Leadership and Faculty Development

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Dilemmas in Teaching: Cases for Collaborative Faculty Reflection

Book
Anson, Chris, Lesley Cafarelli, Carol Rutz, Michelle Weis, eds.
1998
Mendota Press, Madison, WI
LB2331.D53 1998
Topics: General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Designed to spark reflection and lively dialogue in College and university departments and faculty development programs, Dilemmas in Teaching is a collection of short, insightful cases that will strike a chord with experienced faculty and help prepare newer faculty and teaching assistants for the complexities of their chosen profession. Written by faculty as part of a six-year project sponsored by The Collaboration for the Advancement of College Teaching & Learning, the ...
Additional Info:
Designed to spark reflection and lively dialogue in College and university departments and faculty development programs, Dilemmas in Teaching is a collection of short, insightful cases that will strike a chord with experienced faculty and help prepare newer faculty and teaching assistants for the complexities of their chosen profession. Written by faculty as part of a six-year project sponsored by The Collaboration for the Advancement of College Teaching & Learning, the twenty-nine cases are grouped in three sections, each with an introduction, focusing on the classroom, departments and institutions, and the changing culture in higher education. Features include a listing of case abstracts, discussion questions, essays about using cases in faculty development, and a bibliography. This collection is a useful resource for college, department, and faculty development center libraries — certain to be pulled off the shelf often for individual reflection and faculty development programming. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction

Part I: Resource Materials
ch. 1 Stories for Reflective Teaching: using cases in faculty development (Chris M. Anson)
ch. 2 In Case You're Writing a Case: some suggestions (Kathryn Heltne Swanson)

Part II: Cases about Classrooms
ch. 3 Critical Thinking or Thinking Critically (James H. Smith)
ch. 4 Group Cases: one professor's dilemma (Srinivasan Ragothaman)
ch. 5 Judgment Day (Marie McNeff)
ch. 6 The Loafing Letdown (Ronald A. Klocke)
ch. 7 The Case of the Harassed Teacher (Tony Filipvitch)
ch. 8 Yes, Virginia, You're in a Pickle (Mary R. DeMaine)
ch. 9 Too Much Thinking (Richard Jewell)
ch. 10 Grade Expectations (Jeannine L. Saabye)
ch. 11 The Jonas Incident (Chris M. Anson)

Part III:Cases about Departments and Institutions
ch. 12 The Academic Purist (Deborah Petersen-Perlman)
ch. 13 Best in the Class (Carol Rutz)
ch. 14 The Fly in the Ointment (James Swanson)
ch. 15 Risky Business (Lesley K. Cafarelli)
ch. 16 To 'B' or not to 'B': a case of academic appeal (Benedict J. Arogyaswamy)
ch. 17 To Tell or not to Tell (Shamsul Huda, Argirl L. Morgan, and William Serban)
ch. 18 Unpopular Senior Professor (Bruce L. Smith)
ch. 19 Wendy Lamb (Tom Mason and Melissa Shepard)
ch. 20 Assessment at Woebegone State (Lesley K. Cafarelli)
ch. 21 Is Something Rotten in Denmark? (Rebecca Kamm)
ch. 22 Teaching Semantics: euphemisms, taboos, and obscenities (Richard Betting)

Part IV: Cases about the Changing Culture As It Affects Higher Education
ch. 23 The Cancer Student (Carol Rutz)
ch. 24 Facing the Reality of Students' Preparation and Research Skills (Deborah Peterson-Perlman)
ch. 25 Faltering Steps Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (Richard W. Metcalf)
ch. 26 Jalen (Eugene Hermitte and Phyllis Worthy Dawkins)
ch. 27 Special Circumstances (Jeannine L. Saabye)
ch. 28 They're Acting Really Squirrelly (Thomas D. Peacock)
ch. 29 Organic Lab is Hell (Maria C. Milletti and Elva Mae Nicholson)
ch. 30 Who's Learning? (Beverly J. Stratton)
ch. 31 Dissin' the Prof (Susan J. Huber)

Bibliography
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Variations on a Teaching/Learning Workshop: Pedagogy and Faculty Development in Religious Studies

Book
Barnes, Linda L
1999
Scholars Press, Atlanta, GA
BL41.B29 1999
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
An ethnographic study of a series of workshops on pedagogy in religious studies, inaugurated by the American Academy of Religion. Reporting on workshops in New England and the Maritimes, the east, southeast, and southwest, discusses what was and was not effective in the workshops, variables contributing to success that people setting up similar workshops can draw on, and the current state and recent history of religious studies. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
An ethnographic study of a series of workshops on pedagogy in religious studies, inaugurated by the American Academy of Religion. Reporting on workshops in New England and the Maritimes, the east, southeast, and southwest, discusses what was and was not effective in the workshops, variables contributing to success that people setting up similar workshops can draw on, and the current state and recent history of religious studies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 How It All Came About
ch. 2 The Tools of Teaching: The New England / Maritimes Workshop
ch. 3 Non-Textual Materials and Gender: The Eastern International Workshop
ch. 4 Teaching Religious Studies in the Southeast
ch. 5 Teaching Religious Studies in the Southwest
ch. 6 What Made Them Work?
ch. 7 Implications for Faculty Development

Appendix
Index
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Collegial Professionalism: The Academy, Individualism, and the Common Good

Book
Bennett, John B.
1998
Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LB1778.2.B46 1998
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Discussions surrounding collegial practices and exchanges are common, but this volume departs from the usual and focuses on serious problems facing professionals in higher education--from being "open to corrections" and paying more attention to the "ethics of higher education," to creating collegial models that counter the traditional models of "insistent individualism." Bennett looks at the basic structure of what academic professionalism in higher education is and could be. Focusing on ...
Additional Info:
Discussions surrounding collegial practices and exchanges are common, but this volume departs from the usual and focuses on serious problems facing professionals in higher education--from being "open to corrections" and paying more attention to the "ethics of higher education," to creating collegial models that counter the traditional models of "insistent individualism." Bennett looks at the basic structure of what academic professionalism in higher education is and could be. Focusing on the flaws of autonomy that weaken the academy, he develops a more "relational model," which emphasizes "togetherness," "constructive education," "roles and virtues," "hospitality," and "thoughtfulness." He defines and reviews criticism, and he covers topics such as faculty individualism, departmental separatism, generational differences, codes of ethics, collective bargaining, and the competition in the academy for funding and students. The author does not call for an "unreachable academic utopia," but rather for change toward incorporating the collegial ethic of hospitableness and thoughtfulness. Not a bad idea in a world that often seems self-absorbed and disconnected. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Prologue

ch. 1 Assessing the Academy
ch. 2 Self and Community in the Collegium
ch. 3 Professionalism: Academic or Collegial?
ch. 4 Institutions: Fragmented or Connected?
ch. 5 Relationality in Teaching and Scholarship
ch. 6 Creating and Nourishing Communities of Hope

Epilogue
Bibliography
Index
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Practically Speaking: A Sourcebook for Instructional Consultants in Higher Education

Book
Brinko, Kathleen and Robert J. Menges
1997
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
TA9.P73 1999
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A uniquely comprehensive resource about instructional consultation in higher education -- At many colleges, universities, and professional schools, consultants are available to faculty who wish to assess and improve their teaching. Consultation is widely regarded as a powerful intervention for improving teaching and learning. No service provided by teaching centers has greater potential for producing deep and enduring effects on teachers and teaching. A think tank was charged with identifying ...
Additional Info:
A uniquely comprehensive resource about instructional consultation in higher education -- At many colleges, universities, and professional schools, consultants are available to faculty who wish to assess and improve their teaching. Consultation is widely regarded as a powerful intervention for improving teaching and learning. No service provided by teaching centers has greater potential for producing deep and enduring effects on teachers and teaching. A think tank was charged with identifying the knowledge base underlying instructional consultation, examining current practices, and recommending how best practices might best be disseminated. This book is the result of the think tank's work. The book offers a thoughtful blend of research-based principles and practical advice. It speaks practically to the practitioner. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Skills and techniques of instructional consultation. Interactions of teaching improvement / Kathleen T. Brinko
Instructional consulting : a guide for developing professional knowledge / L. Dee Fink
Creative art of effective consultation / Laura L.B. Border
First meeting with the client / Bette LeSere Erickson, Mary Deane Sorcinelli
Collecting information using class observation / Karron Lewis
Small group methods for collecting information from students / Richard Tiberius
Collecting information using videotape / Eric Kristensen
Collecting information using student ratings / Michael Theall, Jennifer Franklin
Data review and follow up consultation / Bette LeSere Erickson, Mary Deane Sorcinelli
Collaborative consultation for international faculty / Erin Porter, Ghislaine Kozuh
Consulting with faculty in small groups / William C. Rando
Programmatic approaches to instructional consultation. Overview of instructional consultation in North America / Diane E. Morrison
Microteaching, teaching laboratory, and alliances for change / Richard Tiberius
Partners in learning : breaking down the barriers around teaching / Myrna Smith
Small Group Instructional Diagnosis (SGID) / Lisa Firing Lenze
Instructional skills workshop program : a peer based model for the improvement of teaching and learning / Judy Wilbee
Teaching improvement process / Mary Deane Sorcinelli
Considerations in setting up a peer consultant program / Michael Kerwin
Context of instructional consultation. Higher education in North America / Charles Claxton
Local variables that affect consultation / Diane E. Morrison
Variability among faculty / Mary Ann Shea
Faculty face student diversity / Milton G. Spann, Jr., Suella McCrimmon
Effects of classroom environments / Gabriele Bauer
Identifying and assessing your consultation style / Laura L.B. Border
Developmental stages of an educational consultant : theoretical perspective / Richard Tiberius, Jane Tipping, Ronald Smith
Personal account of the development of one consultant / David Way
Evaluating instructional consultation. Issues in evaluating consultation ; Evaluating a teaching consultation service / Glenn R. Erickson
Evaluating a consultation program for part time faculty / Barbara J. Millis
Training instructional consultants. Instructional consultants as reflective practitioners / Ronald Smith
Training new consultants in the Connecticut Community Technical College system / Bille Searle, Patricia A. Cook
Training new consultants in the Kentucky Community College system : the teaching consultants' workshop / Michael Kerwin, Judy Rhoads
Training TA's as consultants at the University of Michigan ; workshop for peer mentors / Beverly Black, Bronwen Gates
Professional development for consultants at the University of Washington's Center for Instructional Development and Research / Jody D. Nyquist, Donald H. Wulff
Training new consultants at Stanford University : the TA Consultants Program / Michele Marincovich
Reflecting on practice : observing ourselves consulting / Barbara Hofer, Beverly Black, Linda Acitelli
Using case studies to train instructional consultants / Barbara J. Millis
Professional organizations of instructional consultation / Kathleen T. Brinko
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Reflective Faculty Evaluation: Enhancing Teaching and Determining Faculty Effectiveness

Book
Centra, John A.
1993
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2333.C456 1993
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
There is growing pressure both within and outside higher education to recognize and reward faculty excellence in teaching, as well as in the areas of research and service. In this book, John A. Centra provides faculty members, administrators, and faculty development specialists with the up-to-date approaches they need to evaluate and improve teaching. Greatly expanding his earlier bestseller, Determining Faculty Effectiveness (Jossey-Bass, 1979), Centra underscores the importance of active methods of ...
Additional Info:
There is growing pressure both within and outside higher education to recognize and reward faculty excellence in teaching, as well as in the areas of research and service. In this book, John A. Centra provides faculty members, administrators, and faculty development specialists with the up-to-date approaches they need to evaluate and improve teaching. Greatly expanding his earlier bestseller, Determining Faculty Effectiveness (Jossey-Bass, 1979), Centra underscores the importance of active methods of teaching and the need to evaluate those methods in less traditional ways. He discusses the value and proper use of self-reports and portfolios. And he examines better ways to involve colleagues and students in evaluating and improving teaching. He includes guidelines, time-tested principles, new research insights, and many suggestions that can be adapted by both beginning and experienced teachers, and by those involved in evaluating and enhancing their performance.
From the Publisher

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author
ch. 1 The Role of Evaluation in Developing Teaching Effectiveness
ch. 2 Approaches to Teaching and Implications for Evaluation
ch. 3 Student Evaluations of Teaching: What Research Tells Us
ch. 4 Using Student Evaluations: Guidelines and Benefits
ch. 5 Teachers' Self-Reports and Portfolios
ch. 6 Critical Roles of Colleagues and Department Chairs
ch. 7 Determining Effectiveness in Research and Service
ch. 8 Legal Considerations in Faculty Evaluation
ch. 9 Closing Reflections on Determining Faculty Effectiveness
Resource A: Available Student Rating Instruments
Resource B: Sample Forms for Classroom Observation and Colleague Evaluation
References
Index
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Ethics and the University

Book
Davis, Michael
1999
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2324.D38 1999
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Brings together two related topics: the practice of ethics in the university, and the teaching of practical or applied ethics in the university. Surveys practical ethics, offering an explanation of its recent emergence as a university subject, and identifies some problems that the subject generates for universities. Examines research ethics, including the problem of plagiarism, and discusses how ethics can be integrated into the university curriculum and what part particular ...
Additional Info:
Brings together two related topics: the practice of ethics in the university, and the teaching of practical or applied ethics in the university. Surveys practical ethics, offering an explanation of its recent emergence as a university subject, and identifies some problems that the subject generates for universities. Examines research ethics, including the problem of plagiarism, and discusses how ethics can be integrated into the university curriculum and what part particular cases should play in teaching of ethics. Also looks at sexual ethics. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The ethics boom, philosophy, and the university
ch. 2 Academic freedom, academic ethics, and professorial ethics
ch. 3 The new world of research ethics: a preliminary map
ch. 4 Science: after such knowledge, what responsibility?
ch. 5 University research and the wages of commerce
ch. 6 Of Babbage and kings: a study of a plagiarism complaint
ch. 7 Ethics across the curriculum
ch. 8 Case method
ch. 9 A moral problem in teaching of practical ethics
ch. 10 Sex and the university

Index
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Developing Senior Faculty as Teachers

Book
Finkelstein, Martin, author; and Mark LaCelle-Peterson, ed.
1993
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1778.2.D48 1993
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Colleges and universities in the United States are experiencing a major shift: while their student bodies change, their faculties remain largely the same--at least in the short run. The student body grows increasingly diverse in terms of ethnicity, economic status, and academic preparedness, with more and more students coming from the groups that have been least-well-served by higher education in the past. Student retention and ultimate success depends, in part, ...
Additional Info:
Colleges and universities in the United States are experiencing a major shift: while their student bodies change, their faculties remain largely the same--at least in the short run. The student body grows increasingly diverse in terms of ethnicity, economic status, and academic preparedness, with more and more students coming from the groups that have been least-well-served by higher education in the past. Student retention and ultimate success depends, in part, on the ability of professors--most of whom have been teaching for many years--to provide appropriate classroom experiences and learning assistance.
Faculty demographics present a start contrast: the professoriate, mostly white and male, will continue to age as the large faculty cohort hired in the 1960s and early 1970s reaches mid- and late career. More than half of all full-time faculty members in 1988 were over forty-five, nearly two-thirds had tenure, and relatively few between the ages of forty-five and sixty anticipated leaving their current position. The faculty members who face the challenges and opportunities of the college classroom in the 1990s are a seasoned, stable, and job-secure group. Happily for students and for institutions, faculty members frequently focus their energies on teaching in their later decades of their careers; to date, institutions seeking to support this crucial refocusing have not had resources or models to draw upon.
If senior faculty in their last decades of professional service do, in fact, turn their collective energies to improving teaching and learning, the potential for long-term impact on collegiate education is tremendous. Engaging senior faculty, who control the reward structure, in reflection on how excellent teaching is best supported can fundamentally alter institutional priorities toward a more appropriate balance between teaching and research--and create a better teaching environment. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes (Mark LaCelle-Peterson)

ch. 1 The Senior Faculty: A Portrait and Literature Review(R. Eugene Rice, Martin J. Finkelstein)
ch. 2 Institutions Matter: Campus Teaching Environments' Impact on Senior Faculty (Mark W. LaCelle-Peterson, Martin J. Finkelstein)
ch. 3 Primal Origins and Later Correctives for Midcareer Disillusionment (Robert Boice)
ch. 4 Designing a Reward System to Promote the Career Development of Senior Faculty (Donald W. Farmer)
ch. 5 Building Coalitions for Faculty Revitalization: The Case of Long Island University's Brooklyn Campus (Bernice Braid)
ch. 6 Redefining the Role of Senior Faculty at a Research University (William K. Jackson, Ronald D. Simpson)
ch. 7 Revitalizing Senior Faculty Through Statewide Efforts (Barbara Leigh Smith, Myrna J. Smith)
ch. 8 The Senior Faculty: Higher Education's Plentiful Yet Largely Untapped Resource (Martin J. Finkelstein, Nina Dorset Jemmott)
ch. 9 Resources for Developing Senior Faculty as Teachers (Robert K. Seal)

Index
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New Perspectives on Designing and Implementing Effective Workshops

Book
Fleming, Jean Anderson, ed.
1997
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC44.N49 1997
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This sourcebook provides workshop leaders and designers with the information necessary to hone their skills in everything from planning and instructional design to delivery and evaluation. The authors are seasoned workshop veterans who give practical suggestions grounded in both experience and theory. This volume will help professionals navigate the challenges and exploit the potential of distance learning; effectively use technology and the media to enhance their workshops; and negotiate power ...
Additional Info:
This sourcebook provides workshop leaders and designers with the information necessary to hone their skills in everything from planning and instructional design to delivery and evaluation. The authors are seasoned workshop veterans who give practical suggestions grounded in both experience and theory. This volume will help professionals navigate the challenges and exploit the potential of distance learning; effectively use technology and the media to enhance their workshops; and negotiate power dynamics in the intensity of the workshop atmosphere. This is the 76th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. For more information on the series, please see the Journals and Periodicals page. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1. Workshop Planning (Thomas J. Sork)
ch. 2. Motivationwith a Mission: Understanding Motivation and Culture in Workshop Design (Raymond J. Wlodkowski)
ch. 3. Group Learning in Workshops (Anne M. Will)
ch. 4. Negotiating Power Dynamics in Workshops (Juanita Johnson-Bailey, Ronald M. Cervero)
ch. 5. Residential Workshops (Gretchen Bersch, Jean Anderson Fleming)
ch. 6. Workshops at a Distance (Chere Campbell Gibson, Terry L. Gibson)
ch. 7. Workshop Evaluation: Old Myths and New Wisdom (Grover J. Andrews)
ch. 8. Confessions of a Workshop-aholic (Doe Hentschel)
ch. 9. The Workshop Through New Eyes (Jean Anderson Fleming)
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Teaching American Students: A Guide for International Faculty and Teaching Assistants

Book
Sarkisian, Ellen
1997
Harvard, Derok Bok Center, Cambridge, MA
LB1738.S371 1997
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Many faculty and graduate students from other countries expect language difficulties when they teach, but are unprepared for other surprises: different cultures make different assumptions about the academic background of college students, how students learn, the appropriate roles of teachers and students, and even the fundamental purpose of a college education.

The third edition of Teaching American Students explains the expectations of undergraduates at American colleges and universities ...
Additional Info:
Many faculty and graduate students from other countries expect language difficulties when they teach, but are unprepared for other surprises: different cultures make different assumptions about the academic background of college students, how students learn, the appropriate roles of teachers and students, and even the fundamental purpose of a college education.

The third edition of Teaching American Students explains the expectations of undergraduates at American colleges and universities and offers practical strategies for teaching, including how to give clear presentations, how to teach interactively, and how to communicate effectively. Also included are illustrative examples as well as advice from international faculty and teaching assistants. Appendices offer concrete suggestions on topics from planning the first day of class to grading papers and problem sets. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Starting out : a quick guide for beginning teachers
ch. 2 Assumptions that affect teaching in the American classroom
ch. 3 Bridging the gap : approaching your students and helping them approach you
ch. 4 Giving presentations that students can understand
ch. 5 Leading a discussion : providing direction and continuity
ch. 6 Understanding meanings beyond words
ch. 7 Appendices
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Teaching Fellows Handbook 1997-1998

Book
Harvard University
1997
Harvard, Derok Bok Center, Cambridge, MA
LD 2120.T4 1997
Topics: General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Teaching and resource information for Teaching Fellows at Harvard University. A basic overview of how to secure a teaching appointment, teaching skills and strategies, evaluating and improving teaching. An appendix includes tips on how to create a course section evaluation questionnaire, sample guidelines for oral reports, writing letters of recommendation, and a bibliography of useful books on teaching. Published annually, approximately 90 pages. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Teaching and resource information for Teaching Fellows at Harvard University. A basic overview of how to secure a teaching appointment, teaching skills and strategies, evaluating and improving teaching. An appendix includes tips on how to create a course section evaluation questionnaire, sample guidelines for oral reports, writing letters of recommendation, and a bibliography of useful books on teaching. Published annually, approximately 90 pages. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Part 1
General information on the teaching fellow program
Appointments
Securing a teaching position
Financial support

Part 2
Starting out
Active learning
Teaching skills and strategies
Evaluating and improving your teaching
Responsibilities and resources

Part 3
Resource directory
Frequently asked questions

Appendix
Index
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The Department Chair as Academic Leader

Book
Hecht, Irene, Mary Lou Higgerson, Walter H. Gmelch, Allan Tucker
1999
Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LB2341.D414 1999
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This important new work will help department chairs, faculty, and administrators understand and address the increasing complexity of relationships within higher education, as well as the growing influence of external factors. The Department Chair as Academic Leader is a completely updated revision of Allan Tucker's seminal contribution, Chairing the Academic Department, last published in 1992. This work reflects the approach used in the ACE Workshops for Division and Department Chairs and ...
Additional Info:
This important new work will help department chairs, faculty, and administrators understand and address the increasing complexity of relationships within higher education, as well as the growing influence of external factors. The Department Chair as Academic Leader is a completely updated revision of Allan Tucker's seminal contribution, Chairing the Academic Department, last published in 1992. This work reflects the approach used in the ACE Workshops for Division and Department Chairs and Deans. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction
Acknowledgments
Roles and Responsibilities: Past, Present, and Future
The Academic Department: A New Geography
Roles and Responsibilities of Department Chairs
The Department and its People
The Chair and Department Members
Recruiting the Department's Constituents
Faculty Work and Workload
Developing and Evaluating Department Members
The Department and its Operations
The Department as a Collectivity
Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Student Advising
Resource Management for Chairs
Strategic Planning in the Department
The Department and the University
The Chair and the Dean
Legal Issues for Chairs
Evaluating the Department
The Chair and External Audiences
Epilogue
Index
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Developing Teaching Style in Adult Education

Book
Heimlich, Joe E., and Emmalou Norland
1994
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5251.H383 1994
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Presenting numerous activities--for both individuals and groups--designed to foster self-knowledge and growth in teaching, the authors examine the primary elements of the teaching-learning exchange. Valuable special resources, including scales for measuring beliefs and values about teaching describes individual teaching styles. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Presenting numerous activities--for both individuals and groups--designed to foster self-knowledge and growth in teaching, the authors examine the primary elements of the teaching-learning exchange. Valuable special resources, including scales for measuring beliefs and values about teaching describes individual teaching styles. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The Authors

Pt. 1 Exploring the Personal Side of Teaching
ch. 1 Relating Personal Growth and Teaching Style
ch. 2 Understanding Basic Concepts of Teaching and Learning
ch. 3 Analyzing the Instructional Process

Pt. 2 Reflecting on the Teaching and Learning Exchange
ch. 4 Content
ch. 5 Environment
ch. 6 The Teacher
ch. 7 The Learning Community
ch. 8 The Learner

Pt. 3 Integrating Teaching Concepts with Teaching Style
ch. 9 Matching Methods to Teaching Style
ch. 10 Developing a Personal Style

Resource A. The Van Tilburg/Heimlich Teaching Beliefs Scale
Resource B. The Norland/Heimlich Teaching Values Scale
Resource C. Focusing on Culture as a Characteristic of Learners
Resource D. Representative Teaching Methods and Techniques
References

Index
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Making Teaching Community Property: A Menu for Peer Collaboration and Peer Review

Book
Hutchings, Pat
1996
American Association for Higher Education, Washington, D.C.
LB1778.2.H87 1996
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Describes strategies through which faculty can document and "go public" with their teaching - be it for purposes of improvement or evaluation. Each of nine chapters features a different strategy - from the fairly simple, low-risk "teaching circle," to "course portfolios," to more formal departmental occasions such as faculty hiring - with reports by faculty who have actually tried each strategy, guidelines for good practice, and an annotated list of ...
Additional Info:
Describes strategies through which faculty can document and "go public" with their teaching - be it for purposes of improvement or evaluation. Each of nine chapters features a different strategy - from the fairly simple, low-risk "teaching circle," to "course portfolios," to more formal departmental occasions such as faculty hiring - with reports by faculty who have actually tried each strategy, guidelines for good practice, and an annotated list of resources. Offers lessons campuses can use to create more effective systems for the formal evaluation and reward of teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface by Russell Edgerton
Introduction

ch. 1 Teaching Circles: Starting the Conversation; Setting a Scholarly Tone Teaching Circles in the History Department at Kent State University by John Jameson; Fostering Collective Responsibility for Student Learning Teaching Seminars in the University of North Carolina at Charlotte Mathematics Department by Charles Burnap and Miriam Leiva; Learning Together An Online Faculty Conversation About Online Student Conversation at Rio Hondo College by Susan Obler

ch. 2 Reciprocal Visits and Observations: Opening the Classroom Door; Reciprocal Classroom Visits An Experiment in the Temple University History Department by William Cutler and Howard Spodek; The Teacher Observation/Peer Support (TOPS) Program at California State University-Dominguez Hills by Kathleen McEnerney and Jamie L. Webb; The Featured Faculty Program at Eastern Michigan University byDeborah DeZure

ch. 3 Mentoring: Teachers Teaching Other Teachers; A New Faculty Mentoring Program in the Stanford English Department byDavid Halliburton;The Faculty Tutorial Program at Saint Olaf College by Jonathan Hill; The Issue of Supply Fostering Senior Faculty Leadership at The College of Saint Catherine by Marilou Eldred

ch. 4 A Focus on Student Learning; Interviewing Each Other's Students in the Legal Studies Program at the University of Georgia by Peter Shedd; Classroom Assessment as a Context for Faculty Conversation and Collaboration at California State University-Long Beach by Susan Nummedal; Making Students More Active Agents in Their Learning TQM in the Syracuse University School of Business by Frances Zollers

ch. 5 Portfolios: Putting the Pieces Together; Inventing a New Genre The Course Portfolio at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse by William Cerbin; Developing a Course Portfolio in Math A Report From the University of Nebraska-Lincoln by Steve Dunbar

ch. 6 Team Teaching and Teaching Teams; Teaching Teams in the Math Department at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln by Steve Dunbar; A Team Approach to Course Design and Teaching in an Integrated Arts and Humanities Course at Alverno College by Kevin Casey; Coordinated Studies A Model for Faculty Collaboration and Team Teaching in a Consortium of Washington Campuses by Jean MacGregor; Team Teaching About Teaching the Disciplines The Pedagogy Seminar at Millersville University by Barbara Stengel

ch. 7 Collaborative Inquiry and Pedagogical Scholarship; Collaborative Inquiry in the Teaching of Writing Theory and Practice at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln by Joy Ritchie; Collaborative Inquiry in an Early Childhood Education Course at the University of Wyoming by Jane Nelson; A Collaborative, Comparative Study of Student Learning in Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison by John Wright

ch. 8 Departmental Occasions for Collaboration; The Pedagogical Colloquium Focusing on Teaching in the Hiring Process in the Stanford University History Department by Richard Roberts; A Professional Development Program for Graduate Students Fostering Collaboration in the Writing Program at Northern Arizona University by Geoffrey Chase; The Departmental Teaching Library A Mathematics Course File at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte by Charles Burnap

ch. 9 Intercampus Collaboration and external Review of Teaching External Peer Review of Teaching A New Effort in the Chemistry Department at IUPUI by David Malik; Piloting Long Distance Interviews With Students as a Potential Component of the External Peer Review of Teaching by Jere Morehead

Conclusion: From Peer Collaboration to Peer Review
About the AAHE Teaching Initiative
About the AAHE’s Peer Review of Teaching Project
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Handbook for Associate Instructors

Book
Indiana University, Bloomington
1996
Indiana University Press, Bloomington, IN
LB1778.I52 1996
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
"This handbook provides essential information on regulations and procedures. It is a compilation of policy and procedure statements from a variety of the Department, College of Arts and Science, and the University Graduate School documents. It is intended as a guide to fulfilling the responsibilities associated with an appointment as an Associate Instructure"
Additional Info:
"This handbook provides essential information on regulations and procedures. It is a compilation of policy and procedure statements from a variety of the Department, College of Arts and Science, and the University Graduate School documents. It is intended as a guide to fulfilling the responsibilities associated with an appointment as an Associate Instructure"

Table Of Content:
1 Associate Instructor as Teacher
1 Preparing to Teach
2 Your Own Class
4 A Section of a Larger Class
5 The Syllabus
6 Class Rolls and Grade Books
6 Course Packets and Readers
7 Classrooms
7 Office Hours
9 Ideas for Teaching
9 Choosing an Instructional Style
11 First Class Survival Tips
12 Skills of a Good Teacher
12 Show You Care
14 Keep Students Engaged
16 Communication Checklist
20 Using Instructional Media
25 Discussion Sections
25 Preparing for Discussions
27 Facilitating Discussions
28 Problems With Discussions
30 Laboratory Sections
30 Preparing Lab Sections
31 Managing Lab Sections
31 Safety Procedures
31 Student Preparation
32 Supervising the Experiment
32 Refrain from giving outright answers
33 Lecturing
33 Preparing Lectures
36 Questioning in the Classroom
37 Rewarding Student Participation and Providing Feedback
38 Teaching Outside the Field of Specialty
39 Evaluation of Student Performance
39 Determining Evaluative Criteria
40 Test Construction
42 Constructing Writing Assignments
43 Responding to Student Writing
45 Grading
46 Recording and Distribution of Grades
46 Complaints about Grades
47 The University Grading System
48 Evaluation of Instruction
48 Teacher-Course Evaluation Options for AIs
50 Ethics and the Associate Instructor
50 Academic Integrity
50 Academic Misconduct
52 Privacy of Student Records
52 Letters of Recommendation
53 Sexual Harassment
54 Assisting Emotionally Troubled Students
54 Assisting Students with Disabilities
54 Diversity
54 Accomodating Religious Holidays
55 Teachings with Student Diversity in Mind
59 Cultural Differences for International AIs
60 What Help is Available for New Instructors?
61 Sources
62 Bibliography on College Teaching
64 References
Appendix: Instructor's Guide to Student Services
Cover image

Turning Professors into Teachers: A New Approach to Faculty Development and Student Learning

Book
Katz, Joseph and Mildred Henry
1998
Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LB2331.K325 1993
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A really thoughtful and skillful examination (based on two research projects conducted between 1978 and 1987 which involved fifteen institutions) of the ways in which faculty and students think and learn, offering a concept of undergraduate teaching as a lifelong art that involves the continuous interaction of professors and students. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A really thoughtful and skillful examination (based on two research projects conducted between 1978 and 1987 which involved fifteen institutions) of the ways in which faculty and students think and learn, offering a concept of undergraduate teaching as a lifelong art that involves the continuous interaction of professors and students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Conditions of a New Pedagogy for Undergraduate Learning
An inquiry-oriented approach to faculty development and student learning
Thinking styles in the disciplines and in student learning
Promoting student learning
Three professors report about observing their teaching and their students' learning
Tools for understanding students - the Omnibus personality inventory
Tools for understanding students - the interview
Interviews about teaching and student learning with a biologist and a political scientist
Reenvisioning undergraduate teaching
References
Index
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Leading from the Center: The Emerging Role of the Chief Academic Officer in Theological Schools

Book
McLean, Jeanne P.
1999
Scholars Press, Atlanta, GA
BV4166.M35 1999
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Presents the results of a research study which surveyed the state of the deans of 75 percent of North American theological schools. The study profiles, who the deans are the types of work that they due, and their role in the administration and governance of schools. Reasons for high turnover are explored and recommendations are made to help schools encourage and develop leadership qualities in academic deans. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Presents the results of a research study which surveyed the state of the deans of 75 percent of North American theological schools. The study profiles, who the deans are the types of work that they due, and their role in the administration and governance of schools. Reasons for high turnover are explored and recommendations are made to help schools encourage and develop leadership qualities in academic deans. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part One: Roles, Responsibilities, and Relationships
ch. 1 The Nature and Scope of the Dean's Work
ch. 2 Managerial and Leadership Roles
ch. 3 The Dean-President Relationship
ch. 4 The Dean-Faculty Relationship
ch. 5 The Dean's Work with Senior Administrators, Boards, and Church Leaders

Part Two: Administration as a Vocation
ch. 6 Recruitment and Hiring of Chief Academic Officers
ch. 7 Evaluation and Professional Development
ch. 8 Academic Leadership: The Challenges Ahead

Afterword Advice to Prospective Deans
Appendices
Acknowledgements
Index
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Academic Leadership: A Study of Chief Academic Officers in Theological Schools

Book
McLean, Jeanne P.
1998
St. Paul Seminary, St. Paul, MN
BV4166.5.A28 1998
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The monographs collected in this volume are based on research into the role of chief academic officers in North American theological schools. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The monographs collected in this volume are based on research into the role of chief academic officers in North American theological schools. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Leading from the center : the role of the chief academic officer / by Jeanne P. McLean
ch. 2 Challenges of academic administration : rewards and stresses in the role of the chief academic officer / by Karen M. Ristau
ch. 3 Career paths and hiring practices of chief academic officers in theological schools / by Mary Abdul-Rahman
ch. 4 Professional development for chief academic officers / by Jeanne P. McLean
ch. 5 Dean-faculty relationships / by Jeanne P. McLean with Nicholas Cafarelli
Additional Info:
Each year, hundreds of academics begin new faculty appointments. Some are just launching new careers, while others are advancing to new campuses. As faculty members and their institutions struggle to ease the passage to a new environment, they are faced with critical questions. What are the challenges of the transition process? And how does that process differ for first-time faculty and seasoned faculty?

Drawing on a study conducted ...
Additional Info:
Each year, hundreds of academics begin new faculty appointments. Some are just launching new careers, while others are advancing to new campuses. As faculty members and their institutions struggle to ease the passage to a new environment, they are faced with critical questions. What are the challenges of the transition process? And how does that process differ for first-time faculty and seasoned faculty?

Drawing on a study conducted by researchers at the National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, Faculty in New Jobs shows how faculty and institutions can work together to ease the transition to a new job and facilitate the process of mastering academic work. Robert Menges and his associates offer practical, real-world advice covering all phases of the faculty career--from the difficult early process of settling in, to becoming socially and academically established, to ultimately building the institutional supports necessary for a successful career.

The authors provide newcomers with valuable strategies for adapting to campus culture, building professional relationships, establishing a teaching style, and successfully juggling the diverse responsibilities of the faculty role. They also explain what institutions can do to select, support, and evaluate faculty more effectively. They describe the institutional climate that supports effective faculty transitions into and out of academia. They discuss what administrators can do to help faculty better understand and participate in the institutional culture, while also challenging and changing it in positive ways. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Contributors
ch. 1 Being a Newcomer
ch. 2 Dilemmas of Newly Hired Faculty
ch. 3 New Faculty Talk About Stress
ch. 4 Experiences of Women, Experiences of Men
ch. 5 Perspectives from Faculty of Color
ch. 6 Mentoring and Collegiality
ch. 7 Learning What Students Understand
ch. 8 Seeking and Using Feedback
ch. 9 Feeling in Control
ch. 10 Faculty Well-Being and Vitality
ch. 11 How Disciplinary Consensus Affects Faculty
ch. 12 Establishing a Teaching Development Culture
ch. 13 Learning from Leavers
ch. 14 Accountability for Faculty Welfare
Index
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Demystifying The Profession: Helping Junior Faculty Succeed

Book
Moody, Joann
1997
University of New Haven Press, West Haven, CT
LB2331.7.M653 1997
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The aims of this publication are:

- Demystify certain parts of the academic careers that typically bewilder or confuse junior faculty as well as graduate students considering such careers

- Coach junior and future faculty in concrete ways so they can increase their likelihood of success in and enjoying of the profession

- Spotlight and tell the truth about the special burdens and 'taxes' ...
Additional Info:
The aims of this publication are:

- Demystify certain parts of the academic careers that typically bewilder or confuse junior faculty as well as graduate students considering such careers

- Coach junior and future faculty in concrete ways so they can increase their likelihood of success in and enjoying of the profession

- Spotlight and tell the truth about the special burdens and 'taxes' imposed on non-majority faculty in majority settings (the burdens and taxes are usually related to perceived differences because of the non-majority person's gender, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual preference, and/or social class)

- Prompt senior faculty, department chairs, deans, provosts, and campus vice presidents and presidents so they better understand the stresses and confusions experienced by majority and non-majority junior faculty; and then, based on that understanding, they take pro-active steps to reduce barriers for newcomers and clue them in to implicit agendas and expectations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
From the Publisher
Practical, evidence-based tips for balancing teaching, scholarly writing, and service (and a life!) Research on the effects of mentoring is presented. In addition, it presents results of a study on classroom incivilities and ways in which new faculty members minimize their occurence.
Additional Info:
This book is an attempt to take an overview of reflection, both in terms of the literature, the common meaning of reflection and, in particular, in terms of its value in practical ways of improving learning and professional practice. The existence of an enormous gap in the literature between an identification of the nature of reflection and the processes of learning means that the many applications of reflection in educational ...
Additional Info:
This book is an attempt to take an overview of reflection, both in terms of the literature, the common meaning of reflection and, in particular, in terms of its value in practical ways of improving learning and professional practice. The existence of an enormous gap in the literature between an identification of the nature of reflection and the processes of learning means that the many applications of reflection in educational and professional situations are guided by assumption or guesswork. The book begins by addressing this issue. In doing so, the authors do not attempt to pull the ideas in the literature into one precise definition. They establish boundaries that can be placed around the term to provide it with greater coherency. The book concludes with the practical use of reflection to improve learning and practice. The author considers the conditions of the learning environment which encourage reflection and presents two case studies in professional development and practice where deliberate and carefully designed exercise of reflection contributed to the greater impact of short courses and to effective decision making. The book includes practical activities and exercises which encourage learners to reflect on their learning or practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Pt. I The literature of reflection
ch. 1 Some background to the study of reflection
ch. 2 The 'backbone philosophies' of reflection - Dewey and Habermas
ch. 3 Reflection in experiential learning
ch. 4 Reflection in professional practice - the work of Donald Schon
ch. 5 Reflective practice in the professions - a theoretical stance
ch. 6 Reflective practice in the professions - a practical stance
ch. 7 The role of reflection in counseling, therapy and personal development

Pt. II Reflection and learning
ch. 8 Taking stock of reflection
ch. 9 Reflection in learning - some fundamentals of learning, part 1
ch. 10 Reflection in learning - some fundamentals of learning, part 2
ch. 11 Reflection in learning - mapping learning
ch. 12 The place of reflection in learning

Pt. III Using reflection to improve learning and practice
ch. 13 The conditions for reflection
ch. 14 Reflection in professional situations - two case studies
ch. 15 Learning through reflection - the use of learning journals
ch. 16 Learning through reflection - more ways and means

References
Index
Additional Info:
Changing Practices in Evaluation Teaching offers university and college administrators and faculty the kind of research-based and ready-to-use information required to foster truly effective and equitable teaching evaluation at their institutions.

Seldin shares his years of extensive research on this topic, uniquely examining the transformation of evaluation trends over the past two decades, while pointing out the implications for the future. He and his noteworthy contributors not only ...
Additional Info:
Changing Practices in Evaluation Teaching offers university and college administrators and faculty the kind of research-based and ready-to-use information required to foster truly effective and equitable teaching evaluation at their institutions.

Seldin shares his years of extensive research on this topic, uniquely examining the transformation of evaluation trends over the past two decades, while pointing out the implications for the future. He and his noteworthy contributors not only cite the compelling reasons why colleges and universities must institute fair teaching evaluation systems, they also show readers how to do so.

A complete guidebook, this volume offers a wide array of forms, case studies, web sites, tables, and examples. It is written for presidents, provosts, academic vice presidents, deans, department chairs, instructional development specialists, and faculty—the essential partners in improving teaching evaluation systems. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Current practices—good and bad—nationally by Peter Seldin, Pace University
ch. 2 Student ratings of professors: Uses and misuses by William E. Cashin, Kansas State University
ch. 3 Using feedback to improve teaching by Michele Marincovich, Stanford University
ch. 4 Evaluating teaching through peer classroom observation by Deborah DeZure, Eastern Michigan University
ch. 5 Self-evaluation: What works? What doesn’t? by Peter Seldin, Pace University
ch. 6 Post-tenure review: Evaluating teaching by Joseph C. Morreale, Pace University
ch. 7 Evaluating teaching through electronic classroom assessment by Devorah A. Lieberman, Portland State University
ch. 8 Using the World Wide Web to improve the evaluation of teaching by Clement A. Seldin, University of Massachusetts
ch. 9 Evaluating teaching through portfolios by John Zubizarreta, Columbia College
ch. 10 Administrative courage to evaluate the complexities of teaching by Joan DeGuire North, University of Wisconsin
ch. 11 Building a climate conducive to effective teaching evaluation by Mary Lou Higgerson, Southern Illinois University
ch. 12 Building successful teaching evaluation programs by Peter Seldin, Pace University
ch. 13 Summary and recommendations for evaluating teaching by Peter Seldin, Pace University
Cover image
Wabash tree

Improving College Teaching

Book
Seldin, Peter
1995
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2331.S432 1995
Topics: General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This book provides practical, ready-to-use, research-based information about specific strategies and state-of-the-art techniques to improve college teaching. Through its nineteen chapters written by renowned faculty developers, the book offers a wide range of topics and ideas for thought and implementation. The chapters present programs that develop such necessary new skills as different teaching approaches needed for different kinds of students; use of current educational technology; evaluating one’s own teaching ...
Additional Info:
This book provides practical, ready-to-use, research-based information about specific strategies and state-of-the-art techniques to improve college teaching. Through its nineteen chapters written by renowned faculty developers, the book offers a wide range of topics and ideas for thought and implementation. The chapters present programs that develop such necessary new skills as different teaching approaches needed for different kinds of students; use of current educational technology; evaluating one’s own teaching and helping others to evaluate theirs; and providing feedback on teaching.

Improving College Teaching is an ideal resource for presidents, provost, academic vice presidents, deans, department chairs, instructional development specialists, and faculty—the essential partners in evaluating and improving college teaching. It will also be helpful to students of higher education, whether they are planning careers as academic administrators or faculty. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Crucial new roles for administrators
ch. 2 Motivating faculty
ch. 3 Effective TA training
ch. 4 Starting a university teaching center
ch. 5 Low-cost/no-cost instructional development activities
ch. 6 Instructional development in community colleges
ch. 7 Mentoring programs
ch. 8 Peer classroom observations
ch. 9 Using teaching portfolios
ch. 10 Developing student portfolios
ch. 11 Evaluating your own teaching
ch. 12 Faculty collaboration
ch. 13 Distance education
ch. 14 Teaching adult learners
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Teaching Portfolio: A Practical Guide to Improved Performance and Promotion/Tenure Decisions, 2nd ed.

Book
Seldin, Peter
1997
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2333.S46 1997
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This book examines the teaching portfolio approach to evaluating classroom performance of college instructors. It notes that an estimated 1,000 colleges and universities in the United States are now using or experimenting with portfolios, and that this approach, called a "teaching dossier" has been in use in Canada for 20 years. Key issues, warnings, and benchmarks for success of the portfolio approach are identified. The book distinguishes between the composition and use ...
Additional Info:
This book examines the teaching portfolio approach to evaluating classroom performance of college instructors. It notes that an estimated 1,000 colleges and universities in the United States are now using or experimenting with portfolios, and that this approach, called a "teaching dossier" has been in use in Canada for 20 years. Key issues, warnings, and benchmarks for success of the portfolio approach are identified. The book distinguishes between the composition and use of portfolios for personnel decisions and for teaching improvement. A detailed plan for institutional implementation is given and there is discussion of how different institutions use portfolios with lists of possible portfolio items. A detailed guide for faculty use in compiling and updating portfolios includes annotations and descriptions of each component. There is a discussion of the use and presentation of electronically augmented teaching portfolios, including the advantages and disadvantages of this format which may include electronic mail, animations, simulations, or videoclips using various media including sources from the Internet and media such as CD ROM. Discussion of the personal use of a portfolio to gain feedback shows how it can be used to improve individual teaching performance. Included are 23 actual teaching portfolios from various disciplines at 14 institutions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
About the Contributors
Preface
Part I The Teaching Portfolio: Purpose, Process, and Product
ch. 1 The Teaching Portfolio
ch. 2 Preparing the Teaching Portfolio
ch. 3 Choosing Items for the Teaching Portfolio
ch. 4 Using the Teaching Portfolio
ch. 5 Answers to Common Questions About the Teaching Portfolio
Part II Electronic Teaching Portfolios
ch. 6 Making Good Work Public Through Electronic Teaching Portfolios
Part III How Portfolios Are Used in Seven Institutions
ch. 7 The Teaching Portfolio Program at Drexel University
ch. 8 Using Multiple Pathways to Foster Portfolio Development at Miami University of Ohio
ch. 9 Developing and Implementing the Teaching Portfolio at Oxford College of Emory University
ch. 10 Teaching Portfolios at Pace University: A Culture in Transition
ch. 11 The Teaching Portfolio at Rutgers University
ch. 12 Teaching Portfolios at Texas A&M University: Reflections on a Decade of Practice
ch. 13 Teaching Portfolios at the University of Evansville
Part IV Keeping the Portfolio Current
ch. 14 Strategies for Updating and Improving the Teaching Portfolio
ch. 15 Key Points on Teaching Portfolio Revisions and Updates
Part V Sample Portfolios From Across Disciplines
Accounting
ch. 16 Joseph G. Donelan, University of West Florida
Bioscience and Biotechnology
ch. 17 Shivanthi Anandan, Drexel University
Communication Studies/Communication Sciences and Disorders
ch. 18 Abbey L. Berg, Pace University
ch. 19 Kathleen A. McDonough, State University of New York College at Fredonia
Classical Languages and Literature
ch. 20 Bridget Thomas, Truman State University
Design, Merchandising, and Textiles
ch. 21 Sally L. Fortenberry, Texas Christian University
Education
ch. 22 Amy E. Seldin, Westfield State College
ch. 23 Clement A. Seldin, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
English
ch. 24 Mary Barrows, Barton County Community College
ch. 25 Jane Collins, Pace University
ch. 26 Saundra K. Liggins, State University of New York College at Fredonia
ch. 27 Alan Shepard, University of Guelph
Geology
ch. 28 Stephen W. Henderson, Oxford College of Emory University
Instructional and Performance Technology
ch. 29 Karen L. Rasmussen, University of West Florida
Mathematics
ch. 30 William J. Robinson, Barton County Community College
ch. 31 Janet Liou-Mark, New York City College of Technology
Music
ch. 32 Kay L. Edwards, Miami University
Nursing
ch. 33 Kathryn A. Ballou, University of Missouri, Kansas City
Physics
ch. 34 Curtis C. Bradley, Texas Christian University
Religion
ch. 35 Barbara A. B. Patterson, Emory University
Sociology
ch. 36 Arthur B. Shostak, Drexel University
Theatre Arts
ch. 37 Margaret Mitchell, University of the Incarnate Word
Bibliography
Index
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The Next Generation: Preparing Graduate Students for the Professional Responsibilities of College Teachers

Book
Slevin, James F.
1992
Association of American Colleges
LB2331.S53 1992
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This monograph presents results and recommendations from a project designed as a collaborative effort to prepare graduate students in the humanities for careers as scholar-teachers within institutions committed to liberal education. The project's two principle activities are discussed under the following headings: (1) Encountering Campus Cultures: Discovering the Responsibilities of College Teachers; and (2) Seminars: Reflecting on the Responsibilities of College Teachers. The first of these activities involved the Teaching Fellows in ...
Additional Info:
This monograph presents results and recommendations from a project designed as a collaborative effort to prepare graduate students in the humanities for careers as scholar-teachers within institutions committed to liberal education. The project's two principle activities are discussed under the following headings: (1) Encountering Campus Cultures: Discovering the Responsibilities of College Teachers; and (2) Seminars: Reflecting on the Responsibilities of College Teachers. The first of these activities involved the Teaching Fellows in campus visits during which they attended department and faculty meetings, observed and sometimes taught classes, and met with individual faculty members who assumed mentoring roles and with whom every aspect of the campus, cultural, career and professional life of the college teacher could be explored. The second activity provides the Teaching Fellows with an opportunity to reflect on what they learned at the colleges and involves two kinds of seminar: (1) the core seminar, which brings the experience of contact/encounter into the structure of graduate training; and (2) the disciplinary seminar, which focuses on the connection between scholarly work and teaching, helps prepare the graduate students within their disciplines, and serves as a means of reimagining and restructuring the graduate programs themselves. Findings show that doctoral students, if given the chance, are eager to engage in the work of academic leadership, even at the beginning of their careers and that a major factor in enhancing their willingness to assume an active role is their encounters with college faculty members. Several recommendations are offered and discussed for future consideration. These are: (1) that coalitions should be built to promote reform; (2) that graduate training must include preparation for the full range of professional responsibilities, especially teaching; (3) that support and incentives should be built for participation of graduate educators in these reform efforts; and (4) that alternative, especially collaborative, models should be developed for improving graduate preparation. (From the Publisher)
Cover image

Developing New and Junior Faculty

Book
Sorcinelli, Mary Deane and Ann E. Austin, eds.
1992
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 50)
LB1778.D46 1992
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This volume offers a practical compendium of advice on how to foster the career development of new and junior faculty. It is organized around three main themes: research findings concerning new and junior faculty, model programs and strategies to support faculty development, and organizational factors that affect both the success of the strategies and the experiences of new and junior faculty. Whether readers are junior faculty, senior colleagues, faculty developers, ...
Additional Info:
This volume offers a practical compendium of advice on how to foster the career development of new and junior faculty. It is organized around three main themes: research findings concerning new and junior faculty, model programs and strategies to support faculty development, and organizational factors that affect both the success of the strategies and the experiences of new and junior faculty. Whether readers are junior faculty, senior colleagues, faculty developers, or academic administrators, all can learn how to create more supportive and stimulating environments for the newest members of their academic communities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes (Ann E. Austin)
ch. 1 New and Junior Faculty: A Review of the Literature (M.J. Finkelstein, N.W. LaCelle-Peterson)
ch. 2 The Pretenure Years: A Longitudinal Perspective (D. Olsen, M.D. Sorcinelli)
ch. 3 New and Junior Faculty Stress: Research and Responses (M.D. Sorcinelli)
ch. 4 Orientation Programs for New Faculty (D. Fink)
ch. 5 Lessons Learned About Mentoring (R. Boice)
ch. 6 Improving Junior Faculty Scholarship (D.K. Jarvis)
ch. 7 Supporting Junior Faculty Through a Teaching Fellows Program (A.E. Austin)
ch. 8 The Role of the Chairperson in Support of Junior Faculty (D.W. Wheeler)
Summary and Further Reflections
Index
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Enhancing Student Learning: Setting the Campus Context

Book
Stage, Frances K., Watson, Lemuel W. and Terrell, Melvin
1999
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LB2343.4.E54 1999
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In this important volume, the authors focus on the connections between academic learning and student affairs. Beginning with the premise that academic learning is a critical part of the overall personal development of each student, the authors show how student affairs professionals can work in harmony with their academic colleagues to create a campus milieu that is truly conducive to that development. Such a milieu would offer a rich array ...
Additional Info:
In this important volume, the authors focus on the connections between academic learning and student affairs. Beginning with the premise that academic learning is a critical part of the overall personal development of each student, the authors show how student affairs professionals can work in harmony with their academic colleagues to create a campus milieu that is truly conducive to that development. Such a milieu would offer a rich array of social, athletic, academic, and artistic events, all of which would enrich, enhance, and give deeper meaning to the learning that occurs in the classroom. With its emphasis upon partnership building and interdisciplinary collaboration, this work will be extremely useful to student affairs professionals, college administrators, and faculty members as they work together to design courses and programs that will optimize student learning. Co-published with American College Personnel Association. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Enhancing Student Learning

ch. 1 A Framework to Enhance Student Learning
ch. 2 Theories of Learning for College Students
ch. 3 Cultural Differences in Student Learning and Development
ch. 4 Learning and Development from Theory to Practice
ch. 5 Student Affairs and Learning in the Community College
ch. 6 Service-Learning: Exemplifying the Connections between Theory and Practice
ch. 7 Assessing Student Learning
ch. 8 Setting a New Context for Student Learning

About the Contributors
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The Ethics of Teaching, 3rd ed.

Book
Strike, Kenneth and Jonas F. Soltis
1998
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LB1779.S73 1998
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Written in a style that speaks directly to today's teacher, The Ethics of Teaching, Third Edition uses realistic case studies of day-to-day ethical dilemmas. The book covers such topics as punishment and due process, intellectual freedom, equal treatment of students, multiculturalism, religious differences, democracy, teacher burnout, professional conduct, parental rights and child abuse/neglect. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Written in a style that speaks directly to today's teacher, The Ethics of Teaching, Third Edition uses realistic case studies of day-to-day ethical dilemmas. The book covers such topics as punishment and due process, intellectual freedom, equal treatment of students, multiculturalism, religious differences, democracy, teacher burnout, professional conduct, parental rights and child abuse/neglect. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 What this book is about
ch. 2 Punishment and due process
ch. 3 Intellectual freedom
ch. 4 Equal treatment of students
ch. 5 Dealing with diversity : multiculturalism and religion
ch. 6 Democracy, professionalism, and teaching with integrity
ch. 7 Conclusions and postscript
ch. 8 Supplemental case studies
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Motivation from Within: Approaches for Encouraging Faculty and Students to Excel

Book
Theall, Michael, ed.
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1025.2.M68 1999
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Motivation is not something one "does to" someone else--good motivational practice requires that we engage others in a common quest. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Motivation is not something one "does to" someone else--good motivational practice requires that we engage others in a common quest. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Motivation and Diversity
Motivation and Diversity: A Framework for Teaching.
Student Motivation and Epistemological Beliefs (Michael B. Paulsen & Kenneth A. Feldman).
Motivation for Higher-Order Learning (Janet G. Donald).

Motivation and Methods
Using the ARCS Motivational Process in Computer-Based Instruction and Distance Education (John M. Keller).
CORE Elements of Student Motivation in Problem-Based Learning (Marjorie M. MacKinnon).
The Motivational Benefits of Cooperative Learning (Theodore Panitz)

Motivation and The Institution
Faculty Motivation: The Role of Supportive Teaching Culture (Kenneth A. Feldman & Michael B. Paulsen).
Motivation in Interdisciplinary Programs (Edward B. Nuhfer).
Institutional Improvement and Motivated Faculty: A Case Study (Donald W. Farmer).

Conclusion
What Have We Learned? A Synthesis and Some Guidelines for Effective Motivation in Higher Education (Michael Theall & Jennifer Franklin)
Cover image

The Study of Chief Academic Officers in Theological Schools: Reflections on Academic Leadership (pdf)

Journal Issue
1996
Theological Education 33, supp. (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T48v.33suppl.
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1996-theological-education-v33-sup.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1996-theological-education-v33-sup.pdf

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Jeanne P. McLean)
Academic Leadership: Roles, Issues, and Challenges (Jane I. Smith)
A New Dean Meets a New Day in Theological Education (James Hudnut-Beumler)
The Once and Future Dean: Reflections on Being a Chief Academic Officer (Elizabeth C. Nordbeck)
To a Candidate for Academic Leadership: A Letter (Russell E. Richey)
Of Force Fields and Aspirations: Being an Academic Dean in the Nineteen-Nineties (Brian O. McDermott, S.J.)
Academic Administration as an Inner Journey (Gordon T. Smith)
Developing the Community of Scholars (James L. Waits)
Cover image

The Study of the Seminary Presidency in Catholic Theological Seminaries (pdf)

Journal Issue
1995
Theological Education 32, supp. (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T48v.32suppl.
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1995-theological-education-v32-sup1.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1995-theological-education-v32-sup1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Neely Dixon McCarter)
Leadership in the American Diocesan Seminary: Context, Institutions, and Personalities—1791 to 1965 (Joseph M. White)
The Effects of Institutional Change on the Office of Rector and President in the Catholic Theological Seminaries—1965 to 1994 (Robert J. Wister)
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The Study of the Seminary Presidency in Protestant Theological Seminaries (pdf)

Journal Issue
Waits, James L., Neely Dixon McCarter, Nancy Merrill eds.
1995
Theological Education 32, supp. II (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T48v.32suppl.
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1995-theological-education-v32-sup2.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1995-theological-education-v32-sup2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Neely Dixon McCarter)
Preface
The Office of President
Presidents and Finances
The President as Administrator
Relationships: Boards, Faculties, Staffs, Students, and Constituencies Presidential Profiles
Controversies
“Lord High Everything Else”: The Many Functions of the Seminary President
Concluding Remarks
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The Study of the Seminary Presidency: Reflections of Seminary Leaders (pdf)

Journal Issue
1996
Theological Education 32, supp. III (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T48v.32suppl.
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1996-theological-education-v32-sup3.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1996-theological-education-v32-sup3.pdf

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Neely Dixon McCarter)
Work and Calling: An Interpretation of Presidents' Reflections on the Nature of Their Office (Malcolm L. Warford)
Toward Understanding the Seminary Presidency: Reflections of One President (Robert E. Cooley)
The Presidency in a Union School (Vincent Cushing)
Reflections on Fourteen Years as a Seminary President (James C. Fenhagen)
Reflections of a Pastor/President (Douglas W. Oldenburg)
The President as Pilgrim (Donald W. Shriver, Jr.)
On Becoming a Seminary President: Reflections on My Early Years at Hartford Seminary (Barbara Brown Zikmund)
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Improving College Teaching: Strategies for Developing Instructional Effectiveness

Book
Weimer, Maryellen
1990
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.W37
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This book shows college administrators, deans, department heads, and faculty development professionals how to improve the instructional performance of faculty members. It offers strategies for overcoming resistance and motivating faculty members to improve their teaching--and identifies the resources, activities, and services that will help them to succeed. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book shows college administrators, deans, department heads, and faculty development professionals how to improve the instructional performance of faculty members. It offers strategies for overcoming resistance and motivating faculty members to improve their teaching--and identifies the resources, activities, and services that will help them to succeed. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part One: Removing Barriers to Teaching Improvement
ch. 1. What Makes the Improvement of College Teaching Difficult?
ch. 2. Overcoming Faculty Resistance and Encouraging Participation
ch. 3. Improving Teaching: A Five-Step Process
Part Two: Key Elements of Successful Instructional Development
ch. 4. Ongoing Assessment and Feedback
ch. 5. A Flexible Mix of Improvement Activities
ch. 6. Colleagues Assisting Colleagues
ch. 7. Supportive Academic Leaders
Part Three: Institutional Options for Improving College Teaching
ch. 8. Organizational and Administrative Approaches
ch. 9. Profiles of Teaching Improvement Programs
ch. 10. Closing Advice on Improving College Teaching
Resources: A. How Do You Teach? A Checklist for Developing Instructional
Awareness B. Guidelines for Classroom Observation
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Teaching Improvement Practices: Successful Strategies for Higher Education

Book
Wright, W. Alan; and Wright, Alan W.
1995
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2331.W65 1995
Topics: General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This volume contains 15 papers on strategies for improving teaching in higher education with a focus on perceptions of current practices particularly in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, and Canada. The papers are: "Teaching Improvement Practices: International Perspectives" (W. Alan Wright and M. Carol O'Neil); "Understanding Student Learning: Implications for Instructional Practice" (Christopher K. Knapper); "Increasing Faculty Understanding of Teaching" (Keith Trigwell); "Preparing Faculty as Tutors in Problem-Based Learning" (...
Additional Info:
This volume contains 15 papers on strategies for improving teaching in higher education with a focus on perceptions of current practices particularly in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, and Canada. The papers are: "Teaching Improvement Practices: International Perspectives" (W. Alan Wright and M. Carol O'Neil); "Understanding Student Learning: Implications for Instructional Practice" (Christopher K. Knapper); "Increasing Faculty Understanding of Teaching" (Keith Trigwell); "Preparing Faculty as Tutors in Problem-Based Learning" (David Kaufman); "Introducing Faculty to Cooperative Learning" (Barbara J. Millis); "Improving Laboratory Teaching" (Elizabeth Hazel); "From Shaping Performances to Dynamic Interaction: The Quiet Revolution in Teaching Improvement Programs" (Richard G. Tiberius); "Faculty Development Workshops and Institutes" (James Eison and Ellen Stevens); "Using the Teaching Portfolio to Improve Instruction" (Peter Seldin, and others); "Preparing the Faculty of the Future to Teach" (Laurie Richlin): "The Development of New and Junior Faculty" (Milton D. Cox); "Improving Teaching: Academic Leaders and Faculty Developers as Partners" (Mary Deane Sorcinelli and Norman D. Aitken); "Promoting Inclusiveness in College Teaching" (Nancy Van Note Chism and Anne S. Pruitt); "National-Scale Faculty Development for Teaching Large Classes" (Graham Gibbs); "The Impact of National Developments on the Quality of University Teaching" (George Gordon, Patricia A. Partington). An index is included. (From the Publisher)
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Mentoring Revisited: Making an Impact on Individuals and Institutions

Book
Wunsch, Marie A., ed.
1994
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 57)
LB1731.4.M46 1994
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
If we believe that the welfare of individuals and the organization are one and the same, the points of compatibility and mutual support must be found and nurtured. If we value the "developmental culture" of an academic institution, the concerns of individuals for growth, change, advancement, recognition, and support can be brought into harmony with the goals of the "organizational culture" for stability, continuity, and community. The twenty-first century will ...
Additional Info:
If we believe that the welfare of individuals and the organization are one and the same, the points of compatibility and mutual support must be found and nurtured. If we value the "developmental culture" of an academic institution, the concerns of individuals for growth, change, advancement, recognition, and support can be brought into harmony with the goals of the "organizational culture" for stability, continuity, and community. The twenty-first century will bring new challenges to higher education. Academic institutions must renew their responsibility to support the developmental needs of all their members. This commitment to support human growth is also part of institutional regeneration. An integrated, comprehensive model of personal and organizational development that includes mentoring for students, faculty, staff, and administrators can make a significant contribution to the best use of human resources, community building, and institutional vitality. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes

ch. 1 New Directions for Mentoring: An Organizational Development Perspective (Marie A. Wunsch )
ch. 2 Mentoring: An Adult Developmental Perspective (Mary L. Otto)
ch. 3 Developing Mentoring Programs: Major Themes and Issues (Marie A. Wunsch)
ch. 4 Mentoring Undergraduate Minority Students: An Overview, Survey, and Model Program (Melvin C. Terrell, and R. Kipp Hassel)
ch. 5 Developing a Freshman Mentoring Program: A Small College Experience (Keith B. Wilson)
ch. 6 Enabling the Success of Junior Faculty Women Through Mentoring (Linda K. Johnsrud)
ch. 7 Mentoring New Faculty for Teaching and Research (William K. Jackson, Ronald D. Simpson)
ch. 8 Forging the Ties That Bind: Peer Mentoring Part-Time Faculty (Barbara J. Mills)
ch. 9 Mentoring Faculty at the Departmental Level (Kay U. Herr)
ch. 10 Mentoring Faculty for Midcareer Issues (Daniel W. Wheeler, B.J. Wheeler)
ch. 11 Peer Mentoring Among Graduate Students of Color: Expanding the Mentoring Relationship James Bonilla, Carleton Pickron, Travis Tatum)
ch. 12 Taking a Cultural Journey Through Mentorship: A Personal Story (Virgie O. Chattergy)
ch. 13 Mentoring Minority Graduate Students: A West Indian Narrative (Christine A. Stanley)

Appendix: A Checklist for Developing, Implementing, and Assessing Mentoring Programs
Index
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Teaching Well and Liking It: Motivating Faculty to Teach Effectively

Book
Bess, James L.
1997
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2331.T4246 1997
Topics: General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Any attempt to explain why someone is a good teacher--or is strongly motivated to teach effectively--involves a complex discussion of one of the oldest questions in human history: Why do people do what they do? In Teaching Well and Liking It, a distinguished group of internationally known scholars offers a sophisticated and stimulating look at the issues involved in motivating teachers to teach well in the challenging environment of the ...
Additional Info:
Any attempt to explain why someone is a good teacher--or is strongly motivated to teach effectively--involves a complex discussion of one of the oldest questions in human history: Why do people do what they do? In Teaching Well and Liking It, a distinguished group of internationally known scholars offers a sophisticated and stimulating look at the issues involved in motivating teachers to teach well in the challenging environment of the modern university.

With college and university administrators worried about how to encourage faculty to devote energy to teaching, and students and their parents concerned that faculty are not dedicated to their teaching responsibilities, and faculty themselves feeling guilty and disappointed at their own failure to find satisfaction in teaching, the time is right for a book that explores the factors that inspire, nurture, and reward good teaching. Motivation, as volume editor James L. Bess points out, is a key factor when it comes to commitment, preparation, sustained effort, and performance in any work.

In fact, the effectiveness of any system of higher education is highly contingent on the quality of the teaching enterprise. What is learned, how much is learned, and progress in the psychosocial maturation of the student learner depend on the willingness of college and university faculty to devote long hours to all aspects of teaching. This collection of essays examines personal motivation to teach--both internal and external--as well as organizational conditions such as job characteristics, leadership, and student diversity, and system-wide conditions such as career phases, public policy, politics, and the vagaries of the academicmarketplace. It addresses the issues both theoretically and practically, drawing on the academic and hands-on experience of authors from many fields, including psychology, higher education, business, public policy, and sociology. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Meaning of Human Motivation
ch. 2 Wanting to Be a Good Teacher: What Have We Learned to Date?
ch. 3 Beyond Male Theory: A Feminist Perspective on Teaching Motivation
ch. 4 Self-Determined Teaching: Opportunities and Obstacles
ch. 5 Intrinsic Motivation and Effective Teaching: A Flow Analysis
ch. 6 Behavior Modification in a Loosely Coupled System of Higher Education
ch. 7 Expectancy Theory Approaches to Faculty Motivation
ch. 8 Implications of Goal-Setting Theory for Faculty Motivation
ch. 9 Organizational Cultures and Faculty Motivation
ch. 10 Organization Design and Job Characteristics
ch. 11 Technology and Teaching Motivation
ch. 12 Leadership and Faculty Motivation
ch. 13 Student Diversity: Challenge and Potential for Faculty Motivation
ch. 14 Assessment and Evaluation Techniques
ch. 15 The Influence of Faculty Backgrounds on the Motivation to Teach
ch. 16 Career Phases and Their Effect on Faculty Motivation
ch. 17 The Academic Marketplace and the Motivation to Teach
ch. 18 Public Policy and Faculty Motivation
ch. 19 The Politics of Motivation: A Comparative Perspective
ch. 20 Fostering Faculty Motivation to Teach: Approaches to Faculty Development
ch. 21 The Motivation to Teach: Perennial Conundrums

Contributors
Name Index
Subject Index
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Recognizing Faculty Work: Reward Systems for the Year 2000

Book
Diamond, Robert M. and Bronwyn E. Adam, eds.
1993
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.72.R42 1993
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This volume is structured to provide practical assistance to those engaged in the review of faculty reward systems on their campuses and to provide guidelines to academic administrators, deans, and chairs who are leading these efforts. Chapters have been designed to address major issues relating to promotion, tenure, and merit pay. The different ways in which campuses have approached the process of clarifying their missions and modifying their faculty reward ...
Additional Info:
This volume is structured to provide practical assistance to those engaged in the review of faculty reward systems on their campuses and to provide guidelines to academic administrators, deans, and chairs who are leading these efforts. Chapters have been designed to address major issues relating to promotion, tenure, and merit pay. The different ways in which campuses have approached the process of clarifying their missions and modifying their faculty reward structures are illustrated. Reference materials from scholarly associations and accreditation agencies are included to demonstrate disciplinary perspectives. A model for change is presented along with criteria for assessing a promotion and tenure system. A professional portfolio to document the work of faculty is also described. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes
ch. 1 Changing Priorities and the Faculty Reward System (Robert M. Diamond)
ch. 2 Instituting Change in the Faculty Reward System (Robert M. Diamond)
ch. 3 Differences Among the Disciplines (Bronwyn E. Adam, Alton O. Roberts)
ch. 4 Institutional Approaches to the Issues of Reward and Scholarship (Alton O. Roberts, Jon F. Wergin, Bronwyn E. Adam)
ch. 5 Revitalizing Faculty Work Through Intrinsic Rewards (Robert C. Froh, Robert J. Menges, Charles J. Walker)
ch. 6 Representing Faculty Work: The Professional Portfolio (Robert C. Froh, Peter J. Gray, Leo M. Lambert)
Appendix: Departmental Statements on Faculty Rewards
Index
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The Ethics of Teaching

Book
Keith-Spiegel, Patricia, Bernard E.Whitley Jr., Deborah Ware Balogh, David V. Perkins, Arno F. Wittig
1993
Ball State University, Muncie, IN
LB1779.E75 1993
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This book evolved by collecting a variety of teaching situations that commonly occur in college and university settings. The authors then created responses to the situations and circulated both the cases and the responses to reviewers from a number of departments across the country. As a result, the vast majority of the cases are "discipline free." (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book evolved by collecting a variety of teaching situations that commonly occur in college and university settings. The authors then created responses to the situations and circulated both the cases and the responses to reviewers from a number of departments across the country. As a result, the vast majority of the cases are "discipline free." (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction
Pt. I The Classroom Ambiance
ch. 1 Instructors' Classroom Policies
ch. 2 Student Deportment in the Classroom
Pt. II The Classroom Learning Experience
ch. 3 nstructors' Presentation Style and Content
ch. 4 Required In-Class Learning Activities
Pt. III Assessment of Students
ch. 5 Testing and Other Academic Evaluations
ch. 6 Grading Methods
ch. 7 Feedback to Students
ch. 8 Writing Reference Letters for Students
ch. 9 Biased Treatment of Students
ch. 10 Academic Dishonesty
Pt. IV Outside the Classroom
ch. 11 Availability to Students
ch. 12 Student-Faculty Interactions
Pt. V Relationships in Academia
ch. 13 Multiple Role Relations and Conflicts of Interest
ch. 14 Interprofessional Relations
ch. 15 Exploitation of Students
ch. 16 Discrimination
ch. 17 Manipulative Students and Instructors
ch. 18 Supervising, Advising, and Collaboration With Students
Pt. VI Responsibilities to Students and Colleagues
ch. 19 Instructor Competency
ch. 20 Confidentiality Issues
ch. 21 Political and Public Statements
ch. 22 Responsibilities to the Institution
Afterword: Prevention and Peer Intervention
References
Subject Index
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Ethical Dimensions of College and University Teaching: Understanding and Honoring the Special Relationship Between Teachers and Students

Book
Fisch, Lincoln
1996
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 66)
LB1779.E83 1996
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This volume focuses on the ethical dimensions of teaching, bringing fresh insights and perspectives to inform ongoing discussions of ethics among faculty colleagues, administrators, and students. From these chapters emerges a dominant principle: responsibility to students is directly related to understanding of one's ethical self, and the first step in establishing that ethical identity is self-reflection. By teaching ethically, faculty members model and advocate appropriate behavior to students in a ...
Additional Info:
This volume focuses on the ethical dimensions of teaching, bringing fresh insights and perspectives to inform ongoing discussions of ethics among faculty colleagues, administrators, and students. From these chapters emerges a dominant principle: responsibility to students is directly related to understanding of one's ethical self, and the first step in establishing that ethical identity is self-reflection. By teaching ethically, faculty members model and advocate appropriate behavior to students in a voice more effective than any proclamation. They also answer calls for accountability from the public, the press, and politicians. In all, teaching ethically requires transformations of structures, attitudes, and persons--faculty as well as students--if faculty are to meet fully their responsibilities to themselves, to their students, and to society. This is the 66th issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning. For more information on the series, please see the Journals and Periodicals page. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The ethics of teaching / David C. Smith
Teaching the subject: developmental identities in teaching / Mary Burgan
The ethics of student-faculty friendships / Richard L. Baker, Jr.
Between apathy and advocacy: teaching and modeling ethical reflection / Karen Hanson
nstitutional commitment to fairness in college teaching / Rita Cobb Rodabaugh
Differentiating the related concepts of ethics, morality, law and justice / Terry T. Ray
The ethics of knowledge / Clark Kerr
Ethical principles for college and university teaching / Harry Murray, Eileen Gillese, Madeline Lennon, Paul Mercer, Marilyn Robinson
Making responsible academic ethical decisions / Charles H. Reynolds
Intervening with colleagues / Patricia Keith-Spiegel, Arno F. Wittig, David V. Perkins, Deborah Ware Balogh, Bernard E. Whitley, Jr.
Reflecting on the ethics and values of our practice / Ronald A. Smith
Toward more ethical teaching / Linc. Fisch
Ethics in teaching: putting it together / Kathleen McGrory.
Article cover image

"Developing an Effective Faculty Evaluation System" (pdf)

Article
Cashin, William E.
1996
Idea Paper No. 33, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1996)
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Reviews 20 principles or steps in an effective faculty evaluation system, arguing that while most institutions’ claim that the purpose of their fculty evaluation system is the improvement of teaching, the primary purpose is actually almost always to make personnel decisions. Idea Paper no. 33, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Reviews 20 principles or steps in an effective faculty evaluation system, arguing that while most institutions’ claim that the purpose of their fculty evaluation system is the improvement of teaching, the primary purpose is actually almost always to make personnel decisions. Idea Paper no. 33, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Article cover image

"Packet on the Teaching Portfolio"

Article
Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, Harvard University
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The following content and formatting suggestions have been compiled to help give you ideas about your own Teaching Portfolio. There are many possibilities, and other formation and/or content could suite your situation better. The aim is not necessarily to come up with a standardized document, but one which has coherence and simplicity and which also gives, like a good CV, the best picture of your history and experience. The ...
Additional Info:
The following content and formatting suggestions have been compiled to help give you ideas about your own Teaching Portfolio. There are many possibilities, and other formation and/or content could suite your situation better. The aim is not necessarily to come up with a standardized document, but one which has coherence and simplicity and which also gives, like a good CV, the best picture of your history and experience. The Derek Bok Center is happy to help you with a Teaching Portfolio to suit your needs. Keep in mind the following possibilities and limitations of our services:

What We Cannot Provide:
Editorial advice
Packaging
Duplicating
Filing
Distribution

What We Can Provide:
Help with documentation of teaching
Help with developing teaching strategies, techniques, skills
Consultations on broadening teaching repertoire
Help in developing syllabi, special content, entire courses or aspects of courses
Help with teaching innovations, development/implementation
Templates and sample portfolios
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"Why Professors Don't Change"

Article
Ekroth, Loren
1990
Teaching Excellence 1, no. 5 (1990)
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"The Teaching Portfolio"

Article
Seldin, Peter, and Linda Annis
1991
Teaching Excellence 3, no. 2 (1991)
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Reflections on a Program for 'The Formation of Teachers'"

Article
Palmer, Parker J.
1992
Fetzer Institute (1992)
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Argues that if teachers wish to see greater recognition and reward attached to teaching they must change the status of teaching from private to community property. Need to reconnect teaching to the disciplines; The problem with student evaluation forms that are identical across the disciplines; More.
Additional Info:
Argues that if teachers wish to see greater recognition and reward attached to teaching they must change the status of teaching from private to community property. Need to reconnect teaching to the disciplines; The problem with student evaluation forms that are identical across the disciplines; More.
Article cover image

"Academic Administration as an Inner Journey"

Article
Smith, Gordon T.
1996
Theological Education 33 (Supplement 61-70
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue
Additional Info:
Journal Issue
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"Classroom Observation Techniques" (pdf)

Article
Acheson, Keith A.
1981
Idea Paper No. 4, IDEA Center, Kansas State University
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Techniques for observing the classroom behavior of teachers and students are examined. These techniques provide a framework for analyzing and understanding classroom interaction, for making decisions about what should be happening, and for changing instructional behavior when it is necessary. The observation methods allow collection, analysis, and presentation of accurate, objective, useful, and persuasive data. Persuasive data contain no value judgments. One method is the selective verbatim technique, which involves ...
Additional Info:
Techniques for observing the classroom behavior of teachers and students are examined. These techniques provide a framework for analyzing and understanding classroom interaction, for making decisions about what should be happening, and for changing instructional behavior when it is necessary. The observation methods allow collection, analysis, and presentation of accurate, objective, useful, and persuasive data. Persuasive data contain no value judgments. One method is the selective verbatim technique, which involves having the observer record what is actually said within the confines of a category previously specified by the teacher. Some common categories for selective verbatim include: teacher questions, teacher responses to student statements, teacher directions and assignments, teacher responses to questions, verbal mannerisms, teacher reward and praise statements, teacher criticism, student responses to teacher questions, student questions, and student initiated statements. Examples are presented as illustration. A seating chart can be the basis for several types of informal records about the teachers' and students' classroom behavior. It is primarily used to measure nonverbal behavior, but it is sometimes useful for measuring verbal behavior. The basic element is a diagram, examples of which are included. Seating charts are useful for analyzing "at task" behavior: data indicating whether or not individual students were engaged in the task or tasks the teacher indicated were appropriate. A verbal flow chart is one way of analyzing how classroom procedures inhibit, encourage, or allow students to participate in classroom interactions. A list of common teaching activities and a technique for recording them for analysis is included.
Article cover image

"Of Monks' Cells and Wagon Trains, Excellence and Collegiality"

Article
Jarvis, Donald K.
1996
Focus on Faculty 4, no. 3 (1996): 1-2
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Socializing Future Faculty to the Values of Undergraduate Education"

Article
Gaff, Jerry G., and Leo M. Lambert
1996
Article: Change July/Aug (1996): 38-45
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Focuses on socializing future faculty to the values of undergraduate education. Values of hiring colleges and universities; Approaches to graduate preparation; Preparation of future faculty project; Initiatives and strategic benefits. INSET: More about support programs..
Additional Info:
Focuses on socializing future faculty to the values of undergraduate education. Values of hiring colleges and universities; Approaches to graduate preparation; Preparation of future faculty project; Initiatives and strategic benefits. INSET: More about support programs..
Article cover image

"The Faculty Members of the Future: How Are They Being Shaped?"

Article
Wheeler, Barbara G.
1998
Christian Century (Feb 4-11, 1998): 106-149
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Focuses on the role of faculty members in the career of students. Anxieties expressed by deans and presidents of schools on how faculty members should be trained; How the popularity of religious studies reshaped the training of theological faculty; Capabilities of most theological faculty.
Additional Info:
Focuses on the role of faculty members in the career of students. Anxieties expressed by deans and presidents of schools on how faculty members should be trained; How the popularity of religious studies reshaped the training of theological faculty; Capabilities of most theological faculty.
Article cover image

"The Re-examination of Faculty Priorities"

Article
Edgerton, Russell
1993
Change July/Aug (1993): 10-25
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Discusses how university presidents and provosts across America have been re-examining various aspects of the faculty reward system--from the obligations faculty are expected to perform, to the ways teaching and service are evaluated, to the bases for promotion and advancement. What set off this re-examination; Observations into changing expectations; Changes in how faculty are evaluated; Shifts in faculty incentives and rewards.
Additional Info:
Discusses how university presidents and provosts across America have been re-examining various aspects of the faculty reward system--from the obligations faculty are expected to perform, to the ways teaching and service are evaluated, to the bases for promotion and advancement. What set off this re-examination; Observations into changing expectations; Changes in how faculty are evaluated; Shifts in faculty incentives and rewards.
Article cover image

"Beyond the Graveyard: Engaging Faculty Involvement"

Article
Wilkerson, Margaret B.
1992
Change Jan/Feb (1992): 59-63
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Discusses the challenge that cultural diversity presents to the curriculum and how to engage faculty involvement. New constructs; Bringing cultures into the classroom; Resistance produced by change; Fear of what will happen when students are exposed to the knowledge of cultures that have suffered historical subordination; Innovations; More.
Additional Info:
Discusses the challenge that cultural diversity presents to the curriculum and how to engage faculty involvement. New constructs; Bringing cultures into the classroom; Resistance produced by change; Fear of what will happen when students are exposed to the knowledge of cultures that have suffered historical subordination; Innovations; More.
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Teaching Alone, Teaching Together: Transforming the Structure of Teams for Teaching

Book
Bess, James L.
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.B48 2000
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
There are many excellent books on college and university teaching, but Teaching Alone, Teaching Together makes a uniquely valuable contribution. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
There are many excellent books on college and university teaching, but Teaching Alone, Teaching Together makes a uniquely valuable contribution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Exhibit 1.1 Sample Categories of Analytical Task Dimensions Exhibit 2.1 Issues of Locus of Control in Postsecondary Learning Environments Compared with Previous Educational Levels
Exhibit 2.2 Tasks of the Expert Pedagogue in Higher Education
Exhibit 5.1 Task Requirements of an Effective Discussion Group Leader
Exhibit 5.2 General Competencies Required to Teach Effectively and Specific Competencies for Teaching Discussion Groups

Figure 8.1 Process and Outcomes of Assessor's Role in the Professorial Teaching Team
Figure 8.2 Possible Influences of Assessment Data on Professorial Teaching Teams
Exhibit 9.1 Matrix Organization of Teaching
Cover image
Wabash tree

"Where a Magic Dwells: A Teaching Casebook for Instructors of Religion in the University"

Book
Div of Rel and Theol Studies, Boston University
1999
Division of Religious and Theological Studies, Boston University, Boston, MA (1999)
Unpublished - WC 294
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This is a collection of case studies written by professor and by graduate students teaching in the field of religion. Each case highlights one or more teaching problem (or possibility), some facet of the mystery of teaching (and learning to teach) at the college level. Each case is intended to spark conversations about a particular collegiate teaching situation. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This is a collection of case studies written by professor and by graduate students teaching in the field of religion. Each case highlights one or more teaching problem (or possibility), some facet of the mystery of teaching (and learning to teach) at the college level. Each case is intended to spark conversations about a particular collegiate teaching situation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Case 1 - Can you show me the way? (Bradley Herling and Douglas Hadley)
Case 2 - Daniel in the lion's den (Mark H. Mann)
Case 3 - The Opium of the classroom (Stephen Dawson)
Case 4 - The undermined student (Robert Parks)
Case 5 - The case of the untouchable topic (Douglas Hadley)
Case 6 - Zev and the crying presenter (Lesleigh Cushing)
Case 7 - When is enough, enough? (Greg Farr)
Case 8 - The sacred and the profane (Andrew Irvine and Bradley Herling)
Case 9 - Who am I? (Michael Mitchell)
Case 10 - Oh, my God, it's alive! (Lesleigh Cushing)
Case 11 - The voice of my beloved! Behold, he comes... (Bradely Herling)
Case 12 - Can Thomas Olafson still be saved?(Alina Feld)

Insider notes
Cover image

Creating Learning Communities: A Practical Guide to Winning Support, Organizing for Change, and Implementing Programs

Book
Shapiro, Nancy S. and Jodi H. Levine
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.S473 1999
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In recent years, learning communities - a curricular instructional innovation that integrates different facets of the undergraduate experience to enhance and enrich learning - have become the most promising new strategy for promoting student success and satisfaction in college. Learning communities give students the chance to deepen and diversify their education, connect with others who share their interests, and actively participate in the educational process.. "Creating Learning Communities is a ...
Additional Info:
In recent years, learning communities - a curricular instructional innovation that integrates different facets of the undergraduate experience to enhance and enrich learning - have become the most promising new strategy for promoting student success and satisfaction in college. Learning communities give students the chance to deepen and diversify their education, connect with others who share their interests, and actively participate in the educational process.. "Creating Learning Communities is a guide to the essentials of this rewarding new program area, including how to design, fund, staff, manage, and integrate learning communities into different campuses. Drawing from their own experience, as well as from experiences of campuses around the country, Nancy S. Shapiro and Jodi H. Levine provide both a sound theoretical rationale and nuts-and-bolts advice on the logistical, administrative, financial, and turf-related issues of creating an effective learning community. And perhaps most important, they show how to ensure that such communities embody and fulfill the objectives for which they were established. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Authors

ch. 1 Introduction: Why Learning Communities?
ch. 2 Types and Models of Learning Communities
ch. 3 Creating a Campus Culture for Learning Communities
ch. 4 Developing the Curricula
ch. 5 Recasting Faculty Roles and Rewards
ch. 6 Building Administrative Partnerships
ch. 7 Putting Administrative Structures in Place
ch. 8 Evaluating and Assessing Learning Communities
ch. 9 How Learning Communities Affect Students, Faculty, and the Institution
ch. 10 Concluding Advice and Reflections on Creating Learning Communities

App Learning Communities Contacts
References
Index
Article cover image

"Developing an Effective Teaching Portfolio"

Article
Wolf, Kenneth
1996
Educational Leadership 53, no. 6 (1996): 34-37
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Discusses the development of an effective teaching portfolio. Selecting the contents; Developing profile; Objective of portfolios.
Additional Info:
Discusses the development of an effective teaching portfolio. Selecting the contents; Developing profile; Objective of portfolios.
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Wabash tree

The Full-Time Faculty Handbook

Book
Bianco-Mathis, Virginia and Neal Chalofsky, eds.
1999
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1778.2.F85 1999
Topics: General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The Full-Time Faculty Handbook is a guide to the life of a college professor. Editors Virginia Bianco-Mathis and Neal Chalofsky examine the major components of a life in the academy-teaching, advising, publishing, research and service. Practical, comprehensive, and engaging, this handy guide appeals to a broad audience across all academic disciplines-from new professors to tenured faculty. Themes that are introduced and woven throughout the book include:
+ The basics of ...
Additional Info:
The Full-Time Faculty Handbook is a guide to the life of a college professor. Editors Virginia Bianco-Mathis and Neal Chalofsky examine the major components of a life in the academy-teaching, advising, publishing, research and service. Practical, comprehensive, and engaging, this handy guide appeals to a broad audience across all academic disciplines-from new professors to tenured faculty. Themes that are introduced and woven throughout the book include:
+ The basics of academic life
+ Key strategies for success
+ Political realities vs. the "ideal"
+ Managing your career-creating your own schedule, roadmap, and network
+ Assessing where you are and what needs to be done
+ Finding, fueling, and maintaining your passion

The authors also address the latest trends in the field that are affecting time-honored teaching traditions, such as distance learning, outcome assessment, continuous learning, and the evolving roles and responsibilities of full-time faculty. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Academic Life and Career (Virginia Bianco-Mathis and Neal Chalofsky)

Pt. I Academic Roles and Responsibilities
ch. 1 Administration and Management (Nyla Carney and Teresa Long)
ch. 2 Teaching and Learning (James Fletcher and Sondra Patrick)
ch. 3 Student Advising (Rosemarie Bosler and Sharon Levin)
ch. 4 Academic Research (Sharon Ahern Fechter)
ch. 5 University Service (William Marshall)
ch. 6 Professional Service (Karen Medsker)

Pt. II Issues and Trends
ch. 7 Professional Development and Advancement (Rhonda Malone)
ch. 8 New Learning Approaches: Conceptualizing the Learning-Teaching Interaction (Theodore Stone)
ch. 9 Technology: Computers, Distance Learning, and the Virtual University
ch. 10 Diversity in Higher Education(Mary Hatwood Futrell and Walter Brown)
Epilogue (Neal Chalofsky and Virginia Bianco-Mathis)

Index
About the Editors
About the Contributors
Article cover image

"Preparing A Teaching Portfolio: A Guidebook"

Article
Center for Teaching Effectiveness
2000
Center for Teaching Effectiveness, University of Texas at Austin (2000) http://www.utexas.edu/academic/cte/teachfolio.html
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Very helpful overview, followed by more detailed and extended discussion as well as references.
Additional Info:
Very helpful overview, followed by more detailed and extended discussion as well as references.
Article cover image

"Designing a Teaching Portfolio" (pdf)

Article
Center for Excellence in Learning & Teaching
2000
Center for Excellence in Learning & Teaching, Penn State University (2000) http://www.schreyerinstitute.psu.edu/ pdf/Designing_a_Teaching_Portfolio.pdf
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A brief review and annotated bibliography on designing a teaching portfolio.
Additional Info:
A brief review and annotated bibliography on designing a teaching portfolio.
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Mending the Cracks in the Ivory Tower: Strategies for Conflict Management in Higher Education

Book
Holton, Susan A., ed.
1998
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2331.692.M46 1998
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This book's 14 chapters provide models of conflict management and practical guidance for those working in institutions of higher education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book's 14 chapters provide models of conflict management and practical guidance for those working in institutions of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 "What's It All About? Conflict in Academia" (Susan A Holton)
ch. 2 "Administration in an Age of Conflict" (Gerald Graff)
ch. 3 "The Janus Syndrome: Managing Conflict from the Middle" (Walter H. Gmelch)
ch. 4 "Chairs as Department Managers: Working with Support Staff" (Mary Lou Higgerson)
ch. 5 "Spanning the Abyss: Managing Conflict Between Deans and Chairs"(Ann F. Lucas)
ch. 6 "The Cutting Edge: The Dean and Conflict" (Nancy L. Sorenson)
ch. 7 "And Never the Twain Shall Meet: Administrator-Faculty Conflict"(Judith A. Sturnick)
ch. 8 "Managing Conflict on the Front Lines: Lessons from the Journals of a Former Dean and Provost" (Clara M. Lovett)
ch. 9 "Student Affairs and Academic Affairs: Partners in Conflict Resolution" (Lynn Willett)
ch. 10 "Can We Agree To Disagree? Faculty-Faculty Conflict" (Cynthia Berryman-Fink)
ch. 11 "Views from Different Sides of the Desk: Conflict Between Faculty and Students" (John W. "Sam" Keltner)
ch. 12 "Student-Student Conflict: Whose Problem Is It Anyway?" (Janet Rifkin)
ch. 13 "Conflict Resolution in the Academy: A Modest Proposal" (Joel M. Douglas)
ch. 14 "Academic Mortar To Mend the Cracks: The Holton Model for Conflict Management" (Susan A Holton)

Appendix: "Conflict Management Programs for Administrators"
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Academic Leadership: A Practical Guide to Chairing the Department

Book
Leaming, Deryl R.
1998
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2341.L269 1998
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Dr. Leaming's book provides a comforting reminder that we need not waste time and energy reinventing the wheel. New and veteran administrators, particularly at the academic departmental level, can gain invaluable guidance by taking advantage of Dean Leaming's 30-plus years of experience. Whatever they are experiencing, he has already been through numerous times. He knows their challenges and anxieties, and, more importantly, the solutions to them. His book is written ...
Additional Info:
Dr. Leaming's book provides a comforting reminder that we need not waste time and energy reinventing the wheel. New and veteran administrators, particularly at the academic departmental level, can gain invaluable guidance by taking advantage of Dean Leaming's 30-plus years of experience. Whatever they are experiencing, he has already been through numerous times. He knows their challenges and anxieties, and, more importantly, the solutions to them. His book is written in plain, easy-to-understand language. It deals with everyday duties from attracting and hiring the most qualified people to dismissing those who don't work out, and from encouraging good teaching and research to dealing with difficult faculty members. The book also includes helpful summaries, checklists, tables and sample forms. Academic Leadership: A Practical Guide to Chairing the Department is a must-have resource book for the newly appointed department head that wants to avoid the trial-and-error management method. Dr. Leaming has been a department head at five universities and a dean at two. And he has laid out a roadmap that will come in handy continually for even the experienced person who still has a distance to travel down the administrative highway. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword.
Preface.
Part I: Leadership.
1. Advice for New Chairpersons.
2. Seven Habits of Successful Chairpersons.
3. Providing Leadership.
4. Duties and Responsibilities of Chairpersons.
5. Timesaving Tips for Effective Chairpersons.
6. Communicating.
Part II: Department.
7. Developing a Departmental Vision.
8. Improving Your Department.
9. Developing Outcome Assessment Programs.
10. Managing Change.
11. Building and Maintaining Morale.
12. Managing Conflict.
13. Working With Constituents.
14. Working With Your Dean.
15. Dealing With Curriculum Matters.
16. Conducting Effective Meetings.
17. Budget and Financial Management.
Part III: Legal Issues.
18. Avoiding Legal Problems.
19. Understanding Sexual Harassment and the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Part IV: Faculty.
20. Recruiting and Hiring Faculty.
21. Retaining, Mentoring, and Terminating Faculty.
22. Strategies for Faculty Development.
23. Evaluating Faculty Performance.
24. Handling Promotion and Tenure Issues.
25. Dealing With Chronic Low Achievers.
26. Dealing With Difficult Faculty.
Part V: Students.
27. Recruiting and Retaining Students.
28. Dealing With Emotional and Disrespectful Student Behavior.
Part VI: Looking Ahead.
29. Moving Up the Administrative Ladder.
30. Where Do You Go From Here?
Appendixes.
Index.
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The Professional Development of Graduate Teaching Assistants

Book
Marincovich, Michele, Jack Prostko, Frederic Stout, eds.
1998
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2335.4.P765 1998
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
As both the need for and the expectations of teaching assistants in higher education rise, institutions must ensure that graduate TAs provide effective instruction. This comprehensive TA training handbook is an essential resource for those who prepare graduate TAs for their responsibilities in the classroom and for their overall professional development. Written by experts in the field of TA development, this book provides a clear framework for implementing and assessing ...
Additional Info:
As both the need for and the expectations of teaching assistants in higher education rise, institutions must ensure that graduate TAs provide effective instruction. This comprehensive TA training handbook is an essential resource for those who prepare graduate TAs for their responsibilities in the classroom and for their overall professional development. Written by experts in the field of TA development, this book provides a clear framework for implementing and assessing an effective program. It is an ideal resource for all those who are interested in developing or improving TA training programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Preparing graduate students to teach: Past, present, and future (Nancy Van Note Chism)
ch. 2 The role of centralized programs in preparing graduate students to teach (Jacqueline Mintz)
ch. 3 The disciplinary/departmental context of TA training (Shirley Ronkowski)
ch. 4 Thinking developmentally about TAs (Jody D. Nyquist)
ch. 5 Creating a foundation for instructional decisions (Marilla D. Svinicki)
ch. 6 Strategies for responding to diversity in the classroom (Mathew L. Ouellett and Mary Deane Sorcinelli)
ch. 7 Getting started with TA training on your campus (Frederic Stout)
ch. 8 Teaching teaching: The importance of courses on teaching in TA training programs (Michele Marincovich)
ch. 9 International TA training and beyond (Ellen Sarkisian & Virginia Maurer)
ch. 10 Helping TAs improve undergraduate writing (Jack Prostko)
ch. 11 Technology and TA training (Michael J. Albright)
ch. 12 Evaluating TA teaching (Beverly Black and Matt Kaplan)
ch. 13 Teaching portfolios as a tool for TA development (Pat Hutchings)
ch. 14 Evaluating TA programs (Nancy Van Note Chism)
ch. 15 TA certificate programs (Stacey Lane Tice, Patricia H. Featherstone and Howard C. Johnson)
ch. 16 Preparing future faculty programs (Stacey Lane Tice, Jerry G. Gaff, and Anne Pruitt-Logan
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The Department Chair's Role in Developing New Faculty into Teachers and Scholars

Book
Bensimon, Estela Mara, Kelly Ward, and Karla Sanders
2000
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2341.B4742 2000
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Hiring new tenure-track faculty and seeing them through to tenure is an onerous responsibility for department chairs, with significant departmental and institutional consequences.

The Department Chair's Role in Developing New Faculty into Teachers and Scholars is designed to help chairs with the three critical stages of junior faculty socialization: 1) recruitment and hiring; 2) the first year; and 3) evaluating new faculty performance. The authors offer concrete advice and activities; make ...
Additional Info:
Hiring new tenure-track faculty and seeing them through to tenure is an onerous responsibility for department chairs, with significant departmental and institutional consequences.

The Department Chair's Role in Developing New Faculty into Teachers and Scholars is designed to help chairs with the three critical stages of junior faculty socialization: 1) recruitment and hiring; 2) the first year; and 3) evaluating new faculty performance. The authors offer concrete advice and activities; make extensive use of real-life situations; and provide generic examples of letters, checklists, and orientations that can be adapted to individual contexts.

This book provides the tools chairs need to adapt habit and intuition into effective management practices. The advice will help department chairs achieve the mission and objective of their own units, as well as their colleges and campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Organizing the search for a new faculty member
ch. 2 Negotiating the job offer
ch. 3 Providing information before and upon arrival
ch. 4 Addressing professional/institutional questions
ch. 5 Planning an effective departmental orientation
ch. 6 Orienting new faculty to teaching
ch. 7 Addressing service concerns
ch. 8 Developing full-year orientation programs
ch. 9 Creating mentoring relationships
ch. 10 Demystifying the promotion and tenure process
ch. 11 Developing productive researchers and effective teachers
ch. 12 Monitoring service obligations
ch. 13 Explaining evaluation procedures
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Leading Academic Change: Essential Roles for Department Chairs

Book
Lucas, Ann F. & Associates
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2341.L82 2000
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
For the 80,000 department chairs working on campuses across the nation, this visionary yet practical book shows how to manage academic change at the department level. It provides useful ideas and strategies on handling resistance to change, transforming departments into productive learning communities, and improving educational quality for students. In twelve incisive chapters, top academic scholars, authors, and consultants address topics and trends as diverse as service learning, technologicalchange, curriculum renewal, ...
Additional Info:
For the 80,000 department chairs working on campuses across the nation, this visionary yet practical book shows how to manage academic change at the department level. It provides useful ideas and strategies on handling resistance to change, transforming departments into productive learning communities, and improving educational quality for students. In twelve incisive chapters, top academic scholars, authors, and consultants address topics and trends as diverse as service learning, technologicalchange, curriculum renewal, faculty reward systems, and post-tenure review. They offer effective models to help department chairs and administrators work through the change process, including recommendations based on real-world experiences. They also integrate the latest research with examples of best practices into a readable, accessible format. Whether you are a department chair, administrator, or a faculty member aspiring to improve your department, Leading Academic Change is the expert's guide to mobilizing faculty energy towards academic success. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Questions and Activities for Each Chapter
A Teamwork Approach to Change in the Academic Department (A. Lucas)
A Collaborative Model for Leading Academic Change (A. Lucas)
Handling Resistance to Change (S. Cheldelin)
Transforming Departments into Productive Learning Communities (T. Angelo)
The Collaborative Role of the Chair in Departmental Change
The Departmental Statement on Promotion and Tenure: A Key to Successful Leadership (R. Diamond)
Post-Tenure Review (C. Licata)
Strengthening the Departmental Voice in the Faculty Reward System (H. Altman)
Leading Innovative Change in Curriculum and Teaching
Monitoring and Improving Educational Quality in the Academic Department (L. Gardiner)
Service Learning and the Engaged Department: A Strategy with Many Uses (E. Zlotkowski)
Giving Faculty Ownership of Technological Change in the Department (A. Bates)
Leading Curriculum Renewal (A. Ferren & K. Mussell)
The Academy as Learning Community: Contradiction in Terms or Realizable Future? (P. Senge)
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The Mentor's Guide: Facilitating Effective Learning Relationships

Book
Zachary, Lois J., and Laurent A. Daloz
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1731.4.Z23 2000
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This rich and insightful book explores the critical process of mentoring and presents practical tools for facitlitating the experience from beginning to end. It is based on Laurent A. Daloz's popular and widely used conept that mentoring is a learning journey, in which the mentor and mentee serve as companions along the way. Now leaders, managers,teachers, and leaders form any career, professional, or educational setting can successfully navigate the ...
Additional Info:
This rich and insightful book explores the critical process of mentoring and presents practical tools for facitlitating the experience from beginning to end. It is based on Laurent A. Daloz's popular and widely used conept that mentoring is a learning journey, in which the mentor and mentee serve as companions along the way. Now leaders, managers,teachers, and leaders form any career, professional, or educational setting can successfully navigate the learning journey by using the hand-on worksheets and exericses in this unique resource. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Author

ch. 1 Grounding the Work: Focusing on Learning
ch. 2 Working the Ground: Considering Context
ch. 3 To Everything There Is a Season: Predictable Phases
ch. 4 Tilling the Soil: Preparing
ch. 5 Planting Seeds: Negotiating
ch. 6 Nurturing Growth: Enabling
ch. 7 Reaping the Harvest: Coming to Closure
ch. 8 Regenerating Personal Growth Through Mentoring

App. A Creating a Mentoring Culture
App. B Digging Deeper: Resources for Further Learning

References
Index
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A Handbook on Legal Issues in Theological Field Education

Book
Fox, Susan E. and Judith Trott Guy, eds.
2000
Presbyterian Theological Field Educators, Richmond, VA
KF4868.C44H36 2000
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
When you think about legal issues and field education, how do you feel?
What thoughts come to mind when you think of culture in this context?
What stories and teachings from our faith tradition can inform the interface between legal issues and field education?
(From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
When you think about legal issues and field education, how do you feel?
What thoughts come to mind when you think of culture in this context?
What stories and teachings from our faith tradition can inform the interface between legal issues and field education?
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
(Collaborative effort of the Presbyterian Theological Field Educators (PTFE)
Preface

ch. 1 Legal issues and theological field education
ch. 2 How can students and supervisors get themselves and their theological schools in trouble in a field education placement?
ch. 3 What do field educators need to know about students?
ch. 4 What do field educators need to know about supervisors?
ch. 5 Legal issues and the administration of theological field education
ch. 6 Legal issues and the teaching of theological field education

Resources
Appendix
Article cover image

"'The Long Obedience...': Biblical Reflections on the Vocation of Administrative Service"

Article
Senior, Donald
1998
The Seminary Journal 2 (Fall 1998)
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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The New Faculty Member : Supporting and Fostering Professional Development

Book
Boice, Robert
1992
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1778.2 .B65 1992
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
For the first time in decades, most American campuses are in the midst of hiring large groups of new faculty. As competition for the most qualified candidates increases, institutions must work harder than ever to attract and retain the best and most diverse prospects. This often requires investing considerable resources in recruitment and hiring--and makes it imperative that new hires are not lost to competitors or to unhappy or unproductive ...
Additional Info:
For the first time in decades, most American campuses are in the midst of hiring large groups of new faculty. As competition for the most qualified candidates increases, institutions must work harder than ever to attract and retain the best and most diverse prospects. This often requires investing considerable resources in recruitment and hiring--and makes it imperative that new hires are not lost to competitors or to unhappy or unproductive beginnings. In this book, Robert Boice offers a range of proven support strategies designed to help new faculty thrive--from campuswide programs for nurturing newcomers to projects that help them to help themselves. Boice identifies the major challenges facing most new faculty--teaching, scholarly writing, and simply fitting in as colleagues--and provides tested solutions for helping them cope. He outlines a structured mentoring program to build collegiality through social support networks. And he presents specific techniques for helping new faculty find time, fluency, and balance as writers, including advice on dealing with editorial evaluations or rejections. The author also details a variety of self-help projects, including exercise and mood management groups run largely by new faculty, as well as faculty handbooks and newsletters. And perhaps most important, he tells how to gain the crucial support of department chairs, deans, and other administrators, secure funds to get programs off the ground, and keep new programs manageable and successful. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author
ch. 1 Introduction: New Faculty--A Neglected Resource
Pt. 1 Obstacles Confronting New Faculty Members
ch. 2 Gaining the Acceptance of Colleagues
ch. 3 Establishing Teaching Styles and Skills
ch. 4 Developing Habits of Writing Productivity
Pt. 2 Helping New Faculty Overcome Obstacles
ch. 5 Mentoring to Build Collegiality
ch. 6 Establishing Basic Teaching Skills
ch. 7 Encouraging Scholarly Productivity
ch. 8 Helping New Faculty Help Themselves
Pt. 3 Building an Institutional Support System
ch. 9 Recruitment and Orientation
ch. 10 Retention and Tenure
ch. 11 Tailoring Programs to Special Needs
ch. 12 Enlisting Chairs and Other Administrators
ch. 13 Strategies for Getting Programs Under Way
Resource: Questionnaire Used to Interview New Faculty
References
Index
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To Improve the Academy, vol 19

Journal Issue
Lieberman, Devorah and Catherine Wehlburg
2001
To Improve the Academy 19 (Professional and Organizational Development Network, New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK 2001)
LB1731.T59v.19
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction
Ethical Guidelines for Educational Developers

Section I: Focus on Trends in Faculty Development
ch. 1 Fostering the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Communities of Practice
ch. 2 Transitions and Transformations: The Making of Department Chairs
ch. 3 Education For Responsible Citizenship: A Challenge For Faculty Developers
ch. 4 A Prophet in Your Own Land? Using Faculty and Student Focus Groups to Address Issues of Race, Ethicity, and Gender in the Classroom
ch. 5 Faculty Learning Communities: Change Agents for Transforming Institutions into Learning Organizations

Section II: Focus on Faculty Development and Student Learning
ch. 6 Doing Faculty Development as if We Value Learning Most: Transformative Guidelines From Research to Practice
ch. 7 Higher-Level Learning: The First Step Toward More Significant Learning
ch. 8 Clarity in Teaching Higher Education: Dimensions and Classroom Strategies
ch. 9 Preparing Today's Faculty For Tomorrow's Students: One College's Faculty Development Solution
ch. 10 After Twelve Years of Teaching the College-Teaching Course
ch. 11 Faculty Development that Transforms the Undergraduate Experience at a Research University
ch. 12 The Case for Sophisticated Course Syllabi
ch. 13 The Role of a Teaching Center in Curricular Reform
ch. 14 Technology and the Culture of Teaching and Learning

Section III: Focus on Faculty Development and Professional Support
ch. 15 Developing New Faculty: An Evolving Program
ch. 16 Publish, Don't Perish: A Program to Help Scholars Flourish
ch. 17 Designing Teaching Portfolios Based on a Formal Model of the Scholarship of Teaching
ch. 18 Strengthening Collegiality to Enhance Teaching, Research, and Scholarly Practice: An Untapped Research for Faculty Development
ch. 19 Faculty Quality of Life
ch. 20 Getting Administrative Support for Your Project

Bibliography
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Interdisciplinary Courses and Team Teaching: New Arrangements for Learning

Book
Davis, James R.
1995
American Council on Education and the Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LB2361.5.D38 1995
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
James Davis offers a realistic and stimulating examination of interdisciplinary theory and practice. In addition to providing specific tips on successful team teaching, the book features information drawn from the professional literature, survey results, and useful examples from the author's personal experience. It also includes a listing of nearly 100 interdisciplinary, team-taught courses currently being offered at colleges and universities throughout North America. The book demonstrates that team teaching, when effectively ...
Additional Info:
James Davis offers a realistic and stimulating examination of interdisciplinary theory and practice. In addition to providing specific tips on successful team teaching, the book features information drawn from the professional literature, survey results, and useful examples from the author's personal experience. It also includes a listing of nearly 100 interdisciplinary, team-taught courses currently being offered at colleges and universities throughout North America. The book demonstrates that team teaching, when effectively implemented, is fulfilling for both educator and student. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

Part I Structure and Delivery of Courses
ch. 1 Interdisciplinary Courses and Team Teaching: Definitions and Examples
ch. 2 The Rationale for Interdisciplinary Courses: The Problem of Specialization
ch. 3 Structuring and Delivering Interdisciplinary Courses: Approximating the Ideal
ch. 4 When Faculty Work in Teams: Learning from the Research on Groups and Teams
ch. 5 Faculty and Student Perceptions of Team Teaching: Satisfactions and Frustrations
ch. 6 Future Prospects for Interdisciplinary Courses: Issues and Problems

Part II Selected Examples of Courses
ch. 7 Examples of Interdisciplinary Courses and Programs

Conclusion
Notes
Index
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Good Practice in Tenure Evaluation: Advice for Tenured Faculty, Department Chairs, and Academic Administrators

Book
American Council on Education, The American Association of University Professors, and United Educators Insurance
2000
American Council on Education (ACE), Washington, DC
LB2335.7.G663 2000
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This report provides guidance on conducting tenure evaluations that are thoughtful and just. Practical suggestions for the tenure evaluation process fall into four themes. The first is that of the need for clarity in standards and procedures for evaluation. Institutions should ensure that their stated criteria for tenure match the criteria that, in actual practice, the institutions apply. A second major theme is that tenure decisions must be consistent over ...
Additional Info:
This report provides guidance on conducting tenure evaluations that are thoughtful and just. Practical suggestions for the tenure evaluation process fall into four themes. The first is that of the need for clarity in standards and procedures for evaluation. Institutions should ensure that their stated criteria for tenure match the criteria that, in actual practice, the institutions apply. A second major theme is that tenure decisions must be consistent over time among candidates with different personal characteristics, such as race, gender, disability, and national origin. A third necessity is candor in the evaluation of tenure-track faculty. Periodic evaluations should be candid and expressed in plain English. The fourth theme is that of caring for unsuccessful candidates. Faculty and administrators must treat an unsuccessful tenure candidate with professionalism and decency. Active efforts to assist the candidate in relocating to another position are of mutual benefit to the individual and the institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Summary
ch. 1 Clarity in Standards and Procedures for Tenure Evaluation
ch. 2 Consistency in Tenure Decisions
ch. 3 Candor in the Evaluation of Tenure-Track Faculty
ch. 4 Caring for Unsuccessful Candidates
Conclusion: Moving Forward
Endnotes
Bibliography
Article cover image

"The Ethics of Learner-Centered Education: Dynamics That Impede the Process"

Article
Hansen, Edmund J., and James A. Stephens
2000
Change Sept/Oct (2000): 41-47
Topics: Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Discusses the fact that despite a decade of changing ideas about student learning and instruction based on learner-centered education, most faculty still rely on lectures. Identifies individual and group dynamics that impede collaborative learning, considers the moral base of collaborative learning, and offers some guiding principles of growth-oriented learning.
Additional Info:
Discusses the fact that despite a decade of changing ideas about student learning and instruction based on learner-centered education, most faculty still rely on lectures. Identifies individual and group dynamics that impede collaborative learning, considers the moral base of collaborative learning, and offers some guiding principles of growth-oriented learning.
Article cover image

"Teaching-Related Stress: The Emotional Management of Faculty"

Article
Gates, Gordon S.
2000
The Review of Higher Education 23, no. 4 (2000): 469-490
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The work of faculty is stressful, yet most stress studies focus on faculty's research rather than teaching. This study examined the experience of nine tenured professors in search of answers to these questions: What classroom interactions do faculty find stressful? Why do faculty find these activities stressful? How do faculty explain, perform, and organize classroom practices to cope with these stresses?
Additional Info:
The work of faculty is stressful, yet most stress studies focus on faculty's research rather than teaching. This study examined the experience of nine tenured professors in search of answers to these questions: What classroom interactions do faculty find stressful? Why do faculty find these activities stressful? How do faculty explain, perform, and organize classroom practices to cope with these stresses?
Cover image

Leadership Without Easy Answers

Book
Heifetz, Ronald A.
1994
The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
HM141.H385 1994
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The economy uncertain, education in decline, cities under siege, crime and poverty spiraling upward, international relations roiling: we look to leaders for solutions, and when they don't deliver, we simply add their failure to our list of woes. In doing do, we do them and ourselves a grave disservice. We are indeed facing an unprecedented crisis of leadership, Ronald Heifetz avows, but it stems as much from our demands and ...
Additional Info:
The economy uncertain, education in decline, cities under siege, crime and poverty spiraling upward, international relations roiling: we look to leaders for solutions, and when they don't deliver, we simply add their failure to our list of woes. In doing do, we do them and ourselves a grave disservice. We are indeed facing an unprecedented crisis of leadership, Ronald Heifetz avows, but it stems as much from our demands and expectations as from any leader's inability to meet them. His book gets at both of these problems, offering a practical approach to leadership for those who lead as well as those who look to them for answers. Fitting the theory and practice of leadership to our extraordinary times, the book promotes a new social contract, a revitalization of our civic life just when we most need it. Drawing on a dozen years of research among managers, officers, and politicians in the public realm and the private sector, among the nonprofits, and in teaching, Heifetz presents clear, concrete prescriptions for anyone who needs to take the lead in almost any situation, under almost any organizational conditions, no matter who is in charge, His strategy applies not only to people at the top but also to those who must lead without authority--activists as well as presidents, managers as well as workers on the front line. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction
Pt. I Setting the Frame
ch. 1 Values in Leadership
ch. 2 To Lead or Mislead?
ch. 3 The Roots of Authority
Pt. II Leading With Authority
ch. 4 Mobilizing Adaptive Work
ch. 5 Applying Power
ch. 6 On a Razor's Edge
ch. 7 Falling Off the Edge
Pt. III Leading Without Authority
ch. 8 Creative Deviance on the Frontline
ch. 9 Modulating the Provocation
Pt. IV Staying Alive
ch. 10 Assassination
ch. 11 The Personal Challenge
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
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Mentor in a Manual: Climbing the Academic Ladder to Tenure

Book
Schoenfeld, Clay and Robert Magnan
1994
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB2335.7.S36 1994
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
For assistant professors envisioning tenure, this completely revised publication is about as close to being a mentor as a book can be! Using a representative institution and a prototype assistant professor, Mentor in a Manual provides invaluable counsel for those on the tenure track. Twelve chapters take the new hire through each step with advice on making it through the mazes. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
For assistant professors envisioning tenure, this completely revised publication is about as close to being a mentor as a book can be! Using a representative institution and a prototype assistant professor, Mentor in a Manual provides invaluable counsel for those on the tenure track. Twelve chapters take the new hire through each step with advice on making it through the mazes. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by Allan W. Ostar
Publisher's Notes
Preface to the Anniversary Edition
Preface to the Second Edition

ch. 1: Acquiring a Professional Frame of Mind
ch. 2: Getting to Know Your Territory
ch. 3: Grasping Generic Institutional Expectations
ch. 4: Appreciating the Practical Politics of Getting Promoted
ch. 5: The Teaching Challenge: Preparing to Teach
ch. 6: The Teaching Challenge: In the Classroom
ch. 7: The Teaching Challenge: Outside the Classroom
ch. 8: The Research Paradigm
ch. 9: The Service Syndrome
ch. 10: A Bottom Line: Getting Published
ch. 11: Bell, Candle, and Book
ch. 12: Presenting Your Credentials for the Ultimate Decision

Appendix A: What Do I Do if I Don’t Make Tenure?
Appendix B: Suggested Readings
Index
Article cover image

"Ten Qualities of Self-Renewing Faculty"

Article
Hudson, Frederick
1992
Professional and Organizational Development Network, 11 (1992)
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
1. They are value-driven. 2. They are connected to the world around them. 3. They require solitude and quiet. 4. They pace themselves. 5. They have contact with nature. 6. They are creative and playful. 7. They are adaptive to change. 8. They learn from down-time. 9. They are always in training. 10. They are future-oriented.
Additional Info:
1. They are value-driven. 2. They are connected to the world around them. 3. They require solitude and quiet. 4. They pace themselves. 5. They have contact with nature. 6. They are creative and playful. 7. They are adaptive to change. 8. They learn from down-time. 9. They are always in training. 10. They are future-oriented.
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Getting It Published: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious about Serious Books

Book
Germano, William
2001
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
PN161.G46 2001
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Germano's short volume is filled with useful advice drawn from a career as editor at an academic press (formerly editor-in-chief and humanities editor at Columbia UP, he's now vice president and publishing director at Routledge) and written in an admirably direct style that preserves a personal tone that will appeal to the recent PhD's and new authors who will be his best audience. The gamut of publishing is covered, from ...
Additional Info:
Germano's short volume is filled with useful advice drawn from a career as editor at an academic press (formerly editor-in-chief and humanities editor at Columbia UP, he's now vice president and publishing director at Routledge) and written in an admirably direct style that preserves a personal tone that will appeal to the recent PhD's and new authors who will be his best audience. The gamut of publishing is covered, from basics on publishers and their duties, to the details of writing, editing, and presenting a proposal; surviving the review process; the details of contracts; writing for collections and anthologies; and how to present the finished manuscript. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 What Do Publishers Do?
ch. 3 Writing the Manuscript
ch. 4 Selecting a Publisher
ch. 5 Your Proposal
ch. 6 What Editors Look For
ch. 7 Surviving the Review Process
ch. 8 What a Contract Means
ch. 9 Collections and Anthologies
ch. 10 Quotations, Pictures, and Other Headaches
ch. 11 How to Deliver a Manuscript
ch. 12 And Then What Happens to It
ch. 13 This Book - And the Next
For Further Reading
Index
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The Work of Writing: Insights and Strategies for Academics and Professionals

Book
Rankin, Elizabeth
2001
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
PE1404.R356 2001
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
No matter what the writing assignment -- journal article, executive summary, grant proposal, curriculum guide, or consultant's report -- The Work of Writing will serve as an invaluable aid for faculty and professionals who need to hone their writing skills. In this book, Elizabeth Rankin draws on her years of experience as a leader of academic writing groups and shares a wealth of scenarios from actual writing experiences. These helpful ...
Additional Info:
No matter what the writing assignment -- journal article, executive summary, grant proposal, curriculum guide, or consultant's report -- The Work of Writing will serve as an invaluable aid for faculty and professionals who need to hone their writing skills. In this book, Elizabeth Rankin draws on her years of experience as a leader of academic writing groups and shares a wealth of scenarios from actual writing experiences. These helpful stories speak to complex issues of audience, purpose, genre, and voice that writers routinely address. Using the strategies found in The Work of Writing will make the job of the writer more manageable, more productive, and more rewarding. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Author
ch. 1 The Work of Writing
ch. 2 Contributing to the Professional Conversation
ch. 3 Meeting Readers' Needs and Expectations
ch. 4 Finding Your Professional Voice
ch. 5 Seeing the Project Through
Afterword
App. A: Organizing a Writing Group
App. B: Sample Book Proposal Guidelines
App. C: A Few Good Books on Writingv References
Index
Article cover image

"Do Initial Training Courses Have an Impact on University Teaching? The Evidence From Two Evaluative Studies of One Course"

Article
Rust, Chris
2000
Innovations in Education and Training International 37, no. 3 (2000): 254 262
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Summarizes evidence from two evaluative studies of the initial training course for new teaching staff at Oxford Brookes University, UK. Findings indicate that the course has had a positive effect for most of the participants. Presents evidence of the positive feedback in the form of comments from several participants. Attitude statements used in both studies are appended.
Additional Info:
Summarizes evidence from two evaluative studies of the initial training course for new teaching staff at Oxford Brookes University, UK. Findings indicate that the course has had a positive effect for most of the participants. Presents evidence of the positive feedback in the form of comments from several participants. Attitude statements used in both studies are appended.
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"Collegiality as a Moral and Ethical Practice"

Article
Copeland, M. Shawn
1999
in Practice What You Preach (Franklin, WI: Sheed & Ward, 1999): 315-333
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Calling for accountability, Practice What You Preach discusses ethical questions that arise in congregations and pastoral leadership. Formation of pastors, empowering leaders, resolving power struggles between clergy and laity--these and other critical pastoral issues are addressed by an ecumenical group of contributors. Divided into four parts: the way the churches train their pastors; the way their pastors live; the way communities worship; and the way communities behave, this collection identifies ...
Additional Info:
Calling for accountability, Practice What You Preach discusses ethical questions that arise in congregations and pastoral leadership. Formation of pastors, empowering leaders, resolving power struggles between clergy and laity--these and other critical pastoral issues are addressed by an ecumenical group of contributors. Divided into four parts: the way the churches train their pastors; the way their pastors live; the way communities worship; and the way communities behave, this collection identifies and offers positive solutions to areas where churches are often slow to change. Each essay begins with a case describing a typical problem--from wages to in-fighting--and then discusses what virtues or character traits might be developed to resolve the problem effectively. An eye-opener of a book . . . it will involve you from page one as it invites intelligent people everywhere to reckon with its courageous, timely content. (From the Publisher)
Article cover image

"The Impact of Technology on Teaching"

Article
Curran, Jim, and Ron Pitt
2002
The Faculty Network, Special Issue Spring 2002)
Topics: Using Technology   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Guidelines for Presentation of a Teaching Portfolio"

Article
Staff
2002
Teaching and Learning Centre, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Principles of Good Practice: Supporting Early-Career Faculty"

Article
Sorcinelli, Mary Deane
2000
American Association for Higher Education, Forum on Faculty Roles & Rewards (2000)
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The "Heeding New Voices" study, a year-long series of structured interviews with new faculty and graduate students aspiring to be faculty members around the country, sought both to give voice to those who are just beginning their academic careers and to provide guidance for the senior faculty, chairs, deans, and others in higher education responsible for shaping the professoriate of the future. This booklet, drawn in part from the study's ...
Additional Info:
The "Heeding New Voices" study, a year-long series of structured interviews with new faculty and graduate students aspiring to be faculty members around the country, sought both to give voice to those who are just beginning their academic careers and to provide guidance for the senior faculty, chairs, deans, and others in higher education responsible for shaping the professoriate of the future. This booklet, drawn in part from the study's findings, includes: (1) ten principles of good practice; (2) inventories to prompt department chairs, senior colleagues, and other academic leaders to examine their individual and institutional practices; and (3) examples of concrete and innovative approaches to good practice being tried out now in a variety of institutional settings. The principles reflect the three categories of stated need from the "Heeding New Voices" interviews: improving review and tenure processes (principles 1-4), encouraging positive relations with colleagues and students (principles 5-7), and easing stresses of time and balance (principles 8-10). (Contains 13 references). (EV)
Article cover image

"Faculty Study Groups: Solving 'Good Problems' Through Study, Reflection, and Collaboration"

Article
Wildman, Terry M. Margaret P. Hable, Marlene M. Preston, Susan G. Magliaro
2000
Innovative Higher Education 24, no. 4 (2000): 247-263
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
We describe the development, implementation, and assessment of a faculty study group program designed to foster teaching as a reflective, collaborative activity within a research university. Conceived within conceptual frameworks that challenge technical/rationalist approaches to faculty development, the program was successful in creating opportunities for faculty of different disciplines, age groups, ranks, and teaching experience to establish productive discourse communities around their own teaching. Our experience shows that such ...
Additional Info:
We describe the development, implementation, and assessment of a faculty study group program designed to foster teaching as a reflective, collaborative activity within a research university. Conceived within conceptual frameworks that challenge technical/rationalist approaches to faculty development, the program was successful in creating opportunities for faculty of different disciplines, age groups, ranks, and teaching experience to establish productive discourse communities around their own teaching. Our experience shows that such programs require careful thought and planning, which we detail here, and that faculty even in research oriented institutions can be captured by the “good problem” that teaching represents.
Article cover image

"Nice Work if We Can Keep It: Confessions of a Junior Professor"

Article
Newman, Kathy
1999
Academe 85, no. 3 (1999): 29-33
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
A junior faculty member reflects on the dilemma of that professional position, noting that its anxieties fall into two categories: "Is this all there is?" and "What if we lose it?" She examines problems with, and prohibitions against, speaking one's mind in that position, sees solutions as being institutional or individual, and examines how concerns are linked to other campus constituencies.
Additional Info:
A junior faculty member reflects on the dilemma of that professional position, noting that its anxieties fall into two categories: "Is this all there is?" and "What if we lose it?" She examines problems with, and prohibitions against, speaking one's mind in that position, sees solutions as being institutional or individual, and examines how concerns are linked to other campus constituencies.
Article cover image

"Teaching Beyond the Borders: A Report From the Lilly-Luce Teaching Workshop"

Article
Gottschall, Marilyn
2001
Religious Studies News 16, no. 1 (2001): 7
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students in Higher Education: A Perilous Passage?

Book
Weidman, John C., Twale, Darla J., Stein, Elizabeth Leahy
2001
ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, New York, NY
LC192.4.S63 2001
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This report on the process of graduate and professional student socialization provides information that can be of use to graduate program faculty and administrators, professional associations, state legislatures, and professional licensing bodies charged with assuring clients that well qualified professional practitioners are being prepared in the nation's universities. It addresses implications of issues raised in current literature for designing more effective graduate programs. Socialization in graduate school refers to the ...
Additional Info:
This report on the process of graduate and professional student socialization provides information that can be of use to graduate program faculty and administrators, professional associations, state legislatures, and professional licensing bodies charged with assuring clients that well qualified professional practitioners are being prepared in the nation's universities. It addresses implications of issues raised in current literature for designing more effective graduate programs. Socialization in graduate school refers to the processes through which individuals gain the knowledge, skills, and values necessary for successful entry into a professional career requiring an advanced level of specialized knowledge and skills. The first two sections, "The Professional and Socialization" and "Conceptualizing Socialization in Graduate and Professional Programs," describe the various elements of this socialization process, drawing from research on adult socialization, role acquisition, and career development. The third section, "A Framework for the Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students," presents a conceptual model of graduate and professional student socialization that assumes socialization occurs through an interactive set of stages. The fourth section, "Institutional Culture: Recurrent Themes," illustrates several changing patterns in graduate education that are exerting pressure for reform. The fifth section, "Institutional Culture and Socialization: Differences among Academic Programs," contrasts socialization processes across academic program goals, faculty expectations, and student peer culture. The final section, "Easing the Perilous Passage," discusses modifying the graduate degree program and faculty and administrator roles, increasing diversity, and offering support to students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

The Professions and Socialization
The Professions in Society
Characterizing Socialization
Dimensions of Socialization
Conceptualizing Socialization in Graduate and Professional Programs
Stages of Socialization
Core Elements of Socialization
Structural Engagement
A Framework for the Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students
Linear Models of Socialization
Nonlinear Models of Socialization
An Interactive Framework for the Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students
Institutional Culture: Recurrent Themes
Diversity
International Graduate Students
Professionalism
Professionalization
Ethics
Technology and Distance Learning
Institutional Culture and Socialization: Differences Among Academic Programs
Knowledge Acquisition
Investment
Involvement
Structural Engagement
Easing the Perilous Passage
Modifying the Program
Increasing Diversity
Offering Support for Students
Modifying Faculty and Administrative Roles

References
Index
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The Vitality of Senior Faculty Members: Snow on the Roof-Fire in the Furnace

Book
Bland, Carole J. and William H. Bergquist
2000
ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, George Washington Univ. Press, Washington, D.C.
LB1778.B487 1997
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
By the year 2000, 50 percent of full-time faculty will be over 55, and 68 percent will be over 50. Just when many universities and colleges in America are making major shifts in their missions and their organizational structures, faculty members who are expected to implement these bold new visions will be out singing up for their senior citizen discount cards. Is it any cause for alarm? (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
By the year 2000, 50 percent of full-time faculty will be over 55, and 68 percent will be over 50. Just when many universities and colleges in America are making major shifts in their missions and their organizational structures, faculty members who are expected to implement these bold new visions will be out singing up for their senior citizen discount cards. Is it any cause for alarm? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Senior Faculty and Institutional Vitality
The Case of Stephen Abbot
The Productivity of Senior Faculty
Looking Inside for Vitality - Internal factors affecting the productivity of senior faculty
Looking Outside for Vitality - Institutional factors affecting the productivity of senior faculty
Conclusions and Themes to Guide Approaches to the vitality of Senior Faculty
Approaches to Faculty and Institutional Vitality
Appendix
References
Index
ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Reports
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A New Academic Compact: Revisioning the Relationship between Faculty and Their Institutions

Book
McMillin, Linda A. and William G. Berberet, eds.
2002
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2331.72.N49 2002
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Highlighting the Associated New American Colleges' Faculty Work Project, this volume examines the call for redefining faculty roles and institutional relationships. Believing that in order to serve students successfully colleges must invest in faculty effectiveness, the overriding goal of the project has been to lay the conceptual groundwork for bringing an institution's faculty policies and practices and the actual work patterns of faculty into alignment with the institutional mission. (From ...
Additional Info:
Highlighting the Associated New American Colleges' Faculty Work Project, this volume examines the call for redefining faculty roles and institutional relationships. Believing that in order to serve students successfully colleges must invest in faculty effectiveness, the overriding goal of the project has been to lay the conceptual groundwork for bringing an institution's faculty policies and practices and the actual work patterns of faculty into alignment with the institutional mission. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Editors
About the Contributors
Participants
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Section I: The Compact ch. 1 A New Academic Compact (Jerry Berberet) ch. 2 Professional Development Across the Faculty Career (Marion Terenzio)
ch. 3 Faculty as Institutional Citizens (Lawry Finsen)
ch. 4 Faculty Workload (Linda A. McMillin)

Section II: The Compact in Action
ch. 5 Shared Governance at Butler University (Patricia Bacon)
ch. 6 Workload Differentiation at Ithaca College (Garry Brodhead)
ch. 7 Workload Rebalancing at St. Mary's College of California (Ed Biglin)

Section III: The Compact in Context
ch. 8 A Panel of Experts Responds (Christine M. Licata, Robert M. Diamond, Mary Burgan, Charles E. Glassick, C. J. Weiser, Ric Weibl)
ch. 9 Reflections on The Faculty Work Project (Jon Wergin)
ch. 10 A Holistic Model For Faculty and Institutional Development (Jacqueline A. Mintz)
ch. 11 Institutional Governance (Thomas C. Longin)

Bibliography
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Advice for New Faculty Members

Book
Boice, Robert
2000
Allyn & Bacon, Boston, MA
LB1778.2.B63 2000
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Nihil Nimus is a unique and essential guide to the start of a successful academic career. As its title suggests (nothing in excess), it advocates moderation in ways of working, based on the single-most reliable difference between new faculty who thrive and those who struggle. By following its practical, easy-to-use rules, novice faculty can learn to teach with the highest levels of student approval, involvement, and comprehension, with only modest ...
Additional Info:
Nihil Nimus is a unique and essential guide to the start of a successful academic career. As its title suggests (nothing in excess), it advocates moderation in ways of working, based on the single-most reliable difference between new faculty who thrive and those who struggle. By following its practical, easy-to-use rules, novice faculty can learn to teach with the highest levels of student approval, involvement, and comprehension, with only modest preparation times and a greater reliance on spontaneity and student participation. Similarly, new faculty can use its rule-based practices to write with ease, increasing productivity, creativity, and publishability through brief, daily sessions of focused and relaxed work. And they can socialize more successfully by learning about often-misunderstood aspects of academic culture, including mentoring. Each rule in Advice for New Faculty Members has been tested on hundreds of new faculty and proven effective over the long run -- even in attaining permanent appointment. It is the first guidebook to move beyond anecdotes and surmises for its directives, based on the author's extensive experience and solid research in the areas of staff and faculty development. For new teachers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface.
Introduction: Why New Professors Need Timely Advice.

ch. 1 Moderate Work at Teaching
Wait.
Begin Before Feeling Ready.
Prepare and Present in Brief, Regular Sessions.
Stop.
Moderate Over-attachment and Overreaction.
Moderate Negative Thinking and Strong Emotions.
Let Others Do Some of the Work.
Moderate Classroom Incivilities.
Summary and Extension of the Nihil Nimus Approach to Teaching.

ch. 2 Write in Mindful Ways.
Rationale for a Mindful Approach to Writing.
Wait.
Begin Before Feeling Ready.
Prepare and Present in Brief, Regular Sessions.
Stop.
Moderate Over-attachment and Overreaction.
Moderate Negative Thinking and Strong Emotions.
Let Others Do Some of the Work.
Moderate Classroom Incivilities.
A Summary of Chapter 2 and its Mindful Ways of Writing.

ch. 3 Socialize and Serve with Compassion.
Introduction: Why Compassion Is Ultimately Important.
Learn about Academic Culture, Early, Patiently.
Let Others Do Some of Your Work.
Combine Self-Service with Service for Others.

General Summary: Catalog Summary of Nihil Nimus Rules
Sources.
Appendix: Readings by the Numbers.
Cover image

So You Want to Be a Professor? A Handbook for Graduate Students

Book
Vesilind, P. Aarne
2000
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1778.2.V47 2000
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Maybe you'd like to combine the two loves of your life, teaching and scholarship, and perhaps build a satisfying and profitable academic career, but you're not sure if this is really what you want or how to go about it. Or maybe you've made up your mind but need some good advice on how to succeed. If so, this book is written for you. So You Want To Be a ...
Additional Info:
Maybe you'd like to combine the two loves of your life, teaching and scholarship, and perhaps build a satisfying and profitable academic career, but you're not sure if this is really what you want or how to go about it. Or maybe you've made up your mind but need some good advice on how to succeed. If so, this book is written for you. So You Want To Be a Professor begins with a discussion of jobs in academia and how to find them. Chapters cover a wide range of political skills for future academic success, including lecturing, organizing a course, meeting your first class, testing, maintaining a research program, and writing for publication. No other book provides such a practical overview of essential career-building skills. Even junior faculty will benefit from the advice in this engaging, comprehensive book. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Employment Opportunities in Academia
ch. 2 Getting an Academic Job
ch. 3 Learning to Teach
ch. 4 Organizing a Course
ch. 5 Presenting a Course
ch. 6 Meeting Your First Class
ch. 7 Testing and Evaluation
ch. 8 Advising and Mentoring
ch. 9 Research and Scholarship
ch. 10 Publishing
ch. 11 Getting Tenure
ch. 12 Academic Integrity
ch. 13 Getting Fired
ch. 14 The Academic Career
Cover image

Scholarship in the Postmodern Era: New Venues, New Values, New Visions

Book
Zahorski, Kenneth J., ed.
2002
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 90)
LA227.4.S364 2002
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A little over a decade ago, Ernest Boyer's Scholarship Reconsidered burst upon the academic scene, igniting a robust national conversation that maintains its vitbaality to this day. This volume aims at advancing that important conversation. Its first section focuses on the new settings and circumstances in which the act of scholarship is being played out; its second identifies and explores the fresh set of values currently informing today's scholarly practices; ...
Additional Info:
A little over a decade ago, Ernest Boyer's Scholarship Reconsidered burst upon the academic scene, igniting a robust national conversation that maintains its vitbaality to this day. This volume aims at advancing that important conversation. Its first section focuses on the new settings and circumstances in which the act of scholarship is being played out; its second identifies and explores the fresh set of values currently informing today's scholarly practices; and its third looks to the future of scholarship, identifying trends, causative factors, and potentialities that promise to shape scholars and their scholarship in the new millennium. One of the greatest legacies of Scholarship Reconsidered is the advocacy of a more holistic and humane approach to promoting, evaluating, and rewarding scholarship. This volume hopes to help nurture that legacy.

This is the 90th volume of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes
ch. 1 Beyond Scholarship Reconsidered: Toward an Enlarged Vision of the Scholarly Work of Faculty Members (R. Eugene Rice)
ch. 2 Transforming the Scholarly Process Through Information Technology (Wallace Hannum)
ch. 3 Nurturing Scholarship Through Holistic Faculty Development: A Synergistic Approach (Kenneth J. Zahorski)
ch. 4 New Conceptions of Scholarship for a New Generation of Faculty Members (Mary Deane Sorcinelli)
ch. 5 Engendering Trust Through Institutional Policies and Practices (Ann F. Lucas)
ch. 6 The Soul of Scholarship (Kina S. Mallard
ch. 7 Defining Scholarship for the Twenty-First Century (Robert M. Diamond)
ch. 8 Student-Faculty Collaborations, Undergraduate Research, and Collaboration as an Administrative Model (Ronald L. Dotterer)
ch. 9 Nurturing an Ethos of Community Engagement (Jerry Berberet)
Index
Cover image

The Course Portfolio: How Faculty Can Examine Their Teaching to Advance Practice and Improve Student Learning

Book
Hutchings, Pat, ed.
1998
American Association for Higher Education, Washington, D.C.
LB2333.C65 1998
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Cousin to The Teaching Portfolio, which documents a broad sampling of a faculty member's pedagogical work, the course portfolio focuses instead on the unfolding of a single course, from conception to results. The volume covers defining features and functions, steps in development, audiences and occasions for use, and the course portfolio's place in the development of a scholarship of teaching and learning. It also includes nine case studies by faculty ...
Additional Info:
Cousin to The Teaching Portfolio, which documents a broad sampling of a faculty member's pedagogical work, the course portfolio focuses instead on the unfolding of a single course, from conception to results. The volume covers defining features and functions, steps in development, audiences and occasions for use, and the course portfolio's place in the development of a scholarship of teaching and learning. It also includes nine case studies by faculty in a range of disciplines who have developed and used course portfolios, as well as an annotated resource list. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Margaret A. Miller)
Acknowledgements
Introduction (Pat Hutchings)
ch. 1: Course Anatomy: The Dissection and Analysis of Knowledge Through Teaching (Lee S. Shulman)
ch. 2: Defining Features and Significant Functions of the Course Portfolio (Pat Hutchings)
Case Study 1: Writing a Course Portfolio for an Introductory Survey Course in American History (William W. Cutler, III)
Case Study 2: A Course Portfolio for A Graduate Nursing Course
ch. 3: Why Now: Course Portfolios in Context (Mary Taylor Huber)
Case Study 1: Writing a Course Portfolio for an Introductory Slavery Course in American History (William W. Cutler III)
Case Study 2: A Course Portfolio for A Graduate Nursing Course (Donna Martsoff)
Chapter 3: Why Now? Course Portfolios in Context (Mary Taylor Huber)
Case Study 3: A Course Portfolio for a Colloquium in 2oth-Century American Foreign Relations (Mary Ann Heiss)
Case Study 4: A Course Portfolio in Mathematics (Orin Chein)
ch. 4: How to Develop a Course Portfolio (Pat Hutchings)
Case Study 5: A Course Portfolio for Midcareer Reflection (Deborah M. Langsam)
Case Study 6: Post-Tenure Review: A Case Study of a Course Portfolio Within a Personnel File (Charles W. Mignon)
Case Study 7: A Portfolio That Makes a Point (Eli Passow)
ch. 5: Putting the Focus on Student Learning (Daniel Bernstein)
Case Study 8: A Course Portfolio for a Creative Writing Course (Pat Hutchings)
Case Study 9: A Hypertext Portfolio for an Experimental American Literature Course (Randy Bass)
ch. 6: Audiences and Occasions: Using Course Portfolios for Peer Collaboration and Review of Teaching (Pat Hutchings)
Works Cited
Resources for Further Work (Laurie Milford and Pat Hutchings)
Book cover image

To Improve the Academy, vol. 21

Book
Wehlburg, Catherine, ed.
2003
To Improve the Academy 21 (Professional and Organizational Development Network, New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK 2003)
LB1731.T59v.21
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

Section I: Faculty Development and Its Role in Institutional and National Crisis
ch. 1 September 11, 2001, as a Teachable Moment (Edward Zlotkowski)
ch. 2 The Day After: Faculty Behavior in Post-September 11, 2001, Classes (Michaele DiPietro)
ch. 3 Internationalizing American Higher Education: A Call to Thought and Action (Deborah deZure)

Section II: Faculty Focus in Faculty Development
ch. 4 The Knowledge Survey: A Tool for All Reasons (Edward Nuhfer and Delores Knipp)
ch. 5 Establishing a Teaching Academy: Cultivation of Teaching at a Research University Campus (Patricia Kalivoda, Josef Broder, and William K. Jackson)
ch. 6 Using Cooperative Games for Faculty Development (BarbaraJ. Millis)
ch. 7 Proven Faculty Development Tools that Foster the Scholarship of Teaching in Faculty Learning Communities (Milton D. Cox)
ch. 8 Assessing and Reinvigorating a Teaching Assistant Support Program: The Intersections of Institutional, Regional, and National Needs for Preparing Future Faculty (Kathleen S. Smith)
ch. 9 Transforming Instructional Development: Online Workshops for Faculty (Laurie Bellows and Joseph R. Danos)

Section III: Student-Centered Faculty Development
ch 10 Accommodating Students with Disabilities: Professional Development Needs of Faculty (Sheryl Burgstahler)
ch. 11 Integrity in Learner-Centered Teaching (Douglas Robertson)
ch. 12 Something More: Moments of Meeting and the Teacher-Learner Relationship (Richard G. Tiberius, John Teshima, and Alan R. Kindler)
ch. 13 Undergraduate Students as Collaborators in Building Student Learning Communities (Candyce Reynolds)
ch. 14 Improving Teaching and Learning: Students' Perspectives (X. Mara Chen, Ellen M. Lawler, and Elichia A. Venso)

Section IV: Philosophical Issues in Faculty Development
ch. 15 The Essential Role of Faculty Development in New Higher Education Models (Devorah A. Lieberman and Alan E. Guskin)
ch. 16 Are They Really Teachers? Problem-Based Learning and Information Professionals (Michael Anderson and Virginia Baldwin)
ch. 17 Embracing a Philosophy of Lifelong Learning in Higher Education: Starting with Faculty Beliefs about Their Role as Educators (Caroline Kreber)
ch. 18 A Matrix for Reconsidering: Reassessing, and Shaping E-Learning Pedagogy and Curriculum (Laura Bush, Barry Maid, and Duane Roen)

Bibliography (Catherine M. Wehlburg is Director, Center for teaching Excellence, Texas Christian University. Sandra Chadwick-Blossey is Director, Christian A. Johnson Institute for Effective Teaching, Rollins College.
Cover image

The Disciplines Speak: Rewarding the Scholarly, Professional, and Creative Work of Faculty

Book
Diamond, Robert M. and Adam, Bronwyn E., eds.
1995
American Association for Higher Education, Washington, D.C.
LB2334.D57 1995
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This set of two volumes offers statements from disciplinary/professional societies on what faculty work deserves recognition and reward in their unique culture/community. Volume I covers religion, history, geography, math, chemistry, the arts, business, journalism, and family/consumer science, plus the National Education Association. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This set of two volumes offers statements from disciplinary/professional societies on what faculty work deserves recognition and reward in their unique culture/community. Volume I covers religion, history, geography, math, chemistry, the arts, business, journalism, and family/consumer science, plus the National Education Association. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Eugene Rice)
Editors' Note
Describing the Work of Faculty: Disciplinary Perspectives
Statements (Robert M. Diamond and Bromwyn E. Adam)

Statements
ch. 1 Humanities and Social Sciences
American Academy of Religion - Religious Studies and the Redefining Scholarship Project (A Report of the AAR Ad Hoc Committee on "Defining Scholarly Work")
American Historical Association - Redefining Historical Scholarship (Report of the American Historical Association Ad Hoc Committee on Redefining Scholarly Work)
Association of American Geographers - Toward a Reconsideration of Faculty Roles and Rewards in Geography, Faculty Roles and Rewards

ch. 2 Natural Sciences
American Chemical Society - Report of the American Chemical Society Task Force on the Definition of Scholarship in Chemistry (J. Ivan Legg; Laurence A. Nafie; Paula P. Brownlee; William E. Broderick; Norman C. Craig; Marcetta Y. Darensbourg; William B. DeLauder; Slayton A. Evans, Jr.; Ursula M. Mazur; Theodore E. Tabor; Edward K. Mellon; and Joseph G. Morse)
Joint Policy Board for Mathematics - Recognition and Rewards in the Mathematical Sciences (Report of the Joint Policy Board for Mathematics, Committee on Professional Recognition and Rewards (excerpt))

ch. 3 Fine, Performing and Applied Arts
National Office for Arts Accreditation in Higher Education - The Work of Arts Faculties in Higher Education
Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board
National Architectural Accrediting Board
National Association of Schools of Art and Design
National Association of Schools of Dance
National Association of Schools of Music
National Association of Schools of Theatre

4 Professional Programs
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business - Defining Scholarly Work in Management Education (William K. Laidlaw, Jr.)
Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication - Report of the Association for Education in Journalism & Mass Communication on the Definition of Scholarship in Journalism (Task Force)
Council of Administrators of Family and Consumer Sciences - Recognition and Rewards in the Family and Consumer Sciences

Appendix
National Education Association (NEA) Statement on Faculty Reward Structures
References and Resources
About AAHE
Cover image

Field Guide to Academic Leadership: A Publication of the National Academy for Academic Leadership

Book
Diamond, Robert M., ed.
2002
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco, CA
LB2341.F43 2002
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This guide for those in leadership positions at academic institutions provides information and suggestions for action and administrative practice related to a range of issues. The guide blends research on leadership, change, teaching, and learning with the insights of academic leaders and researchers across the US, and stresses the need for cooperation and collaboration among leaders. Two introductory chapters review forces of change affecting higher education and introduce elements for ...
Additional Info:
This guide for those in leadership positions at academic institutions provides information and suggestions for action and administrative practice related to a range of issues. The guide blends research on leadership, change, teaching, and learning with the insights of academic leaders and researchers across the US, and stresses the need for cooperation and collaboration among leaders. Two introductory chapters review forces of change affecting higher education and introduce elements for significant change, while the bulk of the book offers material on leadership roles and challenges, teaching and learning, assessment, organizational issues, and position-specific issues. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Pt. 1 Basics
ch. 1 Pressures for Fundamental Reform: Creating a Viable Academic Future (Alan E. Guskin and Mary B. Marcy)
ch. 2 Requisites for Sustainable Institutional Change (Robert M. Diamond, Lion F. Gardiner and Daniel W.Wheeler)

Pt. 2 Leadership
ch. 3 Leadership and Change (Dale W. Lick)
ch. 4 Mission and Vision Statements: An Essential First Step (William G. Tierney)
ch. 5 Moving Mountains: Institutional Culture and Transformational Change (Judith A. Ramaley)
ch. 6 Building on Style for More Effective Relationships and Results (Robert M. Diamond and Charles M. Spuches)

Pt. 3 Academics
ch. 7 Research on Learning and Student Development and Its Implications (Lion F. Gardiner)
ch. 8 Student Development: Monitoring the Quality of Learning and Development (Lion F. Gardiner)
ch. 9 Curricula and Courses: Administrative Issues (Robert M. Diamond)
ch. 10 Teaching Strategies for the Twenty-First Century (James Eison)
ch. 11 Technology in the Learning Process (Wallace Hannum)
ch. 12 Improving Academic Advising: Issues and Action Areas for Campus Leaders (Franklin P. Wilbur)
ch. 13 Faculty Development: An Investment for the Future (Marilla Svinicki)

Pt. 4 Assessment
ch. 14 Evaluation and Assessment: An Institutional Context (Michael Theall)
ch. 15 Academic Program Review (Jon F. Wergin)
ch. 16 Leadership in Faculty Evaluation (Michael Theall)
ch. 17 The Mission-Driven Faculty Reward System (Robert M. Diamond)

Pt. 5 Other Issues
ch. 18 Supportive Financial Systems (Susan Stetson Clarke)
ch. 19 Enhancing Student Learning Through Collaboration Between Academic Affairs and Student Affairs (George D. Kuh and Sara E. Hinkle)
ch. 20 Dealing with Technology: Administrative Issues (Steven W. Gilbert and Stephen C. Ehrmann)
ch. 21 Diversity Issues (Joseph H. Silver, Sr.)

Pt. 6 Position-Specific Issues for Academic Leaders
ch. 22 The Role of Governing Boards: Issues, Recommendations, and Resources
ch. 23 Creating Change: Suggestions for the New President (Kenneth A. Shaw)
ch. 24 Transforming the Small College: A Challenge for Presidential Leadership (Eugene Hotchkiss)
ch. 25 Presidents and Chief Academic Officers of Community Colleges (Louis S. Albert)
ch. 26 Chief Academic Officers (Leo M. Lambert)
ch. 27 Academic Deans (Deryl R. Leaming)
ch. 28 Chairs as Institutional Leaders (Daniel W. Wheeler)

Pt. 7 Conclusion
ch. 29 Some Final Observations (Robert M. Diamond)

App Participants at Minnowbrook Conferences
Glossary of Academic Terms
Name Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Using Cases in Higher Education: A Guide for Faculty and Administrators

Book
Honan, James P. and Cheryl Sternman Rule
2002
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.H62 2002
Topics: Case Study Method   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Using Cases in Higher Education: A Guide for Faculty and Administrators is an essential resource created for faculty and administrators who utilize case studies to analyze, assess, and respond to the complex and difficult issues facing higher education leaders. While this volume will prove useful with any case study, it is specifically designed to complement the series of casebooks and teaching notes, starting with Casebook I: Faculty Employment Policies and ...
Additional Info:
Using Cases in Higher Education: A Guide for Faculty and Administrators is an essential resource created for faculty and administrators who utilize case studies to analyze, assess, and respond to the complex and difficult issues facing higher education leaders. While this volume will prove useful with any case study, it is specifically designed to complement the series of casebooks and teaching notes, starting with Casebook I: Faculty Employment Policies and Teaching Notes to Casebook I: Faculty Employment Policies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction: Teaching and Learning with Case Studies

ch. 1. Overview: Using Cases in Higher Education
ch. 2. Case Studies as Teaching Tools
ch. 3. Essential Elements of Effective Case Teaching
ch. 4. Post-Discussion Learning

Annotated Bibliography
Appendix Kansas State University Case
Index
Cover image

Handbook for Academic Authors, Fourth edition

Book
Luey, Beth
2002
Cambridge University Press, New York, NY
PN146.L84 2002
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This new edition of a common-sense guide to all aspects of academic publishing contains an entirely new chapter on writing nonfiction for a general audience. It has been revised and updated throughout to reflect the state of new technologies and their meaning to authors. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This new edition of a common-sense guide to all aspects of academic publishing contains an entirely new chapter on writing nonfiction for a general audience. It has been revised and updated throughout to reflect the state of new technologies and their meaning to authors. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Illustrations
Preface
Preface to the Second Edition
Preface to the Third Edition
Preface to the Fourth Edition
ch. 1 The Publishing Partnership
ch. 2 Journal Articles
ch. 3 Revising a Dissertation
ch. 4 Finding a Publisher for the Scholarly Book
ch. 5 Working with Your Publisher
ch. 6 Multiauthor Books and Anthologies
ch. 7 Finding a Publisher for the College Textbook
ch. 8 Working with Your Textbook Publisher
ch. 9 Books for General Readers
ch. 10 The Mechanics of Authorship
ch. 11 Costs and Prices
ch. 12 Electronic Publishing
Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Tending Talents: Reports From a Study of Theological School Faculty

Journal Issue
Wheeler, Barbara. and Mark N. Wilhelm
1997
Auburn Studies, No. 5 (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY 1997)
BV4070.A8 A1 1997 no. 5
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

The Craft of Research

Book
Booth, Wayne C., Gregory G. Colomb, Joseph M. Williams
1995
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
Q180.55.M4B66 1995
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Here's a concise, practical guide to mastering the art of research. Filled with the tested strategies and expert advice of three distinguished scholars, this book helps you plan, carry out, and report on research in any field, at any level - a term paper, a dissertation, an article, or a book. The Craft of Research is about more than the mechanics of fact gathering: it's a unique introduction to doing ...
Additional Info:
Here's a concise, practical guide to mastering the art of research. Filled with the tested strategies and expert advice of three distinguished scholars, this book helps you plan, carry out, and report on research in any field, at any level - a term paper, a dissertation, an article, or a book. The Craft of Research is about more than the mechanics of fact gathering: it's a unique introduction to doing research effectively. Clearly written and easy to use, it teaches the skills that are essential to the success of any research project. Wayne Booth, Gregory Colomb, and Joseph Williams chart every stage of the research process, from finding a topic and generating research questions about it to marshalling evidence, constructing arguments, creating a first draft, and revising that draft for a final report that meets the needs of a community of readers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
ch. 1 Thinking in Print: The Uses of Research, Public and Private
ch. 2 Connecting with Your Reader: (Re)Creating Your Self and Your Audience
ch. 3 From Topics to Questions
ch. 4 From Questions to Problems
ch. 5 From Questions to Sources
ch. 6 Using Sources
ch. 7 Making Good Arguments: An Overview
ch. 8 Claims and Evidence
ch. 9 Warrants
ch. 10 Qualifications
ch. 11 Pre-Drafting and Drafting
ch. 12 Communicating Evidence Visually
ch. 13 Revising Your Organization and Argument
ch. 14 Revising Style: Telling Your Story Clearly
ch. 15 Introductions
Index
Article cover image

"Department-level Cultures and the Improvement of Learning and Teaching"

Article
Knight, Peter T., and Trowler, Paul R.
2000
Studies in Higher Education 25, no. 1 (2000): 69-83
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This article argues that good practice in teaching and learning in the English-speaking world may be compromised by structural changes in the higher education system. The impact of these changes is, however, affected by leadership practices and working cultures at the departmental level. These can, it is argued, assist in the development of 'deeper' teaching and learning practices even in a context which may be seen as unfavourable to them. ...
Additional Info:
This article argues that good practice in teaching and learning in the English-speaking world may be compromised by structural changes in the higher education system. The impact of these changes is, however, affected by leadership practices and working cultures at the departmental level. These can, it is argued, assist in the development of 'deeper' teaching and learning practices even in a context which may be seen as unfavourable to them. Rejecting simplistic notions of transformational leadership and organisational cultural engineering, the article identifies activity systems at the local, departmental, level as the central loci of changes in approaches to and recurrent practices in teaching and learning. Desirable change is most likely to be achieved in collective and collaborative ways, which means that change processes are contingent and contextualised, and that outcomes are unpredictable and fuzzy. The data in this article come from in-depth interviews with academics in England and Canada; from one author's previous studies; and from literatures on faculty's work environments in English-speaking countries.
Article cover image

"Ethics and the Teaching Responsibilities of Faculty"

Article
Smith, David H.
2003
The Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions, Indiana University (2003), 1-14
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Creating a Culture of Commitment to Learning and Teaching: Twenty Reflections from Twenty Years Experience in Faculty Development"

Article
Frederick, Peter
1996
Paper presented at Wabash College (June 1996)
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"What's Your Philosophy on Teaching, and Does it Matter?"

Article
Montell, Gabriela
2003
The Chronicle of Higher Education, 27 March 2003
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Break Away from Teaching Versus Research"

Article
Jenkins, Alan
2003
Tomorrow’s Professor Listserv #459, (2003) http://campus.umr.edu/lead/teaching/docs/TeachingResearch.htm
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
An article that reviews progress scholars and institutions have made to reshape the potential connections between faculty research and student learning, since Ernest Boyer’s landmark 1990 essay, “Scholarship Reconsidered” – developing our understanding of the research evidence, focusing on course design, and starting to reshape institutions.
Additional Info:
An article that reviews progress scholars and institutions have made to reshape the potential connections between faculty research and student learning, since Ernest Boyer’s landmark 1990 essay, “Scholarship Reconsidered” – developing our understanding of the research evidence, focusing on course design, and starting to reshape institutions.
Article cover image

"Enhancing the Research-Teaching Nexus"

Article
Jonte-Pace, Diane
2003
Faculty Development, Santa Clara University (2003) http://www.scu.edu/provost/facultydevelopment/teaching/researchteaching.cfm
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A short article by Diane Jonte-Pace, reviewing recent literature and issues, and commenting on specifically on aspects of the situation at Santa Clara University.
Additional Info:
A short article by Diane Jonte-Pace, reviewing recent literature and issues, and commenting on specifically on aspects of the situation at Santa Clara University.
Article cover image

"Teaching Circles: Making Inquiry Safe for Faculty"

Article
Black, Laurel, and Mary Ann Cessna
2002
Teaching Excellence 14, no. 3 (2002): 10-11
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Building the Team: Faculty, Staff, and Students Working Together

Book
Disabilities Opportunities Internetworking Technology (DO-IT)
2002
University of Washington, Seattle, WA
LC4813.B85 2002
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This publication contains 2 videotapes, written materials, handout templates, and overhead projection templates developed for those providing professional development to help faculty and administrators in postsecondary institutions become more aware of the rights, responsibilities, potential contributions, and needs of students with disabilities; the rights and responsibilities of postsecondary institutions; reasonable accommodations and instructional strategies for working with students who have disabilities; and campus resources that help provide equitable educational opportunities for ...
Additional Info:
This publication contains 2 videotapes, written materials, handout templates, and overhead projection templates developed for those providing professional development to help faculty and administrators in postsecondary institutions become more aware of the rights, responsibilities, potential contributions, and needs of students with disabilities; the rights and responsibilities of postsecondary institutions; reasonable accommodations and instructional strategies for working with students who have disabilities; and campus resources that help provide equitable educational opportunities for all students. The materials are designed for use in departmental and campus-wide presentations to stimulate discussion and action. The presentation lengths vary from 20 minutes to several days and address the following topics: (1) accommodations strategies; (2) universal design of instruction; (3) effective communication; (4) information access; (5) access to computers; (6) making computer labs accessible to everyone; (7) universal design of Web pages; (8) making distance learning accessible to everyone; (9) science/math/engineering access; (10) accommodating students with learning disabilities; and (11) accommodating students with psychiatric disabilities. For each presentation option, a sample script is included to minimize the work that might otherwise be required to prepare a presentation. The presenter may use a script verbatim or extract ideas to customize a presentation. Along with the presentations, a synthesis of research, implementation and institutionalization strategies, presentation tips and case study examples, frequently asked questions, and a glossary of disability-related terms and a list of resources are included. The 2 videotapes included with this notebook can be used in specific presentations or broadcast on public television. Handout and overhead projection templates are provided in the "Presentation Tools" section of the notebook for easy duplication and use. A Web-based instructional option is also available for faculty and administrators (to access Web-based instruction, see http://www.washington.edu/doit/Faculty/). Also, a distance learning course that can be delivered via electronic mail to faculty and administrators on any campus is available online. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Building a Team Faculty, Staff and Students Working Together
ch. 2 Objectives of Presentation
ch. 3 Services to Students with Disabilities (SSWD)
ch. 4 SSWD Services
ch. 5 Staff Contact Information
ch. 6 “A Student with a Disability”
ch. 7 CSUS Disabled Student Enrollment
ch. 8 Top Ten Academic Majors Disabled Student Enrollment
ch. 9 Case Study: John
ch. 10 Roles, Responsibilities and Expectations (Campus policy)
ch. 11 Case Study: Mary & Professor Aplus
ch. 12 A Learning Disability:
ch. 13 Learning Disability Referral and Diagnostic Process
ch. 14 Characteristics of Students with Learning Disabilities
ch. 15 Characteristics of Students with Learning Disabilities (continued)
ch. 16 Case Study: Roger
ch. 17 Reasonable Accommodation
ch. 18 Possible Accommodations for Blind & Visually Impaired
ch. 19 Possible Accommodations for Mobility Impairments
ch. 20 Possible Accommodations for Deaf & Hard of Hearing
ch. 21 Possible Accommodations for Psychological Disabilities
ch. 22 Possible Accommodations for Learning Disabilities
ch. 23 Testing Center and Logistics of Test Accommodation
ch. 24 Certification of Test/Course Accommodations
ch. 25 Making Classes Accessible
ch. 26 Making Classes Accessible
ch. 27 Important wording in your Syllabus
ch. 28 Universal Design of Teaching and Learning
ch. 29 High Tech Center
ch. 30 Adaptive Technology for Visual Impairments
ch. 31 Adaptive Technology for Blind
ch. 32 Adaptive Technology for Mobility Impairments
ch. 33 Adaptive Technology for Learning Disabilities
ch. 34 Alternative Media
ch. 35 Making Web Pages Accessible
ch. 36 Disability Legislation
ch. 37 University Policies
ch. 38 Recap Objectives
ch. 39 Questions and Answers
ch. 40 Contact Information
ch. 41 Other Campus Resources
ch. 42 Thank you
Cover image

Working Effectively with Graduate Assistants

Book
Nyquist, Jody D. and Donald H. Wulff
1996
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB2335.4.N98 1996
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
While graduate assistants are valued as labour savers, they are also a precious resource whose preprofessional training needs careful design. Written by two leading authorities in the field of instructional development, this indispensable guide details the skills necessary for academics dealing with graduate assistants. The authors provide comprehensive coverage of all aspects of assistant preparation and assessment, and a chapter addressing special needs of international graduate assistants is included. (From ...
Additional Info:
While graduate assistants are valued as labour savers, they are also a precious resource whose preprofessional training needs careful design. Written by two leading authorities in the field of instructional development, this indispensable guide details the skills necessary for academics dealing with graduate assistants. The authors provide comprehensive coverage of all aspects of assistant preparation and assessment, and a chapter addressing special needs of international graduate assistants is included. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Understanding the Challenges of Working With Graduate Teaching Assistants and Graduate Research Assistants
ch. 2 Establishing Supervisory Relationships With Graduate Teaching Assistants and Graduate Research Assistants
ch. 3 Recognizing and Adapting to Stages of Graduate Teaching Assistants' and Graduate Research Assistants' Development
ch. 4 Preparing Graduate Teaching Assistants for Special Challenges in Teaching
ch. 5 Preparing Graduate Teaching Assistants for Their Specific Instructional Roles
ch. 6 Preparing Graduate Research Assistants for Their Responsibilities
ch. 7 Addressing Special Considerations When Working With International Teaching Assistants
ch. 8 Assessing the Performance of Graduate Teaching Assistants and Graduate Research Assistants
ch. 9 Designing a Plan of Action
ch. 10 Selected References Useful to Supervisors of Graduate Teaching Assistants and Graduate Research Assistants

References
About the Authors
Cover image

Academic Life: Hospitality, Ethics, and Spirituality

Book
Bennett, John B.
2003
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LA227.4.B466 2003
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In this profound look at the academy, John Bennett reminds us that our leadership decisions always presuppose our philosophies of life and that understanding precedes practice. How we understand the communities we lead informs the many practical judgments we make about directions to take, structures to create, processes to initiate, and values to uphold.

Bennett argues that faculty may understand their departments or institutions in one of two ...
Additional Info:
In this profound look at the academy, John Bennett reminds us that our leadership decisions always presuppose our philosophies of life and that understanding precedes practice. How we understand the communities we lead informs the many practical judgments we make about directions to take, structures to create, processes to initiate, and values to uphold.

Bennett argues that faculty may understand their departments or institutions in one of two ways: as simply aggregations of individuals or as communities of intertwined persons. From these views, two different leadership values and positions emerge.

The first disposes us toward seeing academic conflict as inevitable and elevates heroic leadership styles where power is understood in terms of advancing one agenda over competitors. The second underwrites leadership as supporting openness to others and emphasizes the vital contributions that can follow.

By providing specific illustrations of the two modes of leadership and the nature of hospitality and openness, Academic Life presents a strong platform from which to build a rich and rewarding academic community. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The nature of insistent individualism
ch. 2 Why the prevalence of insistent individualism?
ch. 3 Hospitality as an essential virtue
ch. 4 Self, others, institutions, and the common good
ch. 5 Conversation as an essential metaphor
ch. 6 The uses of conversation
ch. 7 Community and covenant
ch. 8 Engaged, but not heroic, leadership
Cover image

Metateaching and the Instructional Map

Book
Timpson, William M.
1999
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB1025.3.T56 1999
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Bill Timpson presents his conception of metateaching. As metacognition is the idea of thinking about thinking, metateaching is the idea of thinking about teaching. Your mind will be infused with new, innovative — yet practical — ways to think about your classroom after reading this book.
You will learn about the Instructional Map, a systematic tool to help you organize your classes and visualize the direction, components, and impact of different ...
Additional Info:
Bill Timpson presents his conception of metateaching. As metacognition is the idea of thinking about thinking, metateaching is the idea of thinking about teaching. Your mind will be infused with new, innovative — yet practical — ways to think about your classroom after reading this book.
You will learn about the Instructional Map, a systematic tool to help you organize your classes and visualize the direction, components, and impact of different aspects of teaching. Ideas from the fields of cartography and orienteering will give you a fresh angle from which to view your teaching practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Passages and Pathfinders
Introduction

ch. 1: Of Story and Journey, Map, and Place
ch. 2: The Essence of Maps
ch. 3: Metacognition and Metateaching
ch. 4: The Instructional Map Explained
ch. 5: Using the Instructional Map
ch. 6: Observations, Presentations. and Student Reflections
ch. 7: The Instructional Map and Various Instructional Approaches

References
Article cover image

"Graduate Schools Should Require Internships For Teaching"

Article
Burke, Joseph C.
2001
The Chronicle of Higher Education, 5 October 2001
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Learning Online to Teach Online"

Article
Carnevale, Dan
2003
The Chronicle of Higher Education, Vol. 50, Issue 10, October 2003
Topics: Online Learning   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Asserts that while prospective distance educators are flocking to certification programs, some academics question their value. Although certification programs, which can differ significantly in nature and intensity, go well beyond simple technology training, many newly certified distance educators have found that the certification does not necessarily lead to job security or even employment.
Additional Info:
Asserts that while prospective distance educators are flocking to certification programs, some academics question their value. Although certification programs, which can differ significantly in nature and intensity, go well beyond simple technology training, many newly certified distance educators have found that the certification does not necessarily lead to job security or even employment.
Article cover image

"Defining and Evaluating College Teaching" (pdf)

Article
Cashin, William E.
1989
Idea Paper No. 21, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1989)
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Describes the seven areas that should be considered when evaluating teaching: subject matter mastery, curriculum development, course design, delivery instruction, assessment of instruction, availability to students, and administrative requirements. Idea Paper no. 21, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Describes the seven areas that should be considered when evaluating teaching: subject matter mastery, curriculum development, course design, delivery instruction, assessment of instruction, availability to students, and administrative requirements. Idea Paper no. 21, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Article cover image

"Teaching Squares"

Article
Rhem, James
2003
The National Teaching & Learning Forum 13, no. 1(2003): 1-3
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Visualizing Yourself As A Successful College Teacher, Writer, and Colleague"

Article
Moody, JoAnn
1997
in Demystifying the Profession: Helping Junior Faculty Succeed (New Haven, CT: University of New Haven Press, 1997), 1-10
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Scholarship: A Sacred Vocation"

Article
Pelikan, Jaroslav
1984
Scholarly Publishing 16, no. 1 (1984): 19
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Publish, Don't Perish: Submitting Research Articles to Refereed Journals"

Article
Finn, Margot
1999
Paper presented at the North American Conference on British Studies annual meeting, Boston (1999)
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Guide For Reviewing Programs in Religion & Theology"

Article
AAR Academic Relations Task Force
1999
American Academy of Religion
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Modeled on guides produced for other fields, this document is intended to provide department chairs and deans with a set of strategic questions and suggested steps for conducing a review of their program. We intend this document to be helpful for chairs undertaking annual reviews and reviews for accrediting agencies. It contains an introductory statement on the study of religion; a discussion of the preliminary steps in constructing a successful ...
Additional Info:
Modeled on guides produced for other fields, this document is intended to provide department chairs and deans with a set of strategic questions and suggested steps for conducing a review of their program. We intend this document to be helpful for chairs undertaking annual reviews and reviews for accrediting agencies. It contains an introductory statement on the study of religion; a discussion of the preliminary steps in constructing a successful review; a step-by-step description of their review process, and a description of how to conceptualized the write an effective “self-study narrative.” (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface. The Study of Religion Today and in the Past
Strengthening Your Program and the Field
Purpose of the Guide
Accreditation
What's At Stake
The Review Process
Step 1. The Decision to Conduct the Review
Step 2. Preliminary Preparation for the Review
Step 3. Self-Study
Writing the Evaluative Narrative
List of Sections and Topics for the Narrative
History of the Program
Goals and Defining Characteristics of the Program
Curriculum
Advising System
Resources for Undergraduate Program–faculty, TAs, etc.
Other Program Features
Faculty
Relations with Other Departments and Programs
Governance Structure
Degree to Which Program Seeks Advice and Participation From Other Faculty
Quality and Stability of Leadership
Staff
Funding
Other Local Program Issues
Graduate Program
Overview: General Quality, Trends, Reputation, etc.
Students
Requirements
Curriculum
Advising System
Qualifying Examinations
Master's Theses and/or Dissertations
Time to Degree
Teaching Experience and Training
Financial Support
Summary of Planned Changes in Program
Appendices
Data
Checklist of Documents to Include as Appendices in Self-Study
Table of Contents of Documents Included in the Self-Study
Evaluative Narrative
Descriptive and Quantitative Appendices
Step 4. The External Review
Identifying External Reviewers
Organizing Participants for External Reviewers' Interviews and Meetings
Interacting with the External Reviewers
Being Clear about Priorities
Following up on the External Review
Step 5. Response to the External Review Report
Step 6. Administration Response
Appendix A. Writing the Self-Study Narrative
Introductory Sections of the Self-Study
History of the Program
Program Goals and Definition
Program Structure
Strategic Sections of the Self-Study
The Undergraduate Program
Overview
Students
Requirements
Curriculum
Other Aspects of the Undergraduate Program
Advising
Resources
The Graduate Program
Overview
Students
Requirements
Curriculum
Advising
Qualifying Examination
Master's Theses; Dissertations
Time to Degree
Teaching Experience and Training
Financial Support
Other Program Features
Faculty
Relations with Other Departments and Programs
Governance Structure
Staff
Funding
Space, Equipment, Library Resources, and Other Resources
Other Local Issues
Concluding Sections of the Self-Study
Summary of Planned Changes in the Program
Concluding Flourish
Article cover image

"Enhancing Educational Capital: Challenges and Benefits"

Article
2002
Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, July/August 2002 (Heldref Publications: Washington DC 2002)
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Developing Non-Hierarchical Leadership on Campus: Case Studies and Best Practices in Higher Education

Book
Outcalt, Charles L., Shannon K. Faris, and Kathleen N. McMahon, eds.
2001
Greenwood Press, Westport, CT
LB2806.D437 2001
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Abstract: Key figures in the field of non-hierarchical leadership development share their insights on conceptualizing, promoting, and assessing models of leadership based on teamwork, diversity, and service. This volume will be essential for theorists and practitioners in higher education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Abstract: Key figures in the field of non-hierarchical leadership development share their insights on conceptualizing, promoting, and assessing models of leadership based on teamwork, diversity, and service. This volume will be essential for theorists and practitioners in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction

I. Thinking about Non-Hierarchical Leadership Development
ch. 1 An Interview with Helen S. Astin (Kathleen N. McMahon)
ch. 2 The Emergence of Inclusive, Process-Oriented Leadership (Shannon K. Faris and Charles L. Outcalt)
ch. 3 A Multiple-Level Approach for Understanding the Nature of Leadership Studies (Francis J. Yammarino and Fred Dansereau)
ch. 4 Developing Social Change Agents: Leadership Development for the 1990s and Beyond (Marguerite Bounous-Hammarth)
ch. 5 New Ways of Leading in a Networked World (Cynthia Cherrey and Kathleen Allen)
ch. 6 Using Postmodern Feminism to Reconceptualize "Citizenship" and "Community" (Lori E. Varlotta)

II. Putting Theory into Action: Successful Campus Programs
ch. 7 Developing an Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program in Leadership Studies (Mark T. Green, Jacquelyn Alexander, and Ray Boryczka)
ch. 8 Miami's Leadership Commitment (Dennis S. Roberts)
ch. 9 Spheres of Confluence: Non-Hierarchical Leadership in Action (David C. Robertson and Bryan J. Lubic)
ch. 10 The Peer-to-Peer Context (Sunshine B. Martin)
ch. 11 Common Cause: Different Routes (Cynthia Cherrey, Judi Biggs Garbuio, and Rachel Isgar)
ch. 12 Learning and Leading: A Class Project Provides Context (Nancy S. Huber)
ch. 13 Service, Spirituality, and Social Change (Diane Bischetti)
ch. 14 Designing Experiential Training Sessions for the Social Change Model of Leadership Development (Emily A. Langdon and Nancy B. Mathias)
ch. 15 Emerging Leaders: Leadership Development from a Community College Perspective (Heather Anderson, Paul Dale, James Rubin, Cindy Shoenhair, and Shelle Witten)
ch. 16 Non-Hierarchical Leadership in Action: Creating Change on Our College Campus (Tammera J. Klumpyan and Emily A. Langdon)
ch. 17 Overcoming Resistance to Change in Higher Education (Mary Liscinsky, Christopher S. Chambers, and Christopher R. Foley)
ch. 18 The Advent of Leadership Development in the UCLA International Student Orientation Program (Mariana Zavala-Corzo)

III. The Complex Intersections of Leadership and Identity
ch. 19 Intercultural Leadership: A Program Model for Students in Higher Education (Daniel C. Adams and Patricia M. Aqui)
ch. 20 Transforming Communities: Students Dialoguing across Racial and Ethnic Boundaries (Wayne R. Millette and Roger Fisher)
ch. 21 The Lavender Leader: An Inqueery into Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Student Leadership (Ronni Sanlo)
IV. How We Define and Measure Success: Assessing Leadership Development
ch. 22 Developing Citizenship through Assessment: A Participatory Model for Guiding Learning and Leadership (Christine M. Cress)
ch. 23 Assessing Non-Hierarchical Leadership (Tracy M. Tyree)

Index
About the Contributors
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Using Cases to Improve College Teaching: A Guide to More Reflective Practice

Book
Hutchings, Pat
1993
American Association for Higher Education, Washington, D.C.
LB1778.2 .H88 1993
Topics: Case Study Method   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This monograph explores practical and theoretical issues in use of case studies for college faculty to reflect on and improve instruction. Six chapters: (1) describe teaching case studies, with an overview of how and why they are used; (2) explore the rationale for their use within the frameworks of scholarship and professional development; (3) present three brief case studies and suggestions for their use in discussion; (4) present reports from faculty groups who have ...
Additional Info:
This monograph explores practical and theoretical issues in use of case studies for college faculty to reflect on and improve instruction. Six chapters: (1) describe teaching case studies, with an overview of how and why they are used; (2) explore the rationale for their use within the frameworks of scholarship and professional development; (3) present three brief case studies and suggestions for their use in discussion; (4) present reports from faculty groups who have written case studies, with their suggestions on how to proceed; (5) discuss nine issues that have emerged through the use of cases (how they can place the focus on learning as well as teaching, possible alternative formats, getting at the more subtle issues of practice, going beyond problems to the problematic, whether and how cases can represent best practice, including content issues, using cases to build on one another, creating occasions for more productive use of cases, and the impact of case use on teaching improvement); and (6) describe three possible scenarios illustrating how cases might contribute to a campus culture that takes teaching and learning seriously. Four additional cases and teaching suggestions are appended as is a list of 13 resource organizations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Cases about college teaching and learning - a picture of emerging practice
ch. 2 The Case for cases - a deeper rationale
ch. 3 Using cases on your campus - three examples and strategies for making them work
ch. 4 Writing cases on your campus
ch. 5 Achieving the promise of cases - next steps and emerging issues
ch. 6 Cases and campus culture

Appendices - References - Sources Cited, Projects, People, Materials, Additional Cases
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Universal Challenges in Faculty Work: Fresh Perspectives from Around the World

Book
Cranton, Patricia
1997
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 72)
LB2331.U55 1997
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Global developments directly or indirectly affect teaching and learning in higher education. In this new era of telecommunication revolution and growing international cooperation, it is time for university and college teachers to talk across national boundaries about teaching. In this volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning, contributors from around the world describe issues they are currently facing in their teaching practice. National differences are put into the context ...
Additional Info:
Global developments directly or indirectly affect teaching and learning in higher education. In this new era of telecommunication revolution and growing international cooperation, it is time for university and college teachers to talk across national boundaries about teaching. In this volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning, contributors from around the world describe issues they are currently facing in their teaching practice. National differences are put into the context of universal themes. Faculty are responding to demands for social development and to pressures from the world of work. They are influenced by government policies and financial constraints. Regardless of the context within which they practice, faculty still struggle with the familiar issues of how to learn about teaching, how to juggle teaching and research, and how to evaluate both teaching and learning. The international perspectives presented in this volume give readers a fresh outlook on everyday concerns and introduce new thoughts on teaching and learning. This is the 72nd issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)
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Successful Faculty Development and Evaluation: The Complete Teaching Portfolio

Book
Murray, John P.
1997
Graduate School of Education and Human Development, George Washington University, Washington, DC
LB2333.M86 1997
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This report relates to the concept of teaching portfolios. It discusses the importance of accounting for institutional culture when introducing the concept of teaching portfolios. Includes information on how the department chair can help to improve teaching. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This report relates to the concept of teaching portfolios. It discusses the importance of accounting for institutional culture when introducing the concept of teaching portfolios. Includes information on how the department chair can help to improve teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction
What is a Teaching Portfolio?
What Goes into a Teaching Portfolio?
Evaluating Portfolios
Formative Evaluation Techniques
Shaping an Institutional Definition of Good Teaching
The Organizational Culture and Teaching Portfolios
The Role of Department Chairs
Conclusion
References
Index
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Reshaping Teaching in Higher Education: Linking Teaching with Research

Book
Jenkins, Alan, Rosanna Breen, and Roger Lindsay
2003
Taylor & Francis, Inc.
LB2326.3.R49 2003
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
* Do students gain when they are taught by active researchers?
* Should all faculty be involved in research?
* What are the benefits students (and their parents) should get from studying at an elite research university – and paying higher fees for the privilege?

In Scholarship Re-Considered, Ernest Boyer challenged US universities to "break out of the tired old teaching versus research debate." This book provides an international perspective ...
Additional Info:
* Do students gain when they are taught by active researchers?
* Should all faculty be involved in research?
* What are the benefits students (and their parents) should get from studying at an elite research university – and paying higher fees for the privilege?

In Scholarship Re-Considered, Ernest Boyer challenged US universities to "break out of the tired old teaching versus research debate." This book provides an international perspective on how universities, departments and individual faculty have successfully sought to connect their research to the benefit of student learning and institutional mission. It directly addresses the ways teaching-research links can be developed.

Building on research, the literature and wide practical experience, the authors show how academic research activity can be connected to academic teaching activity in such a way as to ensure that neither operates in a vacuum and, most importantly, that each can be enhanced by the other.

The book addresses the issues at the individual, course and institutional levels, as well as at the level of public policy. An important work for faculty, faculty developers and administrators. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Notes on the authors
Preface
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Overview: reshaping teaching in higher education to support the links between teaching and research
ch. 2 What research and scholarship tell us about teaching-research relationships in higher education
ch. 3 Academic research and student motivation in higher education
ch. 4 Designing the curriculum to link teaching and research
ch. 5 Organizing the institution to link teaching and research
ch. 6 Organizing the department to link teaching and research
ch. 7 Organizing the national and international administration of higher education to link teaching and research

References
Further reading
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Success Strategies for Adjunct Faculty

Book
Lyons, Richard E.
2004
Pearson Education, Boston, MA
LB2331.72.L96 2004
Topics: Adjuncts   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Success Strategies for Adjunct Faculty provides adjunct instructors with a multi-faceted toolkit for increasing both effectiveness and efficiency in today's college courses and enhances their opportunities for success.

Building upon the research and strategies recommended in The Adjunct Professor's Guide to Success, Dr. Lyons leverages his subsequent workshop experiences throughout North America as well as focused research. The book adds new self-analysis tools that enable the instructor to ...
Additional Info:
Success Strategies for Adjunct Faculty provides adjunct instructors with a multi-faceted toolkit for increasing both effectiveness and efficiency in today's college courses and enhances their opportunities for success.

Building upon the research and strategies recommended in The Adjunct Professor's Guide to Success, Dr. Lyons leverages his subsequent workshop experiences throughout North America as well as focused research. The book adds new self-analysis tools that enable the instructor to integrate personal strengths into course planning and delivery, provides additional course management tools, such as a model mentoring agreement and an exam development exercise. Brand new features include testimonials from 28 successful adjunct professors throughout North America, which open and close each of the book's 14 chapters, as well as a new chapter focused on infusing technology into the adjunct professor's instruction. The book includes a rich array of online support resources. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 A Current Perspective on Adjunct Teaching
ch. 2 Formulating a Master Strategy
ch. 3 Today's College Students
ch. 4 Strategic Course Planning
ch. 5 Launching Your Course Effectively
ch. 6 Managing the Context of Your Course
ch. 7 Instructor-Directed Learning Methods
ch. 8 Student-Driven Learning Methods
ch. 9 Infusing Technology into Your Teaching
ch. 10 Managing the Examination Process
ch. 11 Alternative Methods of Assessing Student Learning
ch. 12 Bringing Your Course to an Effective Conclusion
ch. 13 Evaluating the Effectiveness of Your Teaching
ch. 14 Managing Your Adjunct Career

Bibliography
Index
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Exploring The Role of Contingent Instructional Staff in Undergraduate Learning

Book
Benjamin, Ernst, ed.
2003
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB 2328.E86 2003
Topics: Adjuncts   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The majority of undergraduate instructors hold contingent appointments, a term used here to include not only the non-tenure-track part-time faculty but also many instructional staff who lack faculty status, an increasing proportion of full-time non-tenure track faculty, and a substantial number of graduate student teaching assistants. This volume seeks to foster a dialogue, long overdue, between those who believe that the academy has failed to give adequate respect and support ...
Additional Info:
The majority of undergraduate instructors hold contingent appointments, a term used here to include not only the non-tenure-track part-time faculty but also many instructional staff who lack faculty status, an increasing proportion of full-time non-tenure track faculty, and a substantial number of graduate student teaching assistants. This volume seeks to foster a dialogue, long overdue, between those who believe that the academy has failed to give adequate respect and support to undergraduate instruction and those who believe that the academy has failed to give adequate support and respect to the selection and terms and conditions of employment of undergraduate instructors. It may be that the increasing dependence on contingent appointments imperils undergraduate learning no less than it imperils the future of the academic profession. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes

ch. 1 The Faculty Makeover: What Does It Mean for Students? (Jack H. Schuster)
ch. 2 Changing Relationship, Changing Values in the American Classroom (Robert B. Townsend)
ch. 3 Part-Time Faculty: Why Should We Care? (Maureen Murphy Nutting)
ch. 4 Contingent Faculty and Student Learning: Welcome to the Strativersity (Karen Thompson)
ch. 5 How Does University Decision Making Shape the Faculty? (John G. Cross, Edie N. Goldenberg)
ch. 6 The Choices Before Us: An Administrator's Perspective on Faculty Staffing and Student Learning in General Education Courses (Gary W. Reichard)
ch. 7 A Regional Accreditation Perspective on Contingent Faculty Appointments (Sandra E. Elman)
ch. 8 Reappraisal and Implications for Policy and Research (Ernst Benjamin)

Index
Article cover image

"Dynamics of Diversity in the Teaching-Learning Process: A Faculty Development Model for Analysis and Action"

Article
Marchesani, Linda S., and Marianne Adams
1992
in Promoting Diversity in College Classrooms: Innovative Responses for the Curriculum, Faculty, and Institutions (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1992), 9-19
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Four primary factors are relevant to social and cultural diversity in the college classroom: students, teachers, course content, and teaching methods. Faculty can use understanding of these factors and their interrelationships to facilitate learning in an increasingly multicultural environment.
Additional Info:
Four primary factors are relevant to social and cultural diversity in the college classroom: students, teachers, course content, and teaching methods. Faculty can use understanding of these factors and their interrelationships to facilitate learning in an increasingly multicultural environment.
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Paths to the Professoriate: Strategies for Enriching the Preparation of Future Faculty

Book
Wulff, Donald H, Ann E. Austin
2004
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.P3625 2004
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
It has been estimated that in the next ten years, about half of the current higher education faculty will retire. How can we best prepare the next generation of faculty members to fill this tremendous gap in our educational system?

Paths to the Professoriate offers all those involved in higher education—everyone from administrators to scholars to graduate students—a much-needed resource that brings together major research, the ...
Additional Info:
It has been estimated that in the next ten years, about half of the current higher education faculty will retire. How can we best prepare the next generation of faculty members to fill this tremendous gap in our educational system?

Paths to the Professoriate offers all those involved in higher education—everyone from administrators to scholars to graduate students—a much-needed resource that brings together major research, the most important developments in practice, and informed analysis on improving graduate education and preparing the future faculty. This important book includes chapters from some of the best-known researchers, practitioners, and scholars working to prepare the faculty of the future.

In one volume, the authors offer a synthesis of what has been learned about the challenges and concerns in graduate education as preparation for faculty careers, highlight the various projects and approaches for improving graduate education, and identify strategies for institutional leaders, department chairs, faculty advisors, and graduate students. Paths to the Professoriate:

* Presents important reasons for considering ways to improve the preparation of the next generation of faculty
* Describes research studies concerning the graduate school experience
* Highlights illustrative examples of innovative programs and projects
* Provides a synthesis of key lessons from the research and projects addressing the preparation of future faculty

This solidly research-based book covers such vital topics as: the lack of systematic developmentally organized preparation for those aspiring to teaching careers in higher education; graduate students’ perceptions of their graduate experiences and their preparation for faculty work; particular challenges confronting Black doctoral students; reasons students leave doctoral study; programs to prepare graduate students for roles as teaching scholars and engaged citizens; strategies to help graduate students and faculty members identify mutual goals and resolve conflicts; and much more.

Paths to the Professoriate offers all those concerned with the fate of higher education a valuable resource for the future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Authors

Pt. 1 Introduction
ch. 1 The Challenge to Prepare the Next Generation of Faculty

Pt. 2 The Research
ch. 2 The Survey of Doctoral Education and Career Preparation: The Importance of Disciplinary Contexts
ch. 3 The Development of Graduate Students as Teaching Scholars: A Four-Year Longitudinal Study
ch. 4 The 2000 National Doctoral Program Survey: An On-Line Study of Students' Voices
ch. 5 Theories and Strategies of Academic Career Socialization: Improving Paths to the Professoriate for Black Graduate Students
ch. 6 Research on the Structure and Process of Graduate Education: Retaining Students
ch. 7 "So You Want to Become a Professor!": Lessons for the PhDs - Ten Years Later Study

Pt. 3 Strategies for Reform
ch. 8 The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Contributing to Reform in Graduate Education
ch. 9 Preparing Future Faculty: Changing the Culture of Doctoral Education
ch. 10 Re-envisioning the Ph.D.: A Challenge for the Twenty-First Century
ch. 11 Toward a Responsive Ph.D.: New Partnerships, Paradigms, Practices, and People
ch. 12 The Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate: Creating Stewards of the Discipline
ch. 13 Michigan State University's Conflict Resolution Program: Setting Expectations and Resolving Conflicts

Pt. 4 Synthesis, Lessons, and Future Directions
ch. 14 Future Directions: Strategies to Enhance Paths to the Professoriate

Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

What the Best College Teachers Do

Book
Bain, Ken
2004
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2331.B34 2004
Topics: General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Winner of the Virginia and Warren Stone Prize awarded annually by Harvard University Press for an outstanding book on education and society. What makes a great teacher great? Who are the professors students remember long after graduation? This book, the conclusion of a fifteen-year study of nearly one hundred college teachers in a wide variety of fields and universities, offers valuable answers for all educators. The short answer is -- ...
Additional Info:
Winner of the Virginia and Warren Stone Prize awarded annually by Harvard University Press for an outstanding book on education and society. What makes a great teacher great? Who are the professors students remember long after graduation? This book, the conclusion of a fifteen-year study of nearly one hundred college teachers in a wide variety of fields and universities, offers valuable answers for all educators. The short answer is -- it's not what teachers do, it's what they understand. Lesson plans and lecture notes matter less than the special way teachers comprehend the subject and value human learning. Whether historians or physicists, in El Paso or St. Paul, the best teachers know their subjects inside and out -- but they also know how to engage and challenge students and to provoke impassioned responses. Most of all, they believe two things fervently: that teaching matters and that students can learn. In stories both humorous and touching, Ken Bain describes examples of ingenuity and compassion, of students' discoveries of new ideas and the depth of their own potential. What the Best College Teachers Do is a treasure trove of insight and inspiration for first-year teachers and seasoned educators alike. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction: Defining the Best
ch. 2 What Do They Know about How We Learn?
ch. 3 How Do they Prepare to Teach?
ch. 4 What Do They Expect of Their Students?
ch. 5 How Do They Conduct Class?
ch. 6 How Do They Treat Their Students?
ch. 7 How Do They Evaluate Their Students and Themselves?

Epilogue: What Can We Learn From Them?
App How the Study Was Conducted
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
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Rethinking Teaching in Higher Education: From a Course Design Workshop to a Faculty Development Framework

Book
Saroyan, Alenoush, and Cheryl Amundsen, eds.
2004
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1738.R46 2004
Topics: General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Teachers in higher education are constantly looking for ways to engage students and motivate them to respond creatively and actively to their disciplines -- but frequently lack the formal grounding in teaching to design effective courses and implement appropriate learning strategies.

This book reflects and incorporates McGill University's thirty years' experience developing teaching programs and workshops at its Centre for University Teaching and Learning.

Eight authors ...
Additional Info:
Teachers in higher education are constantly looking for ways to engage students and motivate them to respond creatively and actively to their disciplines -- but frequently lack the formal grounding in teaching to design effective courses and implement appropriate learning strategies.

This book reflects and incorporates McGill University's thirty years' experience developing teaching programs and workshops at its Centre for University Teaching and Learning.

Eight authors from the Centre, working as a coordinated team, here develop their most successful program into a portable workshop for anyone who is interested in improving their teaching knowledge and skills. The program in question is a week-long intensive workshop that offers professors in an opportunity to discuss their teaching, reflect on it, and put new strategies into practice to enhance the quality of student learning.

This book takes the reader through the process, walking him or her through the principles of course design and teaching, and providing concepts to frame them within the reader's disciplinary knowledge and expertise. The book also incorporates the perspectives of professors from a wide range of disciplines who participated in the program, and who offer their personal accounts of conceptual change about teaching and learning and their current involvement toward the improvement of student learning.

This book will appeal to new and seasoned teachers in higher education, as well as to graduate students planning an academic career and wanting to develop their teaching skills.

For faculty developers the book captures and reflects the thinking behind the development of this workshop, its evolution since it was first implemented in 1993, and constitutes a practical guide for designing and implementing similar workshops. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Tables
Figures
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Course Design and Teaching Workshop: Why and What? (Alenoush Saroyan)
ch. 2 Assumptions Underlying Workshop Activities (Alenoush Saroyan)
ch. 3 Analysis of Course Content (Cheryl Amundsen, Alenoush Saroyan, and Janet Donald)
ch. 4 Clarifying Learning (Janet Donald)
ch. 5 Designing Teaching for Student Learning (Cheryl Amundsen, Laura Winer, and Terry Gandell)
ch. 6 Evaluating Student Learning (Cynthia Weston and Lynn McAlpine)
ch. 7 The Final Step: Evaluation of Teaching (Alenoush Saroyan)
ch. 8 Impact of the Course Design and Teaching Workshop (Ralph Harris)
ch. 9 The Developers' Apprentices (Myron J. Frankman)
ch. 10 The Challenge to Unlearn Traditional Language (Richard Harris)
ch. 11 Teaching between the Cracks (Richard Janda)
ch. 12 Toward a Comprehensive Framework of Faculty Development (Lynn McAlpine and Alenoush Saroyan)
ch. 13 Development Activities: Case Descriptions from Management and Engineering (Lynn McAlpine, Alenoush Saroyan and Laura Winer)

Appendices
Index
About the Editors and Contributors
Cover image

Building Faculty Learning Communities

Book
Cox, Milton D., and Laurie Richlin, eds.
2004
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 97)
LB2331.7.B83 2004
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Changing our colleges and universities into learning institutions has become increasingly important at the same time it has become more difficult. Faculty learning communities have proven to be effective for addressing institutional challenges, from preparing the faculty of the future and reinvigorating senior faculty, to implementing new courses, curricula, and campus initiatives on diversity and technology. The results of faculty learning community programs parallel for faculty members the results of ...
Additional Info:
Changing our colleges and universities into learning institutions has become increasingly important at the same time it has become more difficult. Faculty learning communities have proven to be effective for addressing institutional challenges, from preparing the faculty of the future and reinvigorating senior faculty, to implementing new courses, curricula, and campus initiatives on diversity and technology. The results of faculty learning community programs parallel for faculty members the results of student learning communities for students, such as retention, deeper learning, respect for other cultures, and greater civic participation.

The chapters in this issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning describe from a practitioner's perspective the history, development, implementation, and results of faculty learning communities across a wide range of institutions and purposes. Institutions are invited to use this volume to initiate faculty learning communities on their campuses.

This is the 97th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' notes
ch. 1 Introduction to faculty learning communities (Miton D. Cox)
ch. 2 Overview of faculty learning communities (Laurie Richlin and Amy Essington)
ch. 3 Institutional considerations in developing a faculty learning community program (Gary M. Shulman, Milton D. Cox, Laurie Richlin)
ch. 4 Developing facilitators for faculty learning communities (Karin L. Sandell, Katy Wigley and Ann Kovalchick)
ch. 5 Facilitating faculty learning communities : a compact guide to creating change and inspiring community (Martha C. Petrone and Leslie Ortquist-Ahrens)
ch. 6 Developing a statewide faculty learning community program (Sheryl Hanssen, Alan Kalish, Wayne E. Hall, Catherine M. Gynn, Mary Louise Holly, and Dan Madigan)
ch. 7 Managing multiple faculty learning communities (Melody Ayn Barton and Laurie Richlin)
ch. 8 Assessing faculty learning communities (Harry Hubball, Anthony Clarke and Andrea L. Beach)
ch. 9 Technology in support of faculty learning communities (Harry Hubball, Anthony Clarke, and Andrea L. Beach)
ch. 10 Supporting diversity with faculty learning communities : teaching and learning across boundaries (Norman Vaughan)
ch. 11 Developing scholarly teaching and the scholarship of teaching and learning through faculty learning communities (Laurie Richlin and Milton D. Cox)
ch. 12 Midcareer and senior faculty learning communities : learning throughout faculty careers (Muriel L. Blaisdell and Milton D. Cox)
ch. 13 Faculty learning communities for preparing future faculty (Laurie Richlin and Amy Essington)
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching as Community Property: Essays on Higher Education

Book
Shulman, Lee S.
2004
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2305.S58 2004
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Lee Shulman has been president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching since 1997. He is a former president of the American Educational Research Association as well as past president of the National Academy of Education. In this second volume of a landmark two volume collection of Shulman's best work, he addresses such compelling questions as What are the most effective approaches to teaching? How important is knowledge of ...
Additional Info:
Lee Shulman has been president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching since 1997. He is a former president of the American Educational Research Association as well as past president of the National Academy of Education. In this second volume of a landmark two volume collection of Shulman's best work, he addresses such compelling questions as What are the most effective approaches to teaching? How important is knowledge of subject matter to a teacher's success? And, how do we measure success in teaching and learning? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Sources
About the Author
Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction

Pt. 1 Learning
ch. 1 Professing the Liberal Arts
ch. 2 Taking Learning Seriously
ch. 3 Problem-Based Learning: The Pedagogies of Uncertainty
ch. 4 Making Differences: A Table of Learning

Pt. 2 The Profession of Teaching
ch. 5 Knowledge and Teaching: Foundations of the New Reform
ch. 6 Learning to Teach
ch. 7 Toward a Pedagogy of Substance
ch. 8 Teaching as Community Property: Putting an End to Pedagogical Solitude
ch. 9 The Scholarship of Teaching: New Elaborations, New Developments
ch. 10 From Minsk to Pinsk: Why a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning?
ch. 11 Lamarck's Revenge: Teaching Among the Scholarships
ch. 12 From Idea to Prototype: Three Exercises in the Peer Review of Teaching
ch. 13 The Pedagogical Colloquium: Three Models
ch. 14 Course Anatomy: The Dissection and Analysis of Knowledge Through Teaching
ch. 15 Visions of the Possible: Models for Campus Support of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
ch. 16 The Doctoral Imperative: Examining the Ends of Erudition

Index
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Diversifying the Faculty: A Guidebook for Search Committees

Book
Turner, Caroline Sotello Viernes
2002
Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C.
LB2332.72.T87 2002
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This monograph suggests ways in which an institution can diversify its faculty and facilitate the work of the search committee before a candidate ever reaches the interview stage. It outlines a step-by-step process to improve the likelihood of a successful search, and it recommends items to consider after a hire is confirmed to ensure that the new faculty member will be more likely to stay. The sections are: (1) Before the ...
Additional Info:
This monograph suggests ways in which an institution can diversify its faculty and facilitate the work of the search committee before a candidate ever reaches the interview stage. It outlines a step-by-step process to improve the likelihood of a successful search, and it recommends items to consider after a hire is confirmed to ensure that the new faculty member will be more likely to stay. The sections are: (1) Before the Search Begins; (2) The Search Process; and (3) After the Search. Appendixes contain a checklist of best practices, a list of leading institutions for minority Ph.D.s, a list of baccalaureate institutions identified as producers of numbers of female doctorates; and a list of Web resources of programs for building diverse faculties. An annotated bibliography lists 59 sources for additional information. (Contains 36 references.) (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part 1 - Before the search begins
Communicating the educational rationale
Aligning departmental and institutional commitments
Creating a welcoming environment
Securing resources
Countering segregated networks

Part 2 - The Search process
Forming the search committee
Educating the search committee on personnel issues
Debunking the myths
Creating the position description
Attracting a diverse candidate pool
Examining hiring biases
Hosting campus visits
Making the offer

Part 3 - After the search
Supporting the new hire
Assessing the search process and outcome
A final note

Appendices
A. Checklist of best practices
B. Leading Ph.D. institutions of minority Ph.D.s, 1993-1997
C. Baccalaureate institutions identified as women doctorate productivity leaders
D. Web resources of programs for building diverse faculties
Notes
References
Annotated Bibliography
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Mentoring for Mission: Nurturing New Faculty at Church-related Colleges

Book
Simon, Caroline J.
2003
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
LB1731.4.M46554 2003
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Simon presents Roman Catholic and Protestant perspectives on ways to nurture new faculty at church-related educational institutions, for those involved in administering faculty development programs and for those seeking advice on designing and implementing such programs. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Simon presents Roman Catholic and Protestant perspectives on ways to nurture new faculty at church-related educational institutions, for those involved in administering faculty development programs and for those seeking advice on designing and implementing such programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Mentoring as an Exercise of Practical Wisdom

ch. 1 Mentoring and Christian Mission
ch. 2 All Mentoring Is Local: Thinking about How Your Program Fits Your Institution
ch. 3 All Mentoring Is Personal: Making Sure Your Program Fits Your Faculty
ch. 4 Getting There from Here
ch. 5 Facing Challenges and Achieving Lasting Success
ch. 6 The Bottom Line: Outcomes of Mentoring

App. 1 Reflection Questions for Mentoring Directors
App. 2 Reflection and Discussion Questions for Mentor Training
App. 3 Questions for Mentors and New Faculty to Reflect on Together

Selected Topical Bibliography
Contributors
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Cultivating Communities of Practice: A Guide to Managing Knowledge

Book
Wenger, Etienne, Richard McDermott, and William M. Snyder
2002
Harvard Business School Publishing, Boston, MA
HD30.2.W46 2002
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In Cultivating Communities of Practice, Etienne Wenger, Richard McDermott, and William M. Snyder argue that while communities form naturally, organizations need to become more proactive and systematic about developing and integrating them into their strategy. This book provides practical models and methods for stewarding these communities to reach their full potential - without squelching the inner drive that makes them so valuable. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
In Cultivating Communities of Practice, Etienne Wenger, Richard McDermott, and William M. Snyder argue that while communities form naturally, organizations need to become more proactive and systematic about developing and integrating them into their strategy. This book provides practical models and methods for stewarding these communities to reach their full potential - without squelching the inner drive that makes them so valuable. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
ch. 1 Communities of Practice and Their Value to Organizations
ch. 2 Communities of Practice and Their Structural Elements
ch. 3 Seven Principles for Cultivating Communities of Practice
ch. 4 The Early Stages of Development: Planning and Launching Communities of Practice
ch. 5 The Mature Stages of Development: Growing and Sustaining Communities of Practice
ch. 6 The Challenge of Distributed Communities
ch. 7 The Downside of Communities of Practice
ch. 8 Measuring and Managing Value Creation
ch. 9 Community-Based Knowledge Initiatives
ch. 10 Reweaving the World: Communities beyond Organizations
Notes
Bibliography
Index
About the Authors
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Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity

Book
Wenger, Etienne
1998
Cambridge University Press, New York, NY
HD58.82.W45 1998
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Communities of Practice presents a theory of learning that starts with this assumption: engagement in social practice is the fundamental process by which we learn and so become who we are. The primary unit of analysis of this process is neither the individual nor social institutions but rather the informal "communities of practice" that people form as they pursue shared enterprises over time. In order to give a social account ...
Additional Info:
Communities of Practice presents a theory of learning that starts with this assumption: engagement in social practice is the fundamental process by which we learn and so become who we are. The primary unit of analysis of this process is neither the individual nor social institutions but rather the informal "communities of practice" that people form as they pursue shared enterprises over time. In order to give a social account of learning, the theory explores in a systematic way the intersection of issues of community, social practice, meaning, and identity. The result is a broad conceptual framework for thinking about learning as a process of social participation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series foreword
Acknowledgments
Prologue: Contexts
Introduction: A social theory of learning
Pt. I Practice
Intro I The concept of practice
ch. 1 Meaning
ch. 2 Community
ch. 3 Learning
ch. 4 Boundary
ch. 5 Locality
Coda I Knowing in practice
Pt. II Identity
Intro II A focus on identity
ch. 6 Identity in practice
ch. 7 Participation and non-participation
ch. 8 Modes of belonging
ch. 9 Identification and negotiability
Coda II Learning communities
Epilogue: Design
Synopsis: Design for learning
ch. 10 Learning Architectures
ch. 11 Organizations
ch. 12 Education
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Article cover image

"Peer Observation: Learning from One Another"

Article
Richardson, Matthew O.
2000
Thought and Action 16, no. 1 (2000): 9-20.
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Describes an approach to faculty development that relies on faculty learning from one another through peer observation. Rather than equating such observation with evaluating a colleague's performance, faculty observers are urged to approach the assignment as "students of teaching."
Additional Info:
Describes an approach to faculty development that relies on faculty learning from one another through peer observation. Rather than equating such observation with evaluating a colleague's performance, faculty observers are urged to approach the assignment as "students of teaching."
Article cover image

"Looking for Good Teaching: A Guide to Peer Observation"

Article
Helling, Barbara B.
1988
Journal of Staff, Program, and Organization Development 6, no. 4 (1998): 147-158
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This observation guide lists 270 separate items, in checklist format, to be used for informal evaluation of classroom teachers by their peers. Items for observation are given for mechanics of teaching, scholarship, organization, classroom relationships, and miscellaneous teaching functions, as well as for preparation, topic choice, quality of interaction, quality of content and discussion, and method and efficiency of question-asking on the part of the teacher.
Additional Info:
This observation guide lists 270 separate items, in checklist format, to be used for informal evaluation of classroom teachers by their peers. Items for observation are given for mechanics of teaching, scholarship, organization, classroom relationships, and miscellaneous teaching functions, as well as for preparation, topic choice, quality of interaction, quality of content and discussion, and method and efficiency of question-asking on the part of the teacher.
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Preparing for Promotion, Tenure, and Annual Review: A Faculty Guide, Second Edition

Book
Diamond, Robert M.
2004
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2335.7 D53 2004
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This practical, best-selling book has guided thousands of faculty through the promotion and tenure process since its publication in 1995. This new edition has been significantly revised and expanded, but has also kept its focus on process—what faculty can do to make a better case for why they should be promoted or tenured.

This new edition of Preparing for Promotion, Tenure, and Annual Review contains a number of ...
Additional Info:
This practical, best-selling book has guided thousands of faculty through the promotion and tenure process since its publication in 1995. This new edition has been significantly revised and expanded, but has also kept its focus on process—what faculty can do to make a better case for why they should be promoted or tenured.

This new edition of Preparing for Promotion, Tenure, and Annual Review contains a number of additional resources not included in the previous version—materials that are designed to help faculty prepare for a major professional review—such as post-tenure review, teaching with technology, dealing with changing guidelines and policies, and suggestions on how annual review materials can be used as a foundation for the promotion and tenure portfolio.

In addition to updated references and resources, there are also expanded sections on scholarship, on teaching and on advising, on how to best document faculty role and impact as part of a team, and on collegiality. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Preface
Acknowledgments.
Introduction
Part I: Process
ch. 1 Planning Ahead
ch. 2 Documenting Your Work
Part II: Resources
ch. 3 Assessing Collegiality: A Faculty Survey
ch. 4 Documenting Effectiveness and Impact as a Member of a Team
ch. 5 Mini-Quest: Questionnaire for Evaluating an Instructional Unit
ch. 6 Documenting an Instructional Innovation or Use of Technology: Guidelines for Faculty
ch. 7 Student Ratings of Faculty: Special Instructions Settings
ch. 8 Evaluating an Advisor: Slelected Items From the ACT Survey of Academic Advising
ch. 9 Documenting and Assessing the Work of Faculty
ch. 10 The Teaching Portfolio: Narrative Guidelines of Faculty
ch. 11 Evaluating Teaching: Selected Additional References
ch. 12 Preparing for Promotion, Tenure, and Annual Review: A Faculty Checklist
Index
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Advancing Faculty Learning Through Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Book
Creamer, Elizabeth G. and Lisa R. Lattuca, eds.
2005
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 102)
LB2360.2.A38 2005
Topics: Liberal Arts   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This volume addresses the limitations of an instrumental perspective on collaboration and explores why stakeholders in higher education should refocus attention on collaboration as a source of faculty learning. The chapters establish a theoretical basis for thinking about faculty learning and then use case studies to explore this topic in the context of service or outreach, research, and teaching.

Included as well are a meta-analysis of the cases ...
Additional Info:
This volume addresses the limitations of an instrumental perspective on collaboration and explores why stakeholders in higher education should refocus attention on collaboration as a source of faculty learning. The chapters establish a theoretical basis for thinking about faculty learning and then use case studies to explore this topic in the context of service or outreach, research, and teaching.

Included as well are a meta-analysis of the cases to demonstrate what they teach about contexts that promote faculty learning and a discussion of the implications of the analysis for higher education policy and practice, including the evaluation of collaboratively produced work. The framework and cases are useful to an audience of academic leaders committed to faculty development and to creating hiring, promotion, and tenure policies that reward the full range of scholarly pursuits. They should also prove instructive to faculty embarking on interdisciplinary teaching, research, or outreach activities.

This is the 102nd issue of the Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes

ch. 1 Learning as professional practice (Lisa R. Lattuca and Elizabeth G. Creamer)
ch. 2 Faculty work as learning : insights from theories of cognition (Lisa R Lattuca)
ch. 3 Interdisciplinary collaboration and academic work : a case study of a university-community partnership (Marilyn J. Arney and Dennis F. Brown)
ch. 4 Insight from multiple disciplinary angles : a case study of an interdisciplinary research team (Eizabeth G. Creamer)
ch. 5 The challenge of integration in interdisciplinary education (Michele Minnis and Vera John-Steiner)
ch. 6 Observations : taking seriously the topic of learning in studies of faculty work and careers (Anna Neumann)
ch. 7 Promoting the effective evaluation of collaboratively produced scholarship : a call to action (Elizabeth G. Creamer)
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Relationships Between Teaching Faculty and Teaching Librarians

Book
Kraat, Susan B., ed.
2005
Haworth Press, Binghampton, NY
ZA3075.R45 2005
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This collection reflects the experiences of librarians, teaching faculty and library directors, whose perspectives range from cynicism to cautious optimism and idealism when it comes to working with teaching faculty. The volume includes case studies, surveys, sample questionnaires, statistics and a toolkit for establishing an effective library liaison program. The essays examine the teaching and learning environment, course growth and maintenance, and the "professor librarian" model. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This collection reflects the experiences of librarians, teaching faculty and library directors, whose perspectives range from cynicism to cautious optimism and idealism when it comes to working with teaching faculty. The volume includes case studies, surveys, sample questionnaires, statistics and a toolkit for establishing an effective library liaison program. The essays examine the teaching and learning environment, course growth and maintenance, and the "professor librarian" model. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction : do you really get more flies with honey?

ch. 1 "Getting psyched" about information literacy : a successful faculty-librarian collaboration for educational psychology and counseling (Lynn Lampert)
ch. 2 Finding common ground : an analysis of librarians' expressed attitudes towards faculty (Lisa M. Given, Heidi Julien)
ch. 3 Librarians grading : giving A's, B's, C's, D's, and F's (Nicole J. Auer, Ellen M. Krupar)
ch. 4 Can't get no respect : helping faculty to understand the educational power of information literacy (William B. Badke)
ch. 5 Research and writing and theses - oh my! : the journey of a collaboratively taught graduate research and writing course (Michelle Toth)
ch. 6 Library research project for first-year engineering students : results from collaboration by teaching and library faculty (Rachel Callison, Dan Budny, and Kate Thomes)
ch. 7 Librarians in the classroom (Peggie Partello)
ch. 8 Faculty-librarian collaboration to teach research skills : electronic symbiosis (Navaz P. Bhavnagri, and Veronica Bielat)
ch. 9 An ethnographic study of attitudes influencing faculty collaboration in library instruction (Kate Manuel, Susan E. Beck, and Molly Molloy)
ch. 10 The library liaison toolkit : learning to bridge the communication gap (Stephan J. Macaluso, and Barbara Whitney Petruzzelli)
Index
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Chairing an Academic Department, Second Edition

Book
Gmelch, Walter H. and Val D. Miskin
2004
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB2341.G555 2004
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
“Academic leaders may be the least studied and most misunderstood management position in the world,” authors Gmelch and Miskin state. Although chairs come to the position for varied reasons, few come with any specific leadership training. Once in the position, they are critiqued, judged, and evaluated by both their faculty and administrators—groups which frequently have conflicting criteria.

Based upon their extensive study of the demands on and ...
Additional Info:
“Academic leaders may be the least studied and most misunderstood management position in the world,” authors Gmelch and Miskin state. Although chairs come to the position for varied reasons, few come with any specific leadership training. Once in the position, they are critiqued, judged, and evaluated by both their faculty and administrators—groups which frequently have conflicting criteria.

Based upon their extensive study of the demands on and needs of chairs, the authors have distilled their findings into a practical and highly accessible volume to guide chairs in their growth. Despite the varied paths to the position, the authors state that all chairs find themselves in an environment distinct from their former faculty situation.

One of the most dramatic changes is that chairs need the ability to switch from one task or situation to another very quickly and must develop a facility for refocusing. As chairs, individuals assume four basic roles: faculty developer, manager, leader, and scholar. Because of these roles and the need to quickly refocus, Gmelch and Miskin advocate becoming a swivel chair. They state: “To balance their roles, chairs must learn to swivel without appearing dizzy, schizophrenic, or ‘two-faced.’” (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: The Call to Leadership
ch. 1 - Department Chair Roles: Weaving the Web
Part 1 Faculty Developer
ch. 2 - Recruit Quality Faculty: The Million Dollar Decision
ch. 3 - Support Your Faculty: 80 Percent of Your Resource
ch. 4 - Motivate Faculty Performance: Your Only Choice
Part 2 Manager
ch. 5 - Chair as Manager: Budgeting Sets the Stage
ch. 6 - Resource Decisions: Planning Directs the Action
Part 3 Leader
ch. 7 - Chair as Leader: Facing the Challenges
Part 4 Scholar
ch. 8 - Chair as Scholar: The Paradox of the Swivel Chair
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Making Time, Making Change: Avoiding Overload in College Teaching

Book
Robertson, Doublas Reimondo
2003
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2335.35.R63 2003
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Lack of time may be the single most commonly experienced problem among American faculty. It is fair to say that the overwhelming majority of the roughly 400,000 full time faculty in American colleges and universities feel overloaded in their teaching lives; they perceive that they do not have time to do their basic faculty duties properly; and they believe that overload goes with the job. We complain yet we do not ...
Additional Info:
Lack of time may be the single most commonly experienced problem among American faculty. It is fair to say that the overwhelming majority of the roughly 400,000 full time faculty in American colleges and universities feel overloaded in their teaching lives; they perceive that they do not have time to do their basic faculty duties properly; and they believe that overload goes with the job. We complain yet we do not reflect on and evaluate our paradigms for how we use our time. Perhaps a pernicious norm has evolved: anyone not complaining about being overwhelmed is suspect. We act as if we have no choice. Einstein once remarked, "Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." A Lakota Sioux saying puts the idea in concrete terms, "When your horse is dead, the proper strategy is to dismount." When it comes to avoiding overload, many of us sit on our dead horses kicking them in the sides over and over again, insanely, wondering why we don't get anywhere. However, we do have choices about how we use our time. Einstein suggested a way to discover our choices when he further observed, "Problems cannot be solved at the same level of awareness that created them." Essentially, that is the objective of this book: to elevate our awareness of how we use our time and how we might improve that use of time. We need to shift our perspective on using time from subject (a perspective from which we act naively) to object (a perspective on which we act intentionally). The tool that we will use to stimulate this shift in awareness comes from a vintage analysis of systems theory and research and focuses on managing the boundaries of our teaching selves better. In Making Time, Making Change, author Douglas Reimondo Robertson leads you on the road to a more rewarding, and less harried, teaching life! (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Dedication
Acknowledgements
About the Author
Toward Dismounting the Dead Horse
Avoiding Overload as Boundary Management
Control/Flow Paradox
Background
Intended Audiences
Objectives
Overview
Part I: Making Time
Be Able to be Efficient in All Things
Related Overload Adaptation
Teaching Applications
Know Your ``Lines in the Sand'' and State Them Clearly, Early, and Often
Interact with Students with Intentional Time and Depth
Use Technological Tools in Course-Related Scholarship
Use Technological Tools to Check for Plagiarism
Use Robots to Score and Record Tests
Digitize Everything that You Can
Word Process Written Feedback
Use Group Feedback Thoughtfully
Remember that Perfect Is Not Beautiful
Do Not Permit Handwritten Student Work
Parse Your Time and Set Appropriate Expectations
Express Your Values in How You Use Your Time
Related Overload Adaptation
Teaching Applications
Identify the Major Areas of Your Life
Assign Times for Each Area
Identify the Major Areas of Your Faculty Work
Assign a Weight to Each Area
Do the Math
Keep Doing the Math
Use Discretion in Disclosing the Details
Don't Hoard Responsibility, Share It
Related Overload Adaptation
Teaching Applications
Employ NIFs
Students
Mastery Learning Programs
Outside Experts
Research Data Bases
Require Students to Download and Print Course Materials
Required Students to Monitor Their Own Completion of Course Assignments
Require Students to Prepare Their Own Study Guides
For Every Aspect of Your Teaching, Find a Time and Place Befitting it
Related Overload Adaptation Teaching Applications
Identify the Major Activities of Your Teaching Work
Allocate Time to Each Type of Work
Create a Place Befitting Each Activity
Be Able to Block Access to You
Leave the Office
Work at Home if You Can
Know Your Campus Options
Know Your Community Options
Be Short with Many So That You May be Long With a Few
Related Overload Adaptation
Teaching Applications
Frame Asynchronous Communication Tools as Your Personal Staff
Be Proud of Your Personal Staff
Do Not Provide Immediate Access to You except during ``Open Door'' Periods
Teach Your Students Your Communication System
Create a Time and Place to Process Asynchronous Communication
Interact Electronically in Correspondence with the Time Available
Stick to Your Knitting, Refer to Other Helpers When Possible
Related Overload Adaptation
Teaching Applications
Do Not Try to Be a Counselor
Do Not Take on Being a Composition Teacher
Do Not Attempt to Be the Computer Support Desk
Do Not Think that You Need to Be a Librarian
Become Familiar with Pertinent Campus and Community Resources
Have a Current Referral Sheet and Use It
Part II: Making Change
Competing Commitments and Change
Assumption Hunting
Step 1: State the Change Commitment
Commitment Task
Commitment Examples
Step 2: Discern What You Are Doing to Prevent the Change from Happening
Interference Examples
Step 3: Identify the Competing Commitment
Competing Commitment Task
Competing Commitment Examples
Step 4: Discover the Big Assumption Behind the Competing Commitment
Big Assumption Task
Big Assumption Examples
Assumption Testing
Step 1: Observe Yourself in Relation to Your Big Assumption
Observation Task
Observation Example
Step 2: Search for Evidence that Undermines Your Big Assumption
Countervailing Evidence Task
Countervailing Evidence Example
Step 3: Construct a Biography of Your Big Assumption
Big Assumption Biography Task
Big Assumption Biography Example
Step 4: Conduct Mini-Experiments that Test Your Big Assumption
Mini-Experiment Task
Mini-Experiment Example
Networks and Change
Networks
Home Department
Step 1: List All of Your Colleagues in Your Department
Home Institution
Step 2: List All of the Members of Work Groups at Your Institution with Whom You Feel that You Meet Frequently, besides Your Department
Step 3: List Any Other Colleagues at Your Institution with Whom You Feel You Have a Relationship
Outside Professional Communities
Step 4: List All of Your Colleagues Outside of Your Institution with Whom You Feel You Have a Relationship
Sex and Number
Step 5: Beginning with Your Home Department List, then Home Institution List, and Finally Outside Professional Communities List, Designate the Sex of the Person and Enumerate the Relationship
Mattering
Step 6: For Each Relationship in General, Indicate How Much What that Person Thinks, Feels, or Does Matters to You
Mapping
Step 7: Sector by Sector (Department, Institution, Communities), Place Each Relationship on the Network Map in the Ring that Corresponds with How Much that Relationship Matters to You
Change
Desired Change
Step 8: Identify the Desired Change(s) in Your Professional Practice
Force Field Analysis
Step 9: For Each Relationship in General, Indicate whether You Think that if the Person Knew about Your Desired Change in Your Professional Practice that Person Would Support or Resist Your Making It
Force Field Mapping
Step 10: For Each Relationship, Place the Appropriate Support or Resistance Symbol (+, -, +/-, or blank) next to the Person's Numbered Circle or Square on the Network Map
Observing
Step 11: Examine Your Map and Take Note of Whatever Stands Out to You as important
Change Strategies
Step 12: Determine Strategies for Increasing the Support in Your Networks and Decreasing the Resistance, Particularly in Your Inner Circles
Bless Its Heart
References
Index
Cover image

The Missing Professor: An Academic Mystery

Book
Jones, Thomas B.
2006
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2331.66.J66 2006
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
With more than a few misgivings but desperate to pay off her loans, Nicole Adams, a newly minted Ph.D. in philosophy, accepts an assistant professorship at Higher State, a small state university in "the middle of the Midwest". Little does she suspect that on just her second day, still flustered and disoriented in her new surroundings, she'll be plunged into a mystery. Crusty R. Reynolds Raskin, with whom she ...
Additional Info:
With more than a few misgivings but desperate to pay off her loans, Nicole Adams, a newly minted Ph.D. in philosophy, accepts an assistant professorship at Higher State, a small state university in "the middle of the Midwest". Little does she suspect that on just her second day, still flustered and disoriented in her new surroundings, she'll be plunged into a mystery. Crusty R. Reynolds Raskin, with whom she uneasily shares an office, disappears after his desk and files have been ransacked. The police are called. Two weeks later, with Raskin still missing, Nicole receives a threatening phone call...

Read one way up, this is an entertaining parody of an academic mystery that satirizes the ways of academe. Turning the book upside down reveals another purpose: each chapter is in fact a case study, as is revealed by a series of discussion questions intended for faculty orientation and development.

As the mystery unfolds, each chapter shows Nicole encountering testing situations such as student incivility and sexual harassment, problems with her first day of class, dilemmas concerning teaching evaluation and peer observation and issues related to assessment, classroom technology and the rights of faculty and students, among others.

This little book can be read and used both ways: as pure entertainment or as a series of cases whose humorous presentation will break down academic barriers and promote spirited discussion. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Case Studies and Discussion Issues
Discussion Questions
ch. 1 Discussion Question 3
ch. 2 Discussion Question 4
ch. 3 Discussion Question 5
ch. 4 Discussion Question 6
ch. 5 Discussion Question 8
ch. 6 Discussion Question 9
ch. 7 Discussion Question 10
ch. 8 Discussion Question 11
ch. 9 Discussion Question 12
ch. 10 Discussion Question 13
ch. 12 Discussion Question 14
ch. 13 Discussion Question 15
ch. 15 Discussion Question 17
ch. 17 Discussion Question 18
ch. 19 Discussion Question 19
ch. 20 Discussion Question 21
ch. 22 Discussion Question 22
Cover image

Reflective Practice for Educators: Professional Development to Improve Student Learning

Book
Osterman, Karen F. and Robert B. Kottkamp
2004
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1731.O78 2004
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In this age of seemingly endless mandated reforms, reflective practice is a truly effective, empowering way to make meaningful, positive changes. Written for teachers, counselors, administrators, and professional development specialists in schools and universities, this book is an educators' guide to reflective practice. The authors explain its potential to create meaningful change in schools and show you how to integrate it effectively into the daily work of schools. The book:<...
Additional Info:
In this age of seemingly endless mandated reforms, reflective practice is a truly effective, empowering way to make meaningful, positive changes. Written for teachers, counselors, administrators, and professional development specialists in schools and universities, this book is an educators' guide to reflective practice. The authors explain its potential to create meaningful change in schools and show you how to integrate it effectively into the daily work of schools. The book:

* Explains reflective practice as a professional development strategy
* Offers ideas and practical strategies to facilitate collaborative, data-based inquiry, dialogue
* Describes reflective practice in action and illustrates its power to create meaningful change in classrooms
* Shows how reflective practice is an important step in creating professional learning organizations
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the authors
ch. 1 Reflective practice, school reform, and professional development
ch. 2 Engaging in reflective practice : a cycle of experiential learning
ch. 3 The keystone of reflective practice : gathering data
ch. 4 Facilitating reflective practice in the workplace
ch. 5 The problematic student
ch. 6 Bullying and victimization in the classroom
ch. 7 Teachers and kids as reflective practitioners of their learning
ch. 8 Reflective practice for empowerment
References
Index
Article cover image

"Seeking Funding: A Manual for Faculty in Theological Education" (pdf)

Article
Faculty Resource Center Staff
2005
ATS Manual (Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh, 2005)
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Practical advice and candid reflection on the author’s 20 years experience writing both successful and unsuccessful grant proposals.
Additional Info:
Practical advice and candid reflection on the author’s 20 years experience writing both successful and unsuccessful grant proposals.
Cover image

Sustaining Teacher Leadership: Beyond the Boundaries of an Enabling School Culture

Book
Gonzales, Linda Dawson
2004
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LB1775.G64 2004
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Sustaining Teacher Leadership describes a model for linking leadership and learning and identifies six components of an enabling culture for teacher leadership: learning, valuing, nurturing, supporting, sharing, and coaching. The model is based on an historical review of artifacts from earlier qualitative studies that report on eight years of a middle school's restructuring and restructuring experiences. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Sustaining Teacher Leadership describes a model for linking leadership and learning and identifies six components of an enabling culture for teacher leadership: learning, valuing, nurturing, supporting, sharing, and coaching. The model is based on an historical review of artifacts from earlier qualitative studies that report on eight years of a middle school's restructuring and restructuring experiences. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
ch. 1 Teacher leadership in the 21st century : an introduction
ch. 2 Context and methods
ch. 3 Enabling culture for teacher leadership
ch. 4 Developing a teacher leader identity
ch. 5 Teacher leaders influence an inchoate school culture
ch. 6 Implications for further study
App. A : artifacts list
App. B : interview protocol
References
Index
Author's biographical sketch
Cover image

The American Faculty: The Restructuring of Academic Work and Careers

Book
Shuster, Jack H., and Martin J. Finklestein
2006
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2331.72.S36 2006
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Higher education is becoming destabilized in the face of extraordinarily rapid change. The composition of the academy's most valuable asset—the faculty—and the essential nature of faculty work are being transformed. Jack H. Schuster and Martin J. Finkelstein describe the transformation of the American faculty in the most extensive and ambitious analysis of the American academic profession undertaken in a generation.

A century ago the American research ...
Additional Info:
Higher education is becoming destabilized in the face of extraordinarily rapid change. The composition of the academy's most valuable asset—the faculty—and the essential nature of faculty work are being transformed. Jack H. Schuster and Martin J. Finkelstein describe the transformation of the American faculty in the most extensive and ambitious analysis of the American academic profession undertaken in a generation.

A century ago the American research university emerged as a new organizational form animated by the professionalized, discipline-based scholar. The research university model persisted through two world wars and greatly varying economic conditions. In recent years, however, a new order has surfaced, organized around a globalized, knowledge-based economy, powerful privatization and market forces, and stunning new information technologies. These developments have transformed the higher education enterprise in ways barely imaginable in generations past.

At the heart of that transformation, but largely invisible, has been a restructuring of academic appointments, academic work, and academic careers—a reconfiguring widely decried but heretofore inadequately described. This volume depicts the scope and depth of the transformation, combing empirical data drawn from three decades of national higher education surveys. The authors' portrait, at once startling and disturbing, provides the context for interpreting these developments as part of a larger structural evolution of the national higher education system. They outline the stakes for the nation and the challenging work to be done. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
List of Figures and Tables

Part One. Overview of the American Faculty
ch. 1. Establishing the Framework
ch. 2. The American Faculty in Perspective
ch. 3. The Professoriate in Profile
Part Two. The Faculty at Work
ch. 4. The Changing Complexion of Faculty Work
ch. 5. Academic Culture and Values and the Quality of Worklife

Part Three. The Academic Career
ch. 6. The Changing Academic Career
ch. 7. The Revolution in Academic Appointments: A Closer Look
ch. 8. Compensation and Academic Careers: Trends and Issues
ch. 9. Pathways to the Professoriate

Part Four. Contemporary Academic Life: An Assessment
ch. 10. American Academic Life Restructured
ch. 11. What's Ahead? Agendas for Policy Analysis, Research, and Action on Academic

Staffing

Appendixes
A. Descriptions of the National Faculty Surveys
B. Selected National Faculty Surveys: A Concordance of Contents
C. Understanding Faculty Trends: Challenges to and Strategies for Interpreting Survey Data
D. Variables for Classifying Faculty Subgroups
E. Master Notes on Contents of Tables and Figures
F. Academic Appointments: Historical Milestones
G. Faculty Compensation: Data Sources
H. Note on Accessing Survey Instruments
I. Faculty Diversity: Race and Ethnicity Categories
J. Appendix Tables and Figures

List of Tables
Tables

References
About the Authors
Index
Additional Info:
Mapping the Territory of Teaching offers a review of the most current and important writings on the topic of scholarship of teaching and learning in higher education. One of the foremost experts in the field, Editor Maryellen Weimer is uniquely qualified to bring this information together. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Mapping the Territory of Teaching offers a review of the most current and important writings on the topic of scholarship of teaching and learning in higher education. One of the foremost experts in the field, Editor Maryellen Weimer is uniquely qualified to bring this information together. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Why and how to look
ch. 2 What to look at
ch. 3 Scholarly work on teaching and learning : an overview
ch. 4 The lens of experience : wisdom of practice
ch. 5 The lens of objectivity : research scholarship
ch. 6 Promising possibilities
ch. 7 Looking ahead : learning from what's behind
ch. 8 From looking to doing : advice for faculty
ch. 9 From looking to doing : advice for academic leaders
App. A Discipline-based pedagogical periodicals
App. B Cross-disciplinary and topical pedagogical periodicals
TTR cover image

"Learning about Teaching in Communities: Lessons for Faculty Development"

TTR
Marshall, Joretta L.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 1 (2005): 29-34
BL41.T4
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
While teaching workshops like those offered by the Wabash Center provide a unique opportunity for scholars to reflect on their teaching, three elements important to the workshops' success can be effective in institutional settings as well. Certain characteristics of community, conversation stimulated by differences, and appropriate attention to self-care help create an environment supportive of faculty development throughout a scholar's career.
Additional Info:
While teaching workshops like those offered by the Wabash Center provide a unique opportunity for scholars to reflect on their teaching, three elements important to the workshops' success can be effective in institutional settings as well. Certain characteristics of community, conversation stimulated by differences, and appropriate attention to self-care help create an environment supportive of faculty development throughout a scholar's career.
TTR cover image

"Theological Educators, Technology and the Path Ahead"

TTR
Delamarter, Steve
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 1 (2005): 51-55
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Digital technology offers a host of opportunities and challenges for theological education. In this essay the author considers possible futures for theological education through creative uses of technology. The first half of the essay identifies five areas in which theological educators have had to gain technology skills in the last several years: 1. Individual facility with a personal computer; 2. Functioning capably in a connected world; 3. Information literacy for research and ministry; 4. ...
Additional Info:
Digital technology offers a host of opportunities and challenges for theological education. In this essay the author considers possible futures for theological education through creative uses of technology. The first half of the essay identifies five areas in which theological educators have had to gain technology skills in the last several years: 1. Individual facility with a personal computer; 2. Functioning capably in a connected world; 3. Information literacy for research and ministry; 4. Technology for face-to-face instruction; and 5. Technology for asynchronous teaching and learning. The second half of the essay identifies the forces that will likely drive technology learning for theological educators in the coming few years: 1. The pressure to meet student expectations; 2. The pressure to enrich the classroom experience by engaging the visual learner; 3. The pressure to enhance the traditional course through richer pedagogical strategies available with technology; and 4. The pressure to offer distance programs.
TTR cover image

"Facilitating the Academic Success of International Students"

TTR
Spencer, Amy
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 164-168
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
International seminarians seeking an education at academic institutions located in the United States often face a host of learning challenges. Seminary faculty that teach in these institutions are often confronted with a need to adjust their teaching methods to facilitate learning by international students. This essay outlines specific strategies to facilitate academic success of international seminarians by offering specific teaching methods for faculty and learning strategies for international students. Topics ...
Additional Info:
International seminarians seeking an education at academic institutions located in the United States often face a host of learning challenges. Seminary faculty that teach in these institutions are often confronted with a need to adjust their teaching methods to facilitate learning by international students. This essay outlines specific strategies to facilitate academic success of international seminarians by offering specific teaching methods for faculty and learning strategies for international students. Topics include training faculty in how to respond to diverse learning styles, expanding learning environments beyond the classroom, methods for enhancing student participation, and development of assignments. Strategies for student success include developing skills in how to improve note taking, critical reading, and writing.
TTR cover image

"'Can We Talk?': Boundary Crossing and Sexual Misconduct in Seminary Teaching"

TTR
Ashby Jr., Homer U. and Carol Hepokoski
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 2 (2002): 80-89
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Mentoring Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This article explores a variety of personal and professional boundary issues encountered by seminary faculty. The authors contend that boundary crossing is inevitable in contemporary theological education, which is structured such that professors engage in multiple roles with students as they attend to the education of the whole person. Guidelines are reviewed for minimizing risk to students and professors. Topics include life as a community member, student-faculty friendship, and romantic ...
Additional Info:
This article explores a variety of personal and professional boundary issues encountered by seminary faculty. The authors contend that boundary crossing is inevitable in contemporary theological education, which is structured such that professors engage in multiple roles with students as they attend to the education of the whole person. Guidelines are reviewed for minimizing risk to students and professors. Topics include life as a community member, student-faculty friendship, and romantic relationships. Attention to work/life balance is seen as critical to the prevention of misconduct. The article ends with a call for continued conversation as well as institutional accountability and change.
Cover image

Teachers Bringing Out the Best in Teachers: A Guide to Peer Consultation for Administrators and Teachers

Book
Blase, Jo and Joseph J. Blase
2006
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1775.2.B58 2006
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
From the Publisher Most teachers have experienced some kind of formal mentoring or induction program. What these programs can miss is the meaningful daily interaction with peers that builds mutual trust and instructional collaboration-the organic, coachable moments that boost professional learning. Based on a unique investigative study of nearly 300 teachers, this powerful new resource provides informative teacher perspectives of informal, naturally occurring, teacher-to-teacher professional development. Jo and Joseph Blase use ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher Most teachers have experienced some kind of formal mentoring or induction program. What these programs can miss is the meaningful daily interaction with peers that builds mutual trust and instructional collaboration-the organic, coachable moments that boost professional learning. Based on a unique investigative study of nearly 300 teachers, this powerful new resource provides informative teacher perspectives of informal, naturally occurring, teacher-to-teacher professional development. Jo and Joseph Blase use this research to identify the following five teacher behaviors that can positively influence other teachers’ morale, teaching skills, and professional growth:

* Building healthy relationships by communicating, caring, and developing trust
* Using five guiding principles for structuring learning experiences
* Planning and organizing for learning
* Showing and sharing
* Guiding for classroom management

This excellent resource helps school leaders promote a culture that encourages lasting professional development. Each chapter presents practical concepts and strategies that can occur in and out of the classroom. Educators share specific experiences and examples, showing each skill in action.

School leaders will learn what strong teacher peer "consultants" actually do that leads to improved teacher confidence and motivation, enhanced trust and mutual respect, and reflective instructional behavior among their colleagues. These cost-effective, authentic strategies will build camaraderie and leadership in your school, engaging colleagues as a team in the vital mission of all schools-educating our youth.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teachers helping teachers : the case for peer consultation
ch. 2 Peer consultation skill #1 : building healthy relationships by communicating, caring, and developing trust
ch. 3 Peer consultation skill #2 : using the five guiding principles for structuring learning experiences
ch. 4 Peer consultation skill #3 : planning and organizing for learning
ch. 5 Peer consultation skill #4 : showing and sharing
ch. 6 Peer consultation skill #5 : guiding for classroom management
ch. 7 Unleashing the hidden potential of peer consultation
Resource : research methods and procedures
Journal cover image

The Economics and Organization of Theological Education

Journal Issue
1968
Theological Education 4, no. 4, supp. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Protestant Theological Education in 1968
ch. 2 The 1970s: Alternatives for Change
Appendix: Seminary Facility Planning: A Case Study of Alternative
Approaches
List of Tables
List of Figures
Journal cover image

Aspects of Management and Governance

Journal Issue
1970
Theological Education 7, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Seminary Staff Officers Set New Directions in Claremont Meeting (Henry W. Brooks)
Managerial Implications of Theological Education in the 1970s (Jesse H. Ziegler)
Crisis in Theological Education (Charles Shelby Rooks)
The Computer—For Seminaries? (C. Richard Broome)
Governance of the Theological School (Wesner Fallaw)
Student Power and Governance (Gerald L. Painter and Raymond Bryan Brown)
Theological Education: A Bird’s Eye Perspective (Richard L. Rising)
Action Training: A Methodology and Theology (Nathan Kollar)
AATS News
Announcements
Directory Changes
Bibliographic Suggestions
Journal cover image

Governance of Theological Schools

Journal Issue
1975
Theological Education 12, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Multilateral Brokerage in Governance (William K. McElvaney)
Reflections on Student Participation in Governance (Carl W. Rohfs)
Reflections on Administrative Life Style
Within a Church Related Seminary (William H. Kade)
Within an Evangelical Multidenominational Seminary (Frank Bateman Stanger)
Effects of Faculty Unionization on Seminary Governance
As Seen by a President (Walter F. Peterson)
As Seen by a Faculty Member (Carnegie Samuel Calian)
Models of Governance (Dwight E. Stevenson)
Divinity School Governance Within a University Structure
A Private Canadian University Perspective (Elliott B. Allen)
A Private U.S. University Perspective (Krister Stendahl)
Journal cover image

Administrative Staff Development in Theological Schools

Journal Issue
1980
Theological Education 16, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
The Professional Manager within the Mission of the Theological Schoo (Dayton D. Hultgren)
What We Need to Know About Law—Federal and State (Wesley S. Walton)
Government Aid—Buried Treasure (Robert E. Broadwell)
Government Aid—Hidden Curse (John W. Baker)
From Student to Ministry through Theological Education (W. Robert Martin, Jr.)
Resource List for Seminary Registrars (Vera L. Watts)
Marketing and Recruitment: Two Unholy Words and Their Possible Usefulness in Theological Education (Lowell H. Fewster)
What Is Theological Research? (H. Darrell Lance)
Journal cover image

Executive Leadership in Theological Education (pdf)

Journal Issue
1992
Theological Education 29, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1992-theological-education-v28-n2.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1992-theological-education-v28-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Introduction to the Leadership Study Project (G. Douglass Lewis)
The Presidential Experience in Theological Education: A Study of Executive Leadership (Leon Pacala)
A Retrospective Study of The Institute for Theological Education Management (William L. Baumgaertner)
Walking the Narrow Path: Female Administrators in ATS Schools (Barbara Brown Zikmund)
Theological Education and Racial/Ethnic Leadership (J. Oscar McCloud)
Principles for Developing Executive Leaders (D. Douglas McKenna and Jeffrey J. McHenry)
Nonprofit Executive Leadership Education Study (David J. Nygren and Miriam D. Ukeritis)
Journal cover image

Faculty Development, Evaluation, and Advancement (pdf)

Journal Issue
1995
Theological Education 31, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1995-theological-education-v31-n2.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1995-theological-education-v31-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Introduction (James L. Waits)
Issues for Future Faculty Planning (Joseph C. Hough, Jr.)
Choosing and Nurturing Faculty for an Unconventional Seminary (Barbara Brown Zikmund and William McKinney)
Faculty Development: An Organic Perspective (Samuel T. Logan, Jr.)
Evaluating an Uncertain Craft: Faculty Assessment and Theological Education (Mary C. Boys, SNJM)
Standards for Innovation: The Case for Theological Librarians (Stephen D. Crocco and Sara J. Myers)
Riding the Whirlwind: The Community of Scholars as a Response to the Changing Face of Theological Education (David D. Thayer, SS)
Cover image

Awards and Recognition for Exceptional Teachers K-12 and Community College Programs in the U.S.A., Canada and Other Countries

Book
Andrews, Hans A.
2006
Matilda Press, Ottawa, IL
LB2838.3.A53 2006
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Awards and Recognition for Exceptional Teachers is the only book written with a focus on the need of teachers everywhere to receive recognition for outstanding work with students in the classroom. The focus is on K-12 and community college teachers. It covers recognition programs in the USA, Canada, London, UK, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Belize (San Pedro), Australia, South America and a few other countries.
You will learn why ...
Additional Info:
Awards and Recognition for Exceptional Teachers is the only book written with a focus on the need of teachers everywhere to receive recognition for outstanding work with students in the classroom. The focus is on K-12 and community college teachers. It covers recognition programs in the USA, Canada, London, UK, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Belize (San Pedro), Australia, South America and a few other countries.
You will learn why all exceptional teachers must have local and state awards and recognition programs:
* Every K-12 and community college system needs a teacher recognition program – less than 50% have them!
* All exceptional teachers should receive a special "thank you" from the board and administration – 85-95% don't!
* Learn how improved student learning evolves as teachers' self-images improve through recognition and national certification programs.
* Learn why board members and parents need to understand how recognition programs impact on improved student learning.
* Parents will learn about exceptional teachers and should demand all teachers be hired and retained at that level.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contents
The author
Preface
Acknowledgments
ch. 1 Exceptional Teacher Awards and Recognition
ch. 2 Developing Philosophy about Recognition
ch. 3 Recognition: Objectives and Outcomes
ch. 4 Community College Programs : National & State
ch. 5 Individual Community College Practices
ch. 6 National K-12 Awards Programs
ch. 7 Recognition Programs by State: K-12
ch. 8 Individual School Programs: K-12
ch. 9 Canadian Programs
ch. 10 Other International Programs
Epilogue: Recognition for Every Exceptional Teacher
Bibliography
Index
Article cover image

"Co-Teaching - Training Professionals To Teach"

Article
Eddy, Pamela
Article: Tomorrow's Professor #739, http://ctl.stanford.edu/Tomprof/postings/5739.html
Topics: General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Becoming a High Performance Mentor: A Guide to Reflection and Action

Book
Rowley, James B.
2006
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1731.4.R687 2006
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
High-performance mentors are not born. Even experienced educators need training in order to provide constructive support to entry-year teachers. James B. Rowley's mentoring framework has been used to successfully train thousands of teachers to acquire the six essential behaviors of high-performance mentoring: committing, accepting, communicating, coaching, learning, and inspiring.
With more than twenty years of experience in training mentor teachers, Rowley blends real-life stories with established research to help ...
Additional Info:
High-performance mentors are not born. Even experienced educators need training in order to provide constructive support to entry-year teachers. James B. Rowley's mentoring framework has been used to successfully train thousands of teachers to acquire the six essential behaviors of high-performance mentoring: committing, accepting, communicating, coaching, learning, and inspiring.
With more than twenty years of experience in training mentor teachers, Rowley blends real-life stories with established research to help readers
* Understand mentoring as a performance continuum with escalating developmental stages
* Improve assessment, communication, and coaching skills
* Reflect on the mentoring process and analyze mentoring relationships
* Utilize mentoring as a pathway to personal and professional growth
Designed for both experienced and novice mentor teachers, this book will also be an enormously useful resource for mentor program coordinators, trainers, staff developers, and principals who want to assure that participants grow in their teaching practice as a result of the mentoring experience.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Mentoring
ch. 3 Committing
ch. 4 Accepting
ch. 5 Communicating
ch. 6 Coaching
ch. 7 Learning
ch. 8 Inspiring
Additional Info:
Adjuncts have become the lifeline of a vast majority of colleges and universities. They teach many of the foundation and core courses taken by first and second year students, they teach professional courses in which their own life experiences are invaluable, and they step in on short notice to fill in for regular faculty engaged in research or away on sabbaticals.

A survey of over 4,000 institutions conducted by ...
Additional Info:
Adjuncts have become the lifeline of a vast majority of colleges and universities. They teach many of the foundation and core courses taken by first and second year students, they teach professional courses in which their own life experiences are invaluable, and they step in on short notice to fill in for regular faculty engaged in research or away on sabbaticals.

A survey of over 4,000 institutions conducted by the US Department of Education reveals that adjuncts are being hired at a much higher rate than full-time faculty. This is due partly to increased enrollment, partly to reduced budgets, partly as a deliberate administrative strategy, and partly to convenience.

The importance of adjuncts to the college or university cannot be overstated. This book provides academic administrators and faculty developers with proactive, practical and results-producing approaches that can help transform fragmented faculties into inclusive and cohesive teaching and scholarly communities.

Structured in an easy-to-follow, practical format, this book provides an invaluable resource of thoughtful and pragmatic approaches to ensure the both quality and satisfaction on the part of the institution and the adjuncts. Topics are presented in a thematic sequence that allows decision-makers to focus on their priority areas; guidance is provided for systematic planning and implementation.

The contents focus on connecting adjunct faculty to core institutional functions and structures: Connection #1 - To The Institution; Connection #2 - To The Department; Connection #3 - To The Profession & The Discipline; Connection #4 - To Teaching; Connection #5 - To Students; Connection #6 - To Scholarship. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Connection 1 To the institution : steps in creating an inclusive teaching community
ch. 2 Connection 2 To the department : steps in developing a collegial community
ch. 3 Connection 3 To teaching : steps in enhancing a culture of quality teaching
ch. 4 Connection 4 To students : steps in fostering and sustaining a supporting learning environment
ch. 5 Connection 5 To scholarship : nurturing the whole professional - teacher and scholar
Cover image

Uncovering Teacher Leadership: Essays and Voices From the Field

Book
Ackerman, Richard H., and Sarah V. Mackenzie, eds.
2007
Corwin Press, A SAGE Publications Company, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1775.U436 2007
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Immerse yourself in exploring the heart of teacher leadership!

Practicing the art of teacher leadership requires self-reflection, creativity, and discipline. This comprehensive reader brings together the top voices in the field, encouraging teacher leaders to examine the tensions in their practice. Edited by recognized leadership experts Richard H. Ackerman (author of The Wounded Leader) and Sarah V. Mackenzie, this must-have resource contains classic essays and contemporary gems that ...
Additional Info:
Immerse yourself in exploring the heart of teacher leadership!

Practicing the art of teacher leadership requires self-reflection, creativity, and discipline. This comprehensive reader brings together the top voices in the field, encouraging teacher leaders to examine the tensions in their practice. Edited by recognized leadership experts Richard H. Ackerman (author of The Wounded Leader) and Sarah V. Mackenzie, this must-have resource contains classic essays and contemporary gems that explore teacher leadership in insightful and surprising ways.

This well-organized compendium features stories and lessons from teacher leaders that explore current issues, underlying feelings, and fresh perspectives. Within a five-part structure, each section begins with an introduction and closes with questions designed to encourage reflection and discussion. Readers will be able to use

* Stories, essays, and research findings for insight and exploration
* Protocols to structure conversations about common issues
* Ideas for inspiring and motivating other educators to examine and improve their practices
* Contributions from teacher leader experts such as Roland Barth, Barnett Barry, Mary Dietz, Gordon A. Donaldson Jr., Michael Fullan, Sam M. Intrator, Marilyn Katzenmeyter, Linda Lambert, Ann Liebermann, Gayle Moller, and many more

Revealing the inner world of teacher leaders will prompt readers to think more deeply about their own leadership. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I: Looking at Teacher Leadership
ch. 1. Surprising Outcomes or Why Do They Read Macbeth (Elizabeth Wiley)
ch. 2. The Teacher Leader (Roland S. Barth)
ch. 3. What Research Says About Teacher Leadership - Ann Lieberman (Lynne Miller)
ch. 4. Teachers as Leaders: Emergence of a New Paradigm (Frank Crowther, Stephen S. Kaagan, Margaret Ferguson, and Leonne Hann)
ch. 5. Honoring the Uniqueness of Teacher Leaders (Marilyn Katzenmeyer and Gayle Moller)
ch. 6. I'm Not Like You (Laura Reasoner Jones)
Questions for Reflection and Conversation

Part II: Teacher Leaders Everywhere
ch. 7. Teacher Professionalism: Diamonds on the Souls of Her Shoes (Nancy Flanagan)
ch. 8. Leadership to the Fore (Michael Fullan)
ch. 9. Teaching as Leading (Linda Lambert, Michelle Collay, Mary E. Dietz, Karen Kent, and Anna Ershler Richert)
ch. 10. What Teachers Bring to Leadership: The Distinctive Assets of Teachers Who Lead (Gordan A. Donaldson, Jr.)
ch. 11. Leading From the Parking Lot (Barbara H. White)
Questions for Reflection and Conversation

Part III: The Heart of Teacher Leaders
ch. 12. The Courage to Lead (Todd West)
ch. 13. On the Balcony (Kathy Stockford)
ch. 14. Teacher Leadership: Noble Aspiration or Myth? (Hank Ogilby)
ch. 15. The Golden Rule of Leadership (Samuel Moring)
ch. 16. A Year in the Life of a Teacher Leader: Enacting Core Beliefs (Terry Young)
ch. 17. Works Well With Others: The Nurturing of a Teacher Leader (Barbara McGillicuddy Bolton)
ch. 18. The Code of Silence (Betsy Webb)
ch. 19. Confessions of a Teacher Leader (Liz Murray)
ch. 20. Reaching Out to Parents (Deborah Vose)
ch. 21. A Roaring Silence (Wendy Lessard)
ch. 22. Education's Glass Ceiling (William Ferriter)
ch. 23. Learning in the Risk Zone (Stephanie Marshall)
ch. 24. Hard Lessons About Leadership (Jennifer Ribeiro)
ch. 25. I, Leader (Gary Chapin)
Questions for Reflection and Conversation

Part IV: Keeping the Teacher in the Leader
ch. 26. Looking Within: A Principal's Thoughts About Teacher Leadership (George F. Marnik)
ch. 27. Taking on Teacher Leadership: A Foray Into Netherland (JoAnne C. Dowd)
ch. 28. To Lead or Not to Lead? A Quandary for Newly Tenured Teachers (Morgaen L. Donaldson)
ch. 29. The Continuum of Leadership Development: Teacher Leaders Move to Administration (Sarah V. Mackenzie)
ch. 30. Working Together Through Learning-Oriented Leadership: Promising Practices for Supporting Teacher Leadership and Growth (Eleanor E. Drago-Severson)
ch. 31. Encouraging Districtwide Teacher Leadership (Mary Ann Minard)
Questions for Reflection and Conversation

Part V: Nuturing Teacher Leaders
ch. 32. It Isn't Just a Dream (Linda Bowe)
ch. 33. The Heart of Teaching: Making the Connection Between Teaching, Leadership, and Inner Life (Sam M. Intrator)
ch. 34. Learning and Growing From Convening: A Context for Reflecting on Teacher Practice (Eleanor E. Drago-Severson, Jennifer Roloff Welch, and Anne E. Jones)
ch. 35. America's Teaching Profession and the Teacher Leaders Network (Barnett Berry and John Norton)
ch. 36. Teacher Leaders Redefining the Status Quo Through Critical Friends Groups (Deborah Bambino)
ch. 37. The Paradox of Teacher Leadership (Jed Frank Lippard)
ch. 38. The Times They Are A-changing (Martha McFarland Williams)
Questions for Reflection and Conversation
Part VI: Conclusion
ch. 39. (How) Can a New Vision of Teacher Leadership Be Fulfilled? (Sarah V. Mackenzie)
ch. 40. Leading From the Back (Richard H. Ackerman)

Index
About the Editors
About the Contributors
Cover image

Rethinking Faculty Work

Book
Gappa, Judith M., Ann E. Austin, and Andrea G. Trice
2007
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.72.G375 2007
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Written for educators, administrators, policy makers, and anyone else concerned with the future of higher education, Rethinking Faculty Work shows how changes in higher education are transforming the careers of faculty and provides a model that makes it possible for all faculty to be in a position to do their best. This important resource offers a vision of academic workplaces that will attract superb faculty committed to fulfilling the missions ...
Additional Info:
Written for educators, administrators, policy makers, and anyone else concerned with the future of higher education, Rethinking Faculty Work shows how changes in higher education are transforming the careers of faculty and provides a model that makes it possible for all faculty to be in a position to do their best. This important resource offers a vision of academic workplaces that will attract superb faculty committed to fulfilling the missions of the universities and colleges where they work. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part One: Higher Education's Changing Context
ch. 1 The Changing Context for Faculty Work and Workplaces
ch. 2 Trends in the National Workplace
ch. 3 Faculty Appointments and Faculty Members: Diversification, Growth, and Diversity
ch. 4 The Academic Profession Today: Diverse Appointments to Meet Diverse Needs
ch. 5 Attracting and Retaining Excellent Faculty

Part Two: The Framework
ch. 6 The Framework of Essential Elements
ch. 7 Respect: The Foundation for the Essential Elements
ch. 8 Shared Responsibility and Joint Leadership

Part Three: The Essential Elements
ch. 9 Equity in Academic Appointments
ch. 10 Academic Freedom
ch. 11 Ensuring Flexibility in Academic Appointments
ch. 12 Professional Growth
ch. 13 Collegiality
ch. 14 Why Rethink Faculty Work and Workplaces? A Call to Action

References
Name Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Life on the Tenure Track: Lessons from the First Year

Book
Lang, James M.
2005
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2836.L36 2005
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This lively account provides guidance to college and university faculty as they plot their course to tenure. Written in journal form by a regular contributor to the Chronicle of Higher Education, Life on the Tenure Track recounts many of Jim Lang's own early struggles in the classroom, at the department meeting, and around the halls of academe. Lang uses wit and anecdote to lighten the burden of a journey that ...
Additional Info:
This lively account provides guidance to college and university faculty as they plot their course to tenure. Written in journal form by a regular contributor to the Chronicle of Higher Education, Life on the Tenure Track recounts many of Jim Lang's own early struggles in the classroom, at the department meeting, and around the halls of academe. Lang uses wit and anecdote to lighten the burden of a journey that is often lonely and confusing. Engaging and accessible, Life on the Tenure Track will provide insight to administrators, graduate students seeking their first appointments, and junior faculty on their own tenure track. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Prologue : before (and after) the beginning

ch. 1 August : beginning
ch. 2 September : teaching
ch. 3 October : writing
ch. 4 November : serving
ch. 5 December : grading
ch. 6 January (and a bit of February) : hiring
ch. 7 February : living
ch. 8 March : relating
ch. 9 April : figuring it out, parts one & two
ch. 10 May : housecleaning
ch. 11 June : settling in (or just settling?)
ch. 12 July : affirming

Epilogue : August redux, beginning again
Resources for first-year faculty : a brief annotated selection
Cover image

The Role of Self in Teacher Development

Book
Lipka, Richard P., ed.
1999
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LB1775.2.R65 1999
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The Role of Self in Teacher Development explores some of the major transition points in becoming a teacher and focuses explicitly on how issues of self and identity bear on these different points. The contributors examine not only pre-service teachers, but also the first years of teaching, the characteristics of the master teacher, and the processes of reexamining and affirming one's identity as a teacher. A recurrent theme throughout the ...
Additional Info:
The Role of Self in Teacher Development explores some of the major transition points in becoming a teacher and focuses explicitly on how issues of self and identity bear on these different points. The contributors examine not only pre-service teachers, but also the first years of teaching, the characteristics of the master teacher, and the processes of reexamining and affirming one's identity as a teacher. A recurrent theme throughout the book is the importance of balancing the personal development of teachers with their professional development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Balancing the Personal and Professional Development of Teachers

ch. 1 Deciding to Teach (Linda F. Tusin)
ch. 2 Deciding to Teach: Implications of a Self-Development Perspective (Stanley J. Zehm)
ch. 3 Becoming a Teacher: The Person in the Process (S. Vianne McLean)
ch. 4 Dimensions of Self That Influence Effective Teaching (Gary D. Borich)
ch. 5 Teacher Self-Appraisal and Appraisal of Self (Les Tickle)
ch. 6 Identity and Induction: Establishing the Self in the First Years of Teaching (Paul G. Schempp, Andrew C. Sparkes, Thomas J. Templin)
ch. 7 Caring: The Way of the Master Teacher (Karen J. Agne)
ch. 8 Effective Teachers: What They Do, How They Do It, and the Importance of Self-Knowledge (Don Hamachek)

Epilogue: How Can the Balance between the Personal and the Professional Be Achieved?
Indices
Cover image

The Academic Self: An Owner's Manual

Book
Hall, Donald E.
2002
Ohio State University Press, Columbus, OH
LB2331.H3122 2002
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The Academician's guide to career management offers insights on climbing the college career ladder that will benefit grad students and full professors alike. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The Academician's guide to career management offers insights on climbing the college career ladder that will benefit grad students and full professors alike. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Owning up to Academic Dysfunctions
ch. 1 Self
ch. 2 Profession
ch. 3 Process
ch. 4 Collegiality, Community, and Change
Postscript: Textualizing Success
App Sample Professional Statement
References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Essential Academic Dean: A Practical Guide to College Leadership

Book
Buller, Jeffrey L.
2007
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2341.B743 2007
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The role of an academic dean is extremely complex, involving budgeting, community relations, personnel decisions, managing a large enterprise, mastering numerous details, fundraising, and guiding a school or college toward a compelling vision for the future. But no academic dean can quickly master all of the intricacies involved in this challenging position. For instance, how do you build support for a shared vision of your unit's future? How do you ...
Additional Info:
The role of an academic dean is extremely complex, involving budgeting, community relations, personnel decisions, managing a large enterprise, mastering numerous details, fundraising, and guiding a school or college toward a compelling vision for the future. But no academic dean can quickly master all of the intricacies involved in this challenging position. For instance, how do you build support for a shared vision of your unit's future? How do you interact effectively with all of the different internal and external constituencies that a dean must serve? How do you set, supervise, and implement a budget? How do you handle the volume of documents that cross your desk? How do you fire someone, ask a chair to step down, respond to a reporter on the telephone, and settle disputes about intellectual property rights? How do you know when it's time to consider leaving your current position for another opportunity? The Essential Academic Dean is about the "how" of academic leadership. Based on a series of workshops given by the author on college administration and management, each topic deals concisely with the most important information deans need at their fingertips when faced with a particular challenge or opportunity. Written both as a comprehensive guide to the academic deanship and as a ready reference to be consulted when needed, this book emphasizes proven solutions over untested theories and stresses what deans need to know now in order to be most successful as academic leaders. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author.
Introduction.

Part I: The Dean’s Role.
ch. 1 The View from the Middle.
ch. 2 Preparing for the Dean’s Role.
ch. 3 What Kind of Dean Are You?
ch. 4 Creating a Vision for the College.
ch. 5 Building a Shared Vision for the College.
ch. 6 Launching Initiatives.
ch. 7 Leading Reform.
ch. 8 A Scenario Analysis on the Dean’s Role.

Part II: The Dean’s Constituents.
ch. 9 Students.
ch. 10 Parents.
ch. 11 Faculty.
ch. 12 Challenging Employees.
ch. 13 Department Chairs.
ch. 14 Staff.
ch. 15 Other Deans.
ch. 16 Upper Administrators.
ch. 17 Friends of the College.
ch. 18 Donors and Potential Donors.
ch. 19 Boards, Trustees, and Legislators.
ch. 20 A Scenario Analysis on the Dean’s Constituents.

Part III: The Dean’s Staff.
ch. 21 Searching for and Building a Strong Administrative Team.
ch. 22 Interviewing a Candidate.
ch. 23 Closing the Deal.
ch. 24 A Scenario Analysis on the Dean’s Staff.

Part IV: The Dean’s Budget.
ch. 25 Setting Budgetary Priorities.
ch. 26 Supervising a Budget.
ch. 27 Implementing Budget Cuts.
ch. 28 A Scenario Analysis on the Dean’s Budget.

Part V: The Dean’s Documents.
ch. 29 Budget Proposals.
ch. 30 Faculty Evaluations.
ch. 31 Chair Evaluations.
ch. 32 Position Requests and Descriptions.
ch. 33 Program Reviews.
ch. 34 Policies and Procedures.
ch. 35 A Scenario Analysis on the Dean’s Documents.

Part VI: The Dean’s Leadership.
ch. 36 Leadership When Meeting One on One.
ch. 37 Leadership When Chairing Committees.
ch. 38 Leadership from the Middle.
ch. 39 Leadership in Development and Increasing Revenue.
ch. 40 A Scenario Analysis on the Dean’s Leadership.

Part VII: The Dean’s Challenges.
ch. 41 Terminating a Faculty Member.
ch. 42 Replacing a Chair.
ch. 43 Responding to Emergencies.
ch. 44 Dealing with the Media.
ch. 45 Intellectual Property Disputes.
ch. 46 Addressing Differences with Other Administrators.
ch. 47 A Scenario Analysis on the Dean’s Challenges.

Part VIII: The Dean’s Unique Opportunities.
ch. 48 The Honors College.
ch. 49 The Professional School.
ch. 50 The Graduate School.
ch. 51 Consortia, Centers, and Institutes.
ch. 52 The Unionized Environment.
ch. 53 Promoting Diversity.
ch. 54 The Dean as Chief Academic Officer.
ch. 55 A Scenario Analysis on the Dean’s Unique Opportunities.

Part IX: The Dean’s Next Step.
ch. 56 Knowing When It’s Time to Go.
ch. 57 Changing Institutions.
ch. 58 Returning to the Faculty.
ch. 59 Planning for a Higher Administrative Role.
ch. 60 A Scenario Analysis on the Dean’s Next Step.

Epilogue: A Checklist for the Essential Academic Dean.
Cover image

Envisioning the Future of Doctoral Education: Preparing Stewards of the Discipline Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate

Book
Golde, Chris M., George E. Walker, and Associates, eds.
2006
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2386.G64 2006
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The development of students as “stewards of the discipline” should be the purpose of doctoral education. A steward is a scholar in the fullest sense of the term—someone who can imaginatively generate new knowledge, critically conserve valuable and useful ideas, and responsibly transform those understandings through writing, teaching, and application. Stewardship also has an ethical and moral dimension; it is a role that transcends a collection of accomplishments and ...
Additional Info:
The development of students as “stewards of the discipline” should be the purpose of doctoral education. A steward is a scholar in the fullest sense of the term—someone who can imaginatively generate new knowledge, critically conserve valuable and useful ideas, and responsibly transform those understandings through writing, teaching, and application. Stewardship also has an ethical and moral dimension; it is a role that transcends a collection of accomplishments and skills. A steward is someone to whom the vigor, quality, and integrity of the field can be entrusted. The most important period of a steward’s formation occurs during formal doctoral education.
Envisioning the Future of Doctoral Education is a collection of essays commissioned for the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate. The question posed to the essayists in this volume was, “If you could start de novo, what would be the best way to structure doctoral education in your field to prepare stewards of the discipline?” The authors of the essays are respected thinkers, researchers, and scholars who are experienced with and thoughtful about doctoral education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The Authors

Part One: Introduction
ch. 1 Preparing Stewards of the Discipline (Chris M. Golde)

Part Two: Commentaries
ch. 2 Who Should Do What: Implications for Institutional and National Leaders (Kenneth Prewitt)
ch. 3 Vectors of Change (David Damrosch)
ch. 4 Heeding the Voices of Graduate Students and Postdocs (Crispin Taylor).

Part Three: The Essays
ch. 5 Unmasking Uncertainties and Embracing Contradictions: Graduate Education in the Sciences (Yehuda Elkana)
Doctoral Education in Mathematics
ch. 6 Developing Scholars and Professionals: The Case of Mathematics (Hyman Bass)
ch. 7 A Time for Change? The Mathematics Doctorate
Doctoral Education in Chemistry (Tony F. Chan)
ch. 8 Time for Reform? (Alvin L. Kwiram)
ch. 9 Developing Breadth and Depth of Knowledge: The Doctorate in Chemistry (Ronald Breslow)
ch. 10 Training Future Leaders (Angelica M. Stacy)
Doctoral Education in Neuroscience
ch. 11 Maintaining Vitality Through Change: Graduate Education in Neuroscience (Zach W. Hall)
ch. 12 The Challenges of Multidisciplinarity: Neuroscience and the Doctorate (Steven E. Hyman)
Doctoral Education in Education
ch. 13 Stewards of a Field, Stewards of an Enterprise: The Doctorate in Education (Virginia Richardson)
ch. 14 Toward a Future as Rich as Our Past (David C. Berliner)
Doctoral Education in History
ch. 15 Expanding the Domain of History (Thomas Bender)
ch. 16 Historians, the Historical Forces They Have Fostered, and the Doctorate in History (Joyce Appleby)
ch. 17 Getting Ready to Do History (William Cronon)
Doctoral Education in English
ch. 18 Rethinking the Ph.D. in English (Andrea Abernethy Lunsford)
ch. 19 Toward a New Consensus: The Ph.D. in English (Gerald Graff)
ch. 20 Words and Responsibilities: Graduate Education and the Humanities (Catharine R. Stimpson)

Part Four: Conclusion
ch. 21 The Questions in the Back of the Book (George E. Walker)

Name Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Inquiry Into the College Classroom: A Journey Toward Scholarly Teaching

Book
Savory, Paul, Amy Nelson Burnett and Amy Goodburn
2007
Anker Publishing Company, Bolton, MA
LB2331.S28 2007
Topics: Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
An essential companion for university faculty interested in conducting scholarly inquiry into their classroom teaching, this practical guide presents a formal model for making visible the careful, difficult, and intentional scholarly work entailed in exploring a teaching question. As a how-to guide, this is an invaluable resource for planning and conducting classroom research—formulating questions and hypotheses, defining a data collection methodology, collecting data, measuring the impact, and documenting the ...
Additional Info:
An essential companion for university faculty interested in conducting scholarly inquiry into their classroom teaching, this practical guide presents a formal model for making visible the careful, difficult, and intentional scholarly work entailed in exploring a teaching question. As a how-to guide, this is an invaluable resource for planning and conducting classroom research—formulating questions and hypotheses, defining a data collection methodology, collecting data, measuring the impact, and documenting the results. Inquiry Into the College Classroom is filled with richly illustrative examples that highlight how university faculty from a range of academic disciplines have performed scholarly inquiries into their teaching and leads faculty on a journey that includes:

* Developing a formal model for structuring the exploration of a classroom inquiry question
* Providing a practical and useful guide for faculty interested in exploring teaching and learning challenges
* Detailing faculty experiences in measuring specific changes in student learning or perspectives
* Demonstrating how to document classroom inquiry in a form to be shared, used, and reviewed by other faculty
* Sharing useful and practical suggestions for getting started with a classroom inquiry
* Highlighting different models for disseminating classroom inquiry work
* Linking classroom inquiry to larger conversations about the scholarship of teaching and learning
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Exhibits
About the Authors
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 A Guide for Scholarly Inquiry into Teaching
What Is Happening in My Classroom?
Teaching: A Scholarly Journey
A Model for Your Classroom Inquiry
Reflecting on Course Background, History, and Development
Identifying an Issue to Investigate
Defining an Inquiry Hypothesis
Developing an Investigative Plan
Relating Your Inquiry to What Has Been Done Before
Seeking Institutional Approval and Student Consent
Teaching the Course
Interpreting and Evaluating Your Findings
Reflecting on the Inquiry Process
Checklist for Assessing Classroom Inquiry
What's Next

ch. 2 The Basic Structure of Classroom Inquiry
ch. 3 Incorporating Additional Forms of Data Collection
ch. 4 Using Classroom Inquiry to Answer Multiple Questions
ch. 5 Overcoming Challenges With Data Collection
ch. 6 Linking Classroom Inquiry With Disciplinary Research
ch. 7 Obtaining Useful Inquiry Results, but More Data Is Needed
ch. 8 Using Classroom Inquiry to Evaluate New Assessment Measures
ch. 9 Classroom Inquiry for Measuring Feedback on Student Learning and Aptitudes
ch. 10 Classroom Inquiry and Scholarly Teaching

ch. 11 Beginning Your Scholarly Journey
Lessons Concerning Classroom Inquiry
Practical Advice forConducting Your Inquiry
From Scholarly Teaching to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Models for Disseminating Your Inquiry Work
Resources for Learning More
An Invitation to Set Out on Your Scholarly Journey

Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Making Teaching and Learning Visible: Course Portfolios and the Peer Review of Teaching

Book
Bernstein, Daniel, Amy Nelson Burnett, Amy Goodburn, and Paul Savory
2006
Anker Publishing Company, Bolton, MA
LB2333.M27 2006
Topics: Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
With higher education’s refocus over the last three decades on bringing greater recognition and reward to good teaching, the idea of peer review has gained popularity. One tool for documenting and reflecting on the quality of teaching and student learning is a course portfolio. A course portfolio captures and makes visible the careful, difficult, and intentional scholarly work of planning and teaching a course.
Illustrated through examples of ...
Additional Info:
With higher education’s refocus over the last three decades on bringing greater recognition and reward to good teaching, the idea of peer review has gained popularity. One tool for documenting and reflecting on the quality of teaching and student learning is a course portfolio. A course portfolio captures and makes visible the careful, difficult, and intentional scholarly work of planning and teaching a course.
Illustrated through examples of course portfolios created during a four-year project on peer review of teaching, this book demonstrates how faculty can integrate well-designed peer review into their daily professional lives, thus improving their teaching by incorporating a means for assessment and collaboration and revealing the student learning that happens with effective teaching within an institutional reward systems.
This book offers a model of peer review intended to help faculty document, assess, reflect on, and improve teaching and student learning through the use of a course portfolio. It features a rich collection of materials—including four dozen exhibits to help assemble a portfolio, reviewers’ comments, and reflections drawn from more than 200 professors and portfolio authors in various disciplines and institutions—that faculty can use to develop their course portfolios to be used in their peer review of teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Making Teaching and Learning Visible
ch. 2 Capturing the Intellectual Work of Teaching: The Benchmark Portfolio
ch. 3 The Benchmark Portfolio: Five Examples
ch. 4 Inquiring Into Specific Aspects of Teaching: The Inquiry Portfolio
ch. 5 Soliciting and Writing External reviews for course Portfolios
ch. 6 Using Course Portfolios to Foster Campus Collaboration
ch. 7 Creating a Campus Community for the Peer Review of Teaching
ch. 8 Addressing Larger Issues in Peer Review
Cover image

Evaluating Faculty Performance: A Practical Guide to Assessing Teaching, Research, and Service

Book
Seldin, Peter, ed.
2006
Anker Publishing Company, now part of Jossey-Bass, an Imprint of John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco
LB2333.S438 2006
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Written by experts in teaching and administration, this guide offers practical, research-based information for faculty members and administrators in search of new approaches for assessing and improving faculty potential. By recognizing that faculty evaluation can be a difficult, time-consuming, and costly process, the authors of Evaluating Faculty Performance have distilled existing evaluation practices into useful recommendations for strengthening the overall system.

Offering numerous suggestions for improving evaluation methods, ...
Additional Info:
Written by experts in teaching and administration, this guide offers practical, research-based information for faculty members and administrators in search of new approaches for assessing and improving faculty potential. By recognizing that faculty evaluation can be a difficult, time-consuming, and costly process, the authors of Evaluating Faculty Performance have distilled existing evaluation practices into useful recommendations for strengthening the overall system.

Offering numerous suggestions for improving evaluation methods, assessing program weaknesses, and avoiding common problems, the book

* Examines compelling reasons for developing effective and systematic faculty assessment processes
* Discusses how to create a climate for positive change by favoring performance counseling over performance evaluation
* Identifies the essential elements and best practices in assessment, while also revealing what not to do in evaluating performance
* Explains the value of the professional portfolio in assessment teaching, and offers advice on how to complete a portfolio
* Outlines key issues, dangers, and benchmarks for success in straightforward language

Included are field-tested forms and checklists that can be used to measure faculty performance in teaching, research, and service. The suggestions for improving faculty assessment are clear and practicable—sensible advice for strengthening a process that is of increasing importance in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Building a Successful Evaluation Program (Peter Seldin)
ch. 2 Essential Operating Principles and Key Guidelines (Peter Seldin)
ch. 3 Building a Climate For Faculty evaluation That Improves Teaching (Mary Lou HJiggerson)
ch. 4 Uses and Abuses of Student Ratings (William Pallett)
ch. 5 Institutional Service (Clement A. Seldin)
ch. 6 Peer Observations as a Catalyst for Faculty Development (Barbara J. Millis)
ch. 7 Self-Evaluation: Composing an Academic Life Narrative (Thomas V. McGovern)
ch. 8 Teaching Portfolios (Monica A. Devanas)
ch. 9 Evaluating Faculty Research (Teck-Kah Lim)
ch. 10 Teaching Evaluation Follies: Misperception and Misbehavior in Student Evaluations of Teachers (Jane S. Halonen, Geroge B. Ellenberg)
ch. 11 Using Evaluation Data to Improve Teaching effectiveness (Todd Zakrajsek)
ch. 12 Using Evaluation Data for Personnel Decisions (David Fite)
ch. 13 The Professional Portfolio: Expanding the Value of Portfolio Development (John Zubizarreta)
ch. 14 Summary and Recommendations for Evaluating Faculty Performance (J. Elizabeth Miller)

Appendix: Selected Forms to Evaluate Teaching, Advising, Research, and Service
Index
Additional Info:
No other teaching experience will feel quite like the first time an instructor walks into a classroom to face a class of students.
This book is a wise and friendly guide for new faculty and graduate student instructors who are about to teach for the first time.
It provides an introduction to the theory of teaching; describes proven strategies and activities for engaging students in their learning; and ...
Additional Info:
No other teaching experience will feel quite like the first time an instructor walks into a classroom to face a class of students.
This book is a wise and friendly guide for new faculty and graduate student instructors who are about to teach for the first time.
It provides an introduction to the theory of teaching; describes proven strategies and activities for engaging students in their learning; and offers advice on classroom management, syllabus creation, grading, assessment, and discipline issues, among other topics. It prepares readers for a confident start as teachers, and gives them a firm foundation on which to develop their skills and personal classroom styles.
The author breaks teaching down into its component elements and tasks to enable graduate student instructors to identify their particular responsibilities, and learn about what works and does not. They will also benefit from reading the book as a whole as it sets their work in the context of course objectives and learning theory.
For new faculty this engaging book provides a solid basis from which to develop their skills and personal styles as teachers; and offers guidance on documenting their classroom success for the purposes of promotion and tenure. For graduate student instructors, the book is a companion that will give them confidence and pleasure in teaching, and stand them in good stead if they decide on a in any future career in academe. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Beginnings

On Being a Novice College Teacher
The Bold Enterprise
Apprehensions and Trepidations
The "It" Factor-Help Students Understand What It Means to Be Educated
Types of Appointments
Finding Help for Your Teaching
Teaching Intentionally
Success-Three Brief Tips
Pedagogy
Teacher-Centered or Student-Centered
Teachers in Their Many Roles
Active Learning
Critical Thinking
Some Major Figures in Pedagogy
Special Attention to Undergraduates
Making Use of Technology
The First Day
A Tone That Signals Community
Authority in the Classroom
Facilities and Their Modifications
Your First Class-Instruction or Only Orientation
Dealing With Anxiety
Day One Arrives
Employing Active Learning From the Start
Messages to Students ... Subtle and Bold
Diversity, Diversity,Diversity
Introducing Students to Your Discipline
The Great Start-Yours
Creating a Syllabus
Syllabus or Course Guidelines-Which Works for You?
Your Course's "Clock"
Constructing a Syllabus
Pausing to Assess and Refresh
Finding Out What Your Students Know-and Helping Them Change Their Minds
Classroom Assessments
Students-What They Expect and What You Might Expect
Student Constituents-Gender, Race, Ethnicity, Religion, Class, Age, Students With Disabilities, Athletes, and Celebrities
Grade Inflation
The Notion of Students as Customers
Your Students' Unasked Questions
Preparing Your Students for Learning-Mnemonics and Beyond
Mandatory Conferences
Learning Styles
Preparation for Discussions
One Hundred Percent Participation
Creating Guidelines With Students
A Safe Environment
Learning Names-Everyone's Task
Who Speaks and Who Doesn't and Who Talks Too Much
Difficult or Challenging Topics: Taboos, Personal Values, and Hurt or Angry Feelings
Humor
Laughing at Others-Be Prepared
Preparing Content
Session Goals
Using PowerPoint
Facilitating Discussions
Texts, Problems, Evidence
Relying on Homework
What You Should Know About How Well Students Read
Using the Board
Video Clips and Films
Using Computer Displays and Overheads
Some Formats to Jump-Start Discussions
Time-Outs for Sluggish Sessions
Discussions Gone Wild
Dealing With Un(der)prepared Classes
Planning Assignments
Your Opportunities for Creating Assignments
The Mechanics of Planning
Papers, Real and Cyber
Exercise versus Display
Motivation
Repetition
Carrots and Sticks-Getting Students to Do Their Homework
When Students Write-Considerations and Assignment Ideas
Writing-the Emotional Side
Assignment Ideas
Term Papers and Their Alternatives
Group Work and Presentations
Using Groups in Your Classes
Gender and Race in Small Groups
Long-Term Projects
Optimizing Group Activities
Pitfalls of Group Projects
Helping Students Give Successful Presentations
Fraud, Cheating, Plagiarism, and Some Assignments That Discourage It
Fraud in Higher Education
Cheating
Plagiarism and Assignments That Discourage It
Dealing With Students Who Cheat or Plagiarize
Grading
Institutional Requirements
Two Mandates in Grading
Learning Outcomes
Rubrics
Test Construction
Improvement as a Factor
Nonnative English Speakers and Others With Writing Problems
Weighting Grades
Gatekeeping Knowledge
Extra Credit
Grading Attendance
Keeping Track of Participation
Assessment of Public Speaking
Grading Group Presentations
Efficient Grading
Making Use of Technology
Grade Complaints
Student Evaluations of You
Making the Most of Your Teaching Time and Planning for Your Future
Teaching Portfolios
Papers and Poster Sessions, Awards, and More
Translating Teaching Experiences Into a Career Other Than Teaching
Resume or Curriculum Vitae

Index
Article cover image

"Legal Primer for New & Not-So-New Administrators"

Article
Euben, Donna R.
2005
American Association of University Professors, Washington, D.C., Presentation to the 15th Annual Legal Issues in Higher Education Conference, University of Vermont, October 24,
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A 15,000 word article from AAUP (American Association of University Professors), addressing faculty recruitment,  tenure and advancement, sexual harassment, academic freedom, and protections against personal liability. “In the end, if you apply institutional policies consistently and fairly, you will be in a solid position to defend decisions.”
Additional Info:
A 15,000 word article from AAUP (American Association of University Professors), addressing faculty recruitment,  tenure and advancement, sexual harassment, academic freedom, and protections against personal liability. “In the end, if you apply institutional policies consistently and fairly, you will be in a solid position to defend decisions.”
Article cover image

"Working Effectively with the Dean"

Article
Malik, David & N. Douglas Lees, eds.
2008
The Department Chair 18, no. 3 (Wiley InterScience)
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Strategies for Teaching Assistant and International Teaching Assistant Development: Beyond Micro Teaching

Book
Ross, Catherine, and Jane Dunphy, eds.
2007
Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Imprint, San Francisco
LB2335.4.R67 2007
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
From the Publisher
Written for anyone who works with graduate students to support their teaching efforts in American research universities, this book draws on the extensive experience of professional educators who represent a variety of programs throughout the United States. They understand the common constraints of many TA development classes, workshops, and programs, as well as the need for motivating and sophisticated techniques that are, at the same time, ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher
Written for anyone who works with graduate students to support their teaching efforts in American research universities, this book draws on the extensive experience of professional educators who represent a variety of programs throughout the United States. They understand the common constraints of many TA development classes, workshops, and programs, as well as the need for motivating and sophisticated techniques that are, at the same time, practical and focused. Their contributions to this book have proven to be effective in developing the sophisticated communication skills required by TAs across the disciplines.


Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I: TA Development
ch. 1 Getting Started
Acknowledging Teaching Fears: The Three-Minute Free Response (Janet Rankin)
An Approach to Successful Collaborative Learning (Nancy C McClure)
Blended Learning: Focusing on Effective Teaching Through Online Discussions and Concept Mapping (Gabriele Bauer)
Diversity in the Classroom: Working Effectively with Undergraduate ESL Students (Shawna Shapiro)
Engaging Students in Active Learning (Shawna Shapiro)
Identity and Authority in the Classroom: An Exercise for New TAs (Mary C Wright)
Planning and Facilitating Discussion (Phillip M Edwards, Stacy Grooters, Margaret Lawrence)
Problems, Pitfalls, and Surprises in Teaching: Mini Cases (Lori Breslow, J Mark Schuster)
Responding to Student Writing (Stacy Grooters, Jennie Dorman)
Stand and Deliver: Developing Impromptu Speaking Skills (Jane Dunphy)
A TA Orientation Plenary Session on University Policies and Resources for Teaching (Derek Bruff)
Teaching in Computer Classrooms (Shaun K Kane, Joe Hannah, Phillip M Edwards, Jennie Dorman)
Teaching in Lab Settings (Jennie Dorman, Michelle Smith, Sara O’Brien, Karen Freisem)

ch. 2 Advanced Skills
Classroom Management Skills: Expanding Your Repertoire (Lee Warren)
Determining Appropriate Course Goalsand Pacing: An Exercise for Advanced TAs (Allyson Polsky McCabe, Lu Zhang)
Developing Effective Consulting Skills (Michele Marincovich, Marcelo Clerici-Arias, Mariatte Denman, Robyn Wright Dunbar)
Interdisciplinary Soapbox (Jill Bible, Robyn Wright Dunbar)
Introduction to Online Teaching and Learning: Using Asynchronous Discussions Effectively (Mary C Wright)
Reaction and Response: Group Problem Solving and Effective Feedback (Jane Dunphy)
Teaching Practice: Emphasis on Active Learning (Tershia Pinder)

ch. 3 Professional Development
ASPECTS: Advancing Students’ Professional Excellence with Certificates in Teaching Series (Mark Decker)
Mock Search Committee: Introduction to the Teaching Philosophy (Judith Gibber)
Teaching Portfolio Overview: Peer and Whole Group Discussion (Gabriele Bauer)

Part II: ITA Development
ch. 4 Culture
Cultural Adjustments (Barbara Gourlay)
Diversity Awareness for ITAs (Doris Yaffe Shiffman)
High-Context Versus Low-Context Culture: Case Studies (Christine Liptak, Colleen Meyers, Kyoung-Ah Nam, Elena Stetsenko)
The High School Visit (Catherine Ross)
Interviews: Surveying College Undergraduates Who Attended High School in the United States (Margo Sampson, Vel Chesser, Stacey Lane Tice)

ch. 5 Pedagogy
American Teaching Performance (Pamela Pollock)
Movie-Based Activities for the ITA Course (Theresa L Pettit)
Pedagogical Uses of Critical Incidents Videos for ITAs (Stacey Lane Tice, Margo Sampson, Vel Chesser)
Practice Identifying and Teaching to a Variety of Learning Styles (Anne Halbert)
Preparing the ITA for Office Hours (Elizabeth Wittner)

ch. 6 Language
Departmental Introduction Speech (Kimberly Kenyon)
Developing Oral Communication Skills (Margaret Lawrence)
Discovering and Teaching the Vocabulary of the Academic Communities (Doris Yaffe Shiffman)
Editorial Jigsaw (Barbara Gourlay)
Fielding Questions: The IgNobel Prizes (Barbara Thompson)
The Fine Art of Q&A (Barbara Gourlay)
The Greek Alphabet: Speaking in Symbols (Barbara Gourlay)
"International Teaching Assistant of the Year" Speech (Kimberly Kenyon)
Mimicking American TA Discourse (Janet Goodwin)
Practicing Communication Strategies (Doris Yaffe Shiffman)
Presentation Summaries—Take Two! (Barbara Thompson)
Working with Authentic TA Discourse (Janet Goodwin)

Resources
Index
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The Academic Chair's Handbook, Second Edition

Book
Wheeler, Daniel W.; Seagren, Alan T.; Becker, Linda Wyson; Kinley, Edward R.; Mlinek, Dara D.; Robson, Kenneth J.
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2341.A217 2008
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Practically focused, easily accessible, this book is directly relevant to the academic environment in which department chairs operate. The authors—internationally known experts in academic administration—conducted interviews with department chairs and heads at 38 academic institutions from across the U.S. and Canada, public and private, two-year and four-year.
The extensive interviews resulted in four thematic patterns that covered the overarching issues department chairs face: quality, change, culture, and ...
Additional Info:
Practically focused, easily accessible, this book is directly relevant to the academic environment in which department chairs operate. The authors—internationally known experts in academic administration—conducted interviews with department chairs and heads at 38 academic institutions from across the U.S. and Canada, public and private, two-year and four-year.
The extensive interviews resulted in four thematic patterns that covered the overarching issues department chairs face: quality, change, culture, and leadership. Each chapter is packed with practical advice and concludes with questions and resources to help chairs develop constructive responses to the myriad issues facing them. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Foreword
Preface

Part 1 Fifteen Strategies in the Building Process
ch. 1 Difficulties in the Building Process
The Context for Leadership
Chairing the Department
The Nature of the Department
The Nature of Faculty Work
A Self-Assessment
Endnotes
Suggested Resources

ch. 2 Consider Your Own Development
Learn About Your Role and Responsibilities in the Department and the Institution
Create a Balance Between Your Professional and Personal Lives
Prepare for Your Professional Future
Conclusion
Endnotes
Suggested Resources

ch. 3 Reflect on Your Role as an Academic Leader
Establish a Collective Departmental Vision or Focus
Develop Faculty Ownership of the Vision
Initiate Changes Carefully
Allocate Resources of Time, Information, and Assignments to Implement the Vision and Departmental Goals
Monitor Progress Toward Achieving the Vision and Goals
Conclusion
Endnotes
Suggested Resources

ch. 4 Create a Positive Interpersonal Work Environment
Establish an Open Atmosphere to Build Trust
Listen to Faculty Needs and Interests
Motivate Faculty and Collaboratively Set Goals
Develop Leadership Skills that Empower Faculty and Provide Effective Feedback
Feedback Techniques
Represent Faculty to Colleagues and Senior Administrators
Serve as a Role Model and Mentor
Encourage and Support Faculty
Conclusion
Endnotes
Suggested Resources

Part 2 Applying the Strategies ch. 5 Help New Faculty Become Oriented
Communicate Expectations for Performance
Provide Feedback on Progress
Enhance Collegial Review Processes
Create Flexible Time Lines for Tenure
Encourage Mentoring and Integration by Senior Faculty
Extend Mentoring and Feedback to Graduate Students Who Aspire to be Faculty Members
Recognize the Department Chair as a Career Sponsor
Support Teaching, Particularly at the Undergraduate Level
Support Scholarly Development
Foster a Balance Between Professional and Personal Life
Conclusion
Endnotes
Suggested Resources

ch. 6 Improve Faculty Teaching
Promote Excellence in Teaching
Support Teaching Improvement
Address Teaching Problems
Employ Case Studies to Guide Your Response to Teaching Problems
Conclusion
Suggested Resources

ch. 7 Improve the Scholarship of Faculty
Foster a Strong Research Climate
Detect a Problem Situation as Early as Possible
Clarify the Reasons for Lack of Performance
Identify a Plan for Improvement
Follow Up on the Plan
Conclusion
Endnotes
Suggested Resources

ch. 8 Refocus Faculty Efforts
Detect the Signs of Lack of Focus
Explore Options with the Individual
Mutually Design a Plan for Intervention
Arrange for Activities, Resources, and Feedback
Conclusion
Suggested Resources

ch. 9 Address Personal Issues of Faculty
Differentiate Between Short- and Long-Term Issues
Adopt Strategies for Temporary Problems
Adopt Strategies for Intervening in Chronic Cases
Conclusion
Suggested Resources

ch. 10 Employ Technology Wisely
Be Aware of Technological Developments
Encourage Faculty and Staff Technology Literacy
Support Technology Training
Use Technology Efficiently
Use Technology to Facilitate Outcomes, Assessment, and Accountability
Develop a Plan for Resource Allocation
Adopt Emerging Technologies Prudently
Consider the Impact on Student Services
Conclusion
Endnotes
Suggested Resources

ch. 11 Adapt to Funding and Resources Challenges
Clarify Responsibility for Budget Development and Allocation
Recognize the Implications of Budget Pressures
Diversify Funding Through Revenue Generation Strategies
Capitalize on Changes in Staffing
Maintain High Morale During Trying Times
Conclusion
Endnotes
Suggested Resources

ch. 12 Foster a Culture of Continuous Improvement
Make Continuous Improvement a Priority
Devise Strategies and Resources to Support Quality Improvement Efforts
Student Learning Assessment
Teaching Effectiveness Assessment
Program Effectiveness Assessment
Encourage Support of Continuous Improvement Efforts
Adopt Reliable Assessment Measures to Track Progress Over Time, Make Comparisons, and Demonstrate Results
An Illustration of the Process
Conclusion
Suggested Resources

ch. 13 Build an Agenda
Four Dimensions of the Building Process
Implementing the Agenda

Conclusion
Endnotes
References
The National Study and the Follow-Up Study
Topical Index to Strategies
Index
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Wabash tree

Best Practices for Supporting Adjunct Faculty

Book
Lyons, Richard E., ed.
2007
Anker Publishing Company, Inc., Bolton, MA
LB1778.2.B475 2007
Topics: Adjuncts   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The number of part-time faculty members is increasing steadily, to the point that most colleges and universities could not function efficiently without them. The evening and weekend availability of adjunct faculty enables us to expand class schedules to serve the educational needs of nontraditional students, and their expertise offers students important real-world perspectives.Yet there is often a lack of preparation or support for their vital role. Best Practices for ...
Additional Info:
The number of part-time faculty members is increasing steadily, to the point that most colleges and universities could not function efficiently without them. The evening and weekend availability of adjunct faculty enables us to expand class schedules to serve the educational needs of nontraditional students, and their expertise offers students important real-world perspectives.Yet there is often a lack of preparation or support for their vital role. Best Practices for Supporting Adjunct Faculty is written for a full range of academic leaders, including instructional administrators, department chairs, and directors of teaching and learning centers. It showcases proven initiatives at a variety of institutional types—two- and four year, public and private—that help achieve the needs of adjunct instructors, while increasing their effectiveness within institutions’ existing delivery systems. This book provides research data on the initiatives highlighted, and valuable ideas for institutions expanding their professional development opportunities for part-time instructors—thus enhancing student learning and improving accountability outcomes. Contents include:

* Deepening our understanding of adjunct faculty
* Ensuring an effective start for adjunct faculty
* Supporting adjunct faculty through face-to-face and online programming
* Mentoring adjunct instructors in a variety of approaches
* Building community and a sense of mission
* Analysis of orientation, pre-service training, recognition, and comprehensive professional development programs for adjunct faculty
* Portraits of proven programs and strategies for implementing initiatives atyour institution
* An adjunct professor’s perspective on the benefits of supporting your part-timers’ teaching
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Preface

ch. 1 Deepening Our Understanding of Adjunct Faculty (Richard E. Lyons)
ch. 2 Ensuring an Effective Start for Adjunct Faculty: Orientation With Multiple Options (Kevin Yee)
ch. 3 The Part-Time Faculty Institute: Strategically Designed and Continually Assessed (Marianne H. Hutti, Gale S. Rhodes, Joni Allison, and Evelyn Lauterbach)
ch. 4 A Proven Program for Supporting Adjunct Faculty Online, (Daryl Peterson)
ch. 5 Mentoring Adjunct Instructors: Fostering Bonds That Strengthen Teaching and Learning (Cynthia Zutter)
ch. 6 A Mentoring Network for Adjunct Faculty: From Proposal to Pilot to Five-Year Plan, (Gayle Nolan, Cynthia Siegrist, and Nancy Richard)
ch. 7 A Consortium Approach to Supporting Part-Time Faculty, (Helen Burnstad, Ben Hayes, Cindy Hoss, and Ann-Marie West)
ch. 8 An Applied Course in Teaching That Serves the Home and Neighboring Institutions (Thomas Lux)
ch. 9 The Associate Program: A Foundation for Professional Growth in Adjunct Faculty (Russell Richardson)
ch. 10 Adjunct Faculty Associates Professional Development Program (Keith Barker, and Dan Mercier)
ch. 11 Supporting Adjunct Faculty Through Orientation and Mentoring Initiatives and an Online Professional Development Course (Jeanne C. Silliman)
ch. 12 A Proven, Comprehensive Program for Preparing and Supporting Adjunct Faculty Members (Frank Harber, and Richard E. Lyons)
ch. 13 Initiating a Support System for Adjunct Faculty: The First Year (Laura Renninger, Shannon Holliday, and Marie Carter)
ch. 14 The Two-Year Effort to Build a Program That Provides Part-Time Faculty Pedagogical Support, Community, and a Sense of Mission, (H. Edward Lambert, and Milton D. Cox)
ch. 15 Professional Development Geared to Part-Timers' Needs: An Adjunct Professor's Perspective (Jason Schwartz)

Index
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The Academic Portfolio: A Practical Guide to Documenting Teaching, Research, and Service

Book
Peter Seldin and J. Elizabeth Miller
2009
Jossey-Bass, a Wiley Imprint, San Francisco
LB1029.P67S45 2009
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This comprehensive book focuses squarely on academic portfolios, which may prove to be the most innovative and promising faculty evaluation and development technique in years. The authors identify key issues, red flag warnings, and benchmarks for success, describing the what, why, and how of developing academic portfolios. The book includes an extensively tested step-by-step approach to creating portfolios and lists 21 possible portfolio items covering teaching, research/scholarship, and service from ...
Additional Info:
This comprehensive book focuses squarely on academic portfolios, which may prove to be the most innovative and promising faculty evaluation and development technique in years. The authors identify key issues, red flag warnings, and benchmarks for success, describing the what, why, and how of developing academic portfolios. The book includes an extensively tested step-by-step approach to creating portfolios and lists 21 possible portfolio items covering teaching, research/scholarship, and service from which faculty can choose the ones most relevant to them.

The thrust of this book is unique:

• It provides time-tested strategies and proven advice for getting started with portfolios.
• It includes a research-based rubric grounded in input from 200 faculty members and department chairs from across disciplines and institutions.
• It examines specific guiding questions to consider when preparing every subsection of the portfolio.
• It presents 18 portfolio models from 16 different academic disciplines.

Designed for faculty members, department chairs, deans, and members of promotion and tenure committees, all of whom are essential partners in developing successful academic portfolio programs, the book will also be useful to graduate students, especially those planning careers as faculty members. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Authors
About the Contributors

ch. 1. The Academic Portfolio Concept
ch. 2. Choosing Items for the Academic Portfolio
ch. 3. Preparing the Portfolio
ch. 4. Suggestions for Improving the Portfolio
ch. 5. Evaluating the Portfolio for Personnel Decisions
ch. 6. Answers to Common Questions
ch. 7. Sample Portfolios from Across Disciplines

Biomedical Engineering
Bioscience and Biotechnology
Child and Family Studies
Education
English
Environmental Engineering
Foreign Languages and Literature
Geology and Environmental Science
Jazz and Contemporary Music
Mathematical Sciences
Nutritional Sciences
Pastoral Counseling
Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Political Science
Product Design
Psychology

References
Index
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Professing to Learn: Creating Tenured Lives and Careers in the American Research University

Book
Neumann, Anna
2009
The John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MYD
LB1778.2.N475 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Research, teaching, service, and public outreach — all are aspects of being a tenured professor. But this list of responsibilities is missing a central component: actual scholarly learning — disciplinary knowledge that faculty teach, explore in research, and share with the academic community. How do professors pursue such learning when they must give their attention as well to administrative and other obligations?

Professing to Learn explores university professors' scholarly growth ...
Additional Info:
Research, teaching, service, and public outreach — all are aspects of being a tenured professor. But this list of responsibilities is missing a central component: actual scholarly learning — disciplinary knowledge that faculty teach, explore in research, and share with the academic community. How do professors pursue such learning when they must give their attention as well to administrative and other obligations?

Professing to Learn explores university professors' scholarly growth and learning in the years immediately following the award of tenure, a crucial period that has a lasting impact on the academic career. Some launch from this point to multiple accomplishments and accolades, while others falter, their academic pursuits stalled. What contributes to these different outcomes?

Drawing on interviews with seventy-eight professors in diverse disciplines and fields at five major American research universities, Anna Neumann describes how tenured faculty shape and disseminate their own disciplinary knowledge while attending committee meetings, grading exams, holding office hours, administering programs and departments, and negotiating with colleagues. By exploring the intellectual activities pursued by these faculty and their ongoing efforts to develop and define their academic interests, Professing to Learn directs the attention of higher education professionals and policy makers to the core aim of higher education: the creation of academic knowledge through research, teaching, and service. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

1. Into the Middle: Mapping the Early Post-Tenure Career in the Research University
2. The Heart of the Matter: Passionate Thought and Scholarly Learning
3. Mindwork: What and How Professors Strive to Learn
4. Location: Where Professors Purse Their Scholarly Learning
5. Becoming Strategic: Recently Tenured University Professors as Agents of Scholarly Learning
6. Organizing to Learn: What Universities Provide for Professors' Scholarly Learning
7. The Middle Remapped: Toward an Ecology of Learning in the Early Post-Tenure Career

Appendix A: Study Designs and Background Data
Appendix B: Interview Protocols and Consent Forms for the Four Universities Project
Appendix C: Framework: University Professors' Scholarly Learning

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Journal Keeping: How to Use Reflective Writing for Learning, Teaching, Professional Insight, and Positive Change

Book
Dannelle D. Stevens and Joanne E. Cooper
2009
Stylus Publishing, LLC., Sterling, VA
PE1404.S827 2009
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
** By the authors of the acclaimed Introduction to Rubrics
** Major growth of interest in keeping journals or diaries for personal reflection and growth; and as a teaching tool
** Will appeal to college faculty, administrators and teachers

One of the most powerful ways to learn, reflect and make sense of our lives is through journal keeping.

This book presents the potential uses and benefits of ...
Additional Info:
** By the authors of the acclaimed Introduction to Rubrics
** Major growth of interest in keeping journals or diaries for personal reflection and growth; and as a teaching tool
** Will appeal to college faculty, administrators and teachers

One of the most powerful ways to learn, reflect and make sense of our lives is through journal keeping.

This book presents the potential uses and benefits of journals for personal and professional development-particularly for those in academic life; and demonstrates journals' potential to foster college students' learning, fluency and voice, and creative thinking.

In professional life, a journal helps to organize, prioritize and address the many expectations of a faculty member's or administrator's roles. Journals are effective for developing time management skills, building problem-solving skills, fostering insight, and decreasing stress.

Both writing and rereading journal entries allow the journal keeper to document thinking; to track changes and review observations; and to examine assumptions and so gain fresh perspectives and insights over past events.

The authors present the background to help readers make an informed decision about the value of journals and to determine whether journals will fit appropriately with their teaching objectives or help manage their personal and professional lives. They offer insights and advice on selecting the format or formats and techniques most appropriate for the reader's purposes. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Tables and Figures
Acknowledgements
Preface

Part One
Journal Writing and Its Theoretical Foundation
ch. 1 Journal Writing: Definition and Rationale
ch. 2 Reflection and Learning from Experience
ch. 3 Reflection and Adult Development Theory

Part Two
Using Journals in Classrooms and Professional Life
ch. 4 Introducing and Structuring Classroom Journal Writing
ch. 5 Classroom Journal-Writing Techniques
ch. 6 Grading Classroom Journal Writing
ch. 7 Journal Writing in Professional Life
ch. 8 Journal Writing in the Computer Age

Part Three
A Collection of Case Studies
Teaching with Journals and Keeping Journals in Professional Life
ch. 9 Case Studies: Teaching With Journals
ch. 10 Case Studies: Journal Keeping in Professional Life

Afterword
Appendices
A. Journal Writing Techniques
B. Contributor Contact Information
References
Index
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Mentoring Early-Stage Faculty: Myths and Missing Elements

Book
Moody, JoAnn
2009
JoAnn Moody, San Diego
LB1731.4.M66 2009
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
As in her other work, JoAnn Moody demonstrates a keen understanding of the day-to-day challenges of faculty issues, drawing from careful research as well as from close connections to the issues facing early-stage faculty. She reminds us that effective mentoring is designed around a flexible set of approaches and cannot be based on what she appropriately labels myths.
Additional Info:
As in her other work, JoAnn Moody demonstrates a keen understanding of the day-to-day challenges of faculty issues, drawing from careful research as well as from close connections to the issues facing early-stage faculty. She reminds us that effective mentoring is designed around a flexible set of approaches and cannot be based on what she appropriately labels myths.

Table Of Content:
Section A: Myths & assumptions
Section B: Missing elements of the mentoring process
Section C: Missing elements in the design of formal mentoring program (e.g., workshops for mentors & mentees)
Section D: Supplementary materials (e.g., checklists, illustrations & discussion scenarios)
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Faculty Vocation and Governance Project (pdf)

Journal Issue
2009
Theological Education 44, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v. 44 no. 2 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2009-theological-education-v44-n2.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2009-theological-education-v44-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Governance and the Future of Theological Education (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Governance: What is it?(G. Douglass Lewis)
Faculty Powers in Shared Governance (David L. Tiede)
More than Simply Getting Along: The Goal of Shared Governance in Theological Schools (Rebekah Burch Basinger)
Report from United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities (Eleazar S. Fernandez and Richard D. Weis)
Report from Iliff School of Theology (Jacob Kinnard and Ann Graham Brock)
Report from Multnomah Biblical Seminary (John L. Terveen)
Report from St. Peter's Seminary (John Dool and Brian Dunn)
Report from Denver Seminary (W. David Buschart and Bradley J. Widstrom)
Report from Ashland Theological Seminary (Wyndy Corbin Reuschling and Lee Wetherbee)
Attending to the Collective Vocation (Gordon T. Smith)
The Academic Teaching and the Practical Needs of the Clergy (John Bright)
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Mentee's Guide: Making Mentoring Work for You

Book
Zachary, Lois J.
2009
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
HF5385.Z33 2009
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Praise for The Mentee's Guide

"The Mentee's Guide inspires and guides the potential mentee, provides new insights for the adventure in learning that lies ahead, and underscores my personal belief and experience that mentoring is circular. The mentor gains as much as the mentee in this evocative relationship. Lois Zachary's new book is a great gift." —Frances Hesselbein, chairman and founding president, Leader to Leader Institute

"...
Additional Info:
Praise for The Mentee's Guide

"The Mentee's Guide inspires and guides the potential mentee, provides new insights for the adventure in learning that lies ahead, and underscores my personal belief and experience that mentoring is circular. The mentor gains as much as the mentee in this evocative relationship. Lois Zachary's new book is a great gift." —Frances Hesselbein, chairman and founding president, Leader to Leader Institute

"Whether you are the mentee or mentor, born or made for the role, you will gain much more from the relationship by practicing the fun and easy A-to-Z principles of The Mentee's Guide by the master of excellence, Lois Zachary." —Ken Shelton, editor, Leadership Excellence

"With this deeply practical book filled with stories and useful exercises, Lois Zachary completes her groundbreaking trilogy on mentoring. Must-reading for those in search of a richer understanding of this deeply human relationship as well as anyone seeking a mentor, whether for new skills, job advancement, or deeper wisdom." —Laurent A. Parks Daloz, senior fellow, the Whidbey Institute, and author, Mentor: Guiding the Journey of Adult Learners

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Authors

ch. 1 The Power and Process of Mentoring
ch. 2 Preparing Yourself to Make the Most of Mentoring
ch. 3 Finding and Getting to Know Your Mentor
ch. 4 Establishing Agreements with Your Mentor
ch. 5 Doing the Work
ch. 6 Coming to Closure with Your Mentor
ch. 7 Making the Transition to from Mentee to Mentor

Appendix: Digging Deeper: An Annotated List of Helpful Resources
References
Index
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The Essential College Professor: A Practical Guide to an Academic Career

Book
Buller, Jeffrey L.
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB1778.2.B85 2010
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
College professors are expected to perform a large number of tasks for which they receive little or no training. For instance, where in graduate school do you learn how to teach most effectively in a large auditorium, and what do you do differently in those classes from when you are teaching in a more intimate setting, with a few upper-level students around a seminar table or in a tutorial? How ...
Additional Info:
College professors are expected to perform a large number of tasks for which they receive little or no training. For instance, where in graduate school do you learn how to teach most effectively in a large auditorium, and what do you do differently in those classes from when you are teaching in a more intimate setting, with a few upper-level students around a seminar table or in a tutorial? How do you secure a contract for a book that you would like to publish? How do you go about applying for external funding to support your research? How do you write a particularly effective syllabus or exam? How do you create the sort of curriculum vitae that is most likely to earn you tenure, promotion, another position, or an administrative appointment? How do you chair a committee? How do you deal with a student who is disrupting one of your classes? Why should you engage in fundraising, recruiting new students, or maintaining close ties with alumni? Why should you develop a "strategic plan" for your career, improving your teaching and enhancing your research? Why is service only a small part of genuine academic citizenship?

The Essential College Professor is about the "how" and "why" of being a faculty member in higher education today. Based on the author's series of highly successful faculty development workshops, each chapter deals concisely with the most important information college professors need at their fingertips when confronted by a particular challenge or faced with an exciting opportunity. Written both as a comprehensive guide to an academic career and as a ready reference to be consulted when needed, The Essential College Professoremphasizes proven solutions over untested theories and stresses what faculty members need to know now in order to be successful in their careers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The Author
Introduction

Part I: The College Professor's Career
ch. 1 Applying for a Faculty Position
ch. 2 Interviewing for a Faculty Position
ch. 3 What Kind of Professor Are You?
ch. 4 Career Planning for College Professors
ch. 5 The Tenure and Promotion Process
ch. 6 Special Challenges for Junior Faculty
ch. 7 Special Challenges for Mid-Career Faculty
ch. 8 Special Challenges for Senior Faculty
ch. 9 Taking the Next Step in Your Career

Part II: The College Professor as Teacher
ch. 10 Assessing Student Learning
ch. 11 Writing an Effective Course Syllabus
ch. 12 Developing Creative Course Materials
ch. 13 Teaching Small Classes
ch. 14 Teaching Large Classes
ch. 15 Teaching One-on-One
ch. 16 Teaching with Technology
ch. 17 Reducing Grade Anxiety
ch. 18 Promoting Student Engagement
ch. 19 Addressing Academic Misconduct
ch. 20 Maintaining Appropriate Faculty-Student Relations
ch. 21 Dealing with Student Problems and Problem Students
ch. 22 Taking the Next Step in Your Teaching.

Part III: The College Professor as Scholar
ch. 23 Writing a Grant Proposal
ch. 24 Writing a Book Proposal
ch. 25 Overcoming Research Block
ch. 26 Balancing Scholarship with Other Duties
ch. 27 Seeking and Providing Peer Support for Scholarship
ch. 28 Alternative Forms of Scholarship
ch. 29 Taking the Next Step in Your Scholarship

Part IV: The College Professor as Citizen
ch. 30 Service Reconsidered
ch. 31 Creating an Effective Curriculum Vitae
ch. 32 Seeking Leadership Positions
ch. 33 Serving on Committees
ch. 34 Serving as an Academic Advisor
ch. 35 Serving as a Mentor
ch. 36 Handling Conflict with a Supervisor
ch. 37 Handling Conflict with Colleagues
ch. 38 The Faculty Member as Fundraiser
ch. 39 Exploring the Possibility of Administrative Work
ch. 40 Taking the Next Step in Your Service

Epilogue: A Checklist for the Essential College Professor
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Developing Portfolios in Education: A Guide to Reflection, Inquiry, and Assessment, Second Edition

Book
Ruth S. Johnson, J. Sabrina Mims-Cox, Adelaide Doyle-Nichols
2010
Sage Publication, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1029.P67 J656 2010
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Developing Portfolios in Education: A Guide to Reflection, Inquiry, and Assessment, Second Edition takes preservice and inservice teachers through the process of developing a professional portfolio. It is designed to teach readers how traditional and electronic portfolios are defined, organized, and evaluated. The text also helps teachers to use their portfolios as an action research tool for reflection and professional development.

New features to the second edition include:<...
Additional Info:
Developing Portfolios in Education: A Guide to Reflection, Inquiry, and Assessment, Second Edition takes preservice and inservice teachers through the process of developing a professional portfolio. It is designed to teach readers how traditional and electronic portfolios are defined, organized, and evaluated. The text also helps teachers to use their portfolios as an action research tool for reflection and professional development.

New features to the second edition include:

• A new chapter that links portfolio development to action research
• Step-by-step descriptions of the portfolio process as it relates specifically to teachers
• Additional and updated material on electronic portfolios
• Discussion questions in each chapter
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
CD Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I: The Rational For Requiring Portfolios
ch. 1 Why develop a portfolio?
ch. 2 Portfolio Development as Action Research
ch. 3 Using Portfolios as Tools for Authentic Assessment and Evaluation
ch. 4 Reflective Inquiry: A Tool for Giving Voice to the Portfolio

Part II: A Guide For Developing Portfolios
ch. 5 Your Portfolio Journey: Ten Steps for Organizing, Managing, and Completing the Process
ch. 6 Contents of the Portfolio
ch. 7 Presenting and Sharing the Portfolio
ch. 8 An Overview of Electronic Portfolios: Exploring the Options
ch. 9 Creating Electronic Portfolios

Part III: The Future of Your Portfolio
ch. 10 After the Credential Program, Now What? Keeping the Portfolio Alive

Glossary
References
Index
About the Authors
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Collaborative Working in Higher Education: The Social Academy

Book
Walsh, Lorraine; and Kahn, Peter
2010
Routledge, New York
LB2331.5.W35 2010
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Collaborative working is an increasingly vital part of Higher Education academic life. Traditionally, university culture supported individual research and scholarship. Today, the focus has shifted from the individual to the group or team. Collaborative Working in Higher Education takes the reader on a journey of examination, discussion, and reflection of emerging collaborative practices. The book offers suggestions for developing practice via a broad overview of the key aspects of collaboration ...
Additional Info:
Collaborative working is an increasingly vital part of Higher Education academic life. Traditionally, university culture supported individual research and scholarship. Today, the focus has shifted from the individual to the group or team. Collaborative Working in Higher Education takes the reader on a journey of examination, discussion, and reflection of emerging collaborative practices. The book offers suggestions for developing practice via a broad overview of the key aspects of collaboration and collaborative working, informed by focused case studies and the international perspectives of the contributing authors.

The book has three main parts:

Part I: Examines the social nature of collaborative working from a practical and critical perspective, focusing on four dimensions of collaborative working: academic practice, professional dialogues, personal and organizational engagement and social structures. It considers organizational models, varied approaches, potential challenges posed by collaborative working, and reflection on the management of collaboration at different stages.

Part II: Focuses on the different aspects of collaborative working, building on the dimensions introduced in Part I, and addressing the crossing of boundaries. It looks at different contexts for collaboration (e.g. discipline-based, departmental, institutional and international) using case studies as examples of collaborative strategies in action, providing learning points and recommendations for practical applications.

Part III: In addition to considering forms of collaboration for the future, this part of the book engages the reader with athough-provoking round-table discussion that itself embodies an act of collaboration.

Collaborative Working in Higher Education is a comprehensive analysis of how collaboration is reforming academic life. It examines the shifts in working practices and reflects on how that shift can be supported and developed to improve practice. Higher Education faculty, administrators, researchers, managers and anyone involved in collaborative working across their institution will find this book a highly useful guide as they embark on their own collaborations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Case Studies
List of Figures
List of Tables
Foreword by Ronald Barnett
Acknowledgements
List of Contributors

Part I
Collaborative Working in Higher Education
ch. 1 Opening Up Collaborative Working
ch. 2 Theoretical Perspectives: The Collaborative Cocktail
ch. 3 Establishing and Sustaining Collaborations

Part II
Case Studies in Collaboration
ch. 4 Brokers of Collaboration
ch. 5 Crossing Boundaries in Collaboration
ch. 6 Proximity and Virtuality in Collaborative Research
ch. 7 Challenging Patterns of Practice through Collaborative Working

Part III
Developing the Social Academy
ch. 8 Squaring the Circle: Round-Table Discussion on Collaborative Working
ch. 9 A Collaborative Future for the Academy

Index
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Wabash tree

Teaching, Learning and Research in Higher Education: A Critical Approach

Book
Mark Tennant, Cathi McMullen and Dan Kaczynski
2010
Routledge, New York
LB2331.T4295 2010
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Teaching, Learning and Research in Higher Education offers a combination of critical perspectives and practical advice that is ideally suited for individuals interested in enhancing their practice through analysis and critique. The aim is to promote a critical understanding of one's own practices: to foster personal and professional formation through a reflexive engagement with one's environment and circumstances. At a practical level this means to continuously think about how to ...
Additional Info:
Teaching, Learning and Research in Higher Education offers a combination of critical perspectives and practical advice that is ideally suited for individuals interested in enhancing their practice through analysis and critique. The aim is to promote a critical understanding of one's own practices: to foster personal and professional formation through a reflexive engagement with one's environment and circumstances. At a practical level this means to continuously think about how to adjust practice rather than following a formulaic approach derived from any particular educational theory.

Teaching, Learning and Research in Higher Education argues that academics can find space for their own agency in the midst of institutional policies and practices that serve to frame, as well as delimit and constrain, what counts as good academic work in teaching and research. This text bridges a gap between those books that provide a high-level analysis of contemporary higher education, the more practical texts on how to be a good teacher in higher education, and those texts which aim to improve teaching through better understanding of the learning process.

Topical chapters include:

Teacher-learner relationship, Learning groups, Practice-oriented learning, Teaching for diversity, e-learning, Assessment, Approaches to Staff Development, Quality assurance, Supervision and Research education, Doing research, and Teaching & Research.

A must-have resource for higher education professions, academic developers, professionals, and anyone looking to improve their teaching and learning practices, Teaching,Learning and Research in Higher Education is also appropriate for continuing and professional development courses in the UK and teaching and learning courses in the US.

Mark Tennant is Dean of the University Graduate School, University of Technology, Sydney.

Cathi McMullen is Lecturer in the School of Marketing and Management at Charles Sturt University.

Dan Kaczynski is Professor in the Educational Leadership department at Central Michigan University. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Illustrations
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Perspectives on Quality Teaching
ch. 3 Reconceptualising the Development of University Teaching Expertise
ch. 4 Framing Teacher-Learner Relationships
ch. 5 Learning Groups
ch. 6 Teaching for Diversity
ch. 7 Assessment
ch. 8 Promoting Workplace-Oriented Learning
ch. 9 Learning in the Digital Age
ch. 10 Postgraduate Research Education
ch. 11 Teaching and Research

Reference
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New Teacher Mentoring: Hopes and Promise for Improving Teacher Effectiveness

Book
Moir, Ellen; Dara Barlin; Janet Gless; and Jan Miles
2009
Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, MA
LB1731.4.N49 2009
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This book is written for K-12 educational contexts, but many of its ideas and analyses can be applied to higher education contexts.
Additional Info:
This book is written for K-12 educational contexts, but many of its ideas and analyses can be applied to higher education contexts.

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I High-Quality New Teacher Mentoring
ch. 1 What We Know and Don't Know About Mentoring and Induction
ch. 2 The Principles of High-Quality Mentoring
ch. 3 Mentor Professional Development

Part II The Case Studies
ch. 4 Durham Public School
ch. 5 Boston Public Schools
ch. 6 New York City Department of Education
ch. 7 Chicago Public Schools

Part III Conclusions and Recommendations
ch. 8 Analyzing Trends: Strategies Honed, Questions Raised, Levers for Change
ch. 9 Implications and Recommendations for Educational Stakeholders

Notes
About the Authors
About the New Teacher Center
Index
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Self-Study Teacher Research: Improving Your Practice Through Collaborative Inquiry

Book
Samaras, Anastasia P.
2011
Sage Publications, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1028.24.S36 2011
Topics: Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The first textbook to offer novice and experienced teachers guidelines for the “how” and “why” of self-study teacher research

Designed to help pre- and in-service teachers plan, implement, and assess a manageable self-study research project, this unique textbook covers the foundation, history, theoretical underpinnings, and methods of self-study research. Author Anastasia Samaras encourages readers to think deeply about both the “how” and the “why” of this essential professional ...
Additional Info:
The first textbook to offer novice and experienced teachers guidelines for the “how” and “why” of self-study teacher research

Designed to help pre- and in-service teachers plan, implement, and assess a manageable self-study research project, this unique textbook covers the foundation, history, theoretical underpinnings, and methods of self-study research. Author Anastasia Samaras encourages readers to think deeply about both the “how” and the “why” of this essential professional development tool as they pose questions and formulate personal theories to improve professional practice.

Written in a reader-friendly style and filled with interactive activities and examples, the book helps teachers every step of the way as they learn and refine research skills; conduct a literature review; design a research study; work in validation groups; collect and analyze data; interpret findings; develop skills in peer critique and review; and write, present, and publish their studies.

Key Features

• A Self-Study Project Planner assists teachers in understanding both the details and process of conducting self-study research.

• A Critical Friends Portfolio includes innovative critical collaborative inquiries to support the completion of a high quality final research project.

• Advice from the most senior self-study academics working in the U.S. and internationally is included, along with descriptions of the self-study methodology that has been refined over time.

• Examples demonstrate the connections between self-study research, teachers’ professional growth, and their students’ learning.

• Tables, charts, and visuals help readers see the big picture and stay organized.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
List of Tables

Part I: The 6 Ws of Self-Study Research
ch. 1 Understanding Self-Study: What and Why
ch. 2 Overview of the Self-Study Process: What and How
ch. 3 The Self-Study Community: When and Where and Who
ch. 4 The Self-Study Research Methodology: Why and How
ch. 5 Self-Study Methods: Why and How

Part II: Your Self-Study Project
ch. 6 Design
ch. 7 Protect
ch. 8 Organize Data
ch. 9 Collect Data
ch. 10 Analyze Data
ch. 11 Assess Research Quality
ch. 12 Write
ch. 13 Present and Publish

Appendix A: Sample of a Self-Study Teacher Research Exemplar Brief Highlighting Five Foci
Appendix B: Self-Study is Not Just for Classroom Teachers

Glossary
References
Index
About the Author
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Beyond Reflective Practice: New Approaches to Professional Lifelong Learning

Book
Helen Bradbury, Faculty of Heal Leeds Metropolitan Uni, Sue Kilminster, Miriam Zukas, eds.
2010
Routledge New York, NY
LC5215.B5 2010
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Reflective practice has moved from the margins to the mainstream of professional education. However, in this process, its radical potential has been subsumed by individualistic, rather than situated, understandings of practice. Presenting critical perspectives that challenge the current paradigm, this book aims to move beyond reflective practice. It proposes new conceptualisations and offers fresh approaches relevant across professions. Contributors include both academics and practitioners concerned with the training and development ...
Additional Info:
Reflective practice has moved from the margins to the mainstream of professional education. However, in this process, its radical potential has been subsumed by individualistic, rather than situated, understandings of practice. Presenting critical perspectives that challenge the current paradigm, this book aims to move beyond reflective practice. It proposes new conceptualisations and offers fresh approaches relevant across professions. Contributors include both academics and practitioners concerned with the training and development of professionals.

Definitions of reflection (which are often implicit) often focus on the individual's internal thought processes and responsibility for their actions. The individual - what they did/thought/felt – is emphasised with little recognition of context, power dynamics or ideological challenge. This book presents the work of practitioners, educators, academics and researchers who see this as problematic and are moving towards a more critical approach to reflective practice.

With an overview from the editors and fourteen chapters considering new conceptualisations, professional perspectives and new practices, Beyond Reflective Practice examines what new forms of professional reflective practice are emerging. It examines in particular the relationships between reflective practitioners and those upon whom they practise. It looks at the ways in which the world of professional work has changed and the ways in which professional practice needs to change to meet the needs of this new world. It will be relevant for those concerned with initial and ongoing professional learning, both in work and in educational contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
List of Contributors
Introduction and Overview

Part I: Conceptual Challenges
ch. 1 Professionalism and social change – the implications of social change for the ‘reflective practitioner' (Nick Frost)
ch. 2 Relocating reflection in the context of practice (David Boud)
ch. 3 Beyond reflective practice: reworking the "critical" in critical reflection (Jan Fook)
ch. 4 A learning practice: Conceptualizing professional lifelong learning for the healthcare sector (Stephen Billett and Jennifer Newton)
ch. 5 Really reflexive practice: auto/biographical research and struggles for a critical reflexivity (Linden West)

Part II: Professional Perspectives
ch. 6 Voices from the past: professional discourse and reflective practice (Janet Hargreaves)
ch. 7 It’s all right for you two, you obviously like each other: recognizing challenges in pursuing collaborative professional learning through team teaching (Sue Knights, Lois Meyer and Jane Sampson)
ch. 8 Preparing for patient-centered practice: developing the patient voice in health professional learning (Penny Morris, Ernest Dalton, Andrea McGoverin, Fiona O'Neil, Jools Symons)
ch. 9 Informal Learning by Professionals in the United Kingdom (Geoffrey Chivers)
ch. 10 Judgment, narrative and discourse: a critique of reflective practice (David Satltiel)

Part III: New Practices
ch. 11 Re-imagining reflection: creating a theatrical space for the imagination in productive reflection (Kate Collier)
ch. 12 A step too far? From professional reflective practice to spirituality ( Cheryl Hunt)
ch. 13 Developing critical reflection within an interprofessional learning program (Kart Karban and Sue Smith)
ch. 14 Beyond reflection dogma (John Sweet)
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Good Mentoring: Fostering Excellent Practice in Higher Education

Book
Nakamura, Jeanne; Shernoff, David J.; Hooker, Charles H., and Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly
2009
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
Q181.N148 2009
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
We pass on our traits through our genes but our cherished values, beliefs, and practices are transmitted through those units of meaning called memes. This remarkable book provides an authoritative account of how 'good work' endures in the sciences—and has profound implications for the quality of work across the professional landscape.

This book should sow the seeds of greatness for protégés and mentors alike, and ...
Additional Info:
We pass on our traits through our genes but our cherished values, beliefs, and practices are transmitted through those units of meaning called memes. This remarkable book provides an authoritative account of how 'good work' endures in the sciences—and has profound implications for the quality of work across the professional landscape.

This book should sow the seeds of greatness for protégés and mentors alike, and well beyond the discipline of science. Mentoring lineages are the hallmark of disciplines that endure and have impact, a reality that the authors powerfully communicate.

Good Mentoring is a landmark study with implications for the continued vibrancy of any discipline. This is a fresh, eye-opening perspective on the social transmission of professional lineages. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The Authors
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Why Mentoring?

Part One: Three Examples of Good Mentoring
ch. 2 The Naturalist
ch. 3 The Physician-Scientist
ch. 4 The Moralist

Part Two: How Good Mentoring Works
ch. 5 Values, Practices, and Knowledge Through the Generations
ch. 6 How Values, Practices, and Knowledge Are Transmitted
ch. 7 Supportive Relationships as the Context for Intergenerational Influence

Part Three: Promoting Good Mentoring
ch. 8 What Have We Learned?
ch. 9 Where Do We Go from Here?

Appendix A: Data Collection, Coding, and Analyses
Appendix B: Science Apprenticeship Study and Interview Questions
Appendix C: Global Code Sheet

References
Index
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Win Them Over: Dynamic Techniques for College Adjuncts and New Faculty

Book
Linehan, Patricia
2007
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB1738.L56 2007
Topics: Adjuncts   |   General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
A new course. Maybe a new institution. Or, perhaps a last-minute class assignment. Where does the adjunct or new faculty member begin? How to make this an involving, innovative course?

Patricia Linehan creates a plan for developing a dynamic and well-organized course. By using the structure that she outlines, instructors--whether experienced or novice--will be able to easily structure the course and then move on to concerning themselves with ...
Additional Info:
A new course. Maybe a new institution. Or, perhaps a last-minute class assignment. Where does the adjunct or new faculty member begin? How to make this an involving, innovative course?

Patricia Linehan creates a plan for developing a dynamic and well-organized course. By using the structure that she outlines, instructors--whether experienced or novice--will be able to easily structure the course and then move on to concerning themselves with the content.

Based on her own experiences as an adjunct, a new instructor, and an advisor to new professionals, Dr. Linehan developed this straightforward and practice system. It includes preparing for a new class, assessment, active learning skills, and important attention to professional development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Why You Should Read This Book

ch. 1 Welcome to the World of Teaching and Hurry Up, Your Class Is About to Start!
ch. 2 Reality Check for Adjunct Instructors
ch. 3 Reality Check for New Full-time Instructors
ch. 4 Getting Ready to Teach
ch. 5 Course Design
ch. 6 Course Management
ch. 7 Grading Issues
ch. 8 Assessment
ch. 9 Motivating Students
ch. 10 Classroom Dynamics
ch. 11 Active Teaching and Learning
ch. 12 Communication and Final Tips
ch. 13 Final Words
ch. 14 Good Resources for Instructors
ch. 15 About the Author
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In Whose Hands? A Study of Theological School Trustees

Journal Issue
Wheeler, Barbara
2002
Auburn Studies, No. 9 (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY 2002)
BV4070.A8 A1 2002 no. 9
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Trustees and boards of theological schools provide long-range guidance and governance for their institution and it is crucial that they have the skills, knowledge and information to make sound and effective decisions.

In this issue:

• Who are the trustees of the approximately 250 theological schools in the United States?

• Do theological schools have the trustees they need? Do they have the perspective, motivation and capacity ...
Additional Info:
Trustees and boards of theological schools provide long-range guidance and governance for their institution and it is crucial that they have the skills, knowledge and information to make sound and effective decisions.

In this issue:

• Who are the trustees of the approximately 250 theological schools in the United States?

• Do theological schools have the trustees they need? Do they have the perspective, motivation and capacity that their institutions most urgently require?
(From the Publisher)
Cover image
Wabash tree

Revitalizing Practice: Collaborative Models for Theological Faculties

Book
Warford, Malcolm L.
2008
Peter Lang, New York, NY
BV4020.R48 2008
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Revitalizing Practice is designed to help theological faculties engage a common set of challenges, particularly in the areas of diversity, formation, and institutional identity. These are not technical problems but are instead the very stuff out of which teaching and learning are practiced. Yet addressing such issues requires intentional strategies and collaborative work. Revitalizing Practice offers four such intentional strategies: «A New Ecology Model», «An Improvisational Model», «An Appreciative Inquiry ...
Additional Info:
Revitalizing Practice is designed to help theological faculties engage a common set of challenges, particularly in the areas of diversity, formation, and institutional identity. These are not technical problems but are instead the very stuff out of which teaching and learning are practiced. Yet addressing such issues requires intentional strategies and collaborative work. Revitalizing Practice offers four such intentional strategies: «A New Ecology Model», «An Improvisational Model», «An Appreciative Inquiry Model», and «A World Café Model». Each of these models provides a thorough and practical framework (based on sound theoretical concepts) designed to help faculties revitalize their practices of theological teaching and learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Seminaries as Endangered Habitats in a Fragile Ecosystem: A New Ecology Model
ch. 2 Student Learning and Formation: An Improvisational Model
ch. 3 Listening and Learning to Teach in Theological Contexts: An Appreciative Inquiry Model
ch. 4 The Ministries for Which We Teach: A World Cafe Model

School Participating in The Lexington Seminar
Contributors
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Peak Performance for Deans and Chairs: Reframing Higher Education's Middle

Book
Roper, Susan Stavert, and Deal, Terrence E.
2010
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LB2341.R587 2010
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This book analyzes the behavior of chairs and deans through the political, structural, human resources, and symbolic frames. Lessons learned from the negative as well as the positive scenarios are highlighted, enabling deans and chairs to easily adapt them to their own situations. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book analyzes the behavior of chairs and deans through the political, structural, human resources, and symbolic frames. Lessons learned from the negative as well as the positive scenarios are highlighted, enabling deans and chairs to easily adapt them to their own situations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction: Trapped between a Rock and a Hard Place

ch. 2 The Way It Is: Ferreting Out Root Stresses and Plotting New Tactics

ch. 3 Change: Stifling Bedlam and Taming Turbulence

ch. 4 Faculty: Confronting Creeps and Cliques

ch. 5 Resources: Stepping Up to Cutbacks

ch. 6 Bosses: Winning over the Higher-Ups

ch. 7 The Way It's Spozed to Be: Leadership in Action

ch. 8 Conclusion: Practice and Perseverance

Bibliography

About the Authors
Cover image

Using Consultants to Improve Teaching

Book
Knapper, Christopher and Sergio Peccinin, eds.
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 79)
LB2799.2.U83 1999
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
With increasing calls for accountability of faculty, the use of peers as teaching consultants could be the answer to how to monitor our own effectiveness as professionals. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
With increasing calls for accountability of faculty, the use of peers as teaching consultants could be the answer to how to monitor our own effectiveness as professionals. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Consulting About Teaching: An Overview(Christopher Knapper, Sergio Piccinin)
ch. 2 A Conceptual Framework for Instructional Consultation(Owen Hicks)
ch. 3 Three Practical Strategies for Peer Consultation(Barbara J. Millis)
ch. 4 Instructional Consultation in a Statewide Setting(Michael A. Kerwin)
ch. 5 Peer Consultation and Faculty Learning Communities(Milton D. Cox)
ch. 6 Consultation Through Action Learning(Liz Beaty)
ch. 7 Consultation Using Critical FriAnds(Gunnar Handal)
ch. 8 How Individual Consultation Affects Teaching(Sergio Piccinin)
ch. 9 Toward an Integrated Approach to Instructional Consultation(Cynthia Weston, Lynn McAlpine)
ch. 10 Resources on Instructional Consultation(Sergio Piccinin, Christopher Knapper)
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Leadership that Works: A Study of Theological School Presidents

Journal Issue
Wheeler, Barbara, Lewis, G. Douglas, Miller, Sharon L., Ruger, Anthony T., and Tiede David L.
2010
Auburn Studies, (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY 2010)
BV4070.A8 A1 2010 no. 15
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image
Wabash tree

Promotion and Tenure Confidential

Book
Perlmutter, David D.
2010
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2335.7.P47 2010
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Sitting down with a young and brilliant mathematician, I asked what he thought were his biggest problems in working toward tenure. Instead of describing difficulties with his equations or his software programs, he lamented that (a) his graduate assistant wasn’t completing his tasks on time, (b) his department chair didn’t seem to care if junior faculty obtained grants, and (c) a senior professor kept glaring at him in ...
Additional Info:
Sitting down with a young and brilliant mathematician, I asked what he thought were his biggest problems in working toward tenure. Instead of describing difficulties with his equations or his software programs, he lamented that (a) his graduate assistant wasn’t completing his tasks on time, (b) his department chair didn’t seem to care if junior faculty obtained grants, and (c) a senior professor kept glaring at him in faculty meetings. He knew he could handle the intellectual side of being an academic—but what about the people side? ‘Why didn’t they offer

Promotion and Tenure Confidential provides that course in an astute and practical book, which shows that P&T is not just about research, teaching, and service but also about human relations and political good sense. Drawing on research and extensive interviews with junior and senior faculty across many institutions, David D. Perlmutter provides clear-sighted guidance on planning and managing an academic career, from graduate school to tenure and beyond.

Topics include:

Making the transformation from student and protégé to teacher and mentor.

Seeking out and holding onto lifelong allies.

How to manage your online reputation and avoid “death by Google”.

What to say and what not to say to deans and department chairs.

How meeting deadlines wins points with everyone in your life.

How, when, and to whom to say “no”.

When and how to look for a new job when you have a job.

How (and whom) to ask for letters of recommendation.

What to do if you know you’re not going to get tenure.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Promotion and Tenure Up Close and Personal

ch. 1 The Doctorate and the Career Track

ch. 2 The Academic Job Search

ch. 3 Colleagues and Academic Cultures

ch. 4 The Balancing Act - Self, Family, and Tenure

ch. 5 Student Relations

ch. 6 Steps to Tenure and Promotion and Beyond

Notes

Acknowledgments

Index
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Hybrid-Context Instructional Model The Internet and the Classrooms: The Way Teachers Experience It

Book
Ndon, Udeme T.
2010
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC3/22/2011
LB1060.N43 2010
Topics: Online Learning   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This book is a product of a dissertation project that was completed in December 2006. This project investigated teachers' experiences in relation to teaching and learning using the hybrid-context instructional model. The dissertation itself has been noted as one of the best in providing practical tips for teachers in this area. The study methodology is included as appendix B. To answer the questions raised during the interviews, the findings of the ...
Additional Info:
This book is a product of a dissertation project that was completed in December 2006. This project investigated teachers' experiences in relation to teaching and learning using the hybrid-context instructional model. The dissertation itself has been noted as one of the best in providing practical tips for teachers in this area. The study methodology is included as appendix B. To answer the questions raised during the interviews, the findings of the study have been supplemented and supported with extensive literature review of empirical studies to provide theoretical and practical solutions. The literature review draws from total Internet, blended, and hybrid instruction studies. The literature on the total Internet instruction has relevance in that the Internet piece of the hybrid-context course shares the same course management systems and requires the same approaches and principles as do total Internet instruction. The book discusses the conceptual and descriptive presentations of the hybrid-context model, media, applicable teaching philosophies; strategies best accomplished in each medium; various ways of linking the face-to-face and the Internet activities; the why and how the study participants transitioned into teaching hybrid-context courses, teachers' expectations, etc. The discussion on 'labor of love' is the core of this book as the discussion has captured the surprises the study participants met in a way that is not reflected in the current literature. Built into this discussion are the amounts of things teachers had to learn in order to function well as hybrid-context model teachers. The contents of this book will aide teachers who teach in any way using the Internet. Therefore, any establishment/individual using the Internet for teaching and learning will benefit from the contents of this book. Also, the administrators will find this book a selling point to encourage more participation in the adoption of the hybrid-context instructional model as well as realizing what the teachers would need to successfully implement this phenomenon. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction
Acknowledgments

Section I Conceptual Hybrid-Context Model
ch. 1 Hybrid-Context Components and Tools
ch. 2 Collaboration Programs and the Trend

Section II Descriptive Hybrid-Context Instructional Model
ch. 3 Descriptive Hybrid-Context Instruction Model
ch. 4 Implied Philosophies, Principles, and Strategies

Section III Course Planning, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation
ch. 5 Course Planning and Development
ch. 6 Course Delivery
ch. 7 Establishing a Community of Learners As Team/Group-Based Strategy
ch. 8 The Evaluation Process

Section IV The Resulting Power of Active Learning
ch. 9 Interactions
ch. 10 Feedback
ch. 11 Learner's Engagement, and Learning
ch. 12 Critical Thinking

Section V What Administrators, Teachers, and Stakeholders Need to Know
ch. 13 Policy and Administrative Concerns
ch. 14 Teachers' Learning, Processes, and Support
ch. 15 Professional Digital Teaching Portfolios
ch. 16 Multiple Teachers' Role Effect
ch. 17 The Learner

Section VI The Context Course Journey
ch. 18 The Hybrid Context Course Journey

Section VII Appendixes
A Samples of Hypothetical Situations
B Applicable Research Approaches
C Writer's Curriculum Vitae

Editor's Curriculum Vitae
About the Author
Cover image

Joining the Mission: A Guide for (Mainly) New College Faculty

Book
VanZanten, Susan
2011
William B Eerdmans Publishing Co., Grand Rapids, MI
LC383.V36 2011
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Joining the Mission is a helpful guide for new (and experienced) faculty at religious colleges and universities. Susan VanZanten here provides an orientation to the world of Christian higher education and an introduction to the academic profession of teaching, scholarship, and service, with a special emphasis on opportunities and challenges common to “mission-driven” institutions. From designing a syllabus to dealing with problem students, from working with committees to achieving a ...
Additional Info:
Joining the Mission is a helpful guide for new (and experienced) faculty at religious colleges and universities. Susan VanZanten here provides an orientation to the world of Christian higher education and an introduction to the academic profession of teaching, scholarship, and service, with a special emphasis on opportunities and challenges common to “mission-driven” institutions. From designing a syllabus to dealing with problem students, from working with committees to achieving a balanced life, VanZanten's guidebook will help faculty across the disciplines — Art to Zoology and every subject between — understand better what it means to pursue faithfully a vocation as professor. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: The Beginning of a Vocation

ch. 1 What Is a Mission-Driven Institution?

ch. 2 A Very Brief History of Western Higher Education

ch. 3 Teaching: Call and Response

ch. 4 Teaching: Brick by Brick

ch. 5 The Faithful Professor: Multiple Paradigms for Faith and Learning

ch. 6 How Outrageous Is Faithful Scholarships?

ch. 7 Beyond Professing Alone: Becoming an Academic Citizen

ch. 8 Composing a Life: Balance and Improvisation

Appendix

Acknowledgments
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Writing for Educators: Personal Essays and Practical Advice

Book
Bromley, Karen, ed.
2009
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
PN165.W78 2009
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This book is for new faculty, graduate students, teachers, administrators, and other academics who want to write more clearly and have their work published. The essays focus on writing journal articles, dissertations, grants, edited books, and other writing in educational settings. The authors are educators who share their own first-hand experiences that provide novice writers with important knowledge and support in the quest for success in professional scholarly writing. A ...
Additional Info:
This book is for new faculty, graduate students, teachers, administrators, and other academics who want to write more clearly and have their work published. The essays focus on writing journal articles, dissertations, grants, edited books, and other writing in educational settings. The authors are educators who share their own first-hand experiences that provide novice writers with important knowledge and support in the quest for success in professional scholarly writing. A variety of authors discuss the writer's craft, including issues of voice, audience, planning,drafting, revision, conventions, style, submitting to journals, editorial review, and editing. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Section I: Finding Your Voice
ch. 1 What? Me Write? Six Reasons to Write for Publication (James J. Carpenter)
ch. 2 Finding Ideas and Developing the Confidence to Write for Publication (Chris Pescatore)
ch. 3 Writing-to-Learn in the Process of Researching (Maureen Boyd)
ch. 4 Reading as a Way to Develop a Writing Identity (Nicholas Paley)

Section II: Writing An Article Or Dissertation
ch. 5 From Idea to Printed Page (Marilyn Tallerico)
ch. 6 Writing to be Read: Clarity and Power in Scholarly Writing (C. Beth Rainforth)
ch. 7 Creating a Corpus: Writing to Shape Practice (Beverly Rainforth)
ch. 8 Nine Notes From a Novice: Publishing a Teaching Idea (Margaret Golden)
ch. 9 Writing With Publication in Mind (Joan Bouza Koster)
ch. 10 Completing a Dissertation in Just Over 2 Years (Holly Hansen-Thomas)
ch. 11 Four Children and a Dissertation (Sandi Graham)

Section III: Reviews, Revising, and Editing
ch. 12 Surviving the Review Process: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (Jenny Gordon)
ch. 13 Rethink, Rewrite, Revise: Mining the Gold (Heather K. Sheridan-Thomas)
ch. 14 Revisiting for Successful Publication (Mitch Rosenwald)
ch. 15 Editing a Book: Nine Questions and Some Answers (Karen Bromley)
ch. 16 An Editor's Perspective on the Importance of Style (Jean Schmittau)

Section IV: Grant Writing
ch. 17 Writing a Grant Proposal (Karen Bromley)
ch. 18 Grant Writing for Teachers (Pat Krizan)
ch. 19 The Collaborative Grant Development Process (Allison Alden)

Section V: Other Writing In Educational Settings
ch. 20 On-Demand Writing by Administrators (Carol Stark)
ch. 21 A Principal's Writing Experiences (Doug Green)
ch. 22 My Surprising Life as an Author (Jo Malin)

Appendices
About the Authors
Article cover image

"American Association of University Professors' Report on Collegiality as a Criterion for Faculty Evaluation"

Article
AAUP's Periodical Academe
2000
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 29, Number 1, February 2000
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Librarians and Teaching Faculty in Collaboration: New Incentives, New Opportunities"

Article
McMahon, Melody Layton
2004
Theological Education, Volume 40, No. 1
Topics: Librarians as Teachers   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
New campus-wide initiatives and developing a technology now provide librarians with fresh tools for supporting and assisting faculty as fellow educators. Librarians can participate in instruction activities as collaborators and by acting as teachers to the teaching faculty Librarians can foster this interaction by cooperating in assessment and accreditation processes, and by joining in learning communities and writing programs. This article will explore ways that the librarian can partner in ...
Additional Info:
New campus-wide initiatives and developing a technology now provide librarians with fresh tools for supporting and assisting faculty as fellow educators. Librarians can participate in instruction activities as collaborators and by acting as teachers to the teaching faculty Librarians can foster this interaction by cooperating in assessment and accreditation processes, and by joining in learning communities and writing programs. This article will explore ways that the librarian can partner in professional development with faculty by participating in curriculum planning and educational assessment.
Article cover image

"Engaging Conversation: Evaluating the Contribution of Library Instruction to the Quality of Student Research"

Article
Emmons, Mark, and Martin, Wanda
2002
College & Research Libraries, Vol. 63, No. 6, pgs. 545-560
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Librarians as Teachers   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Compared research papers before and after implementation of an inquiry-based library instruction program at the University of New Mexico to asses the program's effectiveness and consider its future development. Discusses increased collaboration between the library and the English department and suggests more training for instructors and greater emphasis on a rhetorical research approach.
Additional Info:
Compared research papers before and after implementation of an inquiry-based library instruction program at the University of New Mexico to asses the program's effectiveness and consider its future development. Discusses increased collaboration between the library and the English department and suggests more training for instructors and greater emphasis on a rhetorical research approach.
Article cover image

"A Report on Librarian-Faculty Relations from a Sociological Perspective"

Article
Christiansen, Lars; Stombler, Mindy; and Thaxton, Lyn
2004
Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 30, Number 2, pgs. 116-121
Topics: Librarians as Teachers   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In this report, we review social science and library studies literatures on librarian-faculty relations, and present a preliminary sociological analysis of these relations. We find an asymmetrical disconnection between both groups: Librarians and faculty identify a disconnection that keeps the two separated, but only librarians view this disconnection as problematic.
Additional Info:
In this report, we review social science and library studies literatures on librarian-faculty relations, and present a preliminary sociological analysis of these relations. We find an asymmetrical disconnection between both groups: Librarians and faculty identify a disconnection that keeps the two separated, but only librarians view this disconnection as problematic.
Article cover image

"Reflections on a privilege: Becoming part of the course through a collaboration on Blackboard"

Article
Giles, Kara L.
2004
C&RL News, May 2004, pgs. 261-263, 268
Topics: Librarians as Teachers   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Interrupting Bias in the Faculty Search Process: A Film and Facilitation Guide"

Journal Issue
University of Washington Center for Institutional Change
2010
University of Washington Center for Institutional Change
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A tool to facilitate discussion about diversity in hiring at colleges and universities. The website includes a study guide and order form for a free live action film in which a search committee debates candidate qualifications for an open position.This web site will prepare you to show the film and help your audience to demystify subtle discrimination, examine assumptions, and become change-agents.
Additional Info:
A tool to facilitate discussion about diversity in hiring at colleges and universities. The website includes a study guide and order form for a free live action film in which a search committee debates candidate qualifications for an open position.This web site will prepare you to show the film and help your audience to demystify subtle discrimination, examine assumptions, and become change-agents.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 How To Use This Film: Facilitation Guidelines
ch. 2 Key Concepts
ch. 3 Research on Bias
ch. 4 Common Shortcuts
ch. 5 Frequently Asked Questions
ch. 6 Best Practices for Search Committees
ch. 7 Further Reading
Article cover image

"Toward a New Enterprise: Capitalizing on the Faculty/Librarian Partnership"

Article
Ducas, Ada M., and Michaud-Oystryk, Nicole
2003
College & Research Libraries, Vol. 64, No. 1, January 2003, pgs. 55-74
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In spring 2000, the authors undertook a study to explore the interaction between academic librarians and faculty at the University of Manitoba, the impact of librarians’ contributions, and the future roles of librarians. The following five areas were investigated: teaching/instruction, information services, information technology, research, and collections. The results clearly show that when faculty interact with librarians, librarians have a very positive and considerable impact on both faculty and students. ...
Additional Info:
In spring 2000, the authors undertook a study to explore the interaction between academic librarians and faculty at the University of Manitoba, the impact of librarians’ contributions, and the future roles of librarians. The following five areas were investigated: teaching/instruction, information services, information technology, research, and collections. The results clearly show that when faculty interact with librarians, librarians have a very positive and considerable impact on both faculty and students. In addition, the faculty responses indicate that they are receptive to collaborating with librarians at a higher level of interaction than currently experienced.
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A Survival Guide for New Faculty Members: Outlining the Keys to Success for Promotion and Tenure

Book
Bakken, Jeffrey P., and Simpson, Cynthia G.
2011
Charles C. Thomas Publisher Ltd.
LB2844.1.N4 B28 2011
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The Survival Guide for New Faculty Members: Outlining the Keys to Success for Promotion and Tenure provides new faculty members with practical, down-to-earth wisdom and suggestions for successfully working through to tenure and promotion. The authors—both successful and experienced administrators and experts in higher education—have provided an extremely well-organized and useful guide for new faculty members. It focuses on all aspects of becoming a new faculty member including ...
Additional Info:
The Survival Guide for New Faculty Members: Outlining the Keys to Success for Promotion and Tenure provides new faculty members with practical, down-to-earth wisdom and suggestions for successfully working through to tenure and promotion. The authors—both successful and experienced administrators and experts in higher education—have provided an extremely well-organized and useful guide for new faculty members. It focuses on all aspects of becoming a new faculty member including the various expectations in completing a successful journey toward promotion and tenure. The book underscores the importance of recognizing the three facets of faculty life of teaching, research, and service. This volume clearly sets out, compares, and separates those three components with clarity and provides very useful advice for putting the three together. Taken together with the chapters on “Documenting Your Progress” and “Promotion and Tenure,” new faculty are provided with a solid, practical introduction to building a foundation for success in higher education. Feedback and tips are also provided within each chapter. It is written in a style that readers will be able to easily comprehend and understand and is supported with many examples. In addition, the information can be easily applied to new faculty at various types of institutions of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface 

Part I: The Basic Fundamentals
ch. 1 Choosing The Right Institution
Searching the Chronicle of Higher Education
Type of University
What to Look for Regarding a Faculty Position
Application Materials 
Phone Interview 
Campus Visit 
Questions to Ask While on Campus
Job Offer/Negotiations
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips on Getting Started 
 
ch. 2 What To Do Prior To Arriving At Your New Institution
Finish Your Dissertation 
What if You Don’t Finish? 
Finding a Place to Live 
School Options 
Transportation 
Athletic Events 
Community and Cultural Events 
Children’s Programs 
Visiting the Community
Shopping
Nightlife 
Parks 
Discuss Class Load 
Faculty Expectations and Support 
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips about Relocating 
 
ch. 3 Learning About Your New Institution Once You Are There
Core Curriculum 
Programs Offered 
New Faculty Training 
Faculty Mentors 
Faculty Evaluations 
Funding Opportunities 
Internal Funding Opportunities 
External Funding Opportunities 
University Culture 
Conclusion
Faculty Tips on Learning about Your Institution
 
Part II: The Nuts and Bolts of Success
ch. 4 Teaching
Class Load and Schedule 
Course Teams 
Syllabus Development 
Assessments 
Teaching Style 
Available Technology and Support 
Being Successful 
Student Issues 
Faculty Expectations 
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips about Teaching 
 
ch. 5 Research and Scholarly Activity
Release Time 
Developing Ideas
Research Agenda 
Human Subjects Process 
Manuscript Preparation 
Presentations 
Grant Funding 
Being Successful 
Collaboration/Outreach 
Faculty Expectations
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips about Scholarly Activity 
 
ch. 6 Service
Department Service
College Service 
University Service 
Public School Service 
Community Organization Service 
Professional Organization Service 
Documentation of Service 
Being Successful 
Faculty Expectations 
Conclusion
Faculty Tips about Service 
 
Part III: The Final Steps
ch. 7 Documenting Your Progress
Keeping Track
Developing a Plan 
Constant Updates 
Documenting your Work 
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips on Documenting your Progress 

ch. 8 Promotion and Tenure
When does Promotion and Tenure Occur? 
Preparation for Promotion and Tenure 
What do you submit for Promotion and Tenure? 
What are the Procedures and Timelines for Promotion and Tenure? What Happens if you are Denied Promotion and Tenure? 
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips about Promotion and Tenure 

ch. 9 Creating A Harmony For Being Successful
Find Your Niche 
Focus on your Strengths 
Be Realistic
Find a Balance 
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips on Being Successful 
 
Appendices
Appendix A: University Research Grant Application 
Appendix B: Sample Undergraduate Syllabus 
Appendix C: Sample Graduate Syllabus 
Appendix D: Sample Human Subjects Proposal Form 
Appendix E: Sample Human Subjects Reviewer Form 
Appendix F: Completed Human Subjects Proposal 
Appendix G: Sample Promotion and Tenure Packet 
Index 
Article cover image

"From Mentor to Mentoring Networks: Mentoring in the New Academy"

Article
Sorcinelli, Mary Deane, and Yun, Jung
2007
Change, Vol. 39, No. 6, November-December 2007, pp. 58-61
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The article discusses the emerging models of mentoring as a vital contribution to a successful academic career. Mentoring has been defined as one-to-one relationship win which an experienced faculty member guides and supports the career development of early-career faculty member and research on faculty development. The article highlights the faculty-development resources which were published since 2000 and offers fresh models, concepts and thinking on mentoring in higher education. The resources provides ...
Additional Info:
The article discusses the emerging models of mentoring as a vital contribution to a successful academic career. Mentoring has been defined as one-to-one relationship win which an experienced faculty member guides and supports the career development of early-career faculty member and research on faculty development. The article highlights the faculty-development resources which were published since 2000 and offers fresh models, concepts and thinking on mentoring in higher education. The resources provides new conceptualizations of mentoring, recent studies on mentoring, faculty-development programs and practices, and issues on gender and race.
Cover image

The Effective, Efficient Professor: Teaching Scholarship and Service

Book
Wankat, Philip C.
2002
Allyn & Bacon, Boston, MA
LB2331.W317.2002
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The Effective, Efficient Professor: Teaching, Scholarship and Service develops methods to improve the proficiency and time management skills of faculty in all areas of their careers. Most faculty are discipline experts but have not studied methods to improve their teaching, scholarship or service. This book applies efficiency and time management methods to academe. Throughout the book, the author shows how student learning and academic productivity can be improved by being ...
Additional Info:
The Effective, Efficient Professor: Teaching, Scholarship and Service develops methods to improve the proficiency and time management skills of faculty in all areas of their careers. Most faculty are discipline experts but have not studied methods to improve their teaching, scholarship or service. This book applies efficiency and time management methods to academe. Throughout the book, the author shows how student learning and academic productivity can be improved by being aware of effective time management techniques. A variety of efficient and effective teaching methods are explored. Scholarship, service, and working with graduate students are also discussed. This book will help college faculty at all levels of instruction take charge of their careers! For college professors in all disciplines. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Preface
Introduction: Effectiveness and Efficiency in Academe

Pt. 1Time Management Techniques for Academics
ch. 1 Missions, Goals, and Activities
ch. 2 Applying Time Management Methods

Pt. Effective and Efficient Teaching
ch. 3 Teaching and Learning
ch. 4 Lecture-Style Classes
ch. 5 Problem-Oriented Learning
ch. 6 Rapport with Students and Advising

Pt. Effective, Efficient Students
ch. 7 Undergraduates
ch. 8 Graduate Students and Graduate Programs

Pt. Scholarship and Service
ch. 9 Scholarship and Writing: Still the Path to Fame and Promotion
ch. 10 Service and Administration: Citizenship in the Institution
ch. 11 Closure: Making Changes

References
Index
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A Teacher's Reflection Book: Exercises, Stories, Invitations

Book
Peters, Jean Koh, and Weisberg, Mark
2011
Carolina Academic Press, Durham, NC
LB1025.3.P466 2011
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In university teachers’ hectic lives, finding space to reflect, restore, renew, and recommit can seem impossible. Jean Koh Peters and Mark Weisberg believe regular reflection is critical and have designed A Teacher’s Reflection Book to help teachers and other professionals find that space. Growing out of the authors’ extensive experience facilitating retreats and leading teaching and learning workshops, the book builds on their discoveries in those settings, supporting and ...
Additional Info:
In university teachers’ hectic lives, finding space to reflect, restore, renew, and recommit can seem impossible. Jean Koh Peters and Mark Weisberg believe regular reflection is critical and have designed A Teacher’s Reflection Book to help teachers and other professionals find that space. Growing out of the authors’ extensive experience facilitating retreats and leading teaching and learning workshops, the book builds on their discoveries in those settings, supporting and promoting teachers’ self-directed development.

Inviting that development, A Teacher’s Reflection Book is a cornucopia of stories, exercises, and examples that will inspire teachers to make reflection a cornerstone of their daily lives. With its multiple suggestions and strategies, it offers something for every reader, and is responsive to teachers’ needs at all stages of their careers.

The book’s six chapters offer readers several perspectives from which to reflect. Some sections offer glimpses of teachers in the midst of their daily teaching lives, while others step away, inviting readers to reflect on what it means to have a vocation as a teacher.

The book explores how we listen, a crucial yet rarely taught skill, essential for reflecting, as well as for learning and teaching. And it invites teachers to reflect on their students: who they are, and what and how they learn. For those latter reflections, the authors turn the focus on fear, which so pervades university life and which can distort learners’ and teachers’ perspectives and responses. Throughout this book, readers will visit several classrooms and listen to the evocative voices of several thoughtful students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Gratitudes

ch. 1 How Does a Teacher Say Hello?
I. A Look at Several First Classes II. Exercises to Focus on Hello
II. Exercises to Focus on Hello
A. What Is the First Experience Students Have in Your Course? What Is Their First Experience in Class?
B. What Are the Dispositions of Your Classroom?
C. Fast Forward Through the Semester You’re about to Start
D. Consider “Entrainment” and the Rhythms of Your Semester
E. Think about Hellos in Popular Culture
F. How Will You Deal with Fluctuating Student Attendance During “Shopping Periods”?
G. What Will Be the Role of Technology in Your Classroom, and Will You Make Space to Express That in Your Hello?
H. Will You Know Your Students’ Names?
I. How Will You Handle Your Announcements?
J. As You Begin, How Do You Want the Central Ideas of the Course to Emerge?
K. Consider Generating Ideas by Using Beginning Rituals in Other Settings
III. Final Thoughts about Hello
IV. Conclusion Notes

ch. 2 Reflection: What It Is and How to Practice It
I. Introduction: A Reflection on the Need for Reflection
II. Essential Elements of Reflection—What Makes Reflection Work for You?
A. Identify Meaningful Elements of Reflection That Uniquely Suit Your Needs
B. Three Recommended Elements of Reflection: Starting Focal Point, Experience, Non-judgment
1. A Starting Focal Point
2. Experience
3. Non-judgment
III. A Session of Reflection: The Individual Reflection Event
A. Individual Reflection Event: The Retreat Model
B. Examples of Individual Reflection Events
1. Reflection Event — With a Group, at Our Retreat
2. Reflection Event — Alone, at a Conference, Further Reflected Upon Alone, after the Conference
IV. What a Practice of Mindful Reflection Might Look Like
A. The Spirit of Mindful Reflection — A Practice, Not a Habit
B. The Structure of Mindful Reflection — Useful Strategies
C. Additional Suggestions for Developing a Reflection Practice
1. Downshifting, Making the Transition
2. Giving Oneself Permission
3. Dealing with Technology and Time
D. Creating Conditions for Reflection
V. Conclusion
Notes

ch. 3 Experiments in Listening
I. Looking Retrospectively at Your Experiences of Listening
A. Ask Analytical or General Questions about Your Listening
1. Ten Freewriting/Brainstorming Prompts
2. Explore Your Listening on a Doubting and Believing Spectrum
B. Explore Critical Incidents from the Past
1. High Points and Low Points as a Listener
2. Profile of the Three Best Listeners I Know
3. High Points and Low Points as a Person Being Listened To
II. Looking Prospectively: Analyzing Your Listening for New Insights
A. Collect New Data
B. Experiment with Your Listening
1. Use the Doubting-Believing Spectrum: Two Variants
2. Wait Five Seconds before Responding
3. Don’t Offer Advice
4. Listen with Your Hands Occupied
5. Practice Non-judgment
6. Try a Group Exercise

ch. 4 Who Are Our Students, and How and What Do They Learn in Our Classrooms?
I. Who Were We as Students: Our Best/Worst Moments as Students
II. Student Voices
III. A Culture of Fear and Its Consequences
A. Three Classrooms, Three Nightmare Scenarios
IV. What Can We Do to Facilitate Learning?
A. Teach Non-judgmentally/Teach Non-judgment
B. Discern the Gift, Not the Gifted
C. Use Midstream, or Formative, Assessment
D. Anticipate Difficult Incidents
E. Take One More Minute
F. Trust Ourselves
V. Conclusion
Notes

ch. 5 The Teacher and Vocation
I. Discovering Vocation
A. UnderstandingVocation
B. FindingYourVocation:FourExercises
1. Write Your Obituary
2. Find and Explore a Governing Metaphor
3. Compose a Job Description
4. Visit or Write Your Future Self
C. A Life Lived in Vocation: Implications
II. Nurturing Vocation in Ordinary Times: Two Sets of Processes You Can Trust
A. Internal Processes You Can Trust
B. ExternalProcessesYouCanTrust
III. Some Elements of a Teacher’s Vocation
A. Writing
B. ClassroomTeaching
IV. Conclusion
Notes

ch. 6 How Does a Teacher Say Goodbye?
I. Introduction
II. Invitations for Thinking about Goodbye
III. Ideas for Last Classes/Meetings
A. A Closing Circle
B. Completing the Circle
C. Jean’s Goodbye and Coupon
D. Postcards and Silent Witness
IV. Goodbye: A Unique Moment of Reflection
V. Conclusion
Notes

Appendix • Resources for Reflecting
About the Authors
Index
Cover image

Professors Behaving Badly: Faculty Misconduct in Graduate Education

Book
Braxton, John M., Proper, Eve M., and Bayer, Alan E.
2011
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB1779.B74 2011
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
• A faculty member publishes an article without offering coauthorship to a graduate assistant who has made a substantial conceptual or methodological contribution to the article.
• A professor does not permit graduate students to express viewpoints different from her own.
• A graduate student close to finishing his dissertation cannot reach his traveling advisor, a circumstance that jeopardizes his degree.
This book discusses these and other examples of faculty ...
Additional Info:
• A faculty member publishes an article without offering coauthorship to a graduate assistant who has made a substantial conceptual or methodological contribution to the article.
• A professor does not permit graduate students to express viewpoints different from her own.
• A graduate student close to finishing his dissertation cannot reach his traveling advisor, a circumstance that jeopardizes his degree.
This book discusses these and other examples of faculty misconduct—and how to avoid them.

Using data collected through faculty surveys, the authors describe behaviors associated with graduate teaching which are considered inappropriate and in violation of good teaching practices. They derive a normative structure that consists of five inviolable and eight admonitory proscriptive criteria to help graduate faculty make informed and acceptable professional choices.

The authors discuss the various ways in which faculty members acquire the norms of teaching and mentoring, including the graduate school socialization process, role models, disciplinary codes of ethics, and scholarship about the professoriate and professional performance. Analyzing the rich data gleaned from the faculty surveys, they track how these norms are understood and interpreted across academic disciplines and are influenced by such factors as gender, citizenship, age, academic rank, tenure, research activity, and administrative experience. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables
Acknowledgments
Introduction - The Critical Role of Norms in Graduate Education

ch. 1 Incidents of Faculty Improprieties in Graduate Training
ch. 2 Study Design
ch. 3 The Normative Structure of Graduate Education
ch. 4 Norm Espousal by Institutional Type and Academic Discipline
ch. 5 Personal Attributes and Norm Espousal
ch. 6 Norm Espousal and Faculty Professional Attainments and Involvement
ch. 7 Core Norms, Differentiated Norms, and Key Differentiating Factors
ch. 8 Graduate School Socialization and the Internalization of the Norms of Graduate Study
ch. 9 The Support of Graduate Teaching Norms by Supporting Organizations
ch. 10 Further Perspectives on the Internalization of the Norms of Graduate Teaching and Mentoring
ch. 11 Conclusion and Recommendations for Research, Policy, and Practice

Appendix A - The Graduate Teaching and Mentoring Behaviors Inventory
Appendix B - Means and Standard Deviations for Behaviors Included in the Graduate Teaching and Mentoring Behaviors Inventory (GTMBI)
Appendix C - Respondent Bias Assessment

References
Index
Cover image

Professional Academic Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Book
MacDonald, Susan Peck
1994
Southern Illinois University Press, Carbondale, IL
PN146.M33 1994
Topics: Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Susan Peck MacDonald here tackles important and often controversial contemporary questions regarding the rhetoric of inquiry, the social construction of knowledge, and the professionalization of the academy. MacDonald argues that the academy has devoted more effort to analyzing theory and method than to analyzing its own texts. Professional texts need further attention because they not only create but are also shaped by the knowledge that is special to each discipline. ...
Additional Info:
Susan Peck MacDonald here tackles important and often controversial contemporary questions regarding the rhetoric of inquiry, the social construction of knowledge, and the professionalization of the academy. MacDonald argues that the academy has devoted more effort to analyzing theory and method than to analyzing its own texts. Professional texts need further attention because they not only create but are also shaped by the knowledge that is special to each discipline. Her assumption is that knowledge making is the distinctive activity of the academy at the professional level; for that reason, it is important to examine differences in the ways the professional texts of subdisciplinary communities focus on and consolidate knowledge within their fields.

MacDonald’s examination concentrates on three sample subdisciplinary fields: attachment research in psychology, Colonial New England social history, and Renaissance New Historicism in literary studies. By tracing, over a period of two decades, how members of each field have discussed a problem in their professional discourse, MacDonald explores whether they have progressed toward a greater resolution of their problems. In her examination of attachment research, she traces the field’s progress from its theoretical origins through its discovery of a method to a point of greater conceptual elaboration and agreement. Similarly, in Colonial New England social history, MacDonald examines debates over the values of narrative and analysis and, in Renaissance New Historicism, discusses particularist tendencies and ways in which New Historicist articles are organized by anecdotes and narratives.

MacDonald goes on to discuss sentence-level patterns, boldly proposing a method for examining how disciplinary differences in knowledge making are created and reflected at the sentence level.

Throughout her work, MacDonald stresses her conviction that academics need to do a better job of explaining their text-making axioms, clarifying their expectations of students at all levels, and monitoring their own professional practices. MacDonald’s proposals for both textual and sentence-level analysis will help academic professionals better understand how they might improve communication within their professional communities and with their students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Patterns in Disciplinary Variation
ch. 2 Attachment Research: Compact Problem Definition in a Conceptually Driven Field
ch. 3 Colonial New England Social History: The Problematics of Contemporary History Writing
ch. 4 Renaissance New Historicism: Epistemic and Nonepistemic Textual Patterns
ch. 5 Sentence-Level Differences in Disciplinary Knowledge Making
ch. 6 Professional Sytles and Their Consequences

Appendix: The Sample
Notes
References
Index
Cover image

It Works for Me: Becoming a Publishing Scholar/Researcher

Book
Blythe, Hal, and Sweet, Charlie
2010
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2331.B596 2010
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The authors’ purpose in this book is to provide “a collection of practical tips drawn from real-life experiences.” We believe this particular book is so important to share with today’s audience, we almost called it Take My Book, Please!

On the other hand, does the scholarly world need another book on the importance of scholarship? Further, if the book standard for tenure is slowly disappearing because so ...
Additional Info:
The authors’ purpose in this book is to provide “a collection of practical tips drawn from real-life experiences.” We believe this particular book is so important to share with today’s audience, we almost called it Take My Book, Please!

On the other hand, does the scholarly world need another book on the importance of scholarship? Further, if the book standard for tenure is slowly disappearing because so many academic presses are closing, why would we bother to write one? And recent studies show that new faculty members consider university employment a 9:00-5:00 job, so doesn’t that leave out time for job-related reading? Finally, with the instant gratification of the internet, aren’t books dead in our culture or at least well on their way to extinction?

Why, then, in the name of all that’s sane, did we put this collection together?

a. Our publisher wanted a follow-up to our It Works for Me as a Scholar-Teacher as he believed we had a lot more to say on the subject.

b. With over 800 publications, we thought we had something insightful to say.

c. Most books on the importance of scholarship are either textbook in nature or extremely theoretical, while this book is neither.

d. With our successful It Works for Me series we’ve found a niche in the marketplace.

e. Being a large collaboration, this book provides many voices who all believe that reiterating the importance of scholarship is important.

f. With a series of short, practical tips on scholarship, this book is very easy to read and, hence, might be read.

Actually, all of the above are true. We feel certain you will benefit from the collective work found between these covers. To find information on the full “It Works for Me” series, go to www.newforums.com. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction
Developing a Scholarly Frame of Mind
Creating Your Scholarly Plan

Overviews
Getting Published: Inquiring Minds Want to Know
The No-So-Obvious Strategies to Become a Publishing Research Scholar
Tips for Being Published in Academic Journals
Academic Publishing from an Unknown Regional University
Maintaining Scholarship in a Teaching-Focused Institution
Dave's Hints for Publishing
My Story
When Life Intervenes
A Transitional Journey
Order with Flexibility

Pre-Writing
Working with the IR Office
Identifying Emerging Topics of Scholarly Interest in the Discipline
Differentiating Journals
How to Get Involved in Research
Getting Started in Scholarly Writing
Writing Book Chapters for Publication
Time: The Elusive Ingredient in a Successful Recipe
When You Really Need It Published

Writing
Free to Write: Capturing the Creative Flow
A Research/Scholarly Paper Outline

Post-Writing
For Improved Scholarship, Know Your Editor(s)
Submitting a Manuscript? Do the Homework!
Applying Wagnerian Opera Theory to Scholarship: It's Not over Till
Turning Rejection Letters into Positive Advice

Other Scholarly Matters
Collabowriting Your Scholarship
Listen and Learn
Five Strategies for Successful Co-Authorizing of Articles
Virtual Collaboration
An International Learning Community: Successful Vehicle for Scholarship
The ABC's of Writing Groups at Small Universities
A Writing and Publication Group Becomes an Intellectual Community
Stalking the Reluctant Professor: How to Find a Mentor without Getting Arrested
Why Is It So Darned Hard to Get that Article Pushed out theDoor?
Collaboration Is King: Five Tips for Publishing Research Papers
Using Authentic Data in Classroom Exercises
A Scholarly Assignment
Co-Creating with Students: Establishing Trust in a Student-Faculty Research Group
Getting Published as a Graduate Student
Checking the Checker

New Directions
New Directions in Scholarship
Creating SOTL: An Experiment in Collaboration
Blending Service into Scholarship
Publishing Ideas from Courses that Extend Beyond Your Primary Discipline
S-t-r-e-t-c-h-i-n-g Yourself: Writing Outside Your Comfort Zone
Young Adult Literature as a Publishing Venue for the Higher Education Scholar
Sustaining Scholarship in a Digital Era
Presenting Live in South Africa . . . from My Family Room
Merging Discipline-Based Scholarship with the Scholarship of Teaching
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C(H)AOS Theory: Reflections of Chief Academic Officers in Theological Education

Book
Brillman, Kathleen, and Birch, Bruce C., eds.
2011
William B Eerdmans Publishing Co., Grand Rapids, MI
BV4166.C53 2011
Topics: Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Members of the Association of Theological Schools' Chief Academic Officers Society (CAOS) -- deans and CAOs at more than 250 theological schools in the United States and Canada -- face a number of unique vocational tasks and trials. C(H)AOS Theory brings together in one volume perspectives from more than thirty veteran deans on a variety of topics related to academic leadership, from understanding institutional contexts and nurturing relationships to ...
Additional Info:
Members of the Association of Theological Schools' Chief Academic Officers Society (CAOS) -- deans and CAOs at more than 250 theological schools in the United States and Canada -- face a number of unique vocational tasks and trials. C(H)AOS Theory brings together in one volume perspectives from more than thirty veteran deans on a variety of topics related to academic leadership, from understanding institutional contexts and nurturing relationships to negotiating conflict, setting and meeting academic goals, building budgets, working with assessment and accreditation, and more.

With its rich amalgam of useful information, bold instruction on a host of academic leadership issues, and lively narratives on the ways different colleagues address common challenges, C(H)AOS Theory will serve as a helpful resource for academic leaders. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction - Honoring Complexities, Celebrating Colleagueship: What to Expect from This Book

Reading Institutional Context
ch. 1 Academic Leadership and the Varieties of Theological Schools
Fins on the Left, Fins on the Right: Reading Context in Seminaries (Jana Childers)
Stop, Look, and Listen: Observation in Academic Leadership (Gale R. O'Day)

ch. 2 Developing Vision and Serving Mission
The Centrality of Institutional Mission as an Anchor of Corporate Vision (Jay Wade Marshall)
From Vision to Decision: Identifying the Dean's Essential Role in Facilitating the School's Mission (Richard Benson)

ch. 3 The Vocational Call and Multifaceted Role of the CAO
The Vocation of the Academic Dean (Stephen R. Graham)
The Vocational Call and Multiple Occupations of a CAO (Linda W. Bryan)

Nurturing Commitments
ch. 4 Relating to the CEO
Leading from the Middle (Willie James Jennings)
Building a Relationship That Furthers the Mission (Randolph MacFarland)

ch. 5 The Dean's Role in Governance
Governance and Faculty Leadership: Routine, Complex, Contentious, and Collaborative (D. Cameron Murchison)
Fulcrum Leadership and the Varied Dimensions of Governance (Anne T. Anderson)

ch. 6 Faculty Leadership and Development
Scaffolding That Supports Faculty Leadership: The Dean's Constructive Role (Anne B. Yardley)
Faculty Leadership and Development: Lessons from the Anabaptist-Pietist Tradition (Dale R. Stoffer)

ch. 7 The Dean's Relationship with Students
The Dean and Students: A Denominational Seminary Perspective (Ruth A. Meyers)
The Dean and Students: A Divinity School Perspective (Richard A. Rosengarten)

ch. 8 Modeling/Leading in Teaching and Scholarship
The Dean as Teacher and Scholar: Four Ways to Lead (Craig L. Nessan)
Leading as an Act of Academic Hospitality (Barbara Horkoff Mutch)

ch. 9 Leading in Diversity: Personal Experiences and Institutional Choices
The Stranger in the Center: The Academic Dean as Racial Minority (Stephen Breck Reid)
Locating Multiple Immigrant Identities and Belonging in Relatedness: Insights for Intercultural Leadership (Faustino M. Cruz)
In the Pursuit of a Community That Does Diversity Well (Sherwood G. Lingerfelter, with Winston E. Gooden, and Linda M. Wagener)
Reflections about Gender and Administration in Theological Education (Barbara Brown Zikmund)

Developing Competencies
ch. 10 Orchestrating People and Processes
The Dean as Administrator: It's All a Matter of Relationships (Gary Riebe-Estrella)
Focusing a Complex, Multidimensional Role: Observations from a Protestant Seminary Dean (John T. Carroll)
Building Consensus and Negotiating Conflict (Jack L. Seymour)

ch. 11 Building the Academic Budget
The Budget as a Mission Tool: Vision, Principles, and Strategies (Robin J. Steinke)
Entering Unfamiliar Territory: Budget Basics for the Dean of a University Theological School (Tite Tiénou)

ch. 12 Balancing Formation, Academic Learning, and Ecclesiastical Goals
Developing a Curriculum for Academic, Spiritual, and Vocational Formation (Bruce P. Powers)
Balancing Formation and Academic Learning (Ronald A. Mercier)
Living Fruitfully in the Tensions between Academy and Church (Ervin R. Stutzman)

ch. 13 Understanding and Using Assessment and Accreditation
Understanding and Fostering a Culture of Assessment: A Primer for Academic Deans (John F. VerBerkmoes)
Shifting Models of Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes: A Key to Renewal, Improvement, and Effectiveness (Leland V. Eliason)

ch. 14 Personal, Professional, and Spiritual Development
Finding Wholeness in the Role of the Dean (Bruce C. Birch)

Afterword - The Scholarship of Academic Leadership: A Postscript on the Work of Chief Academic Officers (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Contributors
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Team Teaching: Across the Disciplines, Across the Academy

Book
Plank, Kathryn M., ed., and Rhem, James, foreword
2011
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB1029.T4 A36 2011
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
For those considering adopting team teaching, or interested in reviewing their own practice, this book offers an over-view of this pedagogy, its challenges and rewards, and a rich range of examples in which teachers present and reflect upon their approaches.

The interaction of two teachers—both the intellectual interaction involved in the design of the course, and the pedagogical interaction in the teaching of the course—creates a ...
Additional Info:
For those considering adopting team teaching, or interested in reviewing their own practice, this book offers an over-view of this pedagogy, its challenges and rewards, and a rich range of examples in which teachers present and reflect upon their approaches.

The interaction of two teachers—both the intellectual interaction involved in the design of the course, and the pedagogical interaction in the teaching of the course—creates a dynamic environment that reflects the way scholars make meaning of the world. The process naturally breaks down the teacher-centered classroom by creating a scholarly community in which teachers and students work together to understand important ideas, and where students don’t just learn content, but begin to understand how knowledge is constructed, grasp the connections between disciplines as well as their different perspectives, see greater coherence in the curriculum, and appreciate how having more than one teacher in the classroom leads naturally to dialogue and active learning.

Each of the five examples in this book shares the story of a course at a different institution, and each is designed to reflect a number of different variables in team-taught courses. They represent courses in a variety of different disciplines, including the sciences, social sciences, humanities, and the arts; and at a range of levels, from first-year seminars to graduate courses. They also illustrate a number of different models for instructional teams, such as faculty from the same disciplines, from related disciplines, from two very different disciplines, from different institutions, and one pairing of a faculty member and a staff member.

This book provides insight into the impact of team teaching on student learning and on faculty development. It also addresses the challenges, both pedagogical an administrative, that need to be addressed for team teaching to be effective. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction

ch. 1 Origins - Team Teaching in the Sciences (Amy Jessen-Marshall and Halard L. Lescinsky)
ch. 2 Lessons Learned by a Philosopher and a Biologist in Team Teaching a First-Year Seminar on ‘‘Disease and Culture: Why You Are a Walking Petri Dish’’ (Min-Ken Liao and Sarah Worth)
ch. 3 Arts and Community - Lessons in Team Teaching (Robert A. Richter and Margaret E. Thomas)
ch. 4 Interracial Team Teaching in Social Work (Mathew L. Ouellett and Edith Fraser)
ch. 5 Lessons Learned From an Interdisciplinary Course in Undergraduate Science (Ronald J. Duchovic)

Contributors
Index
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What They Didn't Teach You in Graduate School: 299 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career

Book
Gray, Paul, and Drew, David E.
2012
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB1778.2.G73 2012
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
* This irreverent, but serious, guide to what life in higher education institutions is really like, now enhanced by 100 new tips
* Invaluable advice that ranges from getting your Ph.D. to setting the course of your academic career

Just landed your first faculty position? Close to getting your Ph.D., and planning a career in academe? What will academic life be like? How do you discover its tacit ...
Additional Info:
* This irreverent, but serious, guide to what life in higher education institutions is really like, now enhanced by 100 new tips
* Invaluable advice that ranges from getting your Ph.D. to setting the course of your academic career

Just landed your first faculty position? Close to getting your Ph.D., and planning a career in academe? What will academic life be like? How do you discover its tacit rules? Develop the habits and networks needed for success? What issues will you encounter if you’re a person of color, or a woman? How is higher education changing?

Paul Gray and David E. Drew share their combined experience of many years as faculty and (recovering) administrators to offer even more insider advice—the kind that’s rarely taught or even talked about in graduate school – to help you succeed.

The 100 new hints expand sections on the dissertation process, job hunting, life in the classroom and on dealing with students, as well as on matters that affect readers’ careers, such as research, publication, and tenure. The book concludes with a tongue-in-cheek appendix on How to Become a Millionaire while an academic.

Already have the first edition? Give it to someone less fortunate than you, and take advantage of the new advice you will find in these pages. Too penurious to buy this book? Persuade a family member or friend to get it as a gift. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword 1 to the First Edition
Foreword 2 to the First Edition
Introduction

ch. 1 Basic Concepts
Gray’s Theorem of N + 2
Most academic fields are dominated by fewer than 100 powerful people
How to become known
Drew’s law on publishing papers
Make sure you have a mentor
Specialize. Get known for something

ch. 2 The PhD
Finish your PhD as early as possible
Be humble about your PhD
A PhD is primarily an indicator of survivorship
A PhD is a certification of research ability based on a sample of 1
A PhD is a license to reproduce
You must mave a PhD in hand
The key danger point is where you leave highly structured coursework
The PhD and part-time study
Avoid Watson’s syndrome
Celebrate your PhD!

ch. 3 The dissertation
Prelims
Finding a dissertation topic
Problem-solving mode
Put a lot of effort into writing your dissertation proposal
The range of your literature review
Selecting the dissertation advisory committee
The dissertation abstract
How long is too long for your dissertation?
The chain of references
Couple the likterature search closely with the discussion of results and the conclusion.
The risk of “not significant”results
The dissertation defense

ch. 4 Job Hunting
Job hunting is a research Project
Pick a place where you and your family want to live
When to apply for a faculty position
Find the best possible school for your first job
Change your career or move every seven years
Not-for-profit or for-profit for first or second job?
Exceptions to the previous hint
Build a Reference pool
Resumes are important
Dual careers
The short list

Jobs
Law of supply and demand
Research vs. teaching oriented institutions
The jobs may be at for profits
New programs
National rankings
Teaching in a community college
On-Line universities
The assistant dean strategy
Evaluate a postdoc carefully
Non-academic opportunities
Nonuniversity research organizations
Teaching Abroad for Fun and Profit

Interviewing

Tactics for interviewing
Dressing for the job interview
Don't be intimidated by the schools of those who interview you
Interview your potential bosses
Dealing with interviewers who published less than you did
Prepare an 'elevator speech"

Data Gathering
Determine the culture
Gather salary and tenure data
Obtaining tenure data is a little tricky
Ask about the retirement system
Parking
Determine real pay

Offers
Get the offer in writing, read it, and negotiate before you accept
Get the PhD bdefore you start the tenure track unless you are starving or homeless
Don’t take your first job at the school where you received your PhD
Choosing among offers

Hunting for the Next Job
Positioning for the next job
You become unemployed

ch. 5 Teaching and Service
Publications are the only form of portable wealth
Many colleges and universities value teaching
Teaching is a learned art
Being a mentor
Go to Toastmasters if needed
Meeting classes is paramount
Teaching can be a dangerous profession
Consider student costs when selecting textbooks.
Avoid serving on a committee where you are the technical expert

In The Classroom
Summaries lock in the material
Encourage questions
Enjoy your classes
Lecturing vs. facilitating
Teaching is not synonymous with lecturing
Lecture capture
Obtaining student responsesn through technology (clickers)
PowerPoint presentations

Teaching On-line
Distance education
Distance learning is a blessing. Distance learning is a threat

Students
Be wary of student excuses
Believe it or not, cheating is widespread
Teach every student
Teach to the student’s frame of reference
Distracted students
Undergraduates don’t remember more than 7 years back
Will this be on the final?
Grade inflation
Technobabble
Wikipedia and other web sources
Breaking the students' Wikipedia habit
Letters of reference for students
The student as customer mantra

ch. 6 Research
If you want a reserch career, make sure that the position you are offered allows you to actually do research
You can trade-off teaching load and research opportunities
Research requires both quantitative and qualitative skills. Learn grantsmanship
Don't be modest when writing a grant proposal
Protest if your brilliant grant proposal is declined
Build an advisory panel of nationally respected experts into your grant proposal
If you didn't build in an advisory panel it's not too late
Get the grant approval in writing
Get clearance before you study an organization
The institutional review board (IRB)
Academic trade journals are sources of higher education (and job) information
Collaborate and cooperate
Plagiarism is a No No
Back up, back up, back up your research
The “mode”of the number of publications is 0 followed closely by 1

ch. 7 Tenure
Tenure is the prize
Your promotion dossier
Why tenure is such a hurdle
If , by chance, you achieve tenure, never take another appolntment without it
Tenure, like reaserch support, can be negotiated on the way in
Tenure is tougher in cross-disciplinary fields
Tenure is forever (almost)
Tenure as we know it today may not be here forever
The number of tenured slots may decrease with time

The Mechanics of Tenure
The tenure clock is really four and a half years not seven
The Dreaded Impact Factor
Tenure committees look almost exclusively at refereed publications
Download counts
Multiple authored papers
Publication quality counts
Rolling reviews

ch. 8 Academic Rank
Being a tenured full professor is freedom
As a full professor you must be known for something
Avoid becoming the pitied “Permanent Associate Professor”
Promotion is an opportunity for a larger pay raise

ch. 9 Your Financial Life As An Academic
Academics are risk averse
Contracts are given to faculty for nine months
Salaries vary by field
Summer pay
The zero raise years
Retirement savings
Tax Deferral
Administrators make more

ch. 10 Life As An Academic
Good deans/bad deans
Never, ever choose sides in department politics
Don’t take a joint appointment
Join the faculty club
Office hours
Sabbaticals
Maintain collegiality
As an academic you are a public person
Freedom of speech
Attend Invited Lectures
Serving as an external reviewer
Keeping up with your field
You can go home again-retreat rights.
The board of trustees

Your Administrative Life
Secretaries are a scarce resource
Value your teaching assistants and graders
Grading
Your research assisstants require supervision.
Physical plant
Be careful what you delegate
Business cards

Your Digital Life
Learn the idiosyncracies of your institution's computer center
Electronic mail
The down side of e-mail
Don’t get on too many e-mail lists
Your students love e-mail, texting, and twitter
Keep up with computer developments
Meetings and digital publication
Interlibrary loan is quicker and more efficient than it used to be
Use digital libraries if they are available in your field
Telecommuting
Your web site
Your web visibility
The persistence of language

Institutional Citizen
Get to know the development people in your school and support them
Be responsive to your alumni office
When you do something noteworthy,m let your public relations department know
Communicating your field to the public
The faculty senate in most institutions provides a forum
Service

Department Chair
Never, never become a department chair unless you’re a tenured full professor
Be aware that the powers of a department chair are few
The role conflict in the job
Leadership
Dealing with student problems
Redeeming social values of being chair
Don’t stay in the chair position too long

Travel
Professional travel
Attend conferences
Choosing your conferen
Article cover image

Why Are Associate Professors So Unhappy?

Article
Wilson, Robin
2012
The Chronicle of Higher Education, 3 June 2012
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The article discusses associate professors in the U.S., focusing on their overall happiness and attitudes related to their positions. The article cites a study conducted by the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education at Harvard University which provides statistics related to the job satisfaction of associate professors in areas such as leadership, collaboration, and workload. The article explores the tenure track process for college teachers, notes that few ...
Additional Info:
The article discusses associate professors in the U.S., focusing on their overall happiness and attitudes related to their positions. The article cites a study conducted by the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education at Harvard University which provides statistics related to the job satisfaction of associate professors in areas such as leadership, collaboration, and workload. The article explores the tenure track process for college teachers, notes that few personal and professional services are offered to mid-career professors, and provides comments from various associate professors including Judith C. Amburgey-Peters, Karen L. Kelsky, and Margaret Soltan.
Article cover image
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Student Evaluations: A Critical Review

Article
Huemer, Michael
2011
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Informal student evaluations of faculty were started in the 1960's by enterprising college students.(1) Since then, their use has spread so that now they are administered in almost all American colleges and universities and are probably the main source of information used for evaluating faculty teaching performance.(2) There is an enormous literature on the subject of student evaluations of faculty (SEF).(3) The following is a summary of some developments in ...
Additional Info:
Informal student evaluations of faculty were started in the 1960's by enterprising college students.(1) Since then, their use has spread so that now they are administered in almost all American colleges and universities and are probably the main source of information used for evaluating faculty teaching performance.(2) There is an enormous literature on the subject of student evaluations of faculty (SEF).(3) The following is a summary of some developments in that literature that should be of special interest to faculty, with particular emphasis on criticisms of SEF that have emerged recently. But I begin with the arguments in favor of the use of SEF.
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Research Report: Race and Gender Bias in Student Evaluations of Teaching

Article
Huston, Therese
2005
Seattle University Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

Bias, The Brain, and Student Evaluations of Teaching

Article
Merritt, Deborah J.
2007
CP Merrit Doc (2007)
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Student evaluations of teaching are a common fixture at American law schools, but they harbor surprising biases. Extensive psychology research demonstrates that these assessments respond overwhelmingly to a professor’s appearance and nonverbal behavior; ratings based on just thirty seconds of silent videotape correlate strongly with end-of-semester evaluations. The nonverbal behaviors that influence teaching evaluations are rooted in physiology, culture, and habit, allowing characteristics like race and gender to affect ...
Additional Info:
Student evaluations of teaching are a common fixture at American law schools, but they harbor surprising biases. Extensive psychology research demonstrates that these assessments respond overwhelmingly to a professor’s appearance and nonverbal behavior; ratings based on just thirty seconds of silent videotape correlate strongly with end-of-semester evaluations. The nonverbal behaviors that influence teaching evaluations are rooted in physiology, culture, and habit, allowing characteristics like race and gender to affect evaluations. The current process of gathering evaluations, moreover, allows social stereotypes to filter students’ perceptions, increasing risks of bias. These distortions are inevitable products of the intuitive, “system one” cognitive processes that the present process taps. The cure for these biases requires schools to design new student evaluation systems, such as ones based on facilitated group discussion, that enable more reflective, deliberative judgments. This article draws upon research in cognitive decision making, both to present the compelling case for reforming the current system of evaluating classroom performance and to illuminate the cognitive processes that underlie many facets of the legal system.
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Learning to Lead A Handbook for Postsecondary Administrators

Book
Davis, James R.
2011
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LB2341.D35 2011
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Leadership is an activity that not only manifests itself in formal positions, but also bubbles up in various places within an organization. Perhaps given the importance of leadership to any endeavor, the literature on this topic has burgeoned. Yet among these titles, Learning to Lead stands out as one of the best texts available on leadership for college and university administrators. Critical skills such as managing people, resolving conflict, and ...
Additional Info:
Leadership is an activity that not only manifests itself in formal positions, but also bubbles up in various places within an organization. Perhaps given the importance of leadership to any endeavor, the literature on this topic has burgeoned. Yet among these titles, Learning to Lead stands out as one of the best texts available on leadership for college and university administrators. Critical skills such as managing people, resolving conflict, and making rational (and legal) decisions are explored within the context of the campus. The book also addresses the needs of those who facilitate leadership workshops, serve as mentors to potential leaders, and teach courses on higher education leadership and administration. While presenting all sides of key issues, the author calls for the reader to define his or her own position through a series of provocative reflection questions in each chapter. Thus the book invites interaction and teaches administrators not what to think about leadership, but how to think about it. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Need for Institution-Wide Leadership

Part I. Understanding the Context for Leadership
ch. 1 Leadership and Administration: Building Practical Definitions
ch. 2 Institutional Structure and Mission: Knowing Your Place in Time and Space

Part II. Building the Skills for Leadership
ch. 3 Program Planning and Review: Exerting Influence and Maintaining Accountability
ch. 4 Meetings, Groups, and Teams: Learning to Collaborate
ch. 5 Communication and Conflict Resolution: Finding Agreement
ch. 6 Problem Solving and Decision Making: Employing Rational, Legal, and Ethical Criteria
ch. 7 Financial Management: Seeing Dollars Everywhere
ch. 8 Change: Moving Forward Gracefully
ch. 9 Positive Work Environments: Managing People and Encouraging Development

Part III. Continuing to Learn about Leadership
ch. 10 Perpetual Learning and Personal Renewal: Shaping the Leader Within

Appendix: Directory of Resources
Index
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Thriving in Leadership: Strategies for Making a Difference in Christian Higher Education

Book
Longman, Karen A.
2012
Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, TX
LC383.T57 2012
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In this book, seventeen senior leaders from faith-based colleges and universities across North America--collectively bringing with them hundreds of years of leadership experience--share fresh insights into the theory and practice of Christian higher education leadership. These authors speak honestly about the successes, failures, and demands that have shaped their current leadership decisions and their visions for the future.In this book, seventeen senior leaders from faith-based colleges and universities across ...
Additional Info:
In this book, seventeen senior leaders from faith-based colleges and universities across North America--collectively bringing with them hundreds of years of leadership experience--share fresh insights into the theory and practice of Christian higher education leadership. These authors speak honestly about the successes, failures, and demands that have shaped their current leadership decisions and their visions for the future.In this book, seventeen senior leaders from faith-based colleges and universities across North America--collectively bringing with them hundreds of years of leadership experience--share fresh insights into the theory and practice of Christian higher education leadership. These authors speak honestly about the successes, failures, and demands that have shaped their current leadership decisions and their visions for the future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction

Part I: The Interior Life of Thriving Leaders
ch. 1 Thriving as a Leader: The Role of Resilience and Relationships
ch. 2 Leading from the Center: Body and Place
ch. 3 Honoring Giftedness: A Strengths Approach to Leadership

Part II: The Social Intelligence of Thriving Leaders
ch. 4 Tell Me a Story: Using as Old Tool to Sustain Culture, Embrace Change, and Envision a Bold Future
ch. 5 The Difference Trust Makes
ch. 6 Orchestrating a Life of Influence
ch. 7 Inside Faculty Culture
ch. 8 Building a Powerful Leadership Team
ch. 9 Mentoring for Leadership

Part III: How Leaders Can Shape a Thriving Organizational Culture
ch. 10 Metaphors Matter: Organizational Culture Shaped by Image
ch. 11 Beyond "Hospitality": Moving out of the Host-Guest Metaphor into an Intercultural "World House"
ch. 12 Toward a Distinctive, Christ-Honoring Campus Culture: Working the Vision
ch. 13 Leading a Turnaround and the Joy of a Third-Class Ticket
ch. 14 Leadership in the Fifth Dimension: Balancing Time with the Timeless

Epilogue
About the Author
About the Contributors
Bibliography
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Critical Response Process: A Method For Getting Useful Feedback On Anything You make, From Dance to Dessert, First Edition

Book
Lerman, Liz; and Borstel, John
2003
Liz Lerman Dance Exchange, Takoma Park, MD
BF319.5.F4 L47 2003
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process is a multi-step, group system for giving and receiving useful feedback on creative processes and artistic work-in-progress. Originated in the early 1990's by choreographer and MacArthur "Genius Grant" Fellow Liz Lerman, the Process has been widely embraced by artists, educators, and administrators. It has been applied in such diverse contexts as choreography classes, post-performance discussions, actor/playwright collaborations, curatorial decision-making, and university level curriculum assessment. ...
Additional Info:
Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process is a multi-step, group system for giving and receiving useful feedback on creative processes and artistic work-in-progress. Originated in the early 1990's by choreographer and MacArthur "Genius Grant" Fellow Liz Lerman, the Process has been widely embraced by artists, educators, and administrators. It has been applied in such diverse contexts as choreography classes, post-performance discussions, actor/playwright collaborations, curatorial decision-making, and university level curriculum assessment. In addition to reflection on the work at hand, the Critical Response Process affords artists a voice and a degree of control within the critique of their work promoting dialogue with audiences, fellow artists, students, mentors, and other colleagues.

This book, Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process, offers a detailed introduction to the Process, beginning with its three roles and four core steps. With particular emphasis on the role of the facilitator, this illustrated publication offers guidance on how artists and participants can get the most out of the Process and the opportunities it offers to ask question, give answers, and voice opinions. A final chapter discusses adaptations and variations. Charts and annotated sample dialogues demonstrate the inner workings of the Process. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction by Liz Lerman

ch. 1 The Process
ch. 2 The Roles
ch. 3 The Steps
ch. 4 Facilitation Fundamentals
ch. 5 Deepening the Dialogue
ch. 6 Variations
ch. 7 Conclusion
ch. 8 Sample Dialogues
ch. 9 Acknowledgements

Charts
ch. 10 Forming Neutral Questions
ch. 11 The Three Roles
ch. 12 Steps & Sequence
TTR cover image

Modeling Lifelong Learning: Collaborative Teaching across Disciplinary Lines

TTR
Blanchard, Kathryn D.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 4 (2012): 338-354
BL.T4 v.15 no. 4 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Most courses in colleges and universities are taught by only one instructor. This is often necessitated by the financial exigencies of educational institutions, but is also due to an academic tradition in which the ideal is a single expert teaching in a single discipline. The rapidly changing realities of both the higher education and job markets, however, have called the traditional ideal into question. Interdisciplinary collaborative teaching is one way ...
Additional Info:
Most courses in colleges and universities are taught by only one instructor. This is often necessitated by the financial exigencies of educational institutions, but is also due to an academic tradition in which the ideal is a single expert teaching in a single discipline. The rapidly changing realities of both the higher education and job markets, however, have called the traditional ideal into question. Interdisciplinary collaborative teaching is one way to adapt to the needs of twenty-first-century students, by modeling lifelong learning for students and inviting instructors to be more deliberately reflective about disciplinary assumptions, learning styles, and pedagogies.
Cover image

Context and Content in the Preparation of Future Faculty

Book
Border, Laura L. B.
2010
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2335.4.C65 2010
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This edited book series serves as a guide to the study of improved training, employment and administration of graduate and professional student development programs. A new publication that addresses a critical need in higher education. The series is designed to highlight all aspects of professional development of graduate and professional students. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This edited book series serves as a guide to the study of improved training, employment and administration of graduate and professional student development programs. A new publication that addresses a critical need in higher education. The series is designed to highlight all aspects of professional development of graduate and professional students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Introduction

Section 1— How Graduate Students View the Graduate School Experience
ch. 1 Doctoral Students Make Meaning of Their Experience: A Constructivist Inquiry
ch. 2 Instructional Concerns of Kinesiology Basic Instruction Program Graduate Teaching Assistants

Section 2—Educating Graduate Students for Their Roles as College Instructors
ch. 3 A Prep Course for Graduate Teaching Assistants: Building a Community
ch. 4 A Pedagogy Course’s Influence on Graduate Students’ Self-Awareness as Teacher-Scholars

Section 3—The Challenges Involved in the Education of Future Faculty
ch. 5 Student Engagement Challenges in Teaching about Controversial Issues
ch. 6 Students’ Perceptions of Lesson Objectives in Introductory Mathematics Courses Taught by Teaching Assistants
ch. 7 The Effectiveness of Online Case-based Instruction on International Teaching Assistants’ Presentation and Active Listening Strategies

Section 4—Models in Context: Educating Graduate Students for Future Roles as Academics
ch. 8 An Interdisciplinary Approach to Graduate TA Training: A Reflection of Best Practice
ch. 9 One Process, Two Contexts: Collaborating to Design Professional Development for Graduate Student Educators
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Social Media for Academics: A Practical Guide

Book
Diane Rasmussen Neal, ed.
2012
Chandos Publishing, Oxford
HM742.S63 2012
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
No other book exists that assists academics in learning how to use social media to benefit their teaching and research.
 - the editor has an extensive background in social media teaching, consulting, research, and everyday use
 - all the contributors come to the book with a common goal, from various expertise areas and perspectives

This book provides an overview of social media technologies in the context ...
Additional Info:
No other book exists that assists academics in learning how to use social media to benefit their teaching and research.
 - the editor has an extensive background in social media teaching, consulting, research, and everyday use
 - all the contributors come to the book with a common goal, from various expertise areas and perspectives

This book provides an overview of social media technologies in the context of practical implementation for academics, guided by applied research findings, current best practices, and the author’s successful experiences with using social media in academic settings. It also provides academics with sensible and easy strategies for implementing a wide spectrum of social media and related technologies - such as blogs, wikis, Facebook, and various Google tools for professional, teaching, and research endeavours.

Readership: Academics and academic librarians with professional, teaching and research responsibilities in all fields who are interested in learning more about using social media in the context of their careers, will find this book invaluable. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures and tables
Acknowledgements
About the editor
About the contributors
Introduction (Diane Rasmussen Neal)

Part 1 - The Nuts and Bolts of Social Media for Academics
ch. 1 Blogging your academic self: the what, the why and the how long? (Carolyn Hank)
 - Introduction
 - Scholars in the blogosphere
 - Motivations and benefits
 - Blog publishing: getting started … or getting more
 - Your blog today? Tomorrow?
 - Conclusions
 - Notes
 - References

ch. 2 Non-academic and academic social networking sites for online scholarly communities (Anatolly Gruzd)
 - Introduction
 - General public platforms for online scholarly communities
 - Academic sites for online scholarly communities
 - Conclusions
 - Acknowledgements
 - References

ch. 3 Research and teaching in real time: 24/7 collaborative networks (Anabel Quan-Haase)
 - Real-time technologies for academics
 - The concept of real time
 - Real-time technologies and research
 - Real-time technologies and teaching
 - Choosing a real-time technology
 - Conclusions
 - Acknowledgements
 - Notes
 - References

ch. 4 Locating scholarly papers of interest online
 - Introduction (Maureen Henninger)
 - Overview of online scholarly search services
 - Scholarly communication and social media
 - Use and purpose of scholarly search services
 - Impact of the Open Access movement
 - Search engine functionality
 - Social media and public scholarly search
 - Conclusions
 - Notes
 - References
 - Appendix: features of web-based public scholarly search services

ch. 5 Tracking references with social media tools: organizing what you’ve read or want to read (Jackie Krause)
 - Introduction
 - Why use online social bibliographic tools?
 - A look at top social bibliographic tools: Zotero, Mendeley, CiteULike and Connotea
 - How these tools can improve your research, writing and collaboration
 - How to choose the right tool for your needs
 - Conclusions
 - References

ch. 6 Pragmatics of Twitter use for academics: tweeting in and out of the classroom (Lynne Y. Williams, and Jackie Krause)
 - What is Twitter? An introduction
 - How can Twitter be used by academics?
 - How to get started
 - Research
 - Teaching
 - Professional branding
 - ‘In the field’: academics using Twitter
 - Using Twitter to encourage professional engagement, connection and collaboration
 - Is tweeting for you?
 - References

ch. 7 The academy goes mobile: an overview of mobile applications in higher education (Adam Craig)
 - Introduction
 - Leveraging the backchannel and immediate collaboration
 - QR codes: creating linkages to online content in physical space
 - Treading lightly in uncharted territory
 - References

Part 2 - Putting Social Media Into Practice
ch. 8 Incorporating web-based engagement and participatory interaction into your courses (Jaruee Henninger, and Diane Rasmussen Neal)
 - Online engagement and interaction: what does it mean?
 - Choose the right tools for the job
 - Social networking services in the classroom: a case study
 - Wikis in the classroom
 - Tools for virtual conferences: a case study
 - Conclusions
 - Notes
 - References

ch. 9 When good research goes viral! Getting your work noticed online (Diane Rasmussem Neal)
 - Introduction
 - Social networking: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, and so on
 - Google, you and ‘the filter bubble’
 - Official university pages: viral is not always better
 - Conclusions
 - References

ch. 10 Who is the ‘virtual’ you and do you know who’s watching you? (Lynne Y. Williams)
 - Awareness of data privacy, digital footprints, maintaining separate work and personal online identities, and other types of identity concerns
 - What is an online identity?
 - What is privacy?
 - Data privacy and the ‘virtual’ you
 - Tracking your digital footprints
 - Keeping your work ‘you’ and your personal ‘you’ apart
 - What should you know in order to adequately protect all of your ‘you’s?
 - References

ch. 11 Social media for academic libraries
 - Introduction (David J. Flander)
 - Overview of social media types and sites
 - Creating a Facebook page
 - Promoting and managing the library’s Facebook page
 - Social media policies and procedures
 - Community acceptable behaviour policies
 - Monitoring and interacting with your users
 - Users must have persistent identifiers
 - Identifying and stopping bad behaviour
 - Conclusions
 - Note
 - References

ch. 12 Learning social media: student and instructor perspectives (Robert Foster, and Diane Rasmussen Neal)
 - Introduction
 - Designing and delivering a class in social media
 - The students’ motivations and expectations for the course
 - The instructor’s expectations
 - Students’ views about the course
 - Students’ take-aways from the course
 - The instructor’s take-aways from the course
 - Conclusions from the student
 - Conclusions from the instructor
 - References

Index
Cover image

Managing Online Instructor Workload: Strategies for Finding Balance and Success

Book
Conceição, Simone C. O., and Lehman, Rosemary M.
2011
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5803.C65 C66 2011
Topics: Online Learning   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A large number of institutions are now providing online programs, requiring instructors to change the way they think about teaching and master a distinct set of workload management skills. The first book to discuss workload management for online instructors, Managing Online Instructor Workload offers practical strategies, advice, and examples for how to prioritize, balance, and manage an online teaching workload. Based on surveys and interviews, the timely and comprehensive insight ...
Additional Info:
A large number of institutions are now providing online programs, requiring instructors to change the way they think about teaching and master a distinct set of workload management skills. The first book to discuss workload management for online instructors, Managing Online Instructor Workload offers practical strategies, advice, and examples for how to prioritize, balance, and manage an online teaching workload. Based on surveys and interviews, the timely and comprehensive insight in this book is essential for online instructors, instructional designers, faculty developers and others involved in online learning.

Table Of Content:
List of Tables
Preface
About the Authors

ch. 1 Issues and Challenges When Teaching Online
Institutional Issues and Challenges
Instructional Issues and Challenges
Our Study on Instructor Workload When Teaching Online
Summary

ch. 2 Instructors' Stories for Balancing Workload
Co-Teaching as a Strategy for Balancing Workload
Planning Ahead as a Way to Predict Workload
Giving Individual Feedback as a Workload Management Strategy
Managing Time, Rather Than Time Managing You
Blocking Out Time for the Online Course
Teaching Online During Short Terms
Using Time Allocation Strategies When Teaching for Multiple Institutions
Teaching Online Exclusively from Home
Managing Workload Based on Years of Experience
Teaching Online for a Variety of Institutions
Cohort Program as a Time-Saver
Managing Similar Tasks When Designing for Multiple Courses
Teaching a Recurring Mixed-Mode Online Course
Managing Workload When Current Information Drives Content
Summary

ch. 3 Looking at Workload from a Design Perspective
Identifying Course Tasks
Why It Is Important to Use an Instructional Design Process
Design Framework for Creating a Sense of Presence
Using a Template to Manage Tasks and Prioritize Time
Summary

ch. 4 Managing Tasks and Prioritizing Time
Creating a New Online Course
Converting a Face-to-Face Course
Revising an Existing Online Course
Summary

ch. 5 Using Workload Strategies for Maintaining Quality of Life
Design Strategies
Support Strategies
Teaching Strategies
Time Allocation Strategies
Summary

ch. 6 Final Thoughts and Practical Implications for Balancing Workload
Teaching from an Open Perspective
Adapting the Course Design
Modifying Workload Strategies
Rethinking How to Prioritize Time and Manage Workload
Practical Implications for Balancing Workload

Glossary
References
Index
TTR cover image

From Crawfordsville to Saint Paul: Promoting Reflections on Teaching and Learning as Part of a Seminary’s Institutional Culture

TTR
Hess, Mary, Lose, David J., and Skinner, Matthew
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 178-179
BL41.T4
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Getting Mentored in Graduate School

Book
Johnson, W. Brad, and Huwe, Jennifer M.
2002
American Psychological Association, Washington, DC
LB2371.J62 2003
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Getting Mentored in Graduate School is the first guide to mentoring relationships written exclusively for graduate students. Research has shown that students who are mentored enjoy many benefits, including better training, greater career success, and a stronger professional identity. Authors Johnson and Huwe draw directly from their own experiences as mentor and protégé to advise students on finding a mentor and maintaining the mentor relationship throughout graduate school.
<...
Additional Info:
Getting Mentored in Graduate School is the first guide to mentoring relationships written exclusively for graduate students. Research has shown that students who are mentored enjoy many benefits, including better training, greater career success, and a stronger professional identity. Authors Johnson and Huwe draw directly from their own experiences as mentor and protégé to advise students on finding a mentor and maintaining the mentor relationship throughout graduate school.

Conversational, accessible, and informative, this book offers practical strategies that can be employed not only by students pursuing mentorships but also by professors seeking to improve their mentoring skills. Johnson and Huwe arm readers with the tools they need to anticipate and prevent common pitfalls and to resolve problems that may arise in mentoring relationships.

This book is essential reading for students who want to learn and master the unwritten rules that lead to finding a mentor and getting more from graduate school and your career. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

I. About Mentoring
ch. 1 What Mentoring Is
ch. 2 What a Mentor Can Do For You
ch. 3 Who Gets Mentored and Why

II. How to Find a Mentor
ch. 4 What to Look For in a Mentor
ch. 5 The Intentional Protégé: Initiating a Mentor Relationship

III. How to Manage the Mentor Relationship
ch. 6 Designing the Mentor Relationship
ch. 7 The Stages of Mentor Relationships (What to Expect)
ch. 8 Potential Problems (and How to Handle Them)
ch. 9 On Being an Excellent Protégé
ch. 10 Mentoring for Women and Minorities
ch. 11 Some Additional Ways to Get Mentored

References
Index
About the Authors
Cover image

The Elements of Mentoring, Revised Edition

Book
Johnson, W. Brad, and Ridley, Charles R.
2009
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
HF5385.J64 2008
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Patterned after Strunk and White's classic The Elements of Style, this new edition concisely summarizes the substantial existing research on the art and science of mentoring. The Elements of Mentoring reduces this wealth of published material on the topic to the sixty-five most important and pithy truths for supervisors in all fields. These explore what excellent mentors do, what makes an excellent mentor, how to set up a successful mentor-proté...
Additional Info:
Patterned after Strunk and White's classic The Elements of Style, this new edition concisely summarizes the substantial existing research on the art and science of mentoring. The Elements of Mentoring reduces this wealth of published material on the topic to the sixty-five most important and pithy truths for supervisors in all fields. These explore what excellent mentors do, what makes an excellent mentor, how to set up a successful mentor-protégé relationship, how to work through problems that develop between mentor and protégé, what it means to mentor with integrity, and how to end the relationship when it has run its course. Succinct and comprehensive, this is a must-have for any mentor or mentor-to-be. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
What Excellent Mentors Do: Matters of Skill
ch. 1 Select Your Protégés Carefully
ch. 2 Know Your Protégés
ch. 3 Expect Excellence (and Nothing Else) ch. 4 Affirm, Affirm, Affirm, and Then Affirm Some More
ch. 5 Provide Sponsorship
ch. 6 Be a Teacher and a Coach
ch. 7 Encourage and Support
ch. 8 Offer Counsel in Difficult Times
ch. 9 Protect When Necessary
ch. 10 Stimulate Growth with Challenging Assignments
ch. 11 Give Protégés Exposure and Promote Their Visibility
ch. 12 Nurture Creativity
ch. 13 Provide Correction -- Even When Painful
ch. 14 Narrate Growth and Development
ch. 15 Self-Disclose When Appropriate
ch. 16 Accept Increasing Friendship and Mutuality
ch. 17 Teach Faceting ch. 18 Be an Intentional Model
ch. 19 Display Dependability

Traits of Excellent Mentors: Matters of Style and Personality
ch. 20 Exude Warmth
ch. 21 Listen Actively
ch. 22 Show Unconditional Regard
ch. 23 Tolerate Idealization
ch. 24 Embrace Humor
ch. 25 Do Not Expect Perfection
ch. 26 Attend to Interpersonal Cues
ch. 27 Be Trustworthy
ch. 28 Respect Values
ch. 29 Do Not Stoop to Jealousy

Arranging the Mentor Protégé Relationship: Matters of Beginning
ch. 30 Carefully Consider the "Match"
ch. 31 Clarify Expectations
ch. 32 Define Relationship Boundaries
ch. 33 Consider Protégé Relationship Style
ch. 34 Describe Potential Benefits and Risks
ch. 35 Be Sensitive to Gender
ch. 36 Be Sensitive to Race and Ethnicity
ch. 37 Plan for Change at the Outset
ch. 38 Schedule Periodic Review or Evaluations

Knowing Thyself as a Mentor: Matters of Integrity
ch. 39 Consider the Consequences of Being a Mentor
ch. 40 Practice Self-Care
ch. 41 Be Productive
ch. 42 Make Sure You Are Competent
ch. 43 Hold Yourself Accountable
ch. 44 Respect the Power of Attraction
ch. 45 Accept the Burden of Power
ch. 46 Practice Humility
ch. 47 Never Exploit Protégés
ch. 48 Above All, Do No Harm
ch. 49 Slow Down the Process
ch. 50 Tell the Truth
ch. 51 Seek Consultation
ch. 52 Document Carefully
ch. 53 Dispute Your Irrational Thinking

Welcoming Change and Saying Goodbye: Matters of Closure
ch. 54 Welcome Change and Growth
ch. 55 Accept Endings
ch. 56 Find Helpful Ways to Say Goodbye
ch. 57 Mentor as a Way of Life

References
Index
Cover image

On Being a Mentor: A Guide for Higher Education

Book
Johnson, W. Brad
2007
Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ
LB1731.4.J64 2007
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
On Being a Mentor is the definitive guide for faculty in higher education who wish to mentor both students and junior faculty. It features strategies, guidelines, best practices, and recommendations for professors who wish to excel in this area. Written in a pithy style, this no-nonsense guide offers straightforward advice about managing problem mentorships and measuring mentorship outcomes. Practical cases studies, vignettes, and step-by-step guidelines illuminate the process of mentoring ...
Additional Info:
On Being a Mentor is the definitive guide for faculty in higher education who wish to mentor both students and junior faculty. It features strategies, guidelines, best practices, and recommendations for professors who wish to excel in this area. Written in a pithy style, this no-nonsense guide offers straightforward advice about managing problem mentorships and measuring mentorship outcomes. Practical cases studies, vignettes, and step-by-step guidelines illuminate the process of mentoring throughout.

Other outstanding features include:
*research-based advice on the rules of engagement for mentoring, mentor functions, qualities of good mentors, and methods for forming and managing student-faculty relationships;
*summaries of the common mentoring relationship phases and guidance for adhering to ethical principles when serving as a mentor;
*guidance about mentoring specific populations, including undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and protégés who differ from the mentor in terms of sex and race; and
*recommendations for department chairs and deans on how to foster an academic culture of mentoring.

On Being a Mentor is intended for professors, department chairs, and deans in a variety of educational settings, including colleges, universities, and medical and law schools and is suitable for professors in all fields of study including the sciences, humanities, psychology, education, and management. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part I: On Mentoring
ch. 1 Why Mentoring Matters
ch. 2 The Contours of Mentoring
ch. 3 Mentoring in Academic: A Glimpse Inside

Part II: On Being a Mentor
ch. 4 What Mentors Do: Mentoring Functions
ch. 5 Who Mentors Are: Mentorship-Facilitating Characteristics and Qualities
ch. 6 Designing a Mentorship
ch. 7 The Seasons of Mentorship: Common Relationship Phases
ch. 8 The Ethical Mentor: Doing No Harm

Part III: On Mentoring Specific Groups
ch. 9 Mentoring Undergraduates
ch. 10 Mentoring Graduate Students
ch. 11 Mentoring Junior Faculty
ch. 12 Mentoring Across Sex
ch. 13 Mentoring Across Race

Part IV: Managing Mentorship
ch. 14 Diagnosis and Treatment of Mentorship Dysfunction
ch. 15 Assessing Mentoring Outcomes
ch. 16 Recommendations for Department Chairs and Deans

References
Author of Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Evaluating Teaching and Learning: A practical handbook for colleges, universities and the scholarship of teaching

Book
Kember, David, and Ginns, Paul
2011
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2331.K386 2012
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Every semester, colleges and universities ask students to complete innumerable course and teaching evaluation questionnaires to evaluate the learning and teaching in courses they have taken. For many universities it is a requirement that all courses be evaluated every semester. The laudable rationale is that the feedback provided will enable instructors to improve their teaching and the curriculum, thus enhancing the quality of student learning.

In spite of ...
Additional Info:
Every semester, colleges and universities ask students to complete innumerable course and teaching evaluation questionnaires to evaluate the learning and teaching in courses they have taken. For many universities it is a requirement that all courses be evaluated every semester. The laudable rationale is that the feedback provided will enable instructors to improve their teaching and the curriculum, thus enhancing the quality of student learning.

In spite of this there is little evidence that it does improve the quality of teaching and learning. Ratings only improve if the instruments and the presentation of results are sufficiently diagnostic to identify potential improvements and there is effective counselling. Evaluating Teaching and Learning explains how evaluation can be more effective in enhancing the quality of teaching and learning and introduces broader and more diverse forms of evaluation.

This guide explains how to develop questionnaires and protocols which are valid, reliabile and diagnostic. It also contains proven instruments that have undergone appropriate testing procedures, together with a substantial item bank. The book looks at the specific national frameworks for the evaluation of teaching in use in the USA, UK and Australia.

It caters for diverse methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative and offers solutions that allow evaluation at a wide range of levels: from classrooms to programmes to departments and entire institutions. With detail on all aspects of the main evaluation techniques and instruments, the authors show how effective evaluation can make use of a variety of approaches and combine them into an effective project.

With a companion website which has listings of the questionnaires and item bank, this book will be of interest to those concerned with organising and conducting evaluation in a college, university, faculty or department. It will also appeal to those engaged in the scholarship of teaching and learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Evaluation Principles
ch. 2 Questionnaire design
ch. 3 Questionnaires
ch. 4 Item Bank
ch. 5 Collecting and Processing Questionnaire Data
ch. 6 Collection of Qualitative Data
ch. 7 Analysis of Qualitative Data
ch. 8 Observation
ch. 9 Use of Assessment for Evaluation
ch. 10 Using Evaluation Data for the Scholarship of Teaching
ch. 11 International Perspectives on Teaching Evaluation
ch. 12 Institutional Use of Teaching Evaluation Data
ch. 13 Conclusion
Cover image

Mapping the Range of Graduate Student Professional Development: Studies in Graduate and Professional Student Development, Number 14

Book
Laura L. B. Border
2011
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2371.M37 2011
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This edited book series serves as a guide to the study of improved training, employment and administration of graduate and professional student development programs. A new publication that addresses a critical need in higher education. The series is designed to highlight all aspects of professional development of graduate and professional students. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This edited book series serves as a guide to the study of improved training, employment and administration of graduate and professional student development programs. A new publication that addresses a critical need in higher education. The series is designed to highlight all aspects of professional development of graduate and professional students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
  
Section 1: Taxonomy of TA Training Programs
ch 1 Graduate Student Professional Development: A Decade after Calls for National Reform

Section 2: Orientations
ch. 2 An Introductory Classification of Graduate Teaching Assistant Orientations

Section 3: Mentor and Lead TA Programs
ch. 3 Assessing Graduate Consultant Programs: Directors’ Perceptions of Rationales, Content, Activities, and Benefits
ch. 4 Teaching Mentorship Programs for Graduate Student Development

Section 4: Teaching Courses
ch. 5 Graduate and Professional Student Development: The Role of the Pedagogy Course
ch. 6 Rethinking Courses in College Pedagogy for the Sciences: An Analysis and Subsequent Model

Section 5: Teaching Certificates
ch. 7 Graduate Student Teaching Certificates: Survey of Current Programs
ch. 8 Leveraging Existing PFF Resources to Create a Certificate of University Teaching

Section 6: Other Programming
ch. 9 A Comparative Study of GTA Development in Japan and the US

Section 7: Conclusion
ch. 10 Steps Toward a Framework for an Intended Curriculum for Graduate and Professional Students: How We Talk about What We Do
Cover image

We're Losing Our Minds: Rethinking American Higher Education

Book
Keeling, Richard P., and Hersh, Richard H.
2012
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LA227.4.K435 2011
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
America is being held back by the quality and quantity of learning in college. This is a true educational emergency! Many college graduates cannot think critically, write effectively, solve problems, understand complex issues, or meet employers' expectations. We are losing our minds—and endangering our social, economic, and scientific leadership. Critics say higher education costs too much and should be more efficient. But the real problem is value, not cost; ...
Additional Info:
America is being held back by the quality and quantity of learning in college. This is a true educational emergency! Many college graduates cannot think critically, write effectively, solve problems, understand complex issues, or meet employers' expectations. We are losing our minds—and endangering our social, economic, and scientific leadership. Critics say higher education costs too much and should be more efficient. But the real problem is value, not cost; financial 'solutions' alone won't work. In this book, Keeling and Hersh argue that the only solution - making learning the highest priority in college - demands fundamental change throughout higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements

ch.1 Higher Education Without Higher Learning
ch. 2 Judging College Quality
ch. 3 The Developmental Basis of Higher Learning
ch. 4 The Neuroscience of Learning
ch. 5 Assessment for Higher Learning
ch. 6 More is Not Better, Better is More: A Framework for Rethinking American Higher Education
ch. 7 Talk of Change is Not Change: Rethinking American Higher Education

Notes
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Working Theories for Teaching Assistant Development

Book
Gorsuch, Greta
2012
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2335.4.W67 2012
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This extensive, edited volume showcases established and emerging scholars in the field of Teaching Assistant (TA) and International Teaching Assistant (ITA) education. Working Theories goes beyond reporting good practices or program descriptions, which typically comprises many books on TA and ITA development.  Instead, Working Theories places time-tested, robust theories, frameworks, and models of TA and ITA learning and development at the center of graduate student education by providing a scholarly ...
Additional Info:
This extensive, edited volume showcases established and emerging scholars in the field of Teaching Assistant (TA) and International Teaching Assistant (ITA) education. Working Theories goes beyond reporting good practices or program descriptions, which typically comprises many books on TA and ITA development.  Instead, Working Theories places time-tested, robust theories, frameworks, and models of TA and ITA learning and development at the center of graduate student education by providing a scholarly venue for description, explication, and application of these theories. In turn, these theories and models from psychology, sociology, pedagogy, discourse analysis, and second language learning will be presented in such as way as to inform good practice, but above all, motivate future research. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Organization of the Volume

Part One - Chapters Focusing on Teaching Assistants in General
ch. 1 Scalable Design Principles for TA Development: Lessons from Research, Theory and Experience
ch. 2 The Role of Theory in TA and ITA Research
ch. 3 Feedback about Graduate Teaching Assistants’ Pedagogical Practices: Content Validation of a Survey Informed from Principles of the “How People Learn” Framework
ch. 4 A Theoretical and Empirical Basis for Studying Student-Instructor Relationships
ch. 5 Teaching Assistant Development Through a Fresh Lens: A Self-determination Framework
ch. 6 Preparing the Future Professoriate in Second Language Acquisition
ch. 7 The Development of Disciplinary Communication Competence Among Teaching Assistants: A Research Agenda
ch. 8 Using Grounded Theory to Develop Emergent Explanations on how Second and Foreign Language TAs Construct Their Teacher Theory
ch. 9 Conceptualizing Graduate Teaching Assistant Development Through Stages of Concern
ch. 10 Appropriating Conceptual and Pedagogical Tools of Literacy
ch. 11 Does Instruction Make a Difference? Concept Development in Applied Linguistics M.A. Students

Part Two - Articles Focusing More Exclusively on International Teaching Assistants
ch. 12 Rapport Management of International Teaching Assistants in Their Teaching
ch. 13 A Microethnographic Case Study of Fulbright Language Teaching Assistants
ch. 14 The Roles of Teacher Theory and Domain Theory in Materials and Research in International Teaching Assistant Education
ch. 15 The Instructional Discourse of Domestic and International Teaching Assistants
ch. 16 Written English into Spoken: A Functional Discourse Analysis of American, Indian, and Chinese TA Presentations
ch. 17 The Washback of a Task-based Test of Spoken Language on the Development of ITAs Strategic Compentence
ch. 18 Chinese International Teaching Assistants and the Essence of Intercultural Competence in University Contexts
ch. 19 Learning to Make Suggestions in a Chemistry Lab
ch. 20 Conversation Analysis of the Classroom Communication of a Math ITA
Article cover image

The Development of Graduate Students as Teaching Scholars: A Four-Year Longitudinal Study

Article
Nyquist, Jody D.; Austin, Ann E.; Sprague, Jo; Wulff, Donald H.; Woodford, Bettina; Fraser, Patricia; and Calcagno, Claire
1999
Interim Report August 31, 1999, Research Supported by the Spencer Foundation
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Servant Leadership for Higher Education: Principles and Practices

Book
Wheeler, Daniel W.
2012
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco
LB2341.W464 2012
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
If higher education is to fulfill its mission, the academy must continue to emphasize the ideals of thought, reflection, and development as well as action. This book stresses the importance of understanding that service is a pre-requisite to leadership. This practical book contains leadership principles and strategies and is based on research and best practice. The book is organized around ten principles of servant leadership and how these principles apply ...
Additional Info:
If higher education is to fulfill its mission, the academy must continue to emphasize the ideals of thought, reflection, and development as well as action. This book stresses the importance of understanding that service is a pre-requisite to leadership. This practical book contains leadership principles and strategies and is based on research and best practice. The book is organized around ten principles of servant leadership and how these principles apply to common issues faced in departments and institutions of higher education. The situations addressed are representative so that it is easy to see how the principles apply to other concerns or issues. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Unsuccessful Leadership Models
ch. 2 Servant Leadership: A Philosophy of Living
ch. 3 Servant Leadership Principles
ch. 4 Principle One: Service to Others Is the Highest Priority
ch. 5 Principle Two: Facilitate Meeting the Needs of Others
ch. 6 Principle Three: Foster Problem Solving and Taking Responsibility at All Levels
ch. 7 Principle Four: Promote Emotional Healing in People and the Organization
ch. 8 Principle Five: Means Are as Important as Ends
ch. 9 Principle Six: Keep One Eye on the Present and One on the Future
ch. 10 Principle Seven: Embrace Paradoxes and Dilemmas
ch. 11 Principle Eight: Leave a Legacy to Society
ch. 12 Principle Nine: Model Servant Leadership
ch. 13 Principle Ten: Develop More Servant Leaders
ch. 14 Care and Feeding of Servant Leaders
ch. 15 Some Common Questions (Myths) Regarding Servant Leadership

Epilogue
References
The Author
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Learning Paradigm College

Book
Tagg, John; and Ewell, Peter T.
2003
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.T24 2003
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In The Learning Paradigm College, John Tagg builds on the ground-breaking Change magazine article he coauthored with Robert Barr in 1995, “From Teaching to Learning; A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education.” That piece defined a paradigm shift happening in American higher education, placing more importance on learning outcomes and less on the quantity of instruction. As Tagg defines it, “Where the Instruction Paradigm highlights formal processes, the Learning Paradigm emphasizes results ...
Additional Info:
In The Learning Paradigm College, John Tagg builds on the ground-breaking Change magazine article he coauthored with Robert Barr in 1995, “From Teaching to Learning; A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education.” That piece defined a paradigm shift happening in American higher education, placing more importance on learning outcomes and less on the quantity of instruction. As Tagg defines it, “Where the Instruction Paradigm highlights formal processes, the Learning Paradigm emphasizes results or outcomes. Where the Instruction Paradigm attends to classes, the Learning Paradigm attends to students.” (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Dedication
About the Author
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I. A New Paradigm?
ch. 1 The Challenge
ch. 2 The Problem of Scale: Why Innovations Don’t Transform Colleges
ch. 3 The Instruction Paradigm: Process Before Purpose
ch. 4 The Route to Transformation: The Learning Paradigm, Old and New

Part II. The Foundation: The Learners and the Learning
ch. 5 The Learners
ch. 6 Self-Theories and Academic Motivation
ch. 7 Approaches to Learning

Part III. The Learning Environment of the College
ch. 8 The Whole That Determines the Parts
ch. 9 The Cognitive Economy of the Instruction Paradigm College

Part IV. A Design for Learning
ch. 10 The Cognitive Economy of the Learning Paradigm College
ch. 11 A Learning Paradigm College Promotes Intrinsically Rewarding Goals
ch. 12 A Learning Paradigm College Requires Frequent, Continual, Connected, and Authentic Student Performances
ch. 13 A Learning Paradigm College Provides Consistent, Continual, Interactive Feedback to Students
ch. 14 A Learning Paradigm College Provides a Long Time Horizon for Learning
ch. 15 A Learning Paradigm College Creates Purposeful Communities of Practice
ch. 16 A Learning Paradigm College Aligns All of Its Activities Around the Mission of Producing Student Learning

Part V. Transforming the College
ch. 17 Barriers to Transformation
ch. 18 Scaffolding for Change
ch. 19 The Golden Rule

References
Index
Cover image

Using Network and Mobile Technology to Bridge Formal and Informal Learning

Book
Trentin, Guglielmo; and Repetto, Manuela, eds.
2013
Chandos Publishing, Oxford
LB1028.5.U85 2013
Topics: Online Learning   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
- includes a framework for the sustainability of new educational paradigms based on the combination of formal and informal learning processes supported by network and mobile technology (NMT)
 - provides a series of recommendations on how to use attitudes towards NMT gained outside the school to integrate formal and informal learning
 - gives a teacher training approach on how to use network and mobile technology-based informal learning to enhance ...
Additional Info:
- includes a framework for the sustainability of new educational paradigms based on the combination of formal and informal learning processes supported by network and mobile technology (NMT)
 - provides a series of recommendations on how to use attitudes towards NMT gained outside the school to integrate formal and informal learning
 - gives a teacher training approach on how to use network and mobile technology-based informal learning to enhance formal learning pathways

An ever-widening gap exists between how students and schools use communication technology. Using Network and Mobile Technology to Bridge Formal and Informal Learning introduces new methods (inspired by ‘pedagogy 2.0’) of harnessing the potential of communication technologies for teaching and learning. This book considers how attitudes towards network and mobile technology (NMT) gained outside the school can be shunted into new educational paradigms combining formal and informal learning processes. It begins with an overview of these paradigms, and their sustainability. It then considers the pedagogical dimension of formal/informal integration through NMT, moving on to teachers’ professional development. Next, the organizational development of schools in the context of formal and informal learning is detailed. Finally, the book covers the role of technologies supporting formal/informal integration into subject-oriented education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures and tables
List of abbreviations
Preface
About the contributors

ch. 1 Tapping the motivational potential of mobile handhelds: defining the research agenda (Cathy Tran, Mark Warschauer, and AnneMarie M. Conley)
 - Introduction
 - Educational technology and motivation: past, present and future
 - Proposed research strands for motivation and mobile handheld technology
 - Methodological considerations for research in mobile learning and motivation
 - Conclusion
 - Acknowledgments
 - References

ch. 2 Using social network sites and mobile technology to scaffold equity of access to cultural resources (John Cook, Norbert Pachler, and Ben Bachmair)
 - Introduction
 - Resources for learning: self-representation and writing in a school context
 - Key concepts
 - Using NMT for bridging social capital
 - Conclusions
 - Notes
 - Bibliography (John Cook, Norbert Pachler, Ben Bachmair)

ch. 3 A mobile Web 2.0 framework: reconceptualising teaching and learning (Thomas Cochrane, and Roger Bateman)
 - Introduction
 - Background
 - Mobile Web 2.0 design framework: some examples of use
 - Mobile Web 2.0 framework: key aspects
 - Discussion
 - Conclusion
 - Bibliography

ch. 4 Facing up to it: blending formal and informal learning opportunities in higher education contexts (Julie Willems, and Debra Bateman)
 - Introduction
 - The blurring of formal and informal learning
 - A new model for the knowledge economy
 - Methodology
 - Discussion
 - Conclusionv  - Bibliography

ch. 5 Networked lives for learning: digital media and young people across formal and informal contexts (Solveig Roth, and Ola Erstad)
 - Introduction
 - Networked lives
 - Learning lives
 - Methodology and research context
 - Three portraits
 - Interpretation of the portraits
 - Conclusion
 - Note
 - Bibliography

ch. 6 Network and mobile technologies in education: a call for e-teachers (Guglielmo Trentin)
 - Introduction
 - The key issues
 - From teacher to e-teacher
 - E-teacher education and professional development
 - Some conclusive reflections on e-teacher status
 - Note
 - Bibliography

ch. 7 Networked informal learning and continuing teacher education (Manuela Repetto)
 - Introduction
 - The Aladin project: general approach and activities
 - The Aladin project: results and attestations
 - Conclusion
 - Note
 - Bibliography

ch. 8 A conclusive thought: the opportunity to change education is, l