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"Constructing a Syllabus: A Handbook for Faculty, Teaching Assistants and Teaching Fellows

Article
Woolcock, Michael J. V.
1998
The Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning, Brown University
Topics: Syllabus Construction

Additional Info:
A 40 page article covering basics of course construction and syllabus preparation, by The Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning at Brown University.
Additional Info:
A 40 page article covering basics of course construction and syllabus preparation, by The Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning at Brown University.
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"Writing a Syllabus" (pdf)

Article
Altman, Howard B., and William E. Cashin
1992
Idea Paper No. 27, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1992)
Topics: Syllabus Construction

Additional Info:
Recommendations from the literature about what information might be included in your course syllabus – to communicate to one’s students what the course is about, why the course is taught, where it is going, and what will be required of them to succeed.
Additional Info:
Recommendations from the literature about what information might be included in your course syllabus – to communicate to one’s students what the course is about, why the course is taught, where it is going, and what will be required of them to succeed.
Additional Info:
How to extract "big picture" open-ended discussion questions (what Understanding by Design calls "Essential Questions") from one's stated learning goals, and to embed them into the syllabus and the course activities.
Additional Info:
How to extract "big picture" open-ended discussion questions (what Understanding by Design calls "Essential Questions") from one's stated learning goals, and to embed them into the syllabus and the course activities.
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After World Religions: Reconstructing Religious Studies

Book
Cotter, Christopher R. and Robertson, David G.
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
BL41.A38 2016
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Syllabus Construction

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The World Religions Paradigm has been the subject of critique and controversy in Religious Studies for many years. After World Religions provides a rationale for overhauling the World Religions curriculum, as well as a roadmap for doing so. The volume offers concise and practical introductions to cutting-edge Religious Studies method and ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The World Religions Paradigm has been the subject of critique and controversy in Religious Studies for many years. After World Religions provides a rationale for overhauling the World Religions curriculum, as well as a roadmap for doing so. The volume offers concise and practical introductions to cutting-edge Religious Studies method and theory, introducing a wide range of pedagogical situations and innovative solutions. An international team of scholars addresses the challenges presented in their different departmental, institutional, and geographical contexts. Instructors developing syllabi will find supplementary reading lists and specific suggestions to help guide their teaching. Students at all levels will find the book an invaluable entry point into an area of ongoing scholarly debate. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
List of Contributors
Forward: Before the 'After' in 'After World Religions': Wilfred Cantwell Smith on the Meaning and End of Religion (James L. Cox)

ch. 1 Introduction: The ‘World Religions’ Paradigm in Contemporary Religious Studies (Christopher R. Cotter & David G. Robertson)

Part I: Subservie Pedagogies: Data and Methods
ch. 2 The Problem of ‘Religions’: Teaching Against the Grain with ‘New Age Stuff” (Steven J. Sutcliffe)
ch. 3 Not a Task for Amateurs’: Graduate Instructors and Critical Theory in the World Religions Classroom (Tara Baldrick-Morrone, Michael Graziano and Brad Stoddard)
ch. 4 The Critical Embrace: Teaching the World Religion Paradigm as Data (Steven Ramey)

Part II: Alternative Pedagogies: Power and Politics
ch. 5 Religion as Ideology: Recycled Culture vs. World Religions (Craig Martin)
ch. 6 Doing Things with ‘Religion’: A Discursive Approach in Rethinking the World Religions Paradigm (Teemu Taira)
ch. 7 Looking Back on the End of Religion: Opening Re Marx (Paul-Francois Tremlett)
ch. 8 The Sacred Alternative (Suzanne Owen)

Part III: Innovative Pedagogies: Methods and Media
ch. 9 The Desjardins Diet for World Religions Paradigm Loss (Michel Desjardins)
ch. 10 Narrating the USA’s Religious Pluralism: Escaping World Religions through Media (David W. McConeghy)
ch. 11 Archaeology and the 'World Religions' Paradigm: The European Neolithic, Religion, and Cultural Imperialism (Carole M. Cusack)
ch. 12 Complex Learning and the World Religions Paradigm: Teaching Religion in a Shifting Subject Landscape (Dominic Corrywright)

Afterword: On Utility and Limits (Russell T. McCutcheon)
Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Creating Your Syllabus

Article
Sinor, Jennifer; and Kaplan, Matt
2014
The Regents of the University of Michigan
Topics: Syllabus Construction

Additional Info:
This web page from the University of Michigan offers suggestions on creating a syllabus “students will appreciate and respond positively to.” Included are ideas on setting learning goals, what to include in your syllabus, course policies and schedule/weekly calendar/assignments.
Additional Info:
This web page from the University of Michigan offers suggestions on creating a syllabus “students will appreciate and respond positively to.” Included are ideas on setting learning goals, what to include in your syllabus, course policies and schedule/weekly calendar/assignments.
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How Do I Create an Effective Syllabus?

Article
Boye, Allison
Texas Tech University
Topics: Syllabus Construction

Additional Info:
From Texas Tech University, this 8-page document provides general strategies and tips for developing a syllabus. Starting with an explanation of the goal and function of a syllabus, it then provides advice on each of the required and optional sections of a syllabus, and ends with a list of online and paper-based resources.
Additional Info:
From Texas Tech University, this 8-page document provides general strategies and tips for developing a syllabus. Starting with an explanation of the goal and function of a syllabus, it then provides advice on each of the required and optional sections of a syllabus, and ends with a list of online and paper-based resources.
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Introduction to Web Design Course Outline

Web
2015
Florida State University
Topics: Syllabus Construction

Additional Info:
Chapter 3 of Florida State University’s Guide to Teaching & Learning Practices contains suggestions for creating a syllabus. Especially useful is the section with examples of writing policy and rule statements, and the sample syllabus.
Additional Info:
Chapter 3 of Florida State University’s Guide to Teaching & Learning Practices contains suggestions for creating a syllabus. Especially useful is the section with examples of writing policy and rule statements, and the sample syllabus.

To teach is to create worlds. Worlds known and unknown, worlds that we will visit and be visited by, worlds that will haunt us. Worlds that we hope students will engage in many ways. Worlds that hopefully will show the ways in which their own worlds are constituted so they ...

Additional Info:
A learning-centered syllabus focuses on the needs of the students and their learning process. This post provides resources for creating the best syllabus for your course.
Additional Info:
A learning-centered syllabus focuses on the needs of the students and their learning process. This post provides resources for creating the best syllabus for your course.
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Wabash tree

The Course Syllabus: A Learning-Centered Approach, Second Edition

Book
O'Brien, Grunert, Judith, Barbara J. Millis, and Margaret W. Cohen
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2361.G78 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Syllabus Construction

Additional Info:
When it was first published in 1997, The Course Syllabus became the gold standard reference for both new and experienced college faculty. Like the first edition, this book is based on a learner-centered approach. Because faculty members are now deeply committed to engaging students in learning, the syllabus has evolved into a useful, if lengthy, document. Today's syllabus provides details about course objectives, requirements and expectations, and also includes information about ...
Additional Info:
When it was first published in 1997, The Course Syllabus became the gold standard reference for both new and experienced college faculty. Like the first edition, this book is based on a learner-centered approach. Because faculty members are now deeply committed to engaging students in learning, the syllabus has evolved into a useful, if lengthy, document. Today's syllabus provides details about course objectives, requirements and expectations, and also includes information about teaching philosophies, specific activities and the rationale for their use, and tools essential to student success. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I Focus on Learning
Planning Your Learning-Centered Syllabus: An Overview of the Process
Composing a Learning-Centered Syllabus
Using a Learning-Centered Syllabus

Part II Examples
Checklist
Title Page
Table of Contents
Instructor Information
Letter to the Student
Purpose of the Coarse
Course Description
Course and Unit Objectives
Resources
Readings
Course Calendar
Course Requirements
Evaluation
Grading Procedures
How to Use the Syllabus
How to Study for this Course
Content Information
Learning Tools
Checklist

Part III Resources
Suggested Readings

References
Index
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The Graphic Syllabus and the Outcomes Map: Communicating Your Course

Book
Nilson, Linda B.
2007
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2361.N55 2007
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Syllabus Construction

Additional Info:
This book shows college instructors how to communicate their course organization to students in a graphic syllabus—a one-page diagram, flowchart, or concept map of the topical organization—and an outcomes map—a one-page flowchart of the sequence of student learning objectives and outcomes from the foundational through the mediating to the ultimate. It also documents the positive impact that graphics have on student learning and cautions readers about common ...
Additional Info:
This book shows college instructors how to communicate their course organization to students in a graphic syllabus—a one-page diagram, flowchart, or concept map of the topical organization—and an outcomes map—a one-page flowchart of the sequence of student learning objectives and outcomes from the foundational through the mediating to the ultimate. It also documents the positive impact that graphics have on student learning and cautions readers about common errors in designing graphic syllabi. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Limits of a Text Syllabus
ch. 2 How and Why Graphics Enhance Learning
ch. 3 Designing a Graphic Syllabus
ch. 4 Charting an Outcomes Map
ch. 5 How Graphics Benefit Course Organization

Appendix A. More Model Graphic Syllabi for Inspiration
Appendix B. Computer Software for Graphic Syllabi and Outcomes Maps

Bibliography
Index
Additional Info:
A two-page article by Ken Bains, briefly reviewing elements of a syllabus that can stimulate deeper and more enthusiastic student learning.
Additional Info:
A two-page article by Ken Bains, briefly reviewing elements of a syllabus that can stimulate deeper and more enthusiastic student learning.
Additional Info:
Actual students weigh-in on what they like and dislike in how a syllabus is constructed.
Additional Info:
Actual students weigh-in on what they like and dislike in how a syllabus is constructed.
Additional Info:
A 4 page annotated list of what should be included in a course syllabus, (according to the literature of learning in higher education) if a syllabus is to effectively communicate what the course is about, why the course is taught, where it is going, and what will be required. IDEA Paper no. 27, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
A 4 page annotated list of what should be included in a course syllabus, (according to the literature of learning in higher education) if a syllabus is to effectively communicate what the course is about, why the course is taught, where it is going, and what will be required. IDEA Paper no. 27, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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