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Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher

Book
Brookfield, Stephen D.
1995
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.B677 1995
Topics: General Overviews

Additional Info:
Building on the insights of his highly acclaimed earlier work, The Skillful Teacher, Stephen D. Brookfield offers a very personal and accessible guide to how faculty at any level and across all disciplines can improve their teaching. Applying the principles of adult learning, Brookfield thoughtfully guides teachers through the processes of becoming critically reflective about teaching, confronting the contradictions involved in creating democratic classrooms, and using critical reflection as a ...
Additional Info:
Building on the insights of his highly acclaimed earlier work, The Skillful Teacher, Stephen D. Brookfield offers a very personal and accessible guide to how faculty at any level and across all disciplines can improve their teaching. Applying the principles of adult learning, Brookfield thoughtfully guides teachers through the processes of becoming critically reflective about teaching, confronting the contradictions involved in creating democratic classrooms, and using critical reflection as a tool for continuous personal and professional development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 What It Means to Be a Critically Reflective Teacher
ch. 2 Becoming Critically Reflective: A Process of Learning and Change
ch. 3 Learning to Know Ourselves: The Value of Autobiography
ch. 4 Surprised by the Familiar: What Autobiographies Reveal
ch. 5 Seeing Ourselves Through Our Students' Eyes
ch. 6 Understanding Classroom Dynamics: The Critical Incident Questionnaire
ch. 7 Holding Critical Conversations About Teaching
ch. 8 Solving Problems Collaboratively: The Good Practices Audit
ch. 9 Storming the Citadel: Reading Theory Critically
ch. 10 Using the Literature of Critical Reflection
ch. 11 Negotiating the Risks of Critical Reflection
ch. 12 Creating a Culture of Reflection

References
Name Index
Subject Index
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How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching

Book
Ambrose, Susan; Bridges, Michael W.; DiPietro, Michele; Lovett, Marsha C; Norman, Marie K., and Mayer, Richard E.
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB1025.3.H68 2010
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Praise for How Learning Works

How Learning Works is the perfect title for this excellent book. Drawing upon new research in psychology, education, and cognitive science, the authors have demystified a complex topic into clear explanations of seven powerful learning principles. Full of great ideas and practical suggestions, all based on solid research evidence, this book is essential reading ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Praise for How Learning Works

How Learning Works is the perfect title for this excellent book. Drawing upon new research in psychology, education, and cognitive science, the authors have demystified a complex topic into clear explanations of seven powerful learning principles. Full of great ideas and practical suggestions, all based on solid research evidence, this book is essential reading for instructors at all levels who wish to improve their students' learning.

This book is a must-read for every instructor, new or experienced. Although I have been teaching for almost thirty years, as I read this book I found myself resonating with many of its ideas, and I discovered new ways of thinking about teaching.

Thank you Carnegie Mellon for making accessible what has previously been inaccessible to those of us who are not learning scientists. Your focus on the essence of learning combined with concrete examples of the daily challenges of teaching and clear tactical strategies for faculty to consider is a welcome work. I will recommend this book to all my colleagues.

As you read about each of the seven basic learning principles in this book, you will find advice that is grounded in learning theory, based on research evidence, relevant to college teaching, and easy to understand. The authors have extensive knowledge and experience in applying the science of learning to college teaching, and they graciously share it with you in this organized and readable book. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures, Tables, and Exhibits
Foreword
Acknowledgments
About the Authors

Introduction Bridging Learning Research and Teaching Practice
ch. 1 How Does Students' Prior Knowledge Affect Their Learning?
ch. 2 How Does the Way Students Organize Knowledge Affect Their Learning?
ch. 3 What Factors Motivate Students to Learn?
ch. 4 How Do Students Develop Mastery?
ch. 5 What Kinds of Practice and Feedback Enhance Learning?
ch. 6 Why Do Student Development and Course Climate Matter for Student Learning?
ch. 7 How Do Students Become Self-Directed Learners?

Conclusion Applying the Seven Principles to Ourselves
Appendices
Appendix A What Is Student Self-Assessment and How Can We Use It?
Appendix B What Are Concept Maps and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix C What Are Rubrics and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix D What Are Learning Objectives and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix E What Are Ground Rules and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix F What Are Exam Wrappers and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix G What Are Checklists and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix H What Is Reader Response/Peer Review and How Can We Use It?

References
Name Index
Subject Index
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McKeachie's Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research, and Theory for College and University Teachers (Fourteenth Edition)

Book
McKeachie, Wilbert J., and Svinicki, Marilla
2013
Houghton Mifflin, Boston, MA
LB2331.M394 2014
Topics: Learning Designs   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
This indispensable handbook provides helpful strategies for dealing with both the everyday challenges of university teaching and those that arise in efforts to maximize learning for every student. The suggested strategies are supported by research and adaptable to specific classroom situations. Rather than suggest a "set of recipes" to be followed mechanically, the book gives instructors the tools they need to deal with the ever-changing dynamics of teaching and learning. ...
Additional Info:
This indispensable handbook provides helpful strategies for dealing with both the everyday challenges of university teaching and those that arise in efforts to maximize learning for every student. The suggested strategies are supported by research and adaptable to specific classroom situations. Rather than suggest a "set of recipes" to be followed mechanically, the book gives instructors the tools they need to deal with the ever-changing dynamics of teaching and learning. Available with InfoTrac Student Collections http://gocengage.com/infotrac.

Table Of Content:
Preface
A Special Preface for Teaching Assistants and Graduate Student Instructors

Part 1 Getting Started
Ch. 1 Introduction
The College or University Culture
Research Versus Teaching?
Teaching as Scholarship
In Conclusion

Ch. 2 Countdown for Course Preparation
Time: Three Months Before the First Class
Write Objectives, Goals, or Outcomes
What Goals?
Order Textbooks, Lab Supplies, or Other Resources Students May Need
Choose a Textbook or Other Reading Materials
Time: Two Months Before the First Class
Begin Drafting a Syllabus for the Class
Time: One Month Before the First Class
Begin Preparing Lesson Plans
Plan for Out-of-Class Learning
Choose Appropriate Teaching Methods
Select Appropriate Technology
Time: Two Weeks Before the First Class
Check Resources
Start a Portfolio
Time: One Week Before the First Class

Ch. 3 Meeting a Class for the First Time
Setting the Stage
Breaking the Ice
Problem Posting
Introducing the Syllabus
Testing, Grading, and Fairness
Introducing the Textbook
Assessing Prior Knowledge
Questions and Reactions
What About Subject Matter?
In Conclusion

Part 2 Basic Skills for Facilitating Student Learning
Ch. 4 Reading as Active Learning
Textbooks
How Do You Get Students to Do the Assigned Reading?
Research on Learning from Reading
Teaching Students to Learn More from Reading
In Conclusion

Ch. 5 Facilitating Discussion: Posing Problems, Listening, Questioning
A Little Bit of Theory
Problems in Teaching by Discussion
Starting Discussion
Starting Discussion with a Common Experience
Starting Discussion with a Controversy
Starting Discussion with Questions
Starting Discussion with a Problem or Case
Breaking a Problem into Subproblems
Socratic Discussion
Barriers to Discussion
What Can I Do About Nonparticipants?
Buzz Groups--Peer Learning
The Inner Circle or Fishbowl
The Discussion Monopolizer
How Can We Have a Discussion If the Students Haven't Read the Assignment?
Handling Arguments and Emotional Reactions
The Two-Column Method
Emotional Reactions
Teaching Students How to Learn Through Discussion
Student-Led Discussions
Taking Minutes or Notes, Summarizing
Online Discussions
In Conclusion

Ch. 6 How to Make Lectures More Effective
Research on the Effectiveness of Lectures
What Are Lectures Good For?
A Little Bit of Theory
Planning Lectures
Preparing Your Lecture Notes
Organization of Lectures
The Introduction
The Body of the Lecture
How Can Lectures Be Improved?
Attention
What Can Be Done to Get Attention?
Teaching Students How to Be Better Listeners
How Do Students Process the Content of a Lecture?
Should Students Take Notes?
How to Get Students Actively Thinking in a Lecture Situation
The Lecturer as a Person
In Conclusion

Ch. 7 Assessing, Testing, and Evaluating: Grading Is Not the Most Important Function
Planning Methods of Testing and Assessment
Alternative Testing Models
Group Testing
Online Testing
Other Methods of Assessing Learning
Performance Assessment (Authentic Assessment)
Graphic Representations of Concepts
Journals, Research Papers, and Annotated Bibliographies
Portfolios
Peer Assessment
Assessing Group Work
Classroom Assessment
In Conclusion

Ch. 8 Testing: The Details
When to Test
Constructing the Test
Choosing the Type of Question
How Many Questions Should You Use?
Administering the Test
After the Test
Grading Essay Questions
Helping Yourself Learn from the Test
Assigning a Grade
Returning Test Papers
Dealing with an Aggrieved Student
What Do You Do About the Student Who Missed the Test?
In Conclusion

Ch. 9 Good Designs for Written Feedback for Students
Reducing Student Frustration and Aggression
Helping Students Become Test-Wise
Taking Multiple-Choice Tests
Taking Essay Tests
Why Teach Test Taking?
Helping Students Learn from a Test
In Conclusion

Ch. 10 Assigning Grades: What do they Meang
Do Grades Provide Information Useful for Decision Making?
Assigningn Grades: On a "Curve" or Against a Standard?
Reducing Student Anxiety about Grades?
What About the Student Who Wants a Grade Changed?
Grades vs. Learning: Some Related Research
In Conclusion

Part 3 Understanding Students
Ch. 11 Motivation in the College Classroom
Motivational Theories: An Overview
Autonomy and Self-Determination
Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation
Expectancy-Value Theory
Mastery and Performance Goals
Attribution Theory
Social Goals and Social Motivation
Putting Motivation Theory into Practice
In Conclusion

Ch. 12 Teaching Culturally Diverse Students
Culture and Communication
Nonverbal Communication
Verbal Communication
Motivation and Stress
Cultural Differences in Motivation
Cultural Stressors
Increasing Motivation
Dealing with Stressors
Tailoring Your Teaching Methods
Match Learning Styles
Be Concrete
Enhance Performance Measurement
Choose Appropriate Nonverbal Behaviors
Be Accessible
In Conclusion

Ch. 13 Different Students, Different Challenges
Intellectual/Academic Problems
Aggressive, Challenging Students
Students Who Want hte Truth and Students Who Believe that Everything Is Relative
Students Who Are Underprepared for the Course or Struggling
Individualized Teaching and Mentoring
Class Management Problems
Attention Seekers and Students Who Dominate Discussions
Inattentive Students
Students Who Come to Class Unprepared
The Flatterer, Disciple, Con Man (or Woman)
Students with Excuses
Emotional Problems
Angry Students
Discouraged, Ready-to-Give-up Students
Students with Emotional Reactions to Sensitive Topics
Dealing with Psychological Problems
Potential Suicides
In Conclusion

Part 4 Adding to Your Repertoire of Skills and Strategies for Facilitating Active Learning
Ch. 14 Active Learning: Cooperative, Collaborative, and Peer Learning
Peer Learning and Teaching
Peer Tutoring
The Learning Cell
Team Learning: Syndicate and Jigsaw
Student Characteristics and Peer Learning
Why Does Peer Learning Work?
In Conclusion

Ch. 15 Problem-Based Learning: Teaching with Cases, Simulations, and Games
Problem-Based Learning
The Case Method
Finding the Right Cases
Tips for Teaching with Cases
Games and Situations
In Conclusion

Ch. 16 How to Enhance Learning by Using High-Stakes and Low-Stakes Writing
A Little Theory: High Stakes and Low Stakes
Low-Stakes Writing
Kinds
Occasions
Handling Low-Stakes Writing
High-Stakes Writing
Topics and Assignments
Criteria for Evaluation
Multiple Papers and Multiple Drafts
Worst-Case Scenario
Responding to High-Stake Papers
Middle-Stakes Assignments: Think Pieces
Peer Response
About Correctness: Spelling and Grammar
About Grading
Portfolios
Contract Grading
Preventing--and Handling--Plagiarism
In Conclusion

Ch. 17 Technology and Teaching
How Will Technology Enhance Teaching and Learning?
What Considerations Go into Teaching with Technology?
Course Content
The Instructor
Students
Technology Tools
What Are the Effects of Technology on Teaching?
In Conclusion

Part 5 Skills for Use in Other Teaching Situations
Ch. 18 Teaching Large Classes (You Can Still Get Active Learning!)
Facilitating Active Learning
Encouraging Student Writing in Large Classes
Other Ways to Maintain Student Involvement
Student Anonymity
Organization Is the Key
Giving Tests in Large Classes
Making Outside Reading Assignments
Communicating with Large Classes
Coordinating Multisection Courses
Training and Supervising Teaching Assistants
In Conclusion

Ch. 19 Laboratory Instruction: Ensuring an Active Learning Experience
Styles of Laboratory Instruction
Expository Instruction
Inquiry Instruction
Discovery Instruction
Problem-Based Learning
Studio Instruction Brings Together the Arts and Sciences
Turning Novice Researchers into Practicing Scientists
Link to Cognitive Development
What Research Says
In Conclusion

Part 6 Teaching for Higher-Level Goals
Ch. 20 Teaching Students How to Become More Strategic and Self-Regulated Learners
What Are the Characteristics of Strategic Learners?
The Importance of Goals and Self Reflection
Increasing Students' Self-Awareness
Using Existing Knowledge to Help Learn New Things
Teaching Domain-Specific and Course Specific Strategies
Methods for Checking Understanding
Knowing How to Learn Is Not Enough--Students Must Also Want to Learn
Putting It All Together--Executive Control Processes in Strategic Learning
What Instructors Can Do to Help Their Students
In Conclusion

Ch. 21 Teaching Thinking
Setting Goals for Thinking
Improving Thinking Quality
In Conclusion

Ch. 22 The Ethics of Teaching and Teaching of Ethics
Responsibilities to Students
To Encourage the Free Pursuit of Learning
To Demonstrate Respect for Students
To Respect Confidentiality
To Model the Best Scholarly and Ethical Standards
To Foster Honest Academic Conduct and to Ensure Fair Evaluation
To Avoid Exploitation, Harassment, or Discrimination
The Teaching of Ethics
How Can We Teach Values?
Modeling Values
Making Ethical Choices
In Conclusion

Part 7 Lifelong Learning for the Teacher
Ch. 23 Vitality and Growth Throughout Your Teaching Career
How Can You Develop Effective Skills and Strategies?
Looking for New Ideas, New Methods, and Alternative Strategies for Handing Problems
Reading
Hearing, Discussing
Seeing, Experiencing
How Can You Get and Use Feedback to Continue to Improve Your Teaching?
Feedback from Student Performance
Feedback from Peers
Feedback from Faculty Development Specialists
Feedback from Students
Keys to Improvement with Feedback from Students
Consultation
Classroom Assessment and Research
Self-Evaluation
In Conclusion

References
Index
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Small Teaching: Everyday Lessons from the Science of Learning

Book
Lang, James M.
2016
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco, CA
LB1063.L36 2016
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Employ cognitive theory in the classroom every day

Research into how we learn has opened the door for utilizing cognitive theory to facilitate better student learning. But that's easier said than done. Many books about cognitive theory introduce radical but impractical theories, failing to make the connection to the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Employ cognitive theory in the classroom every day

Research into how we learn has opened the door for utilizing cognitive theory to facilitate better student learning. But that's easier said than done. Many books about cognitive theory introduce radical but impractical theories, failing to make the connection to the classroom. In Small Teaching, James Lang presents a strategy for improving student learning with a series of modest but powerful changes that make a big difference—many of which can be put into practice in a single class period. These strategies are designed to bridge the chasm between primary research and the classroom environment in a way that can be implemented by any faculty in any discipline, and even integrated into pre-existing teaching techniques. Learn, for example:

- How does one become good at retrieving knowledge from memory?
- How does making predictions now help us learn in the future?
- How do instructors instill fixed or growth mindsets in their students?

Each chapter introduces a basic concept in cognitive theory, explains when and how it should be employed, and provides firm examples of how the intervention has been or could be used in a variety of disciplines. Small teaching techniques include brief classroom or online learning activities, one-time interventions, and small modifications in course design or communication with students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
About the Author
Introduction: Small Teaching

Part I Knowledge
ch. 1 Retrieving
ch. 2 Predicting
ch. 3 Interleaving

Part II Understanding
ch. 4 Connecting
ch. 5 Practicing
ch. 6 Self-Explaining

Part III Inspiration
ch. 7 Motivating
ch. 8 Growing
ch. 9 Expanding

Conclusion: Beginning
Works Cited
Index
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What the Best College Teachers Do

Book
Bain, Ken
2004
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2331.B34 2004
Topics: General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Winner of the Virginia and Warren Stone Prize awarded annually by Harvard University Press for an outstanding book on education and society. What makes a great teacher great? Who are the professors students remember long after graduation? This book, the conclusion of a fifteen-year study of nearly one hundred college teachers in a wide variety of fields and universities, offers valuable answers for all educators. The short answer is -- ...
Additional Info:
Winner of the Virginia and Warren Stone Prize awarded annually by Harvard University Press for an outstanding book on education and society. What makes a great teacher great? Who are the professors students remember long after graduation? This book, the conclusion of a fifteen-year study of nearly one hundred college teachers in a wide variety of fields and universities, offers valuable answers for all educators. The short answer is -- it's not what teachers do, it's what they understand. Lesson plans and lecture notes matter less than the special way teachers comprehend the subject and value human learning. Whether historians or physicists, in El Paso or St. Paul, the best teachers know their subjects inside and out -- but they also know how to engage and challenge students and to provoke impassioned responses. Most of all, they believe two things fervently: that teaching matters and that students can learn. In stories both humorous and touching, Ken Bain describes examples of ingenuity and compassion, of students' discoveries of new ideas and the depth of their own potential. What the Best College Teachers Do is a treasure trove of insight and inspiration for first-year teachers and seasoned educators alike. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction: Defining the Best
ch. 2 What Do They Know about How We Learn?
ch. 3 How Do they Prepare to Teach?
ch. 4 What Do They Expect of Their Students?
ch. 5 How Do They Conduct Class?
ch. 6 How Do They Treat Their Students?
ch. 7 How Do They Evaluate Their Students and Themselves?

Epilogue: What Can We Learn From Them?
App How the Study Was Conducted
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
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