Cognitive Development

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Women's Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice and Mind

Book
Belenky, Mary, Blythe Clinchy, Nancy Goldberger, and Jill Tarule
1986
Basic Books, New York, NY
HQ1206.W88 1986
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Despite the progress of the women's movement, many women still feel silenced in their families and schools. Based on in-depth interviews with 135 women, this moving and important book explains why. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Despite the progress of the women's movement, many women still feel silenced in their families and schools. Based on in-depth interviews with 135 women, this moving and important book explains why. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction:: To the Other Side of Silence
Part I The Ways of Knowing
ch. 1 Silence
ch. 2 Received Knowledge: Listening to the Voices of Others
ch. 3 Subjective Knowledge: The Inner Voice
ch. 4 Subjective Knowledge: The Quest for Self
ch. 5 Procedural Knowledge: The Voice of Reason
ch. 6 Procedural Knowledge: Separate and Connected Knowing
ch. 7 Constructed Knowledge: Integrating the Voices
Part II: Development in Context: Families and Schools
ch. 8 Family Life and The Politics of Talk
ch. 9 Toward an Education for Women
ch. 10 Connected Teaching
Appendix A: Interview Schedule
Appendix B: Educational Dialectics
References
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Thinking About Teaching and Learning: Developing Habits of Learning with First Year College and University Students

Book
Leamnson, Robert
1999
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2331.L39 1999
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Here is a compelling read for every teacher in higher education who wants to refresh or reexamine his or her classroom practice.

Building on the insights offered by recent discoveries about the biological basis of learning, and on his own thought-provoking definitions of teaching, learning and education, the author proceeds to the practical details of instruction that teachers are most interested in — the things that make or break ...
Additional Info:
Here is a compelling read for every teacher in higher education who wants to refresh or reexamine his or her classroom practice.

Building on the insights offered by recent discoveries about the biological basis of learning, and on his own thought-provoking definitions of teaching, learning and education, the author proceeds to the practical details of instruction that teachers are most interested in — the things that make or break teaching.

Practical and thoughtful, and based on forty years of teaching, wide reading and much reflection, Robert Leamnson provides teachers with a map to develop their own teaching philosophy, and effective nuts-and-bolts advice.

His approach is particularly useful for those facing a cohort of first year students less prepared for college and university. He is concerned to develop in his students habits and skills that will equip them for a lifetime of learning.

He is especially alert to the psychology of students. He also understands, and has experienced, the typical frustration and exasperation teachers feel when students ingeniously elude their teachers' loftiest goals and strategies. Most important, he has good advice about how to cope with the challenge.

This guide will appeal to college teachers in all disciplines. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Thinking About Thinking About Teaching: How a philosophy of teaching develops and why it is important to have one
ch. 2 The Biological Basis of Learning: Learning as brain change, rather than brain use
ch. 3 Language: On the questionable utility of unexpressed ideas
ch. 4 Today's First-Year Students: Culture, motivation and preparation
ch. 5 Teaching and Pedagogy: How the way we teach affects the way students learn
ch. 6 The Classroom: The classroom as dynamic arena - What students are really doing
ch. 7 Writing and other Technologies: Technology, old, and new, and as a means to an end
ch. 8 Final Thoughts: Reflections and ruminations

App Two sample assignment sheets
References
Annotated Bibliography
Index
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Forms of Intellectual and Ethical Development in the College Years

Book
Perry, William G., Jr.
1970
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Orlando, FL
LB3609.P4 1970
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Since its original publication in 1970, this landmark book by William Perry has remained the cornerstone of much of the student development research that followed. Using research conducted with Harvard undergraduates over a fifteen-year period, Perry derived an enduring framework for characterizing student development - a scheme so accurate that it still informs and advances investigations into student development across genders and cultures. Drawing from firsthand accounts, Perry traces a path ...
Additional Info:
Since its original publication in 1970, this landmark book by William Perry has remained the cornerstone of much of the student development research that followed. Using research conducted with Harvard undergraduates over a fifteen-year period, Perry derived an enduring framework for characterizing student development - a scheme so accurate that it still informs and advances investigations into student development across genders and cultures. Drawing from firsthand accounts, Perry traces a path from students' adolescence into adulthood. His nine-stage model describes the steps that move students from a simplistic, categorical view of knowledge to a more complex, contextual view of the world and of themselves. Throughout this journey of cognitive development, Perry reveals, the most significant changes occur in forms in which people perceive their world rather than in the particulars of their attitudes and concerns. He shows ultimately that the nature of intellectual development is such that we should pay as much attention to the processes we use as to the content. In a new introduction to this classic work, Lee Knefelkamp - a close colleague of Perry's and a leading expert on college student development - evaluates the book's place in the literature of higher education. Knefelkamp explains how the Perry scheme has shaped current thinking about student development and discusses the most significant research that has since evolved from Perry's groundbreaking effort. Forms of Ethical and Intellectual Development in the College Years is a work that every current and future student services professional must have in their library. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction and Resume
Context of Students' Reports
The Students' Experience
Concepts of the Scheme
The Development Scheme
Critique
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Disciplinary Differences in Teaching and Learning: Implications for Practice

Book
Hativa, Nina and Michele Marinocovich
1995
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 64)
LB2331.D55 1995
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Cognitive Development   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning increases our knowledge and understanding of the causes and consequences of disciplinary differences in the patterns of teaching and learning, in the instructional strategies to increase teaching effectiveness, in the culture and environment in which teaching takes place, and in faculty and students' attitudes, goals, beliefs, values, philosophies, and orientations toward instruction. Despite their practical and pervasive influence, disciplinary differences have ...
Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning increases our knowledge and understanding of the causes and consequences of disciplinary differences in the patterns of teaching and learning, in the instructional strategies to increase teaching effectiveness, in the culture and environment in which teaching takes place, and in faculty and students' attitudes, goals, beliefs, values, philosophies, and orientations toward instruction. Despite their practical and pervasive influence, disciplinary differences have been subjected to relatively little systematic study, especially in their effect on the quality of teaching and learning in higher education. This volume both provides new summaries of important studies on disciplinary differences and points out promising directions for further research. This is the 64th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. For more information on the series, please see the Journals and Periodicals page. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Disciplinary differences in knowledge validation(Janet G. Donald)
ch. 2 What is taught in an undergraduate lecture? : differences between a matched pair of pure and applied disciplines (Nira Hativa)
ch. 3 Disciplinary differences in classroom teaching behaviors (Harry G. Murray and Robert D. Renaud)
ch. 4 The relationship of disciplinary differences and the value of class preparation time to student ratings of teaching (Jennifer Franklin and Michael Theall)
ch. 5 Disciplinary and institutional differences in undergraduate education goals (John C. Smart and Corinna A. Ethington)
ch. 6 Disciplines with an affinity for the improvement of undergraduate education (John M. Braxton)
ch. 7 Discipline-specific pedagogical knowledge in linguistics and Spanish (Lisa Firing Lenze)
ch. 8 Subject-matter differences in secondary schools : connections to higher education (Susan S. Stodolsky and Pamela L. Grossman)
ch. 9 Disciplinary differences in what is taught and in students' perceptions of what they learn and of how they are taught (William E. Cashin and Ronald G. Downey)
ch. 10 Approaches to studying and perceptions of the learning environment across disciplines (Noel Entwhistle and Hilary Tait)
ch. 11 Disciplinary differences in students' perceptions of success : modifying misperceptions with attributional retraining (Verena H. Menec and Raymond P. Perry)
Concluding remarks : on the meaning of disciplinary differences
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Adult Learning and Development: Perspectives from Educational Psychology

Book
Smith, M. Cecil and Thomas Pourchot
1998
Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ
LC5225.P78A48 1998
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Adult education occurs whenever individuals engage in sustained, systematic learning in order to affect changes in their attitudes, knowledge, skills, or belief systems. Learning, instruction, and developmental processes are the primary foci of educational psychology research and theorizing, but educational psychologists' work in these domains has centered primarily on the childhood and adolescent school years. More recently, however, a number of educational psychologists have studied learning and development in adulthood. ...
Additional Info:
Adult education occurs whenever individuals engage in sustained, systematic learning in order to affect changes in their attitudes, knowledge, skills, or belief systems. Learning, instruction, and developmental processes are the primary foci of educational psychology research and theorizing, but educational psychologists' work in these domains has centered primarily on the childhood and adolescent school years. More recently, however, a number of educational psychologists have studied learning and development in adulthood. The results of these efforts have resulted in what is now called adult educational psychology.
The purpose of this volume is to introduce this new subfield within educational psychology. Section 1 focuses on the interplay between learning and development in adulthood, how various forms of instruction lead to different learning outcomes for adults, description of the diverse social contexts in which adult learning takes place, and the development of metacognitive knowledge across the life span. Section 2 describes both research and theory pertaining to adult intellectual functioning, thinking, and problem-solving skills within various contexts. Section 3 describes research in a variety of adult learning domains; discusses the cognitive and behavioral dimensions of reading in adulthood and the applications of reading in real-life circumstances; examines an educational intervention developed to promote forgiveness; and relates the outcomes of an intervention designed to educate parents about their children's mathematics learning. Section 4 summarizes the themes and issues running throughout this, the first book that has sought to span the gulf betweenadult education, adult development, and educational psychology. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
ch. 1 What Does Educational Psychology Know About Adult Learning and Development?
ch. 2 We Learn, Therefore We Develop: Learning Versus Development - or Developing Learning?
ch. 3 Abstraction, the Will, the Self, and Models of Learning in Adulthood
ch. 4 Extending Sociocultural Theory to Adult Learning
ch. 5 On the Development of Adult Metacognition
ch. 6 Changing Mind, Changing World: Practical Intelligence and Tacit Knowledge in Adult Learning
ch. 7 The Role of Adults' Beliefs About Knowledge in School, Work, and Everyday Life
ch. 8 Adult Intelligence: Sketch of a Theory and Applications to Learning and Education
ch. 9 Mnemonic Strategies for Adult Learner
ch. 10 Adult Age Differences in Reading and Remembering Text and Using This Information to Make Decisions in Everyday Life
ch. 11 The Educational Psychology of Reading in Adulthood
ch. 12 Forgiveness Education With Adult Learners
ch. 13 Contributions of Parent Education to Adult Development
ch. 14 Toward an Adult Educational Psychology
Author Index
Subject Index
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The Critical Years: Young Adults & The Search for Meaning, Faith & Commitment

Book
Parks, Sharon
1986
Harper & Row, New York, NY
BV4529.2.P37 1991
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
A key study for understanding the transformation of meaning in young adults. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A key study for understanding the transformation of meaning in young adults. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Elusiveness of Adulthood
ch. 2 Meaning-Making: An Activity of Faith
ch. 3 Developmental Theories: Insights into the Motion of Faith
ch. 4 The Journey Toward Mature Faith: A Model
ch. 5 Young Adult Faith: Promise and Vulnerability
ch. 6 Imagination: The Power of Adult Faith
ch. 7 Higher Education: A Community of Imagination
ch. 8 Culture as Mentor

Appendices
Notes
Index
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"The Medicine Wheel: Emotions and Connections in the Classroom"

Article
Frederick, Peter J.
1991
To Improve the Academy 10 (1991): 197-214
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Emotions in the Classroom Connections in the Classroom The Medicine Wheel in the Classroom References Appendix A
Additional Info:
Emotions in the Classroom Connections in the Classroom The Medicine Wheel in the Classroom References Appendix A
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"The Power of Stories in the Classroom"

Article
Frederick, Peter J.
1990
American Association for Higher Education Bulletin 43, no. 3 (1990): 5-8
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Understanding the Tensions and Emotions of Learning"

Article
Brookfield, Stephen D.
1990
in The Skillful Teacher (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1990), 43-56
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain

Book
Damasio, Antonio R.
1994
G.P. Putnam's Sons, New York, NY
QP401.D2 1994
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles

Additional Info:
Since Descartes famously proclaimed, “I think, therefore I am,” science has often overlooked emotions as the source of a person's true being. Even modern neuroscience has tended, until recently, to concentrate on the cognitive aspects of brain function, disregarding emotions. This attitude began to change with the publication of Descartes' Error in 1995. Antonio Damasio—“one of the world's leading neurologists” (The New York Times)—challenged traditional ideas about the connection ...
Additional Info:
Since Descartes famously proclaimed, “I think, therefore I am,” science has often overlooked emotions as the source of a person's true being. Even modern neuroscience has tended, until recently, to concentrate on the cognitive aspects of brain function, disregarding emotions. This attitude began to change with the publication of Descartes' Error in 1995. Antonio Damasio—“one of the world's leading neurologists” (The New York Times)—challenged traditional ideas about the connection between emotions and rationality. In this wondrously engaging book, Damasio takes the reader on a journey of scientific discovery through a series of case studies, demonstrating what many of us have long suspected: emotions are not a luxury, they are essential to rational thinking and to normal social behavior. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
PART I Unpleasantness in Vermont
Gage's Brain Revealed
A Modern Phineas Gage
In Colder Blood
PART II Assembling an Explanation
Biological Regulation and Survival
Emotions and Feelings
The Somatic-Marker Hypothesis
PART III Testing the Somatic-Marker Hypothesis
The Body-Minded Brain
A Passion for Reasoning
Postscriptum
Notes and References
Further Reading
Acknowledgments
Index
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Learning and Development: Making Connections to Enhance Teaching

Book
Silverman, Sharon L. and Martha E. Casazza
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.2.S55 2000
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
A ready reference to learning process in college students, or lack there of, and how instructors can help them transform their own education for the better. This comprehensive resource offers readers a proven approach to strengthening persistence and achievement in post-secondary education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A ready reference to learning process in college students, or lack there of, and how instructors can help them transform their own education for the better. This comprehensive resource offers readers a proven approach to strengthening persistence and achievement in post-secondary education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Pt. 1 Understanding Learning and Development
ch. 1 Today's Learners
ch. 2 Theories of Personal Development and Learning
ch. 3 Theories Related to Cognitive Development and Learning
ch. 4 A Framework for Effective Practice
Pt. 2 Applying Research to Teaching
ch. 5 Self and Identity
ch. 6 Motivation
ch. 7 Interaction with the Environment
ch. 8 Ways of Knowing
ch. 9 Learning Styles and Preferences
ch. 10 Self-Regulation and Goal Setting
Pt. 3 New Teaching Perspectives
ch. 11 Critical Reflection on Practice
ch. 12 Educator as Innovator, Researcher, and Change Agent
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Religious Education and the Brain

Book
Larsen, Jerry
2000
Paulist Press, Mahwah, NJ
BL42.L37 2000
Topics: Religious Education   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
What if what we know about our brains and the way humans think was applied to the way we nurture each other in faith? Would we do it differently? What if we let cognitive science inform our educational strategies and the ways we help each other form our spirits? What if we began to believe that brain research and scientific investigation could reveal something of our spiritual nature and destiny?" ...
Additional Info:
What if what we know about our brains and the way humans think was applied to the way we nurture each other in faith? Would we do it differently? What if we let cognitive science inform our educational strategies and the ways we help each other form our spirits? What if we began to believe that brain research and scientific investigation could reveal something of our spiritual nature and destiny?" These questions are at the heart of Jerry Larsen's fascinating and sure-to-be-talked-about book. Writing in a clear, accessible style, Larsen offers a model and methods for joining the discoveries of brain science with the work of religious education. He touches on the discoveries about the left and right brain thinking styles, multiple intelligence, memory mechanisms, meaning-making strategies and on the nature of consciousness. And he reflects on the belief that we can do religious education better if we take cues from what we know about the God-given network between our ears. This book is unique. There are no other books on the market on the subject of religious education and the brain. Enhanced with practical charts and illustrations, and with great ecumenical appeal, it will make useful reading for religious educators, religious professionals, and teachers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Lessons of the Brain
ch. 2 The Meaning Factory
ch. 3 The Role of the Religious Educator/Factory Consultant
ch. 4 Religious Education as Model Building
ch. 5 Perception: Doors to the Factory
ch. 6 A Pedagogy of Perception
ch. 7 Metaphor and Understanding
ch. 8 I Remember
ch. 9 Driving Memory into Being
ch. 10 The Sevenfold Path to Religious Intelligence
ch. 11 Pilgrim Mind
ch. 12 The Emergence of Consciousness

Epilogue
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Knowledge, Difference, and Power: Essays Inspired by Women's Ways of Knowing

Book
Goldberger, Nancy, Jill Tarule, Blythe Clinchy, and Mary Belenky, eds.
1996
Basic Books, New York, NY
Not catalogued
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Ten years ago, Mary Belenky, Blythe Clinchy, Nancy Goldberger, and Jill Tarule wrote Women's Ways of Knowing, a book The New York Times Book Review called "a framework for future research on women, knowledge, and identity." In the decade that followed, their theory of women's psychology, development, and ways of knowing has been applied in several fields, from the social sciences to the humanities, women's studies, education, psychology, and law. ...
Additional Info:
Ten years ago, Mary Belenky, Blythe Clinchy, Nancy Goldberger, and Jill Tarule wrote Women's Ways of Knowing, a book The New York Times Book Review called "a framework for future research on women, knowledge, and identity." In the decade that followed, their theory of women's psychology, development, and ways of knowing has been applied in several fields, from the social sciences to the humanities, women's studies, education, psychology, and law. But even as it was embraced by readers, Women's Ways of Knowing also became the center of a fierce debate within academic circles. Now, in 14 illuminating new essays, the original authors and invited contributors explore how the theory introduced in Women's Ways of Knowing has developed and shifted over the years and how it has been received, applied, used, and abused. The authors, and others, respond to critics of the original theory. The essays also expand the original argument beyond gender and knowing to address the complicating factors of race, class, and culture. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: The Beginning of the Story: Collaboration and Separation
Introduction: Looking Backward, Looking Forward

ch. 1 Reconfiguring Teaching and Knowing in the College Classroom (Ann Stanton)
ch. 2 Women's Ways of "Knowing" Law: Feminist Legal Epistemology, Pedagogy, and Jurisprudence (Carrie Menkel-Meadow)
ch. 3 Embodying Knowledge, Knowing Desire: Authority and Split Subjectivities in Girls' Epistemological Development (Elizabeth Debold, Deborah Tolman, and Lyn Mikel Brown)
ch. 4 Connected Knowing in Constructive Psychotherapy (Michael J. Mahoney)
ch. 5 Women's Ways of Knowing in Women's Studies, Feminist Pedagogies, and Feminist Theory (A. Maher with Mary Kay Tetreault)
ch. 6 Unknown Women and Unknowing Research: Consequences of Color and Class in Feminist Psychology (Vanessa M. Bing and Paela Trotman Reid)
ch. 7 Connected and Separate Knowing: Toward a Marriage of Two Minds (Blythe McVicker Clinchy)
ch. 8 Reason's "Femininity": A Case for Connected Knowing (Sara Ruddick)
ch. 9 Voices in Dialogue: Collaborative Ways of Knowing (Jill Mattuck Tarule)
ch. 10 Speech Is Silver, Silence Is Gold: The Asymmetrical Intersubjectivity of Communicative Action (Patrocinio P. Schweickart)
ch. 11 Cultural Imperatives and Diversity in Ways of Knowing (Nancy Rule Goldberger)
ch. 12 Strategic Suspensions: Feminists of Color Theorize the Production of Knowledge (Ada Hurtado)
ch. 13 Public Homeplaces: Nurturing the Development of People, Families, and Communities (Mary Field Belenky)
ch. 14 Gendered Ways of Knowing and the "Epistemological Crisis" of the West (Sandra Harding)

Contributors
Index
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Applying the Science of Learning to University Teaching and Beyond

Book
Halpern, Diane F. and Milton D. Hakel, eds.
2002
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.A59 2002
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
It is sadly true that most of the way we teach and learn is uninformed by laboratory findings in human cognition. Although researchers have made considerable progress in understanding the cognitive and social variables that mediate in the learning process, very little of this basic knowledge has been translated into practice, many research questions that are critically important for directing educational reform remain unanswered, and few in the scientific community ...
Additional Info:
It is sadly true that most of the way we teach and learn is uninformed by laboratory findings in human cognition. Although researchers have made considerable progress in understanding the cognitive and social variables that mediate in the learning process, very little of this basic knowledge has been translated into practice, many research questions that are critically important for directing educational reform remain unanswered, and few in the scientific community have been actively involved in the efforts to reform higher education. This edited volume is among many recent attempts to build on empirically-validated learning activities to enhance what and how much is learned and how well and how long it is remembered. Thus, the movement for a real "Science of Learning" has taken hold-the application of scientific principles to the study of learning-both under the controlled conditions of the laboratory and in the messy real-world settings where most of us go about the business of learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Learning That Lasts a Lifetime: Teaching for Long-Term Retention and Transfer (Diane F. Halpern, Milton D. Hakel)
ch. 2 Biology Is to Medicine as Psychology Is to Education: True or False? (Nora S. Newcombe)
ch. 3 Successful Lecturing: Presenting Information in Ways That Engage Effective Processing (Robert A. Bjork)
ch. 4 Improving Comprehension Through Discourse Processing (Arthur C. Graesser, Natalie K. Person, Xiangen Hu)
ch. 5 The Theory of Successful Intelligence as a Basis for Instruction and Assessment in Higher Education (Robert J. Sternberg, Elena L. Grigorenko)
ch. 6 Cognitive Theory and the Design of Multimedia Instruction: An Example of the Two-Way Street Between Cognition and Instruction (Richard E. Mayer)
ch. 7 Issues, Examples, and Challenges in Formative Assessment (Earl Hunt, James W. Pellegrino)
ch. 8 Cognitive Psychology and College-Level Pedagogy: Two Siblings That Rarely Communicate (Margaret W. Matlin)

Index
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"The Historical Reconstruction of Knowledge about Race: Implications for Transformative Teaching"

Article
Banks, James A.
1995
Educational Researcher 24, no. 2 (1995): 15-25
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Cognitive Development   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
A historical case study of the construction and reconstruction of race between the late 19th century and the 1940s is used to document the ways in which the social, cultural, political, and historical contexts in which knowers are embedded influence the knowledge they construct and reconstruct.
Additional Info:
A historical case study of the construction and reconstruction of race between the late 19th century and the 1940s is used to document the ways in which the social, cultural, political, and historical contexts in which knowers are embedded influence the knowledge they construct and reconstruct.
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"'Learning Styles' and Instructional Design"

Article
Sadler-Smith, Eugene
1996
Innovations in Education and Training International 33, no. 4 (1996): 185-193
Topics: Course Design   |   Cognitive Development   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"A Developmental Perspective on Learning" (pdf)

Article
King, Patricia M., and Marcia B. Baxter Magolda
1996
Journal of College Student Development 37, no. 2 (1996): 163-173
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Originally published in March/April 1996, advances an integrated perspective on learning and personal development by viewing the cognitive and affective dimensions of development as related parts of one process. Proposes that from this integrated perspective, a successful educational experience simultaneously increases cognitive understanding and sense of self, personal maturity, and interpersonal effectiveness.
Additional Info:
Originally published in March/April 1996, advances an integrated perspective on learning and personal development by viewing the cognitive and affective dimensions of development as related parts of one process. Proposes that from this integrated perspective, a successful educational experience simultaneously increases cognitive understanding and sense of self, personal maturity, and interpersonal effectiveness.
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"Models of the College Students' Epistemological Development" (pdf)

Article
Pugh, Sharon
2005
Indiana University, http://www.indiana.edu/~l506/theoryframe/506Model.htm January 5,
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Reviews theories of how notions of what constitutes knowledge and how one gets it change as individuals mature –"epistemological development," or development of ways of knowing.
Additional Info:
Reviews theories of how notions of what constitutes knowledge and how one gets it change as individuals mature –"epistemological development," or development of ways of knowing.
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Affective Teaching

Book
Rompelman, Lynne
2002
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LB1072.R66 2002
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles

Additional Info:
In Affective Teaching, Lynne Rompelman extends the research on the affective domain by incorporating students' and teachers' voices regarding the nature of caring of teachers within an academic setting. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
In Affective Teaching, Lynne Rompelman extends the research on the affective domain by incorporating students' and teachers' voices regarding the nature of caring of teachers within an academic setting. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Pt. 1 What Do We Know About the Affective Domain?
ch. 1 Affective Teachers
ch. 2 Affective Instruction
ch. 3 Affective Educational Settings

Pt. II How Do We Emphasize the Affective Domain in Teaching?
ch. 4 The Symbiotic Relationship Between the Cognitive and Affective Domains
ch. 5 An Assessment Tool to Determine Whether You Are an Affective Teacher
Additional Info:
Neuroscience tells us that the products of the mind -- thought, emotions, artistic creation -- are the result of the interactions of the biological brain with our senses and the physical world: in short, that thinking and learning are the products of a biological process.

This realization, that learning actually alters the brain by changing the number and strength of synapses, offers a powerful foundation for rethinking teaching ...
Additional Info:
Neuroscience tells us that the products of the mind -- thought, emotions, artistic creation -- are the result of the interactions of the biological brain with our senses and the physical world: in short, that thinking and learning are the products of a biological process.

This realization, that learning actually alters the brain by changing the number and strength of synapses, offers a powerful foundation for rethinking teaching practice and one's philosophy of teaching.

James Zull invites teachers in higher education or any other setting to accompany him in his exploration of what scientists can tell us about the brain and to discover how this knowledge can influence the practice of teaching. He describes the brain in clear non-technical language and an engaging conversational tone, highlighting its functions and parts and how they interact, and always relating them to the real world of the classroom and his own evolution as a teacher.

"The Art of Changing the Brain" is grounded in the practicalities and challenges of creating effective opportunities for deep and lasting learning, and of dealing with students as unique learners. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: A new perspective, some struggles, and a hope
ch. 1 The Sweet Edge: Learning is physical - we can understand!
ch. 2 Where we ought to Be: The natural relationship between brain structure and learning
ch. 3 Holding a Just Balance: Brain connections that change data into knowledge
ch. 4 Our Trade and our Art: Evolution of the brain and motivation of the learner
ch. 5 A Feeling of this Business: In the business of reason and memory, feelings count
ch. 6 What we Already Know: To begin, find out about existing neuron networks
ch. 7 Only Connect!: How teachers can change neuronal networks
ch. 8 Sense Luscious: Using the power of the sensory brain to help people learn
ch. 9 Waiting for Unity: Helping people comprehend their experience
ch. 10 The Courageous Leap: Creating knowledge by using the integrative frontal cortex
ch. 11 Test by Trial: Using the motor brain to close the loop of learning
ch. 12 We did this ourselves: Changing the brain through effective use of emotion
Epilogue
Index
About the Author
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Motivating Students

Web
Teaching Effectiveness Program, University of Oregon (2000)
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Short insightful responses to a series of questions, including how do I: deal with apathetic students? deal with groups who are not functioning well together? get my students to prepare for class? create assignments that are challenging but not overwhelming? And: Should class be fun?
Additional Info:
Short insightful responses to a series of questions, including how do I: deal with apathetic students? deal with groups who are not functioning well together? get my students to prepare for class? create assignments that are challenging but not overwhelming? And: Should class be fun?
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Teaching for Understanding: What It Is and How to Do It

Book
Newton, Douglas P.
2000
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1025.3.N495 2000
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Teaching for Understanding describes the nature of understanding, strategies that support it, and factors which bear upon it in a way which makes it accessible to teachers in raining, practicing teachers, and lecturer in education. Its coverage includes understanding and its nature, constructing relationships and mental structures, surrogate teachers, metacognition, and assessment. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Teaching for Understanding describes the nature of understanding, strategies that support it, and factors which bear upon it in a way which makes it accessible to teachers in raining, practicing teachers, and lecturer in education. Its coverage includes understanding and its nature, constructing relationships and mental structures, surrogate teachers, metacognition, and assessment. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Understanding: A Worthwhile Goal
ch. 3 The Nature of Understanding
ch. 4 Making Connections
ch. 5 Mental Engagement
ch. 6 Supporting Understanding With Analogies
ch. 7 Using Surrogate Teachers
ch. 8 Failing to Understand
ch. 9 The Total Learning Environment
ch. 10 Knowing What Counts
ch. 11 Motivated to Understand
ch. 12 The Self-regulation of Learning
ch. 13 Evaluating Understanding

In Conclusion
Glossary
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Wabash tree

Learning and Motivation in the Postsecondary Classroom

Book
Svinicki, Marilla
2004
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB1065.S84 2004
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Adult Learners   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
While there is much available research and theory about learning and motivation, until now there has been no resource that translates esoteric findings into everyday language and examples that can be readily applied in college classrooms. This book brings the findings and theories of educational psychology to classroom faculty, helping them to adopt a scholarly approach to understanding their students' learning problems. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
While there is much available research and theory about learning and motivation, until now there has been no resource that translates esoteric findings into everyday language and examples that can be readily applied in college classrooms. This book brings the findings and theories of educational psychology to classroom faculty, helping them to adopt a scholarly approach to understanding their students' learning problems. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 My Attempt to Motivate You to Learn About Learning.
ch. 2 Helping Students Learn the Content.
ch. 3 Helping Students Understand.
ch. 4 Helping Students Develop Skills, Including Intellectual Skills.
ch. 5 Helping Students Retain and Use What They've Learned in Other Settings.
ch. 6 Helping Students Help Themselves.
ch. 7 Motivating Students to Learn.
ch. 8 What to Do About Individual Differences in Learning.
ch. 9 Putting It All Together.

Appendix: The Theories in a Nutshell.
Bibliography.
Index.
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Contextual Teaching and Learning: What It Is and Why It's Here to Stay

Book
Johnson, Elaine B.
2002
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1027.J545 2002
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Contextual teaching and learning (CTL) is a system for teaching that is grounded in brain research. Brain research indicates that we learn best when we see meaning in new tasks and material, and we discover meaning when we are able to connect new information with our existing knowledge and experiences. Students learn best, according to neuroscience, when they can connect the content of academic lessons with the context of their ...
Additional Info:
Contextual teaching and learning (CTL) is a system for teaching that is grounded in brain research. Brain research indicates that we learn best when we see meaning in new tasks and material, and we discover meaning when we are able to connect new information with our existing knowledge and experiences. Students learn best, according to neuroscience, when they can connect the content of academic lessons with the context of their own daily lives.

Johnson discusses the elements of the brain-compatible contextual teaching and learning system: making meaningful connections; investing school work with significance; self-regulated learning; collaboration; critical and creating thinking; nurturing the individual; reaching high standards; and using authentic assessment. Drawing on the practices of teachers in kindergarten through university, Johnson provides numerous examples of how to use each part of the CTL system.

Contextual Teaching and Learning: What it Is and Why It's Here to Stay is more than a handbook on precise steps to follow to help children of all abilities achieve high standards by joining academic lessons with their immediate context. This book also explains how the brain works, discusses why teachers need to pay attention to context, and makes a strong case for the need to teach students to think critically and creatively. This inspirational book urges educators to eliminate the student question: "Why do we have to learn this?" If the educators invest learning with meaning by relying on context, that question won't have to be asked. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

ch. 1 Why Contextual Teaching and Learning (CTL)?
CTL: Rooted in a New Worldview
A Response to the Limitations of Traditional Education
Rejecting Dualism: Unifying Thought and Action
CTL: A Brain-Compatible System
Conclusion: The Challenge of Context

ch. 2 A Definition: Why CTL Works
Psychology, Neuroscience, and a Definition of CTL
CTL Defined
The CTL System: Eight Components
The Significance for CTL of Three Scientific Principles
Conclusion: The Challenge of Interdependence, Differentiation, and Self-Organization for Educators

ch. 3 Making Connections to Find Meaning
CTL and TAG: One System for Everyone
It's the Connection That Counts
Ways to Connect Teaching and Learning, With Examples
Conclusion: Making Connections - A Natural Human Activity

ch. 4 Self-Regulated Learning and Collaboration
The Importance of Process
Self-Regulated Learning: A Definition
The Knowledge and Skills Essential to Self-Regulated Learning
The Self-Regulated Learning Process
Self-Regulated Learning and the Teacher's Responsibility
Conclusion: The Transforming Power of Self-Regulated Learning

ch. 5 Critical and Creative Thinking
Introduction: The Need for Critical and Creative Thinking
Critical Thinking Defined
Eight Steps for Critical Thinkers
Critical Thinking Used to Solve Problems
Critical Thinking Used to Make Decisions
Critical Thinking Applied to Ethical Deliberation and Action
Mental Activities That Aid Creativity
Barriers to Creativity
Creative and Critical Thinking: Two Sides of One Coin

ch. 6 No One Is Ordinary: Nurturing the Individual
Introduction: The Versatile CTL Teacher
Teaching and the Learning Environment
The Influence of Relationships
Examples of Reaching Out
Nurturing Eight Kinds of Intelligence
Emotion, Learning, and Memory
Conclusion: To Make the Heart Sing

ch. 7 Reaching High Standards and Using Authentic Assessment
Introduction: Standards Worth Reaching
Creating Demanding Objectives
Objectives That Hold Meaning
Using External Standards
Service Learning and CTL Objectives
Standards and Standardized Tests
Four Kinds of Authentic Assessment
Examples of Projects
Evaluating a Performance Task
Conclusion: Authentic Assessment and High Standards

ch. 8 CTL: A Pathway to Excellence for Everyone

References
Index
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Cultivating Judgment: A Sourcebook for Teaching Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum

Book
Nelson, John
2005
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2395.35.N44 2005
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
This fine sourcebook provides college and university teachers, across the curriculum, with specific classroom-tested activities and assignments to stimulate and develop student critical thinking.

The book consists of fifty modules, each containing:

* A description of a critical thinking assignment,

* An explanation of the assignment's purposes and benefits,

* A discussion of ways to use or modify the assignment in the classroom, and
<...
Additional Info:
This fine sourcebook provides college and university teachers, across the curriculum, with specific classroom-tested activities and assignments to stimulate and develop student critical thinking.

The book consists of fifty modules, each containing:

* A description of a critical thinking assignment,

* An explanation of the assignment's purposes and benefits,

* A discussion of ways to use or modify the assignment in the classroom, and

* Suggested related activities, including relevant bibliographical sources.

Most modules were developed by the author; in other cases, the author shaped, refined, and expanded on material that has been developed and used by colleagues. Some modules are discipline-specific, some are suitable for a number of disciplines; and many can easily be modified for use in a wide variety of fields. The assignments vary in scope, difficulty and complexity. Some are deigned for introductory freshman courses, while others have been used in graduate courses but could be adapted for lower level courses.

Each module stands alone, but the modules are loosely grouped into five sections:

(1) Problems and Puzzles
(2) Analyses and Critiques
(3) Opinions, Decisions, Values
(4) Projects, Experiments, Adventures
(5) Student as Teacher, Teacher as Student.

The sourcebook also includes an introductory chapter on the nature and importance of critical thinking, a cross-referencing of all activities by discipline, and a wide-ranging bibliography. Cultivating Judgment has been extensively tested in college classrooms, then revised, expanded and significantly improved. The author has conducted extensive research on the teaching of thinking skills, and discovered that discovered that no existing source filled the need for a book that spells out and demonstrates how to teach critical thinking in virtually any discipline, from liberal arts to more specialized career programs.

You will find Cultivating Judgment to be an engaging book, and one that combines intellectual rigor with a playful, creative spirit – and, one that can be used as a textbook in a general course on critical thinking, or as a resource for teachers across the curriculum! (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction: Thinking About Critical Thinking
Activities by Discipline
Section One: Problems and Puzzles
Activity 1: Thinking on Another Planet (Testing Critical Thinking)
Activity 2: Who Killed Harry Skank? (Solving Problems and Puzzles)
Activity 2: Handout: Murder Mystery
Activity 3: Do Bees Build It Best? (Solving Mathematical Problems)
Section Two: Analyses and Critiques
Activity 4: Is the Earth Hollow? (Distinguishing Fact from Opinion)
Activity 4: Handout: Fact vs. Opinion
Activity 5: From the Known to the Unknown (Making Inferences)
Activity 6: I’m Taking Medication—You’re on Drugs (Detecting Slanting)
Activity 6: Handout on Evaluating Internet Sources
Activity 7: For the Semantically Challenged (Deciphering Euphemisms)
Activity 8: Weighing the Evidence (Evaluating Evidence and Statistics)
Activity 8: Handout: Evaluating Evidence
Activity 9: Eyewitness (Observing, Remembering, Describing)
Activity 10: Asking the Right Questions (Asking Questions, Getting Information)
Activity 11: The Guiding Light (Using Study Guides Collaboratively)
Activity 11: Handout: Study Guide to When She Was Bad
Activity 11: Handout: Study Guide to "Ode to a Nightingale"
Activity 12: What Do Men Want? (Comparing Student Opinions)
Activity 13: At First Blush (Analyzing Behavior)
Activity 14: The State vs. Rumpelstiltskin (Using Evidence, Applying Principles)
Activity 15: It’s a Bird, It’s a Bootie Bird (Defining Terms, Applying Definitions)
Activity 16: The Pecking Order (Applying Concepts, Using Examples)
Activity 17: Incident Report (Reporting Events, Making Decisions)
Activity 18: Who Fired the First Shot? (Analyzing Historical Accounts)
Activity 19: You Write Like a Girl (Analyzing Literature, Detecting Stereotypes)
Activity 20: Can Shakespeare Be Trusted? (Writing Critically about Literature)
Activity 21: The Prisoner’s Dilemma (Using Cost-Benefit Analysis)
Activity 22: Just Because (Using Causal Analysis)
Activity 23: Dissecting Words Instead of Frogs (Analyzing Scientific Articles)
Activity 24: What Did That Prove? (Analyzing Experiments)
Section Three: Opinions, Decisions, Values
Activity 25: Coping 101 (Using Critical Thinking in Self-examination)
Activity 26: Tracing the Family Tree (Examining Family and Cultural Heritage)
Activity 27: A Personal Declaration of Independence (Making Decisions)
Activity 28: Dealing with the Devil (Examining Personal Values)
Activity 29: Defending the Indefensible (Examining the Vocabulary of Motive)
Activity 30: Crimes and Punishments (Making Judgments, Defining Consequences)
Activity 31: Who’s the Worst Offender? (Making Ethical Judgments)
Activity 32: How Will We Be Judged? (Making Historical Judgments)
Activity 33: In This Writer’s Opinion (Presenting Opinions Persuasively)
Activity 34: The Devil’s Advocate (Analyzing Arguments, Responding to Criticisms)
Activity 34 Handout: Paraphrasing Exercise
Activity 35: It’s Debatable (Debating Issues, Refuting Arguments)
Activity 36: What Are the Alternatives? (Solving Problems, Comparing Solutions)
Section Four: Projects, Experiments, Adventures
Activity 37: Does a Dog Know Its Name? (Testing Hypotheses)
Activity 38: Anthropology Comes Home (Interpreting Cultural Rituals)
Activity 39: If I Had My Way (Creating Models)
Activity 40: Making the Case (Students as Consultants: The Case Method)
Activity 41: Trying Jekyll for the Crimes of Hyde (Conducting Mock Trials)
Activity 42: Suddenly You’re Old (Students as Actors: Playing Roles)
Activity 43: Playing with Literature (Students as Collaborators: Playing with Texts)
Activity 44: Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain (Students as Artists)
Activity 45: Thinking Online and Off (Using Technology to teach Critical Thinking)
Activity 46: My Aquatic Uncle (Bringing the Disciplines Together)
Section Five: Student as Teacher, Teacher as Student
Activity 47: Seminaring (Students as Collaborative Teachers)
Activity 48: Back to the Classroom (Teachers as Students)
Activity 49: Time to Take Inventory (Student Self-Inventory)
Activity 50: What’s Missing from this Course? (Student Evaluations)
Activity 50 Handout: Student Feedback Survey
Appendix / Selected Critical Thinking Websites Bibliography
Article cover image

"'For the Bible Tells Me So': Using Developmental Theory to Teach the Bible"

Article
Howell, David B.
2004
Perspectives in Religious Studies 27, no. 4 (2004): 399-411
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Mind, Metaphor and Language Teaching

Book
Holme, Randall
2004
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
P 53.H59 2004
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
This book explores how insights into figurative language can reshape what teachers do in the classroom. It reveals why some well-known methods work while others do not. Rejecting prescriptive pedagogical formulae, it recounts classroom episodes that help teachers rethink their own practice. Finally, the book sets out how we can use these episodes to reappraise language learning theory in a way that treats it as consonant with the cognitive nature ...
Additional Info:
This book explores how insights into figurative language can reshape what teachers do in the classroom. It reveals why some well-known methods work while others do not. Rejecting prescriptive pedagogical formulae, it recounts classroom episodes that help teachers rethink their own practice. Finally, the book sets out how we can use these episodes to reappraise language learning theory in a way that treats it as consonant with the cognitive nature of language. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Acknowledgements
Introduction

ch. 1 The Study of Metaphor
ch. 2 Using Figurative Language
ch. 3 Teaching the Language and Structure of Metaphor
ch. 4 Allegory and Analogy: Teaching with Extended Metaphors
ch. 5 Teaching Lexis through Metaphor
ch. 6 Metaphor and the Teaching of Grammar
ch. 7 The Metaphor of Learning
ch. 8 Conclusions

Bibliography
Index
TTR cover image

"Cognitive Dissonance Theory and the Induced-Compliance Paradigm: Concerns for Teaching Religious Studies"

TTR
Burns, Charlene P. E.
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 1 (2006): 3-8
BL41.T4
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Cognitive Dissonance Theory and the Induced-Compliance Paradigm pose some interesting questions for those teaching religious studies in publicly funded colleges and universities. Given that religious beliefs can be challenged by the historical-critical study of scriptures, for example, and that the cognitive dissonance generated when this occurs can result in unconscious alteration of beliefs and attitudes, it is vital to make explicit the potential for manipulation of student beliefs. The author ...
Additional Info:
Cognitive Dissonance Theory and the Induced-Compliance Paradigm pose some interesting questions for those teaching religious studies in publicly funded colleges and universities. Given that religious beliefs can be challenged by the historical-critical study of scriptures, for example, and that the cognitive dissonance generated when this occurs can result in unconscious alteration of beliefs and attitudes, it is vital to make explicit the potential for manipulation of student beliefs. The author asks what, if any, responsibilities are implied for the instructor.
TTR cover image

"Enhancing the Learning and Retention of Biblical Languages for Adult Students"

TTR
Morse, MaryKate
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 1 (2004): 45-50
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Adult Learners   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Finding ways to reduce students' anxiety and maximize the value of learning Greek and Hebrew is a continual challenge for biblical language teachers. Some language teachers use technology tools such as web sites or CDs with audio lessons to improve the experience. Though these tools are helpful, this paper explores the value gained from understanding first how students learn and then how technology tools best support that learning. Developments in ...
Additional Info:
Finding ways to reduce students' anxiety and maximize the value of learning Greek and Hebrew is a continual challenge for biblical language teachers. Some language teachers use technology tools such as web sites or CDs with audio lessons to improve the experience. Though these tools are helpful, this paper explores the value gained from understanding first how students learn and then how technology tools best support that learning. Developments in cognitive psychology and neuroscience offer many insights concerning adult learning and retention. After a presentation of key insights, several ideas are suggested for enhancing the learning and retention experience of biblical language students.
Article cover image

"Teaching Critical Thinking: Some Lessons From Cognitive Science"

Article
van Gelder, Tim
2005
College Teaching 53, no. 1 (2005): 41-46
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
This article draws six key lessons from cognitive science for teachers of critical thinking. The lessons are: acquiring expertise in critical thinking is hard; practice in critical thinking skills themselves enhances skills; the transfer of skills must be practiced; some theoretical knowledge is required; diagramming arguments ("argument mapping") promotes skill; and students are prone to belief preservation. The article provides some guidelines for teaching practice in light of these lessons.
Additional Info:
This article draws six key lessons from cognitive science for teachers of critical thinking. The lessons are: acquiring expertise in critical thinking is hard; practice in critical thinking skills themselves enhances skills; the transfer of skills must be practiced; some theoretical knowledge is required; diagramming arguments ("argument mapping") promotes skill; and students are prone to belief preservation. The article provides some guidelines for teaching practice in light of these lessons.
Article cover image

"Turning Water into Wine: Giving Remote Texts Full Flavor for the Audience of Friends"

Article
Gregory, Marshall
2005
College Teaching 53, no. 3 (2005): 95-98
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
This essay argues that teachers would be more effective at promoting students' willingness to work hard at course content that seems to them remote and abstract if teachers explicitly presented that content to students more as a means to their education rather than as the aim of their education. Teachers should confront the fact that most of the content they teach will be forgotten by students. Once this fact is ...
Additional Info:
This essay argues that teachers would be more effective at promoting students' willingness to work hard at course content that seems to them remote and abstract if teachers explicitly presented that content to students more as a means to their education rather than as the aim of their education. Teachers should confront the fact that most of the content they teach will be forgotten by students. Once this fact is accepted, then it follows that teaching content that teachers know will be forgotten as if it should never be forgotten is myopic and perhaps dysfunctional. An alternative teaching model is to use course content to stimulate the flourishing of developmental human skills--rationality, language, aesthetic responsiveness, imagination, introspection, moral and ethical deliberation, sociability, and physicality--in the service of a developmental notion of liberal education that can never go out of date and can never be forgotten because its effects become absorbed as developmentally advanced orientations of life, not crammed into short-term memory for the sake of passing tests.
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12 Brain/Mind Learning Principles in Action

Book
Caine, Renate Nummela, Geoffrey Caine, Carol McClintic and Karl Klimek
2005
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1060.A16 2005
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Step up to-and meet-the challenges of how to use the latest brain research for teaching, with practical concrete applications!
This new book from the Caines and their colleagues will introduce new readers to their renowned 12 organizing principles for how the brain learns and how to use that knowledge for student learning. For those hundreds of thousands already using the Caines' groundbreaking work in their schools, this fieldbook will bring ...
Additional Info:
Step up to-and meet-the challenges of how to use the latest brain research for teaching, with practical concrete applications!
This new book from the Caines and their colleagues will introduce new readers to their renowned 12 organizing principles for how the brain learns and how to use that knowledge for student learning. For those hundreds of thousands already using the Caines' groundbreaking work in their schools, this fieldbook will bring the latest research on the brain and its executive function and make the principles more practical than ever before for classroom application. 12 Brain/Mind Learning Principles in Action is grouped around key teaching and learning fundamentals:
* Climate for learning
* Instruction
* Student processing
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Getting started
ch. 2 Introduction to relaxed alertness
ch. 3 The development of competence and confidence accompanied by meaning or purpose
ch. 4 How the social environment contributes to relaxed alertness
ch. 5 How meaning contributes to a state of relaxed alertness
ch. 6 Emotions and patterning
ch. 7 Introduction to immersion in complex experience
ch. 8 Seeing the parts and experiencing wholeness
ch. 9 Engaging the physiology in learning
ch. 10 Engage the learner's capacity to recognize and master essential patterns
ch. 11 Engaging and assessing developmental steps and shifts in learning
ch. 12 Introduction to active processing : the art of digesting experience and consolidating learning
ch. 13 How to capitalize on different aspects of memory
ch. 14 Powerful learning requires the integration of attention and context
ch. 15 Including the conscious and unconscious in learning
ch. 16 Teaching to unique students
Resource A The brain/mind principles wheel
Resource B The brain/mind capacities wheel
Resource C How to develop learning circles
Resource D Guided experiences presentation cycle
Resource E Guidelines for the guided experiences model
Resource F Global experience design wheel
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Wabash tree

How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School

Book
National Research Council
2000
National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.
LB1060.H672 2000
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
This book includes far-readching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original hardcover edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions.
When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do—with ...
Additional Info:
This book includes far-readching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original hardcover edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions.
When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do—with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods—to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb.
How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1: Introduction
ch. 1 Learning: From Speculation to Science

Part II: Learners and Learning
ch. 2 How Experts Differ from Novices
ch. 3 Learning and Transfer
ch. 4 How Children Learn
ch. 5 Mind and Brain

Part III: Teachers and Teaching
ch. 6 The Design of Learning Environments
ch. 7 Effective Teaching: Examples in History, Mathematics, and Science
ch. 8 Teacher Learning
ch. 9 Technology to Support Learning

Part IV: Future Directions for the Science of Learning
ch. 10 Conclusions
ch. 11 Next Steps for Research

References
Biographical Sketches of Committees' Members and Staff
Acknowledgments
Index
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The First Time Effect: The Impact of Study Abroad on College Student Intellectual Development

Book
McKeown, Joshua S.
2009
State University of New York, Albany
LB2375.M38 2009
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A fresh look at study abroad programs on American college and university campuses. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A fresh look at study abroad programs on American college and university campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables
Introduction

ch. 1 A New Look at Study Abroad
ch. 2 Student Development on Study Abroad
ch. 3 Focusing on Today's Students
ch. 4 The Experience of First Time Travelers
ch. 5 Challenge of a Lifetime

Appendix A.1 Schools Involved in the Study
Appendix A.2 Institutional Review Board Results
Appendix A.3 Script for Participating Schools
Appendix B Pilot Test and Follow-up Testing
Appendix C Questionnaire
Appendix D Pilot Research Project Results
Appendix E Study Limitations

References
Index
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Student Development in College: Theory, Research, and Practice, Second Edition

Book
Evans, Nancy J., Deanna S. Forney, Florence M. Guide, Lori D. Patton, and Kristen A. Renn
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2343.4.S78 2010
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
The second edition of Student Development in College offers higher education professionals a clear understanding of the developmental challenges facing today's college students. Thoroughly revised and updated, this edition includes new integrative theories of student development, expanded coverage of social identity theories, a targeted focus on higher education-related research, a current review of student development research and application, and reconceptualization of typology theories as a way to understand individual differences.<...
Additional Info:
The second edition of Student Development in College offers higher education professionals a clear understanding of the developmental challenges facing today's college students. Thoroughly revised and updated, this edition includes new integrative theories of student development, expanded coverage of social identity theories, a targeted focus on higher education-related research, a current review of student development research and application, and reconceptualization of typology theories as a way to understand individual differences.

Praise for the Second Edition of Student Development in College

Student Development in College is a rich, comprehensive exploration of the major theoretical perspectives that inform development. The authors' attention to nuances and complexities results in a substantive history of theory development and a careful story about how various perspectives evolved yielding contemporary theorizing. The book is a masterful blend of theoretical lenses and their use in designing developmentally appropriate practice for diverse populations of contemporary college students. It is an excellent resource for all educators who work on college campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Figures and Exhibit
The Authors
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part One: Understanding and Using Student Development Theory
ch. 1 Definitions and Historical Roots of Student Development
ch. 2 Using Student Development Theory

Part Two: Foundational Theories
ch. 3 Psychosocial Identity Development
ch. 4 Chickering's Theory of Identity Development
ch. 5 Perry's Theory of Intellectual and Ethical Development
ch. 6 Moral Development Theory
ch. 7 Later Cognitive Structural Theories
ch. 8 Kolb's Theory of Experiential Learning

Part Three: Integrative Theories
ch. 9 Ecological Approaches to College Student Development
ch. 10 Development of Self-Authorship
ch. 11 Development of Faith and Spirituality
ch. 12 Schlossberg's Transition Theory

Part Four: Social Identity Development
ch. 13 Social Identity: Concepts and Overview
ch. 14 Racial Identity Development
ch. 15 Ethnic Identity Development and Acculturation
ch. 16 Multiracial Identity Development
ch. 17 Sexual Identity Development
ch. 18 Gender and Gender Identity Development

Part Five: Concluding Reflections
ch. 19 Using Theories in Combination
ch. 20 Final Thoughts and Future Directions

References
Index
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Wabash tree

How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching

Book
Ambrose, Susan; Bridges, Michael W.; DiPietro, Michele; Lovett, Marsha C; Norman, Marie K., and Mayer, Richard E.
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB1025.3.H68 2010
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Praise for How Learning Works

How Learning Works is the perfect title for this excellent book. Drawing upon new research in psychology, education, and cognitive science, the authors have demystified a complex topic into clear explanations of seven powerful learning principles. Full of great ideas and practical suggestions, all based on solid research evidence, this book is essential reading for instructors at all levels who wish to improve ...
Additional Info:
Praise for How Learning Works

How Learning Works is the perfect title for this excellent book. Drawing upon new research in psychology, education, and cognitive science, the authors have demystified a complex topic into clear explanations of seven powerful learning principles. Full of great ideas and practical suggestions, all based on solid research evidence, this book is essential reading for instructors at all levels who wish to improve their students' learning.

This book is a must-read for every instructor, new or experienced. Although I have been teaching for almost thirty years, as I read this book I found myself resonating with many of its ideas, and I discovered new ways of thinking about teaching.

Thank you Carnegie Mellon for making accessible what has previously been inaccessible to those of us who are not learning scientists. Your focus on the essence of learning combined with concrete examples of the daily challenges of teaching and clear tactical strategies for faculty to consider is a welcome work. I will recommend this book to all my colleagues.

As you read about each of the seven basic learning principles in this book, you will find advice that is grounded in learning theory, based on research evidence, relevant to college teaching, and easy to understand. The authors have extensive knowledge and experience in applying the science of learning to college teaching, and they graciously share it with you in this organized and readable book. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures, Tables, and Exhibits
Foreword
Acknowledgments
About the Authors

Introduction Bridging Learning Research and Teaching Practice
ch. 1 How Does Students' Prior Knowledge Affect Their Learning?
ch. 2 How Does the Way Students Organize Knowledge Affect Their Learning?
ch. 3 What Factors Motivate Students to Learn?
ch. 4 How Do Students Develop Mastery?
ch. 5 What Kinds of Practice and Feedback Enhance Learning?
ch. 6 Why Do Student Development and Course Climate Matter for Student Learning?
ch. 7 How Do Students Become Self-Directed Learners?

Conclusion Applying the Seven Principles to Ourselves
Appendices
Appendix A What Is Student Self-Assessment and How Can We Use It?
Appendix B What Are Concept Maps and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix C What Are Rubrics and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix D What Are Learning Objectives and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix E What Are Ground Rules and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix F What Are Exam Wrappers and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix G What Are Checklists and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix H What Is Reader Response/Peer Review and How Can We Use It?

References
Name Index
Subject Index
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The Evolving Self: Problem and Process in Human Development

Book
Kegan, Robert
1983
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
BF713.K44 1982
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
The Evolving Self focuses upon the most basic and universal of psychological problems--the individual's effort to make sense of experience, to make meaning of life. According to Robert Kegan, meaning-making is a lifelong activity that begins in earliest infancy and continues to evolve through a series of stages encompassing childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. The Evolving Self describes this process of evolution in rich and human detail, concentrating especially on the ...
Additional Info:
The Evolving Self focuses upon the most basic and universal of psychological problems--the individual's effort to make sense of experience, to make meaning of life. According to Robert Kegan, meaning-making is a lifelong activity that begins in earliest infancy and continues to evolve through a series of stages encompassing childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. The Evolving Self describes this process of evolution in rich and human detail, concentrating especially on the internal experience of growth and transition, its costs and disruptions as well as its triumphs.

At the heart of our meaning-making activity, the book suggests, is the drawing and redrawing of the distinction between self and other. Using Piagetian theory in a creative new way to make sense of how we make sense of ourselves, Kegan shows that each meaning-making stage is a new solution to the lifelong tension between the universal human yearning to be connected, attached, and included, on the one hand, and to be distinct, independent, and autonomous on the other. The Evolving Self is the story of our continuing negotiation of this tension. It is a book that is theoretically daring enough to propose a reinterpretation of the Oedipus complex and clinically concerned enough to suggest a variety of fresh new ways to treat those psychological complaints that commonly arise in the course of development.

Kegan is an irrepressible storyteller, an impassioned opponent of the health-and-illness approach to psychological distress, and a sturdy builder of psychological theory. His is an original and distinctive new voice in the growing discussion of human development across the life span. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Prologue: Construction and Development

Part One: Evolutionary Truces
ch. 1 The Unrecognized Genius of Jean Piaget
ch. 2 The Evolution of Moral Meaning-Making
ch. 3 The Constitutions of the Self

Part Two: The Natural Emergencies of the Self
ch. 4 The Growth and Loss of the Incorporative Self
ch. 5 The Growth and Loss of the Impulsive Self
ch. 6 The Growth and Loss of the Imperial Self
ch. 7 The Growth and Loss of the Interpersonal Self
ch. 8 The Growth and Loss of the Institutional Self
ch. 9 Natural Therapy

References
Index
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Student Development in College: Theory, Research, and Practice / Edition 1

Book
Evans, Nancy J., Forney, Deanna S., Guido-DiBrito, Florence
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2343.4.E88 1998
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
The second edition of Student Development in College offers higher education professionals a clear understanding of the developmental challenges facing today's college students. Thoroughly revised and updated, this edition includes new integrative theories of student development, expanded coverage of social identity theories, a targeted focus on higher education-related research, a current review of student development research and application, and reconceptualization of typology theories as a way to understand individual differences. (...
Additional Info:
The second edition of Student Development in College offers higher education professionals a clear understanding of the developmental challenges facing today's college students. Thoroughly revised and updated, this edition includes new integrative theories of student development, expanded coverage of social identity theories, a targeted focus on higher education-related research, a current review of student development research and application, and reconceptualization of typology theories as a way to understand individual differences. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Authors

Part One: Understanding and Using Student Development Theory
ch. 1 Student Development as a Field of Study
ch. 2 Using Student Development Theory

Part Two: Psychosocial Identity Development Theories
ch. 3 Chickering's Theory of Identity Development
ch. 4 Josselson's Theory of Identity Development in Women
ch. 5 Racial and Ethnic Identity Development
ch. 6 Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Identity Development
ch. 7 Schlossberg's Transition Theory

Part Three: Cognitive-Structural Theories
ch. 8 Perry's Theory of Intellectual and Ethical Development
ch. 9 Later Cognitive Structural Theories
ch. 10 Kohlberg's Theory of Moral Development
ch. 11 Gilligan's Theory of Women's Moral Development

Part Four: Typology Theories
ch. 12 Kolb's Theory of Experiential Learning
ch. 13 Holland's Theory of Vocational Personalities and Environments
ch. 14 The Myers-Briggs Adaptation of Jung's Theory of Personality Type

Part Five: Reflecting On Theory In Practice
ch. 15 Using Theories in Combination
ch. 16 Future Directions for Theory in Student Development Practice

Recommendations for Further Reading
References
Name Index
Subject Index
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Learning to Learn with Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT): A Practical Guide for Academic Success

Book
Kitsantas, Anastasia, and Dabbagh, Nada
2009
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB2395.7.K57 2009
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
The purpose of this practical guide is to facilitate college students' academic success by fostering self-regulated learning skills or learning to learn through the use of Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT). It enables the college instructor, online instructor, instructional developer, or educator to envision, plan for, and implement customized instructional and curricular designs that foster learning to learn and motivate students to take ownership of their own learning. Specifically, this book ...
Additional Info:
The purpose of this practical guide is to facilitate college students' academic success by fostering self-regulated learning skills or learning to learn through the use of Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT). It enables the college instructor, online instructor, instructional developer, or educator to envision, plan for, and implement customized instructional and curricular designs that foster learning to learn and motivate students to take ownership of their own learning. Specifically, this book demonstrates how college faculty who use Learning Management Systems (LMS) as well as emerging technologies such as Web 2.0 applications and social software can design learning tasks and course assignments that support and promote student: goal setting use of effective task strategies self-monitoring and self-evaluation time management help seeking motivation and affect Given the emphasis on retention of freshmen as a measure of institutional effectiveness, the focus on student success, and the increasing use of ILT in higher education, this book fulfills a dire need in the literature on the integration of technology and self-regulated learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction to Learning How to Learn
ch. 2 Defining Integrative Learning Technologies
ch. 3 Self-Regulatory Training with Integrative Learning Technologies: A Theory-Based Model
ch. 4 Goal Setting
ch. 5 Task Strategies
ch. 6 Self-Monitoring and Self-Evaluation
ch. 7 Time Management
ch. 8 Help Seeking
ch. 9 Motivation, Affect, and Learning Communities
ch. 10 New Approaches to Integrative Learning Technologies
Additional Info:
Our goal in writing this book was to validate teachers for strong efforts in their life's work. We often observe teachers' frustrations with what they perceive to be a multitude of different hot topics in education that they must attend to now, but which they expect to come and go, like the last hot topics. So, we wanted to help readers see similarities between many of these hot topics-differentiation, multiple ...
Additional Info:
Our goal in writing this book was to validate teachers for strong efforts in their life's work. We often observe teachers' frustrations with what they perceive to be a multitude of different hot topics in education that they must attend to now, but which they expect to come and go, like the last hot topics. So, we wanted to help readers see similarities between many of these hot topics-differentiation, multiple intelligences, culturally responsive teaching, brain-friendly strategies, authentic assessment, and ethical classroom management which we feel are not flashes in the pan. And we trust that serious practitioners will not oversimplify the findings of neuroscientists and their application to education. Reading studies and books by scientists, a number of which are user-friendly, can help ensure that teachers separate the hype from credible information. We have seen this professionally judicious approach in the work of graduate students (Kolinski, 2007) in adopting brain-friendly strategies.

We have intentionally packed both theoretical/research-based and practical information in this book because professional educators want to know why they should use certain approaches, models, and strategies. In turn, as professionals, we should be able to explain why we teach the way we do-not to justify, but to educate others about our knowledge-based, reflective, decision-making processes and the impact on student learning. Thus, it is important to read Chapter 1 because it lays a foundation.

Each succeeding chapter (2-6) has unique and compelling twists and turns-chock full of ideas to use or to adapt. It is possible to gain lots of ideas, processes, and strategies from reading and implementing (or adapting) even one of the unit chapters, or a part of it. While some of the units are explicitly about literacy, others focus on content using reading, writing, speaking, and listening as critical in the learning process. Thus, literacy skills are reinforced and strengthened. Additionally, some of our colleagues and public school partners have given us feedback that they wanted to implement some of the units and activities themselves. So, feel free to use this book for self-exploration and professional development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Foreword
Preface

ch. 1 A Case for Differentiation and Much More
ch. 2 The Fabric of My Life: Using Poetry, Prose, and Graphic Novels to Help Students Reflect Upon Their Identities
ch. 3 Choices That Change Our Lives: Using Realistic Fiction and Nonfiction to Help Students Reflect on Difficult Decisions
ch. 4 Community and Culture: Understanding Ourselves and Others in the Global Community
ch. 5 A Journey from Innocence to Experience: A Course in Young Adult Literature for Future Teachers
ch. 6 Convince Me: A Syllabus for a Freshman Composition Course Focused on Writing Arguments

About the Authors
Index
TTR cover image

"The Application of Cognitive-Developmental or Mediated Cognitive Learning Strategies in Online College Coursework"

TTR
Pruitt, Richard A.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 3 (2011): 226-246
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
This research article explores the active use of cognitive-developmental or mediated cognitive learning strategies in undergraduate online courses. Examples and applications are drawn from two online sessions integrating online interaction, essay and discussion assignments, as well as a variety of multimedia components conducted during the spring of 2008. While focus on the interaction among students remains an important aspect of the online discussion environment, particular attention is given to the interaction ...
Additional Info:
This research article explores the active use of cognitive-developmental or mediated cognitive learning strategies in undergraduate online courses. Examples and applications are drawn from two online sessions integrating online interaction, essay and discussion assignments, as well as a variety of multimedia components conducted during the spring of 2008. While focus on the interaction among students remains an important aspect of the online discussion environment, particular attention is given to the interaction between the student and the instructor. This paper argues that while online learning environments are ultimately student-controlled, they should be teacher-centered. The findings of this research suggest that students are more directly influenced by an instructor’s intentional effort to mediate the learning process than by the course objectives, material, or subject matter. Successful use of online technologies requires deliberate action on the part of the instructor to integrate various mediated cognitive learning strategies: (a) student participation and response is significantly increased, and (b) student motivation and morale is dramatically influenced.
Cover image

Knowing and Reasoning in College: Gender-Related Patterns in Students' Intellectual Development

Book
Magolda, Marcia B. Baxter
1992
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1060.B4 1992
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
From the Publisher
Understanding college students' intellectual development is at the heart of effective educational practice. How do college students learn? How can educators maximize intellectual development in the college environment for both sexes—both in and out of the classroom? In this book Marcia B. Baxter Magolda demonstrates how educators can use a deeper understanding of the way students learn to teach more effectively. Drawing on a unique ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher
Understanding college students' intellectual development is at the heart of effective educational practice. How do college students learn? How can educators maximize intellectual development in the college environment for both sexes—both in and out of the classroom? In this book Marcia B. Baxter Magolda demonstrates how educators can use a deeper understanding of the way students learn to teach more effectively. Drawing on a unique longitudinal study of more than one hundred college students, both male and female—and presenting information not available in single-gender studies—the author explains surprising gender-related patterns that affect the way students develop. Baxter Magolda uses data gathered from in-depth interviews over a five-year period to reveal four distinct "ways of knowing."

The book provides useful real-life examples of how instructional approaches, class expectations, peer interaction, evaluation methods, and other factors affect intellectual development in the classroom. Similarly, the author demonstrates how peer relationships, student organizations, educational advising, internships, employment, and international and cultural exchange can support and develop complex learning beyond the classroom. "Knowing and Reasoning in College" provides practical recommendations on how to respond to each of the four ways of knowing. It shows how, by designing instruction and interaction to reach students at every level, educators can maximize learning, promote skill acquisition and development of complex reasoning, and enrich students' overall college experience. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author

Part One: Understanding Gender-Related Patterns in Knowing
ch. 1 Studying Ways of Knowing
ch. 2 Gender-Related Patterns in Knowing
ch. 3 Absolute Knowing: Receiving and Mastering Knowledge
ch. 4 Transitional Knowing: Interpersonal and Impersonal Patterns
ch. 5 Independent Knowing: Embracing and Subordinating Others' Ideas
ch. 6 Contextual Knowing: Integrating One's Own and Others' Ideas
ch. 7 Relating the Patterns to Diverse Student Populations

Part Two: Implications for Academic and Student Affairs
ch. 8 Teaching Responsively to Different Ways of Knowing
ch. 9 Developing Students in the Classroom
ch. 10 Supporting Patterns of Knowing in the Cocurriculum
ch. 11 Promoting Cocurricular Learning
ch. 12 Becoming Responsive to Ways of Knowing in Higher Education

Resources:
A. Context of the Study: Miami University
B. Design and Methods Used in the Study
C. Study Interview and Questionnaire

References
Index
Cover image

The Learning Self: Understanding the Potential for Transformation

Book
Tennant, Mark
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC1100.T46 2012
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This new book from the award-winning author of Psychology and Adult Learning puts the spotlight on the kind of learning that brings about significant personal change. Tennant explores the techniques, processes, and practices educators can use to promote learning that leads to change and examines assumptions about self and identity, how we are formed, and our capacity for change.

Throughout the book, Tennant posits that individuals can be ...
Additional Info:
This new book from the award-winning author of Psychology and Adult Learning puts the spotlight on the kind of learning that brings about significant personal change. Tennant explores the techniques, processes, and practices educators can use to promote learning that leads to change and examines assumptions about self and identity, how we are formed, and our capacity for change.

Throughout the book, Tennant posits that individuals can be agents in their own self-formation and change by understanding and acting on the circumstances and forces that surround and shape them. Educators, he argues, must be open to different theoretical ideas and practices while simultaneously valuing these practices and viewing them with a critical eye.

The book aims to:

• promote, among educators and others with an educational dimension to their work, a more critical approach to their learning designs and practices;
• equip individuals with a framework for understanding and being agents of their own self-formation and change.

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Author

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 The Authentic or Real Self
ch. 3 The Autonomous Self
ch. 4 The Repressed Self
ch. 5 The Socially Constructed Self
ch. 6 The Storied Self
ch. 7 Knowing Oneself
ch. 8 Controlling Oneself
ch. 9 Caring for Oneself
ch. 10 (Re)creating Oneself

References
Index
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Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn

Book
Davidson, Cathy N.
2011
Penguin Group, London, England
BF321.D38 2011
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
When Cathy Davidson and Duke University gave free iPods to the freshman class in 2003, critics said they were wasting their money. Yet when students in practically every discipline invented academic uses for their music players, suddenly the idea could be seen in a new light-as an innovative way to turn learning on its head.

This radical experiment is at the heart of Davidson's inspiring new book. Using cutting-edge ...
Additional Info:
When Cathy Davidson and Duke University gave free iPods to the freshman class in 2003, critics said they were wasting their money. Yet when students in practically every discipline invented academic uses for their music players, suddenly the idea could be seen in a new light-as an innovative way to turn learning on its head.

This radical experiment is at the heart of Davidson's inspiring new book. Using cutting-edge research on the brain, she shows how "attention blindness" has produced one of our society's greatest challenges: while we've all acknowledged the great changes of the digital age, most of us still toil in schools and workplaces designed for the last century. Davidson introduces us to visionaries whose groundbreaking ideas-from schools with curriculums built around video games to companies that train workers using virtual environments-will open the doors to new ways of working and learning. A lively hybrid of Thomas Friedman and Norman Doidge, Now You See It is a refreshingly optimistic argument for a bold embrace of our connected, collaborative future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction - I'll Count -- You Take Care of the Gorilla

Part One - Distraction and Difference: The Keys to Attention and the Changing Brain
ch. 1 Learning from the Distraction Experts
ch. 2 Learning Ourselves

Part Two - The Kids Are All Right
ch. 3 Project Classroom Makeover
ch. 4 How We Measure
ch. 5 The Epic Win

Part Three - Work in the Future
ch. 6 The Changing Workplace
ch. 7 The Changing Worker

Part Four - The Brain You Change Yourself
ch. 8 You, Too, Can Program Your VCR (and Probably Should)

Conclusion - Now You See It
Acknowledgments
Appendix - Twenty-first-Century Literacies -- a Checklist
Notes
Index
TTR cover image

Teaching with Complicating Views: Beyond the Survey, Behind the Pro and Con

TTR
Locklin, Reid B.
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 3 (2013): 201-220
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 3
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
In this article I propose a method of selecting and assigning readings in the religious studies or theology classroom, such that these readings complicate one another, rather than standing in opposition or as simple alternatives. Such a strategy emulates key pedagogical insights of twelfth-century sentence collection, an activity at the very heart of the earliest universities in Europe. It also draws support from the theories of intellectual development advanced by ...
Additional Info:
In this article I propose a method of selecting and assigning readings in the religious studies or theology classroom, such that these readings complicate one another, rather than standing in opposition or as simple alternatives. Such a strategy emulates key pedagogical insights of twelfth-century sentence collection, an activity at the very heart of the earliest universities in Europe. It also draws support from the theories of intellectual development advanced by William G. Perry, Jr. and the Women's Ways of Knowing Collaborative. Both precedents suggest a principle of “complicating views” that can be flexibly employed in a variety of ways and diverse pedagogical contexts, as illustrated by examples from several classes. Such strategies aim to avoid reinforcing intellectual patterns of dualism or undifferentiated relativism; instead, they attempt to promote students' ability to integrate discordant voices and to appreciate diverse points of view, while also staking their own claims relative to them.
Article cover image

"The Educational Meaning of Communal Laughter: On the Experience of Corporeal Democracy"

Article
Vlieghe, Joris; Maarten Simons; and Jan Masschelein
2010
Educational Theory 60.6: 719-34
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Teaching Applied Creative Thinking: A New Pedagogy for the 21st Century (ACT Creativity Series) (Volume 2)

Book
Sweet, Charlie; Carpenter, Rusty; Blythe, Hal; and Apostel, Shawn
2013
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB1062.C378 2013
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The authors of Teaching Applied Creative Thinking: A New Pedagogy for the 21st Century believe this book to be the first in the field about teaching creative thinking in the new millennium. While many books talk about creativity and provide the justification for adding creative thinking as a student learning outcome, this book focuses on applying creativity to the teaching and learning process. ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The authors of Teaching Applied Creative Thinking: A New Pedagogy for the 21st Century believe this book to be the first in the field about teaching creative thinking in the new millennium. While many books talk about creativity and provide the justification for adding creative thinking as a student learning outcome, this book focuses on applying creativity to the teaching and learning process. The authors ask, “does anyone truly believe the world’s problems are going to be solved by students with only a high proficiency in common core competencies?”

With student learning outcomes as a goal, we must rethink teaching and learning to include creativity. Posed for the 21st-Century learner, their new paradigm, Mentor-from-the-Middle, replicates scholarly inquiry by developing a scholarly frame of mind. The teacher assumes new roles in this paradigm of scholar, mentor, facilitator, coach, model, and critical reflector. These roles in turn combine to help transform the learner into an active creative thinker.

"The authors’ goals in writing this book are to fill a void, to transform teaching, to create a new model, and to develop a new approach to teaching and learning. In the old world, before the coming of Google, the transfer of knowledge was the work of the teacher; now knowledge is available at the tip of our fingers. But the Google cannot solve the world’s problems. We will always need great teachers to transform and synthesize knowledge into skills, to teach creative thinking, to apply learning, and to create a love for learning that lasts a lifetime. The authors discuss new brain research, advanced technologies, the teaching environment, and pedagogy. They synthesize this knowledge in a wonderful way to encourage the reader to think deeply about how this research might affect the teacher and the learner. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction: Optimizing Student Learning

ch. 1 Why a Pedagogy of Creativity Studies, Why Now?
ch. 2 The Role of Authority in Teaching-Learning Paradigms
ch. 3 The Meddler-in-the-Middle Pedagogy
ch. 4 The Role of Authority in the Meddler-in-the-Middle Theory
ch. 5 The Learning Environment for Optimal Creative Thinking
ch. 7 Blinded by Science . . . Not
ch. 8 Starting to Build a New Pedagogy
ch. 9 Moving from Meddling to Mentoring-from-the-Middle: A New Paradigm
ch. 10 What the Mentor Teaches
ch. 11 Where the Mentor Teaches
ch. 12 Teaching Perception Shift
ch. 13 Teaching Piggybacking
ch. 14 Teaching Brainstorming
ch. 15 Teaching Glimmer-Catching
ch. 16 Teaching Collaborating
ch. 17 Teaching Going with the Flow
ch. 18 Teaching Playing
ch. 19 Teaching Pattern Recognition
ch. 20 Teaching Metaphor Usage
ch. 21 A Typical Opening Day Using the New Pedagogy
ch. 22 Crossword Puzzles: A Universal Tool for Teaching Creative Thinking
ch. 23 How Video Games Can Inform Teaching
ch. 24 The Creative Campus
ch. 25 A Proposal for Professional Development

Afterword
Appendix I
Cover image
Wabash tree

Using Reflection and Metacognition to Improve Student Learning: Across the Disciplines, Across the Academy

Book
Kaplan, Matthew; Silver, Naomi; LaVaque-Manty, Danielle; and Meizlish, Deborah, eds.
2013
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB2331.U85 2013
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Research has identified the importance of helping students develop the ability to monitor their own comprehension and to make their thinking processes explicit, and indeed demonstrates that metacognitive teaching strategies greatly improve student engagement with course material.

This book -- by presenting principles that teachers in higher education can put into practice in their own classrooms -- explains how to lay ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Research has identified the importance of helping students develop the ability to monitor their own comprehension and to make their thinking processes explicit, and indeed demonstrates that metacognitive teaching strategies greatly improve student engagement with course material.

This book -- by presenting principles that teachers in higher education can put into practice in their own classrooms -- explains how to lay the ground for this engagement, and help students become self-regulated learners actively employing metacognitive and reflective strategies in their education.

Key elements include embedding metacognitive instruction in the content matter; being explicit about the usefulness of metacognitive activities to provide the incentive for students to commit to the extra effort; as well as following through consistently.

Recognizing that few teachers have a deep understanding of metacognition and how it functions, and still fewer have developed methods for integrating it into their curriculum, this book offers a hands-on, user-friendly guide for implementing metacognitive and reflective pedagogy in a range of disciplines.

Offering seven practitioner examples from the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, the social sciences and the humanities, along with sample syllabi, course materials, and student examples, this volume offers a range of strategies for incorporating these pedagogical approaches in college classrooms, as well as theoretical rationales for the strategies presented.

By providing successful models from courses in a broad spectrum of disciplines, the editors and contributors reassure readers that they need not reinvent the wheel or fear the unknown, but can instead adapt tested interventions that aid learning and have been shown to improve both instructor and student satisfaction and engagement. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword

ch. 1 Reflective Pedagogies and the Metacognitive Turn in College Teaching (Naomi Silver)
ch. 2 Make Exams Worth More than the Grade: Using Exam Wrappers to Promote Metacognition (Marsha C. Lovett)
ch. 3 Improving Critical-Thinking Skills in Introductory Biology Through Quality Practice and Metacognition (Paula P. Lemons, Julie Reynolds, Amanda Curtin, Ahrash Bissell)
ch. 4 Reflection and Metacognition in Engineering Practice (Denny Davis, Michael Trevisan, Paul Leiffer, Jay McCormack, Steven Beyerlein, M. Javed Khan, and Patricia Brackin)
ch. 5 “The Steps of the Ladder Keep Going Up”: A Case Study of Hevruta as Reflective Pedagogy in Two Universities (Mary C. Wright, Jeffrey L. Bernstein, Ralph Williams)
ch. 6 Implementing Metacognitive Interventions in Disciplinary Writing Classes (Mika LaVaque and E. Margaret Evans)
ch. 7 Designs for Writing: A Metacognitive Strategy for Iterative Drafting and Revising (E. Ashley Hall, Jane Danielewicz, and Jennifer Ware)
ch. 8 Reflection, ePortfolios, and WEPO: A Reflective Account of New Practices in a New Curriculum (Kathleen Blake Yancey, Leigh Graziano, Rory Lee, and Jennifer O'Malley)
ch. 9 Annotated Bibliography (Naomi Silver)

Contributors
Index
Cover image

Visible Learning and the Science of How We Learn

Book
Hattie, John; and Yates, Gregory C. R.
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LC1067.5.H36 2014
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: On publication in 2009 John Hattie’s Visible Learning presented the biggest ever collection of research into what actually work in schools to improve children’s learning. Not what was fashionable, not what political and educational vested interests wanted to champion, but what actually produced the best results in terms of improving learning and educational outcomes. It became an instant bestseller and was described ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: On publication in 2009 John Hattie’s Visible Learning presented the biggest ever collection of research into what actually work in schools to improve children’s learning. Not what was fashionable, not what political and educational vested interests wanted to champion, but what actually produced the best results in terms of improving learning and educational outcomes. It became an instant bestseller and was described by the TES as revealing education’s ‘holy grail’.

Now in this latest book, John Hattie has joined forces with cognitive psychologist Greg Yates to build on the original data and legacy of the Visible Learning project, showing how it’s underlying ideas and the cutting edge of cognitive science can form a powerful and complimentary framework for shaping learning in the classroom and beyond.

Visible Learning and the Science of How We Learn explains the major principles and strategies of learning, outlining why it can be so hard sometimes, and yet easy on other occasions. Aimed at teachers and students, it is written in an accessible and engaging style and can be read cover to cover, or used on a chapter-by-chapter basis for essay writing or staff development.

The bookis structured in three parts – ‘learning within classrooms’, ‘learning foundations’, which explains the cognitive building blocks of knowledge acquisition and ‘know thyself’ which explores, confidence and self-knowledge. It also features extensive interactive appendices containing study guide questions to encourage critical thinking, annotated bibliographic entries with recommendations for further reading, links to relevant websites and YouTube clips. Throughout, the authors draw upon the latest international research into how the learning process works and how to maximise impact on students, covering such topics as:

teacher personality;
expertise and teacher-student relationships;
how knowledge is stored and the impact of cognitive load;
thinking fast and thinking slow;
the psychology of self-control;
the role of conversation at school and at home;
invisible gorillas and the IKEA effect;
digital native theory;
myths and fallacies about how people learn.

This fascinating book is aimed at any student, teacher or parent requiring an up-to-date commentary on how research into human learning processes can inform our teaching and what goes on in our schools. It takes a broad sweep through findings stemming mainly from social and cognitive psychology and presents them in a useable format for students and teachers at all levels, from preschool to tertiary training institutes. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part 1 – Learning within classrooms
ch. 1 Why don’t students like learning at school? The Willingham thesis
ch. 2 Is knowledge an obstacle to teaching?
ch. 3 The teacher-student relationship
ch. 4 Your personality as teacher: Can your students trust you?
ch. 5 Time as a global indicator of classroom learning
ch. 6 The recitation and the nature of classroom learning
ch. 7 Teaching for automaticity in basic academic skill
ch. 8 The role of feedback
ch. 9 Acquiring complex skills though social modelling and explicit teaching
ch. 10 Just what does expertise look like?
ch. 11 Just how does expertise develop?
ch. 12 Expertise in the domain of classroom teaching

Part 2 – Learning foundations
ch. 13 How knowledge is acquired
ch. 14 How knowledge is stored in the mind
ch. 15 Does learning need to be conscious? What is the hidden role of gesture?
ch. 16 The impact of cognitive load
ch. 17 Your memory and how it develops
ch. 18 Mnemonics as sport, art, and instructional tools
ch. 19 Analysing your students’ style of learning
ch. 20 Multitasking: A widely held fallacy
ch. 21 Your students are digital natives. Or are they?
ch. 22 Is the Internet turning us into shallow thinkers?
ch. 23 How does music affect learning

Part 3 – Know thyself
ch. 24 Confidence and its three hidden levels
ch. 25 Self-enhancement and the dumb-and-dumber effect
ch. 26 Achieving self-control
ch. 27 Neuroscience of the smile: A fundamental tool in teaching
ch. 28 The surprising advantages of being a social chameleon
ch. 29 Invisible gorillas, inattentional blindness, and paying attention
ch. 30 Thinking fast and thinking slow - your debt to the inner robot
ch. 31 IKEA, effort, and valuing

Glossary
Reference
Index
Additional Info:
Scaffolding is a teaching and learning process in which an instructor provides support that is tailored to students’ needs as they learn a skill or process, with the expectation that the scaffolding will be removed as students become more competent and independent at applying the skill or process.
Additional Info:
Scaffolding is a teaching and learning process in which an instructor provides support that is tailored to students’ needs as they learn a skill or process, with the expectation that the scaffolding will be removed as students become more competent and independent at applying the skill or process.
Additional Info:
By “Decoding” what an expert does so that he or she does not get stuck at the bottleneck, we can spell out crucial operations, the “critical thinking” of a discipline.
Additional Info:
By “Decoding” what an expert does so that he or she does not get stuck at the bottleneck, we can spell out crucial operations, the “critical thinking” of a discipline.
Additional Info:
"Threshold concepts" is a concept term gives a name to points in new learning that mark a departure from old ways of viewing the world and entrance into new ways that may be counterintuitive and thus upsetting ("troublesome knowledge") and yet they are ways that must be grasped in order to go forward in learning.
Additional Info:
"Threshold concepts" is a concept term gives a name to points in new learning that mark a departure from old ways of viewing the world and entrance into new ways that may be counterintuitive and thus upsetting ("troublesome knowledge") and yet they are ways that must be grasped in order to go forward in learning.
Additional Info:
The research discussed in this article looked at the impact of students having laptops in class that were being used for non-course related tasks, such as surfing the web.
Additional Info:
The research discussed in this article looked at the impact of students having laptops in class that were being used for non-course related tasks, such as surfing the web.
Additional Info:
Unrealistic expectations: Many students are under the impression that if they have to work hard at something, they must not be talented in that field, and as a result, they should do something else. (Science and Engineering focus. However the principles apply to all domains of learning.)
Additional Info:
Unrealistic expectations: Many students are under the impression that if they have to work hard at something, they must not be talented in that field, and as a result, they should do something else. (Science and Engineering focus. However the principles apply to all domains of learning.)
Additional Info:
When students ask for studying advice, what should we tell them?
Additional Info:
When students ask for studying advice, what should we tell them?
Additional Info:
A good question is both answerable and challenging, inspiring analysis, synthesis, interpretation, and critical thinking.
Additional Info:
A good question is both answerable and challenging, inspiring analysis, synthesis, interpretation, and critical thinking.
Additional Info:
What are some of the things teachers can do to help support the full and healthy maturation of learners’ brains? Here are few ideas.
Additional Info:
What are some of the things teachers can do to help support the full and healthy maturation of learners’ brains? Here are few ideas.
Cover image

Learning Patterns in Higher Education: Dimensions and research perspectives

Book
Gijbels, David; Donche, Vincent; Richardson, John T. E.; and Vermunt, Jan D., eds.
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LB 1060.L42446 2013
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Learning Patterns in Higher Education brings together a cutting edge international team of contributors to critically review our current understanding of how students and adults learn, how differences and changes in the way students learn can be measured in a valid and reliable way, and how the quality of student learning may be enhanced.

There is substantial evidence that students in ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Learning Patterns in Higher Education brings together a cutting edge international team of contributors to critically review our current understanding of how students and adults learn, how differences and changes in the way students learn can be measured in a valid and reliable way, and how the quality of student learning may be enhanced.

There is substantial evidence that students in higher education have a characteristic way of learning, sometimes called their learning orientation (Biggs 1988), learning style (Evans et al. 2010) or learning pattern (Vermunt and Vermetten 2004). However, recent research in the field of student learning has resulted in multi-faceted and sometimes contradictory results which may reflect conceptual differences and differences in measurement of student learning in each of the studies. This book deals with the need for further clarification of how students learn in higher education in the 21st century and to what extent the measurements often used in learning pattern studies are still up to date or can be advanced with present methodological and statistical insights to capture the most important differences and changes in student learning.

The contributions in the book are organized in two parts: a first conceptual and psychological part in which the dimensions of student learning in the 21st century are discussed and a second empirical part in which questions related to how students’ learning can be measured and how it develops are considered.

Areas covered include:

Cultural influences on learning patterns
Predicting learning outcomes
Student centred learning environments and self-directed learning
Mathematics learning

This indispensable book covers multiple conceptual perspectives on how learning patterns can be described and effects and developments can be measured, and will not only be helpful for ‘learning researchers’ as such but also for educational researchers from the broad domain of educational psychology, motivation psychology and instructional sciences, who are interested in student motivation, self-regulated learning, effectiveness of innovative learning environments, as well as assessment and evaluation of student characteristics and learning process variables. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
List of Tables
List of Contributors

List of Authors: David Gijbels, Vincent Donche, John T. E. Richardson
ch. 1 Students’ Learning Patterns in Higher Education and Beyond: Moving Forward (David Gijbels, Vincent Donche, John T.E Richardson)
ch. 2. (Dis)similarities In Research On Learning Approaches and Learning Patterns (Gert Vanthournout, Vincent Donche, David Gijbels, Peter Van Petegem)
ch. 3 The Dimensionality In Student Learning Patterns In Different Cultures (Jan D. Vermunt, Larike H. Bronkhorst, J. Reinaldo Martinez-Fernandez)
ch. 4 Modelling Factors For Predicting Student Learning Outcomes In Higher Education (Linda Price)
ch. 5 Exploring The Concept of `Self-Directedness In Learning` - Theoretical Approaches and Measurement In Adult Education Literature (Isabel Raemdonck, CAroline Meurant, Julien Balasse, Anne Jacot and Mariane Frenay)
ch. 6 Student Teachers’ Learning Patterns In School-Based Teacher Education Programmes - The Influence of Person, Context and Time ( Maaike D. Endijk, Vincent Donche and IDA Oosterheert)
ch. 7 Achievement Goals, Approaches To Studying and Academic Attainment (John T. E Richardson and Richard Remedios)
ch. 8 Learning Processes In Higher Education - Providing New Insights To Understand The Effects of Motivation and Cognition On Specific and Global Measures of Achievement (Mikael De Cler CQ. Benot Galand and Mariane Frenay)
ch. 9 University Students’ Achievement Goals and Approaches To Learning In Mathematics - A Re-Analysis Investigating ‘Learning Patterns’ (Francisco Cano and Ana Belen Garcia Berben)
ch. 10 Exploring The Use of A Deep Approach To Learning With Students In The Process of Learning To Teach (Carol Evans)
ch. 11 Understanding Differences In Student Learning and Academic Achievement In First Year Higher Education - An Integrated Research Perspective (Vincent Donche. Liesje Coertjens, Tine Van Daal, Sven De Maeyer and Peter Van Petegem)
ch. 12 Challenges In Analysing Change In Students’ Approaches To Learning (Sari Lindblom-Ylanne, Anna Parpala and Lisa Postareff)
ch. 13 Students’ Approaches To Learning In Higher Education - The Interplay Between Context and Student (Eva Kyndy, Filip Douchy and Eduardo Cascallar)
ch. 14 Do Case-Based Learning Environments Matter? Research Into Their Effects On Students’ Approaches To Learning, Motivation and Achievement (Marlies Baten, Katrien Struyven and Flilip Douchy)
ch. 15 Learning Patterns In Transition: Reflections and Prospects (Jan D. Vermunt. John T.E. Richardson, Vincent Donche and David Gijbels)

Index
Additional Info:
A frequently-cited, critical review of an edited work, Constructivism in Education (Stephe and Gale, 1995). Jaworski offers summary and analysis of the book's chapters, each of which advocates for or critiques some form of constructivism in education.
Additional Info:
A frequently-cited, critical review of an edited work, Constructivism in Education (Stephe and Gale, 1995). Jaworski offers summary and analysis of the book's chapters, each of which advocates for or critiques some form of constructivism in education.
Additional Info:
Preparing the way to advocate for a more "brain based" approach to diverse learners, Inglis asserts that even the creator of "multiple intelligences," Howard Garner, announced a decade ago that he was "over" the theory and that educators need to "move on."
Additional Info:
Preparing the way to advocate for a more "brain based" approach to diverse learners, Inglis asserts that even the creator of "multiple intelligences," Howard Garner, announced a decade ago that he was "over" the theory and that educators need to "move on."
Article cover image

College Diversity Experiences and Cognitive Development: A Meta-Analysis

Article
Bowman, Nicholas A.
2010
Review of Educational Research, Vol. 80, No. 1 (March 2010), pp. 4-33
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This study uses meta-analysis to examine the relationship between exposure to diversity and cognitive development systematically. Findings suggest that several types of diversity experiences are positively related to several cognitive outcomes, but magnitude of effect varies substantially depending on type of diversity experience, type of cognitive outcome, and study design.
Additional Info:
This study uses meta-analysis to examine the relationship between exposure to diversity and cognitive development systematically. Findings suggest that several types of diversity experiences are positively related to several cognitive outcomes, but magnitude of effect varies substantially depending on type of diversity experience, type of cognitive outcome, and study design.
Additional Info:
Faculty who understand the mental and emotional changes that college students experience can design courses that meet students’ needs and support continued development. Links on this site present theories and research on students’ cognitive, moral, and emotional development. Divided into four categories: Cognitive, Moral, Cognitive and Moral and Emotional Development.
Additional Info:
Faculty who understand the mental and emotional changes that college students experience can design courses that meet students’ needs and support continued development. Links on this site present theories and research on students’ cognitive, moral, and emotional development. Divided into four categories: Cognitive, Moral, Cognitive and Moral and Emotional Development.
Additional Info:
Overview of a study where developmental psychologist William Perry suggests that your perspective on learning will change and mature as your college experience unfolds. Gives expected levels of development.
Additional Info:
Overview of a study where developmental psychologist William Perry suggests that your perspective on learning will change and mature as your college experience unfolds. Gives expected levels of development.
Additional Info:
A little dated--1990's--but is a thorough lit review
Additional Info:
A little dated--1990's--but is a thorough lit review
Additional Info:
As students develop cognitively, integrating knowledge in ways that reflect their learning, they also need to grow both interpersonally, by considering themselves as part of a larger whole, and intrapersonally, by establishing a belief system that can influence and guide their choices and experiences.
Additional Info:
As students develop cognitively, integrating knowledge in ways that reflect their learning, they also need to grow both interpersonally, by considering themselves as part of a larger whole, and intrapersonally, by establishing a belief system that can influence and guide their choices and experiences.
Additional Info:
Study used the Measure of Epistemology Reflection to explore impact of service-learning and social justice education on cognitive development. Results showed service-learning courses had a positive impact on cognitive development, while service-learning courses w/a social justice emphasis appeared to have more impact on students’ cognitive development than those without.
Additional Info:
Study used the Measure of Epistemology Reflection to explore impact of service-learning and social justice education on cognitive development. Results showed service-learning courses had a positive impact on cognitive development, while service-learning courses w/a social justice emphasis appeared to have more impact on students’ cognitive development than those without.
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Learning to Learn: International Perspectives From Theory and Practice

Book
Crick, Ruth Deakin; Stringher, Cristina; and Ren, Kai, eds.
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1060.L43 2014
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Learning to Learn provides a much needed overview and international guide to the field of learning to learn from a multidisciplinary lifelong and lifewide perspective. A wealth of research has been flourishing on this key educational goal in recent years. Internationally, it is considered to be one of the key competencies needed to compete in the global economy, but also a crucial factor ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Learning to Learn provides a much needed overview and international guide to the field of learning to learn from a multidisciplinary lifelong and lifewide perspective. A wealth of research has been flourishing on this key educational goal in recent years. Internationally, it is considered to be one of the key competencies needed to compete in the global economy, but also a crucial factor for individual and social well-being. This book draws on leading international contributors to provide a cutting-edge overview of current thinking on learning to learn research, policy, and implementation in both formal and informal learning environments.

But what learning to learn is exactly, and what its constituting elements are, are much debated issues. These seem to be the crucial questions if assessment and development of this 'malleable side of intelligence' are to be accomplished. The approach of this volume is to consider a broad conception of learning to learn, not confined to only study strategies or metacognition, yet acknowledging the importance of such elements.

The book sets out to answer five main questions:
• What is learning to learn?
• What are its functions and how do we assess it?
• What does it promise to the individual and society at large?
• How is it conceived in national curricula internationally?
• How can it be developed in a variety of contexts?

The text is organized into two parts: the first addresses the core question of the nature of learning to learn from a theoretical and policy viewpoint, and the second presents recent research carried out in several educational systems, with special attention to assessment and curriculum. It gives an account of pedagogical practices of learning to learn and its role in individual empowerment from childhood to adulthood.

Contributors also highlight the potential use of learning to learn as an organizing concept for lifelong learning, school improvement, and teacher training along with potential conflicts with existing incentive practices and policies.

This book is a vital starting point and guide for any advanced student or researcher looking to understand this important area of research. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures, tables, and boxes
List of Contributors
Forward
Acknowledgements
Introduction (Ruth Deakin Crick, Kai Ren, and Cristina Stringher)

Part I - Theory
ch. 1 What is learning to learn? A learning to learn proces and output model (Cristina Stringher)
ch. 2 Learning to learn, know, and reason (Andreas Demetriou)
ch. 3 Learning to learn: a complex systems perspective (Ruth Deakin Crick)
ch. 4 Learning to learn for the individual and society (Aureliana Alberici, and Paolo Di Rienzo)
ch. 5 Learning to learn from a Confucian perspective: insight from China (Kai Ren)

Part II - International Research and Practice
ch. 6 Learning to learn in early childhood: home and preschool influence on Chinese learners (Nirmala Rao, Jin Sun, and Li Zhang)
ch. 7 Learning to learn at a whole-system level: development of the South Australian Teaching for Effective Learning Framework (Chris Goldspink, and Margot Foster)
ch. 8 Learning to learn in Finland: theory and policy, research and practice (Jarkko Hautamaki, and Sirkku Kuplainen)
ch. 9 The Spanish approach to learning to learn (Amparo Moreno, and Elena Martin)
ch. 10 School improvement for learning: principles for a theoretically oriented practice (Cristina Stringher)
ch. 11 Using a 360 degree assessment model to support learning to learn (Barbara L. McCombs)
ch. 12 Learning to learn in practice in non-formal education (Paul Kloosterman)
ch. 13 Learning to learn, lifewide and lifelong learning: reflections on the New Zealand experience (Rosemary Hipkins, and Bronwen Cowie)
ch. 14 Learning to learn with Indigenous Austsralians (Julianne Willis)

Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Beyond Reason and Tolerance: The Purpose and Practice of Higher Education

Book
Thompson, Jr., Robert J.
2014
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
LB2322.2.T46 2014
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Provides a developmental science basis to inform necessary transformations in undergraduate educational practices
Argues that emerging adulthood is an especially dynamic time of reorganization and development of the brain that both influences, and is influenced by, the undergraduate experience
Synthesizes advances in our understanding of human development and learning
Has direct implications for undergraduate education practices

The major ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Provides a developmental science basis to inform necessary transformations in undergraduate educational practices
Argues that emerging adulthood is an especially dynamic time of reorganization and development of the brain that both influences, and is influenced by, the undergraduate experience
Synthesizes advances in our understanding of human development and learning
Has direct implications for undergraduate education practices

The major challenges facing higher education are often framed in terms of preparing students for life-long learning. Society's 21st century needs require civic-minded individuals who have the intellectual and personal capabilities to constructively engage political, ethnic, and religious differences, work effectively, and live together with many different kinds of people in a more global society. In this volume, Robert J. Thompson aims to influence the current conversation about the purposes and practices of higher education. Beyond Reason and Tolerance adopts a developmental science basis to inform the transformations in undergraduate educational practices that are necessary to empower students to act globally and constructively engage difference. It synthesizes current scholarship regarding the nature and development of three core capacities deemed essential: A personal epistemology that reflects a sophisticated understanding of knowledge, beliefs, and ways of thinking; empathy and the capacity to understand the mental states of others; and an integrated identity that includes values, commitments, and a sense of agency for civic and social responsibility.

Beyond Reason and Tolerance argues that to foster the development of these capabilities, colleges and universities must recommit to providing a formative liberal education and adopt a developmental model of undergraduate education as a process of intellectual and personal growth, involving empathy as well as reasoning, values as well as knowledge, and identity as well as competencies. Thompson focuses on emerging adulthood as an especially dynamic time of reorganization and development of the brain that both influences, and is influenced by, the undergraduate experience. Advances in our understanding of human development and learning are synthesized with regard to the direct implications for undergraduate education practices.

Readership: Faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students in psychology, human development, and education who have an interest in intergroup relations and cognitive and social development during the period of emerging adulthood. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface


ch. 1 American Higher Education in the 21st Century

ch. 2 Emerging Adulthood: A Developmental Science Perspective

ch. 3 Personal Epistemology

ch. 4 Empathy

ch. 5 Identity and the Process of Self-Authorship

ch. 6 Campus Culture: Developing the Capacities to Constructively Engage Difference

ch. 7 Providing a Formative Undergraduate Liberal Education


References
Index
Article cover image

"Applying science of learning in education: Infusing psychological science into the curriculum" (pdf)

Article
Benassi, Victor A.; Overson, Catherine E.; and Hakala, Christopher M.
2014
American Psychological Association, Division 2, Washington, DC
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
A 300 page free-download e-book on the interplay between the science of learning, the science of instruction, and the science of assessment. Research on how people learn is applied to educational settings. The book is based on theory and research in cognitive psychology. (Excerpted from the Introduction.)
Additional Info:
A 300 page free-download e-book on the interplay between the science of learning, the science of instruction, and the science of assessment. Research on how people learn is applied to educational settings. The book is based on theory and research in cognitive psychology. (Excerpted from the Introduction.)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments and Dedication
About the Editors
Table of Contents
Introduction (Victor A. Benassi, Catherine E. Overson, and Christopher M. Hakala

Part 1: Science of Learning - Principles and Approaches
ch. 1 Prior Knowledge is More Than Content: Skills and Beliefs Also Impact Learning (Susan A. Ambrose and Marsha C. Lovett)
ch. 2 When and Why Introducing Difficulties and Errors Can Enhance Instruction (Courtney M. Clark and Robert A. Bjork)
ch. 3 Expertise Reversal Effect and Its Instructional Implications (Chee Ha Lee and Slava Kalyuga)
ch. 4 Using Feedback to Promote Learning (John A. C. Hattie and Gregory C. R. Yates)
ch. 5 Research-Based Principles for Designing Multimedia Instruction (Richard E. Mayer)
ch. 6 Generating Active Learning (Sharon Bertsch and Bryan Pesta)
ch. 7 Test-enhanced Learning (Mary A. Pyc, Pooja K. Agarwal, and Henry L Roediger, III)
ch. 8 Supporting Self-Explanation in the Classroom (Jennifer L. Chiu and Michelene T. H. Chi)
ch. 9 Potent Techniques to Improve Learning from Text (Khuyen Nguyen and Mark A. McDaniel)
ch. 10 Learning From Worked Examples: How to Prepare Students for Meaningful Problem Solving (Alexander Renkl)
ch. 11 Spacing and Interleaving of Study and Practice (Shana K. Carpenter)
ch. 12 How Accuracy in Students’ Self Perceptions Relates to Success in Learning (Joyce Ehrlinger and E. Ashley Shain)
ch. 13 Metacognition and Instruction (John Girash)
ch. 14 Operation ARA: A Serious Game that Combines Intelligent Tutoring and Learning Principles to Teach Science (Keith Millis, Arthur C. Graesser, Diane F. Halpern)

Part 2: Preparing Faculty to Apply Science of Learning
ch. 15 Assessing the Impact of Instructional Methods (Regan A. R. Gurung)
ch. 16 Applying the Science of Learning: The Cognition Toolbox (Victor A. Benassi, Elizabeth M. Tappin, Catherine E. Overson, Michael J. Lee, Edward J. O’Brien, Barbara Prudhomme White, Jennifer J. Stiegler-Balfour, and Christopher M. Hakala)
ch. 17 Applying Evidence-Based Principles of Learning to Teaching Practice: The Bridging the Gap Seminar (Debra Swoboda)
ch. 18 Helping Students to Get the Most Out of Studying (Stephen L. Chew)

Part 3: Putting the Science of Learning into Practice
ch. 19 The Effects of Memory Retrieval, Errors and Feedback on Learning (Nate Kornell and Janet Metcalfe)
ch. 20 Applying Multimedia Principles to Slide Shows for Academic Presentation (Catherine Overson)
ch. 21 Student misconceptions: Where do they come from and what can we do? (Annette K. Taylor and Patricia Kowalski)
ch. 22 Examining the Benefits of Cumulative Exams (Natalie K. Lawrence)
ch. 23 Intervening on Behalf of Low-Skilled Comprehenders in a University General Chemistry Course (Samuel Pazicni and Daniel T. Pyburn)
ch. 24 The Influence of Guiding Questions on Skilled- and Less-Skilled Readers’ Understanding of Written Discourse (Jennifer J. Stiegler-Balfour, Victor A. Benassi, Heather Tatsak, and Andrea Taatjes)
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Sticky Learning: How Neuroscience Supports Teaching That's Remembered

Book
Inglis, Holly J.
2014
Augsburg Fortress, Minneapolis, MN
LB1060.I54 2014
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Despite the introduction of new technologies for classrooms, many seminary courses still utilize primarily auditory methods to convey content. Course outcomes may include opportunities for learners to demonstrate knowledge and skills gained but may not include opportunities for learners to begin to embed knowledge and skills into their long-term memory.

Educators are engaging with neuroscientists to reshape classroom practices, content delivery, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Despite the introduction of new technologies for classrooms, many seminary courses still utilize primarily auditory methods to convey content. Course outcomes may include opportunities for learners to demonstrate knowledge and skills gained but may not include opportunities for learners to begin to embed knowledge and skills into their long-term memory.

Educators are engaging with neuroscientists to reshape classroom practices, content delivery, curriculum design, and physical classroom spaces to enhance students’ learning and memory, primarily in elementary and secondary education. Why not in seminary education?

An overview of how learning occurs in our brain, what the different types of memory are, and how memory is created serves as a framework for suggesting pedagogical tools. These brain-friendly tools are specifically applied to individual academic disciplines, enabling instructors to make concrete modifications in the structure and content of what is taught, making learning more ‘sticky.’

Inglis’s synopsis of the use of neuroscience in the classroom and suggested action is followed by a collaborative dialogue with Kathy L. Dawson and Rodger Y. Nishioka. Dawson and Nishioka provide practical commentary regarding the successful implementation of Inglis’s proposed approach. As a group, Inglis, Dawson, and Nishioka create a text that extends pedagogical innovation in inspiring but practical ways. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part One: Where We Are
ch. 1 The Changing Landscape (Holly J. Inglis)

Part Two: Where We Are Headed
ch. 2 The Nature of Learning (Holly J. Inglis)
ch. 3 How the Brain Works (Holly J. Inglis)
ch. 4 How Memory Works (Holly J. Inglis)

Part Three: The Courage to Change the Things You Can
ch. 5 Tips for Sticky Learnging (Holly J. Inglis)
ch. 6 The Artistic and Even Risky Endeavor of Teaching: A Narrative Response to “Tips for Sticky Learning” (Rodger Y. Nishioka)
ch. 7 What’s a Teacher to Do? (Holly J. Inglis)
ch. 8 Reimagining Course Design: A Case Study (Kathy L. Dawson)

Works Cited
Cover image

Changing Minds and Brains: The Legacy of Reuven Feuerstein Higher Thinking and Cognition Through Mediated Learning

Book
Feuerstein, Reuven; Falik, Louis; and Feuerstein, Refael S.
2015
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LB1590.3.F475 2015
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Decades before educators began to draw teaching and learning implications from neuroscientists’ groundbreaking findings on brain plasticiy, Reuven Feuerstein had already theorized it and developed practices for teaching and developing higher level cognition and learning for all students, even those with Down syndrome and other learning disabilities. His mediated learning, enrichment instruments, and dynamic assessment are used in urban districts in the United ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Decades before educators began to draw teaching and learning implications from neuroscientists’ groundbreaking findings on brain plasticiy, Reuven Feuerstein had already theorized it and developed practices for teaching and developing higher level cognition and learning for all students, even those with Down syndrome and other learning disabilities. His mediated learning, enrichment instruments, and dynamic assessment are used in urban districts in the United States and around the world to raise student achievement, success levels, and self-regulation.

In this final work, Feuerstein provides a first-person reflective narrative of the implementation of mediated learning experience (MLE) past and present, including stories, new insights, observations, and newly formulated concepts on MLE and how it contributes to higher-level thinking and overcoming disability. Featuring both educational and clinical case examples, it offers a more detailed picture of the practical applications than any other publication to date. Those familiar with Feuerstein’s methods will find this book an important resource in deepening their knowledge. It is also essential reading for all educators looking for approaches that promote thinking skills that improve educational outcomes for diverse learners.

Book Features:
• Provides stories of Feuerstein’s inspirational journey as a teacher and learner, often working with special needs children and youth.
• Relates mediated learning to contemporary learning environments
• Explores theory and research on whether spiritual and behavioral practices change the brain.
• Includes chapters devoted to questioning techniques and the effects of modern media access to the development of thinking skills.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Carl Haywood)
Prologue
Mediated Learning Experience in the Classroom
Medicating the Special Needs of a Child
Preface

ch. 1 Mediated Learning Experience and Theory of Structural Cognitive Modifiability
ch. 2 Defining and Describing Mediated Learning Experience
ch. 3 Applications of Mediated Learning Experience
ch. 4 Mediated Learning Experience and the Nature of Change
ch. 5 Sources of Support for the Theory of Structural Cognitive Modifiability
ch. 6 Materialism, Spiritualism, the Mirror Neurons, and Cognitive Modifiability
ch. 7 How Mediated Learning Experience Produces Structural Cognitive Modifiability
ch. 8 Making Mediated Learning Experience Effective: Summarizing and Integrating
ch. 9 Questioning as a Basic Mechanism of Mediated Learning Experience
ch. 10 Mediated Learning Experience and “Generation Y”: Implications for Parents and Teachers

Annotated Bibliography
References
Index
About the Authors
Cover image

Minds Online: Teaching Effectively with Technology

Book
Miller, Michelle D.
2014
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB1028.5.M548 2014
Topics: Online Learning   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: From wired campuses to smart classrooms to massive open online courses (MOOCs), digital technology is now firmly embedded in higher education. But the dizzying pace of innovation, combined with a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of new tools and programs, challenges educators to articulate how technology can best fit into the learning experience. Minds Online is a concise, nontechnical guide for academic ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: From wired campuses to smart classrooms to massive open online courses (MOOCs), digital technology is now firmly embedded in higher education. But the dizzying pace of innovation, combined with a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of new tools and programs, challenges educators to articulate how technology can best fit into the learning experience. Minds Online is a concise, nontechnical guide for academic leaders and instructors who seek to advance learning in this changing environment, through a sound scientific understanding of how the human brain assimilates knowledge.

Drawing on the latest findings from neuroscience and cognitive psychology, Michelle Miller explores how attention, memory, and higher thought processes such as critical thinking and analytical reasoning can be enhanced through technology-aided approaches. The techniques she describes promote retention of course material through frequent low‐stakes testing and practice, and help prevent counterproductive cramming by encouraging better spacing of study. Online activities also help students become more adept with cognitive aids, such as analogies, that allow them to apply learning across situations and disciplines. Miller guides instructors through the process of creating a syllabus for a cognitively optimized, fully online course. She presents innovative ideas for how to use multimedia effectively, how to take advantage of learners’ existing knowledge, and how to motivate students to do their best work and complete the course.

For a generation born into the Internet age, educational technology designed with the brain in mind offers a natural pathway to the pleasures and rewards of deep learning, (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Is Online Learning Here to Stay?
ch. 2 Online Learning: Does It Work?
ch. 3 The Psychology of Computing
ch. 4 Attention
ch. 5 Memory
ch. 6 Thinking
ch. 7 Incorporating Multimedia Effectively
ch. 8 Motivating Students
ch. 9 Putting It All Together

Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
Additional Info:
Vanderbilt University’s very helpful and brief overview of metacognition (“thinking about one’s thinking”) with helpful references throughout and good ideas for helping students put it into practice.
Additional Info:
Vanderbilt University’s very helpful and brief overview of metacognition (“thinking about one’s thinking”) with helpful references throughout and good ideas for helping students put it into practice.
Cover image

Fostering Habits of Mind in Today's Students: A New Approach to Developmental Education

Book
Fletcher, Jennifer; Najarro, Adela; and Yelland, Hetty, eds.
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2331.2.F54 2015
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Students need more than just academic skills for success in college and career, and the lack of an explicit instructional focus on the “soft skills” critical to postsecondary success poses a challenge for many students who enter college, especially the underprepared.

Based upon a multi-campus, cross-disciplinary collaboration, this book presents the resulting set of habits-of-mind-based strategies that demonstrably help not only low-income, ESL, and first-generation college students overcome ...
Additional Info:
Students need more than just academic skills for success in college and career, and the lack of an explicit instructional focus on the “soft skills” critical to postsecondary success poses a challenge for many students who enter college, especially the underprepared.

Based upon a multi-campus, cross-disciplinary collaboration, this book presents the resulting set of habits-of-mind-based strategies that demonstrably help not only low-income, ESL, and first-generation college students overcome obstacles on the path to degree completion; these strategies equally benefit all students. They promote life-long, integrative learning and foster intellectual qualities such as curiosity, openness, flexibility, engagement, and persistence that are the key to developing internalized and transferrable competencies that are seldom given direct attention in college classrooms.

This contributed volume, written with full-time and adjunct faculty in mind, provides the rationale for this pedagogical approach and presents the sequential instructional cycle that begins by identifying students’ assets and progressively focusing on specific habits to develop their capacity to transfer their learning to new tasks and situations.

Faculty from both two-year and four-year colleges provide examples of how they implement these practices in English, math, and General Education courses, and demonstrate the applicability of these practices across course types and disciplines.

Chapters address key factors of college success, including:
* The link between habits of mind and student retention and achievement
* Using an assets-based approach to teaching and learning
* Supporting and engaging students
* Creating inclusive learning communities
* Building confidence and self-efficacy
* Promoting transfer of learning
* Teacher networks and cross-disciplinary collaboration

By foregrounding habits of mind as an instructional lens, this book makes a unique contribution to teaching in developmental and general education settings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Emily Lardner)
Prefact
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Why Habits of Mind Matter (Jennifer Fletcher)

ch. 1 Discovering Assets (Hetty Yelland)
Superpower Essay (Lydia Graeyn)
Reflecting Home Culture (Adela Najarro)
Book Building (Adela Najarro)
Opening-Week Activities (Ken Rand)

ch. 2 Creating Communities (Adela Najarro)
Pass as a Class (Lydia Graecyn)
Building a Supportive Community in the Classroom (Tina Sander)
Forming Familias (Adela Najarro)

ch. 3 Engaging Leaners (Jennifer Fletcher and Hetty Yelland)
Lazy Teacher of Genius? A Case for Vocabulary Enhancement through Playing Scrabble in the Classroom (Hetty Yelland)
Recess (Jennifer McGuire)
The Great Debaters? Well, Close Enough (Maria Boza)
Gender and Miscommunication (Sunita Lanka)
Letters to the Editor (Kathleen Lenoard)

ch. 4 Building Confidence (Jennifer Fletcher)
Bordom Busters (Jennifer Fletcher)
A Diference You (Jennifer Fletcher)
Working the Workshop (Lydia Graecyn)
Proofreading: How Can We Polish Our Essays When Our Brains and Computers Have Such Limitations? (Tina Sander)

ch. 5 Developing Students’ Self-Efficacy (Adela Najarro)
Academic Essay Structure (Adela Najarro)
Group Projects: Turning Students into Teachers (Olga Blomgren)
Students Respond to Instructors’ Comments on Essays (Rhea Mendoza-Lewis)
Cheating? Everyone Cheats (Daphne Young)

ch. 6 Promoting Transfer of Learning (Jennifer Fletcher)
Using the Habit of Mind as a Reflective Tool (Natasha Oehlman)
Reading, Writing, and Habits of Mind Reflection Essay (Olga Blomgren)
Words of Advice (Jennifer McGuire)
Negotiating Transfer within Sustainability: From Consumer to Policy Maker (Rebecca Kersnar)
Writing in the Math Class (Ken Rand)

Conclusion (Jennifer Fletcher)
Appendix A: Making Cross-Disciplinary Intersegmental Collaboration Work
The Story behind the Exemplars (Jennifer Fletcher and Becky Reed Rosenberg)
Appendix B: Connective Learning Log
Questions for Reflecting on Transfer of Learning
Appendix C: Habits of Mind Lesson Student Feedback Form
Appendix D: Presurvey of Math
Appendix E: Presurvey of Writing
Appendix F: Postsurvey of Math
Appendix G: Postsurvey of Writing
About the Editors and Contributors
Index
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Looking and Learning: Visual Literacy across the Disciplines

Book
Little, Deandra; Felten, Peter; and Berry, Chad
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA, (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 141)
LB1068.L66 2015
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
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Abstract: In this volume, the authors focus on the importance of inclusive teaching and the role faculty can play in helping students achieve, though not necessarily in the same way. To teach with a focus on inclusion means to believe that every person has the ability to learn. It means that most individuals want to learn, to improve their ability to better understand the ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: In this volume, the authors focus on the importance of inclusive teaching and the role faculty can play in helping students achieve, though not necessarily in the same way. To teach with a focus on inclusion means to believe that every person has the ability to learn. It means that most individuals want to learn, to improve their ability to better understand the world in which they live, and to be able to navigate their pathways of life.

This volume includes the following topics:

- best practices for teaching students with social, economic, gender, or ethnic differences
- adjustments to the teaching and learning process to focus on inclusion
- strategies for teaching that help learners connect what they know with the information presented
- environments that maximize learners’ academic and social growth.

The premise of inclusive teaching works to demonstrate that all people can and do learn. Educators and administrators can incorporate the techniques of inclusive learning and help learners retain more information.

This is the 141st volume of the quarterly Jossey-Bass higher education series New Directions for Teaching and Learning. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Deandra Little, Peter Felten, Chad Berry)

ch. 1 Teaching Visual Literacy in the Astronomy Classroom (Anthony Crider)
An astronomy professor describes how he teaches students to read and write images, diagrams, and plots to teach visual literacy skills along with a deeper understanding of how images are used to understand and explain in the field of astronomy.

ch. 2 Learning to See the Infinite: Teaching Visual Literacy in a First-Year Seminar Course (Michael S. Palmer)
This chapter describes an interdisciplinary first-year seminar course designed to develop students’ visual literacy skills and includes an overview of the course and a discussion of the efficacy of the instructional interventions, as well as a timeline and description of the specific learning activities used to help students learn to “see the infinite.”

ch. 3 Sociology through Photography (Katherine Hyde)
This chapter explores how photography can inspire and cultivate sociological mindfulness through two sets of assignments that highlight the complexity of visual representations of social identity and guide sociological inquiry.

ch. 4 Seeing Is the Hardest Thing to See: Using Illusions to Teach Visual Perception (Cedar Riener)
A cognitive science professor explains how he uses optical illusions to teach visual perception in ways that encourage students to change their perspectives about how vision works, and in the process begin to question their assumptions about how knowledge is constructed in a variety of disciplines.

ch. 5 How to Navigate an “Upside-Down” World: Using Images in the History Classroom (Steven S. Volk)
This chapter explores the challenges and benefits of working with images in a history classroom, including the complexity of helping students use images as historical evidence, ways in which close readings of images can help students develop deep attention, and how work with images can be done in a way that accommodates all students, including those with limited or no sight.

ch. 6 Teaching Film and Filmmaking in a Second Language (Alison J. Murray Levine)
This chapter describes a pedagogical approach that blends theory and practice in upper-level French film classes, and that has objectives, design, and assignments applicable to many contexts in which instructors might want to engage with visual material.

ch. 7 Learning—to and from—the Visual Critique Process (Phillip Motley)
A professor of visual communications examines the ways visual critique can benefit students in art, design, or visual communication fields, as well as those in a range of other courses where interpreting or creating visual images is a crucial part of course content.

ch. 8 Teaching Visual Literacy across the Curriculum: Suggestions and Strategies (Deandra Little)
This final chapter highlights seven general suggestions and strategies as a quick guide to effective practice for faculty (and others) working to develop visual literacy in classrooms and across the curriculum.

Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Critical Reading in Higher Education: Academic Goals and Social Engagement

Book
Manarin, Karen; Carey, Miriam; Rathburn, Melanie; and Ryland, Glen
2015
Indiana University Press, Bloomington, IN
LB2395.3.M26 2015
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Faculty often worry that students can’t or won’t read critically, a foundational skill for success in academic and professional endeavors. “Critical reading” refers both to reading for academic purposes and reading for social engagement. This volume is based on collaborative, multidisciplinary research into how students read in first-year courses in subjects ranging from scientific literacy through composition. The authors discovered the good (students can read), the bad (students ...
Additional Info:
Faculty often worry that students can’t or won’t read critically, a foundational skill for success in academic and professional endeavors. “Critical reading” refers both to reading for academic purposes and reading for social engagement. This volume is based on collaborative, multidisciplinary research into how students read in first-year courses in subjects ranging from scientific literacy through composition. The authors discovered the good (students can read), the bad (students are not reading for social engagement), and the ugly (class assignments may be setting students up for failure) and they offer strategies that can better engage students and provide more meaningful reading experiences. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by (Pat Hutchings)
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Different Courses, Common Concern
ch. 2 Can Students Read? Comprehension, Analysis, Interpretation, and Evaluation
ch. 3 Critical Reading for Academic Purposes
ch. 4 Critical Reading for Social Engagement
ch. 5 So Now What

Appendix One: Rubrics and Worksheets
Appendix Two: Taxonomy of Absence
Appendix Three: Coda on Collaboration
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Creating Self-Regulated Learners: Strategies to Strengthen Students’ Self-Awareness and Learning Skills

Book
Nilson, Linda
2013
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1060.N55 2013
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Most of our students neither know how learning works nor what they have to do to ensure it, to the detriment both of their studies and their development as lifelong learners.

The point of departure for this book is the literature on self-regulated learning that tells us that deep, lasting, independent learning requires learners to bring into play a range of cognitive skills, affective attitudes, and even physical ...
Additional Info:
Most of our students neither know how learning works nor what they have to do to ensure it, to the detriment both of their studies and their development as lifelong learners.

The point of departure for this book is the literature on self-regulated learning that tells us that deep, lasting, independent learning requires learners to bring into play a range of cognitive skills, affective attitudes, and even physical activities – about which most students are wholly unaware; and that self-regulation, which has little to do with measured intelligence, can be developed by just about anyone and is a fundamental prerequisite of academic success.

Linda Nilson provides the theoretical background to student self-regulation,the evidence that it enhances achievement, and the strategies to help students develop it. She presents an array of tested activities and assignments through which students can progressively reflect on, monitor and improve their learning skills; describes how they can be integrated with different course components and on various schedules; and elucidates how to intentionally and seamlessly incorporate them into course design to effectively meet disciplinary and student development objectives. Recognizing that most faculty are unfamiliar with these strategies, she also recommends how to prepare for introducing them into the classroom and adding more as instructors become more confident using them.

The book concludes with descriptions of courses from different fields to offer models and ideas for implementation.

At a time of so much concern about what our students are learning in college and how well prepared they are for the challenges of tomorrow’s economy and society, self-regulated learning provides a reassuring solution, particularly as studies indicate that struggling students benefit the most from practicing it. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Barry J. Zimmerman)
Preface
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 What Is Self-Regulated Learning and How Does It Enhance Learning?
ch. 2 Fostering Self-Regulated Learning from the Start
ch. 3 Self-Regulated Reading, Watching, and Listening
ch. 4 Self-Regulated Learning from Live Lectures
ch. 5 Self-Regulated Learning from Meta-Assignments
ch. 6 Self-Regulated Learning from Exams and Quizzes
ch. 7 Frequent or Occasional Self-Regulated Learning Activities
ch. 8 Fostering Self-Regulated Behavior
ch. 9 Closing a Course with Self-Regulated Learning
ch. 10 To Grade or Not to Grade? Or to Grade a Different Way?
ch. 11 Planning to Integrate Self-Regulated Learning into Course Design
ch. 12 Models of Integrated Courses and Their Impact on Students

References
About the Author
Index
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Facilitating Learning with the Adult Brain in Mind: A Conceptual and Practical Guide

Book
Taylor, Kathleen and Marienau, Cahterine
2016
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5225.L42 T4 2016
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
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Abstract: Facilitating Learning with the Adult Brain in Mind explains how the brain works, and how to help adults learn, develop, and perform more effectively in various settings. Recent neurobiological discoveries have challenged long-held assumptions that logical, rational thought is the preeminent approach to knowing. Rather, feelings and emotions are essential for meaningful learning to occur in the embodied brain. Using stories, metaphors, and ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: Facilitating Learning with the Adult Brain in Mind explains how the brain works, and how to help adults learn, develop, and perform more effectively in various settings. Recent neurobiological discoveries have challenged long-held assumptions that logical, rational thought is the preeminent approach to knowing. Rather, feelings and emotions are essential for meaningful learning to occur in the embodied brain. Using stories, metaphors, and engaging illustrations to illuminate technical ideas, Taylor and Marienau synthesize relevant trends in neuroscience, cognitive science, and philosophy of mind. Readers unfamiliar with current brain discoveries will enjoy an informative, easy-to-read book. Neuroscience fans will find additional material designed to supplement their knowledge.

Many popular publications on brain and learning focus on school-aged learners or tend more toward anatomical description than practical application. This book provides facilitators of adult learning and development a much-needed resource of tested approaches plus the science behind their effectiveness.

- Appreciate the fundamental role of experience in adult learning
- Understand how metaphor and analogy spark curiosity and creativity
- Alleviate adult anxieties that impede learning
- Acquire tools and approaches that foster adult learning and development

Compared with other books on brain and learning, this volume includes dozens of specific examples of how experienced practitioners facilitate meaningful learning. These "brain-aware" approaches can be adopted and adapted for use in diverse settings. Facilitating Learning with the Adult Brain in Mind should be read by advisors/counselors, instructors, curriculum and instructional developers, professional development designers, corporate trainers and coaches, faculty mentors, and graduate students—in fact, anyone interested in how adult brains learn. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

PART I: Brain: Then and Now
ch. 1 Brain Basics–changes in the brain over eons
ch. 2 The Learning, Changing Adult Brain–experience, memory, and emotions
ch. 3 Metaphors, Embodiment, and Hemispheres–foundations of brain-aware approaches

PART II: PracticesThat Enhance Adult Learning–featuring the Theatre of Knowing
ch. 4 Setting the Stage for Learning–lowering anxiety, engaging curiosity
ch. 5 Enter Stage Left–starting with verbal-theoretical conceptual approaches in mind
ch. 6 Enter Stage Right–starting with embodied and metaphorical approaches in mind
ch. 7 Center Stage–interweaving multifaceted approaches
ch. 8 Spotlight on Meaning Making–scaffolding reflection and feedback

PART III: Reflecting on Practice
ch. 9 Enhancing Brain-Aware Practice with Theory–foundational theories of learning and development
ch. 10 Toward Complexity and Commitment–learning that promotes courageous informed action

Epilogue
References
Acknowledgments
About the Authors and Contributors
Name Index
Subject Index
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Teach Students How to Learn: Strategies You Can Incorporate Into Any Course to Improve Student Metacognition, Study Skills, and Motivation

Book
McGuire, Saundra Yancy
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1025.3.M356 2015
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
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Abstract: Miriam, a freshman Calculus student at Louisiana State University, made 37.5% on her first exam but 83% and 93% on the next two. Matt, a first year General Chemistry student at the University of Utah, scored 65% and 55% on his first two exams and 95% on his third—These are representative of thousands of students who decisively improved their grades by acting on the advice described in this ...
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Abstract: Miriam, a freshman Calculus student at Louisiana State University, made 37.5% on her first exam but 83% and 93% on the next two. Matt, a first year General Chemistry student at the University of Utah, scored 65% and 55% on his first two exams and 95% on his third—These are representative of thousands of students who decisively improved their grades by acting on the advice described in this book.

What is preventing your students from performing according to expectations? Saundra McGuire offers a simple but profound answer: If you teach students how to learn and give them simple, straightforward strategies to use, they can significantly increase their learning and performance.

For over a decade Saundra McGuire has been acclaimed for her presentations and workshops on metacognition and student learning because the tools and strategies she shares have enabled faculty to facilitate dramatic improvements in student learning and success. This book encapsulates the model and ideas she has developed in the past fifteen years, ideas that are being adopted by an increasing number of faculty with considerable effect.

The methods she proposes do not require restructuring courses or an inordinate amount of time to teach. They can often be accomplished in a single session, transforming students from memorizers and regurgitators to students who begin to think critically and take responsibility for their own learning.

Saundra McGuire takes the reader sequentially through the ideas and strategies that students need to understand and implement. First, she demonstrates how introducing students to metacognition and Bloom’s Taxonomy reveals to them the importance of understanding how they learn and provides the lens through which they can view learning activities and measure their intellectual growth. Next, she presents a specific study system that can quickly empower students to maximize their learning. Then, she addresses the importance of dealing with emotion, attitudes, and motivation by suggesting ways to change students’ mindsets about ability and by providing a range of strategies to boost motivation and learning; finally, she offers guidance to faculty on partnering with campus learning centers.

She pays particular attention to academically unprepared students, noting that the strategies she offers for this particular population are equally beneficial for all students.

While stressing that there are many ways to teach effectively, and that readers can be flexible in picking and choosing among the strategies she presents, Saundra McGuire offers the reader a step-by-step process for delivering the key messages of the book to students in as little as 50 minutes. Free online supplements provide three slide sets and a sample video lecture.

This book is written primarily for faculty but will be equally useful for TAs, tutors, and learning center professionals. For readers with no background in education or cognitive psychology, the book avoids jargon and esoteric theory. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Dedication
Acknowledgements
Introduction

ch. 1 Saundra’s journey: From traditional instructor to academic transformer
ch. 2 Why don’t our students already know how to learn?
ch. 3 Metacognition: What it is and how it helps students become independent learners
ch. 4 The power of teaching Bloom’s Taxonomy and the Study Cycle to students
ch. 5 Metacognitive learning strategies at work
ch. 6 Mindset matters
ch. 7 Connections between emotions, motivation, and learning
ch. 8 What faculty can do to boost motivation, positive emotions, and learning
ch. 9 What students can do to boost motivation, positive emotions, and learning
ch. 10 Partnering with your campus learning center
ch. 11 Teaching learning strategies to groups
ch. 12 Teaching unprepared students

Epilogue- Experiment and have fun!

Appendix A: Compilation of strategies for students
Appendix B: Books and weblinks recommended for students
Appendix C: Compilation of strategies for instructors
Appendix D: Resources for presenting learning strategies to groups
Appendix E: Learning strategies inventory
Appendix F: Dramatic individual student improvement
Appendix G: Selected student feedback
Appendix H: Slides from Chemistry Presentation
Appendix I: An Advanced Placement physics class

References
About the Authors
Index
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The Neuroscience of Learning and Development: Enhancing Creativity, Compassion, Critical Thinking, and Peace in Higher Education

Book
Ludvik, Marilee J. Bresciani, ed.
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1062..N48 2016
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Is higher education preparing our students for a world that is increasingly complex and volatile, and in which they will have to contend with uncertainty and ambiguity? Are we addressing the concerns of employers who complain that graduates do not possess the creative, critical thinking, and communication skills needed in the workplace?

This book harnesses what we have learned from innovations in teaching, from neuroscience, experiential learning, and ...
Additional Info:
Is higher education preparing our students for a world that is increasingly complex and volatile, and in which they will have to contend with uncertainty and ambiguity? Are we addressing the concerns of employers who complain that graduates do not possess the creative, critical thinking, and communication skills needed in the workplace?

This book harnesses what we have learned from innovations in teaching, from neuroscience, experiential learning, and studies on mindfulness and personal development to transform how we deliver and create new knowledge, and indeed transform our students, developing their capacities for adaptive boundary spanning.

Starting from the premise that our current linear, course-based, educational practices are frequently at odds with how our neurological system facilitates learning and personal development, the authors set out an alternative model that emphasizes a holistic approach to education that integrates mindful inquiry practice with self-authorship and the regulation of emotion as the cornerstones of learning, while demonstrating how these align with the latest discoveries in neuroscience.

The book closes by offering practical ideas for implementation, showing how simple refinements in classroom and out-of-classroom experiences can create foundations for students to develop key skills that will enhance adaptive problem solving, creativity, overall wellbeing, innovation, resilience, compassion, and ultimately world peace. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Gavin W. Henning)
Foreword (Ralph Wolff)
Acknowledgments
Preface (Marilee J. Bresciani Ludvik)
Introduction: Rethinking How We Design, Deliver, and Evaluate Higher Education (Marilee J. Bresciani Ludvik)

ch. 1 Basic Brain Parts and Their Functions (Matthew R. Everard, Jacopo Annese, and Marliee J. Bresciano)
ch. 2 Unpacking Neuroplasticity and Neurogenesis (Matthew Evrard and Marilee J. Bresciani Ludvik, with review by Thomas Van Vleet)
ch. 3 Strategies That Intentionally Change the Brain (Marilee J. Bresciani Ludvik, Matthew R. Evrard, and Philippe Goldin, with review by Thomas Van Vleet)
ch. 4 (Re)Conceptualizing Meaning Making in Higher Education: A Case for Integrative Educational Encounters That Prepare Students for Self-Authorship (Emily Marx and Lisa Gates)
ch. 5 Intentional Design of High-Impact Experiential Learning (Patsy Tinsley McGill)
ch. 6 Enhancing Well-Being and Resilience (Christine L. Hoey)
ch. 7 Enhancing Creativity (Shaila Mulholland)
ch. 8 Enhancing Compassion and Empathy (Sara Schairer)
ch. 9 Balance Begets Integration: Exploring the Importance of Sleep, Movement, and Nature (Bruce Bekkar)
ch. 10 Enhancing and Evaluating Critical Thinking Dispositions and Holistic Student Learning and Development Through Integrative Inquiry (Marilee J. Bresciani Ludvik, Philippe Goldin, Matthew R. Evrard, J. Luke Wood, Wendy Bracken, Charles Iyoho, and Mark Tucker)
ch. 11 Mindfulness at Work in Higher Education Leadership: From Theory to Practice Within the Classroom and Across the University (Les P. Cook and Anne Beffel)
ch. 12 A Mindful Approach to Navigating Strategic Change (Laurie J. Cameron)

Afterword: Adoption, Adaptation, and Transformation (Marilee J. Bresciani Ludvik)
About the Editor and Contributors
Index
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Learning, Development and Education: From learning theory to education and practice

Book
Illeris, Knud
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1060.I445 2016
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In the World Library of Educationalists, international experts themselves compile career-long collections of what they judge to be their finest pieces – extracts from books, key articles, salient research findings, major theoretical and practical contributions – so the world can read them in a single manageable volume. Readers will be able to follow the themes and strands and see how their work contributes to the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In the World Library of Educationalists, international experts themselves compile career-long collections of what they judge to be their finest pieces – extracts from books, key articles, salient research findings, major theoretical and practical contributions – so the world can read them in a single manageable volume. Readers will be able to follow the themes and strands and see how their work contributes to the development of the field. This volume brings together the selected works of Knud Illeris.

Leaving a promising business career at age 27 to begin his higher education, Knud Illeris exemplifies the true spirit of youth and adult education that has resulted in him having published in almost twenty countries, including the UK, Germany, China, Korea and Brazil. Knud Illeris’ work revolves around the way learning takes place and in some cases does not take palce. Split into five parts;

- Learning Theory
- Lifelong Learning as a Psychological Process
- Special Learning Issues
- Various Learning Approaches to Education
- Learning in Working Life

Learning, Development and Education: From learning theory to education and practice is arranged thematically and examines youth and adult learning through Illeris’ model based on three dimensions of learning and competence development– emotional, cognitive and social, and four kinds of learning.

In this collection of his papers, written over a period of almost five decades, and published in multiple languages, spanning from Faroese to Chinese, some of his most important works are chronicled. This compelling overview of Illeris’ contribution to educational thinking and theory charts the challenges and obstacles faced by disciplination and selection, and offers a genuine impression and understanding of an almost lifelong engagement with a wide range of topics in the field of learning – an engagement which has been the central area of Illeris’ academic life. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Part I - Learning Theory

ch. 1 A Comprehensive Understanding of Human Learning
ch. 2 The Development of a Comprehensive and Coherent Theory of Learning
ch. 3 Learning in the Competition State: Problems and Alternative Perspectives

Part II - Learning and Life Course
ch. 4 Lifelong Learning as a Psychological Process
ch. 5 Learning, Identity and Self-Orientation in Youth
ch. 6 Adult Learning
ch. 7 Lifelong Learning and the Low-Skilled

Part III - Special Learning Issues
ch. 8 Learning and Cognition
ch. 9 Transfer of Learning in the Learning Society
ch. 10 Adult Learning and Responsibility
ch. 11 Adult Education between Emancipation and Control (Annegrethe Ahrenkiel and Knud Illeris)
ch. 12 Mislearning, Defense and Resistance

Part IV - Various Learning Approaches to Education
ch. 13 The Organisation of Studies at Roskilde University: The concept, practice and problems of project organisation
ch. 14 Project Work in University Studies: Background
ch. 15 Learning, Experience and Personal Development
ch. 16 Transformative Learning
ch. 17 Transformative Learning re-defined: as changes in elements of the identity

Part V - Learning in Working Life
ch. 18 Workplaces and Learning
ch. 19 Workplace Learning and Learning Theory
ch. 20 The workplace as a Framework for Learning
ch. 21 Workplace Learning as Competence Development

Index
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Why Students Resist Learning: A Practical Model for Understanding and Helping Students

Book
Tolman, Anton O. and Kremling, Janine, eds.
2017
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2343.4.W555 2017
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
However personally committed faculty may be to helping students learn, their students are not always as eager to participate in this endeavor, and may react with both active and passive resistant behaviors, including poor faculty evaluations.

The purpose of this book is to help faculty develop a coherent and integrated understanding of the various causes of student resistance to learning, providing them ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
However personally committed faculty may be to helping students learn, their students are not always as eager to participate in this endeavor, and may react with both active and passive resistant behaviors, including poor faculty evaluations.

The purpose of this book is to help faculty develop a coherent and integrated understanding of the various causes of student resistance to learning, providing them with a rationale for responding constructively, and enabling them to create conditions conducive to implementing effective learning strategies.

In this book readers will discover an innovative integrated model that accounts for student behaviors and creates a foundation for intentional and informed discussion, evaluation, and the development of effective counter strategies. The model takes into account institutional context, environmental forces, students’ prior negative classroom experiences, their cognitive development, readiness to change, and metacognition. The various chapters take the reader through the model’s elements, exploring their practical implications for teaching, whether relating to course design, assessments, assignments, or interactions with students.

The book includes a chapter written entirely by students, offering their insights into the causes of resistance, and their reflections on how participating on this project has affected them.

While of great value for faculty, this book is also useful to faculty developers advising future and current faculty, as well as to administrators, offering insight into how institutional values impact teaching practice and student attitudes. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (John Tagg)
Acknowledgments
Preface: What Makes This Book Unique (Anton O. Tolman)

ch. 1 Defining and Understanding Student Resistance (Anton O. Tolman, Andy Sechler, and Shea Smart)
ch. 2 Student Voices: Discovering Resistance (Averie Hamilton, Andy Sechler, Colt Rothlisberger, Shea Smart, Anton O. Tolman, Matthew Anderson, Rob Blair, and Amy Lindstrom)
ch. 3 Obstacles, Biases, and the Urgent Need to Understand the Social Cost of Resistance (Anton O. Tolman, Andy Sechler, and Shea Smart)
ch. 4 The Impact of Institutional Culture on Student Disengagement and Resistance to Learning (Janine Kremling and Erikca DeAnn Brown)
ch. 5 Societal and Environmental Influences That Shape Student Motivation (Christopher Lee and Amy Lindstrom)
ch. 6 Through the Students’ Eyes: Internalized Forces That Shape Student Motivation (Christopher Lee, Andy Sechler, and Shea Smart)
ch. 7 Negative Classroom Experiences (Janine Kremling, Colt Rothlisberger, and Shea Smart)
ch. 8 Seeing the Invisible: How Cognitive and Developmental Influences Shape Student Resistance (Trevor Morris, Rob Blair, and Colt Rothlisberger)
ch. 9 How Promoting Student Metacognition Can Reduce Resistance (Rob Blair, Anton O. Tolman, Janine Kremling, and Trevor Morris)
ch.10 Creating a Campus Climate to Reduce Resistance (Anton O. Tolman, Janine Kremling, and Ryan Radmall)

Epilogue: Final Thoughts (Anton O. Tolman, Janine Kremling, and Trevor Morris)
Appendix
TTM Learning Survey
Learning Strategies and Self-Awareness Assessment #1 (LSSA)
Learning Strategies and Self-Awareness Assessment #3
Becoming Aware of Your Learning Approach
Interpreting the TTM Survey
About the Editors and Contributors
Index
Cover image

Contemplative Studies in Higher Education

Book
Sanders, Linda A., ed.
2013
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 134)
LB2361.C59 2013
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The complexities of 21st-century life- personal, social, cultural, and environmental - demand thoughtful responses, responses fostered and enhanced through contemplative experience. Contemplative education includes studies of the history, psychology, and socialcultural context of such experience, as well as the development of experiential knowledge through one or more personal practices.

Contemplative education has recently emerged in the academy. Although there has been significant published discussion of postsecondary courses and ...
Additional Info:
The complexities of 21st-century life- personal, social, cultural, and environmental - demand thoughtful responses, responses fostered and enhanced through contemplative experience. Contemplative education includes studies of the history, psychology, and socialcultural context of such experience, as well as the development of experiential knowledge through one or more personal practices.

Contemplative education has recently emerged in the academy. Although there has been significant published discussion of postsecondary courses and programs that incorporate contemplative views and practices, there have been few studies of relevant curricula and pedagogy. This volume integrates research, theory, and practice through a fusion of perspectives and approaches, giving readers the opportunity to review contemplative educational concepts and applications in academic, social, and institutional domains.

This is the 134th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. New Directions for Teaching and Learning offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Linda A. Sanders)

ch. 1 Peak Oil, Peak Water, Peak Education (Thomas B. Coburn)
This chapter introduces contemplative education as a way of teaching and learning that is meaningful, relevant, and critical to the evolution of the 21st century academy. The essay also offers guidelines for contemplative practice in face-to-face and online class environments.

ch. 2 Contemplative Science: An Insider Prospectus (Willoughby B. Britton, Anne-Catharine Brown, Christopher T. Kaplan, Roberta E. Goldman, Marie DeLuca, Rahil Rojiani, Harry Reis, Mandy Xi, Jonathan C. Chou, Faye McKenna, Peter Hitchcock, Tomas A. Rocha, Josh Himmelfarb, David M. Margolis, Halsey F. Niles, Allison M. Eckert, Tana Frank)
Seventeen members of the Contemplative Studies Research Lab from Brown University envision a new kind of science that includes collaborative research and the integration of contemplative studies into scientific training. The chapter includes comprehensive discussion about the long-term consequences of contemplative pedagogies for the fields of science and medicine.

ch. 3 Contemplative Practices and the Renewal of Legal Education (Rhonda V. Magee)
This chapter discusses the contemplative law movement and its influence on the development of new courses and cocurricular sessions at the University of San Francisco School of Law and other law school programs. The contemplative approach to law is also presented as transformative and inclusive epistemology and methodology in response to multiple critiques that call for change in legal education.

ch. 4 Birthing Internal Images: Employing the Cajita Project as a Contemplative Activity in a College Classroom (Vijay Kanagala, Laura I. Rendón)
This chapter provides a step-by-step description of planning and implementing the cajita project, a contemplative exercise, designed to facilitate self-refl exivity, as well as personal and social responsibility in graduate students majoring in higher education leadership and student affairs at the University of Texas–San Antonio. The chapter also explains the cultural and pedagogical origins of the cajita project.

ch. 5 Integrating Contemplative Education and Contemporary Performance (Linda A. Sanders)
In this chapter, faculty and students characterize contemplative education, and students disclose their perspectives of how contemplative view and practice affect their personal and professional development in a graduate, interdisciplinary performing arts community. At Naropa University, traditional contemplative education is integrated with conservatory-level, contemporary performance training in its Master of Fine Arts in Theater: Contemporary Performance program.

ch. 6 The Formation and Development of the Mindful Campus (Margaret A. DuFon, Jennifer Christian)
This chapter recounts the efforts of faculty and students to cultivate contemplative pedagogies and mindfulness through curricular initiatives and extracurricular programs at California State University– Chico. The authors describe their campuswide programmatic and promotional work that captures the attention, support, and involvement of the greater Chico community.

ch. 7 Koru: Teaching Mindfulness to Emerging Adults(Holly B. Rogers)
This chapter reviews the developmental features of emerging adulthood and explores the ways in which mindfulness is a useful developmental aid for this age group. The specifi c strategies employed in Koru, a program designed at Duke University to make mindfulness accessible to college students, are described. Student responses to Koru are also briefly discussed.

ch. 8 Contemplative Pedagogy: A Quiet Revolution in Higher Education (Arthur Zajonc)
A contemplative pedagogy movement is quietly emerging around the world. This chapter offers a brief history of the movement, which has occurred during the last fi fteen years throughout postsecondary campuses, and describes the contemplative practices of mindfulness, concentration, open awareness, and sustaining contradictions. The author also voices such larger hopes for higher education as the cessation of ignorance and an “epistemology of love” and suggests that contemplative pedagogy can cultivate and form the capacities that are required for integrative, transformative teaching and learning in the 21st century academy.

Index
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Unforgettable: Enabling Deep and Durable Learning

Book
Gray, W. Michael
2016
Wipf & Stock Publishers, Eugene, OR
LB2331.G669 2016
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
We have an uneasy relationship with the relentless deluge of information gushing out of academia and our media outlets. To turn it off is escapist, but to attempt to cognitively grapple with it is overwhelming.

In Unforgettable: Enabling Deep and Durable Learning, a nationally recognized master teacher gives professors and their students the means to chart a clear path through this information explosion. Humans crave explanatory patterns, and ...
Additional Info:
We have an uneasy relationship with the relentless deluge of information gushing out of academia and our media outlets. To turn it off is escapist, but to attempt to cognitively grapple with it is overwhelming.

In Unforgettable: Enabling Deep and Durable Learning, a nationally recognized master teacher gives professors and their students the means to chart a clear path through this information explosion. Humans crave explanatory patterns, and this book enables teachers to think deeply about their academic disciplines to find and articulate their core explanatory principles and to engage their students in a compelling way of thinking. An alternative title for this book could be Why the Best College Teachers Do What They Do because the author articulates a compelling rationale that will equip faculty to create and deliver transformative courses. Students in transformative courses grapple with essential questions and gain mental muscle that equips them for real world challenges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction

ch. 1 Teaching for Transformation
ch. 2 Becoming a Clear-Thinking Teacher
ch. 3 Thinking Like an Expert
ch. 4 Developing and Clarifying Your Ideas
ch. 5 Explanatory Power
ch. 6 This Is The Way: Designing the Optimal Learning Path
ch. 7 Student Flourishing
ch. 8 Ask, Don’t Tell
ch. 9 Speaking Truth in Love: Assessment as Communication
ch. 10 Averting Disaster

Appendix 1 - Logic of a Chief
Appendix 2 - Richard Paul’s eight elements of thought compared with my approach
Appendix 3 - Gowin’s Knowledge Vee
Appendix 4 - Socratic GPS
Appendix 5 - Assessment is Course Design
Bibliography
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How Higher Education Feels: Commentaries on Poems That Illuminate Emotions in Learning and Teaching

Book
Quinlan, Kathleen M.
2016
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LB2324.Q56 2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Teaching and learning in higher education can evoke strong feelings, including confusion, anxiety, boredom, curiosity, surprise and exhilaration. These emotions affect students’ learning, progress and overall success. Teachers’ emotions affect how they teach and their relationships and communication with students. Yet the emotional dimensions of teachers’ and students’ experiences are rarely discussed in the context of improving higher education.

This book addresses ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Teaching and learning in higher education can evoke strong feelings, including confusion, anxiety, boredom, curiosity, surprise and exhilaration. These emotions affect students’ learning, progress and overall success. Teachers’ emotions affect how they teach and their relationships and communication with students. Yet the emotional dimensions of teachers’ and students’ experiences are rarely discussed in the context of improving higher education.

This book addresses that gap, offering short, evocative case studies to spark conversation among university teachers. It challenges readers to reflect on how higher education feels, to explore the emotional landscape of courses and programmes they create and consider the emotional effects of messages embedded in various policies and practices.

Following the student lifecycle from enrollment to reunion, each of the main chapters contains 10 to 15 accessible, emotionally-engaging poems that serve as succinct case studies highlighting how some aspect of learning, teaching or development in higher education feels. Each chapter also contains an expert scholarly commentary that identifies emergent themes across the cases and establishes connections to theory and practice in higher education. The poems-as-case-studies are ideal for use in faculty or educational development workshops or for individual reflection. A variety of theoretical perspectives and associated reflection prompts provide lenses for variously interpreting the poems. An appendix offers suggestions for structuring case discussions as part of educational development activities.

The book promotes a person-centered discourse, giving voice to previously neglected aspects of higher education and reminding us that education is essentially a human endeavor. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
ch 1. Introduction
ch 2. Seven Stances on Emotion in Education
ch 3. Transition to Higher Education–In Search of Belonging(Expert Commentary by Terrell Strayhorn)
ch 4. Remaking Self-in-World 53 (Expert Commentary by Marcia B. Baxter Magolda)
ch 5. Taking Care of Students and Ourselves (Expert Commentary by Celia Hunt)
ch 6. Teaching in the Real World 107 (Expert Commentary by Michalinos Zembylas)
ch 7. For Love of People, Culture and Society (Expert Commentary by Monica McLean with Sarah LeFanu and Susan Bruce)
ch 8. For Love of Humanities and Arts (Expert Commentary by David Keplinger)
ch 9. For Love of Science (Expert Commentary by John Bowden and Pamela Green)
ch 10. Success and Failure – Achievement-Related Emotions (Expert Commentary by Reinhard Pekrun)
ch 11. Where We’ve Been, Where We’re Going
ch 12. Conclusion
Appendix 1: Using the Cases as Discussion Prompts – A Sample Discussion Guide
Index by Contributor
Index by Poem Title
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Traversing Bloom's Taxonomy in an Introductory Scripture Course

TTR
Bruehler, Bart B.
2018
Teaching Theology and Religion 21, no. 2 (2018): 92-109
BL41.T4 v.21 no. 2
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Many courses in higher education rely on the hierarchical organization of Bloom's taxonomy to categorize and sequence learning. Introductory courses on scripture often emphasize remembering content and background as a basis for applying the sacred text to one's life. However, a review of the literature demonstrates little support for the widely assumed hierarchical nature of Bloom's taxonomy. Furthermore, this study examined the performance of traditional and non‐traditional students in ...
Additional Info:
Many courses in higher education rely on the hierarchical organization of Bloom's taxonomy to categorize and sequence learning. Introductory courses on scripture often emphasize remembering content and background as a basis for applying the sacred text to one's life. However, a review of the literature demonstrates little support for the widely assumed hierarchical nature of Bloom's taxonomy. Furthermore, this study examined the performance of traditional and non‐traditional students in a New Testament survey course on a comprehensive exam (a Remember task) and an application assignment (an Apply task) and found no correlation between the two. Furthermore, students struggled most with the interpretation portion of the application assignment, prompting the realization that interpreting a sacred text is a complex hermeneutical enterprise incorporating multiple levels of the taxonomy. Thus, introductory scripture courses may be better organized around the central, integrating practice of interpretation supported by needed information and application skills.