Balancing Teaching and Research

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Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate

Book
Boyer, Ernest
1990
The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, Princeton, NJ
LA227.3.B694 1990
Topics: Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
Ernest L. Boyer's Scholarship Reconsidered offers a new paradigm that recognizes the full range of scholarly activity by college and university faculty and questions the existence of a reward system that pushed faculty toward research and publication and away from teaching. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Ernest L. Boyer's Scholarship Reconsidered offers a new paradigm that recognizes the full range of scholarly activity by college and university faculty and questions the existence of a reward system that pushed faculty toward research and publication and away from teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Preface
ch. 1 Scholarship over Time.
ch. 2 Enlarging the Perspective.
ch. 3 The Faculty: A Mosaic of Talent.
ch. 4 The Creativity Contract.
ch. 5 The Campuses: Diversity with Dignity.
ch. 6 A New Generation of Scholars.
ch. 7 Scholarship and Community.
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Scholarship Assessed: Evaluation of the Professoriate

Book
Glassick, Charles E., Mary Taylor Huber, Gene I. Maeroff
1997
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.G63 1997
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
Begun under the oversight of Ernest L. Boyer and completed by authors Glassick, Huber, and Maeroff, Scholarship Assessed examines the changing nature of scholarship in today's colleges and universities. It proposes new standards for assessing scholarship and evaluating faculty with special emphasis on methods for documenting effective scholarship. Based on the findings of the Carnegie Foundation's National Survey on the Reexamination of Faculty Roles and Rewards, this is an excellent ...
Additional Info:
Begun under the oversight of Ernest L. Boyer and completed by authors Glassick, Huber, and Maeroff, Scholarship Assessed examines the changing nature of scholarship in today's colleges and universities. It proposes new standards for assessing scholarship and evaluating faculty with special emphasis on methods for documenting effective scholarship. Based on the findings of the Carnegie Foundation's National Survey on the Reexamination of Faculty Roles and Rewards, this is an excellent resource for anyone engaged in the debate about creating institutional standards of rigor and quality in our colleges and universities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Authors
Prologue: Scholarship - A Personal Journey
ch. 1 Scholarship in Transition
ch. 2 Standards of Scholarly Work
ch. 3 Documenting Scholarship
ch. 4 Trusting the Process
ch. 5 The Qualities of a Scholar
App. A Questionnaire for the National Survey on the Reexamination of Faculty Roles and Rewards, 1994
App. B Results of the National Survey on the Reexamination of Faculty Roles and Rewards, 1994
App. C Technical Notes
App. D Carnegie Classifications
Notes
Index
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Exploring New Understandings of Theological Scholarship (pdf)

Journal Issue
1995
Theological Education 32, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.32no.1
Topics: Theological Education   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1995-theological-education-v32-n1.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1995-theological-education-v32-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Introduction (James L. Waits)
The Nature and Criteria of Theological Scholarship (Don Browning)
Theological Scholarship as a Form of Church Service (George P. Schner, SJ)
Theological Scholarship from the Perspective of a Catholic Woman (Ellen M. Leonard)
Theological Research and Scholarship as a Service of Faith: A Roman Catholic Perspective (Peter C. Phan)
Multicultural and Global Theological Scholarship: An Asian American Perspective (Jung Young Lee)
The Nature and Criteria of Theological Scholarship: An Evangelical Critique and Plan (Walter C. Kaiser Jr.)
An African American Perspective on the Nature and Criteria of Theological Scholarship (Preston N. Williams)
Cultivating Theological Scholarship (Rebecca S. Chopp
A Brief Response, Don Browning)
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Recognizing Faculty Work: Reward Systems for the Year 2000

Book
Diamond, Robert M. and Bronwyn E. Adam, eds.
1993
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.72.R42 1993
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This volume is structured to provide practical assistance to those engaged in the review of faculty reward systems on their campuses and to provide guidelines to academic administrators, deans, and chairs who are leading these efforts. Chapters have been designed to address major issues relating to promotion, tenure, and merit pay. The different ways in which campuses have approached the process of clarifying their missions and modifying their faculty reward ...
Additional Info:
This volume is structured to provide practical assistance to those engaged in the review of faculty reward systems on their campuses and to provide guidelines to academic administrators, deans, and chairs who are leading these efforts. Chapters have been designed to address major issues relating to promotion, tenure, and merit pay. The different ways in which campuses have approached the process of clarifying their missions and modifying their faculty reward structures are illustrated. Reference materials from scholarly associations and accreditation agencies are included to demonstrate disciplinary perspectives. A model for change is presented along with criteria for assessing a promotion and tenure system. A professional portfolio to document the work of faculty is also described. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes
ch. 1 Changing Priorities and the Faculty Reward System (Robert M. Diamond)
ch. 2 Instituting Change in the Faculty Reward System (Robert M. Diamond)
ch. 3 Differences Among the Disciplines (Bronwyn E. Adam, Alton O. Roberts)
ch. 4 Institutional Approaches to the Issues of Reward and Scholarship (Alton O. Roberts, Jon F. Wergin, Bronwyn E. Adam)
ch. 5 Revitalizing Faculty Work Through Intrinsic Rewards (Robert C. Froh, Robert J. Menges, Charles J. Walker)
ch. 6 Representing Faculty Work: The Professional Portfolio (Robert C. Froh, Peter J. Gray, Leo M. Lambert)
Appendix: Departmental Statements on Faculty Rewards
Index
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"Teaching vs. Research: No Simple Debate"

Article
Johnston, Timothy D.
1994
Academic Leader 10, no. 1 (1994): 3-4
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
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"Rethinking What It Means to be a Scholar"

Article
Rice, R. Eugene
1990
Teaching Excellence 1, no. 8 (1990)
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
Academia is one of the professions in which socially constructed fictions have tremendous power. Years of graduate study and the power of academic mentors creates an environment which deeply socializes future academics. The image of the academic professional which is currently promulgated emerged during the expansionist (post-World War II) period of higher education. In this conception, the scholar is seen primarily as a researcher pursuing knowledge for its own sake. ...
Additional Info:
Academia is one of the professions in which socially constructed fictions have tremendous power. Years of graduate study and the power of academic mentors creates an environment which deeply socializes future academics. The image of the academic professional which is currently promulgated emerged during the expansionist (post-World War II) period of higher education. In this conception, the scholar is seen primarily as a researcher pursuing knowledge for its own sake. The teaching role has been given much less emphasis. During this same expansionist period, higher education began to serve a much broader and more diverse clientele with more varied academic needs. For these two transformations to now become compatible, a broader conception of scholarship is urgently needed. Such a conception would have at least four elements. While new knowledge acquired through reasoning and analytical theory-building is valuable, knowledge gained through experience must also be seen as legitimate. Second, specialized knowledge must be reintegrated. That is, scholars must look for new relationships between the parts and the whole. This synthesis can be achieved through an emphasis on interdisciplinarity. Third, scholarship must begin to address the pragmatic needs of the larger world. The pursuit of knowledge to solve societal problems must be valued as scholarship of the first order. Finally, the scholarship of teaching, in which research is conducted on effective and appropriate teaching methods, must be emphasized for all scholars. Teaching that is not grounded in the most recent research is not appropriate for a college or university setting. A 21-item bibliography is included. (PAA)
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"Integration of Teaching and Research: Myth, Reality, and Possibility"

Article
Weimer, Maryellen
1997
in Universal Challenges in Faculty Work (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997), 53-62
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
The prevailing notion of integration of college teaching and research is more myth than reality. To make the relationship more productive, educators must change the terms, redefine research, and reorient thinking about teaching, understanding that teaching and research are distinct and not automatically linked. Institutions must implement policies reflecting broader definitions of research and more intellectual orientations to teaching.
Additional Info:
The prevailing notion of integration of college teaching and research is more myth than reality. To make the relationship more productive, educators must change the terms, redefine research, and reorient thinking about teaching, understanding that teaching and research are distinct and not automatically linked. Institutions must implement policies reflecting broader definitions of research and more intellectual orientations to teaching.
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"Interconnectedness of Scholarship and Pedagogy"

Article
O'Neill, Maura
1995
Council of Societies for the Study of Religion Bulletin 24, no. 2 (1995): 29-31
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
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The Pleasures of Academe: A Celebration and Defense of Higher Education

Book
Axtell, James
1998
University of Nebraska Books, Lincoln, NE
LA227.4.A98 1998
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
In this book, the distinguished historian James Axtell offers a compelling defense of higher education. Drawing on national statistics, broad-ranging scholarship, and delightful anecdotes, Axtell reminds us of the dedication of professors and the increasing demands placed on them. He describes the professional work cycle, the evolution of scholarship in the past three decades, the importance of "habitual scholarship," and the best ways to judge a university. He discusses, with ...
Additional Info:
In this book, the distinguished historian James Axtell offers a compelling defense of higher education. Drawing on national statistics, broad-ranging scholarship, and delightful anecdotes, Axtell reminds us of the dedication of professors and the increasing demands placed on them. He describes the professional work cycle, the evolution of scholarship in the past three decades, the importance of "habitual scholarship," and the best ways to judge a university. He discusses, with imagination and wit, the many pleasures of academic life, including intercollegiate sports, the "benign pathology" of loving and collecting books, teaching and service outside the classroom, life in college towns, and working vacations. Axtell persuasively confronts the major critics of higher education, arguing that they have perpetuated misunderstandings of tenure, research, teaching, curricular change, and professional politics. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: In Praise of the University
Acknowledgments
Academic

ch. 1 (Mis)Understanding Academic Work
ch. 2 Scholarship Reconsidered
ch. 3 Twenty-five Reasons to Publish
ch. 4 Encountering the Other
ch. 5 What Makes a University Great?
Pleasures
ch. 6 Confessions of a Bibliolater
ch. 7 The Making of a Scholar-Athlete
ch. 8 Between Disciplines
ch. 9 Extracurriculum
ch. 10 College Towns
ch. 11 Academic Vacations

Conclusion: Professors, Critics, and Higher Education
Notes
Index
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Reaffirming Higher Education

Book
Neusner, Jacob and Noam M.M. Neusner
2000
Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick, NJ
LA227.4.N47 1999
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
The American college and university today must assess what difference scholarship makes to teaching and what teaching means to scholarship. Reaffirming Higher Education asks who teaches, what, to whom, and why. The authors maintain that what matters in higher learning is learning, while denying that scholarship detracts from teaching. The authors outline reform and renewal for both the institutional and personal dimensions of higher learning that would encompass the ideal ...
Additional Info:
The American college and university today must assess what difference scholarship makes to teaching and what teaching means to scholarship. Reaffirming Higher Education asks who teaches, what, to whom, and why. The authors maintain that what matters in higher learning is learning, while denying that scholarship detracts from teaching. The authors outline reform and renewal for both the institutional and personal dimensions of higher learning that would encompass the ideal of the academic ethic. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contents
Preface

ch. 1 Who Should Teach in a University?
ch. 2 What Should Universities Teach?
ch. 3 Who Should Go to College?
ch. 4 What is at Stake on Campus?

Epilogue: The Major Matters Most of All
Bibliography
Index
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Getting It Published: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious about Serious Books

Book
Germano, William
2001
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
PN161.G46 2001
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Germano's short volume is filled with useful advice drawn from a career as editor at an academic press (formerly editor-in-chief and humanities editor at Columbia UP, he's now vice president and publishing director at Routledge) and written in an admirably direct style that preserves a personal tone that will appeal to the recent PhD's and new authors who will be his best audience. The gamut of publishing is covered, from ...
Additional Info:
Germano's short volume is filled with useful advice drawn from a career as editor at an academic press (formerly editor-in-chief and humanities editor at Columbia UP, he's now vice president and publishing director at Routledge) and written in an admirably direct style that preserves a personal tone that will appeal to the recent PhD's and new authors who will be his best audience. The gamut of publishing is covered, from basics on publishers and their duties, to the details of writing, editing, and presenting a proposal; surviving the review process; the details of contracts; writing for collections and anthologies; and how to present the finished manuscript. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 What Do Publishers Do?
ch. 3 Writing the Manuscript
ch. 4 Selecting a Publisher
ch. 5 Your Proposal
ch. 6 What Editors Look For
ch. 7 Surviving the Review Process
ch. 8 What a Contract Means
ch. 9 Collections and Anthologies
ch. 10 Quotations, Pictures, and Other Headaches
ch. 11 How to Deliver a Manuscript
ch. 12 And Then What Happens to It
ch. 13 This Book - And the Next
For Further Reading
Index
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The Work of Writing: Insights and Strategies for Academics and Professionals

Book
Rankin, Elizabeth
2001
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
PE1404.R356 2001
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
No matter what the writing assignment -- journal article, executive summary, grant proposal, curriculum guide, or consultant's report -- The Work of Writing will serve as an invaluable aid for faculty and professionals who need to hone their writing skills. In this book, Elizabeth Rankin draws on her years of experience as a leader of academic writing groups and shares a wealth of scenarios from actual writing experiences. These helpful ...
Additional Info:
No matter what the writing assignment -- journal article, executive summary, grant proposal, curriculum guide, or consultant's report -- The Work of Writing will serve as an invaluable aid for faculty and professionals who need to hone their writing skills. In this book, Elizabeth Rankin draws on her years of experience as a leader of academic writing groups and shares a wealth of scenarios from actual writing experiences. These helpful stories speak to complex issues of audience, purpose, genre, and voice that writers routinely address. Using the strategies found in The Work of Writing will make the job of the writer more manageable, more productive, and more rewarding. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Author
ch. 1 The Work of Writing
ch. 2 Contributing to the Professional Conversation
ch. 3 Meeting Readers' Needs and Expectations
ch. 4 Finding Your Professional Voice
ch. 5 Seeing the Project Through
Afterword
App. A: Organizing a Writing Group
App. B: Sample Book Proposal Guidelines
App. C: A Few Good Books on Writingv References
Index
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Scholarship in the Postmodern Era: New Venues, New Values, New Visions

Book
Zahorski, Kenneth J., ed.
2002
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 90)
LA227.4.S364 2002
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A little over a decade ago, Ernest Boyer's Scholarship Reconsidered burst upon the academic scene, igniting a robust national conversation that maintains its vitbaality to this day. This volume aims at advancing that important conversation. Its first section focuses on the new settings and circumstances in which the act of scholarship is being played out; its second identifies and explores the fresh set of values currently informing today's scholarly practices; ...
Additional Info:
A little over a decade ago, Ernest Boyer's Scholarship Reconsidered burst upon the academic scene, igniting a robust national conversation that maintains its vitbaality to this day. This volume aims at advancing that important conversation. Its first section focuses on the new settings and circumstances in which the act of scholarship is being played out; its second identifies and explores the fresh set of values currently informing today's scholarly practices; and its third looks to the future of scholarship, identifying trends, causative factors, and potentialities that promise to shape scholars and their scholarship in the new millennium. One of the greatest legacies of Scholarship Reconsidered is the advocacy of a more holistic and humane approach to promoting, evaluating, and rewarding scholarship. This volume hopes to help nurture that legacy.

This is the 90th volume of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes
ch. 1 Beyond Scholarship Reconsidered: Toward an Enlarged Vision of the Scholarly Work of Faculty Members (R. Eugene Rice)
ch. 2 Transforming the Scholarly Process Through Information Technology (Wallace Hannum)
ch. 3 Nurturing Scholarship Through Holistic Faculty Development: A Synergistic Approach (Kenneth J. Zahorski)
ch. 4 New Conceptions of Scholarship for a New Generation of Faculty Members (Mary Deane Sorcinelli)
ch. 5 Engendering Trust Through Institutional Policies and Practices (Ann F. Lucas)
ch. 6 The Soul of Scholarship (Kina S. Mallard
ch. 7 Defining Scholarship for the Twenty-First Century (Robert M. Diamond)
ch. 8 Student-Faculty Collaborations, Undergraduate Research, and Collaboration as an Administrative Model (Ronald L. Dotterer)
ch. 9 Nurturing an Ethos of Community Engagement (Jerry Berberet)
Index
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Handbook for Academic Authors, Fourth edition

Book
Luey, Beth
2002
Cambridge University Press, New York, NY
PN146.L84 2002
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This new edition of a common-sense guide to all aspects of academic publishing contains an entirely new chapter on writing nonfiction for a general audience. It has been revised and updated throughout to reflect the state of new technologies and their meaning to authors. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This new edition of a common-sense guide to all aspects of academic publishing contains an entirely new chapter on writing nonfiction for a general audience. It has been revised and updated throughout to reflect the state of new technologies and their meaning to authors. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Illustrations
Preface
Preface to the Second Edition
Preface to the Third Edition
Preface to the Fourth Edition
ch. 1 The Publishing Partnership
ch. 2 Journal Articles
ch. 3 Revising a Dissertation
ch. 4 Finding a Publisher for the Scholarly Book
ch. 5 Working with Your Publisher
ch. 6 Multiauthor Books and Anthologies
ch. 7 Finding a Publisher for the College Textbook
ch. 8 Working with Your Textbook Publisher
ch. 9 Books for General Readers
ch. 10 The Mechanics of Authorship
ch. 11 Costs and Prices
ch. 12 Electronic Publishing
Bibliography
Index
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The Craft of Research

Book
Booth, Wayne C., Gregory G. Colomb, Joseph M. Williams
1995
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
Q180.55.M4B66 1995
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Here's a concise, practical guide to mastering the art of research. Filled with the tested strategies and expert advice of three distinguished scholars, this book helps you plan, carry out, and report on research in any field, at any level - a term paper, a dissertation, an article, or a book. The Craft of Research is about more than the mechanics of fact gathering: it's a unique introduction to doing ...
Additional Info:
Here's a concise, practical guide to mastering the art of research. Filled with the tested strategies and expert advice of three distinguished scholars, this book helps you plan, carry out, and report on research in any field, at any level - a term paper, a dissertation, an article, or a book. The Craft of Research is about more than the mechanics of fact gathering: it's a unique introduction to doing research effectively. Clearly written and easy to use, it teaches the skills that are essential to the success of any research project. Wayne Booth, Gregory Colomb, and Joseph Williams chart every stage of the research process, from finding a topic and generating research questions about it to marshalling evidence, constructing arguments, creating a first draft, and revising that draft for a final report that meets the needs of a community of readers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
ch. 1 Thinking in Print: The Uses of Research, Public and Private
ch. 2 Connecting with Your Reader: (Re)Creating Your Self and Your Audience
ch. 3 From Topics to Questions
ch. 4 From Questions to Problems
ch. 5 From Questions to Sources
ch. 6 Using Sources
ch. 7 Making Good Arguments: An Overview
ch. 8 Claims and Evidence
ch. 9 Warrants
ch. 10 Qualifications
ch. 11 Pre-Drafting and Drafting
ch. 12 Communicating Evidence Visually
ch. 13 Revising Your Organization and Argument
ch. 14 Revising Style: Telling Your Story Clearly
ch. 15 Introductions
Index
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"Break Away from Teaching Versus Research"

Article
Jenkins, Alan
2003
Tomorrow’s Professor Listserv #459, (2003) http://campus.umr.edu/lead/teaching/docs/TeachingResearch.htm
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
An article that reviews progress scholars and institutions have made to reshape the potential connections between faculty research and student learning, since Ernest Boyer’s landmark 1990 essay, “Scholarship Reconsidered” – developing our understanding of the research evidence, focusing on course design, and starting to reshape institutions.
Additional Info:
An article that reviews progress scholars and institutions have made to reshape the potential connections between faculty research and student learning, since Ernest Boyer’s landmark 1990 essay, “Scholarship Reconsidered” – developing our understanding of the research evidence, focusing on course design, and starting to reshape institutions.
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"Enhancing the Research-Teaching Nexus"

Article
Jonte-Pace, Diane
2003
Faculty Development, Santa Clara University (2003) http://www.scu.edu/provost/facultydevelopment/teaching/researchteaching.cfm
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A short article by Diane Jonte-Pace, reviewing recent literature and issues, and commenting on specifically on aspects of the situation at Santa Clara University.
Additional Info:
A short article by Diane Jonte-Pace, reviewing recent literature and issues, and commenting on specifically on aspects of the situation at Santa Clara University.
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"Scholarship: A Sacred Vocation"

Article
Pelikan, Jaroslav
1984
Scholarly Publishing 16, no. 1 (1984): 19
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

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"Publish, Don't Perish: Submitting Research Articles to Refereed Journals"

Article
Finn, Margot
1999
Paper presented at the North American Conference on British Studies annual meeting, Boston (1999)
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
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"Seeking Funding: A Manual for Faculty in Theological Education" (pdf)

Article
Faculty Resource Center Staff
2005
ATS Manual (Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh, 2005)
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Practical advice and candid reflection on the author’s 20 years experience writing both successful and unsuccessful grant proposals.
Additional Info:
Practical advice and candid reflection on the author’s 20 years experience writing both successful and unsuccessful grant proposals.
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"The Professor's Vocations: Reflections on the Teacher as Writer"

TTR
Jinkins, Michael
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 2 (2004): 64-70
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
The following essay is based on an oral presentation, "On Being a Good Teacher and a Good Writer," which the author was asked to make for the Southwest Commission on Religious Studies, March 16, 2003. The purpose of the presentation was to encourage conversation among theological educators on the character of their vocation. A panel discussion of the theme followed the presentation. The presentation was designed to engage this subject at an ...
Additional Info:
The following essay is based on an oral presentation, "On Being a Good Teacher and a Good Writer," which the author was asked to make for the Southwest Commission on Religious Studies, March 16, 2003. The purpose of the presentation was to encourage conversation among theological educators on the character of their vocation. A panel discussion of the theme followed the presentation. The presentation was designed to engage this subject at an autobiographical and reflective level rather than as an academic argument. The published version of the essay seeks to retain something of the personal reflective character of the original presentation.
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"'I Wasn't Prepared for the Emotion': Archival Research in Religious and Theological Studies"

TTR
Hicks, Jane E.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 1 (2003): 43-47
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
One might think that primary research in library and church archives would be a dry, lifeless endeavor, far removed from the present–day spiritual urgency that quickens the religious studies classroom. After all, archives raise the specter of musty tomes housed in dark, dank, and isolated basements. To the contrary, based on interviews with several students and teachers doing such research, this article maintains that primary archival research in religious ...
Additional Info:
One might think that primary research in library and church archives would be a dry, lifeless endeavor, far removed from the present–day spiritual urgency that quickens the religious studies classroom. After all, archives raise the specter of musty tomes housed in dark, dank, and isolated basements. To the contrary, based on interviews with several students and teachers doing such research, this article maintains that primary archival research in religious and theological studies is often experienced as empowering, connecting researchers to their subjects with an immediacy that secondary sources simply cannot provide. Diaries, letters, hymns, administrative reports, and church–school teaching notes are the sorts of documentary evidence and personal effects at issue, and these offer unexpected insights to researchers who brave the archives.
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"Dialogue for Accountability: Pedagogical Proficiency and Religious Scholarship"

TTR
Talvacchia, Kathleen T.
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 2 (1998): 79-86
BL41.T4
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The author believes that the value of teaching in the academy will continue to be diminished as long as teaching and scholarship are viewed as separate and unequal. Thus, pedagogical proficiency is a fundamentally important component of religious and theological scholarship. Pedagogical skills allow scholars to be in dialogue with people outside of their content specialization and outside of the academy; therefore, they enable dialogue with the people of a ...
Additional Info:
The author believes that the value of teaching in the academy will continue to be diminished as long as teaching and scholarship are viewed as separate and unequal. Thus, pedagogical proficiency is a fundamentally important component of religious and theological scholarship. Pedagogical skills allow scholars to be in dialogue with people outside of their content specialization and outside of the academy; therefore, they enable dialogue with the people of a religious tradition who are not scholarly specialists, but who are the living community of the religious tradition. The article seeks first to articulate a clear understanding of teaching competency, drawing on the concept of pedagogical proficiency. The case is then made for the role of teaching in scholarly research and, finally, its specific role in religious and theological research, showing that research accountability to a living religious tradition necessarily demands teaching competency.
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Professing to Learn: Creating Tenured Lives and Careers in the American Research University

Book
Neumann, Anna
2009
The John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MYD
LB1778.2.N475 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Research, teaching, service, and public outreach — all are aspects of being a tenured professor. But this list of responsibilities is missing a central component: actual scholarly learning — disciplinary knowledge that faculty teach, explore in research, and share with the academic community. How do professors pursue such learning when they must give their attention as well to administrative and other obligations?

Professing to Learn explores university professors' scholarly growth ...
Additional Info:
Research, teaching, service, and public outreach — all are aspects of being a tenured professor. But this list of responsibilities is missing a central component: actual scholarly learning — disciplinary knowledge that faculty teach, explore in research, and share with the academic community. How do professors pursue such learning when they must give their attention as well to administrative and other obligations?

Professing to Learn explores university professors' scholarly growth and learning in the years immediately following the award of tenure, a crucial period that has a lasting impact on the academic career. Some launch from this point to multiple accomplishments and accolades, while others falter, their academic pursuits stalled. What contributes to these different outcomes?

Drawing on interviews with seventy-eight professors in diverse disciplines and fields at five major American research universities, Anna Neumann describes how tenured faculty shape and disseminate their own disciplinary knowledge while attending committee meetings, grading exams, holding office hours, administering programs and departments, and negotiating with colleagues. By exploring the intellectual activities pursued by these faculty and their ongoing efforts to develop and define their academic interests, Professing to Learn directs the attention of higher education professionals and policy makers to the core aim of higher education: the creation of academic knowledge through research, teaching, and service. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

1. Into the Middle: Mapping the Early Post-Tenure Career in the Research University
2. The Heart of the Matter: Passionate Thought and Scholarly Learning
3. Mindwork: What and How Professors Strive to Learn
4. Location: Where Professors Purse Their Scholarly Learning
5. Becoming Strategic: Recently Tenured University Professors as Agents of Scholarly Learning
6. Organizing to Learn: What Universities Provide for Professors' Scholarly Learning
7. The Middle Remapped: Toward an Ecology of Learning in the Early Post-Tenure Career

Appendix A: Study Designs and Background Data
Appendix B: Interview Protocols and Consent Forms for the Four Universities Project
Appendix C: Framework: University Professors' Scholarly Learning

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Writing for Educators: Personal Essays and Practical Advice

Book
Bromley, Karen, ed.
2009
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
PN165.W78 2009
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This book is for new faculty, graduate students, teachers, administrators, and other academics who want to write more clearly and have their work published. The essays focus on writing journal articles, dissertations, grants, edited books, and other writing in educational settings. The authors are educators who share their own first-hand experiences that provide novice writers with important knowledge and support in the quest for success in professional scholarly writing. A ...
Additional Info:
This book is for new faculty, graduate students, teachers, administrators, and other academics who want to write more clearly and have their work published. The essays focus on writing journal articles, dissertations, grants, edited books, and other writing in educational settings. The authors are educators who share their own first-hand experiences that provide novice writers with important knowledge and support in the quest for success in professional scholarly writing. A variety of authors discuss the writer's craft, including issues of voice, audience, planning,drafting, revision, conventions, style, submitting to journals, editorial review, and editing. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Section I: Finding Your Voice
ch. 1 What? Me Write? Six Reasons to Write for Publication (James J. Carpenter)
ch. 2 Finding Ideas and Developing the Confidence to Write for Publication (Chris Pescatore)
ch. 3 Writing-to-Learn in the Process of Researching (Maureen Boyd)
ch. 4 Reading as a Way to Develop a Writing Identity (Nicholas Paley)

Section II: Writing An Article Or Dissertation
ch. 5 From Idea to Printed Page (Marilyn Tallerico)
ch. 6 Writing to be Read: Clarity and Power in Scholarly Writing (C. Beth Rainforth)
ch. 7 Creating a Corpus: Writing to Shape Practice (Beverly Rainforth)
ch. 8 Nine Notes From a Novice: Publishing a Teaching Idea (Margaret Golden)
ch. 9 Writing With Publication in Mind (Joan Bouza Koster)
ch. 10 Completing a Dissertation in Just Over 2 Years (Holly Hansen-Thomas)
ch. 11 Four Children and a Dissertation (Sandi Graham)

Section III: Reviews, Revising, and Editing
ch. 12 Surviving the Review Process: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (Jenny Gordon)
ch. 13 Rethink, Rewrite, Revise: Mining the Gold (Heather K. Sheridan-Thomas)
ch. 14 Revisiting for Successful Publication (Mitch Rosenwald)
ch. 15 Editing a Book: Nine Questions and Some Answers (Karen Bromley)
ch. 16 An Editor's Perspective on the Importance of Style (Jean Schmittau)

Section IV: Grant Writing
ch. 17 Writing a Grant Proposal (Karen Bromley)
ch. 18 Grant Writing for Teachers (Pat Krizan)
ch. 19 The Collaborative Grant Development Process (Allison Alden)

Section V: Other Writing In Educational Settings
ch. 20 On-Demand Writing by Administrators (Carol Stark)
ch. 21 A Principal's Writing Experiences (Doug Green)
ch. 22 My Surprising Life as an Author (Jo Malin)

Appendices
About the Authors
Cover image

The Status of Theological Research (pdf)

Journal Issue
2010
Theological Education 46, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v. 46 no. 1 2010
Topics: Theological Education   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2010-theological-education-v46-n1.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2010-theological-education-v46-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Crafting Research in the Service of Theological Education (Joel B. Green)
Doers of the Word: Research and Teaching in Theology (Brian E. Daley, SJ)
Crafting Research that Contributes to Theological Education (Emilie M. Townes)
History, Seminary, and Vocation (E. Brooks Holifield)
The Mystery of Meaning (Kathleen O'Connor)
Honoring the Body: Nurturing Wellness through Seminary Curriculum and Community Life (Mary Chase-Ziolek)
Faculty Vocation and Governance within a Consortium of Denominationally Accountable Seminaries (Larry Perkins)
Seminaries, Congregations, and Clergy: Lifelong Partners in Theological Education (C. Franklin Granger)
Cover image

Professional Academic Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Book
MacDonald, Susan Peck
1994
Southern Illinois University Press, Carbondale, IL
PN146.M33 1994
Topics: Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Susan Peck MacDonald here tackles important and often controversial contemporary questions regarding the rhetoric of inquiry, the social construction of knowledge, and the professionalization of the academy. MacDonald argues that the academy has devoted more effort to analyzing theory and method than to analyzing its own texts. Professional texts need further attention because they not only create but are also shaped by the knowledge that is special to each discipline. ...
Additional Info:
Susan Peck MacDonald here tackles important and often controversial contemporary questions regarding the rhetoric of inquiry, the social construction of knowledge, and the professionalization of the academy. MacDonald argues that the academy has devoted more effort to analyzing theory and method than to analyzing its own texts. Professional texts need further attention because they not only create but are also shaped by the knowledge that is special to each discipline. Her assumption is that knowledge making is the distinctive activity of the academy at the professional level; for that reason, it is important to examine differences in the ways the professional texts of subdisciplinary communities focus on and consolidate knowledge within their fields.

MacDonald’s examination concentrates on three sample subdisciplinary fields: attachment research in psychology, Colonial New England social history, and Renaissance New Historicism in literary studies. By tracing, over a period of two decades, how members of each field have discussed a problem in their professional discourse, MacDonald explores whether they have progressed toward a greater resolution of their problems. In her examination of attachment research, she traces the field’s progress from its theoretical origins through its discovery of a method to a point of greater conceptual elaboration and agreement. Similarly, in Colonial New England social history, MacDonald examines debates over the values of narrative and analysis and, in Renaissance New Historicism, discusses particularist tendencies and ways in which New Historicist articles are organized by anecdotes and narratives.

MacDonald goes on to discuss sentence-level patterns, boldly proposing a method for examining how disciplinary differences in knowledge making are created and reflected at the sentence level.

Throughout her work, MacDonald stresses her conviction that academics need to do a better job of explaining their text-making axioms, clarifying their expectations of students at all levels, and monitoring their own professional practices. MacDonald’s proposals for both textual and sentence-level analysis will help academic professionals better understand how they might improve communication within their professional communities and with their students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Patterns in Disciplinary Variation
ch. 2 Attachment Research: Compact Problem Definition in a Conceptually Driven Field
ch. 3 Colonial New England Social History: The Problematics of Contemporary History Writing
ch. 4 Renaissance New Historicism: Epistemic and Nonepistemic Textual Patterns
ch. 5 Sentence-Level Differences in Disciplinary Knowledge Making
ch. 6 Professional Sytles and Their Consequences

Appendix: The Sample
Notes
References
Index
Cover image

It Works for Me: Becoming a Publishing Scholar/Researcher

Book
Blythe, Hal, and Sweet, Charlie
2010
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2331.B596 2010
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The authors’ purpose in this book is to provide “a collection of practical tips drawn from real-life experiences.” We believe this particular book is so important to share with today’s audience, we almost called it Take My Book, Please!

On the other hand, does the scholarly world need another book on the importance of scholarship? Further, if the book standard for tenure is slowly disappearing because so ...
Additional Info:
The authors’ purpose in this book is to provide “a collection of practical tips drawn from real-life experiences.” We believe this particular book is so important to share with today’s audience, we almost called it Take My Book, Please!

On the other hand, does the scholarly world need another book on the importance of scholarship? Further, if the book standard for tenure is slowly disappearing because so many academic presses are closing, why would we bother to write one? And recent studies show that new faculty members consider university employment a 9:00-5:00 job, so doesn’t that leave out time for job-related reading? Finally, with the instant gratification of the internet, aren’t books dead in our culture or at least well on their way to extinction?

Why, then, in the name of all that’s sane, did we put this collection together?

a. Our publisher wanted a follow-up to our It Works for Me as a Scholar-Teacher as he believed we had a lot more to say on the subject.

b. With over 800 publications, we thought we had something insightful to say.

c. Most books on the importance of scholarship are either textbook in nature or extremely theoretical, while this book is neither.

d. With our successful It Works for Me series we’ve found a niche in the marketplace.

e. Being a large collaboration, this book provides many voices who all believe that reiterating the importance of scholarship is important.

f. With a series of short, practical tips on scholarship, this book is very easy to read and, hence, might be read.

Actually, all of the above are true. We feel certain you will benefit from the collective work found between these covers. To find information on the full “It Works for Me” series, go to www.newforums.com. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction
Developing a Scholarly Frame of Mind
Creating Your Scholarly Plan

Overviews
Getting Published: Inquiring Minds Want to Know
The No-So-Obvious Strategies to Become a Publishing Research Scholar
Tips for Being Published in Academic Journals
Academic Publishing from an Unknown Regional University
Maintaining Scholarship in a Teaching-Focused Institution
Dave's Hints for Publishing
My Story
When Life Intervenes
A Transitional Journey
Order with Flexibility

Pre-Writing
Working with the IR Office
Identifying Emerging Topics of Scholarly Interest in the Discipline
Differentiating Journals
How to Get Involved in Research
Getting Started in Scholarly Writing
Writing Book Chapters for Publication
Time: The Elusive Ingredient in a Successful Recipe
When You Really Need It Published

Writing
Free to Write: Capturing the Creative Flow
A Research/Scholarly Paper Outline

Post-Writing
For Improved Scholarship, Know Your Editor(s)
Submitting a Manuscript? Do the Homework!
Applying Wagnerian Opera Theory to Scholarship: It's Not over Till
Turning Rejection Letters into Positive Advice

Other Scholarly Matters
Collabowriting Your Scholarship
Listen and Learn
Five Strategies for Successful Co-Authorizing of Articles
Virtual Collaboration
An International Learning Community: Successful Vehicle for Scholarship
The ABC's of Writing Groups at Small Universities
A Writing and Publication Group Becomes an Intellectual Community
Stalking the Reluctant Professor: How to Find a Mentor without Getting Arrested
Why Is It So Darned Hard to Get that Article Pushed out theDoor?
Collaboration Is King: Five Tips for Publishing Research Papers
Using Authentic Data in Classroom Exercises
A Scholarly Assignment
Co-Creating with Students: Establishing Trust in a Student-Faculty Research Group
Getting Published as a Graduate Student
Checking the Checker

New Directions
New Directions in Scholarship
Creating SOTL: An Experiment in Collaboration
Blending Service into Scholarship
Publishing Ideas from Courses that Extend Beyond Your Primary Discipline
S-t-r-e-t-c-h-i-n-g Yourself: Writing Outside Your Comfort Zone
Young Adult Literature as a Publishing Venue for the Higher Education Scholar
Sustaining Scholarship in a Digital Era
Presenting Live in South Africa . . . from My Family Room
Merging Discipline-Based Scholarship with the Scholarship of Teaching
Cover image

What They Didn't Teach You in Graduate School: 299 Helpful Hints for Success in Your Academic Career

Book
Gray, Paul, and Drew, David E.
2012
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB1778.2.G73 2012
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
* This irreverent, but serious, guide to what life in higher education institutions is really like, now enhanced by 100 new tips
* Invaluable advice that ranges from getting your Ph.D. to setting the course of your academic career

Just landed your first faculty position? Close to getting your Ph.D., and planning a career in academe? What will academic life be like? How do you discover its tacit ...
Additional Info:
* This irreverent, but serious, guide to what life in higher education institutions is really like, now enhanced by 100 new tips
* Invaluable advice that ranges from getting your Ph.D. to setting the course of your academic career

Just landed your first faculty position? Close to getting your Ph.D., and planning a career in academe? What will academic life be like? How do you discover its tacit rules? Develop the habits and networks needed for success? What issues will you encounter if you’re a person of color, or a woman? How is higher education changing?

Paul Gray and David E. Drew share their combined experience of many years as faculty and (recovering) administrators to offer even more insider advice—the kind that’s rarely taught or even talked about in graduate school – to help you succeed.

The 100 new hints expand sections on the dissertation process, job hunting, life in the classroom and on dealing with students, as well as on matters that affect readers’ careers, such as research, publication, and tenure. The book concludes with a tongue-in-cheek appendix on How to Become a Millionaire while an academic.

Already have the first edition? Give it to someone less fortunate than you, and take advantage of the new advice you will find in these pages. Too penurious to buy this book? Persuade a family member or friend to get it as a gift. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword 1 to the First Edition
Foreword 2 to the First Edition
Introduction

ch. 1 Basic Concepts
Gray’s Theorem of N + 2
Most academic fields are dominated by fewer than 100 powerful people
How to become known
Drew’s law on publishing papers
Make sure you have a mentor
Specialize. Get known for something

ch. 2 The PhD
Finish your PhD as early as possible
Be humble about your PhD
A PhD is primarily an indicator of survivorship
A PhD is a certification of research ability based on a sample of 1
A PhD is a license to reproduce
You must mave a PhD in hand
The key danger point is where you leave highly structured coursework
The PhD and part-time study
Avoid Watson’s syndrome
Celebrate your PhD!

ch. 3 The dissertation
Prelims
Finding a dissertation topic
Problem-solving mode
Put a lot of effort into writing your dissertation proposal
The range of your literature review
Selecting the dissertation advisory committee
The dissertation abstract
How long is too long for your dissertation?
The chain of references
Couple the likterature search closely with the discussion of results and the conclusion.
The risk of “not significant”results
The dissertation defense

ch. 4 Job Hunting
Job hunting is a research Project
Pick a place where you and your family want to live
When to apply for a faculty position
Find the best possible school for your first job
Change your career or move every seven years
Not-for-profit or for-profit for first or second job?
Exceptions to the previous hint
Build a Reference pool
Resumes are important
Dual careers
The short list

Jobs
Law of supply and demand
Research vs. teaching oriented institutions
The jobs may be at for profits
New programs
National rankings
Teaching in a community college
On-Line universities
The assistant dean strategy
Evaluate a postdoc carefully
Non-academic opportunities
Nonuniversity research organizations
Teaching Abroad for Fun and Profit

Interviewing

Tactics for interviewing
Dressing for the job interview
Don't be intimidated by the schools of those who interview you
Interview your potential bosses
Dealing with interviewers who published less than you did
Prepare an 'elevator speech"

Data Gathering
Determine the culture
Gather salary and tenure data
Obtaining tenure data is a little tricky
Ask about the retirement system
Parking
Determine real pay

Offers
Get the offer in writing, read it, and negotiate before you accept
Get the PhD bdefore you start the tenure track unless you are starving or homeless
Don’t take your first job at the school where you received your PhD
Choosing among offers

Hunting for the Next Job
Positioning for the next job
You become unemployed

ch. 5 Teaching and Service
Publications are the only form of portable wealth
Many colleges and universities value teaching
Teaching is a learned art
Being a mentor
Go to Toastmasters if needed
Meeting classes is paramount
Teaching can be a dangerous profession
Consider student costs when selecting textbooks.
Avoid serving on a committee where you are the technical expert

In The Classroom
Summaries lock in the material
Encourage questions
Enjoy your classes
Lecturing vs. facilitating
Teaching is not synonymous with lecturing
Lecture capture
Obtaining student responsesn through technology (clickers)
PowerPoint presentations

Teaching On-line
Distance education
Distance learning is a blessing. Distance learning is a threat

Students
Be wary of student excuses
Believe it or not, cheating is widespread
Teach every student
Teach to the student’s frame of reference
Distracted students
Undergraduates don’t remember more than 7 years back
Will this be on the final?
Grade inflation
Technobabble
Wikipedia and other web sources
Breaking the students' Wikipedia habit
Letters of reference for students
The student as customer mantra

ch. 6 Research
If you want a reserch career, make sure that the position you are offered allows you to actually do research
You can trade-off teaching load and research opportunities
Research requires both quantitative and qualitative skills. Learn grantsmanship
Don't be modest when writing a grant proposal
Protest if your brilliant grant proposal is declined
Build an advisory panel of nationally respected experts into your grant proposal
If you didn't build in an advisory panel it's not too late
Get the grant approval in writing
Get clearance before you study an organization
The institutional review board (IRB)
Academic trade journals are sources of higher education (and job) information
Collaborate and cooperate
Plagiarism is a No No
Back up, back up, back up your research
The “mode”of the number of publications is 0 followed closely by 1

ch. 7 Tenure
Tenure is the prize
Your promotion dossier
Why tenure is such a hurdle
If , by chance, you achieve tenure, never take another appolntment without it
Tenure, like reaserch support, can be negotiated on the way in
Tenure is tougher in cross-disciplinary fields
Tenure is forever (almost)
Tenure as we know it today may not be here forever
The number of tenured slots may decrease with time

The Mechanics of Tenure
The tenure clock is really four and a half years not seven
The Dreaded Impact Factor
Tenure committees look almost exclusively at refereed publications
Download counts
Multiple authored papers
Publication quality counts
Rolling reviews

ch. 8 Academic Rank
Being a tenured full professor is freedom
As a full professor you must be known for something
Avoid becoming the pitied “Permanent Associate Professor”
Promotion is an opportunity for a larger pay raise

ch. 9 Your Financial Life As An Academic
Academics are risk averse
Contracts are given to faculty for nine months
Salaries vary by field
Summer pay
The zero raise years
Retirement savings
Tax Deferral
Administrators make more

ch. 10 Life As An Academic
Good deans/bad deans
Never, ever choose sides in department politics
Don’t take a joint appointment
Join the faculty club
Office hours
Sabbaticals
Maintain collegiality
As an academic you are a public person
Freedom of speech
Attend Invited Lectures
Serving as an external reviewer
Keeping up with your field
You can go home again-retreat rights.
The board of trustees

Your Administrative Life
Secretaries are a scarce resource
Value your teaching assistants and graders
Grading
Your research assisstants require supervision.
Physical plant
Be careful what you delegate
Business cards

Your Digital Life
Learn the idiosyncracies of your institution's computer center
Electronic mail
The down side of e-mail
Don’t get on too many e-mail lists
Your students love e-mail, texting, and twitter
Keep up with computer developments
Meetings and digital publication
Interlibrary loan is quicker and more efficient than it used to be
Use digital libraries if they are available in your field
Telecommuting
Your web site
Your web visibility
The persistence of language

Institutional Citizen
Get to know the development people in your school and support them
Be responsive to your alumni office
When you do something noteworthy,m let your public relations department know
Communicating your field to the public
The faculty senate in most institutions provides a forum
Service

Department Chair
Never, never become a department chair unless you’re a tenured full professor
Be aware that the powers of a department chair are few
The role conflict in the job
Leadership
Dealing with student problems
Redeeming social values of being chair
Don’t stay in the chair position too long

Travel
Professional travel
Attend conferences
Choosing your conferen
Cover image

Social Media for Academics: A Practical Guide

Book
Diane Rasmussen Neal, ed.
2012
Chandos Publishing, Oxford
HM742.S63 2012
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
No other book exists that assists academics in learning how to use social media to benefit their teaching and research.
 - the editor has an extensive background in social media teaching, consulting, research, and everyday use
 - all the contributors come to the book with a common goal, from various expertise areas and perspectives

This book provides an overview of social media technologies in the context ...
Additional Info:
No other book exists that assists academics in learning how to use social media to benefit their teaching and research.
 - the editor has an extensive background in social media teaching, consulting, research, and everyday use
 - all the contributors come to the book with a common goal, from various expertise areas and perspectives

This book provides an overview of social media technologies in the context of practical implementation for academics, guided by applied research findings, current best practices, and the author’s successful experiences with using social media in academic settings. It also provides academics with sensible and easy strategies for implementing a wide spectrum of social media and related technologies - such as blogs, wikis, Facebook, and various Google tools for professional, teaching, and research endeavours.

Readership: Academics and academic librarians with professional, teaching and research responsibilities in all fields who are interested in learning more about using social media in the context of their careers, will find this book invaluable. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures and tables
Acknowledgements
About the editor
About the contributors
Introduction (Diane Rasmussen Neal)

Part 1 - The Nuts and Bolts of Social Media for Academics
ch. 1 Blogging your academic self: the what, the why and the how long? (Carolyn Hank)
 - Introduction
 - Scholars in the blogosphere
 - Motivations and benefits
 - Blog publishing: getting started … or getting more
 - Your blog today? Tomorrow?
 - Conclusions
 - Notes
 - References

ch. 2 Non-academic and academic social networking sites for online scholarly communities (Anatolly Gruzd)
 - Introduction
 - General public platforms for online scholarly communities
 - Academic sites for online scholarly communities
 - Conclusions
 - Acknowledgements
 - References

ch. 3 Research and teaching in real time: 24/7 collaborative networks (Anabel Quan-Haase)
 - Real-time technologies for academics
 - The concept of real time
 - Real-time technologies and research
 - Real-time technologies and teaching
 - Choosing a real-time technology
 - Conclusions
 - Acknowledgements
 - Notes
 - References

ch. 4 Locating scholarly papers of interest online
 - Introduction (Maureen Henninger)
 - Overview of online scholarly search services
 - Scholarly communication and social media
 - Use and purpose of scholarly search services
 - Impact of the Open Access movement
 - Search engine functionality
 - Social media and public scholarly search
 - Conclusions
 - Notes
 - References
 - Appendix: features of web-based public scholarly search services

ch. 5 Tracking references with social media tools: organizing what you’ve read or want to read (Jackie Krause)
 - Introduction
 - Why use online social bibliographic tools?
 - A look at top social bibliographic tools: Zotero, Mendeley, CiteULike and Connotea
 - How these tools can improve your research, writing and collaboration
 - How to choose the right tool for your needs
 - Conclusions
 - References

ch. 6 Pragmatics of Twitter use for academics: tweeting in and out of the classroom (Lynne Y. Williams, and Jackie Krause)
 - What is Twitter? An introduction
 - How can Twitter be used by academics?
 - How to get started
 - Research
 - Teaching
 - Professional branding
 - ‘In the field’: academics using Twitter
 - Using Twitter to encourage professional engagement, connection and collaboration
 - Is tweeting for you?
 - References

ch. 7 The academy goes mobile: an overview of mobile applications in higher education (Adam Craig)
 - Introduction
 - Leveraging the backchannel and immediate collaboration
 - QR codes: creating linkages to online content in physical space
 - Treading lightly in uncharted territory
 - References

Part 2 - Putting Social Media Into Practice
ch. 8 Incorporating web-based engagement and participatory interaction into your courses (Jaruee Henninger, and Diane Rasmussen Neal)
 - Online engagement and interaction: what does it mean?
 - Choose the right tools for the job
 - Social networking services in the classroom: a case study
 - Wikis in the classroom
 - Tools for virtual conferences: a case study
 - Conclusions
 - Notes
 - References

ch. 9 When good research goes viral! Getting your work noticed online (Diane Rasmussem Neal)
 - Introduction
 - Social networking: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, and so on
 - Google, you and ‘the filter bubble’
 - Official university pages: viral is not always better
 - Conclusions
 - References

ch. 10 Who is the ‘virtual’ you and do you know who’s watching you? (Lynne Y. Williams)
 - Awareness of data privacy, digital footprints, maintaining separate work and personal online identities, and other types of identity concerns
 - What is an online identity?
 - What is privacy?
 - Data privacy and the ‘virtual’ you
 - Tracking your digital footprints
 - Keeping your work ‘you’ and your personal ‘you’ apart
 - What should you know in order to adequately protect all of your ‘you’s?
 - References

ch. 11 Social media for academic libraries
 - Introduction (David J. Flander)
 - Overview of social media types and sites
 - Creating a Facebook page
 - Promoting and managing the library’s Facebook page
 - Social media policies and procedures
 - Community acceptable behaviour policies
 - Monitoring and interacting with your users
 - Users must have persistent identifiers
 - Identifying and stopping bad behaviour
 - Conclusions
 - Note
 - References

ch. 12 Learning social media: student and instructor perspectives (Robert Foster, and Diane Rasmussen Neal)
 - Introduction
 - Designing and delivering a class in social media
 - The students’ motivations and expectations for the course
 - The instructor’s expectations
 - Students’ views about the course
 - Students’ take-aways from the course
 - The instructor’s take-aways from the course
 - Conclusions from the student
 - Conclusions from the instructor
 - References

Index
Cover image

Inside the Undergraduate Teaching Experience: The University of Washington's Growth in Faculty Teaching Study

Book
Beyer, Catharine Hoffman; Taylor, Edward; and Gillmore, Gerald M.
2013
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
LD5753.B495 2013
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Shows what kind of changes college faculty make to their teaching and why they make them.

The image of college faculty members as abstracted, white-haired, tweed-jacketed professors, mumbling lectures from notes that were yellowed by twenty years of repeated use is still pervasive. In this view, college faculty care only about their research and have little connection to the students sitting ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Shows what kind of changes college faculty make to their teaching and why they make them.

The image of college faculty members as abstracted, white-haired, tweed-jacketed professors, mumbling lectures from notes that were yellowed by twenty years of repeated use is still pervasive. In this view, college faculty care only about their research and have little connection to the students sitting passively in front of them. Inside the Undergraduate Teaching Experience directly challenges this view of today’s college faculty and serves as a guide for graduate students and new faculty who seek ways—both personal and pedagogical—to become more effective teachers.

Inside the Undergraduate Teaching Experience reports the results of the University of Washington’s Growth in Faculty Teaching Study (UW GIFTS), which sought to find out whether or not faculty ever change what they do in the classroom, even when there is little external pressure for them to do so. Key findings in the study were that all courses that faculty members taught were deeply embedded in their academic disciplines, even freshman-level classes; that content and critical thinking as goals for learning could not be separated; that faculty members were making changes to their teaching continuously; that such changes were motivated by the faculty member’s intentional assessment of the learning needs of her particular classes; and that most changes were aimed at helping students meet faculty members’ goals for learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Gifts
College Teaching Realities
Purpose of the Study and Key Findings
Literatures
Our Paths
Organization

ch. 2 How Was the Study Conducted
Faculty Sample
Graduate Student Sample
Study Design
Generalizability and Usefulness

ch. 3 What Courses Did Faculty Describe?
Key Findings: Disciplinary Practice, Content, and Critical Thinking
Class Size, TA Help, and Course Levels
Pedagogy
Course Requirements
Learning beyond the Classroom
Summary: Courses

ch. 4 What Changes Did Faculty Make to Their Courses?
Changes to Courses
Few Changes
Big Directions of Change
Are You Still Making Changes to Your Teaching
Summary: Changes

ch. 5 Why Did Faculty Make Changes to Their Courses?
Reasons for Changes Made to Specific Courses
End-of-interview Ratings of Sources of Change
Summary: Reasons and Sources for Change

ch. 6 What Allowed Faculty to Teach from the Self?
The Importance of Changes in the Self
Moving Beyond the Graduate Student Experience
Learning to Trust Their Own Authority over Time
Permission to Make Mistakes
Knowing That They Know How to Teach
Paring Down, Opening Up, and Weaving In
Listening to Changes in the Self
Summary: Teaching from the Self

ch. 7 What Did Faculty Say about Students
Students as Learners
Students Today…
Praise for Students Today
Summary: Students and Other Learners

8. What “Research” Methods Did Faculty Use?
Sources of Information on Teaching and Learning
Tracking the Effects of Change
Summary: Researching One’s Own Teaching Effectiveness

9. Were There Differences across Groups?
Difference Based on Faculty Characteristics
Faculty of Color
Three Disciplines
Graduate Students and Faculty Members
Summary: Differences

10. Learning in the Act of Teaching

Appendices
Appendix A: UW GIFTS Interview Questions for Faculty
Appendix B: Focus Group Questions for Graduate Students
Appendix C: Tables on Statistically Significant Differences

Notes
Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Social Media in Higher Education: Teaching in Web 2.0

Book
Patrut, Monica; and Patrut, Bogdan, eds.
2013
IGI Global, Hershey PA
LB2395.7.S635 2013
Topics: Online Learning   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
In today’s businesses and society, social media continues to play a vital role in the transformation of communication into an interactive dialogue. The success of social media has encouraged the integration of these aspects in higher education teaching practices.

Social Media in Higher Education: Teaching in Web 2.0 provides research on the pedagogical challenges faced in recent years in order to improve the understanding of social media in ...
Additional Info:
In today’s businesses and society, social media continues to play a vital role in the transformation of communication into an interactive dialogue. The success of social media has encouraged the integration of these aspects in higher education teaching practices.

Social Media in Higher Education: Teaching in Web 2.0 provides research on the pedagogical challenges faced in recent years in order to improve the understanding of social media in the educational systems. It will highlight the levels of education ranging from learning centered on the student to the collaboration between academic networks and organizations. This reference source is essential for practitioners, researchers, and students interested in gaining insight into educational institutions as well as academic communities and environments. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgement

Section 1 Teaching 2.0
ch. 1 The Implementation of a University 2.0 Model (Domenico Consoil)
ch. 2 Using Social Media as a Concept and Tool for Teaching Marketing Information Systems (Theodosios Tsiakis)
ch. 3 The Use of New Web-Based Technologies in Strategies of Teaching Gender Studies (Madalina Manolache, Monica Patrut)
ch. 4 Integrating Social Media and Traditional Media within the Academic Environment (Swati Jaywant Rao Bute)
ch. 5 Using Facebook in Teaching (Ioana Boghian)

Section 2 Student 2.0
ch. 6 Personalization of Learning Environments in a Post-Industrial Class (IIya Levin, Andrei Kojukhov)
ch. 7 Personal Knowledge Management and Social Media: What Students Need to Learn for Business Life (Marie-Luise Gro)
ch. 8 Usage of Social Media by Children and Teenagers: Results of EU KIDS Online II (Anca Velicu, Valentina Marinescu)
ch. 9 Students' Publishing Projects and their Impact on Teaching and Learning (Sandra Hofhues, Anna Heudorfer)

Section 3 Tools and Technological Issues in Web 2.0
ch. 10 The Potential of Document Sharing for Scaffolding Writing Instruction (Katherine Landu Wright)
ch. 11 The Role of the Web Technologies in Connection to the Communication's Streamlining and Diversification between the Actors of a Learning System (Dorin Bocu, Razvan Bocu, Bogdan Patrut)
ch. 12 @Twitter is Always Wondering what's Happening: Learning with through Social Networks in Higher Education (Narelle Lemon)
ch. 13 The Universal Appeal of Facebook: Providing Access to Tertiary Students from Australian Aboriginal Communities (Maree Gruppetta, Terry Mason)

Section 4 Educational and Ethical Issues in Web 2.0 Age
ch. 14 Risky Media: Using Subversive Technologies in Education to Question Assumptions about Power, Teaching, and Assessment (Matthew J. Kruger-Ross, Tricia M. Farwell)
ch. 15 Online Anxiety: Implications for Educational Design in a Web 2.0 World (David Mathew)
ch. 16 Cyberbullying: The Bad and Ugly Side of Information Age (Osman Toiga Aricak, Taskin Tanrikulu, Sinem Siyahhah, Huseyin Kinay)
ch. 17 Barriers to Emerging Technology and Social Media Integration in Higher Education: Three Case Studies (Ana Adi, Christina, Gasser Scotte)
ch. 18 Making the Most of Informal and Situated Learning Opportunities through Mobile Learning (Mar Camacho)
ch. 19 Media and Communication Research Facing Social Media (Georgeta Drula)

Compilation of References
About the Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
A short article by Diane Jonte-Pace, reviewing recent literature and issues, and commenting specifically on aspects of the situation at Santa Clara University.
Additional Info:
A short article by Diane Jonte-Pace, reviewing recent literature and issues, and commenting specifically on aspects of the situation at Santa Clara University.
Additional Info:
An article that reviews progress scholars and institutions have made to reshape the potential connections between faculty research and student learning, since Ernest Boyer’s landmark 1990 essay, “Scholarship Reconsidered” – developing our understanding of the research evidence, focusing on course design, and starting to reshape institutions.
Additional Info:
An article that reviews progress scholars and institutions have made to reshape the potential connections between faculty research and student learning, since Ernest Boyer’s landmark 1990 essay, “Scholarship Reconsidered” – developing our understanding of the research evidence, focusing on course design, and starting to reshape institutions.
Additional Info:
A short, punchy advice list by Quentin Vicens, and Philip E. Bourne - pharmacists, but relevant for the humanities as well. With some references for further reading and reflection.
Additional Info:
A short, punchy advice list by Quentin Vicens, and Philip E. Bourne - pharmacists, but relevant for the humanities as well. With some references for further reading and reflection.
Additional Info:
A one-page list of important publishers of academic books in religion and theology.
Additional Info:
A one-page list of important publishers of academic books in religion and theology.
Cover image

Behind the Academic Curtain: How to Find Success and Happiness with a PhD

Book
Furstenberg, Frank F.
2013
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LB1778.2 F87 2013
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: More people than ever are going to graduate school to seek a PhD these days. When they get there, they discover a bewildering environment: a rapid immersion in their discipline, a keen competition for resources, and uncertain options for their future, whether inside or outside of academia. Life with a PhD can begin to resemble an unsolvable maze. In Behind the Academic Curtain, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: More people than ever are going to graduate school to seek a PhD these days. When they get there, they discover a bewildering environment: a rapid immersion in their discipline, a keen competition for resources, and uncertain options for their future, whether inside or outside of academia. Life with a PhD can begin to resemble an unsolvable maze. In Behind the Academic Curtain, Frank F. Furstenberg offers a clear and user-friendly map to this maze. Drawing on decades of experience in academia, he provides a comprehensive, empirically grounded, and, most important of all, practical guide to academic life.

While the greatest anxieties for PhD candidates and postgrads are often centered on getting that tenure-track dream job, each stage of an academic career poses a series of distinctive problems. Furstenberg divides these stages into five chapters that cover the entire trajectory of an academic life, including how to make use of a PhD outside of academia. From finding the right job to earning tenure, from managing teaching loads to conducting research, from working on committees to easing into retirement, he illuminates all the challenges and opportunities an academic can expect to encounter. Each chapter is designed for easy consultation, with copious signposts, helpful suggestions, and a bevy of questions that all academics should ask themselves throughout their career, whether at a major university, junior college, or a nonacademic organization. An honest and up-to-date portrayal of how this life really works, Behind the Academic Curtain is an essential companion for any scholar, at any stage of his or her career. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Entering Graduate School
ch. 2 An Academic Career or Not?
ch. 3 Being an Assistant Professor
ch. 4 Academic Midlife
ch. 6 The Endgame

Notes
Index
Additional Info:
Before you reconcile yourself to the idea that excellence in teaching and research are mutually exclusive, consider the similarities between the two endeavors.
Additional Info:
Before you reconcile yourself to the idea that excellence in teaching and research are mutually exclusive, consider the similarities between the two endeavors.
Additional Info:
The fully automatic bibliography maker that auto-fills. Easy and free way to build a works cited page.
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The fully automatic bibliography maker that auto-fills. Easy and free way to build a works cited page.
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Nel examines the factors contributing to overwork on the part of faculty members in higher education: habit, economics, a culture of busy-ness, the blurred line between work and "fun," technological connectedness, etc.
Additional Info:
Nel examines the factors contributing to overwork on the part of faculty members in higher education: habit, economics, a culture of busy-ness, the blurred line between work and "fun," technological connectedness, etc.
Additional Info:
Based on "preliminary findings of an ongoing study at Boise State University," the author reports that faculty work 61 hours/week, increasingly at administrative tasks, and "largely alone." Only a vanishingly small percentage of time is spent on research and writing. The article is especially relevant in contrast with periodic pieces purporting to show that instructors in higher ed are protected from economic realities and underworked.
Additional Info:
Based on "preliminary findings of an ongoing study at Boise State University," the author reports that faculty work 61 hours/week, increasingly at administrative tasks, and "largely alone." Only a vanishingly small percentage of time is spent on research and writing. The article is especially relevant in contrast with periodic pieces purporting to show that instructors in higher ed are protected from economic realities and underworked.
Additional Info:
In this Prezi (without voice-over), Thompson explains "open access" to educators and scholars. Includes attention to Open Educational Resources (OER), the relation of Creative Commons to "public domain" and traditional copyright, the difference between "open access" and "open source," different axes of "openness," and the economic crisis in academic publishing. Includes link to Google Doc capturing all URLs cited in the Prezi.
Additional Info:
In this Prezi (without voice-over), Thompson explains "open access" to educators and scholars. Includes attention to Open Educational Resources (OER), the relation of Creative Commons to "public domain" and traditional copyright, the difference between "open access" and "open source," different axes of "openness," and the economic crisis in academic publishing. Includes link to Google Doc capturing all URLs cited in the Prezi.
Additional Info:
First half of podcast looks at belief identities between the sacred and secular. Second half focuses on how to build an academic career, win research funding, and get articles published.
Additional Info:
First half of podcast looks at belief identities between the sacred and secular. Second half focuses on how to build an academic career, win research funding, and get articles published.
Additional Info:
Topics covered: The importance of publication, and the relative merits of different publications; getting teaching experience; services to the discipline and the community; conferences and networking; what to put in your CV; how to keep up-to-date with your field
Additional Info:
Topics covered: The importance of publication, and the relative merits of different publications; getting teaching experience; services to the discipline and the community; conferences and networking; what to put in your CV; how to keep up-to-date with your field
Additional Info:
Zoe Alderton leads a group of academics with experience of all levels of academic publishing in a discussion which aims to demystify the process.
Additional Info:
Zoe Alderton leads a group of academics with experience of all levels of academic publishing in a discussion which aims to demystify the process.
Additional Info:
A referenced study suggests that, while discussing content of one's research with students does not significantly improve instruction, there is a better way to use your research in teaching: choose forms of teaching (like inquiry-based and problem solving approaches) that "mirror the research process."
Additional Info:
A referenced study suggests that, while discussing content of one's research with students does not significantly improve instruction, there is a better way to use your research in teaching: choose forms of teaching (like inquiry-based and problem solving approaches) that "mirror the research process."
Additional Info:
A series of invited blog posts by Wabash Center program participants, reflecting back on earlier moments in their teaching careers, what they learned, and what they wish they had known.
Additional Info:
A series of invited blog posts by Wabash Center program participants, reflecting back on earlier moments in their teaching careers, what they learned, and what they wish they had known.
Web cover image

Tapping into the Potential of Late-Career Professors

Web
Baldwin, Roger G. and Zeig, Michael J.
2013
Inside Higher Ed May 10,
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Policies should encourage senior professors to engage in periodic review of their performance and professional goals and allow deans and department chairs to negotiate revised responsibilities are necessary to take fuller advantage of the gifts senior faculty can share with their institutions – and to ensure that senior faculty are treated fairly and consistently. 
Additional Info:
Policies should encourage senior professors to engage in periodic review of their performance and professional goals and allow deans and department chairs to negotiate revised responsibilities are necessary to take fuller advantage of the gifts senior faculty can share with their institutions – and to ensure that senior faculty are treated fairly and consistently. 
Article cover image

Faculty in the Middle Years: Illuminating an Overlooked Phase of Academic Life

Article
Baldwin, Roger G.; Lunceford, Christina J.; and Vanderlinden, Kim E.
2005
The Review of Higher Education 29.1, 97-118
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Initial findings from this exploratory study indicate significant questions, such as: why does the focus of faculty work appear to shift and, in later career? How do the administrative and leadership roles often assumed by midlife and mid-career faculty affect other dimensions of faculty work? Is the level of work satisfaction of mid-career faculty a function of the job demands or of life assessment and career questioning? What roles do ...
Additional Info:
Initial findings from this exploratory study indicate significant questions, such as: why does the focus of faculty work appear to shift and, in later career? How do the administrative and leadership roles often assumed by midlife and mid-career faculty affect other dimensions of faculty work? Is the level of work satisfaction of mid-career faculty a function of the job demands or of life assessment and career questioning? What roles do institutional context and disciplinary field play in the experiences and perceptions of the middle years of the academic life cycle?
Cover image

147 Practical Tips for Emerging Scholars: From Publishing to Time Management, Grant Seeking, and Beyond

Book
King, Kathleen; and Cranston-Gingras, Ann
2014
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB1778.2.K55 2014
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Higher educations professionals face a myriad of competing demands on their time. Many of these pressures exist apart from teaching and outside the classroom altogether. Career requirements can seem to be never ending, and if they are not carefully managed and balanced, they can overrun even the most committed scholar’s resolve.

The latest book in Atwood’s 147 Tips series, 147 Practical ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Higher educations professionals face a myriad of competing demands on their time. Many of these pressures exist apart from teaching and outside the classroom altogether. Career requirements can seem to be never ending, and if they are not carefully managed and balanced, they can overrun even the most committed scholar’s resolve.

The latest book in Atwood’s 147 Tips series, 147 Practical Tips for Emerging Scholars presents readers with a much-needed guide to the varied ins and outs of a career in higher education. Advocating detailed planning and clear priorities, the authors have crafted a thorough and accessible book to simplify and de-stress the navigation of a scholar’s world. Their pragmatic and detailed tips offer advice on crucial topics including:

- Writing grants
- Research
- Working with technology
- Collaboration
- Mentoring

The authors write:
147 Practical Tips for Emerging Scholars assists you in developing your successful professional journey as a scholar by delivering proven and succinct guidance.... You can use this book as a ready reference that you can turn to again and again for solid direction, clarity, and encouragement.

This essential volume offers fresh and enriching insights, and will prove an indispensable tool for higher education professionals - new and veteran alike. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Dedication
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Time Management and the Missing Operating Instructions
ch. 2 How to Approach Academic Careers Systematically

Tips Categories
-Taking Control of Your Career as a Scholar
- Building A Research Agenda
- General Writing Tips
- Developing and Writing Your Literature Review
- Presenting at Conferences
- Publishing in Refereed Journals
- Writing Grants
- Writing Academic Books
- Ethics and Responsibility
- Technology for Writing and Teaching
- Passing It On: Collaborating and Mentoring

References
Appendix A: Resource Appendix
Appendix B: Three Research and Publication Tracking Tables
About the Authors
Cover image

Mindful Teaching and Learning: Developing a Pedagogy of Well-Being

Book
Ragoonaden, Karen, ed.
2015
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LB1025.3.M57 2015
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Mindful Teaching and Learning: Developing a Pedagogy of Well-Being features a community of scholar-practitioners from across disciplines, methodologies, and ideological perspectives exploring and examining contexts that support mindful teaching, mindful learning, and a pedagogy of well-being. Collectively, these chapters document and analyze the opportunities and challenges within pedagogical sites and discuss how the disposition of mindfulness can be nurtured and sustained in educational ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Mindful Teaching and Learning: Developing a Pedagogy of Well-Being features a community of scholar-practitioners from across disciplines, methodologies, and ideological perspectives exploring and examining contexts that support mindful teaching, mindful learning, and a pedagogy of well-being. Collectively, these chapters document and analyze the opportunities and challenges within pedagogical sites and discuss how the disposition of mindfulness can be nurtured and sustained in educational practice and praxis. Bolstered by the positive evidence-based standards emanating from clinical settings, mindfulness based training has spread into a variety of other fields like psychology, healthcare, and more recently, education.

Within pedagogical environments, an emergent secular conception of mindfulness, under the auspices of educational psychologists like Langer (1987; 1997), Goleman, (2008), Lantieri (2008), Roeser, Skinner, Beers, and Jennings, (2012), and Schonert-Reichl and Lawlor (2010), is making headway. Consequently, Mindfulness Training (MT) resources have been applied to educational contexts in order to maximize the academic, emotional, physical, and psychological benefits provided by this mind-body approach to well-being.

Acknowledging the increasing evidence base for the efficacy of mindfulness interventions as well as the elevated stress levels reported by many educators and their students, this book discusses how mindful practices, praxis, and research can inform and support pedagogy, curriculum, and leadership initiatives in higher education in the twenty-first century. Alongside the multitude of recent studies in the area of Mindfulness, contributors discuss their own experiences using Self-study, Contemplative pedagogy, Living Educational Theory, and Curriculum Inquiry. The content of this book examines ways in which to develop habits of mind and courses of action, as well as a curriculum of study that can support educators as they cultivate competencies for thriving and coping with the modern demands of being a teacher. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Mindful Teaching and Learning: Developing a Pedagogy of Well-Being (Karen Ragoonaden)

ch. 1 Mindfulness Training: A Transdisciplinary Approach to Assessing Efficacy in Education (Elizabeth R. Mackenzie)
ch. 2 Mindful Education and Well-Being (Karen Ragoonaden)
ch. 3 Enhancing Learning through Contemplative Pedagogy (Kathryn Byrnes and Tom Bassarear)
ch. 4 Living Collaborative Leadership: Cultivating a Mindful Approach (Sabre Cherkowski, Kelly Hanson, and Jennifer Kelly)
ch. 5 Mindfulness-Based Wellness Education: Pedagogical Insights (Geoffrey Soloway)
ch. 6 Mindful Curricular Engagement: Preparing Prospective Educators to See/Act with Discernment and Deliberation (Margaret Macintyre Latta)

About the Contributors
Index
Cover image

The Coach's Guide for Women Professors: Who Want a Successful Career and a Well-Balanced Life

Book
Seltzer, Rena
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2332.3.S45 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: If you find yourself thinking or saying any of the following, this is a book you need to pick up.

I know or suspect that I am underpaid, but I hate negotiating.

I do everything else first and then write in the time left over.

I’m not sure exactly what the promotion requirements are in my ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: If you find yourself thinking or saying any of the following, this is a book you need to pick up.

I know or suspect that I am underpaid, but I hate negotiating.

I do everything else first and then write in the time left over.

I’m not sure exactly what the promotion requirements are in my department.

Since earning tenure, my service load has increased and my research is suffering.

I don’t get enough time with my family.

This is a practical guide for women in academe – whether adjuncts, professors or administrators – who often encounter barriers and hostility, especially if women of color, and generally carry a heavier load of service, as well as household and care responsibilities, than their male colleagues. Rena Seltzer, a respected life coach and trainer who has worked with women professors and academic leaders for many years, offers succinct advice on how you can prioritize the multiplicity of demands on your life, negotiate better, create support networks, and move your career forward.

Using telling but disguised vignettes of the experiences of women she has mentored, Rena Seltzer offers insights and strategies for managing the situations that all women face – such as challenges to their authority – while also paying attention to how they often play out differently for Latinas, Black and Asian women. She covers issues that arise from early career to senior administrator positions.

This is a book you can read cover to cover or dip into as you encounter concerns about time management; your authority and influence; work/life balance; problems with teaching; leadership; negotiating better; finding time to write; developing your networks and social support; or navigating tenure and promotion and your career beyond. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Frances Rosenbluth)
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 How to Have More Time
ch. 2 Authority, Voice, and Influence
ch. 3 Work/Life Balance
ch. 4 Teaching
ch. 5 Establishing a Productive Writing Practice
ch. 6 Networking and Social Support
ch. 7 Tenure and Promotion & The Academic Job Market
ch. 8 Negotiation
ch. 9 Life after Tenure
ch. 10 Leadership

Conclusion
References
Index
About the Author
Cover image

Small Teaching: Everyday Lessons from the Science of Learning

Book
Lang, James M.
2016
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco, CA
LB1063.L36 2016
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Employ cognitive theory in the classroom every day

Research into how we learn has opened the door for utilizing cognitive theory to facilitate better student learning. But that's easier said than done. Many books about cognitive theory introduce radical but impractical theories, failing to make the connection to the classroom. In Small Teaching, James Lang presents a strategy for improving student ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Employ cognitive theory in the classroom every day

Research into how we learn has opened the door for utilizing cognitive theory to facilitate better student learning. But that's easier said than done. Many books about cognitive theory introduce radical but impractical theories, failing to make the connection to the classroom. In Small Teaching, James Lang presents a strategy for improving student learning with a series of modest but powerful changes that make a big difference—many of which can be put into practice in a single class period. These strategies are designed to bridge the chasm between primary research and the classroom environment in a way that can be implemented by any faculty in any discipline, and even integrated into pre-existing teaching techniques. Learn, for example:

- How does one become good at retrieving knowledge from memory?
- How does making predictions now help us learn in the future?
- How do instructors instill fixed or growth mindsets in their students?

Each chapter introduces a basic concept in cognitive theory, explains when and how it should be employed, and provides firm examples of how the intervention has been or could be used in a variety of disciplines. Small teaching techniques include brief classroom or online learning activities, one-time interventions, and small modifications in course design or communication with students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
About the Author
Introduction: Small Teaching

Part I Knowledge
ch. 1 Retrieving
ch. 2 Predicting
ch. 3 Interleaving

Part II Understanding
ch. 4 Connecting
ch. 5 Practicing
ch. 6 Self-Explaining

Part III Inspiration
ch. 7 Motivating
ch. 8 Growing
ch. 9 Expanding

Conclusion: Beginning
Works Cited
Index
Cover image

Teach from the Heart: Pedagogy as Spiritual Practice

Book
Paris, Jenell
2016
Cascade Books, Eugene, OR
LB1025.3.P37 2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
How can a teacher remain whole and happy, able to teach well for an entire semester, an entire year, and an entire career? Teach from the Heart is about finding, rediscovering, or holding on to the heart of the teaching life, which is, quite literally, the teacher's heart. It is an encouragement to take up teaching as more than a service to provide, a profession to master, or a job ...
Additional Info:
How can a teacher remain whole and happy, able to teach well for an entire semester, an entire year, and an entire career? Teach from the Heart is about finding, rediscovering, or holding on to the heart of the teaching life, which is, quite literally, the teacher's heart. It is an encouragement to take up teaching as more than a service to provide, a profession to master, or a job to perform. It is an invitation to artisanry, teaching as a craft that we master by working with our hands over long periods of time, producing results that bear the mark of their maker. Whether you're just beginning, or in it for the long haul, sit down with Teach from the Heart and deepen your heart for the teaching life. We need not bring to class the wisdom and knowledge we gained elsewhere; we can take up teaching as a spiritual practice, with the classroom as a sacred space for our own formation as persons.

With nearly forty years' experience as both student and teacher, Jenell Paris's perspective is hard-won, but still lighthearted and enthusiastic. Teachers from any context will benefit: stories and examples include preschool, K-12, community education, and college teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 The Change You Wish to See
ch. 2 Your Attention Please
ch. 3 Teach Here, Now
ch. 4 Have Fun
ch. 5 Say Yes, Say No
ch. 6 Define the Relationship
ch. 7 Make It by Hand
ch. 8 Nurture Integrity
ch. 9 Survive Crisis
ch. 10 Be True to Your School
ch. 11 Fall in Love

Epilogue: Commencing
Bibliography