Four faculty from graduate schools will meet to develop materials and guidelines for the preparation of leaders of children's ministry in congregations.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a special meeting of four faculty members from four different graduate schools who have invested in the development of children's ministry leadership. The project had three goals: to discuss the nature of resources that are needed to inform seminaries and graduate schools about the development of academic programs for church ministry leaders; to create a working plan for a book on children's ministry in congregations; to create a preliminary outline of criteria and describe a model that can be used in the design of learning and worship experiences for children.
The book developed through the project had a working title: Being the People of God: Only When Children Are Present. The book intends to engage the topics of the principles of children's ministry, historical themes and perspectives, understanding community and cultural context, and implications for leadership and ministry development. They conceptualized a consortium of schools concerned with children's ministry development among 14-15 seminaries and graduate schools interested in developing children's ministry leaders.
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The ICJS Seminary Consultation on Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Rabb, Sharon
Institute for Christian & Jewish Studies
Agencies
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Three-day consultation of faculty and administrators from Jewish and Christian seminaries in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions to discuss and develop strategies for theological training in a religiously plural world.
Proposal abstract :
Three-day consultation of faculty and administrators from Jewish and Christian seminaries in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions to discuss and develop strategies for theological training in a religiously plural world.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a three-day consultation bringing together faculty and deans from Jewish and Christian seminaries in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions to examine the challenges of teaching theology in a religiously pluralistic world.
The consultation was held with 21 seminaries represented. During the consultation, participants identified and addressed the following areas of particular concern: "(1) the ways in which theological education might become more self-conscious and self-critical in its attention to the challenges raised by the Jewish/Christian encounter; (2) the ways in which a sustained encounter with the Jewish or Christian other might become a more vital force in the formation and education of seminarians; (3) the challenges raised by the Shoah in the seminary curriculum both on theological understanding and on religious identity-formation; (4) new approaches to teaching theology that capitalize on the synergy that comes from encountering the religious other."
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Rural Ministry Education: A Conference for Seminary Teachers

Awarded Grant
Waldkoenig, Gilson|Goreham, Gary
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg
Theological Schools
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
A conference in which individuals who are currently teaching rural ministry courses in accredited seminary programs can compare teaching and learning methods and resources.
Proposal abstract :
A conference in which individuals who are currently teaching rural ministry courses in accredited seminary programs can compare teaching and learning methods and resources.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather together seminary professors who teach in the area of rural ministry. For the purpose of comparing teaching and learning methods and resources, and to work together on significant teaching and learning issues common to rural ministry education.
The Rural Ministry Education Conference was held over six days at a retreat center in rural Minnesota, with 19 in attendance. One learning of the conference was recognition of the high level of creativity and qualification among the professors in this specialization. Other learning acknowledged the marginality of this specialization within theological education. This is significant due to the contradictory reality that the majority of seminarians come from suburban churches, yet the majority of first calls are to rural and small town churches. The conference helped to create a network of practitioners in this area for sharing resources and for collaborating.
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Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Project

Awarded Grant
Walvoord, Barbara
University of Notre Dame
2001
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Supports the participation of two religion faculty (Kyle Roberts, Trinity International University, and Paul Keim, Goshen College) in an interdisciplinary faculty project on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, sponsored by the Kaneb Center at Notre Dame.
Proposal abstract :
Supports the participation of two religion faculty (Kyle Roberts, Trinity International University, and Paul Keim, Goshen College) in an interdisciplinary faculty project on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, sponsored by the Kaneb Center at Notre Dame.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to support research to assess the curriculum approach of the REACH program (Relevant Education for Adults) of Trinity International University. This research was a project of the Kaneb Center of Notre Dame University. They sought to develop a questionnaire to analyze how their liberal arts approach to biblical studies is received and appropriated by students in the foundational courses of their Christian Ministry major.
Researchers report that the original objectives were met to a degree. They were able to discern to a limited degree some apparent progression in students from the first course through the final course. However, the research tool was unable to provide clear criteria to determine objectively the results. The most beneficial outcome was in acquiring a "snapshot" of student perceptions of the Bible and their approaches towards solutions to contradictions they observed in the Bible.
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Pre-conference workshop on service-learning in religious studies, prior to the Upper Midwest Regional Meeting of the AAR in St. Paul in 2001.

Awarded Grant
Thompson, Deanna
Hamline University
Colleges/Universities
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
The event focuses on teaching and learning for civic engagement and social justice and revitalizing the vocations of teaching and learning through service.
Proposal abstract :
The event focuses on teaching and learning for civic engagement and social justice and revitalizing the vocations of teaching and learning through service.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to support a pre-conference workshop to be held before the Upper Midwest Regional Meetings of the AAR-SBL. The event focused on two key themes: teaching and learning for civic engagement and social justice, and revitalizing the vocations of teaching and learning through service. Specifically, the workshop would engage the issues of service learning in religious studies..
The event was held prior to the regional meeting. Two nationally known leaders in service learning led the workshops. Participants reported that the event provided them with a clear overall understanding of service learning and many ideas for ways to use it in their teaching. One other outcome of the workshop was participants' interest in having more programming at the regional meeting on pedagogical issues.
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Putting Bible 105 on Solid Ground: Strengthening Messiah College by Improving its Basic Bible Class

Awarded Grant
Cosby, Michael
Messiah College
Colleges/Universities
2001
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Faculty workshop to explore and develop a pedagogical philosophy, structure, and resources for improving the required introductory Bible class at Messiah College.
Proposal abstract :
Faculty workshop to explore and develop a pedagogical philosophy, structure, and resources for improving the required introductory Bible class at Messiah College.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funding for a faculty conference aimed at improving the content and delivery of the basic Bible course. This included developing a consistent methodological approach, a statement of philosophy and expectations, the construction of web pages for biblical resources for teaching, and the development of computer-generated visual aids for instruction. An important outcome they hoped to achieve was the assessment and mentoring of adjunct biblical faculty.
The faculty conference enabled curriculum standardization. The remainder of the project focused on evaluating and mentoring the Bible teachers in the school, especially the adjunct professors. A high quality of teaching was observed and individualized mentoring had the effect of affirming teaching and strengthening morale. A website was developed and used to great benefit by the faculty.


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New Horizons in Theology

Awarded Grant
Jones, Serene|Lakeland, Paul
Vanderbilt University
Colleges/Universities
2001
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Three yearly meetings of this group of theologians will serve as a "forming ground" for the development of a major seminary textbook that helps students explore the relationship between classic doctrine and present day challenges.
Proposal abstract :
Three yearly meetings of this group of theologians will serve as a "forming ground" for the development of a major seminary textbook that helps students explore the relationship between classic doctrine and present day challenges.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund three years of gatherings (renewed for two extra years) of the Constructive Christian Theology working group. Its aim was to develop a major introductory textbook addressing all the major themes of Christian theology from a contemporary North American ecumenical perspective. They also aimed to create a "forming ground" for a new generation of North American theologians.
The meetings consisted of panel discussions and subgroup work on topical subsections. In addition to the work, the weekend was filled with good colleagueship and a growing sense of their shared vocation as professors of theology. The developed textbook was completed and published under the title, Constructive Theology: A Contemporary Approach to Classical Themes (Fortress, 2005).
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Mining the Motherlode: Teaching and Learning African American Religious Life

Awarded Grant
McNary-Zak, Bernadette|Aponte, Edwin
Perkins School of Theology Southern Methodist University
Theological Schools
2001
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for three meetings of seventeen faculty to develop and distribute materials that explore methods for teaching about African American religious traditions.
Proposal abstract :
Support for three meetings of seventeen faculty to develop and distribute materials that explore methods for teaching about African American religious traditions.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather a group to develop and distribute materials that explore methods of teaching and learning about African American religious traditions. They hoped to discuss issues related to teaching and learning, and to examine innovative ways to engage African American students, in particular, and all students, in general, in the study of African American religious traditions. The result of their gathering and work together would be a book on the topic. The group members were all participants of the 1999-2000 AAR Teaching and Learning Workshop, "Mining the Mother Load of African American Religious Life."
The project directors report that the group met three times between November, 2001 and October, 2002. The manuscript was written through a collaborative process of dialogue and engagement which the formal gatherings made possible. The completed work was accepted for publication at Oxford University Press.
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Pearls and Treasure: Pearls of Wisdom; Stewardship of Treasure

Awarded Grant
Easter, Opal
Catholic Theological Union of Chicago
Theological Schools
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Pilot program to prepare students for the administrative dimensions of effective pastoral leadership, including presentations by pastors and professionals from the community; create an implementation handbook for other seminaries.
Proposal abstract :
Pilot program to prepare students for the administrative dimensions of effective pastoral leadership, including presentations by pastors and professionals from the community; create an implementation handbook for other seminaries.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to develop a program to train students in church administration for Christian ministry. A series of six workshops in the area of styles of leadership, a formulation and evaluation of budgets, financial reporting, public relations, fundraising, conflict resolution and personnel management. They hoped to develop the program as a model for school in the Association of Chicago Theological Schools.
The program name changed to "Pearls and Treasures: Pearls of Wisdom, Stewardship of Treasure" in order to communicate to students the need to gain wisdom about the stewardship aspect of a call to ministry. They saw as key component of the program the enlisting of professionals from the corporate community, experienced pastors in the field, and other outside experts. This helped the educational experience to become a partnership, "mutually benefiting the student through interaction with experienced professionals, and helping experienced professionals develop confidence in the next generation of pastoral leaders who can work with them in a collaborative manner."
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Developing Pedagogies on Catholicism as Ritual and Practice

Awarded Grant
Morrill, Bruce|Pierce, Joanne|Rodgers, Susan|Ziegler, Joanna
College of the Holy Cross
2002
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a faculty seminar to explore inclusion of the performative dimension of Catholic ritual and practice in eight undergraduate courses across the curriculum that examine religion.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a faculty seminar to explore inclusion of the performative dimension of Catholic ritual and practice in eight undergraduate courses across the curriculum that examine religion.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to re-connect participation, ritual, practice and performance more adequately to classroom pedagogy and scholarship about Catholicism. Through a faculty seminar, it hoped to explore the performative dimension of Catholicism and of Catholic knowledge. Specifically, they hoped to exchange ideas on how to enhance aspects of their courses to include aspects of ritual and practice in Catholicism.
Twelve faculty members met for a four-day interdisciplinary seminar on teaching, research, and writing about the bodily and performative dimensions of Roman Catholicism. Faculty representation was in the areas of religious studies, philosophy, psychology, Spanish, sociology-anthropology and visual arts. Each scholar shared scholarship on practices of Catholicism from their discipline, reflecting upon pedagogical strategies that help to teach that practice. The project director reports that faculty were highly engaged with the discussion and found the seminar stimulating and useful. Participant evaluations bear this out.
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The Virtual World Project: Creating a Virtual World of the Bible and The Early Church

Awarded Grant
O’Keefe, John|Simkins, Ronald
Creighton University
Colleges/Universities
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for modern computer imaging technology to create virtual tours of ancient sites for use in teaching biblical studies and history of Christianity.
Proposal abstract :
Support for modern computer imaging technology to create virtual tours of ancient sites for use in teaching biblical studies and history of Christianity.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to use computer imaging technology to create virtual towns of ancient sites for use in the teaching and learning of students of the Bible and early Christianity. They hoped to make the archeological remains of the ancient world more accessible. They also hoped to link those images to interactive maps, photographs of the excavations and artifacts, voice narrations, and samples of ancient texts.
The project directors were able to visit and photograph ten archeological sites in Turkey and six sites in Greece. They produced nearly 8000 photographs, 500 of which are "stand alone" photos depicting details from the various sites visited. The remaining photos were in the process of being assembled into approximately 750 Quick Time Virtual Reality movies of the sites. They also continued development of the Virtual World website, found at http://www.virtualworldproject.org/
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Embedding Dialogue as a Learning Outcome in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Markham, Ian
Hartford Seminary
Theological Schools
2002
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Educating the faculty through a conference and two consultants on the pedagogical issues of authentic dialogical engagement and reviewing/assessing the curriculum for its adherence to the ‘interfaith‘(Muslim/Christian) dialogue concept.
Proposal abstract :
Educating the faculty through a conference and two consultants on the pedagogical issues of authentic dialogical engagement and reviewing/assessing the curriculum for its adherence to the ‘interfaith‘(Muslim/Christian) dialogue concept.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to reflect on the theory and practice of dialogue, within the context of inter-religious experience, with a goal of embedding this pedagogical process into the curriculum. Through a conference of seminary representatives who are most involved in diversity and dialogue, along with a faculty retreat, they hoped to ensure that a broad understanding of dialogue would become an integral part of all their degree programs.
Organizers confirm that the grant "facilitated a key and defining theme for the Seminary." Activities included a conference of nineteen professors, all engaged in teaching inter-religious dialogue, a retreat with faculty facilitated by outside consultants, and a conference on the topic of "teaching dialogue" between Muslims and Christians. As a result of these efforts, the Mission and Values statements of the Seminary had explicit reference to the goal of dialogue, a new core course on dialogue became part of their revised MA program, and an issue of Muslim World was developed on the theme of Christian-Muslim dialogue.
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Knowledge, Power and Wisdom: Transforming Biblical Studies

Awarded Grant
Schüssler Fiorenza, Elisabeth
Harvard University
Colleges/Universities
2002
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Research and writing to develop intellectual frameworks, methodological practices, educational measures and institutional analyses to rethink biblical doctoral studies as regards the rhetorics and ethics of biblical inquiry.
Proposal abstract :
Research and writing to develop intellectual frameworks, methodological practices, educational measures and institutional analyses to rethink biblical doctoral studies as regards the rhetorics and ethics of biblical inquiry.

Learning Abstract :
The project is a study leave work that is part of an overarching project to rethink the standard educational methods and framework of Biblical Studies in order to address "the uneasy relationship between church and critical biblical scholarship" and "the political functions of Biblical Studies in the face of increasing global fundamentalism and Scriptural literalism."
During the study leave two types of work were engaged: "further research on the issues and initiation of public discussion on how to reshape graduate biblical education in general and doctoral education in particular." A total of four articles on the research topic were published during the study leave period.
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Teaching the Context of Theological Education: The Role of the Field Educator

Awarded Grant
O’Gorman, Robert
Loyola University Chicago
Colleges/Universities
2002
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
A study of contextual pedagogy in selected theological schools to assess effective methods, underlying curricular vision, and faculty transition to new methods.
Proposal abstract :
A study of contextual pedagogy in selected theological schools to assess effective methods, underlying curricular vision, and faculty transition to new methods.

Learning Abstract :
This study leave project sought to study in selected theological schools the teaching practices of field educators that best connect students' learning to the contexts of ministry, and thus, provide a fuller description of teaching in professional theological education. He hoped to assess the following issues: the methods of teaching and learning relating ministerial contexts and theology; the curricular vision this approach to teaching and learning requires; and change strategies necessary for a faculty to make a commitment to contextual theological teaching practices.
A total of six theological schools were studied with 97 persons interviewed (45 students and 52 faculty). He found, overall, that for each school the definition of context differed, and this in turn influenced the models used to relate theory to practice and the dominant characteristic of the school.
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Teaching the Bible: How the History and Culture of Biblical Interpretation in the Bible Belt has Influenced Teaching and Learning in Theology

Awarded Grant
Bonilla, Max
University of St. Thomas (MN)
Colleges/Universities
2002
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
To make explicit the cultural assumptions of the Bible Belt that affect teaching and learning in biblical studies by videotaping interviews with Southern pastors, students, and teachers; to develop web resources from the data collected for exploring the formational aspects of learning.
Proposal abstract :
To make explicit the cultural assumptions of the Bible Belt that affect teaching and learning in biblical studies by videotaping interviews with Southern pastors, students, and teachers; to develop web resources from the data collected for exploring the formational aspects of learning.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to understand how teaching trends contributed to the development of hermeneutical and theological assumptions concerning the Bible in the "Bible Belt." Through interviews with pastors, students and professors, the research hoped to discern primarily the role that "Bible Belt" culture plays in the teaching and learning process, as well as the influence of the teaching process directly on the "Bible Belt" cultural perception of the Bible. Hoped for results included a website of collected data and a course on the topic.
Research data collected was put into a website as www.biblebeltresearch.org. The course that emerged was well attended and included a variety of pedagogical strategies including field research and multimedia presentations. Important outcomes of the research also included a paper entitled, "Hermeneutics of the Bible Belt: Struggles in Interpretation" and various talks to local churches to raise awareness of the culture and cultural dynamics of their context.
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Teaching Seminars at the Hebrew Union College

Awarded Grant
Dallaire, Hélène
Hebrew Union College - New York Jewish Institute of Religion
Colleges/Universities
2002
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Support for a guest speaker on Teaching Biblical Hebrew for the faculty’s monthly teaching seminar.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a guest speaker on Teaching Biblical Hebrew for the faculty’s monthly teaching seminar.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a consultant who specializes in Biblical Hebrew instruction to work with their teaching assistants and private tutors who instruct their rabbinical and graduate students in Biblical, Rabbinic and Modern Hebrew.
The consultant, Dr. David Levenson of Florida State University, gave a three-hour presentation on the teaching of Biblical Hebrew. Following the session, the students engaged Dr. Levenson over lunch with more specific questions, including scenarios from their classroom experience. The project director reported positive feedback from participants and that the teaching seminar served as springboard for further discussion on the use of technology in teaching Biblical Hebrew.
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An Exploration of Communicative Language Learning for Seminary Training in Biblical Hebrew

Awarded Grant
Overland, Paul
Ashland Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Project to increase retention of Hebrew literacy skills by taking advantage of discoveries in the field of Second Language Acquisition in order to develop communicative competence among students, establish an immersion environment of instruction, and facilitate retention by instructional songs and tutorial CD.
Proposal abstract :
Project to increase retention of Hebrew literacy skills by taking advantage of discoveries in the field of Second Language Acquisition in order to develop communicative competence among students, establish an immersion environment of instruction, and facilitate retention by instructional songs and tutorial CD.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to explore theories of communicative learning in the area of Second Language Acquisition, with the aim of enhancing literacy in Biblical Hebrew. Goals for the project included developing communicative competence among students, establishing an emersion environment of instruction, facilitating retention through instructional song, targeting relaxation as a conscious goal, and learning via Total Physical Response.

The project director reports that from his course work using these methods, ancient language acquisition students using communicative methods may achieve linguistic skills equivalent to those achieved in a non-communicative classroom. Learning needs of more students are better met via a communicative classroom than a traditional classroom. A student's ability to carry a language course to its completion may be enhanced by use of communicative instruction. Finally, he discovered that interactive computer tutorials find eager reception among students, especially when combined with instructional song.
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Analytikon: A Web Based New Testament Greek Grammar Review Tool

Awarded Grant
McDonough, Sean|Keazirian, Edward
Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, MA
Theological Schools
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Development of a free access Web site where users with prior knowledge of basic New Testament Greek could review basic grammar and vocabulary, and also refresh their skills in parsing, translating, and grammatical analysis through drilling, self-assessment, and remedial instruction.
Proposal abstract :
Development of a free access Web site where users with prior knowledge of basic New Testament Greek could review basic grammar and vocabulary, and also refresh their skills in parsing, translating, and grammatical analysis through drilling, self-assessment, and remedial instruction.

Learning Abstract :
Analytikon is a free-access website where users with prior knowledge of basic New Testament Greek can review basic grammar and vocabulary, and also refresh their skills in parsing, translation, and grammatical analysis through drilling, self-assessment, and remedial instruction. Students from all over the world can now make use of a professionally designed, interactive web tool that takes them step by step through the essentials of New Testament Greek. The site should be especially attractive to instructors of Greek at the undergraduate and graduate level, who can direct their students to an easy-to-use, no cost site where the lessons from the classroom can be reinforced by structured exercises. At a time when many schools are considering whether teaching Greek, while theoretically desirable, may be impractical, Analytikon demonstrates that modern technological tools can help make learning ancient languages a manageable and fulfilling task. http://www.analytikon.org/
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Reading Hebrew: A Biblical Hebrew Web Course

Awarded Grant
Bandstra, Barry
Hope College
Colleges/Universities
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
To create Reading Hebrew which will be a complete first-year Biblical Hebrew language course of instruction that will be available over the Internet at no cost to students or their institution; it will include course management tools for instructors.
Proposal abstract :
To create Reading Hebrew which will be a complete first-year Biblical Hebrew language course of instruction that will be available over the Internet at no cost to students or their institution; it will include course management tools for instructors.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to create a web-based introductory course of instruction for Biblical Hebrew, including course management tools for instructors. The course hoped to provide a complete Biblical Hebrew learning package for individual students of biblical literature who may not have access to college or seminary instruction.
The project director reports that the course was successfully developed and can be found online at http://readinghebrew.org The program was demonstrated in the Pedagogy section of the 2003 international meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature at Cambridge University in England. This setting provided valuable scholarly evaluation and feedback on the work.
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Using Technology to Teach Byzantine Sacred Chant

Awarded Grant
Marangos, Frank
Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Sch of Theology
Theological Schools
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of an interactive Web Site and accompanying CD-Rom of Greek Orthodox liturgical hymns for the purpose of helping theological students preparing for ordination to the priesthood learn the theological content and musical notation of Byzantine sacred music.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of an interactive Web Site and accompanying CD-Rom of Greek Orthodox liturgical hymns for the purpose of helping theological students preparing for ordination to the priesthood learn the theological content and musical notation of Byzantine sacred music.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to support theological students preparing for ordination to the priesthood learn the theological content and musical notation of Byzantine Sacred Music through developing an interactive web site and accompanying CD-ROM of Greek Orthodox liturgical hymns.
The site was developed and can be found at http://chant.hchc.edu# . The program includes 21 Byzantine hymns representing the major feast days of the Orthodox Church. Hymns can be heard in both English and Greek and are sung by both men and women. The site also allows for viewing the words to the hymns and both Western and Byzantine notation for the hymn. The project director reports, "perhaps most significantly, the marriage of the latest presentation technology with centuries-old tradition resulted in serious challenges. Among these were disagreements over the interpretation and usage of the Byzantine notation itself, as well as its conversion into Western notation and interpretation."
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Multimedia Resources in Teaching Worship: Teaching the Process of Pastoral Discernment

Awarded Grant
Johnson, Todd
Loyola University Chicago
Colleges/Universities
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching    |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for the analysis and development of a pedagogy used in teaching worship, moving it from a product of theological abstraction, to a process of pastoral engagement. This grant also supports the development of digital multimedia resources (Web Site and CD-Roms) for professors who teach worship.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the analysis and development of a pedagogy used in teaching worship, moving it from a product of theological abstraction, to a process of pastoral engagement. This grant also supports the development of digital multimedia resources (Web Site and CD-Roms) for professors who teach worship.

Learning Abstract :
Although this grant did not proceed as hoped, there were many positive outcomes that resulted. First, at both Loyola and North Park, I was able to engage the question of technology and teaching, specifically how we do distance learning. I was also able to raise the question of contextual teaching and pastoral theology pedagogy. These conversations continue at both institutions and will be a key component to the development of Fuller's PhD in liturgy, which I am developing. The central question I have is how can we develop doctoral students who are both solid scholars and thorough the creative teaching.

Second, I have been able to engage scholar/teachers from numerous disciplines in the discussion of the use of media in teaching. Beyond presentations to various groups of liturgists beyond my two focus groups, I have engaged those involved in congregational studies, sociology of religion, ritual studies, homiletics, and liturgical music. In these conversations I saw possibilities for these resources that I had not seen before.

Third, I have seen students over the past two years engage in pastoral questions about worship in greater detail than I ever had before. Students began seeing the implementation of various rites and liturgies as being done not in a general way but with a specific community of people, with unique likes and dislikes and a distinct history. This has helped our discussion about worship move from issues of personal preference to issues of pastoral concern. This has been the most successful part of being able to bring pieces of a community's liturgical life into the classroom as a text used for our learning. It has also improved the quality of the student's participant-observation of liturgies.
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A Jointly-sponsored Symposium at Regent College - “The Bible and the Nations”

Awarded Grant
Smith, Gordon
Regent College
Theological Schools
2002
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Jointly-sponsored symposium held at Regent College to further understand how Scriptures are translated, read, interpreted, and taught differently across cultures and to foster dialogue between faculty in evangelical schools, third world theologians, Bible translators, and mission leaders engaged in teaching ministries.
Proposal abstract :
Jointly-sponsored symposium held at Regent College to further understand how Scriptures are translated, read, interpreted, and taught differently across cultures and to foster dialogue between faculty in evangelical schools, third world theologians, Bible translators, and mission leaders engaged in teaching ministries.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather international scholars for a symposium on how scriptures are translated, read and taught in different ways across cultures. They hoped to highlight the role of scriptures in Christian mission. They also hoped to develop a conversation between their faculty and mission leaders and theologians from around the world.
The project director reports two important learnings. First, they discovered a critical need to include World Religions training in their curriculum, and attention to this reality in ministry formation. Second, they discovered the need for intentional dialogue between scholars of developed countries and those of the developing world.
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Achieving More Effective Biblical Preaching Through Interdisciplinary Teaching of Contemporary Biblical Interpretation in a Catholic M.Div. Curriculum

Awarded Grant
Heille, Gregory
Aquinas Institute of Theology
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a gathering of up to twenty M.Div faculty in biblical studies and homiletics for two meetings to identify and discuss collaborative approaches for effectively teaching biblical interpretation for preaching.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a gathering of up to twenty M.Div faculty in biblical studies and homiletics for two meetings to identify and discuss collaborative approaches for effectively teaching biblical interpretation for preaching.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to design and implement a collaborative Biblical Studies and Homiletics curriculum, capable of developing preachers with hermeneutical and rhetorical skill to effectively bring the biblical text and the contemporary world into dialogue. This would be accomplished through two gatherings of scholars from Roman Catholic schools of theology to discuss and identify collaborative approaches. They hoped to identify best practices and pedagogical approaches and to integrate them in the curriculum through syllabi development.
A total of 27 scholars from 11 Roman Catholic schools participated in the project. The consultations were held in September, 2003, and February, 2004, with ongoing work occurring through a common website. Four syllabi were developed and engaged as models to be used in curricular integration. The project director reports, "The unifying thread in the grant syllabi and the organizing principle by which the grant is being taken forward in course and curriculum design and writing and speaking is contemplō – studēo - praedico." He believes that this hermeneutical process, which means I contemplate – I study – I preach, "shows potential to be a significant Roman Catholic contribution to homiletics theory and pedagogy."
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Teaching Youth Ministry: A Consultation

Awarded Grant
Kirkham Hawkins, Faith
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a consultation to bring together professors of youth ministry from various mainline Protestant seminaries, divinity schools, and schools of theology in order to a) determine current curricula and pedagogical practices in teaching youth ministry and b) enhance the teaching of youth ministry through sharing resources, approaches, and discussing pedagogical and theological commitments underlying the teaching of youth ministry.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a consultation to bring together professors of youth ministry from various mainline Protestant seminaries, divinity schools, and schools of theology in order to a) determine current curricula and pedagogical practices in teaching youth ministry and b) enhance the teaching of youth ministry through sharing resources, approaches, and discussing pedagogical and theological commitments underlying the teaching of youth ministry.

Learning Abstract :
The project director reports that the consultation was held in October of 2003 with 18 participants. The topics that most significantly affected their teaching as professors of youth ministry were the following: 1) the youth culture that is "technology-driven multitasking" requires teaching practices that "engage multiple levels of thought simultaneously"; 2) the need to teach youth ministry "as a means of laying foundation for a lifetime of formation" in theological reflection; and 3) the need to recognize a "theology from youth perspectives" and therefore, "teach forms of youth ministry that problematize the questions of youth rather than assuming we know what those questions and answers are."
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Workshop on Teaching Religion and Ecology

Awarded Grant
Haberman, David
Indiana University
Colleges/Universities
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for the gathering of a group of twenty college-level teachers to explore together thoughts and strategies for effective teaching in the emeging field of religion and ecology.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the gathering of a group of twenty college-level teachers to explore together thoughts and strategies for effective teaching in the emeging field of religion and ecology.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather together 20 college-level teachers for a 3-day workshop to explore together thoughts and strategies for effective teaching in the field of religion and ecology. The group invited comprised members of the Forum on Religion and Ecology. This group developed out of a series of ten conferences on the world's religious traditions and ecology, held at the Center for the Study of World Religions at the Harvard Divinity School from 1996-1998.
A total of 22 scholars in the area of religion and ecology attended the workshop held at Indiana University. The project director reports: "Elements of this workshop I would highlight for others to emulate would be 1) clear assignments and provocative pre-workshop readings, 2) short presentations (rather than long polished presentations), 3) a combination of small discussion groups and whole-group discussions, and 4) creation of a ‘safe' environment to try out new ideas and discuss those troubling aspects of teaching."
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The Role of the Religious Studies Introductory Course in Supporting the Jesuit Mission in Catholic Higher Education in the 21st Century

Awarded Grant
McGinn, Sheila
John Carroll University
Colleges/Universities
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave grant to improve religious and theological education at the 28 Jesuit Catholic colleges and universities in the United States by structuring a conversation among the institutions concerning how their current introductory Religious Studies/Theology courses can better support the Jesuit mission in higher education in the current environment of religious pluralism, technological innovation, and a developing global culture in the 21st century.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave grant to improve religious and theological education at the 28 Jesuit Catholic colleges and universities in the United States by structuring a conversation among the institutions concerning how their current introductory Religious Studies/Theology courses can better support the Jesuit mission in higher education in the current environment of religious pluralism, technological innovation, and a developing global culture in the 21st century.

Learning Abstract :
The primary points I learned from the data-collection and analysis phases of this project were that a) collecting and analyzing survey data takes at least five times more time and energy than projected, and (b) faculty and administrators are not nearly as responsive to a colleague's request for data as one might like.

1. Mail-in surveys have a notoriously low rate of return, so it takes considerable effort to follow up with recipients if you want a substantial response to the survey. We resorted to email, telephone calls, and even personal visits to certain key respondents in order to get a broad response to the questionnaires.

2. Collating the results - including generating the schema for collating the responses to the open-ended questions-took somewhat less time than anticipated, but the tremendous learning curve for using SPSS to analyze the student data more than compensated for this. I relied heavily on a colleague in the Psychology department for both a tutorial on how to use the program and suggestions about which kinds of analyses to run.

My success with the course re-design phase of the project reinforced for me the idea that it is essential to lay a solid foundation for collaboration if you want to gain a consensus on a key decision, particularly in the abbreviated time frame of a grant project. This project was designed to include consultation with a wide range of individuals and interest groups, and this consultation was key to achieving the final result of changing the course design in ways that all the faculty could support.
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Consultation on Teaching Religion 121: The bible in Culture and Community

Awarded Grant
Odell, Margaret|Langerquist, L. DeAne
St. Olaf College
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for a 2-day workshop for faculty devoted to enhancement of teaching and learning in The Bible in Culture and Community. Goals for the project include: enhancing student learning in The Bible in Culture and Community course, exploring modes of instruction appropriate to first year students and to biblical materials with the goal of developing students' abilities as interpreters of biblical materials, and to increase interaction and collaboration between instructors ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a 2-day workshop for faculty devoted to enhancement of teaching and learning in The Bible in Culture and Community. Goals for the project include: enhancing student learning in The Bible in Culture and Community course, exploring modes of instruction appropriate to first year students and to biblical materials with the goal of developing students' abilities as interpreters of biblical materials, and to increase interaction and collaboration between instructors of the course.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to hold a two-day workshop for specific St. Olaf faculty devoted to enhancing the teaching and learning in their required first-year course in Biblical and Theological Studies, called the Bible in Culture and Community.
With a strong turnout, almost ¾ of the faculty who teach this course attended the workshop. The project director reports as particularly useful, "a long conversation about what sorts of interpretive assignments are appropriate to the particular set of students in these courses." Another goal was to explore modes of instruction. This was met with examples provided by an outside consultant. Enhancing student learning was a goal, and it could not be evaluated until used in classes. However, they planned to evaluate the new techniques upon use to determine effectiveness. Finally, informed follow-up appeared to be occurring as colleagues reported results to each other. More formal sessions were planned for ongoing critique and evaluation.
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The Sacred Sites of Asia: A Georeferenced Multimedia Instructional Resource

Awarded Grant
Holdrege, Barbara
University of California - Santa Barbara
Colleges/Universities
2003
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of a georeferenced multimedia Web site for the study of sacred sites in Asia that can be utilized as an instructional resource in a range of undergraduate and graduate courses on Asian religions and cultures at educational institutions throughout the world.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the development of a georeferenced multimedia Web site for the study of sacred sites in Asia that can be utilized as an instructional resource in a range of undergraduate and graduate courses on Asian religions and cultures at educational institutions throughout the world.

Learning Abstract :
The grant funded ongoing collaborative interdisciplinary work at the University of California at Santa Barbara to continue development of The Sacred Sites of Asia Project. It is hoped that this project will revolutionize the way in which courses on Asian religions and cultures are taught by studying the various sacred spaces of these religions. The collaborators during this phase of the grant were Barbara Holdrege (Hindu), William Power (Chinese Religions and Buddhist traditions), Juan Campo (Islamic traditions) and Jose Cabezon (Tibetan Buddhist traditions). This project was concerned with expanding the instructional applications of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) and technologies beyond the earth sciences and social sciences into the humanities.

Students were generally very enthusiastic in their responses to the website, emphasizing the value of this instructional resource in facilitating their understanding of key terms and concepts and enhancing their ability to assimilate and integrate the course material.

When copyright issues are settled, the Sacred Sites of Asia website modules will be made available through the Alexandria Digital Library to faculty, students, and the wider public as broad-based instructional resources that can be adapted to fulfill the pedagogical objectives of a range of courses on Asian religions and cultures – not only at UC campuses but also at other educational institutions throughout the world.
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Teaching and Learning Scriptual Reasoning

Awarded Grant
Ochs, Peter
University of Virginia
Colleges/Universities
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support a consultation between the Scriptural Reasoning group and experts in contemporary theory of education/religious education -- to test, for example, our (members of the Scriptural Reasoning group) sense that Scriptural Reasoning does not fit into the persistent tendencies of that theory to draw dichotomies between universal/value-neutral and religion-specific subject matters, and to help frame the pedagogic inquiry for the Scriptural Reasoning group.
Proposal abstract :
Support a consultation between the Scriptural Reasoning group and experts in contemporary theory of education/religious education -- to test, for example, our (members of the Scriptural Reasoning group) sense that Scriptural Reasoning does not fit into the persistent tendencies of that theory to draw dichotomies between universal/value-neutral and religion-specific subject matters, and to help frame the pedagogic inquiry for the Scriptural Reasoning group.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a pedagogical approach to the biblical hermeneutical method of "Scriptural Reasoning." To this end, directors from the Societies for Scriptural Reasoning proposed a three-day consultation of its Scriptural Reasoning Theory group in dialogue with educational theorists so as to frame long-term strategies of research and programmatic planning in this area.


The consultation was held successfully in May, 2003, with Dr. John Proctor, professor of theological education at Westminster College, Cambridge University. The project director reports that work with the consultant helped to fulfill the goals of the project: "uncovering the basic categories of teaching and learning that pertain to the practice of scriptural reasoning and, thereby, preparing representatives of the SRT to plan a comprehensive project on pedagogy and scriptural reasoning … the consultation and report has enabled members of the SRT to identify the types of cognitive skills, text-learning, and social interaction that are required to practice scriptural reasoning across the boundaries of the three Abrahamic faiths."
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Teaching Biblical Exegesis More Effectively

Awarded Grant
Brown, William
Union Presbyterian Seminary
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
A department retreat and year-end follow-up session to develop a common exegetical method and effective ways of teaching it.
Proposal abstract :
A department retreat and year-end follow-up session to develop a common exegetical method and effective ways of teaching it.

Learning Abstract :
The grant effectively enabled the biblical department at Union - PSCE to review and improve how the department teaches biblical exegesis, particularly in its core courses (i.e., Introduction to the Old Testament and Introduction to the New Testament). The biblical faculty had noticed throughout recent years a decline in the quality of exegesis papers and in the passing rate on the Bible ordination exams of the Presbyterian Church (USA). Many students felt that the various faculty members were teaching exegesis in different ways and expressed the need for more uniformity in method and expectations.

Following an all-day retreat in the fall, the use of a new exegetical guide in the introductory courses during the year, and new strategies of teaching exegesis throughout the school year, the biblical faculty met again at the end of the school year to assess both the new guide and the teaching strategies in light of the goal of improving students' exegetical skills.
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Teaching and Learning about Judaism and Jewish-Christian Relations at the Christian Seminary

Awarded Grant
Menn, Esther
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
A one-day consultation involving two parallel core groups of faculty (Chicago- area faculty and ELCA denominational faculty and staff) who will discuss and plan a comprehensive program of guest lectures, evening lectures, brown bag discussions and workshops, to educate seminarians on Judaism and Jewish Christian relations.
Proposal abstract :
A one-day consultation involving two parallel core groups of faculty (Chicago- area faculty and ELCA denominational faculty and staff) who will discuss and plan a comprehensive program of guest lectures, evening lectures, brown bag discussions and workshops, to educate seminarians on Judaism and Jewish Christian relations.

Learning Abstract :
Learning and teaching about subjects vital for Christian leadership today such as Jewish-Christian relations can take place in and around the existing seminary curriculum, if one identifies faculty partners and takes creative measures. Activities proven to be especially effective at highlighting Jewish-Christian relations include public lectures by Jewish guest speakers scheduled during core course meetings, events such as Shabbat experiences at a local synagogue that fulfill existing institutional requirements, and lunch-hour discussions about current events related to Jewish-Christian relations. Strong connections with other seminaries, synagogues, and local institutions can generate enthusiasm and build momentum, especially when funds are limited. Persistence and tailoring offerings to reflect the strengths of local Christian faculty and Jewish scholars and leaders are keys to success. Collaboration among seminaries in planning a conference on Jewish Christian relations can draw attention to the subject and establish working relationships that promise to bear additional fruit in the future.
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Pearls and Treasure: Pearls of Wisdom; Stewardship of Treasure

Awarded Grant
Easter, Opal
Catholic Theological Union of Chicago
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Designing Courses   |   Educating Clergy   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Support for the initiation of a teaching program in church administration at Catholic Theological Union that is specifically focused on the training of theology students in functions of church administration activities.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the initiation of a teaching program in church administration at Catholic Theological Union that is specifically focused on the training of theology students in functions of church administration activities.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to continue the work of the Wabash center grant received in 2002 (WC 2002-003) in order to bring it to its completion. The grant sought to fund an innovative course delivery for a seminary curriculum in church administration in partnership with the corporate community, experienced pastors in the field and other outside experts. The current request would fund resources for the publication and marketing of a teaching manual on the curriculum to be distributed to other schools of theology for implementation.
During the period of the grant the project director reports the following accomplishments: the Implementation Handbook was completed and distribution begun; enrollment in the program increased; and the program became a permanent part of the curriculum in the fall of 2004.
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A Thing That Cannot and Can be Changed: Teaching A Practical Theology of Cancer

Awarded Grant
Hummel, Leonard
Vanderbilt University/The Divinity School
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support to analyze the results of a focus group of fifteen clergy and lay leaders representing churches from around the United States that met to discuss: 1)the primary experiences and responses to cancer in their church and community; and 2) what learning processes or methods of teaching should be included in a course on the practical theology of cancer. The results will be incorporated into a course at Vanderbilt to help ...
Proposal abstract :
Support to analyze the results of a focus group of fifteen clergy and lay leaders representing churches from around the United States that met to discuss: 1)the primary experiences and responses to cancer in their church and community; and 2) what learning processes or methods of teaching should be included in a course on the practical theology of cancer. The results will be incorporated into a course at Vanderbilt to help future pastors comprehend the basic issues of contemporary cancer (science, prevention, diagnosis, treatment and outcome) and a practical theological perspective to bear on the phenomenon of cancer.

Learning Abstract :
This study examined the results of a qualitative focus group conducted with fourteen pastoral care givers who were asked to discuss these two questions: 1) Would you describe the primary experiences of and responses to (concerning) cancer in your church congregation and the surrounding community:" 2) "Given your experiences, what would a course in the practical theology of cancer contain?" A discussion of the findings of these groups indicates the following about their experiences of cancer: (1) the ministries of their congregations are central to their experience; (2) a variety of fears appear to pervade the experience of both those with cancer and of those who care for them to such an extent that the word ‘cancer' itself is so frightening; (3) these fears are fueled primarily by the many uncertainties that accompany the illness throughout its trajectory; (4) the suffering of those with cancer is often compounded by stigmas attached to the disease; (5) the absence of just and equitable access to healthcare also compounds the suffering of cancer patients; (6) both those with cancer and the pastors themselves have many questions about the causes of cancer.

A discussion of the findings of these groups indicates the following about their recommendations for a course on cancer: (1) such a course should contain information about the basic science of cancer so that pastors may be more empathic with those suffering from it; (2) the course should assist religious care givers to have a better understanding of their own emotional responses to cancer; (3) various educational media – including novels and movies – should be included, as well as presentations by medical experts; (4) the course should include directions for education that may provide pastors and those for whom they care with hope in the face of cancer; (5) the course should assist pastors in understanding the general coping and religious coping processes that occur throughout the trajectory of the illness; (6) theological reflection on the meaning of the disease is crucial for a helpful and effective course. The study concludes by noting its own limitations, and by suggesting further qualitative focus group studies, as well as other research projects to develop and evaluate this course.
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Biblical Hebrew Language Resource Project

Awarded Grant
Richards, Kent
Society of Biblical Literature
Agencies
2002
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for development of an electronic Biblical Hebrew language resource tool designed for ease of adoption and adaptation by colleges, seminaries and translation training programs along with the necessary bibliographic resource database.
Proposal abstract :
Support for development of an electronic Biblical Hebrew language resource tool designed for ease of adoption and adaptation by colleges, seminaries and translation training programs along with the necessary bibliographic resource database.

Learning Abstract :
The grant supported a larger project of the SBL to develop a resource to facilitate the teaching of Biblical Hebrew through web-based technology. This resource would include the following modules: basic Hebrew dictionary, grammar and syntax, vocabulary and translation exercises, audio file pronunciation guide, video presentations of each segment of the grammar, and a database of books, articles and reference works related to the study of Hebrew. The grant would cover digitizing expenses, along with salary replacement funds for a professor to work on the project.
The project director reports that the money was used as proposed and that great progress was made toward the completion of the resource.
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Writing Theology Well

Awarded Grant
YaghFjian, Lucretia
Weston Jesuit School of Theology
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a book project aimed at the development of a text, "Writing Theology Well: A Theological Writer's Rhetoric," that will provide a discipline driven introduction to theological writing and research for students enrolled in theological schools and seminaries, writing instructors and tutors, and theological faculty.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a book project aimed at the development of a text, "Writing Theology Well: A Theological Writer's Rhetoric," that will provide a discipline driven introduction to theological writing and research for students enrolled in theological schools and seminaries, writing instructors and tutors, and theological faculty.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a semester's leave to research and write a text on theological writing. The text, Writing Well: a Theological Writer's Rhetoric, is adapted from materials developed from the Episcopal Divinity School/Weston Jesuit Theological Seminary WRITE program.
Speaking from her strengths,the project director would encourage applicants to design proposals that emerge from writing and research they are already doing, for such proposals will be grounded in the "already" as they imagine and articulate the "not yet." Secondly, the project should be important enough to undertake even if it doesn't get funded; and if it is important, there is a high probability that it will get funded. Finally, travel to other institutions can contribute significantly to a project, and expand one's imagination of its intended "audience." Speaking from hindsight, one thing the project director would do differently is request a longer grant period. However, given most people's natural tendency to underestimate the time required to complete a project, she would advise aspirants to expect to have more work to do when the grant concludes, because there is never enough time to do everything one had hoped to do. But if, like her, they look forward to finishing the work, then the "grant" will continue to support, inspire and encourage its recipients, long after its termination date.
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Reading and Teaching the Bible as Asian, Black and Latino/a Scholars in the U.S.

Awarded Grant
Liew, Tat-siong Benny|Segovia, Fernando|Bailey, Randall
Interdenominational Theological Center
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a two-year consultation of a selected group of Asian, Black, and Latino/a teachers of biblical studies in the U.S. on how the Bible is read within these racial/ethnic communities and taught as an Asian, Black, or Latino/a faculty, as well as how these findings can be incorporated into the teaching of biblical studies by faculty members not of these groups.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a two-year consultation of a selected group of Asian, Black, and Latino/a teachers of biblical studies in the U.S. on how the Bible is read within these racial/ethnic communities and taught as an Asian, Black, or Latino/a faculty, as well as how these findings can be incorporated into the teaching of biblical studies by faculty members not of these groups.

Learning Abstract :
The main goal of providing a forum for careful and critical discussion on how to read and teach the Bible from the perspectives of Black/Asian and Latino/a communities was met. The various sessions gave the participants a unique experience of inter-racial/ethnic communication and great strides were made in the group's ability to communicate effectively. It was very helpful to use the first of three sessions to give autobiographical introductions and deliberations on racial/ethnic studies before tackling the goal in the second session of sharing drafts of papers on race/ethnicity/nation and biblical studies. By discussing syllabi, lesson plans and choices for student assignments, the group engaged pedagogical issues involved with race and ethnicity course offerings across the curriculum from undergraduate courses through seminary courses to doctoral courses. Presentations at an international conference and at a national conference, along with a book and plans for future meetings of these some of the alums helped to disseminate some of the groups' work as well as gave opportunities for feedback from others outside the group.
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Information Literacy in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Graham, M. Patrick|Gragg, Douglas
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to review bibliographic instruction programs in select theological libraries, formulate a more systematic approach for such instructional programs in terms of information literacy, and introduce this as a collaborative program for American Theological Library Association (ATLA) libraries.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to review bibliographic instruction programs in select theological libraries, formulate a more systematic approach for such instructional programs in terms of information literacy, and introduce this as a collaborative program for American Theological Library Association (ATLA) libraries.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought "to review bibliographic instructional programs in select theological libraries, formulate a systematic approach for such instructional programs in terms of information literacy, and introduce this as a collaborative program for American Theological Association (ATLA) libraries."
The project director reports that he completed a review of research on information literacy programs, interviewed four leading figures in the movement, and visited some of the leading theological libraries to discuss their instructional programs. He also visited the ATLA offices and four premiere academic libraries that have information literacy programs. He received an "overwhelmingly positive" response from faculty in his attempt to develop an information literacy program based in the large core courses at Candler. As a result of this project, he will be working with 19 courses to develop the students' information literacy.
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The Dancing Church Around the World

Awarded Grant
Kane, Thomas
Weston Jesuit School of Theology
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for the production of a two-disc DVD that will provide teachers with visual educational materials about liturgy and culture and to design liturgical/theological methodologies with teaching strategies for using digital material in the classroom and for students to use in independent projects.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the production of a two-disc DVD that will provide teachers with visual educational materials about liturgy and culture and to design liturgical/theological methodologies with teaching strategies for using digital material in the classroom and for students to use in independent projects.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a two-disk DVD that would provide teachers with visual educational materials about liturgy and culture for use with teaching strategies for the application of digital materials in the classroom and in independent projects. This would be accomplished through the transfer of the three existing Dancing Church documentaries to the DVD format, as well as adding newly edited material. Finally, it sought to design and develop web-based materials providing teachers with teaching methods and strategies for using video material in the classroom, and students with strategies for using the materials independently.
The project director reports that all goals were met and a two –disk DVD was produced entitled, The Dancing Church Around the World. A web site was developed with an order form, study guides, bibliographies and teaching strategies. It can be found at www.thedancingchurch.com
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Teaching Theology through Music: Conveying Theological Concepts through the Music of the Church

Awarded Grant
Cavadini, John|Kroeker, Charlotte
University of Notre Dame
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to help 10 academic theologians and 10 musicians develop pedagogy for teaching theology through music, to implement applications in academic coursework, and to compile projects created by the group for distribution via the Web.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to help 10 academic theologians and 10 musicians develop pedagogy for teaching theology through music, to implement applications in academic coursework, and to compile projects created by the group for distribution via the Web.

Learning Abstract :
Some of the learnings and outcomes from this grant include the following. 1) It is possible for musicians and theologians not only to learn from each other, but for musicians and theologians from different denominations to work together congenially, and to enhance their own faith experience by coming into contact with Christian traditions different from their own. 2) Musicians know little about theological meaning in the sacred music they perform; theologians know little about the complexity or meaning of the music that accompanies sacred texts, or about its power to carry and communicate theological truths. Addressing these voids was perhaps one of the most important outcomes of the seminar. 3) What we shared from our Christian traditions far outweighed any differences. That was so evident as we explored together the music of our faith, which is remarkably ecumenical. 4) The participants expressed what a rare experience this seminar was for them. Perhaps this would be the case for most musicians and theologians, whose roles may be parallel but do not intersect. In this case, theology and music were studied and experienced together, for common goals, with shared understanding. 5) There is substantial need for written materials that probe the nature of what happens when theological texts are combined with music. Great works of sacred music are not studied by scholars for both their theological and musical characteristics, as a general rule. 6) Having the two week seminar at the beginning of the summer worked well. 7) We are only starting to understand the nature and power of the arts to convey theological meaning. It is a field waiting to be discovered, nurtured and probed.
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Teaching Pentecostalism

Awarded Grant
Wacker, Grant|Blumhofer, Edith
Wheaton College - Illinois
Colleges/Universities
2003
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for a day-long invitational consultation, followed by collaboration to create a web-based global conversation on teaching Pentecostalism. Purpose of the project is to address particular pedagogical challenges and construct models for teaching the history of Pentecostalism.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a day-long invitational consultation, followed by collaboration to create a web-based global conversation on teaching Pentecostalism. Purpose of the project is to address particular pedagogical challenges and construct models for teaching the history of Pentecostalism.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to address particular pedagogical challenges and construct models through a consultation of scholars. They hoped to identify challenges and concerns, offer several models and rationales and prepare web resources.
The consultation was hosted by the Institute for the Study of American Evangelicals at Wheaton College. Scholars invited to the consultation prepared syllabi for reflection and discussion on teaching about these movements. They summarized the practical implications of their discussion as follows: 1) most secondary sources by insiders are "unapologetically normative"; 2) "the secondary materials produced by outsiders commonly reflect a mirror image of the insider sources; 3) "the primary materials are packaged with claims of supernatural activity"; 4) the majority of the sources are not published books and articles; 5) "the definition of the subject itself is problematic"; 6) the study of Pentecostalism is politically charged; 7) unlike some of the traditions historians study, Pentecostalism is "rapidly growing and changing"; 8) "Pentecostalism is no longer, if it ever was, primarily a North American phenomenon."
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Generative Congregations for Theological Field Education

Awarded Grant
Carroll, R. Leon
Columbia Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2003
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that seeks to identify critical qualities of teaching congregations that distinguish them as generative centers for theological field education.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that seeks to identify critical qualities of teaching congregations that distinguish them as generative centers for theological field education.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to identify critical qualities of teaching congregations that distinguish them as "generative centers of theological education." The research would be done as a "modest congregational studies project, involving in an analysis of five to six congregations."
One could argue that these fourteen habits and virtues of generative congregations (future oriented, theologically grounded, missionally focused, worship-centered, contextually savvy, publicly engaged, cooperatively linked, shared leadership, personally hospitable, grace-fully managed, programmatically balanced, missional resources, highly participatory, and spiritually nurturing) are merely a personal description of the "ideal church," and there are grounds for such a critique. However, it is important to note that numerous qualities of the ideal church did not make their way onto this list. For example, no one theological perspective was found to be a common characteristic. These congregations range from moderately evangelical-conservative to relatively liberal. Likewise, no one political ideology was found. Some congregations are predominately Republican; others are largely Democratic - with all of the customary partisan views about war, abortion, taxation, welfare and other issue. Also, fewer than half of these congregations see themselves as having strong programs of ministry with children and youth. And numerous other qualities that one might expect on a personal "wish list" do not appear on this list of habits and virtues.

One characteristic not on the list is assumed - but should be acknowledged. All of these congregations are obviously deeply faithful to God, and this faith commitment profoundly influences the identity and mission of each church. While different congregations may emphasize different aspects of the Christian Gospel, all of them live out their faith in ways that have integrity with their understanding of their vocation as Christian disciples.

It was suggested earlier that a critical element of any pastoral internship is the supervising pastor. And this premise is borne out with each of these five congregations. Without exception, there is a strong and able supervisor who is a careful mentor with personal enthusiasm for working with theological students. Without this commitment, even the most generative of congregations would probably struggle as a teaching partner in theological education.

Perhaps the ultimate test of congregational generativity has to do with the competencies cultivated by an intern in the field setting. The following is my own minimal list of competencies that one might hope an intern will address in a pastoral internship: Constructive theological reflection, self-knowledge, authentic personal piety or spirituality, healthy interpersonal relationships, leadership, insightful contextual analysis, pastoral skills, and vocational clarity.

While there are no guarantees that an intern and congregational placement will experience the chemistry needed to develop a constructive internship, there is an interesting correlation between this list of pastoral competencies and the characteristics of generative congregations. One might easily conclude that congregations with the habits and virtues described in this report are positioned to contribute significantly to the personal growth and professional development of students in ministry.
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Congregational Studies: A Cross-Disciplinary Approach to Contextualize Teaching in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Mercer, Joyce
San Francisco Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2004
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that concerns the intersections between congregational studies and teaching-learning in theological education. The purpose of the project is to explore the use of congregational studies as an important and valuable tool for teaching and learning across the disciplines in theological education, contributing to a broader conversation about teaching-learning issues among seminary faculties, and offering new possibilities for contextual education in theology.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that concerns the intersections between congregational studies and teaching-learning in theological education. The purpose of the project is to explore the use of congregational studies as an important and valuable tool for teaching and learning across the disciplines in theological education, contributing to a broader conversation about teaching-learning issues among seminary faculties, and offering new possibilities for contextual education in theology.

Learning Abstract :
This study leave project examined the intersections between congregational studies and teaching-learning issues in theological education. Congregational studies offers opportunities to contextualize such teaching and learning by locating it in the interstices between particular contexts of ministry (congregations and other settings), the processes by which learners analyze these contexts, and the larger questions of theology, biblical studies, history, ethics, leadership, etc. that go beyond any one particular setting or context. Instead of studying the issues and questions that make up the explicit curriculum of theological education in the abstract, a congregational studies-based pedagogy allows particular ministry settings to operate as "case studies" for teaching and learning. Because a congregational studies approach apprentices learners in the practices of "reading" congregational contexts, it invites them into the "community of practice" made up of public theologians/church leaders able to understand such contexts and think theologically without reducing the scope of their concern to a single case. Such practices are portable across contexts for ministry.
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Planning meeting of the 20th Anniversary Conference of the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion

Awarded Grant
Schüssler Fiorenza, Elisabeth|Pui Lan (for name tag see notes), Kwok
Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, Inc.
Agencies
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a planning meeting to determine which topics to address at the 20th anniversary conference.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a planning meeting to determine which topics to address at the 20th anniversary conference.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather members of the editorial board of the Journal of Feminist Studies in religion to plan a conference to be held in 2005, celebrating the 20th anniversary of the journal.
The planning group decided on the theme "Teaching for Change: Creating Knowledge, Transforming Institutions" for the conference. It would focus around the issues of critically assessing the history and development of the teaching of feminist studies in religion in departments of religion and theological schools.
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Teaching Systematic Theology Today: Towards Building a Transitional Classroom

Awarded Grant
Jones, Serene|Lakeland, Paul
Vanderbilt University
Colleges/Universities
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a series of annual seminars devoted to exploring the challenges of building classrooms on North American campuses where Christian Systematic Theology is taught in a "transnational environment." Specific attention to the global contexts of theology will be a central aim of the project.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a series of annual seminars devoted to exploring the challenges of building classrooms on North American campuses where Christian Systematic Theology is taught in a "transnational environment." Specific attention to the global contexts of theology will be a central aim of the project.

Learning Abstract :
The ongoing conversations about teaching and learning have been exciting and productive, the work on developing innovative teaching-texts has borne fruit in several books, and most importantly, the pedagogical challenges of engaging the hearts and minds of today's students has been expanded and deepened. Fifteen new assistant professors of religion/theology were admitted to the group and in doing so a new generation of theological educators were introduced to the pleasures and difficulties of theological teaching. Members were encouraged that scholarship and teaching need not be seen as competing enterprises but as wise companions. It is the conclusion of the group that the best theology is solid teachable theology. Insofar as this view of the group's collective scholarly endeavor has been promoted, it is the hope of the group that the field of theology in North America as a whole has been enriched.
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Building Bridges, Crossing Borders: Modeling Connectivity in the Theological Classroom

Awarded Grant
McArver, Susan|Cascante, Fernando|Sharp, Carolyn
Union Presbyterian Seminary
Theological Schools
2004
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for development of pedagogical practices in theological classrooms that encourage intentional connections across disciplines, cultures, and discourses, in order to better equip students for more fully integrated ministries in the Church and the world.
Proposal abstract :
Support for development of pedagogical practices in theological classrooms that encourage intentional connections across disciplines, cultures, and discourses, in order to better equip students for more fully integrated ministries in the Church and the world.

Learning Abstract :
Purpose: to develop pedagogical practices that foster connections across disciplines, cultures, and discourses, in order to equip our students for more fully integrated ministries. Twelve educators began; four discontinued because of changes in professional or family circumstances. Positive outcomes: 1) our conversations were extraordinarily rich and important for our development as teachers; 2) interdisciplinary and multicultural programming was carried out in six theological schools; 3) an article on multiculturalism was published in Theological Education. Challenges: 1) The loss of four colleagues required that we drop the public-voice dimension of our work: many factors can hamper the effectiveness or commitment even of participants who start out with great enthusiasm and vision. 2) Neither of two planned collaborative articles was completed, despite carefully structured timelines and significant work.
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Teaching the Reformed Tradition Workshop

Awarded Grant
Weston, William
Association of Presbyterian Colleges & Universities
Agencies
2004
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Fifteen teachers and scholars will be brought together for a workshop at Centre College to discuss teaching the Reformed tradition. Faculty who are conversant with various aspects of Calvinism and teachers who want to bring this tradition to their students will be invited to the workshop. The intellectual object of the workshop will be to bring the pieces together in an informed and critical way. The practical object of the ...
Proposal abstract :
Fifteen teachers and scholars will be brought together for a workshop at Centre College to discuss teaching the Reformed tradition. Faculty who are conversant with various aspects of Calvinism and teachers who want to bring this tradition to their students will be invited to the workshop. The intellectual object of the workshop will be to bring the pieces together in an informed and critical way. The practical object of the workshop will be to assemble resources for teaching about the various aspects of the Reformed tradition and its social effects, from which teachers could draw in constructing a variety of courses.

Learning Abstract :
Two dozen scholars from various disciplines met at Centre College to discuss teaching about the impact of the Reformed tradition on the modern world. Calvinism had, of course, a huge effect on religious life during the Reformation, and on Reformed churches thereafter. In addition, though, Reformed, Calvinist, and Puritan Christianity deeply shaped modern capitalist economies, democracies, science, and the very conception of the self. Both the religious and social impacts of the Reformed tradition are richly teachable to undergraduates. One unexpected finding: the Reformed impact on modernity is so pervasive that, after about 1800, its distinctive effects are harder to see. The workshop led to a webpage, "Calvinism and the Modern World" (http://web.centre/edu/weston/calvinism/), which develops these themes.
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Teaching for Change: Creating Knowledge, Tranforming Institutions

Awarded Grant
Schüssler Fiorenza, Elisabeth|Pui Lan (for name tag see notes), Kwok
Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, Inc.
Agencies
2004
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
The Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion (JFSR), Inc., on the occasion of its 20th anniversary of publication, received a grant to bring feminist scholars and teachers together for a four-day conference. The goal is to critically assess the history and development of the teaching of feminist studies in religion in departments of religion and theological schools, explore different theoretical approaches in the field with the attention to their effects ...
Proposal abstract :
The Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion (JFSR), Inc., on the occasion of its 20th anniversary of publication, received a grant to bring feminist scholars and teachers together for a four-day conference. The goal is to critically assess the history and development of the teaching of feminist studies in religion in departments of religion and theological schools, explore different theoretical approaches in the field with the attention to their effects on course and program design and criteria of evaluation, discuss diverse models of feminist pedagogies, and envision strategies for transforming classroom teaching and institutions. Because the JFSR, Inc. is committed to nurturing the next generation of scholars and teachers in the field, one half of the participants will be graduate students and junior faculty. The JFSR, Inc., is in a unique position to convene such a gathering because of the broad network it has established with scholars and teachers across religious disciplines for twenty years.

Learning Abstract :
The grant provided for 73 participants and 7 student volunteers to engage in 4-day conference around issues related to feminist studies in religion. The conference had three main foci: Taking Stock, a critical survey of the teaching and learning of feminist studies in religion in diverse contexts; Theoretical Analysis, a review of diverse theoretical frameworks of feminist studies in religion and how they affect classroom teaching, course design, choice of pedagogy, evaluation of students, and impact on the academy and wider public; and Strategies and Commitment, a creative envisioning of how to strengthen ongoing feminist networking and mentoring, nurture a new generation, learn across racial and disciplinary boundaries and differences, and reach out to readers not in the academy. Papers generated for the panel discussion at the conference were published in the fall 2005 issue of the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion. An additional special issue of papers generated for and emerging from the conference is planned for a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion.
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Biblical Studies in Classroom and Church: Scripture as Sanctuary, Commentary as Hypertext

Awarded Grant
Martin, Dale
Yale University
Colleges/Universities
2005
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that seeks to clarify how current ways of teaching biblical studies, mainly through the use of historical criticism, encourage certain teaching practices that may or may not adequately equip pastors with the variety of tools they later need for teaching about the Bible. The study will examine and critique current practices involved with teaching historical criticism in theological education, focusing both on theoretical critiques ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that seeks to clarify how current ways of teaching biblical studies, mainly through the use of historical criticism, encourage certain teaching practices that may or may not adequately equip pastors with the variety of tools they later need for teaching about the Bible. The study will examine and critique current practices involved with teaching historical criticism in theological education, focusing both on theoretical critiques inspired by poststructuralist and postmodernist theories and on theological critiques inspired by the long history of Christian interpretation and theologies of interpretation. The study also proposes to develop specific suggestions for thinking anew about the nature of scripture and practices of teaching biblical interpretation -- suggestions that could radically change the way biblical studies are taught in seminaries, divinity schools, and churches. In addition, this study endeavors to expand the interpretative frame for reading the Bible, and even more centrally, promote a corresponding shift in teaching practices.

Learning Abstract :
I set out with concerns that ministerial students were being taught biblical interpretation mostly through the modern historical critical method and with little emphasis on other methods of interpretation, or the relationship of scripture to other media, such as art, music, and literature. I also wanted to find out if students were being taught particularly theological methods of interpretation, and if so how. I learned that in some cases faculty and curricula were doing a good job of broadening the curriculum related to the Bible and teaching theological interpretation. But this seems not to be the case in many, if not most, Protestant seminaries and divinity schools. I offer general and specific suggestions for changing the teaching of biblical studies to emphasize explicit training in theological hermeneutics. I also advocate placing historical critical methods within a much more varied and interdisciplinary curriculum.
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Ethnicity in Interpreting and Teaching the New Testament

Awarded Grant
Wan, Sze-kar
Andover Newton Theological School
Theological Schools
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project to extend methods and agendas developed by biblical scholars for the study of ethnicity to the teaching and learning of the Bible. Specifically, this project aims at accomplishing the following goals: 1) to study how ethnicity is incorporated in introductory courses to the Bible both as a method of interpreting the biblical text and as a pedagogical instrument to involve students of diverse racial and ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project to extend methods and agendas developed by biblical scholars for the study of ethnicity to the teaching and learning of the Bible. Specifically, this project aims at accomplishing the following goals: 1) to study how ethnicity is incorporated in introductory courses to the Bible both as a method of interpreting the biblical text and as a pedagogical instrument to involve students of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds. This is to be accomplished by means of a survey of Bible courses that stress the importance of ethnicity; 2) to learn from scholars who are most successful in incorporating issues of race and ethnicity into their teaching of the Bible through team-teaching with them; 3) to pool together resources developed by others to help scholars better handle the issue of race and ethnicity in Bible courses.

Learning Abstract :
Insofar as teaching and learning the Bible occupies center stage in a theological curriculum, how to do it will continue to be contested. This project convinces me that the most effective pedagogy is one that begins by engaging the students' construction of self and ends with the students' bringing their identities into dialogue with the biblical text. The text is not conveyed merely as a value-free object but filtered through the students' own identities. By the same token, the students' self-understanding is not simply affirmed but is brought into a dialogue with the text. An enduring question is how to reconcile this dialogical model of learning with the current orthodoxy of objective learning. These two sets of ideal are not inherently contradictory, but to bridge them requires creative and sustained collaboration with other teachers. What is true with teaching and learning the Bible is eminently true in other theological and religious disciplines as well.
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Teaching Political Engagement

Awarded Grant
Broadway, Mikael
Shaw University Divinity School
Theological Schools
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that will examine better ways to teach church-state relations and political engagement in order to help students (a) more accurately understand the changing context of church and state in the contemporary setting, (b) creatively and constructively lead congregations to engage political institutions and structures in accord with ecclesiological and other theological convictions; and (c) rethink political engagement so that it reaches to the level ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a study leave project that will examine better ways to teach church-state relations and political engagement in order to help students (a) more accurately understand the changing context of church and state in the contemporary setting, (b) creatively and constructively lead congregations to engage political institutions and structures in accord with ecclesiological and other theological convictions; and (c) rethink political engagement so that it reaches to the level of everyday practices of churches and local community organizations. The research will include gathering information, through interviews and focus groups, on how churches and church-related organizations understand and teach political and social engagement. A particular focus will be the practices of teaching and formation which enable African American churches to engage social and political structures in their communities. A conference will bring together seminary teachers with other practitioners and teachers to articulate methods of teaching political engagement in seminary classes on theology and ethics.

Learning Abstract :
This project provided valuable opportunities for scholarly interaction with leaders of exemplary churches through interviews. The interviews produced useful data in audio form which will bear fruit for analysis and reflection. The focus groups with Black church leaders will provide data both for comparison with the interviews and for the body of data about Black churches in North Carolina. The information on teaching and learning processes employed in exemplary churches is already influencing professors' teaching.
Providing financial assistance to students did not always cohere with the technical skills needed for the project. A Project schedule requires clarity about how long it will take to initiate basic institutional paperwork and processes.
This project contributes to the discussion of integrating core theological, biblical, and historical courses with day-to-day practices of churches. It also contributes to using church practice-based models of teaching and learning as sources for course design in theological education.
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Teaching the Introductory Course in Theology: Orientation and Best Practices Workshop

Awarded Grant
Hinze, Christine|Dempsey, Deirdre
Marquette University
Colleges/Universities
2005
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for a faculty workshop that seeks: 1) to provide new teachers with a clear picture of the background, purposes, and core learning objectives of the foundational course; 2) to communicate with newer teachers concerning the range of options available for structuring this course and for employing the required set of scripture and classical theological readings; 3) to provide a forum wherein veteran teachers can share tips and “best practices” with newer teachers; 4) ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a faculty workshop that seeks: 1) to provide new teachers with a clear picture of the background, purposes, and core learning objectives of the foundational course; 2) to communicate with newer teachers concerning the range of options available for structuring this course and for employing the required set of scripture and classical theological readings; 3) to provide a forum wherein veteran teachers can share tips and “best practices” with newer teachers; 4) to establish lines of communication (initiated during the workshop and continued by means including the course website) for newer and veteran teachers of this course to continue such sharing and communication.

Learning Abstract :
The grant provided support for a workshop for new teachers in the theology core at Marquette. The workshop involved discussions about best practices for core course teaching, syllabus/class management, use of technology in the theology classroom, aiding students in the close reading of texts, and issues pertaining to lectures: purposes, potentials, and limitations.
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Modern Methods for an Ancient Language: A Workshop on Second Language Acquisition and Biblical Hebrew

Awarded Grant
Overland, Paul
Ashland Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2005
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The overarching goal is collaboratively to advance pedagogy of Biblical Hebrew by 1) exploring strategies for adapting to Hebrew the insights uncovered in Second Language Acquisition (including Communicative Language Teaching), b) to train a pilot-group of teachers who will field-test communicative methods in their Hebrew classrooms, and c) to asses these methods’ effectiveness with a view to extending their use among both English-speaking and non-English-speaking students of Hebrew.
Proposal abstract :
The overarching goal is collaboratively to advance pedagogy of Biblical Hebrew by 1) exploring strategies for adapting to Hebrew the insights uncovered in Second Language Acquisition (including Communicative Language Teaching), b) to train a pilot-group of teachers who will field-test communicative methods in their Hebrew classrooms, and c) to asses these methods’ effectiveness with a view to extending their use among both English-speaking and non-English-speaking students of Hebrew.

Learning Abstract :
What we learned - As to product: Second Language Acquisition principles generate genuine benefit for students of ancient languages. Adaptation and implementation of these principles to Hebrew is achievable.
As to process: a group of cordial, competent, and dedicated strangers will foster a synergy escorting all to achievements none could have imagined alone. Also, to generate a complex, novel, and cohesive written tool requires uncommon forethought and considerable dedication.
Recommendations for teaching and learning: 1) import skills from experts in parallel fields; 2) collaborate, forming teams reaching beyond known networks; 3) when unearthing fresh pedagogy, plot not only to inform but actually to train teachers; 4) arrange to field test discoveries; 5) maximize any design efforts by asking early, "How could this be ‘wrapped' for easiest access in a non-English context?"; 6) state any technology-for-teaching as a second layer, after primary content is solidly in place.
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The Creative Writing Workshop as Pedagogical Practice for Biblical Studies in a Multi-Cultural Environment

Awarded Grant
Wiles, Virginia
New Brunswick Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2005
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for the exploration of the use of the Creative Writing Workshop as a pedagogical practice for teaching Biblical Studies in a multi-cultural, postmodern environment.
Proposal abstract :
Support for the exploration of the use of the Creative Writing Workshop as a pedagogical practice for teaching Biblical Studies in a multi-cultural, postmodern environment.

Learning Abstract :
The primary success of this project was in the ways that it opened up students to their own creative possibilities. The primary disappointments related to the discovery of how much the academic process of seminary (and, undoubtedly, earlier schooling) had instilled a certain "fear" in the students about getting things "right." They were very afraid of doing the "wrong" thing. The course also demonstrated how difficult it is for students to deal with questions of point of view. This is especially crucial in a multi-cultural context where cross-cultural perception and conversation is valued. Wider conversation with faculty in relation to this grant project indicated that much more conversation and exploration is needed in the areas of how one can incorporate associational thinking into a seminary curriculum and how we can better communicate our differing teaching methodologies across disciplines so that students have a more coherent educational experience.
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Best Practices in Teaching Theology and the Arts in the Undergraduate Classroom: A Two-Year Consultation

Awarded Grant
Deffenbaugh, Daniel|Vrudny, Kimberly
Hastings College
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to focus on the following goals: 1) Provide faculty opportunities to think critically and creatively about the theoretical foundations and practical applications for use of two-dimensional art as a pedagogical tool in the undergraduate religion classroom; 2) Identify "best practices" for teaching theology with two-dimensional art through the use of various methods, including: formal presentations, large and small group discussions, immersion in and reflection on arts events, and ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to focus on the following goals: 1) Provide faculty opportunities to think critically and creatively about the theoretical foundations and practical applications for use of two-dimensional art as a pedagogical tool in the undergraduate religion classroom; 2) Identify "best practices" for teaching theology with two-dimensional art through the use of various methods, including: formal presentations, large and small group discussions, immersion in and reflection on arts events, and teaching demonstrations; and 3) Evaluate "best practices" in context by observing theology and the arts lessons developed by consultation participants in the intervening year and presented to members of the consultation in the second year.

Learning Abstract :
This study was designed to bring together twelve scholars from around the country who utilize two-dimensional visual art as a pedagogical tool in the undergraduate classroom. The objectives of the consultation included deepening our understanding of the theoretical frameworks in theology and the arts, exploring how to read images in the context of theology, sharing challenges and successes in the classroom, and considering legal issues in the use of art as a teaching resource. Regarding the latter, the group discovered that copyright restrictions are at once strict yet very ambiguous. Chief among learning outcomes was the need for greater cross-disciplinary conversation between art historians and theologians, for the latter too often overlook insights that seem commonplace to the former. While theologians are prepared to use art as more than an illustrative tool, dialogue with art historians will assist them in learning to read a painting as a theological text. Assessment of student learning in the theology and arts classroom defies quantitative analysis and remains elusive even when qualitative methods are employed. The group found that distribution of annotated course syllabi would be extremely helpful for instructors hoping to venture into this interdisciplinary study. It hopes to publish several articles and "notes from the classroom" in a forthcoming issue of Teaching Theology and Religion.
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Teaching Sustainably: Exploring Teaching and Learning Strategies for Long-Term/Sustainable Interdisciplinary Courses and Research at the Intersections of Religion, Nature, and Culture

Awarded Grant
Patterson, Barbara
Emory University
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a workshop on teaching sustainability. The grant includes support for a panel presentation and discussion about various pedagogical settings and approaches for interdisciplinary teaching of courses at the interstices of religion, nature and culture.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a workshop on teaching sustainability. The grant includes support for a panel presentation and discussion about various pedagogical settings and approaches for interdisciplinary teaching of courses at the interstices of religion, nature and culture.

Learning Abstract :
In the Wabash grant-funded workshop, "Teaching Learning Sustainably," it was discovered that current research on theories and applications of environmental sustainability stirs strong interest for course development among faculty at a variety of institutions. Requiring an interdisciplinary approach, this workshop explored how religion and theology specifically contribute to and challenge emerging ethics and content about sustainability on campuses and in communities. Who defines this term? How can religion and theology become stronger conversation partners with science? What kinds of pedagogies could best reflect issues and ethics relating sustainability and religion? What kinds of inquiry-driven and experiential approaches? The need for a growing conversation through additional workshops and in teaching journals addressing emerging best practices will contribute to this growing field of courses, curriculi, and teachings strategies addressing the intersection of sustainability, religion and theology, and ethics.
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Teaching Faith and Diversity: How a Jesuit University Approaches Conflicting Religious Traditions in Islam and Christianity

Awarded Grant
Ryscavage, Richard
Fairfield University
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to focus on the following goals: 1) Develop an enhanced model of teaching religion that includes rhetorical training, providing Fairfield undergraduates with the experience and the tools to engage in religious dialogue focused on different social issues; 2) Research and evaluate the teaching methodology used for the designated classes and adapt the system for other courses that deal with difficult issues; and 3) Guide and engage students in discovering ...
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project to focus on the following goals: 1) Develop an enhanced model of teaching religion that includes rhetorical training, providing Fairfield undergraduates with the experience and the tools to engage in religious dialogue focused on different social issues; 2) Research and evaluate the teaching methodology used for the designated classes and adapt the system for other courses that deal with difficult issues; and 3) Guide and engage students in discovering relationships between academic disciplines that have different methods of inquiry and different bodies of knowledge essential to the holistic Jesuit approach to humanistic-based higher education.

Learning Abstract :
Fairfield University set out to understand how a Jesuit university, rooted in a specific Christian tradition, could teach students how to enter into difficult conversations with Islamic believers, while maintaining their own core beliefs. Fairfield's Center for Faith and Public Life took the lead on facilitating this work engaging broadly with students, faculty, Campus Ministry, and Student Services.

Their efforts to engage participants in inter-religious and inter-cultural dialogue took shape through various formats and in different settings. Cluster courses, guest speakers, the Axis of Evil Comedy Tour, and the Interfaith Youth Core student/faculty workshops all provided an array of learning experiences for members of the campus community. Additionally, a student learning outcomes rubric was developed for the cluster course and the workshop which provided important data on these learning experiences.

An unanticipated outcome of this project was the formation of two student led programs including a Fairfield University Chapter of the Muslim Student Association and the Student Living and Learning Community on Interfaith Religious Literacy. They were especially enthusiastic about this development because it provides tangible evidence that students have taken ownership of the topic and are working in creative ways to continue to realize an enhanced interfaith dialogue on campus.
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Summer 2006 Workshop: Teaching Theological Core to Upper Class Students

Awarded Grant
Windley-Daoust, Susan|Daily, Eileen
St. Mary's University of Minnesota
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a workshop to explore how a theology department at a Catholic University structures an upper-division general education course (or collection of courses) to teach the Roman Catholic Tradition.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a workshop to explore how a theology department at a Catholic University structures an upper-division general education course (or collection of courses) to teach the Roman Catholic Tradition.

Learning Abstract :
Five members of our department met over fourteen hours to discuss how they might more effectively teach upper-division general education courses in basic Catholic Christian theology. One of the best outcomes of these workshops was that we came to a greater self-understanding about the possibilities and limits within "Faith Traditions 2" courses, as we teach them in theology. We assessed the reality of the Gen Ed student's exposure to Church tradition. We are going to adjust some language to accommodate a better sense of student preparedness and liberal arts content. We discovered ways to encourage critical thinking/analysis in our courses, and decided to continue focusing and brainstorming on how to do this effectively. We decided to adjust some course offerings to better address the reality of our mix of students. And overall, the big picture is clearer to all of us. We as a teaching community have a stronger basis on which to understand and present what has felt in the past like an amorphous set of classes. Brian McDermott's essay on theological literacy was helpful: when he defines theological literacy as having to do with "learning new ways to learn, with developing a new, more complex form of consciousness; and with taking responsibility for, and trusting what one has come to know. It is helpful to be reminded that what we are about is inviting students to an informed conscience, where they take responsibility for their own beliefs. If we can teach students this kind of theological literacy - through presenting the tradition, analyzing it, and encouraging dispositions of appreciation - we will have succeeded in our work.
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One day consultation for faculty in New York City region who teach courses on urban religions

Awarded Grant
Bender, Courtney
Columbia University
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that brings together faculty in the New York City area to discuss best practices in the teaching of urban religions, build and solidify connections among regional scholars, and to assess and generate strategies for teaching about religious life in New York City.
Proposal abstract :
Support for a project that brings together faculty in the New York City area to discuss best practices in the teaching of urban religions, build and solidify connections among regional scholars, and to assess and generate strategies for teaching about religious life in New York City.

Learning Abstract :
Our consultation successfully identified and brought together a large proportion of the New York metro areas' scholars whose research and teaching centers on the city and its religions. The breadth of expertise and scholarly and pedagogical issues and ideas mirror the diversity of the city. Nonetheless, all scholars shared interests in teaching religions as dynamic, living communities, and pursuing new strategies of teaching (through encounter, oral history, ethnographic and historical research, and interactive web-based learning). Likewise, the group identified several areas and arenas that demand scholarly attention and scholarly collaboration, including community based studies focused on multiple religious organizations from multiple traditions, and the formalization of data collection methods and theoretical frameworks.
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Teaching Religious Studies Courses at a State University in Pennsylvania

Awarded Grant
Holm, Tawny
Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to address the specific questions involved in teaching religious studies courses from an academic perspective in a secular state university in Pennsylvania. We propose a series of symposia with invited speakers, both from world religions in Pennsylvania and pedagogical experts, together with Religious Studies faculty from across the state to be hosted by our Department of Religious Studies at IUP. Our goals are to reflect on what ...
Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to address the specific questions involved in teaching religious studies courses from an academic perspective in a secular state university in Pennsylvania. We propose a series of symposia with invited speakers, both from world religions in Pennsylvania and pedagogical experts, together with Religious Studies faculty from across the state to be hosted by our Department of Religious Studies at IUP. Our goals are to reflect on what is working in our current pedagogical strategies, interact and share problems and successes with faculty of other Pennsylvania universities (especially those in the state system to which we belong), and incorporate new pedagogical methods as learned through this reflection and interaction with all participants. Our culminating activity will be to compose a resource handbook on teaching Religious Studies in Pennsylvania.

Learning Abstract :
Our three annual symposia in 2007-2009 were organized under three separate sub-themes meant to stoke creative thinking about how to teach students about religion and religions at PA state universities (many of which do not have a religiously diverse student population): Critical Thinking on Women and Religion; Religion and Media; and Religion and Violence, and the Response of the Public Intellectual. We were able to invite faculty across Pennsylvania, as well as three guest speakers in different religions each year, in addition to two pedagogical experts in years one and two. In addition to learning new teaching strategies and topics for our constituency via our interactions with each other, our concrete results included influencing two of our sister state universities to offer new courses in Religious Studies as well as to begin new minor programs. We are also still working on a resource handbook to be published online.
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Enhancing Pedagogies of Formation in Text and Language Classes at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College

Awarded Grant
Kamionkowski, S. Tamar
Reconstructionist Rabbinical College
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
The RRC is planning a three-year initiative to enhance pedagogies of formation in text and language courses. We appreciate the significance of pedagogies of formation in fostering rabbinic identity and integrity. Since RRC already has strong co-curricular support for spiritual formation and an exemplary program in practical rabbinics, and since we have a curricular focus on texts and languages, we will concentrate on integrating pedagogies of formation in these areas. ...
Proposal abstract :
The RRC is planning a three-year initiative to enhance pedagogies of formation in text and language courses. We appreciate the significance of pedagogies of formation in fostering rabbinic identity and integrity. Since RRC already has strong co-curricular support for spiritual formation and an exemplary program in practical rabbinics, and since we have a curricular focus on texts and languages, we will concentrate on integrating pedagogies of formation in these areas. We will convene an advisory committee of RRC alumni to consult on rabbinic formation and assist in designing and monitoring our intervention; gather data regarding implementation of pedagogies of formation among RRC text and language teachers; provide individual coaching and peer support groups for text and language teachers; monitor the effectiveness of the project and design modifications; and disseminate results through publications and presentations.

Learning Abstract :
Our most powerful learning involved the importance of cultivating the faculty's own formation as clergy educators. It was through becoming more self-aware, connecting with their passions for course material, learning to deliver feedback with honesty and warmth, ad supporting each other through satisfactions and frustrations that faculty members could expend their capacities to mentor students in rabbinic formation. To most effectively cultivate the faculty's formation, we structured reflections, discussion, and text study into small cluster meetings, regular faculty meetings and in-services, as well as bringing RRC alumni (working rabbis) into conversation with faculty members. We also came to view text and language acquisition not as an adjunct to rabbinic formation, but as an integral component, "a whole attitude and approach in which the text becomes the students' frame of reference, their window on the world."
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Explorations - Theology and Literature

Awarded Grant
Connors, Russell
St. Catherine University
Colleges/Universities
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The purpose of the grant is to explore connections - especially pedagogical connections - between theology and literature. In dialogue with colleagues from our own English Department, we will investigate a more rigorous use of literature in theology courses as an effective means of theological exploration. The members of the English department hope to find ways to help their students delve into some of the spiritual and religious questions in ...
Proposal abstract :
The purpose of the grant is to explore connections - especially pedagogical connections - between theology and literature. In dialogue with colleagues from our own English Department, we will investigate a more rigorous use of literature in theology courses as an effective means of theological exploration. The members of the English department hope to find ways to help their students delve into some of the spiritual and religious questions in literature.

Learning Abstract :
This project sought to explore the pedagogical role that literature can play in theology classes and courses. Guest lecturer and author Marilynne Robinson gave our faculty language for what we are attempting to teach our students, and helped us explore the ways that literature, like religious experience, can disclose the sacred in "ordinary" experience. We studied the analogous way in which theological discourse and works of literature are formative of the imagination.

The effective use of literature in theology will depend significantly on the time, energy, care and instruction that are associated with it. We look forward to continuing the fruitful conversation about the connections between theology and literature, between aesthetic and religious experience.
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Rethinking the Christian Studies Classroom: Mapping the Hidden (and Not So Hidden) Dynamics of Teaching Religion in the South

Awarded Grant
Hulsether, Mark|Medine, Carolyn|Gravett, Sandra
Southeastern Commission for the Study of Religion (SECSOR)
Agencies
2006
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support is requested to enable a group of professors with responsibilities for teaching Christianity in large public universities in the south to gather during a two-year process in which they reflect critically upon the place of Christian Studies in religious studies in large public universities, develop new models for teaching Christian Studies in this context, and disseminate their results (both successes and remaining or emerging tensions). The proposed gatherings will ...
Proposal abstract :
Support is requested to enable a group of professors with responsibilities for teaching Christianity in large public universities in the south to gather during a two-year process in which they reflect critically upon the place of Christian Studies in religious studies in large public universities, develop new models for teaching Christian Studies in this context, and disseminate their results (both successes and remaining or emerging tensions). The proposed gatherings will be held in association with the 2007 and 2008 annual meeting of the Southeastern Commission for the Study of Religion (SECSOR), and the grant will be administered by SECSOR.

Learning Abstract :
"Rethinking the Religious Studies Classroom: Mapping the Hidden (and Not So Hidden) Dynamics of Teaching Religion in the South," discussed two main themes. First, Christianity shapes how our students understand the world, whether they are practitioners or not. Their understandings are informed by personal orientations to Christianity, by social groups such as Life Teen, and by a general sense of growing up with the historical legacies of the South. Thus, students bring forms of identity that we as teachers may threaten, as well as a language for talking about them that is in tension with academic discourse. Developing strategies for unpacking and bridging these differences is key. Second, we came to see that, as Religious Studies departments expand to address religions from a global perspective, two results are gaps in the curriculum on Christianity and a proliferation of methods and discourses that may lead to a breakdown in communication with students and within departments. Developing departmental learning goals becomes crucial, so that we can meet the needs of students, satisfy the many constituents of public universities, and fulfill our mandate to contribute to an informed and critical public discourse.
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A series of Faculty Meetings on the Pedagogical Challenges of Engaging Bioethical Issues across the Theological Curriculum

Awarded Grant
Kilner, John
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School
Theological Schools
2006
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Theological education has insufficiently equipped most church leaders to engage many crucial challenges to human life and dignity - largely due to pedagogical deficiencies connected to the compartmentalization of bioethics in the theological curriculum. The proposed initiative seeks to begin the process of correcting this insufficiency through a series of three meetings in early 2007 involving 12 Trinity faculty members. These meetings will be driven by a pedagogical purpose: to learn how ...
Proposal abstract :
Theological education has insufficiently equipped most church leaders to engage many crucial challenges to human life and dignity - largely due to pedagogical deficiencies connected to the compartmentalization of bioethics in the theological curriculum. The proposed initiative seeks to begin the process of correcting this insufficiency through a series of three meetings in early 2007 involving 12 Trinity faculty members. These meetings will be driven by a pedagogical purpose: to learn how a theological faculty can teach students most effectively to understand and engage crucial bioethical challenges.

Learning Abstract :
Once faculty members in every discipline of the curriculum are equipped to make the conceptual connections between their disciplines and bioethical challenges, they can become highly energized to develop appropriate pedagogical strategies for insuring that their courses help students to understand and engage vital bioethical challenges. This project mobilized such a team of teachers through readings, a set of three extended meetings, and a final reflection instrument that fostered further pedagogical strategizing. The project also uncovered a serious obstacle to classroom effectiveness. Teachers need better tools - case studies in particular-to bridge from their particular disciplines to bioethical issues. They need better understanding of how to mobilize the resources of their disciplines to address ethical case studies. And they need to be equipped to engage the unique pedagogical challenges involved in using highly inter-disciplinary bioethics case studies in class. A follow-up initiative is being developed to address these needs.
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Teaching Exegesis in Historically Black Theological Schools

Awarded Grant
Ashmore, James|Mbuvi, Andrew
Shaw University Divinity School
Theological Schools
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
This project will examine the unique dimensions of teaching Biblical exegesis in Historically Black Theological Schools (HBTS). The faculty who teach Biblical Studies in select schools (Hood, Howard, ITC, Payne, Proctor, and Shaw) will meet for a conference to discuss the unique needs of their students and the expectations of the African American Church, to share best practices in teaching, and to formulate one or more approaches for teaching exegesis ...
Proposal abstract :
This project will examine the unique dimensions of teaching Biblical exegesis in Historically Black Theological Schools (HBTS). The faculty who teach Biblical Studies in select schools (Hood, Howard, ITC, Payne, Proctor, and Shaw) will meet for a conference to discuss the unique needs of their students and the expectations of the African American Church, to share best practices in teaching, and to formulate one or more approaches for teaching exegesis within their contexts. These approaches will be tested in classes at all six schools. After testing the approaches in the classroom at the institutions, a second conference will be held to evaluate the approaches, summarize the findings, and plan for future collaboration.

Learning Abstract :
We gathered scholars who teach in Biblical Studies at six Historically Black Theological Schools, selected methods of teaching biblical interpretation, tested those methods in the classroom, and evaluated the results. The faculty who gathered had to share best practices in teaching, and to learn from each other. The two conferences we held produced enthusiastic responses from the participants. They also highlighted a general lack of agreement about what it means to teach biblical interpretation. Although there was general agreement that teaching Historical Critical methods and teaching biblical interpretation as a prelude to preaching are not good models, there was very little agreement about what we should teach. We also recognized that insufficient attention has been paid to correlating teaching methods to the skills we want students to gain.
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Teaching for Transformation: Collaborative Teaching and Learning in Biblical Studies

Awarded Grant
Schüssler Fiorenza, Elisabeth
Harvard Divinity School
Theological Schools
2007
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
This research project seeks to explore the conditions and practices of collaborative teaching and learning in biblical studies. It is situated in the intersection of her work in feminist hermeneutics, biblical rhetorical studies and graduate biblical education. Cooperative education requires from faculty and students “reflective action,” that is context specific, recognizes differences, and bridges the gap between theory and practice. Such a collaborative pedagogy is concretized through an analysis of ...
Proposal abstract :
This research project seeks to explore the conditions and practices of collaborative teaching and learning in biblical studies. It is situated in the intersection of her work in feminist hermeneutics, biblical rhetorical studies and graduate biblical education. Cooperative education requires from faculty and students “reflective action,” that is context specific, recognizes differences, and bridges the gap between theory and practice. Such a collaborative pedagogy is concretized through an analysis of the didactic approach developed in Germany called Theme-Centered-Interaction (TCI) with its relation of group dynamics to a democratic goal of education. By focusing on the modes and conditions of collaborative learning and teamwork, the project seeks to develop the didactics of collaborative learning and teaching in biblical studies understood as critical rhetorical studies.

Learning Abstract :
I am very grateful to the Wabash Center for awarding me a faculty research grant which allowed me to continue my exploration of the need for transforming graduate education on the MA and PhD/ThD levels. The rich academic literature on collaborative teaching and learning seems to have had great impact on undergraduate teaching but seems not yet to have transformed the pedagogy of doctoral studies. Yet such a transformation is necessary not only because the discipline presently cultivates a great variety of methods, sub-fields and theoretical perspectives but also because doctoral students often no longer have comprehensive religious-theoretical or the logical training before entering the field. Whereas this situation is seen by many as one of crisis and fragmentation, it also provides an opportunity for rethinking graduate biblical studies. I hope that this project and its forthcoming publications will engender increased discussion of this important issue.
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Introducing Whom to What? Purposes and Practices of Teaching Introductory Bible Courses as a Non-Major Requirement at Select CCCU Schools

Awarded Grant
Kirkpatrick, Shane
Anderson University
Colleges/Universities
2007
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
A lot of the colleges that are members of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) require that all students, regardless of their major, take courses in Bible. Though this practice is common, it is not without its pedagogical challenges. To focus reflection upon the teaching of such courses, this project pursues three interrelated questions. The first is a question of purpose: Why are introductory Bible courses required for ...
Proposal abstract :
A lot of the colleges that are members of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) require that all students, regardless of their major, take courses in Bible. Though this practice is common, it is not without its pedagogical challenges. To focus reflection upon the teaching of such courses, this project pursues three interrelated questions. The first is a question of purpose: Why are introductory Bible courses required for non-majors? The second is a question of practice: Depending upon the stated purpose, how are such courses taught? The third is a question of assessment: How are such courses assessed? Gathering the instructors of introductory Bible courses at select midwestern CCCU schools can result not only in opportunities for pedagogical reflection and coordination among the faculty at each school but also in the gathering of comparative data to further enrich the reflection on these questions.

Learning Abstract :
Part of the success of this project was realized already in the gathering of faculty members who teach these challenging introductory Bible courses; the opportunity-rarely experienced-to share with and find support from others who face similar pedagogical challenges was empowering and encouraging. The question of why such courses are required was generally answered with reference to the institutional history, identity, and context of the particular school and its constituency. The question of how they are taught involved the identity of the instructors, who draw upon their own strengths and preparation in relation to that institutional context. The third question found that formal or large-scale assessment measures are generally not well developed but are the focus of increasing interest and attention. Instructors of these courses work to design an experience that can be educationally, developmentally, and vocationally valuable for their particular students.
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Teaching the Bible: Toward Responsible Interpretation

Awarded Grant
Kirkham Hawkins, Faith
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological Schools
2007
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
A central argument of educational theorists - that focusing upon transferring information is less effective at promoting learning than focusing upon developing skills that use information - is the foundation for the project director’s conviction that teachers and students of the Bible are likely to benefit from pedagogical resources that help foster among students commitment to and skills for responsible interpretation of the Bible. Hence, this study leave project ...
Proposal abstract :
A central argument of educational theorists - that focusing upon transferring information is less effective at promoting learning than focusing upon developing skills that use information - is the foundation for the project director’s conviction that teachers and students of the Bible are likely to benefit from pedagogical resources that help foster among students commitment to and skills for responsible interpretation of the Bible. Hence, this study leave project is focused on research and development of approaches to teaching the Bible focused on responsible interpretation. The project aims to combine a scholar’s understanding of the Bible with a teacher’s understanding of the classroom. Specific attention will be given to study of an array of pedagogical theories and methods particularly germane to enhancing student learning in biblical studies courses.

Learning Abstract :
This project sought to research pedagogical theories in relation to a way of interpreting the Bible that would engage the students in their own questions and interpretations. Successful at surveying a selection of the pedagogical literature, there is much left to mine in the resources of problem based learnings and using case studies. Suggestions for future study leaves include structuring a learning community for the leave recipient.
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Slave Narratives & the Bible in the Classroom

Awarded Grant
Powery, Emerson
Lee University
Colleges/Universities
2007
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Funding will provide a 2-3 day meeting for four faculty members from different institutions to meet and plan a week-long seminar on the use of slave narratives as pedagogical tools in theology and religion classes. These discussions will have a direct effect on the classroom experience by exposing students to 19th century marginalized persons who found creative strategies for their spiritual and political well-being through their own engagement with biblical ...
Proposal abstract :
Funding will provide a 2-3 day meeting for four faculty members from different institutions to meet and plan a week-long seminar on the use of slave narratives as pedagogical tools in theology and religion classes. These discussions will have a direct effect on the classroom experience by exposing students to 19th century marginalized persons who found creative strategies for their spiritual and political well-being through their own engagement with biblical stories.

Learning Abstract :
We do not think, after our preliminary conversations, that a one-week seminar would be sufficient, so we are in the process of developing a proposal for a 3-year endeavor with yearly symposia involving a small, select group of conversation partners and culminating in a final formal conference on the pedagogical use of the slave narrative across the theological curricula. We would like to assist the UNC research staff in updating their excellent resources, especially in the areas of "religious themes" (within the slave narrative tradition) and pedagogy. Their website resource can be a revolutionary pedagogical tool in any classroom at any level of the educational journey.
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Assessment of the Impact of Specialized Theological Education on Pastoral Ministry

Awarded Grant
Fortune, Marie
FaithTrust Institute
Agencies
2007
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
The Project will help assess the effectiveness of seminary faculty in preparing students for pastoral ministry shaped by healthy boundaries and good judgment in pastoral relationships. The outcome of this assessment will serve to better prepare seminary faculty to effectively provide specialized teaching in theological education. In turn, the preparation of students for pastoral ministry will be enhanced. The assessment will focus on faculty and administrators previously trained by FaithTrust ...
Proposal abstract :
The Project will help assess the effectiveness of seminary faculty in preparing students for pastoral ministry shaped by healthy boundaries and good judgment in pastoral relationships. The outcome of this assessment will serve to better prepare seminary faculty to effectively provide specialized teaching in theological education. In turn, the preparation of students for pastoral ministry will be enhanced. The assessment will focus on faculty and administrators previously trained by FaithTrust Institute through the Seminary Project.

Learning Abstract :
For nearly ten years, FaithTrust Institute has educated the faculty and administrators of seminaries on professional ethics in pastoral ministry through the Seminary Project. The key objective of this training is to prepare future pastoral ministers to be aware of and address issues of professional ethics within their congregations and their denominations. Recently, FaithTrust Institute convened a gathering of 15 faculty and administrators to assess the impact these trainings have on student learning. Participants believe strongly that FaithTrust Institute should continue its training and expand it to include all seminaries in the Association of Theological Schools. Students benefit from learning about healthy boundaries, the role of judicatory committees, and ministerial ethics is an issue of power and abuse rather than an issue of "sexual morality." Success of the FaithTrust Institute Seminary Project is reflected in seminaries incorporating the training and educational materials into their curriculum on a permanent basis.
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Teaching Rabbinic Literature: A Conference on Bridging Scholarship and Pedagogy

Awarded Grant
Levisohn, Jon
Brandeis University
Colleges/Universities
2007
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
In January 2008, a conference will be held at Brandeis University on the teaching of rabbinic literature, as part of an ongoing research project at the Mandel Center entitled the Initiative on Bridging Scholarship and Pedagogy in Jewish Studies. This conference will bring together teachers and scholars of rabbinic literature from colleges and universities, rabbinical seminaries, institutes for advanced Jewish studies, synagogues, and k-12 schools. In addition to learning with and ...
Proposal abstract :
In January 2008, a conference will be held at Brandeis University on the teaching of rabbinic literature, as part of an ongoing research project at the Mandel Center entitled the Initiative on Bridging Scholarship and Pedagogy in Jewish Studies. This conference will bring together teachers and scholars of rabbinic literature from colleges and universities, rabbinical seminaries, institutes for advanced Jewish studies, synagogues, and k-12 schools. In addition to learning with and from one another, the conference will promote the power and the potential of teaching among the participants. And most importantly, the conference will contribute to the development of the scholarship of teaching rabbinic literature - a sub-field of the scholarship of teaching that is in its infancy - through the publication of papers and presentations.

Learning Abstract :
This project was based on a hypothesis that teachers and scholars of rabbinic literature from a variety of settings would be intrigued by the prospect of coming together to explore the teaching of their subject. That hypothesis proved to be correct. For two days, over 200 people attended presentations on everything from teaching midrash to children, to teaching the history of ancient Israel to college students, to teaching halakhic literature to adults. The energy and enthusiasm of the participants was corroborated by robust evaluation data. And videos of the presentations have already been downloaded thousands of times. Alongside the sense of accomplishment, however, is a renewed appreciation of the difficulty of developing the scholarship of teaching. Countless hours were invested to encourage presenters to move beyond exploration of fascinating aspects of the subject to fascinating (or better, troublesome) aspects of teaching the subject, and from advocacy to disciplined inquiry. Naturally, some investments paid off more than others.
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Facing Faith in the Upstate: Religious Diversity in South Carolina

Awarded Grant
Damrel, David
University of South Carolina Upstate
Colleges/Universities
2007
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
The University of South Carolina Upstate will host a one-day regional conference centered on the improvement and future of teaching Comparative Religion in the Upstate region of South Carolina. The grant-sponsored component of the conference will gather 5-6 full-time tenure-track faculty from regional colleges and universities to explore two core questions. The first specific focus is on how to improve the teaching of comparative religion in the region, with the ...
Proposal abstract :
The University of South Carolina Upstate will host a one-day regional conference centered on the improvement and future of teaching Comparative Religion in the Upstate region of South Carolina. The grant-sponsored component of the conference will gather 5-6 full-time tenure-track faculty from regional colleges and universities to explore two core questions. The first specific focus is on how to improve the teaching of comparative religion in the region, with the intent that the conference will foster the practical exchange of classroom-ready techniques, strategies and pedagogical ideas and the identification of appropriate teaching materials. The second theme emphasizes the contemporary importance of the study of Comparative Religion and examines how religious studies can best be integrated into larger university curricula.

Learning Abstract :
The conference taught us that there is a strong and sustained interest in public conversations about a wide range of issues connected with religion and the roles of religion in public life. The challenge remains to formulate a clear topic that allows both a broad number of participants and yet still permits effective discussion. The strengths of our event were in the engaged, well-prepared and excellent keynote speaker and the flexible, interactive nature of the panel presentations. Areas for improvement include developing a more formal means of networking and establishing a more routine and structured format for elaborating and following up on some of the specific themes of interest that emerged from the event. We were pleased and encouraged by the results of what we hope is the first in a long-term joint exploration of religious life in the region.
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Teaching Teachers in the Faith & Health Initiative to Address Culturally Diverse Issues

Awarded Grant
Bridgeman , Valerie
Memphis Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2007
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Memphis Theological Seminary has at the core of its history a commitment to diversity and ecumenical dialogue, as reflected in its mission statement. The seminary is immensely diverse in population (approximately 40% African American; 26 denominations, plus Jewish and Islamic presence, approximately 44% female, etc.). Recently, the seminary has positioned itself, in a joint mission with the Methodist Hospital System in Memphis, to build a learning model for Faith & Health. The initiative recognizes ...
Proposal abstract :
Memphis Theological Seminary has at the core of its history a commitment to diversity and ecumenical dialogue, as reflected in its mission statement. The seminary is immensely diverse in population (approximately 40% African American; 26 denominations, plus Jewish and Islamic presence, approximately 44% female, etc.). Recently, the seminary has positioned itself, in a joint mission with the Methodist Hospital System in Memphis, to build a learning model for Faith & Health. The initiative recognizes the role faith plays in people’s physical and emotional health. In the course of a “first-run,” two things became clear: The program needed to more intentionally address diverse population concerns; and pedagogy for teaching faith and health in a diverse setting needed to be explored more specifically. This proposal seeks to address both these issues.

Learning Abstract :
The Faith and Health pedagogical initiative was designed to get faculty and potential faculty members in the program "on the same page." Our objective for the project was to gather the primary faculty members who would participate in the teaching to see a common language as well as to ensure that we all knew what the other meant by "faith & health."

The event was viewed as a kick-off for ongoing assessment and training for professors in the faith and health doctorate of ministry and the MAR certificate. The D. Min. director and the dean of the seminary continue to provide thoughtful leadership and inspiration in the evolving program at MTS, as well as evaluate training for each layer of teachers.

Participants reported the time together fired them to work on the themes of the consultant led sessions as they prepared for their particular D. Min. Seminar. They acknowledged that our brief time together was not sufficient, and expressed a desire to continue such conversations, if only once or twice a year. The participants appreciated the metaphors that arose from the road to Emmaus conversation, especially those that suggested we come alongside people as they try to make sense of their lives and what has happened around them.
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The Most Difficult Religious Conversation? Pedagogical Strategies for Teaching the Complexities of Abortion

Awarded Grant
Hornsby, Teresa
Drury University
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
This project will provide pedagogical strategies for having difficult conversations in a classroom by using abortion, perhaps the most contentious conversation, as a model. We propose to hold a series of six workshops to 1) identify and evaluate existing models of teaching about abortion; 2) consider the range of pedagogical decisions teachers must make in order to encourage learning among students (and educators) who have already made decisions about the topic in ...
Proposal abstract :
This project will provide pedagogical strategies for having difficult conversations in a classroom by using abortion, perhaps the most contentious conversation, as a model. We propose to hold a series of six workshops to 1) identify and evaluate existing models of teaching about abortion; 2) consider the range of pedagogical decisions teachers must make in order to encourage learning among students (and educators) who have already made decisions about the topic in advance of encountering it; 3) create an emic model that explores ‘insider’ information side-by-side with academic religious pedagogy and lived experiences; 4) provide guidelines and strategies that give confidence to the instructor and provide an atmosphere where respectful conversation and learning, rather than conflict, happens. Ultimately, these workshops seek to create guidelines that can be used to teach either a course or a unit within a course on a difficult topic in general (or abortion specifically).

Learning Abstract :
These are some of the learnings that I take from the project. Use sensitivity and understanding; recognize that the student's approach is more personal than academic; student responses will be as complex as the topic. "Virtue Language" is most effective - avoid "right, wrong" or "good,bad;" instead ask, "Was she courageous (strong) in making her choice?" This creates potential for agreement rather than divisiveness. For credibility, use stories of actual (not hypothetical) situations. Students are more comfortable talking about abortion when it concerns ‘others,' e.g., women in non-industrialized countries or historical women. Start there and bring the conversation closer to their own demographic in increments. Bring in guest speakers at the onset who will represent and articulate the various views of the students. If not, students fear that they will have to do it themselves and they do not feel confident in their own ability to articulate their positions effectively. They become defensive.
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The Challenge of Religious History: Improving Undergraduate and Graduate Education in a Public University

Awarded Grant
Sterk, Andrea|Caputo, Nina
University of Florida
Colleges/Universities
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
This project aims to promote more effective teaching of religious history, with a focus on the Abrahamic traditions of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. A 16-month multi-layered series will foster sustained conversation among those who teach in this area. Over the course of three semesters prominent scholar-teachers with specializations from antiquity to modern America will engage faculty and students on three levels: 1) a broader public lecture; 2) a smaller seminar on pedagogy ...
Proposal abstract :
This project aims to promote more effective teaching of religious history, with a focus on the Abrahamic traditions of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. A 16-month multi-layered series will foster sustained conversation among those who teach in this area. Over the course of three semesters prominent scholar-teachers with specializations from antiquity to modern America will engage faculty and students on three levels: 1) a broader public lecture; 2) a smaller seminar on pedagogy for faculty and graduate students; and 3) informal discussion over meals. They will address new methodologies in teaching and research, the benefits as well as the limitations of the secular setting, and the overlapping identities of both historical religious communities and contemporary religious historians in the postmodern university. While the primary target audience is faculty and graduate students at the University of Florida, a volume of essays is intended for those who teach religious history at other institutions.

Learning Abstract :
Despite both the practical and conceptual challenges involved, we learned that an extended, multi-layered series is an effective means of generating and sustaining dialogue on a circumscribed theme. Though a large public university, the University of Florida is somewhat off the beaten track of many very prominent academics. In organizing this series, we were careful to invite scholars who not only lectured, but engaged in individual and group meetings with faculty and graduate students. This truly fostered the development of an intellectual community and ongoing conversation. We were very pleased that a core group of approximately 20 graduate students attended lectures and seminars presented by twelve different scholars over the course of three semesters. This project, then, was ultimately successful in promoting teaching and learning about religion in history and in shaping those who engage in this endeavor at the University of Florida and at other institutions.
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Resourcing the Teaching of American Church Music History

Awarded Grant
Blumhofer, Edith|Eskridge, Larry
Wheaton College - Illinois
Colleges/Universities
2008
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This project will support a consultation on teaching American church music history. Specifically, the grant will fund an exploration of how courses are currently structured, a consultation, and the circulating of the observations and suggestions that arise from the consultation. We expect that the principles suggested by the consultation to guide the teaching of American church music history will initiate a cross-disciplinary conversation, generate on-line information about current teaching practices ...
Proposal abstract :
This project will support a consultation on teaching American church music history. Specifically, the grant will fund an exploration of how courses are currently structured, a consultation, and the circulating of the observations and suggestions that arise from the consultation. We expect that the principles suggested by the consultation to guide the teaching of American church music history will initiate a cross-disciplinary conversation, generate on-line information about current teaching practices and resources, expand and refine the suggested core principles that inform both teaching and learning.

Learning Abstract :
The Institute for the Study of American Evangelicals completed a survey of materials used to teach church music history at ATS seminaries, Bible colleges, and liberal arts colleges. We hosted a conference that crossed the disciplines to explore how church music history is being taught. We discussed needs and strengths and recommendations for improvement. We regret that we were unable to commission an historiographical essay. American church music history has never been a robust discipline, and yet many consider it an essential context for evaluating change over time. Scholars in several disciplines have recently shown how rich the study of American church music is for their own fields, and their interest provides an opportunity to enhance teaching and learning in a subject with wide import for American lived religion.
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Teaching Practices for the Integration of Psychology and Theology

Awarded Grant
Holeman, Toddy (Virginia)
Asbury Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2008
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
The integration of psychology/theology has been written and discussed energetically during the last decade. These discussions focused on the question: Can one integrate these disciplines? This project extends this discussion beyond the philosophical by asking a different question: How does one teach towards the practice of integration? What teaching practices help counseling/psychology students know “how to do” integration when they are sitting with a client? Therefore this project ...
Proposal abstract :
The integration of psychology/theology has been written and discussed energetically during the last decade. These discussions focused on the question: Can one integrate these disciplines? This project extends this discussion beyond the philosophical by asking a different question: How does one teach towards the practice of integration? What teaching practices help counseling/psychology students know “how to do” integration when they are sitting with a client? Therefore this project will investigate teaching practices that promote the integration of psychology/counseling/ theology/biblical studies. Using qualitative methodology, through face to face interviews with professors of psychology/counseling and/or their students, and observation of class sessions when available, the lead investigator will discover how professors of psychology or counseling prepare counseling students to “think Christianly” when in session with a client. Journal articles, teaching resources, symposium at professional counseling conferences, and/or an edited book on teaching practices in integration will emerge from this project.

Learning Abstract :
Are students in counselor training programs as theologically competent as they are clinically competent? What teaching strategies promote a sophisticated level of integration? Integrating theological reflection with counseling practice is a skill that does not come intuitively to master level students. Beginning counseling students in theological settings want specific tools for their counseling integration toolbox. In contrast, graduating students view integration as something that happens primarily within the counselor as embodied in the "person of the counselor". Yet the depth and breadth of theological reflection remains in question. Faculty in counselor education programs tend to rely on texts written by other counselors which integrate theology into the presentation. Accessible and applicable theological resources written by theologians are lacking. Teaching practices related to the integration of counseling practice and theology must move beyond the theoretical and into the realm of application within the classroom as well as in field placement.
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Interdisciplinary Interpretive Issues

Awarded Grant
Liew, Tat-siong Benny
Pacific School of Religion
Theological Schools
2008
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
This project is a development of a course, “Interdisciplinary Interpretive Issues,” for GTU’s doctoral students in the area of Interdisciplinary Studies. Such a course will help me not only to teach students how to do interdisciplinary work, but also to think through how to do interdisciplinary teaching.
Proposal abstract :
This project is a development of a course, “Interdisciplinary Interpretive Issues,” for GTU’s doctoral students in the area of Interdisciplinary Studies. Such a course will help me not only to teach students how to do interdisciplinary work, but also to think through how to do interdisciplinary teaching.

Learning Abstract :
The goal here was to develop a course on "Interdisciplinary Interpretive Issues" for GTU's students in the area of Interdisciplinary Studies. Several key questions arose in designing this course. First, given the scope of the course and the amount of new materials students are likely to encounter, should such a course use mainly essays or books as assigned readings? Second, is such a course best taught by a team or by a single individual, and how would that decision impact our understanding of team teaching vis-a-vis interdisciplinarity? Third, within the context of a freestanding seminary, where would students "go" after taking such a course if they desire to go deeper into disciplines beyond the confines of theological studies? Fourth and finally, given the globalized, hybridized, and pluralistic world most of us live in today, is there a way to combine interdisciplinary studies with inter-religious conversations in a single course?
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Teaching Worship from Global Perspectives

Awarded Grant
Kim, Eunjoo
Iliff School of Theology
Theological Schools
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Recognizing the significant change in the contemporary context for worship in a global and pluralistic culture, this project aims to develop a new paradigm for teaching worship as a way to help liturgics faculty become better equipped in their teaching. Two liturgics professors will be invited from different institutions and will work with me to construct new approaches to teaching liturgics courses by reconfiguring the nature and function of worship ...
Proposal abstract :
Recognizing the significant change in the contemporary context for worship in a global and pluralistic culture, this project aims to develop a new paradigm for teaching worship as a way to help liturgics faculty become better equipped in their teaching. Two liturgics professors will be invited from different institutions and will work with me to construct new approaches to teaching liturgics courses by reconfiguring the nature and function of worship in a global world, the image and role of worship leaders in a pluralistic culture of congregations, and an effective pedagogy that can help students stretch and broaden their knowledge and experience of worship. A one-day workshop will include three conversation sessions and demonstrations of teaching in an actual class setting. The project will be evaluated based on the students’ class evaluations and the participants’ self-reflection and feedback. Funding will support the participants’ travel and accommodation, reception, honoraria, stipend for the project director, and miscellaneous expenses for the event.

Learning Abstract :
The project seminar was useful for the participants. It helped us improve our teaching in many ways. By sharing and evaluating our course syllabi, we gained some insights into improving our courses from global perspectives; through the preparation and delivery of our lectures, we could challenge students to think about worship out of the box. The entire process of the project went well, as I had planned, and our lectures turned out to be invaluable resources to teach worship from global perspectives. However, offering three lectures for three-and-a-half hours did not allow sufficient time for discussing crucial issues emerging from the lectures at a deeper level. Perhaps, a panel discussion with one or two presentations in relation to multicultural worship in a global world might have been a more effective pedagogical strategy than giving three lectures to have enough conversation with students within the limited time.
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Religious Studies Capstone Course: Research and Workshop

Awarded Grant
Miller, Charles
University of North Dakota
Colleges/Universities
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
The fellowship will offer the necessary support, both in terms of time and resources, so that the research and planning needed to facilitate a three-day workshop/retreat for the other religion faculty can be accomplished. During the workshop, the religion faculty will work on the planning and development of the new, required, and recently approved course for Religion majors: RELS 480: Religion Capstone, which will be taught in the fall semester ...
Proposal abstract :
The fellowship will offer the necessary support, both in terms of time and resources, so that the research and planning needed to facilitate a three-day workshop/retreat for the other religion faculty can be accomplished. During the workshop, the religion faculty will work on the planning and development of the new, required, and recently approved course for Religion majors: RELS 480: Religion Capstone, which will be taught in the fall semester of 2010.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to bring together the religion faculty to share their diverse ideas about the newly approved and soon to be taught religion capstone course. The hope was that, at the end of our time together, we would have developed a shared vision of this course, as well as articulated solutions to the many practical matters inherent in such a project – including everything from which classroom would be best, to articulating objectives and assessments. During the faculty's time together, we were able to explore in depth our own ideas about what a capstone course should be, as well as to enter into dialogue about how we might meld our disparate ideas into a coordinated effort. We were not able to accomplish as much as we had hoped, but did make decisions regarding several fundamental issues (for example, the three primary foci of the course that will become basic to our course objectives). We also agreed to continue meeting during the upcoming semester so that progress toward realizing our goal might continue.
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Teaching and Learning toward Eco-Justice: Where Sustainability and Social Justice Meet in Theological Education

Awarded Grant
Moe-Lobeda, Cynthia
Seattle University
Theological Schools
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Funding will support the development of a three-day consultation exploring the pedagogical problems and possibilities that accompany theological education that connects ecology and social justice. This consultation will gather, from around the nation, ten professors in graduate level theological education who teach “ecology and theological studies” and who desire to expand “ecology” to “eco-justice.” (“Eco-justice” here refers to the convergence of ecological concerns and social justice concerns). Participants will collaborate ...
Proposal abstract :
Funding will support the development of a three-day consultation exploring the pedagogical problems and possibilities that accompany theological education that connects ecology and social justice. This consultation will gather, from around the nation, ten professors in graduate level theological education who teach “ecology and theological studies” and who desire to expand “ecology” to “eco-justice.” (“Eco-justice” here refers to the convergence of ecological concerns and social justice concerns). Participants will collaborate to: 1) identify pedagogical issues and challenges inherent in a curriculum linking environmental issues to social justice; 2) design questions for exploring these challenges; 3) construct knowledge for meeting these challenges; 4) broadly disseminate this knowledge within their professional communities; and 5) build local collegial support for teaching eco-justice. The group’s findings eventually will be summarized in an edited volume on teaching eco-justice in theological education, designed to give practical support for professors venturing into this little explored domain.

Learning Abstract :
This project catalyzed learning on varied levels. On a primary level participating faculty learned a great deal about challenges and possibilities that emerge in theological education when social justice issues (such as environmental racism and climate imperialism) are brought to bear on ecological issues. Moreover, we learned from one another a wealth of approaches to exploring the intersection of social justice and ecologic sustainability, and teaching in that nexus.
Participating faculty raised and led one another in exploring such issues as:
- Eco-justice as the framework for seeking to dismantle sexism and racism and to eradicate poverty.
- Using womanist methodology as the pedagogical basis for teaching eco-justice in theological education.
- The epistemological challenge of learning from voices of the Earth.
- How to prepare our students to forge paths toward sustainable earth-human relations that we have failed to forge.
On a secondary level, consultation planners gained tremendous insight into method and process for creating further venues in which faculty may collaboratively construct pedagogies that equip students to face the Earth crisis as a theological issue and a social justice, and to lead others in that venture.
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Developing Departmental Conversations about a New Major

Awarded Grant
Japinga, Lynn
Hope College
Colleges/Universities
2009
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
The primary purpose of this project is to develop a new structure for the religion major in a church-related liberal arts college. It should involve a radical re-thinking of the way the department teaches religion rather than simply tinkering with the details. In order to prepare for this difficult but essential conversation, faculty in the department will meet three times to share syllabi and discuss Stephen Prothero’s Religious Literacy. ...
Proposal abstract :
The primary purpose of this project is to develop a new structure for the religion major in a church-related liberal arts college. It should involve a radical re-thinking of the way the department teaches religion rather than simply tinkering with the details. In order to prepare for this difficult but essential conversation, faculty in the department will meet three times to share syllabi and discuss Stephen Prothero’s Religious Literacy. A Wabash Consultant will then lead the department in a two-day retreat to begin discussion of learning objectives and possible shapes for a new major. The department will then meet 3-6 times over the next year to flesh out the new major.

Learning Abstract :
This grant enabled the faculty of the religion department to work toward developing a new structure for the religion major. After several conversations about the field of religious studies, and after a two day retreat with a consultant, the department decided not to create a new major from the ground up, but instead to adjust our current curriculum to allow students to specialize in Bible, history/theology, or ethics/culture, or to continue with the old major which emphasized breadth of exposure. We found that starting from scratch was a very labor-intensive process that we were not prepared to do. The project was expanded to include a series of dinner meetings with faculty colleagues from other disciplines to discuss faith and vocation. My colleagues and I appreciated the space to discuss important issues and questions in a safe and supportive environment. Such conversations have the potential to build strong bonds among faculty and a deeper sense of vocation.
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Teaching Latinamente and Liberation Education: A Comparative Study of Service-Learning in University Theological Studies

Awarded Grant
Rosario-Rodriguez, Rubén
Saint Louis University
Colleges/Universities
2009
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to provide a comparative analysis of how different faculty members in the Department of Theological Studies (DTS) at Saint Louis University (SLU) incorporate service-learning into their Theology courses. As a Latino faculty member, and participant in the 2008-2009 Colloquy on Teaching for Latino/a Faculty, I am particularly interested in exploring whether or not I can identify a distinctly latinamente approach to employing service-learning as a teaching ...
Proposal abstract :
This project seeks to provide a comparative analysis of how different faculty members in the Department of Theological Studies (DTS) at Saint Louis University (SLU) incorporate service-learning into their Theology courses. As a Latino faculty member, and participant in the 2008-2009 Colloquy on Teaching for Latino/a Faculty, I am particularly interested in exploring whether or not I can identify a distinctly latinamente approach to employing service-learning as a teaching strategy.

Learning Abstract :
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Introduction to the Bible: Learning and Teaching in Critical Perspective

Awarded Grant
Penner, Todd
Austin College
Colleges/Universities
2009
Topics: Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
In this proposed project, some of the basic pedagogical and educational premises of an Introduction to the Bible course in a liberal arts context will be examined. In particular, to what degree do such introductory courses mesh with the larger missions of liberal arts colleges, especially with respect to the fostering of critical-thinking and the nurturing of civic engagement. In addition, some of the learning objectives reflected in the content ...
Proposal abstract :
In this proposed project, some of the basic pedagogical and educational premises of an Introduction to the Bible course in a liberal arts context will be examined. In particular, to what degree do such introductory courses mesh with the larger missions of liberal arts colleges, especially with respect to the fostering of critical-thinking and the nurturing of civic engagement. In addition, some of the learning objectives reflected in the content of some of the current textbooks used in introductory courses will be studied alongside the learning objectives in the classes that use these texts in the liberal art schools to clarify some of the basic issues at stake related to learning and teaching in introductory Bible courses.

Learning Abstract :
This project enabled me to learn a tremendous amount about my field in terms of its teaching of the Bible to undergraduates. I have learned that the textbook industry is in many respects driving our curriculum. I have learned that our teaching aims and goals, despite our best efforts, are often co-opted, without our knowing, by our slavish reliance on textbooks in the classroom. Pedagogies of the Bible are still relatively based on a seminary-model, since that is the model that has formed graduate training of the Bible. There is little reflection being given on teaching to undergraduates within a liberal arts context beyond rather general observations, often by people who are not even in the field of religion. In particular, it has become clear that a critical appraisal of the textbooks themselves has to be made before the question of their utility can be engaged. As far as I have discerned so far, critical pedagogy has paid relatively little attention to the textbook. It has focused by in large on the contextual nature of teaching itself (in the relationship of teacher, student, and outside world). These are elements I am currently invested in exploring further.
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Hip-Hop Pedagogy: Best Practices for Incorporating Emerging Voices into the Theological Dialogue

Awarded Grant
Powe, F. Douglas
Saint Paul School of Theology
Theological Schools
2010
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This grant will fund a dialogue focused on methodologies and practices for incorporating hip-hop voices into the classroom. The dialogue will hopefully help move the field towards fostering a learning environment that challenges (and is challenged by) various ways of thinking theological that incorporate insights from hip-hop culture into theological education. To this end, a primary purpose of this dialogue is to think about pedagogical strategies for developing a conversation ...
Proposal abstract :
This grant will fund a dialogue focused on methodologies and practices for incorporating hip-hop voices into the classroom. The dialogue will hopefully help move the field towards fostering a learning environment that challenges (and is challenged by) various ways of thinking theological that incorporate insights from hip-hop culture into theological education. To this end, a primary purpose of this dialogue is to think about pedagogical strategies for developing a conversation between the hip-hop culture and various theological voices (e.g., liberation, womanist, etc.,).

Learning Abstract :
Thinking about a hip hop pedagogy helped those involved in this project to discover the ways in which hip hop can inform and be marginalized in academia. Hip hop is a term that gets used in a variety of ways from a cultural movement to simply meaning rap music. Creating a learning environment that navigates this spectrum (movement to simply meaning rap music) in a way that illumines the epistemological framework of hip hop requires thinking interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary. Hip hop is interdisciplinary in its commitment to living at the intersection of various disciplines (e.g., sociology, art and theology). It is multidisciplinary because no one discipline can completely capture its significance in American culture. Hip hop is transdisciplinary because for some it is a meaning making system. Thinking about hip hop pedagogically in these ways promotes an on-going dialogue that can alter the way we teach.
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Seeking Best Practices in Teaching Political Theology

Awarded Grant
Casey, Shaun
Wesley Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2010
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
This grant will enable a diverse cohort of teachers to assemble in Washington, DC to discuss their craft and to assess whether or not an ongoing conversation among scholars would be mutually beneficial to their research and teaching in political theology.
Proposal abstract :
This grant will enable a diverse cohort of teachers to assemble in Washington, DC to discuss their craft and to assess whether or not an ongoing conversation among scholars would be mutually beneficial to their research and teaching in political theology.

Learning Abstract :
Wesley Theological Seminary conducted a highly successful meeting of 14 scholars at our new site in downtown Washington, DC. Through sharing best teaching practices we learned that there is a profound need for political theologians to talk to each other about the craft of teaching our subject. There were many creative and challenging teaching strategies presented and all attendees identified new practices they would incorporate into their own teaching. We learned that we perceive a need to engage in deeper public discourse with political actors. We will work on finding and engaging political conversation partners in Washington, DC. And we learned that we want to keep meeting.
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Teaching Contemplative Traditions: A Workshop

Awarded Grant
Fort, Andrew
Texas Christian University
2010
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
We propose to offer a workshop in spring 2011 on critical pedagogy related to teaching contemplative traditions in liberal arts university settings, primarily for those in the Southwest region of the American Academy of Religion. The purpose will be to converse about philosophical, methodological and pedagogical issues raised in teaching such courses and offering relevant and appropriate exercises, to share practices and methods that will enhance student learning, and to create ...
Proposal abstract :
We propose to offer a workshop in spring 2011 on critical pedagogy related to teaching contemplative traditions in liberal arts university settings, primarily for those in the Southwest region of the American Academy of Religion. The purpose will be to converse about philosophical, methodological and pedagogical issues raised in teaching such courses and offering relevant and appropriate exercises, to share practices and methods that will enhance student learning, and to create a supportive network of teachers in the region for an ongoing discussion about teaching contemplative traditions. We plan to gather 12-15 people at various stages of their careers and with different levels of experience in dealing with contemplative teaching.

Learning Abstract :
Aside from the value of the readings and information exchange in conversation, nearly all the most significant learnings in this workshop were re-learnings. First was the importance of "group ecology:" the ability to start fast and go deep due to 1) small group size, 2) respect and trust from collegial humility and support, 3) desire to learn without expending energy on scholarly positioning, and (critically) 4) the right space. Also crucial was to prepare extensively and build carefully, consulting at each step. Other key aspects to success were attending to definitional/category issues from the start and a group sense of excitement at breaking ground regionally and nationally. We look to continue the open conversation and community formation in the near future.
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Pedagogical Issues in the Teaching of Eastern Christianity

Awarded Grant
Penn, Michael
Mount Holyoke College
2010
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The five college consortium of Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, Smith, and the University of Massachusetts is in the planning process of establishing the United States’ first multi-institutional certificate program in Eastern Christianity. Prior to focusing on this program’s curriculum, we are hoping to have a series of three dinner meetings to discuss the larger pedagogical issues of teaching Eastern Christianity in a Western context. These would be dedicated to ...
Proposal abstract :
The five college consortium of Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, Smith, and the University of Massachusetts is in the planning process of establishing the United States’ first multi-institutional certificate program in Eastern Christianity. Prior to focusing on this program’s curriculum, we are hoping to have a series of three dinner meetings to discuss the larger pedagogical issues of teaching Eastern Christianity in a Western context. These would be dedicated to addressing the classroom challenges and learning goals shared by those of us who teach undergraduate courses in Eastern Orthodoxy. These three meetings would thus allow area faculty to first discuss the pedagogical underpinnings of this new program before later meetings that will focus more on program logistics.

Learning Abstract :
A series of three dinner conversations allowed faculty from the five college consortium to discuss the pedagogical challenges and benefits of teaching Eastern Christianity in a primarily Western Context. They also provided the impetus for further collaborations as we explore ways to better coordinate our teaching and consider the possibility of implementing the U.S.'s first, multi-institutional program on Eastern Christianity. Two topics were of particular note: 1) concerns with how to balance claims concerning the importance of Eastern traditions for the history of Christianity without resorting to an orientalist discourse of Eastern "otherness"; and 2) discussions of how greater focus on the orthodox churches could lead to a concept of "global Christianity" broader than its current configuration that often concentrates primarily upon Western missionary efforts. Instead, greater attention to the long history of the orthodox churches could lead to a fuller representation of Christian diversity from its origins to the present.
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Akouete, Legete, Anaginōskete (Hear, Speak, Read)

Awarded Grant
Hutson, Christopher
Abilene Christian University Graduate School of Theology
Theological Schools
2011
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Four undergraduate Greek instructors at ACU are collaborating on designs to improve the ways we teach Greek at all levels, especially by using more inductive methods. This project will jump start a new engagement with techniques for teaching students to hear and speak Koine Greek, adapting methods from Second Language Acquisition theorists. We seek funding (a) to convene an on-campus workshop for all four of our instructors to interact with ...
Proposal abstract :
Four undergraduate Greek instructors at ACU are collaborating on designs to improve the ways we teach Greek at all levels, especially by using more inductive methods. This project will jump start a new engagement with techniques for teaching students to hear and speak Koine Greek, adapting methods from Second Language Acquisition theorists. We seek funding (a) to convene an on-campus workshop for all four of our instructors to interact with two outside resource persons in order to demonstrate, analyze, and discuss oral/aural teaching methods for language acquisition, and (b) to send one of our instructors to an 8-day immersion program in spoken Koine Greek, so that she can become our in-house expert to help us all improve the ways we use this method.

Learning Abstract :
Before this project, we were intrigued by the possibilities of teaching Greek using oral techniques. We had heard about colleagues in other institutions who were using Second Language Acquisition theories for teaching biblical languages, but we did not know how to begin. After the project, we ourselves can employ Total Physical Response and other oral and visual techniques within an overall inductive approach to Koiné Greek. Further, we have moved as a department away from the common Erasmian pronunciation system to Demotic and Reconstructed Koiné pronunciation that are more realistic representations of the way people spoke Greek in the first century. Early indications are that our students, who used to think of Greek as a drudge or a test of intellectual fortitude, are now approaching Greek with enthusiasm as a real language for communication. We think they are more likely to become better readers and life-long readers.
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New Directions in Teaching Buddhism: A Workshop on Religious Studies Pedagogy for a Global 21st Century

Awarded Grant
Schaeffer, Kurtis
University of Virginia
Colleges/Universities
2012
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Teaching Buddhism today happens in increasingly diverse classrooms, in universities that are more globally connected than ever, and with digital tools for collaborative engagement at our fingertips. Recognizing the changing demands and opportunities of teaching Buddhism in a global twenty-first century, this pedagogical workshop – hosted at the University of Virginia on September 14, 2012 – will bring together 50 graduate students and faculty in Buddhist Studies to consider both theoretical frameworks and practical solutions ...
Proposal abstract :
Teaching Buddhism today happens in increasingly diverse classrooms, in universities that are more globally connected than ever, and with digital tools for collaborative engagement at our fingertips. Recognizing the changing demands and opportunities of teaching Buddhism in a global twenty-first century, this pedagogical workshop – hosted at the University of Virginia on September 14, 2012 – will bring together 50 graduate students and faculty in Buddhist Studies to consider both theoretical frameworks and practical solutions to address the new context in which we find ourselves teaching Buddhism.

Learning Abstract :
The grant funds were used to host a seminar in October of 2012 for graduate students in North American PhD programs in Buddhist Studies. The seminar consisted of a 2-day event in which PhD candidates presented work-in-progress to each other and to distinguished professors in the field The grant covered group meals, keynote speaker and respondent fees, and airfare for visiting distinguished scholars. The event was managed by PhD candidates in the Buddhist Studies program in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia, with oversight from professors in the program.
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Toward a Wisdom of the Heart: A Pilot Program to Effect Cognitive and Affective Appropriation of Ethical and Moral Teaching in a Theological Seminary

Awarded Grant
Bracken, W. Jerome |Anderson, Justin
Immaculate Conception Seminary - Seton Hall University
Theological Schools
2012
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
This pilot project seeks to uncover those teaching methodologies that professors of moral theology/ethics have determined to be successful in helping students not only to intellectually understand Catholic moral teachings, but also to personally and affectively appropriate those teachings. By providing a format for professors to discuss and evaluate teaching methods they have employed, they will benefit by constructing a peer review body of knowledge about such methods as ...
Proposal abstract :
This pilot project seeks to uncover those teaching methodologies that professors of moral theology/ethics have determined to be successful in helping students not only to intellectually understand Catholic moral teachings, but also to personally and affectively appropriate those teachings. By providing a format for professors to discuss and evaluate teaching methods they have employed, they will benefit by constructing a peer review body of knowledge about such methods as well as sharpening their own teaching skills. These methodologies which seek to combine a knowledge of the mind with a wisdom of the heart invite students, both clerical and lay, to freely commit, within the solitude of their own consciences, to church teachings in a deeply personal and ecclesially-oriented way. We submit that students will then be more fully prepared to fulfill their ministerial objectives as visible leaders in the Roman Catholic Church.

Learning Abstract :
Through the grant we have come to a greater appreciation of the necessity of clearly understanding who the human person is as learner, including his or her divine vocation, anthropology, and way we speak about these realities. On a more concrete level, we have also learned that a great many of our colleagues in moral theology have given serious and prolonged thought to how they might best assist the student in his or her forming studies to learn both the truths of our faith and commit themselves to them. These same colleagues also saw the need and benefit for an exchange of concrete, pedagogical ideas and practices. By publishing our findings in a peer-reviewed article, we hope to disclose not only the details of what we learned, but instigate a larger discussion at the service of both instructor and student of moral theology.
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The Bible and the Big Questions at PC(USA) Liberal Arts Colleges: Toward Pedagogies of Values Identification, Critical Thinking, and Civic Engagement

Awarded Grant
Lopez, Davina
Eckerd College
2013
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
The Bible has historically comprised a core component of the Humanities at PC(USA) liberal arts colleges, given the latter’s indebtedness to Judeo-Christian traditions. Herein a challenge for biblical studies teachers resides in contestations over content, method, and interpretive authority, alongside the Bible’s disputed importance in college curricula. At the same time, the Bible is a potential resource for helping students to ask “big questions.” This project will ...
Proposal abstract :
The Bible has historically comprised a core component of the Humanities at PC(USA) liberal arts colleges, given the latter’s indebtedness to Judeo-Christian traditions. Herein a challenge for biblical studies teachers resides in contestations over content, method, and interpretive authority, alongside the Bible’s disputed importance in college curricula. At the same time, the Bible is a potential resource for helping students to ask “big questions.” This project will bring together biblical studies teachers at five PC(USA) liberal arts colleges for three workshops over the next year, wherein we aim to develop a collaborative, supportive atmosphere and think about ways to understand similarities and differences between our teaching personae and practices. Rather than rehearse oppositions between “faith” and “intellect” in teaching biblical studies, we will embrace three intersecting sites for exploring pedagogical dilemmas and strategies: values identification and spiritual life, critical thinking and interconnectedness of knowledge, and community-integrative education and civic engagement.

Learning Abstract :
This project aimed to consider a range of questions facing teachers of biblical studies at PC(USA) liberal arts colleges, including: a) what specific resources the Presbyterian higher-educational heritage offers for contemporary biblical-studies pedagogies; b) how teachers of biblical literature at PC(USA) liberal arts colleges might overcome dichotomous understandings of biblical studies pedagogies as being either rooted in "seminary" or "university" models; c) how teaching the Bible with undergraduates at PC(USA) liberal arts colleges can be enhanced through challenging supposed oppositions ("faith"/"intellect," "believers"/"non-believers"); d) how the Bible, which historically has occupied a central place in liberal arts curricula, might be best encountered in a contemporary liberal arts setting - with contemporary students; and e) how teachers of biblical literature in these settings might learn from each other and clarify our own pedagogical orientation to the material that we share, embracing a holistic vision of what teaching the Bible can be and do.
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Teaching Sexuality and Religion to a Changing Student Body: Challenges and Strategies for Classroom Instructors

Awarded Grant
Ott, Kate
Drew University
Colleges/Universities
2014
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Sexuality, more so than other subject areas, magnifies the embodied nature of teaching and learning as well as conspicuously silences open dialogue given its taboo status in many religious and theological contexts. Students need to be equipped to consider affective and contextual issues of sexuality in the context of their overall educational formation. Instructors need constructive pedagogical strategies for teaching sexuality across a variety of cultural contexts and religious traditions ...
Proposal abstract :
Sexuality, more so than other subject areas, magnifies the embodied nature of teaching and learning as well as conspicuously silences open dialogue given its taboo status in many religious and theological contexts. Students need to be equipped to consider affective and contextual issues of sexuality in the context of their overall educational formation. Instructors need constructive pedagogical strategies for teaching sexuality across a variety of cultural contexts and religious traditions in order to deal effectively, responsibly, and explicitly with classroom dynamics and institutional contexts. We will convene eleven professors with expertise teaching sexuality and religion across disciplines, from diverse institutional and religious contexts, to: 1) identify the unique aspects of the religious or theological context contributing to the null curriculum related to sexuality; and 2) develop pedagogical strategies to overcome these constrictions, which we will then implement and share at our home institutions, a national conference, and through peer-reviewed publication(s).

Learning Abstract :
Sexuality, more so than other subject areas, magnifies the embodied nature of teaching and learning as well as conspicuously silences open dialogue given its taboo status in many religious and theological contexts. Yet, student learning about sexuality that incorporates knowledge of and about religion, in particular, may greatly improve the public discourse about sexuality through our students as responsible citizens and as leaders in their chosen professions. To bridge this gap, a collaborative group of professors and instructors with expertise and experience teaching sexuality and religion in a variety of disciplines and diverse institutional and religious contexts developed, tested, and refined classroom teaching strategies to shift from a content-based "subject matter" to an embodied learning experience, resulting in perspective transformation as a primary student-learning outcome. Findings in the form of "guiding questions," encourage instructors to attend to contextual, experiential and performative aspects of the classroom environment.
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Can Virtue be Learned? An Exploration of Student Learning Experiences Using Select Pedagogies and Their Implications for Fostering Altruism, Compassion, and Solidarity as Learning Outcomes in Undergraduate Ethics Courses

Awarded Grant
Fozard Weaver, Darlene|Agnew Cochran, Elizabeth
Duquesne University
Colleges/Universities
2015
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
What does it mean to teach virtue, or to learn it? We consider this question through research related to student learning outcomes in undergraduate ethics courses at a religiously-affiliated university with an explicit commitment to social justice. We will gather qualitative data on student learning experiences, with particular focus on select pedagogical approaches that involve exposing students to the experiences of others. We also focus our inquiry around the implications ...
Proposal abstract :
What does it mean to teach virtue, or to learn it? We consider this question through research related to student learning outcomes in undergraduate ethics courses at a religiously-affiliated university with an explicit commitment to social justice. We will gather qualitative data on student learning experiences, with particular focus on select pedagogical approaches that involve exposing students to the experiences of others. We also focus our inquiry around the implications of these pedagogies in relation to student understanding of and attitudes regarding three character traits identified as “other-regarding” virtues in theological and philosophical scholarship--altruism, compassion, and solidarity. Our research will assist us in refining student learning outcomes for our ethics courses and will also generate a collaborative journal article exploring virtue and select pedagogies in the undergraduate classroom.

Learning Abstract :
This qualitative study examined student experiences of learning in required undergraduate ethics courses at a religiously affiliated university. The study used three pedagogical strategies (reflection on literature and film, deep listening via community-engaged conversations, and experiential learning activities) that expose students to others' experiences. Our guiding questions were: How do our students understand the purposes and value of ethics courses? Do students experience some pedagogical strategies as having greater impact on the learning, particularly with regard to virtues of altruism, compassion, and solidarity? Do their attitudes toward the moral value of theological resources shift during the course? Students reported that the pedagogical strategies positively impacted their learning by enhancing comprehension of course material, introducing affectively engaging moral exemplars, and facilitating cognitive shifts that informed their moral reasoning. The results aligned with student attitudes regarding the purposes and value of ethics courses but showed less impact on attitudes toward theological resources.
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Religious Studies Inside Prison Walls: A Regional Workshop

Awarded Grant
Lloyd, Vincent
Syracuse University
Colleges/Universities
2015
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
What are the most effective means of teaching religious studies inside a prison? To address this question, we propose a workshop exploring two dominant secular paradigms in prison education. What can religious studies scholars learn from these pedagogical paradigms, and how might these paradigms need to be inflected based on the particular experience of religious studies educators? While there has been an increase in the number of prison education programs ...
Proposal abstract :
What are the most effective means of teaching religious studies inside a prison? To address this question, we propose a workshop exploring two dominant secular paradigms in prison education. What can religious studies scholars learn from these pedagogical paradigms, and how might these paradigms need to be inflected based on the particular experience of religious studies educators? While there has been an increase in the number of prison education programs with religious studies faculty involvement, there has been relatively little discussion of the unique pedagogical issues raised for religious studies professors teaching in prisons. We have identified a group of ten scholars (including both theologians and secular religious studies scholars) who have expertise in this area who will gather to share best practices, build mentoring relationships, and explore connections between teaching and research.

Learning Abstract :
What are the most effective means of teaching religious studies inside a prison? While there has been an increase in the number of prison education programs with religious studies faculty involvement, there has been relatively little discussion of the unique pedagogical issues raised for religious studies professors teaching in prisons. These questions guided the workshop that we convened at the University of Montreal on May 3, 2015.
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The Hebrew Learning Project

Awarded Grant
Seow, Choon-Leong
Princeton Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Provide learning-focused opportunities for reflection on, conversation about, and experimentation with Hebrew language pedagogy, especially related to uses of electronic media.
Proposal abstract :
Provide learning-focused opportunities for reflection on, conversation about, and experimentation with Hebrew language pedagogy, especially related to uses of electronic media.

Learning Abstract :
Project sought to fund a research seminar for both professors and graduate students on the teaching of the Hebrew language. It sought to reflect upon, dialogue about and experiment with Hebrew language pedagogy that focused on learning. Other goals included exploring the ways in which electronic media might foster interactive learning and to create an archive of effective teaching and learning aides.

Grant funding resulted in the creation of a CD-ROM with PowerPoint presentation of Hebrew grammar that allows for class interactivity. Also, the group developed an innovative vocabulary learning program called "Living Words", which teaches Hebrew vocabulary through pictures and Hebrew words occurring in the contexts of the Hebrew Bible. The project had an immediate impact at the seminary, prompting the Bible department to discuss changes and the language programs and its overall curriculum.
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Legal Issues in Theological Field Education and Their Implications for Teaching Through Service Learning Experiences

Awarded Grant
Fox, Susan
Association of Presbyterian Theological Field Educators
Agencies
2000
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Consultations to engage theological field educators in examining major legal issues which shape the context of their work and influence the educational processes they use in theological field education; and to develop a basic legal guide for Supervised Ministry faculty.
Proposal abstract :
Consultations to engage theological field educators in examining major legal issues which shape the context of their work and influence the educational processes they use in theological field education; and to develop a basic legal guide for Supervised Ministry faculty.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to convene a series of consultations that would engage theological field educators in examining major legal issues which shape the context of their work and influence the educational processes they use in their work. They also sought to develop a basic legal guide for Supervised Ministry faculty.
The consultations and writing led to the development of A Handbook on Legal Issues in Theological Field Education. This text examines the major legal issues which shape the context of field education and influence its pedagogy. Specifically, the group considered "theological reflection around the intersection of cultural context, personal experience, faith tradition and legal issues." This provided a framework for their conversations. They also considered ways to make a place for legal issues pedagogically in theological field education without "displacing the learning-teaching dynamic."
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Faculty Seminar on Teaching for Field Education

Awarded Grant
Bartlett, David |Blodgett, Barbara
Yale Divinity School
Theological Schools
2000
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Support a seminar to prepare members of Yale University Divinity School to teach more effectively a practical reflection and experiential learning course designed for students engaged in field education.
Proposal abstract :
Support a seminar to prepare members of Yale University Divinity School to teach more effectively a practical reflection and experiential learning course designed for students engaged in field education.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to prepare faculty members to teach more effectively a practical reflection and experiential learning course designed for students engaged in field education. It hoped to form established faculty toward a pedagogical style and instructional strategies that puts their academic specialty in conversation with students' experiential learning in ministry settings. It also hoped to introduce to faculty pedagogical theories about experiential learning.
A two-day summer seminar grounded basic issues of learning for faculty work in the supervised ministry practicum. In the classroom they paired each faculty member with a practitioner from a ministry site. They discovered that the presence of the practitioner freed faculty to engage their subject area with students, since the practitioner could address practical ministry questions. They discovered and implemented new teaching strategies, although faculty leaned more heavily on experiential learning pedagogies with which they were more familiar. Overall, the work was a successful revisioning of the teaching of field education at Yale.
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Arampur: A Virtual Indian Village on the World Wide Web

Awarded Grant
Schmalz, Mathew|Gottschalk, Peter
College of the Holy Cross
2000
Topics: Diversity and Social Justice   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Support for creation of a virtual Indian village on the World Wide Web to engage students in the exploration of issues of religious and cultural difference through the specificity of North Indian rural life.
Proposal abstract :
Support for creation of a virtual Indian village on the World Wide Web to engage students in the exploration of issues of religious and cultural difference through the specificity of North Indian rural life.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to engage students in the exploration of religious and cultural differences through a website designed to be a virtual tour of a North Indian rural village. As a teaching aide it sought to introduce students to religious life in rural North India, to engage students in the examination of the relationship between religion and society and to provide instructional support for courses considering South Asian civilization and issues of cross-cultural understanding.
The Virtual Village website was developed and can be found at: http://virtualvillage.wesleyan.edu/
The researchers found the experience formative for themselves as teacher-scholars. Their research showed how their investigative techniques developed, and showed them their ability to work collaboratively with each other and with the residents of the village upon whom the site is based. The website design required awareness of the diverse learning styles of students and the pedagogies needed to match those styles. The open structure of the website reflects for them their commitment to develop their teaching further.
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Teaching Religious and Theological Texts in an Integrated Freshman Core

Awarded Grant
Niedner, Frederick
Valparaiso University
Colleges/Universities
2000
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Study leave grant to support study of teaching and learning issues involved in the integration of religious and theological texts into core curriculum, including faculty resistance to such topics of study.
Proposal abstract :
Study leave grant to support study of teaching and learning issues involved in the integration of religious and theological texts into core curriculum, including faculty resistance to such topics of study.

Learning Abstract :
This study leave project sought to study ways of assisting the teaching and enhancing the learning of theological texts in the Valparaiso University's Freshman Core course. He sought to examine and reflect upon reasons why both students and teachers find the study of religious and theological texts more problematic than the study of other kinds of texts. He also hoped to provide training for faculty who would teach the core, and to develop materials that could assist in recruitment of faculty instructors.
A significant learning gained from discussion with faculty concerned their own feelings of uneasiness and inadequacy when handling religious texts, particularly sacred or canonical texts. These instructors concluded that their uneasiness must have surely affected the nature of the class discussions and contributed to student uneasiness. Speaking at length with faculty in the area of Literature helped him to see that these instructors treat all texts as sacred and thus model for other faculty and students a "religious reading" of text. This is a useful stance to bring to the core course.
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Integrating Archaeology into Biblical Studies: A Consultation Series for Improving Instruction

Awarded Grant
Aubin, Melissa
Florida State University
Colleges/Universities
2000
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Consultation to work on improving teaching and learning in the area of biblical studies through identifying strategies for the integration of the study of archaeology.
Proposal abstract :
Consultation to work on improving teaching and learning in the area of biblical studies through identifying strategies for the integration of the study of archaeology.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to convene scholars in a series of consultations devoted to integrating knowledge from the field of biblical archeology into biblical studies courses that have been traditionally limited to the literature of biblical cultures. It sought to identify ways to integrate the material culture of the biblical world into biblical studies courses, to consider new pedagogical strategies to that end, and to strategize practical approaches for integrating the work into syllabi.
The first consultation was dedicated to creating material for an anthology of practical strategies for integrating archeology into biblical studies. Participants' remarks became the basis of essays for the anthology. They also discussed teaching experiences in this area, syllabi and teaching materials. The second consultation was devoted to continued discussion on the anthology and the practical pedagogical issues it raised. Finally, they discussed ways to present accumulated teaching materials and specific resources.
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Redesigning the Practice of Ministry Segment of the Master of Divinity Degree

Awarded Grant
Hartzfeld, David
Ashland Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Secure teaching consultants for help in redesigning the Practices of Ministry segment of the MDiv degree
Proposal abstract :
Secure teaching consultants for help in redesigning the Practices of Ministry segment of the MDiv degree

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to completely redesign the entire M.Div. curriculum into one that intentionally integrated theory and practice to develop personal formation as a foundation upon which to build ministry formation. This redesign focused upon the Christian Ministry Department collaborating in the creation of all courses in the new curriculum so that ministry skills would be integrated with personal formation and ministry formation.
The department discussed the matter for a full year and set time aside for a two-day retreat where the principles of the redesign were examined in conjunction with outside education experts. They learned that the discussions within the department yielded better pairings and more effective sequencing of the courses. The outside experts presented alternative teaching models for integration in the curriculum. The new design was presented to students in a retreat day format. Students were initially resistant to the changes but became more open as the courses developed.
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Teaching and Learning in Theological Field Education: The Role of the Field Educator

Awarded Grant
O’Gorman, Robert
Association for Theological Field Education
Agencies
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Consultation to explore how Field Educators can sharpen the focus of their identity, paradigms, and methods of teaching as well as impact teaching in the theological curriculum.
Proposal abstract :
Consultation to explore how Field Educators can sharpen the focus of their identity, paradigms, and methods of teaching as well as impact teaching in the theological curriculum.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather theological field educators from the Association of Theological Field Education for consultation to explore how as a guild they could envision their own paradigms and methods of teaching so as to greater impact teaching in the curriculum of theological education.
Project director reports that the group discovered that the topic of field educators as teachers represents a major new vision of field education that can potentially reinvigorate the discipline and make field education a more integral part of seminary curricula. They saw the project as having significant potential for the transformation of theological education in the ways that it can help seminaries integrate theory and practice more thoroughly in their curriculum. Finally, they realized through the consultation how little is known in the academy about the work of field educators, and thus their task as a guild to communicate to academic administrators in the larger academy about their work.
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Coming Together: A Consultation for Pastoral Psychologists

Awarded Grant
Bohn, Carole
Boston University
Colleges/Universities
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Consultation to initiate communication among faculty who represent various perspectives on the integration of religion, spirituality, and psychology to improve theoretical and practical educational models and to extend the repertoire of approaches and resources for teaching and learning.
Proposal abstract :
Consultation to initiate communication among faculty who represent various perspectives on the integration of religion, spirituality, and psychology to improve theoretical and practical educational models and to extend the repertoire of approaches and resources for teaching and learning.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather pastoral counselors together for a consultation whose aim was to bring into dialogue three groups of faculty who represent three distinct, "nonconversant perspectives" on the integration of religion/spirituality and psychology. Three groups of individuals gathered: (1) liberal Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish faculty, (2) Evangelical Christian faculty, and (3) psychologists who are interested in religious issues. The goal of the consultation was communication between the groups and examining theoretical and practical educational models in their work.
The participants agreed that their knowledge of educational models was developed in ways useful for their individual teaching. Their preconceptions about their differences were challenged and they found that they had much more in common than previously realized. They learned that their points of difference were more inline with the divisions between empirical and theoretical research that is present in the field of psychology generally. A major success of the consultation that contributed to overall learning was the opportunity to form personal relationships with colleagues who represent different perspectives.
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The Teaching of Worship in Roman Catholic Seminaries: Examining the Interplay of Theory and Practice

Awarded Grant
Foley, Edward
Catholic Theological Union of Chicago
Theological Schools
1999
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Research project to examine the ways in which the foundational theology, theological reflection, and practical skills for worship leadership are taught in selected Roman Catholic Seminaries in the U.S. so as to discover what pedagogies, curricular designs, deployment of personnel or other factors might contribute to this integration in Roman Catholic seminarians.
Proposal abstract :
Research project to examine the ways in which the foundational theology, theological reflection, and practical skills for worship leadership are taught in selected Roman Catholic Seminaries in the U.S. so as to discover what pedagogies, curricular designs, deployment of personnel or other factors might contribute to this integration in Roman Catholic seminarians.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought "to examine the ways in which the foundational theology, theological reflection and practical skills for worship leadership courses are taught in selective Roman Catholic seminaries in the U.S. so as to discover what pedagogies, curricula designs, deployment of personnel or other factors might contribute to this integration in Roman Catholic seminaries." This would be accomplished through site visits, interviews with professors, and feedback from students and recently ordained graduates.
From this study the researchers learned that for the group study the total environment of the institution, as well as the openness of the student contributed most to the acquisition of integration skills. Faculty mentoring and modeling of holistic integration also proved to be important. The researcher assumed that curriculum pedagogy issues would dominate his findings, but discovered that environment and personal openness were more important.
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Conference on Religion in the South and Electronic Media

Awarded Grant
Laderman, Gary
Emory University
Colleges/Universities
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Three day conference to promote discussion between scholars across disciplines (theology, religious studies, history) about teaching religions in the American South, emphasizing the uses of electronic media.
Proposal abstract :
Three day conference to promote discussion between scholars across disciplines (theology, religious studies, history) about teaching religions in the American South, emphasizing the uses of electronic media.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund an interdisciplinary, multimedia conference entitled "Religion in the American South: Toward a renewed scholarship." They hoped to promote discussion between scholars in theology, religious studies and history about teaching religion in the American South with emphasis on electronic media.
The project director reports that the conference reinvigorated scholarly interest in religions in the South and emphasized the potential of the web for research and teaching in this area. It also promoted the exchange of ideas about teaching among conference participants.
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Consultation on Bible in the General Education Curricula

Awarded Grant
Giles, Terry
Gannon University
Colleges/Universities
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Series of four full-day meetings that gather representatives from regional institutions that have introductory courses on Bible in the general education curriculum. Topics will consist of the rationale for the presence of such courses, the use of new communication technologies and evaluation/assessment in such courses, and consideration of the future cultural role of biblical studies.
Proposal abstract :
Series of four full-day meetings that gather representatives from regional institutions that have introductory courses on Bible in the general education curriculum. Topics will consist of the rationale for the presence of such courses, the use of new communication technologies and evaluation/assessment in such courses, and consideration of the future cultural role of biblical studies.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to bring together representatives of colleges and universities from the Eastern Great Lakes region for a series of four consultations on the Bible and general education curriculum. The purpose of the consultation was to assess the rationale for those courses and to evaluate various methodologies used in teaching them. Ultimately, it hoped to examine and articulate the role of Biblical studies in the core curriculum of an
American university at the commencement of the 21st century.

They found that there is no one normative approach to Biblical texts in general educational curriculum. Rather, the curriculum should be learner centered, focusing on helping students to discover their own answers. Biblical courses will remain key to curriculum in the 21st century because of the ways in which Biblical literacy helps to create an historical reality by which to evaluate immediate experience. Also, it helps students read primary texts. Computer technology and the internet are key resources for teaching Bible in the 21st century.
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Collaboration on a Religion and Culture Course

Awarded Grant
Denzey, Nicola
Skidmore College
1999
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Three religion faculty collaborate to shape a new introductory course with an emphasis on team-teaching, multimedia presentations, an interactive website with course resources and databases, and an honors section.
Proposal abstract :
Three religion faculty collaborate to shape a new introductory course with an emphasis on team-teaching, multimedia presentations, an interactive website with course resources and databases, and an honors section.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to shape a new introduction to religion course with hopes of it invigorating the new religion major at the school. The course would be team taught by scholars of religion with different specializations and would involve creation of a course website with resource and databases. The course would also have an additional, jointly taught session for students in the Skidmore Honors Forum.
Grant money allowed them to bring in outside resources to the course and include a field trip for religion majors. Changes in the required faculty load made it impractical to include an extra Honors Forum section. They incorporated that work into the course instead. The major success of the course was the development of website of resources including online syllabi, course assignments and readings, religion links, an online image database and a glossary of course terms.
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Digitized Resources in the History of Christianity: A Model for the Use of Information Technologies as Supplements in Classroom Teaching and Learning

Awarded Grant
Kalantzis, George
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
1999
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Creation of browser-based digital collection of the instructional material and other resources used in the first of the sequence of History of Christianity courses offered at the seminary.
Proposal abstract :
Creation of browser-based digital collection of the instructional material and other resources used in the first of the sequence of History of Christianity courses offered at the seminary.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to create an internet-based digital collection of the instructional materials and resources for use in Garrett's introductory History of Christianity courses. It also hoped to create a better understanding of the issues of interactive and visual learning, to demonstrate the viability of interpreting digitized resources in theological education, to provide an interdisciplinary model for using information technology, and to investigate the use of alternative research methods.
A substantial amount of the project was able to be completed. Though, unforeseen elements involving the rapid technological changes of this work slowed down some progress. Changes in hardware and software were not always compatible with student computers. The transfer of primary texts worked well and allowed all students to share one common version of text and pagination which facilitated classroom discussion. Secondary sources on the database required debate and clarification over copyright rules. Overall, the project allowed the courses to use the potential of the instruction as a repository of information and presentation.
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Writing Program Initiative

Awarded Grant
McAvoy, Jane
Lexington Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
1999
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Collaborative development of a writing initiative that creates a separate space and instruction for seminary students’ writing in tandem with the regular courses and faculty of the seminary, and completion of a handbook on writing for seminarians.
Proposal abstract :
Collaborative development of a writing initiative that creates a separate space and instruction for seminary students’ writing in tandem with the regular courses and faculty of the seminary, and completion of a handbook on writing for seminarians.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to fund a retreat to examine the way in which the seminary is attempting "to build a writing initiative that creates a separate space and instruction for writing in tandem with regular courses and faculty of the seminary." The grant also sought funding for a summer research stipend for the director of the seminary's writing center to complete a handbook on writing for seminarians.
As a result of their reflection, they learned that the writing director works on a number of levels and needs to be aware of the varying kinds of instruction needed. An article was written as a result of this reflection and the book research was completed.
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The Church as a Community of Practice

Awarded Grant
Pauw, Amy
Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
1999
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Designing Courses   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Develop a seminary course to better support students’ ministry by making vivid the centrality of practices in the life of the church, using Powerpoint to draw in the images and sounds of ritual, music, nurture, and outreach, and exploring Internet and media resources for teaching theology.
Proposal abstract :
Develop a seminary course to better support students’ ministry by making vivid the centrality of practices in the life of the church, using Powerpoint to draw in the images and sounds of ritual, music, nurture, and outreach, and exploring Internet and media resources for teaching theology.

Learning Abstract :
Project sought to teach ecclesiology in a new way by focusing on the Christian church as a community of practice and by the use of the computer assisted instruction to teach those practices.
Students responded positively to this new approach to teaching ecclesiology. They felt that it "helped them to link historical study and theological reflection with contemporary church life." Several learnings were reported on the use of computer technology for teaching theology. One reflection involved the amount of time needed in order to teach with computer technology, both in its preparation and implementation. The second point involved the discipline specific nature of technology and teaching. It appears most useful for courses with visual and material examples as a central component. Finally, it was learned that computer technology cannot replace reading, lecturing, discussing texts and writing papers. Rather, it is a useful supplement to these approaches.
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Consultation for Learning Bible at Seattle Pacific University

Awarded Grant
Wall, Robert |Steele, Les
Seattle Pacific University
Colleges/Universities
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Assessment

Proposal abstract :
Two departmental retreats with outside professional consultants, the first to consider the pedagogy of a Scripture course intended for the traditional college sophomore, and the second to reflect on and assess the teaching of that course during the prior year.
Proposal abstract :
Two departmental retreats with outside professional consultants, the first to consider the pedagogy of a Scripture course intended for the traditional college sophomore, and the second to reflect on and assess the teaching of that course during the prior year.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a consultation on learning Bible at Seattle Pacific University in order to develop new strategies for teaching scripture as a required course. This would be accomplished through faculty retreats with nationally known scholars of teaching, as well as conversations with student focus groups.
The project director reports that the consultation was provocative and successful in accomplishing the stated goals. They reported the following implications of the consultation on the future of the Bible course: 1. develop a process to train and utilize advanced students as participant observers; 2. use of the "clearness meeting" to engage in formative faculty conversations regarding teaching and vocation; 3. to develop longitudinal surveys to evaluate long-term student learning; 4. to support and encourage writing and consultation on issues related to the course; 5. use of teaching portfolios for faculty teaching this course.
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Teaching Catholic Social Teaching

Awarded Grant
Whitmore, Todd
University of Notre Dame
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Series of conferences for Catholic colleges and universities to help develop programs in Catholic social teaching.
Proposal abstract :
Series of conferences for Catholic colleges and universities to help develop programs in Catholic social teaching.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought "to initiate the institution of programs in Catholic social teaching at twelve Catholic colleges and universities in the United States." It sought to respond to the lack of knowledge and practice of Catholic social teaching on the part of American Catholics, through the creation of college and university level programs.
Overall, the participants' efforts on the individual campuses were successful in creating stronger programs for teaching Catholic social teaching in their institutions. In these schools, administrative officers frequently cited the presence of these programs as evidence of the school's Catholic identity; however, at times the level of verbal support did not match the material support. Other learning involved the reality that schools have not yet fully appreciated or rewarded faculty for their involvement in Catholic social teaching and justice projects. Participants saw these programs as having a positive effect on their campuses.
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Regional Consultation on Pastoral Theology

Awarded Grant
Ramsay, Nancy
Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
1999
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Consultation of fifteen pastoral theologians for sustained conversation about current resources, curricular issues, and teaching strategies for courses in pastoral care, and postmodern challenges for pastoral formation and practice.
Proposal abstract :
Consultation of fifteen pastoral theologians for sustained conversation about current resources, curricular issues, and teaching strategies for courses in pastoral care, and postmodern challenges for pastoral formation and practice.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather for a consultation 15 participants from the Society for Pastoral Theology to discuss the ways they teach a "correlational discipline" affected by attention to post modernist issues of power and difference. Specifically, they looked at the construction of basic courses in pastoral theology in the M.Div. curriculum, PhD curriculum, and the development of pastoral identities more rooted in multicultural realities. Their goal was to engage curricula of pastoral theology more intentionally with the realities of culture, power and difference.
The consultation was very successful specifically around the following issues: sharing foundational course syllabi; teaching methods using and teaching critically operative meta-theories for pastoral theological reflection; doctoral program pedagogies; formation and vocation. They recognized "a consensus among participants about the importance of helping students develop skills in analyzing the dynamics of power in contemporary contexts" and of "the value of assisting students in identifying normative values operative in their pastoral practice and interdisciplinary methods."
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A National Conference on Service/Learning in the Discipline of Religion: A Future of Service

Awarded Grant
McLain, F. Michael|Favazza, Joseph
Rhodes College
Colleges/Universities
1999
Topics: Research and Writing on Teaching   |   Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices

Proposal abstract :
Convene a conference on service-learning in religion as a pre-conference of the 1999 AAR meeting in Boston and publish a volume based on the proceedings as part of the American Association of Higher Education’s series on service/learning in the disciplines.
Proposal abstract :
Convene a conference on service-learning in religion as a pre-conference of the 1999 AAR meeting in Boston and publish a volume based on the proceedings as part of the American Association of Higher Education’s series on service/learning in the disciplines.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to organize a national conference on service learning in religion, emphasizing foundational and curricular issues. It would be scheduled as a pre-conference to the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion. Based on conference proceedings they hoped to publish a volume on service learning in religion in collaboration with the American Association of Higher Education and National Campus Compact.
Conference evaluation forms indicate that the conference achieved its intended goals. Further, reflection included a continued effort to articulate issues related to service learning, including the positive and negative aspects of it as a pedagogical strategy. They also sought to clarify issues surrounding different service sites, different institutional locations and different missions. Finally, they saw the need to continue reflecting on the place of service learning in graduate programs.
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Charlotte-Area Regional Consultation on Teaching the New Testament

Awarded Grant
Carey, Greg
Winthrop University
Colleges/Universities
1998
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Identity, Vocation, and Culture of Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Series of three workshops involving biblical scholars who teach in colleges, universities, and seminaries in the Charlotte area to explore methods, models, and resources for teaching the New Testament.
Proposal abstract :
Series of three workshops involving biblical scholars who teach in colleges, universities, and seminaries in the Charlotte area to explore methods, models, and resources for teaching the New Testament.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop consultation on teaching and learning with Biblical scholars from the Charlotte-Rockhill area. The goal would be to explore methods, models and resources for teaching the New Testament, especially the introductory level course.
The project met the group's expectations with its emphasis on practical, classroom oriented discussions. One of the most positive benefits of the consultation was the opportunity for new teachers to have an informal opportunity to share strategies and information with one another and to be mentored by more senior colleagues.
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Regional Consultation on Teaching and Learning in Biblical, Historical, Systematic and Moral Theology from an Evangelical Perspective

Awarded Grant
Padgett, Alan|Gasque, W. Ward
Pacific Association for Theological Studies
Agencies
1998
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching in Specific Contexts   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Four-day consultation of representatives of ten evangelical schools in the Northwestern United States to compare programs, share resources, and discuss other aspects of teaching and learning.
Proposal abstract :
Four-day consultation of representatives of ten evangelical schools in the Northwestern United States to compare programs, share resources, and discuss other aspects of teaching and learning.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to develop a consultation on teaching and learning in Biblical, historical, systematic and moral theology from an evangelical perspective, focusing on schools in the geographic region of the Pacific Northwest. Their goals were to bring seminary teachers together to discuss redesigning their introductory courses, share syllabi, reflect on issues of technology and teaching and learning style, to reflect upon the resources of American evangelical theology and Christian wisdom and to bring pastors into discussion about seminary formation.
The group that gathered found it useful to be with other evangelical scholars and that it was an aid to their common dialogue about teaching theology better. The most helpful session involved sharing introductory course syllabi. They also found the discussions on teaching theology to adult learners in the use of art in teaching theology to be extremely profitable.
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A Consultation on Teaching Spiritual Formation

Awarded Grant
Frohlich, Mary
Catholic Theological Union of Chicago
Theological Schools
1997
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Ecumenical consultation to explore how best to prepare students in a holistic way to be spiritual formators for others.
Proposal abstract :
Ecumenical consultation to explore how best to prepare students in a holistic way to be spiritual formators for others.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds for a consultation on teaching spiritual formation with faculty and practitioners in seminaries, theology schools, and spiritual formation programs in the Chicago area. The consultation would help participants clarify the focus and effectiveness of their teaching, particularly in light of the holistic approach to teaching that is different in important ways from a traditional classroom focus on lecture, reading and research papers.
A day long consultation was held, with the group divided equally between professors and practitioners. The topics discussed included the following: challenges in doing or teaching spiritual formation; how the students are like or unlike the "formators"; the main components and chief goals of "spiritually formative processes"; and implications of these reflections on teaching.
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The Apocalyptic Imagination

Awarded Grant
Walls, Neal|Newsom, Carol
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological Schools
1998
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Preparation and planning for a new sequence of team-taught biblical courses on apocalyptic and millennial themes.
Proposal abstract :
Preparation and planning for a new sequence of team-taught biblical courses on apocalyptic and millennial themes.

Learning Abstract :
The grant provided for the preparation of a series of courses on Apocalypticism and Millennialism. The development of these courses involved considerable research, particularly concerning scanning, cataloging, researching copyright and permissions for images relevant to the book of Revelation. It also involved interdisciplinary work with faculty in both the school of theology and the graduate school of religion. It is hoped that these teaching resources will be available not only to Christian educators in the Atlanta area but also to students and teachers across the on-line community.
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Database of Texts and Images for Teaching the New Testament

Awarded Grant
Attridge, Harold
Yale University
Colleges/Universities
1998
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Create a structured, web-searchable database of texts and images related to the study of the New Testament. The database will augment Yale’s existing Ad Hoc Digital Library that supports the teaching of church history.
Proposal abstract :
Create a structured, web-searchable database of texts and images related to the study of the New Testament. The database will augment Yale’s existing Ad Hoc Digital Library that supports the teaching of church history.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to create a structured, web-searchable database of texts and images to support the teaching of courses in the New Testament. The distinctiveness of this site would be its connection to the extensive resources of Yale University. The material in this database can help to place New Testament studies into the context of the worlds in which it was written and in which it came to be accepted as authoritative. Thus, the focus of the project was to use electronic resources to help integrate the study of the New Testament, both in its immediate context and in the context of the history of Christianity.
The project goals were met with the creation of the Eikon Image Database for Biblical Studies, an online resource with immediate impact on the teaching of New Testament at Yale Divinity School. In the grant period the conceptual framework and interlocking structure of the database were put in place. A great deal of content was added, with more to be completed. They learned a great deal about the potential and problems of creating digital resources.
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Taking the Pulse: A Survey of Seminary Introductory Christian Ethics Courses

Awarded Grant
Bounds, Elizabeth
Candler School of Theology - Emory University
Theological Schools
1998
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Relating Pedagogy and Curriculum

Proposal abstract :
Research and assessment of pedagogical practices in Christian Ethics courses as the basis of course design and revision.
Proposal abstract :
Research and assessment of pedagogical practices in Christian Ethics courses as the basis of course design and revision.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to survey seminary Introductory Christian Ethics courses in order to assess the current condition of Christian Ethics in the U.S. on the basis of pedagogical practices. The goal was to revise the introductory course at Candler through this study. Also, academic papers would result from this study, including a review of pedagogical approaches.
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Bible in Pop Culture: Developing a Multimedia CD-ROM for Teaching in Biblical Studies

Awarded Grant
Beal, Timothy|Linafelt, Tod
Eckerd College
1998
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Technology and Teaching

Proposal abstract :
Develop an interactive multimedia CD-ROM textbook supplement on the Bible in contemporary media--particularly music, film and graphic arts.
Proposal abstract :
Develop an interactive multimedia CD-ROM textbook supplement on the Bible in contemporary media--particularly music, film and graphic arts.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought funds to produce an interactive, hypertextual CD_ROM for teaching biblical studies. Specific educational goals were to facilitate teaching biblical literature to undergraduates by highlighting the ways in which it is a powerful influence in contemporary media; to encourage close textual reading by asking students to make specific textual connections; to encourage critical analysis of the relation between Bible, popular culture and new media.
Collecting and evaluating examples of biblical idiom in popular culture, they were able to produce a "demo disk." Also, during the grant period, the technology began a shift from the CD-ROM format to web-based formats. By the end of the project, the project planners were deciding whether to transfer the work to a website.
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An Introduction to the Study of Christianity -- Developing Collaboratively Authored Curriculum Resources

Awarded Grant
Ruiz, Jean-Pierre
St. John's University (Jamaica, NY)
Colleges/Universities
1998
Topics: Gathering Faculty within an Institution   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Designing Courses

Proposal abstract :
Develop a textbook and other curricular resources in support of a new core-curriculum undergraduate introductory course in theology, doing so through a process of collaborative authorship among members of the department faculty.
Proposal abstract :
Develop a textbook and other curricular resources in support of a new core-curriculum undergraduate introductory course in theology, doing so through a process of collaborative authorship among members of the department faculty.

Learning Abstract :
As initially designed, this project fell short in its estimate of the amount of time and energy that would be required to implement a core curriculum course with as many sections, as many students and as many adjunct faculty members as came to be the case for our Perspectives on Christianity: A Catholic Approach. As a result, the process of consensus building among the faculty has proceeded much more slowly than was originally anticipated. In addition, institutional complications, including the organizational details of a new university-wide core-curriculum, the need to coordinate course offerings across several campuses and with theology faculty in two distinct colleges of the university, and the implementation of new features of a university-wide information technology infrastructure have increased the challenges involved in this process.

It quickly became clear that the original intention, to produce a collaboratively authored printed textbook for our Perspectives on Christianity: A Catholic Approach represented an inadequate solution. This initial disappointment actually opens doors to opportunities of a different sort: it becomes increasingly clear that the St. John's University's Academic Computing Initiative will play an important role in the development of curriculum resources and course materials. These course materials, taking advantage of the flexibility and scalability of digital technology, can be customized and updated much more easily than conventional printed textbooks. In addition, digital technology has the potential for facilitating more interactive teaching and learning. Web-CT, the St. John's Campus Pipeline gateway, the wireless network and the notebook computers in the hands of freshmen provide both an incentive and a practical opportunity for our faculty to implement appropriate and well-designed digital technological teaching and learning resources. Because digital technology looms large in the consciousness of our undergraduate students, as a "given" of their world, it also provides faculty with an opportunity to tap into the "new literacy" in teaching theology and religion. The university administration has shown considerable interest in this dimension of the project, and has encouraged the department to proceed.

On the plus side, our faculty's intensive and systematic attention to the design and implementation of Perspectives on Christianity: A Catholic Approach has yielded significant positive outcomes, inasmuch as this work has focused our attention intentionally and deliberately on issues of teaching and learning. Implicit assumptions about successful teaching came to the surface for examination and for revision. At the same time, the department's collaboration in the design of this course has resulted in a stronger sense of the department's shared mission, and has increased the concern of the full-time faculty for the faculty development of our adjunct faculty colleagues.
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Meeting on Various Methods of Practical Theology for Teaching and Learning

Awarded Grant
Doehring, Carrie
Society for Pastoral Theology
Agencies
2000
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Educating Clergy

Proposal abstract :
Pre-conference meeting of those who teach in pastoral psychology and theology to evaluate the practice-theory-practice method used in "Introduction to Pastoral Care" courses and the correlation of various disciplinary perspectives used at the master's level in both seminary and university contexts.
Proposal abstract :
Pre-conference meeting of those who teach in pastoral psychology and theology to evaluate the practice-theory-practice method used in "Introduction to Pastoral Care" courses and the correlation of various disciplinary perspectives used at the master's level in both seminary and university contexts.

Learning Abstract :
The project sought to gather teachers of pastoral psychology and theology in a one-day meeting preceding the annual meeting of the Society for Pastoral Theology. The purpose of the meeting would be to reflect upon various methods of practical theology used by those who teach in the area of pastoral theology at a master's level. Specifically, they hoped to consider their use of a practice-theory-practice method in their introductory courses and examine how various disciplinary perspectives relate to each other and to practice.
The following five themes emerged as common rationales for their teaching strategies: theological education that seeks both pastoral formation and critical thinking, with the method of practical theology to ground it; beginning with and valuing experience, with authority granted to the context of pastoral care; enhancing self-awareness of social identity and power differentials; acknowledging students' accountability to denominational and professional organizations; and forming students who have a capacity for empathy and who know how to establish and maintain faithful relationships.
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Meeting of librarians on “Introduction to Theological Librarianship” at the ATLA meeting in June 1997

Awarded Grant
Crocco, Stephen
Pittsburgh Theological Seminary
Theological Schools
1996
Topics: Gathering Faculty across Institutions   |   Teaching a Specific Subject

Proposal abstract :
Support for a meeting of librarians on “Introduction to Theological Librarianship” at the ATLA meeting in June 1997
Proposal abstract :
Support for a meeting of librarians on “Introduction to Theological Librarianship” at the ATLA meeting in June 1997

Learning Abstract :
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Utilizing Directed Peer Groups to Enhance Teaching Fellow Effectiveness

Awarded Grant
Born, Christopher|Gregory, Bradley
Catholic University of America
Theological Schools
2017
Topics: Teaching a Specific Subject   |   Innovative Teaching and Best Practices   |   Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

Proposal abstract :
Following up on a previous grant from the Wabash Center to develop an inquiry-based model of learning across undergraduate theology and religious studies courses, Catholic University’s School of Theology and Religious Studies proposes to further its work in peer mentoring among graduate student teaching fellows. The primary goal of this project is to identify the specific learning activities that are most effective in enhancing student engagement on a variety ...
Proposal abstract :
Following up on a previous grant from the Wabash Center to develop an inquiry-based model of learning across undergraduate theology and religious studies courses, Catholic University’s School of Theology and Religious Studies proposes to further its work in peer mentoring among graduate student teaching fellows. The primary goal of this project is to identify the specific learning activities that are most effective in enhancing student engagement on a variety of religious and theological topics and to implement those activities more widely among faculty and teaching fellows. Secondly, we will catalog the most effective learning activities among graduate teaching fellows as they witness, identify, and incorporate new activities into their own courses. The final goal is to enhance the undergraduate experience by encouraging teaching fellows to utilize best practices or activities related to the array of theology and religious studies topics.

Learning Abstract :