Teaching Religion

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Going Online: Perspectives on Digital Learning

Journal Issue
Ubell, Robert
2017
Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group
BL41.T48 1997
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

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Journal Issue.
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Table Of Content:
Editor's Note
Foreword

Articles
Ch. 1 Identification Questions
Ch. 2 Critical Representations
Ch. 3 On Teaching Religion: A Symposium
Ch. 4 The Voice of Theology: Rethinking the Personal and the Objective in Christian Pedagogy
Ch. 5 Three-Ring Circus at a Combustible Crossroads: Teaching Religion as Core Curriculum
Ch. 6 Moments of Transformation: The Process of Teaching and Learning
Ch. 7 "Stumbling Along between the Immensities": Reflections on Teaching in the Study of Religion
Ch. 8 Postscript

Responses and Rejoinders
Ch. 9 Ethics, Biblical and Denominational: A Response to Mark Smith
Ch. 10 Pederasty and Romans 1:27: A Response to Mark Smith
Ch. 11 Paul and Ancient Bisexuality: A Rejoinder

Book Reviews
Abe, Masao, Buddhism and Interfaith Dialogue
Boccaccini, Gabriele, Middle Judaism: Jewish Thought, 300 B.C.E. to 200 C.E.
Bounds, Elizabeth M., Coming Together, Coming Apart: Religion, Community and Modernity
Bynum, Caroline Walker, The Resurrection of the Body in Western Christianity, 200-1336
Campbell, June, Traveller in Space: In Search of Female Identity in Tibetan Buddhism
Dawson, Lorne L. ed. Cults in Context: Readings in the Study of New Religious Movements
Deutsch, Nathaniel, The Gnostic Imagination: Gnosticism, Mandaeism, and Merkabah Mysticism
Gardell, Mattias, In the Name of Elijah Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam
Goodblatt, David, The Monarchic Principle: Studies in Jewish Self-Government in Antiquity
Ingraffia, Brian, Postmodern Theory and Biblical Theology: Vanquishing God's Shadow
Katz, Jonathan G., Dreams, Sufism and Sainthood: The Visionary Career of Muhammad al-Zawawi
Keenan, John P., The Gospel of Mark: A Mahayana Reading
Kuschel, Karl-Josef, Abraham: A Sign of Hope for Jews, Christians and Muslims
Lindley, Susan Hill, You Have Stept Out of Your Place: A History of Women and Religion in America
Lucas, Phillip Charles, The Odyssey of a New Religion: The Holy of MANS from New Age to Orthodoxy
Mugambi, J.N.K., From Liberation to Reconstruction: African Christian Theology after the Cold War
Parkhill, Thomas, The Forrest Setting in Hindu Epics: Princes, Sages, Demons
Peterson, Richard T., Democratic Philosophy and the Politics of Knowledge
Russell, L. M., and J. S Clarkson, eds., Dictionary of Feminist Theologies
Schuon, Frithijof, The Transfiguration of Man
Villa-Vicencio, Charles, The Spirit of Freedom: South African Leaders on Religion and Politics

Books Received
Index To Volume
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She Can Read: Feminist Reading Strategies for Biblical Narrative

Book
Cheney, Emily
1996
Trinity Press, Valley Forge, PA
BS521.4.C48 1996
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Using the research of feminist literary critics and building upon the work of feminist biblical scholars, Emily Cheney offers three strategies for women whose ecclesiastical traditions expect them to base their sermons on biblical texts, and for women who want their sermons to reflect a feminist consciousness and compassion. The strategies focus on gender reversal, analogy, and women as exchange objects, all tested on several texts without female characters from ...
Additional Info:
Using the research of feminist literary critics and building upon the work of feminist biblical scholars, Emily Cheney offers three strategies for women whose ecclesiastical traditions expect them to base their sermons on biblical texts, and for women who want their sermons to reflect a feminist consciousness and compassion. The strategies focus on gender reversal, analogy, and women as exchange objects, all tested on several texts without female characters from the Gospel of Matthew. A concluding section reflects upon what role the authority of the text plays when readers use these strategies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
List of Abbreviations
Introduction
ch. 1 The Need for Reading Strategies
ch. 2 Scholarship of Feminist Literary Critics
ch. 3 Gender Reversal
ch. 4 Analogy
ch. 5 Women as Exchange Objects
ch. 6 Application of the Strategies to Mt. 1:18-25
Conclusion
Appendix: Sample Sermon
Notes
Bibliography of Works Cited
Scripture Index
General Index
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Religious and Theological Studies in American Higher Education: A Pilot Study

Journal Issue
Hart, Ray
1999
Journal of the American Academy of Religion, No. 59 (Oxford University Press, Cary, NC)
BL41.H37 1991
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

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Journal Issue.
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Reasoning and Rhetoric in Religion

Book
Murphy, Nancey C.
1994
Trinity Press, Valley Forge, PA
BR118.M876 1994
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

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These days, when popular religious movements are enthusiastic rather than reflective, it is particularly helpful for students to be given better ways of grasping the significance and strengths of their own beliefs. Nancey Murphy's new book presents the methods of contemporary argumentation analysis in a way that helps readers develop habits of critical reading and thinking that serve them well not only in religion, but in other fields of experience ...
Additional Info:
These days, when popular religious movements are enthusiastic rather than reflective, it is particularly helpful for students to be given better ways of grasping the significance and strengths of their own beliefs. Nancey Murphy's new book presents the methods of contemporary argumentation analysis in a way that helps readers develop habits of critical reading and thinking that serve them well not only in religion, but in other fields of experience and action. At one and the same time easy to read, and deep in its implications, her book is something of a tour de force. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Claims and Grounds
ch. 2 Warrants and Backing
ch. 3 Qualifiers and Rebuttals
ch. 4 Hypothetical Reasoning
ch. 5 Rhetoric and Communication
ch. 6 Academic Papers
ch. 7 Reasoning in Sermons
ch. 8 Reasoning in Ethics
ch. 9 Reasoning in History
ch. 10 Reasoning in Biblical Studies
ch. 11 Reasoning in Theology
ch. 12 Relating the Theological Disciplines
ch. 13 Philosophy of Religion
ch. 14 Apologetics and Religious Pluralism
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Critical Thinking and the Academic Study of Religion

Book
Penaskovic, Richard
1997
Scholars Press, Atlanta, GA
BL41.P464 1997
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

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This work responds to a renewed emphasis on teaching in the academy. Written from the perspective of a classroom teacher, it is a practical application of the principles behind the Critical Thinking movement to the study of religion. Emphasizing that the acquisition of critical thinking depends less on what is taught than on how it is taught, the author presents concrete examples from his own experience to illustrate a student ...
Additional Info:
This work responds to a renewed emphasis on teaching in the academy. Written from the perspective of a classroom teacher, it is a practical application of the principles behind the Critical Thinking movement to the study of religion. Emphasizing that the acquisition of critical thinking depends less on what is taught than on how it is taught, the author presents concrete examples from his own experience to illustrate a student centered approach to teaching. By demonstrating how the study of religion contributes to the development of critical thinking - through the acquisition of problem-solving, decision-making, and metacognitive skills - Penaskovic suggests its value to a broader liberal arts curriculum as well. Both a theoretical review of Critical Thinking and a "nuts-and-bolts" manual on how it can be used and assessed in the classroom, this work will challenge new and veteran teachers alike to re-examine and renew what they do in the classroom. The book includes a selected, annotated bibliography on Critical Thinking. Every teacher of religion will want to read this book. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Preface

ch. 1 What Is Critical Thinking?
ch. 2 Barriers to Critical Thinking?
ch. 3 The Three Levels of Learning
ch. 4 Teaching in the Active Mode
ch. 5 Cooperative Learning
ch. 6 Critical Thinking and Creativity
ch. 7 The Assessment of Critical Thinking
ch. 8 Unsolved Mysteries

Appendix A: Glossary of Terms
Select Annotated Bibliography
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Beyond the Classics: Essays in Religious Studies and Liberal Education

Book
Reynolds, Frank E. and Sheryl L. Burkhalter, ed.
1990
Scholars Press, Atlanta, GA
BL41.B49 1990
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Liberal Arts

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Taken ad seriatim, these essays present a wide range of differing theoretical positions and practical strategies for reform. It is our hope that, when read from this point of view, they will evoke the kind of very specific discussions, debates and actions that will be required if real change is to occur. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Taken ad seriatim, these essays present a wide range of differing theoretical positions and practical strategies for reform. It is our hope that, when read from this point of view, they will evoke the kind of very specific discussions, debates and actions that will be required if real change is to occur. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Reconstructing liberal education : a religious studies perspective (Frank E. Reynolds)
ch. 2 University, the liberal arts, and the teaching and study of religion (Charles H. Long)
ch. 3 "Seeking an end to the primary text" or "putting an end to the text as primary" (Lawrence E. Sullivan)
ch. 4 Rethinking the humanities for the 1990s : redressing the balance (George W. Pickering)
ch. 5 Confidence and criticism : religious studies and the public purposes of liberal education (Robin W. Lovin) -- Education and the intellectual virtues (Lee H. Yearly)
ch. 6 Legal status of religious studies programs in public higher education (W. Royce Clark)
ch. 7 Four modes of discourse : blurred genres in the study of religion (Sheryl L. Burkhalter)
ch. 8 Beyond ours and theirs : the global character of religious studies (James H. Foard)
ch. 9 Religious studies and exposure to multiple worlds in the liberal arts curriculum (Judith A. Berling)
ch. 10 Writing across the curriculum : a religious studies contribution ( James H. Foard)
ch. 11 Dearth in Venice (William R. Darrow)
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Teaching the Bible: The Discourses and Politics of Biblical Pedagogy

Book
Segovia, Fernando F. and Mary Ann Tolbert, eds.
1998
Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY
BS600.2.T44 1998
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
This volume gathers together papers from a broad variety of voices in biblical criticism and theological studies. The papers are divided into four major sections in keeping with their major concerns and aims: Biblical interpretation and theological education, social location and Biblical pedagogy in the US, social location and Biblical pedagogy in global perspective, and Biblical interpretation. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This volume gathers together papers from a broad variety of voices in biblical criticism and theological studies. The papers are divided into four major sections in keeping with their major concerns and aims: Biblical interpretation and theological education, social location and Biblical pedagogy in the US, social location and Biblical pedagogy in global perspective, and Biblical interpretation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Pedagogical Discourse and Practices in Contemporary Biblical Criticism

Part I Biblical Interpretation and Theological Education
ch. 1 Theological Education in a New Context: Reflections from the Perspective of Brazilian Theology (Paulo Fernando Carneiro de Andrade)
ch. 2 Constructive Theology and Biblical Worlds (Peter Hodgson)
ch. 3 Globalization in Theological Education (Joseph C. Hough, Jr.)
ch. 4 Jesus/the Native: Biblical Studies from a Postcolonial Perspective (Kwok Pui-lan)
ch. 5 Four Faces of Theology: Four Johannine Conversations (Jean-Pierre Ruiz)

Part II Social Location and Biblical Pedagogy in the United States
ch. 6 Crossing the Line: Three Scenes of Divine-Human Engagement in the Hebrew Bible (Francisco Garcia-Treto)
ch. 7 Reading from an Indigenous Place (Mark Lewis Taylor)
ch. 8 Pedagogical Discourse and Practices in Cultural Studies: Toward a Contextual Biblical Pedagogy (Fernando F. Segovia)
ch. 9 A New Teaching with Authority: A Re-evaluation of the Authority of the Bible (Mary Ann Tolbert)
ch. 10 A Meeting of Worlds: African Americans and the Bible (Vincent L. Wimbush)

Part III Social Location and Biblical Pedagogy in Global Perspective
ch. 11 A Reading of the Story of the Tower of Babel from the Perspective of Non-Identity: Gen 11:1-9 in the Context of Its Production (J. Severino Croatto)
ch. 12 "Go Therefore and Make Disciples of All Nations" (Matt 28:19a): A Postcolonial Perspective on Biblical Criticism and Pedagogy (Musa W. Duba)
ch. 13 Cross-Textual Interpretation and Its Implications for Biblical Studies (Archie C. C. Lee)
ch. 14 Biblical Exegesis and Its Shortcomings in Theological Education (Temba L. J. Mafico)
ch. 15 The Hermeneutics of Liberation: Theoretical Grounding for the Communitarian Reading of the Bible (Pablo Richard)
ch. 16 Biblical Studies in India: From Imperialistic Scholarship to Postcolonial Interpretation (R.S. Sugirtharajah)

Part IV Biblical Interpretation: Pedagogical Practices
ch. 17 A Rhetorical Paradigm for Pedagogy (Rebecca S. Chopp)
ch. 18 Reading the Bible in the Global Context: Issues in Methodology and Pedagogy (Denise Dombkowski Hopkins, Sharon H. Ringe, and Frederick C. Tiffany)
ch. 19 Crossing Borders: Biblical Studies in a Trans-Cultural World (Kathleen M. O'Connor)
ch. 20 Weaving a New Web of Creative Remembering (Elaine M. Wainwright)
ch. 21 Lessons for North America from a Third-World Seminary (Antoinette Clark Wire)

Contributors
Index
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The Formation of Christian Understanding: Theological Hermeneutics

Book
Wood, Charles M.
1993
Trinity Press, Valley Forge, PA
BS476.W65 1993
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Reissued in response to many requests, this is a book about the Bible--specifically about Christian ways of relating to, using, and understanding Christian scripture and tradition. Professor Wood demonstrates that the aim of Christian understanding is the knowledge of God and the changes in outlook on the Bible that came with the rise of biblical criticism. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Reissued in response to many requests, this is a book about the Bible--specifically about Christian ways of relating to, using, and understanding Christian scripture and tradition. Professor Wood demonstrates that the aim of Christian understanding is the knowledge of God and the changes in outlook on the Bible that came with the rise of biblical criticism. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface to the Second Edition
Preface to the First Edition

ch. 1 The Task of Theological Hermeneutics
ch. 2 The Aims of Christian Understanding
ch. 3 The Conditions of Christian Understanding
ch. 4 The Canon of Christian Understanding
ch. 5 Christian Understanding as a Critical Task

Notes
Index
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Greening the College Curriculum: A Guide to Environmental Teaching in the Liberal Arts

Book
Collett, Jonathan, and Stephen Karakashian, eds.
1996
Island Press, Washington, D.C.
LC1023.G74 1996
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Greening the College Curriculum provides the tools college and university faculty need to meet personal and institutional goals for integrating environmental issues into the curriculum. Leading educators from a wide range of fields, including anthropology, biology, economics, geography, history, literature, journalism, philosophy, political science, and religion, describe their experience introducing environmental issues into their teaching. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Greening the College Curriculum provides the tools college and university faculty need to meet personal and institutional goals for integrating environmental issues into the curriculum. Leading educators from a wide range of fields, including anthropology, biology, economics, geography, history, literature, journalism, philosophy, political science, and religion, describe their experience introducing environmental issues into their teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Jonathan Collett and Stephen Karakashian)

ch. 1 Reinventing Higher Education (David W. Orr)
ch. 2 Anthropology (William Balée)
ch. 3 Biology (David G. Campbell and Vern Durkee)
ch. 4 Economics (Gerald Alonzo Smith)
ch. 5 Geography (Lisa Naughton-Treves and Emily Young)
ch. 6 History (John Opie and Michael Black)
ch. 7 Literature (Vernon Owen Grumbling)
ch. 8 Media and Journalism (Karl Grossman and Ann Filemyr)
ch. 9 Philosophy (Holmes Rolston III)
ch. 10 Political Science (Michael E. Kraft)
ch. 11 Religion (Steven C. Rockefeller)
ch. 12 Reinventing the Classroom: Connected Teaching (Jonathan Collett)

Contributors
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Disciplinary Differences in Teaching and Learning: Implications for Practice

Book
Hativa, Nina and Michele Marinocovich
1995
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 64)
LB2331.D55 1995
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Cognitive Development   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning increases our knowledge and understanding of the causes and consequences of disciplinary differences in the patterns of teaching and learning, in the instructional strategies to increase teaching effectiveness, in the culture and environment in which teaching takes place, and in faculty and students' attitudes, goals, beliefs, values, philosophies, and orientations toward instruction. Despite their practical and pervasive influence, disciplinary differences have ...
Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning increases our knowledge and understanding of the causes and consequences of disciplinary differences in the patterns of teaching and learning, in the instructional strategies to increase teaching effectiveness, in the culture and environment in which teaching takes place, and in faculty and students' attitudes, goals, beliefs, values, philosophies, and orientations toward instruction. Despite their practical and pervasive influence, disciplinary differences have been subjected to relatively little systematic study, especially in their effect on the quality of teaching and learning in higher education. This volume both provides new summaries of important studies on disciplinary differences and points out promising directions for further research. This is the 64th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. For more information on the series, please see the Journals and Periodicals page. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Disciplinary differences in knowledge validation(Janet G. Donald)
ch. 2 What is taught in an undergraduate lecture? : differences between a matched pair of pure and applied disciplines (Nira Hativa)
ch. 3 Disciplinary differences in classroom teaching behaviors (Harry G. Murray and Robert D. Renaud)
ch. 4 The relationship of disciplinary differences and the value of class preparation time to student ratings of teaching (Jennifer Franklin and Michael Theall)
ch. 5 Disciplinary and institutional differences in undergraduate education goals (John C. Smart and Corinna A. Ethington)
ch. 6 Disciplines with an affinity for the improvement of undergraduate education (John M. Braxton)
ch. 7 Discipline-specific pedagogical knowledge in linguistics and Spanish (Lisa Firing Lenze)
ch. 8 Subject-matter differences in secondary schools : connections to higher education (Susan S. Stodolsky and Pamela L. Grossman)
ch. 9 Disciplinary differences in what is taught and in students' perceptions of what they learn and of how they are taught (William E. Cashin and Ronald G. Downey)
ch. 10 Approaches to studying and perceptions of the learning environment across disciplines (Noel Entwhistle and Hilary Tait)
ch. 11 Disciplinary differences in students' perceptions of success : modifying misperceptions with attributional retraining (Verena H. Menec and Raymond P. Perry)
Concluding remarks : on the meaning of disciplinary differences
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Vision and Discernment: An Orientation in Theological Study

Book
Wood, Charles M.
1985
Scholars Press, Atlanta, GA
BV4020.W66 1985
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
This book offers an orientation in Christian theology, broadly conceived. Its subject is not that single discipline in the theological curriculum to which the title of 'theology' is nowadays often reserved, but rather the whole curriculum, or the whole range of disciplines which together constitute the enterprise of Christian theology, and whose study constitutes theological education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book offers an orientation in Christian theology, broadly conceived. Its subject is not that single discipline in the theological curriculum to which the title of 'theology' is nowadays often reserved, but rather the whole curriculum, or the whole range of disciplines which together constitute the enterprise of Christian theology, and whose study constitutes theological education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
ch. 1 Toward understanding our context
ch. 2 Theology as critical inquiry
ch. 3 Three dimensions of theology
ch. 4 Vision and discernment
ch. 5 Theological inquiry and theological education
Index
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Teaching the Introductory Course in Religious Studies: A Sourcebook

Book
Juergensmeyer, Mark, ed.
1991
Scholars Press, Atlanta, GA
BL41.T44 1991
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
The objective of this volume was to collect resources to assist teachers of undergraduate courses in religious studies - especially those teachers whose training has been limited to only one religious tradition - and to provide reflection on the changing nature of the liberal arts curriculum, and the role that religious studies plays within it. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The objective of this volume was to collect resources to assist teachers of undergraduate courses in religious studies - especially those teachers whose training has been limited to only one religious tradition - and to provide reflection on the changing nature of the liberal arts curriculum, and the role that religious studies plays within it. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction (Mark Juergensmeyer)

Part 1. Types of Introductory Courses
ch. 1 Thinking About the Introductory Course: Some Preliminary Questions (Karen McCarthy Brown)
ch. 2 Teaching Religion and Religions: The "World Religions" Course (Ninian Smart)
ch. 3 The "Introduction to Religion" Course: The Template (William Darrow)
ch. 4 The "Introduction to Religious Studies" Course (Mark Juergensmeyer)

Part 2. Thinking About the Traditions
ch. 5 The Pros and Cons of Thinking of Religion as Tradition (Ninian Smart)
ch. 6 Teaching the Hindu Tradition (J.S. Hawley)
ch. 7 The Sikh Tradition (Mark Juergensmeyer)
ch. 8 Chinese Religion (Judith Berling)
ch. 9 Japanese Religions (Miriam Levering)
ch. 10 Introducing Buddhism (Frank Reynolds)
ch. 11 Placing Islam (Richard Martin, and William Darrow)
ch. 12 Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Religions (William Darrow)
ch. 13 Iranian Religions (William Darrow)
ch. 14 Judaism (William Scott Green)
ch. 15 Teaching the Christian Tradition (Carol Zaleski)
ch. 16 Teaching African-American Religions (Karen McCarthy Brown)
ch. 17 Native North and South American Religions (Lawrence Sullivan)
ch. 18 Australian Aboriginal Religion (John Hilary Martin, O.P.)
ch. 19 Teaching African Religions (Karen McCarthy Brown)
ch. 20 Teaching About Religion in America (Howard Miller)
ch. 21 Secular Ideologies: How Do They Figure in Religious Studies Courses? (Ninian Smart)

Part 3. "How I Teach the Introductory Course": A Symposium
ch. 22 The Introductory Course, The Most Important Course (Wilfred Cantwell Smith)
ch. 23 The Introductory Course: Less is Better (Jonathan Z. Smith)
ch. 24 How I Teach the Introductory Course (Robert Bellah)
ch. 25 The Introductory Course: A Balanced Approach (Ninian Smart)
ch. 26 Another World to Live In: Teaching the Introductory Course Philosophically (Huston Smith)
ch. 27 Religion as Language (Karen McCarthy Brown)
ch. 28 A Brief Argument in Favor of an Endangered Species: The World Religion Survey Course (Mark Juergensmeyer)

Part 4. The Classroom Experience
ch. 29 The Classroom Scene: Teaching, Material Culture and Religion (Richard Carp)
ch. 30 Using Audio-Visual Resources to Teach About Religion (Richard Carp)
ch. 31 Tricks of the Trade (Gurudharm Singh Khalsa)
ch. 32 Riddle Me a Riddle: Bringing Those Absent into Religious Studies (Susan Henking)
ch. 33 Bibliographic Resources on Gender and Religion (Susan Henking)
ch. 34 Basic Readings in the Academic Study of Religion (Mark Juergensmeyer)
ch. 35 Course Syllabi (William Darrow, and Mark Juergensmeyer)
ch. 36 Bibliography of Texts and Other Resources (William Darrow, and Gurudharm Singh Khalsa)
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Cases and Course Design

Book
Stivers, Robert L., ed.
1997
Spotlight on Teaching 5, no. 1 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Cases and Course Design (Robert L. Stivers)
ch. 2 Case Writing and Teaching in a Seminary: Reflecting on Ministry Experience (V. Sue Zabel)
ch. 3 Law and Order: Waco, Texas, 1993, Revisited (Leland E. Elhard)
ch. 4 Sopater's Body (David E. Frederickson)
ch. 5 Adult Learners, Feminist Practices, and the Use of Cases (Carol Allen)
ch. 6 A Study of Case Studies (Anne Reissner)
ch. 7 Case Studies and the Teaching of History (Garth M. Rosell)
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"Rhetoric, Pedagogy, and the Study of Religions"

Article
Miller, Richard, Laurie Patton and Stephen Webb
1994
Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Vol. 62, No. 3 (1994): 819-850
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Richard Miller, Laurie Patton and Stephen Webb ask several questions about the goals and aims of those teaching religious studies and what actually occurs in classrooms. The authors are concerned about the lack of a common working vocabulary for speaking about such philosophical issues. They note that teaching religion is typically classified according to one of two paradigms, either instrumental or transmission. The "instrumental" paradigm views teaching in terms of ...
Additional Info:
Richard Miller, Laurie Patton and Stephen Webb ask several questions about the goals and aims of those teaching religious studies and what actually occurs in classrooms. The authors are concerned about the lack of a common working vocabulary for speaking about such philosophical issues. They note that teaching religion is typically classified according to one of two paradigms, either instrumental or transmission. The "instrumental" paradigm views teaching in terms of its technical components, while the "transmission" paradigm seeks to impart the concepts and tools necessary for critical analysis to the students. Miller, Patton and Webb propose a third alternative, the "rhetorical" paradigm. This model seeks to empower voices within the classroom, including that of the teacher. It requires teachers to reexamine the power relations present in the classroom and to reconfigure these relationship in such a way that students feel free to engage actively in the course. The authors consider the rhetorical model in light of the three specific subdisicplines of religious ethics, the comparative history of religions, and theology.
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"Greening the College Curriculum: Religion"

Article
Rockefeller, Steven C.
1996
in Greening the College Curriculum (Washington, DC : Island Press, 1996), 268-308
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Where a Magic Dwells: A Teaching Casebook for Instructors of Religion in the University"

Book
Div of Rel and Theol Studies, Boston University
1999
Division of Religious and Theological Studies, Boston University, Boston, MA (1999)
Unpublished - WC 294
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This is a collection of case studies written by professor and by graduate students teaching in the field of religion. Each case highlights one or more teaching problem (or possibility), some facet of the mystery of teaching (and learning to teach) at the college level. Each case is intended to spark conversations about a particular collegiate teaching situation. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This is a collection of case studies written by professor and by graduate students teaching in the field of religion. Each case highlights one or more teaching problem (or possibility), some facet of the mystery of teaching (and learning to teach) at the college level. Each case is intended to spark conversations about a particular collegiate teaching situation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Case 1 - Can you show me the way? (Bradley Herling and Douglas Hadley)
Case 2 - Daniel in the lion's den (Mark H. Mann)
Case 3 - The Opium of the classroom (Stephen Dawson)
Case 4 - The undermined student (Robert Parks)
Case 5 - The case of the untouchable topic (Douglas Hadley)
Case 6 - Zev and the crying presenter (Lesleigh Cushing)
Case 7 - When is enough, enough? (Greg Farr)
Case 8 - The sacred and the profane (Andrew Irvine and Bradley Herling)
Case 9 - Who am I? (Michael Mitchell)
Case 10 - Oh, my God, it's alive! (Lesleigh Cushing)
Case 11 - The voice of my beloved! Behold, he comes... (Bradely Herling)
Case 12 - Can Thomas Olafson still be saved?(Alina Feld)

Insider notes
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"Teaching Theology in Context"

Article
Johnson, Luke T., and Charlotte McDaniel
2000
Christian Century (Feb 2-9, 2000): 118-122
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Discusses information on the comprehensive program in contextual education launched by the Candler School of Theology in 1998. First two stages of a three-stage process under way; Six major aspects of concern.
Additional Info:
Discusses information on the comprehensive program in contextual education launched by the Candler School of Theology in 1998. First two stages of a three-stage process under way; Six major aspects of concern.
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Tracing Common Themes: Comparative Courses in the Study of Religion

Book
Carman, John B. and Steven P. Hopkings, eds.
1991
Scholars Press, Atlanta, GA
BL41.T73 1991
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
This volume focuses theoretically and practically on thematic approaches for teaching comparative courses in religion. It seeks to address the impact that the comparative study of religion has had on the humanities, how it has fared in the various pedagogic shifts discerned in the liberal arts over the last decade, and how the study of religion can serve to globalize humanities education in our increasingly culturally and religiously plural world. (...
Additional Info:
This volume focuses theoretically and practically on thematic approaches for teaching comparative courses in religion. It seeks to address the impact that the comparative study of religion has had on the humanities, how it has fared in the various pedagogic shifts discerned in the liberal arts over the last decade, and how the study of religion can serve to globalize humanities education in our increasingly culturally and religiously plural world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Thematic Comparison in Teaching the History of Religion (John B. Carman, and Steven P. Hopkins)
ch. 2 A Thematic Course in the Study of Religion (Kendall W. Folkert, Edited by John E. Cort)
ch. 3 A Mega-Theme for an Introductory Course in Religious Studies (Frederick J. Streng)
ch. 4 Pilgrimage as a Thematic Introduction to the Comparative Study of Religion (Richard R. Niebuhr)
ch. 5 Pilgrimage Out West (John Stratton Hawley)
ch. 6 'Healing' as a Theme in Teaching the Study of Religion in a Liberal Arts Setting (Linda Barnes)
ch. 7 The Strange in the Midst of the Familiar: A Thematic Seminar on Sacrifice (Michael D. Swartz)
ch. 8 The Symbol of Destruction and the Destruction of Symbol: Sacrifice as a Thematic Course Focus (William R. Darrow)
ch. 9 Mysticism: A Popular and Problematic Course (Frederick J. Streng)
ch. 10 Spiritual Practices in Historical Perspective (Carol Zaleski)
ch. 11 Understanding the Self: East and West--An Interdisciplinary Study of a Theme (Fredrick J. Streng)
ch. 12 Bourgeois Relativism and the Comparative Study of the Self (Lee H. Yearley)
ch. 13 Scriptures and Classics (William A. Graham)
ch. 14 Words, Truth, and Power (Miriam Levering)
ch. 15 Religion and Gender: A Comparative Approach (Miriam Levering)
ch. 16 Women in African-American Religions: The Caribbean and South America (Karen McCarthy Brown)
ch. 17 Teaching Comparative Religious Ethics (Brown W. Lovin, and Frank E. Reynolds)
ch. 18 Comparative Ethics (Mark Juergensmeyer)
ch. 19 Creativity and Art: Artists, Shamans, and Cosmology (Thomas V. Peterson)
ch. 20 Better Questions: Introduction to the History of Religion and Art (Richard M. Carp)
ch. 21 Concluding Reflections: The Fulcrum of Comparison (John B. Carman, and Steven P. Hopkins)
Book cover image

Insider, Outsider and Gender Identities in the Religion Classroom

Book
Patton, Laurie L., ed.
1997
Spotlight on Teaching 5, no. 2 November
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Insider, Outsider, and Gender Identities in the Religion Classroom (Laurie L. Patton) ch. 2 Crossovers and Cross-ups: A Cautionary (NancyFalk)
ch. 3 Mindfield or Mindfield: Teaching Religion in a Multicultural Classroom (Zayn R. Kassam)
ch. 4 Taking Myself Seriously: Transformation of a Working Pedagogical Model (Marcia Y. Riggs)
ch. 5 Spotlight on Teaching: Insider/Outsider (Francisca Cho)
ch. 6 Holy Shock at Sacred Cities: "Rocks Are not my Problem" "Why aren't Women Allowed to make the Pilgrimage to Mecca?" (Kimberly Patton)
ch. 7 Teaching Critical Theory (Miriam Peskowitz)
Cover image

Religion and Film: Capturing the Imagination

Journal Issue
Matties, Gordon, ed.
1998
Spotlight on Teaching 6, no. 1 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Religion and Film: Capturing the Imagination (Gordon Matties)
ch. 2 Apocalyptic Visions: Beyond Corporeality (Ann Pearson)
ch. 3 Seduction by Visual Image (Barbara DeConcici)
ch. 4 Teaching Film and Religion (Paul V. Flesher, and Robert Torry)
ch. 5 Teaching Field of Cosmogonic Myth (Mara E. Donaldson)
ch. 6 A Picture's Worth: Teaching Religion and Film (Irena S. M. Makarushka)
ch. 7 Religion and Popular Movies (Conrad Ostwalt)
Journal cover image

Teaching the Bible: Initiations and Transformations: Special Issue Sponsored by the Society of Biblical Literature

Journal Issue
Chance, J. Bradley, ed.
1998
Spotlight on Teaching 6, no. 2 November
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching the Bible: Initiations and Transformations: Special Issue Sponsored by the Society of Biblical Literature (J. Bradley Chance)
ch. 2 Context and Community: The Two Foci of Jewish Biblical Interpretation (Baruch Levine)
ch. 3 Teaching Genre Awareness in Introductory Bible Classes: An Exercise (Rodney K. Duke)
ch. 4 Using Summaries of Israel's Story in Introductory Biblical Studies Courses (Milton P. Horne)
Journal cover image

Teaching Religion and the Spotlight on Teaching Syllabus Development Project

Journal Issue
Talvacchia, Kathleen T., and Williams, Raymond, eds.
1999
Spotlight on Teaching 7, no. 1 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching Religion and the Spotlight on Teaching Syllabus Development Project (Kathleen Talvacchia, and Raymond Williams)
ch. 2 Touching the Tassels: The Changing Role of Course Syllabi in the Academy (Michel Desjardins)
Journal cover image

Theory Practice Learning: Models in Violence Studies and Conflict Resolution

Journal Issue
Freund, Richard, ed.
2000
Spotlight on Teaching 8, no. 1 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Theory Practice Learning: Models in Violence Studies and Conflict Resolution (Richard Freund)
ch. 2 Experiential Learning: Pedagogy for Life (Barbara A.B. Bobbi Patterson)
ch. 3 The Challenges of Experience for Learning about Violence against Women (Traci C. West)
ch. 4 Religious Practices for Social Change (Thee Smith)
ch. 5 Nonviolence in the Modern World (John E. Cort)
ch. 6 Experiential Education: Pedagogy Across the Spectrum (Peter Gathje)
Journal cover image

Teaching about the Holocaust: A Religious Studies Perspective

Journal Issue
Dean-Otting, Miriam, ed.
2000
Spotlight on Teaching 12, no. 3 September
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching about the Holocaust: A Religious Studies Perspective (Miriam Dean-Otting)
ch. 2 Memory and Silence: Teaching the Holocaust in a Liberal Arts College (Royal W. Rhodes)
ch. 3 Interpreting the Bible after the Holocaust (Marilyn Salmon)
ch. 4 Film and the Teaching of the Holocaust (Jay Geller)
ch. 5 A Holocaust Curriculum for the Twenty-first Century (Peter Haas)
Journal cover image

Teaching Religion and Music: "Those Who Sing Pray Twice"

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2001
Spotlight on Teaching 16, no. 2 Spring
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2001-02spring.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2001-02spring.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching Religion and Music: “Those Who Sing Pray Twice” (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Hearing the Sacred: Introducing Religious Chant and Music into Religious Studies Teaching (Guy L. Beck)
ch. 4 Sacred Music in the Religious Studies Classroom (Stephen Marini)
ch. 4 In Pursuit of Active Listening (Vivian-Lee Nyitray)
ch. 5 Religion, Musically Speaking (Carol M. Babiracki)
ch. 6 From the Dutar to the Electric Guitar: Exposing Students to the Music of the Muslim World (Vernon J. Schubel)
ch. 7 Explorations in Jewish Music (Joshua R. Jacobson)
ch. 8 Environmental Activist Music as Community-Building Ritual (Masen Uliss)

ch. 9 The Importance of Listening to the Heartbeat of Mother Earth (Ina J. Fandrich)
Article cover image

"Member-at-Large: An Interview with Tina Pippin, Recipient of the Inaugural AAR Excellence in Teaching Award"

Article
Peterson, Thomas
2001
Religious Studies News 16, no. 1 (2001): 19-20
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

From Cloister To Commons: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Religious Studies

Book
Devine, Richard, Joseph A. Favazza and F. Michael McLain, eds.
2002
American Association for Higher Education, Washington, D.C.
BL41.F76 2002
Topics: Service Learning   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
This volume, like its series companions, goes beyond simple "how-to" to discuss the implementation of service-learning within religious studies and what that discipline contributes to the pedagogy of service learning. The volume contains both theoretical and pedagogical essays by scholar-teachers in religious studies education, plus a resource guide. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This volume, like its series companions, goes beyond simple "how-to" to discuss the implementation of service-learning within religious studies and what that discipline contributes to the pedagogy of service learning. The volume contains both theoretical and pedagogical essays by scholar-teachers in religious studies education, plus a resource guide. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreward (Raymond Brady Williams)
About This Series (Edward Zlotkowski)
Introduction (Richard Devine, Joseph A. Favazza, and F. Michael McLain)
Part I: Service-Learning and the Discipline of Religious Studies
ch. 1 Service-Learning and the Dilemma of Religious Studies: Descriptive or Normative? (Fred Glennon)
ch. 2 Creating the Engaged University: Service-Learning, Religious Studies, and Institutional Mission (Charles R. Strain)
Part II:Service-Learning and Its Communities
ch. 3 Making Meaning: Reflection on Community, Service, and Learning (Keith Morton)
ch. 4 On En/Countering the Other (Elizabeth M. Bounds, Barbara A.B. Patterson, and Tinna Pippin)
ch. 5 Service-Learning and Community Partnerships: Curricula of Mutuality (Peter M. Antoci and Sandra K. Smith Speck)
ch. 6 Expanding the Horizon of Engagement: Pioneering Work at the University of Denver (M. Elizabeth Blissman)
Part III Course Chapters
ch. 7 Toward an Assessment-Based Approach to Service-Learning Course Design (Thomas G. McGowan)
ch. 8 Service-Learning in an Introduction to Theology Course (Robert Masson)
ch. 9 "God and Human Suffering" as a Service -Learning Course (Chris Johnson)
ch. 10 "Religion and Social Engagement: Labor and Business Ethics" (John Leahy and Kim Bobo)
ch. 11 Making a Difference with Service-Learning: "Christian Ethis and Modern Problems" (Walter H. Schuman)
ch. 12 The Interweaving of "World Religions" and Service-Learning in a Community College Setting (Raj Ayyar)
ch. 13 The Role of Service-Learning in the Transformation of "Islam: Faith and Practice" (Jonathan Brumberg-Kraus)
ch. 14 "The History and Religion of Ancient Israel": An Introductory Course to the Hebrew Bible (Bradley D. Dudley)
ch. 15 "Fieldwork in the Jewish Community" (Terry Smith Hatkoff)
Print and Electronic Resource Guide
Contributors to this Volume
Cover image

Faith & Doubt at Ground Zero

Book
Produced by Helen Whitney, written by Helen Whitney & Ron Rosembaum.
2002
PBS Home Video
HV6432.F34 2002
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
PBS Home Video. From the Producer
Ground Zero in Manhattan has become a site of pilgrimage. Thousands of people visit the site, looking for consolation and questioning the events of September 11. There is a profound quiet to their meditations. Starting here, FRONTLINE sets out on a quest to find out how peoples' faith has been challenged, and how they are coping with difficult questions of good and evil, religion ...
Additional Info:
PBS Home Video. From the Producer
Ground Zero in Manhattan has become a site of pilgrimage. Thousands of people visit the site, looking for consolation and questioning the events of September 11. There is a profound quiet to their meditations. Starting here, FRONTLINE sets out on a quest to find out how peoples' faith has been challenged, and how they are coping with difficult questions of good and evil, religion and apostasy, and the frailty of human life.
Article cover image

"Developing a Wisdom Community As a Feminist Hermeneutic: Pedagogy for a New Millennium"

Article
Pazdan, Mary Margaret
2000
Perspectives in Religious Studies 27, no. 4 (2000): 413-425
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Teaching Levi-Strauss

Book
Penner, Hans H., ed.
1998
Scholars Press, Atlanta, GA
GN362.T43 1998
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Claude Levi-Strauss's mid-twentieth century work in structural anthropology revolutionized the study of myth, kinship, and totemism, with lasting effects in cultural studies generally and especially in religious studies. This book provides an introduction to this revolution through generous reproductions of some of Levi-Strauss's most important writing on religion. Reactions and responses, both positive and negative, to the revolution are also included, ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Claude Levi-Strauss's mid-twentieth century work in structural anthropology revolutionized the study of myth, kinship, and totemism, with lasting effects in cultural studies generally and especially in religious studies. This book provides an introduction to this revolution through generous reproductions of some of Levi-Strauss's most important writing on religion. Reactions and responses, both positive and negative, to the revolution are also included, as well as some of Levi-Strauss's replies to his critics. A general introduction by the volume editor provides a framework for understanding the historical development and contemporary meaning of structuralism for religious studies. This volume provides an unparalleled resource for teaching students about structuralism through Levi-Strauss's own essays and classic critiques of the theory. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Preface
Volume Preface
Acknowledgments & References to Reprinted Articles
Introduction (Hans H. Penner)

Part 1 Essays by Levi-Strauss
ch. 1 Introduction to Marcel Mauss
ch. 2 Totemism: "Towards the Intellect"
ch. 3 The Structural Study of Myth
ch. 4 The Story of Asdiwal
ch. 5 Four Winnebago Myths

Part 2 Essays on Levi-Strauss
ch. 6 Structuralism, Anthropology and Levi-Strauss (Hans H. Penner)
ch. 7 Science or Bricolage? (David Maybury-Lewis)
ch. 8 Levi-Strauss and Myth (K. O. L. Burridge)
ch. 9 The Meaning of Myth (Mary Douglas)
ch. 10 Structure, Sign and Play (Jacques Derrida)
ch. 11 Absent Meaning (Dan Sperber)

Part 3 Levi-Strauss Responds
ch. 12 The Meaning and Use of the Notion of Model
ch. 13 Finale
Cover image

Teaching Freud

Book
Jonte-Pace, Diane, ed.
2003
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
BF175.4.R44T43 2003
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
One of the central questions of the field of Religious Studies is "What is religion and how might we best understand it?" Sigmund Freud was surely a paradigmatic cartographer of this terrain. Among the first theorists to explore the unconscious fantasies, fears, and desires underlying religious ideas and practices, Freud can be considered one of the founders of the field. Yet ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
One of the central questions of the field of Religious Studies is "What is religion and how might we best understand it?" Sigmund Freud was surely a paradigmatic cartographer of this terrain. Among the first theorists to explore the unconscious fantasies, fears, and desires underlying religious ideas and practices, Freud can be considered one of the founders of the field. Yet Freud's legacy is deeply contested. With his reputation at perhaps its lowest point since he came to public attention a century ago, students often assume that Freud is sexist, dangerous, passe, and irrelevant to the study of religion. How can Freud be taught in this climate of critique and controversy? The fourteen contributors to this volume, all recognized scholars of religion and psychoanalysis, describe how they address Freud's contested legacy by "teaching the debates." They describe their courses on Freud and religion, their innovative pedagogical practices, and the creative ways they work with resistance.

Part I focuses on institutional and curricular contexts: contributors describe how they teach Freud at a Catholic and Jesuit undergraduate institution, a liberal seminary, and a large multicultural university. In Part II contributors describe courses structured around psychoanalytic interpretations of religious figures and phenomena: Ramakrishna, Jesus and Augustine, myth and mysticism. Part III focuses explicitly on courses structured around major debates over gender, Judaism, anti-Semitism, religion, and ritual. Part IV describes courses in which psychoanalysis is presented as a powerful pedagogy of transformation and insight. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Introduction: Teaching Freud and Religion

I. Institutional and Curricular Contexts: Teaching Freud and Religion in Undergraduate Institutions, Graduate Programs, and Seminaries
ch. 1 Teaching Freud in the Language of Our Students: The Case of a Religiously Affiliated Undergraduate Institution (Diane Jonte-Pace)
ch. 2 Freud and/as the Jew in the Multicultural University (Jay Geller)
ch. 3 Teaching Freud in the Seminary (Kirk A. Bingaman)
ch. 4. Teaching Freud, Teaching Freud's Values: A Graduate Course (Volney Gay)

II. Teaching Freud as Interpreter of Religious Texts and Practices
ch. 5 "Let Him Rejoice in the Roseate Light!": Teaching Psychoanalysis and Mysticism (William Parsons)
ch. 6 Teaching Freud While Interpreting Jesus (Donald Capps)
ch. 7 Teaching Freud and Interpreting Augustine's Confessions (Sandra Lee Dixon)
ch. 8 Psychoanalyzing Myth: From Freud to Winnicott (Robert A. Segal)

III. Teaching the Controversies
ch. 9 Rethinking Freud: Gender, Ethnicity, and the Production of Scientific Thought (Janet Liebman Jacobs)
ch. 10 Why Do We Have to Read Freud? (Carol Delaney)
ch. 11 Teaching Freud in Religion and Culture Courses: A Dialogical Approach (Mary Ellen Ross)

IV. Teaching the Teachings, Teaching the Practice
ch. 12 Teaching the Hindu Tantra with Freud: Transgression as Critical Theory and Mystical Technique (Jeffrey J. Kripal)
ch. 13 The Challenge of Teaching Freud: Depth Psychology and Religious Ethics (Ernest Wallwork)
ch. 14 Teaching Freud's Teachings (James E. Dittes)

Index
Cover image

Teaching Islam

Book
Wheeler, Brannon M., ed.
2003
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
BP42.T43 2003
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Despite the importance of Islam in global affairs and the role of Islamic Studies in Religious Studies, little attention has been given to the basic questions of how Islam should be taught. This volume brings together a number of leading scholars of Islamic Studies with rich experience in teaching Islam in a diversity of undergraduate settings, from large public universities to ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Despite the importance of Islam in global affairs and the role of Islamic Studies in Religious Studies, little attention has been given to the basic questions of how Islam should be taught. This volume brings together a number of leading scholars of Islamic Studies with rich experience in teaching Islam in a diversity of undergraduate settings, from large public universities to small private colleges. Topics addressed include Islamic law, the Quran, Sufism, women in Islam, Islam in America, and teaching about Islam through Arabic literature and the use of new information technology. Along with providing practical information about structuring courses and assignments, the contributors examine the place of Islamic Studies in the larger theoretical framework of Religious Studies and liberal arts curricula. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part One Theoretical and Pedagogical Frames For Presenting Islam In The Religious Studies Classroom
ch. 1 What Can't Be Left Out: The Essentials of Teaching Islam as a Religion (Brannon M. Wheeler)
ch. 2 On the ``Introduction to Islam'' (A. Kevin Reinhart)
ch. 3 Recent Critical Scholarship and the Teaching of Islam(Keith Lewinstein)
ch. 4 Islamicate Civilization: The View from Asia (Bruce B. Lawrence)

Part Two Dimensions of Muslim Faith, Community, and Order
ch. 5 The Essential Shari'ah: Teaching Islamic Law in the Religious Studies Classroom (Jonathan E. Brockopp)
ch. 6 Disparity and Context: Teaching Quranic Studies in North America (Jane Dammen Mcauliffe)
ch. 7 Between Orientalism and Fundamentalism: Problematizing the Teaching of Sufism (Carl W. Ernst)
ch. 8 Engendering and Experience: Teaching a Course on Women in Islam (Zayn Kassam)

Part Three Contemporary Issues and Challenges In Teaching Islam as a Religion
ch. 9 The Wedding of Zein: Islam through a Modern Novel (Michael A. Sells)
ch. 10 Teaching about Muslims in America (Marcia K. Hermansen)
ch. 11 Corporating Information Technology into Courses on Islamic Civilization (Corinne Blake)
ch. 12 Teaching Religion in the Twenty-First Century (Tazim R. Kassam)

Index
Cover image

Learning to Think: Disciplinary Perspectives

Book
Donald, Janet
2002
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1060.D64 2002
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Learning to think in a discipline is a demanding scholarly task that is not often associated with the development of university students. Although the intellectual development of postsecondary students is gaining increased attention, relating student development to the process of inquiry in different disciplines is unexplored terrain. This book attempts to come to a deeper understanding of thinking processes by exploring the approaches to thinking taken in different disciplines and ...
Additional Info:
Learning to think in a discipline is a demanding scholarly task that is not often associated with the development of university students. Although the intellectual development of postsecondary students is gaining increased attention, relating student development to the process of inquiry in different disciplines is unexplored terrain. This book attempts to come to a deeper understanding of thinking processes by exploring the approaches to thinking taken in different disciplines and then considering how these could be applied to student intellectual development.

Drawing on more than twenty-five years of research, Janet Donald shows how knowledge is structured and how professors and students perceive learning in their fields-and offers strategies for constructing and using knowledge that will help postsecondary institutions to promote students' intellectual development within and across the disciplines. The author first creates a framework for understanding student intellectual development and for learning to think in different disciplines. In succeeding chapters, she describes the principal methods of inquiry in each discipline and their effects on learning to think, examining what this means for students and how we might use it to improve the instructional process.

For faculty members, this book provides insight into the representation and development of curricula, courses, and programs to improve teaching and learning processes. Professors of education may find a specific use for the comparisons across disciplines in planning courses on teaching methods, as an aid in providing students with insight into how disciplines or fields of study are constructed, and in refining their own conceptual framework in their field. Administrators, particularly of programs and departments, will find suggestions for policy initiatives that are needed to create a supportive learning environment and for organizing teaching and learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author

ch. 1 Learning to Think: A Cross-Disciplinary Perspective
ch. 2 Orderly Thinking: Learning in a Structured Discipline
ch. 3 Hard Thinking: Applying Structured Knowledge to Unstructured Problems
ch. 4 Inductive Thinking: Knowledge-Intensive Learning
ch. 5 Multifaceted Thinking: Learning in a Social Science
ch. 6 Precedent and Reason: Case Versus Logic
ch. 7 Organizing Instruction and Understanding Learners
ch. 8 Criticism and Creativity: Thinking in the Humanities
ch. 9 Learning, Understanding, and Meaning

References
Name Index
Subject Index
Article cover image

"Teaching the Bible through the Internet: In the Classroom and at a Distance"

Article
Simkins, Ronald A.
2000
Journal of Religion and Society 2 (2000)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
This essay will argue that the internet provides an “added-value” to education, providing resources for more effective teaching and enhancing the learning of the students. The internet emphasizes written communication, facilitating clarity of thought and serving as the basis for critical thinking. The internet emphasizes the social dimensions of learning, and the students’ own role in their learning. This essay will illustrate the value of the internet for teaching and ...
Additional Info:
This essay will argue that the internet provides an “added-value” to education, providing resources for more effective teaching and enhancing the learning of the students. The internet emphasizes written communication, facilitating clarity of thought and serving as the basis for critical thinking. The internet emphasizes the social dimensions of learning, and the students’ own role in their learning. This essay will illustrate the value of the internet for teaching and learning through a case study of transforming a traditional introductory course on the Bible into a distance course.
Journal cover image

Teaching Religious Studies and Theology in Community Colleges

Journal Issue
Edwards, Kerry, and Kassam, Tazim R., eds.
2002
Spotlight on Teaching 17, no. 3 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2002-10oct.pdf 
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2002-10oct.pdf 

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching Religious Studies and Theology in Community Colleges (Kerry Edward, Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Teaching Weekend Religion Classes Part-time at Red Rocks Community College (Joy Lapp)
ch. 3 Developing the Religious Studies Program At Tulsa Community College (Cherie Hughes)
ch. 4 Teaching Biblical Languages and Biblical Archaeology in the Community College (M. Douglas Nelson)
ch. 5 Comparative Religion from On Ground to Online: Design to Implementation (Paula A. Drewek)
ch. 6 The Pragmatic Dimension of the Community College and Its Impact on Religious Studies (Peter D. Jauhiainen)
ch. 7 Teaching Religion in Community Colleges (Mary Karen Solomon)
ch. 8 Weekend Warrior: Adventures in the Teaching Trade (Jan Briel)
Journal cover image

Teaching About Material Culture in Religious Studies

Journal Issue
Nyitray, Vivian- Lee (Guest Editor), and Kassam Tazim R., (Editor)
2003
Spotlight on Teaching 18, no. 3 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2003-05may.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2003-05may.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching about Material Culture in Religious Studies (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Teaching Religion and Material Culture (Vivian-Lee Nyitray)
ch. 3 Material Culture and the Varieties of Religious Imagination (Ivan Strenski)
ch. 4 Teaching Religion and American Film (Judith Weisenfeld)
ch. 5 Teaching with Food (Daniel Sack)
ch. 6 Teaching Biblical Archaeology and Material Culture as Part of Teaching Judaism (Richard A. Freund)
ch. 7 Teaching Religion and Learning Religion through Material Culture (Jonathan Huoi Xung Lee)
ch. 8 Complicating Things: Material Culture and the Classroom (Leslie Smith)
Journal cover image

Teaching about Religion and Violence

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2003
Spotlight on Teaching 18, no. 4 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2003-10oct.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2003-10oct.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching about Religion and Violence (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Teaching about Religious Violence without Trivializing It (Mark Juergensmeyer)
ch. 3 Religion and Violence: A Teaching Opportunity (Eugene V. Gallagher)
ch. 4 Beyond the Four Naivetés: Approaching the Secular as If It Were Religious (Ira Chernus)
ch. 5 Religion after 9/11: Hijack It, Exonerate It, Get over It (Elizabeth Castelli)
ch. 6 Exegesis Has Consequences: Teaching Biblical Warrants for Violence (Rebecca Raphael)
ch. 7 Religion and Violence: Teaching Islam at an Evangelical Institution (David Vila)
ch. 8 Teaching about Millennialism, Peace, and Violence (Catherine Wessinger)
ch. 9 Poisonous Teachings: Aum Shinrikyo and Violence (Ian Reader)
ch. 10 Religion, Nationalism, Violence, and Leadership: The South Asian Context (Ainslie Embree)
ch. 11 World Religions, Violence, and Conflict Resolution (Marc Gopin)
Cover image

Using Film to Teach New Testament

Book
Boyer, Mark G.
2002
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
BS2530.B65 2002
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Boyer describes a teaching method which uses popular movies to explore themes encountered in the New Testament. Topics include, for example, martyrdom in Witness and The Gospel of Luke and apocalypse in Waterworld and The Book of Revelation. A modernized film interpretation of Shakespeare's Rome. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Boyer describes a teaching method which uses popular movies to explore themes encountered in the New Testament. Topics include, for example, martyrdom in Witness and The Gospel of Luke and apocalypse in Waterworld and The Book of Revelation. A modernized film interpretation of Shakespeare's Rome. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Teaching Literature
The New Testament is Literature
Literary Redaction Criticism: The Dreamer of Oz: L. Frank Baum and The Wizard of Oz
The Elements of a Story: The Wizard of Oz
Teaching Mark's Gospel
The Good Mother
Phenomenon
Sommersby
The Shawshank Redemption
Teaching Matthew's Gospel
Being There
Willow
Teaching Luke's Gospel
Witness
Teaching John's Gospel
Jeremiah Johnson
Powder
The Shawshank Redemption
Teaching the Acts of the Apostles
The Mission
Teaching Pauline Theology
Regarding Henry
The Doctor
Teaching the Book of Revelation
Pale Rider
The Milagro Beanfield War
Waterworld
Teaching the "Vineyard" Metaphor
A Walk in the Clouds
Teaching Hermeneutics
Romeo and Juliet
TTR cover image

"Using the Web in Religious Studies Courses"

TTR
Moore, Rebecca
2001
Journal of Religious and Theological Information 3, no. 3/4 (2001): 139-150
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Religion in Southern Culture: Classroom Notes"

Article
Lippy, Charles
2002
Journal of Southern Religion 5 (2002)
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Service Learning and Religious Studies: An Awkward Fit?"

Article
Harris-Shapiro, Carol
Council of Societies for the Study of Religion Bulletin 31, no 2 (2002): 35-39
Topics: Service Learning   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

The PRS-LTSN Journal 2, no. 2

Journal Issue
2003
PRS-LTSN Journal 2, no. 2 (University of Leeds, UK)
BV1474 v. 2 no. 2 2003
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
News and Information
ch. 1 The LTSN and the PRS-LTSN
LTSN
Activities
The LTSN Genereic Centre
The PRS-LTSN General Activities

ch. 2 Projects and Funding
ETHICS (update) Employability (update)
ch. 3 Departmental Visits and Contacts
Contacts
ch. 4 Workshops, Events, and Networks
Forthcoming Events
Other Events
Networks

ch. 5 Other LTSN Subject Centres
The LTSN Generic Cdentre

Articles
ch. 6 Teaching Ancient Philosophy (John Sellars)
ch. 7 Posters and Oral Presentations in Undergraduate History Science (Louise Jarvis and Joe Cain)
ch. 8 A preliminary Study of Group Learning/Teaching in the Culture of Religious Studies (Rosemary Beckham)
Appendices A and B (merged) - General Staff Survey and Results
Appendices C and D (merged) - Student Survey and Results
ch. 9 An Analysis of the Conceptual Frameworks Utilised by Undergraduate Theology Students when Studying Science and Religion (Tonie L. Stolberg and Peter Fulljames)
ch. 10 Breaking Down the classroom Walls: Innovative Teaching and Learning Methods in Religious Studies and Theology (Sophie Gilliat-Ray)
ch. 11 Third Colloquim on Learning and Teaching Support in Theology and Religious Studies: BA to MA student Progression (Julie Collar)
ch. 12 About the Journal
Cover image

The PRS-LTSN Journal 1, no. 2

Journal Issue
2002
The PRS-LTSN Journal, 1, no. 2 (University of Leeds, UK 2002)
BV1474 v. 1 no. 2 2002
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Building on Success: editorial
ch. 2 The LTSN and the PRS-LTSN
ch. 3 Subject Centre News, Winter 2002
ch. 4 Projects and Funding
ch. 5 Departmental Visits and Contacts
ch. 6 Workshops, Events and Networkds
ch. 7 Other LTSN Subject Centres
ch. 8 External Pressures on Teaching (George MacDonald Ross)
Appendix: Further Information and resources
ch. 9 Informing, Teaching, or Propagandising? Combining Environmental and Science Studies for Undergraduates (Sean Johnston and Mhairi Harvey)
ch. 10 How do Different Student Constituencies (not) Learn the History and Philosophy of their Subject? Case Studies from Science, Technology and Medicine (Graeme Gooday)
ch. 11 Studying Islam after 9-11: Reflections and Resources (Gary Bunt)
ch. 12 Speaking the Sexual (Julia Collar)
ch. 13 How to Cheat in Koine Greek (Jane McLarty)
ch. 14 About the Journal
Cover image

The PRS-LTSN Journal 1, no. 1

Journal Issue
2001
The PRS-LTSN Journal 1, no. 1 (University of Leeds, UK 2001)
BV1474 vo. 1 no. 1 2001
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Thinking, believing and sharing: editorial
ch. 2 Welcome from the Director (George MacDonald Ross)
ch. 3 The LTSN and the PRS-LTSN
ch. 4 QAA Benchmarking Project
ch. 5 Workshops, Events and Networks
ch. 6 Teaching Pjilosophy and HPS to Science Students (Geoffrey Cantor)
ch. 7 The Vision of God and its Impact on the Educational Process (William S. Campbell)
ch. 8 The Special Educational Needs and Disability Act: the Implications for PRS (Gary Bunt)
ch. 9 Cultivating Transferable Skills in Philosophy Undergraduates (Christopher Cowley)
ch. 10 Double Marking versus Monitoring of Examinations (Roger White)
ch. 11 Report on a History of Science, Technology and Medicine Workshop, Leeds, 30-31 May 2001 (Graeme Gooday)
ch. 12 Report of a Workshop on Teaching South Asian Religious Traditions, Centre for Applied South Asian Studies, University of Manchester, 18 May 2001 (Suthren Hirst, Searle-Chatterjee, and Nesbitt)
ch. 13 About the Journal
Cover image

Disciplines as Frameworks for Student Learning: Teaching the Practice of the Disciplines

Book
Riordan, Tim and James Roth, eds.
2005
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2331.D544 2005
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Liberal Arts   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Creating ways to make a discipline come alive for those who are not experts - even for students who may not take more than one or two courses in the disciplines they study - requires rigorous thought about what really matters in a field and how to engage students in its practice.

Faculty from Alverno College representing a range of liberal arts disciplines - chemistry, economics, history, literature, ...
Additional Info:
Creating ways to make a discipline come alive for those who are not experts - even for students who may not take more than one or two courses in the disciplines they study - requires rigorous thought about what really matters in a field and how to engage students in its practice.

Faculty from Alverno College representing a range of liberal arts disciplines - chemistry, economics, history, literature, mathematics and philosophy - here reflect on what it has meant for them to approach their disciplines as frameworks for student learning.

The authors all demonstrate how the ways of thinking they have identified as significant for their students in their respective disciplines have affected the way they design learning experiences. They show how they have shaped their teaching around the ways of thinking they want their students to develop within and across their disciplines; and what that means in terms of designing assessments that require students to demonstrate their thinking and understanding through application and use. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Common ground : how history professors and undergraduate students learn through history (James Roth)
ch. 2 Learning to think mathematically (Susan Pustejovsky)
ch. 3 Teaching students to practice philosophy (Donna Englemann)
ch. 4 Making economics matter to students (Zohreh Emami)
ch. 5 Reading and responding to literature: developing critical perspectives (Lucy Cromwell)
ch. 6 Articulating the cognitive processes at the heart of chemistry (Ann van Heerden)
ch. 7 Because Hester Prynne was an existentialist, or why using disciplines as frameworks for learning clarifies life (Rebecca Valentine)
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Stony the Road We Trod: African American Biblical Interpretation

Book
Felder, Cain Hope, ed.
Fortress Press, Minneapolis, MN
not catalogued
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
A hallmark of American black religion is its distinctive use of the Bible in creating community, resisting oppression, and fomenting social change. What can critical biblical studies learn from the African American experience with the Bible, and vice versa?
This singular volume marks the emergence of a critical mass of black biblical scholars. Combining sophisticated exegesis with special sensitivity to issues of race, class, and gender, the authors of ...
Additional Info:
A hallmark of American black religion is its distinctive use of the Bible in creating community, resisting oppression, and fomenting social change. What can critical biblical studies learn from the African American experience with the Bible, and vice versa?
This singular volume marks the emergence of a critical mass of black biblical scholars. Combining sophisticated exegesis with special sensitivity to issues of race, class, and gender, the authors of this scholarly collection examine the nettling questions of biblical authority, blacks and African in biblical narratives, and the liberating aspects of Scripture. Together they are reshaping and redefining the questions, concerns, and scholarship that determine how the Bible is appropriated by church, academy, and the larger society today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Map
Introduction

Part I: The Relevance of Biblical Scholarship and the Authority of the Bible
ch. 1 Interpreting Biblical Scholarship for the Black Church Tradition (Thomas Hoyt, Jr.)
ch. 2 The Hermeneutical Dilemma of the African American Biblical Student (Renita J. Weems)
ch. 3 Reading Her Way through the Struggle: African American Women and the Bible (Renita J. Weems)

Part II: African American Sources For Enhancing Biblical Interpretation
ch. 4 The Bible and African Americans: An Outline of an Interpretative History (Vincent L. Wimbush)
ch. 5 "An Ante-bellum Sermon": A Resource for an African American Hermeneutic (David T. Shannon)

Part III: Race and Ancient Black Africa in the Bible
ch. 6 Race, Racism, and the Biblical Narratives (Cain Hope Felder)
ch. 7 The Black Presence in the Old Testament (Charles B. Copher)
ch. 8 Beyond Identification: The Use of Africans in Old Testament Poetry and Narratives (Randall C. Bailey)

Part IV: Reinterpreting Biblical Texts
ch. 9 Who Was Hagar? (John W. Waters)
ch. 10 The Haustafeln (Household Codes) in African American Biblical Interpretation: "Free Slaves" and " Subordinate Women"(Clarice J. Martin)
ch. 11 An African American Appraisal of the Philemon-Paul-Onesimus Triangle (Lloyd A. Lewis)

Index of Ancient Sources
Index of Topics and Names
Contributors
Cover image

Occasional Papers, Volume 2.: The Chicago Forum on Pedagogy and The Study of Religion: A Publication of the Martin Marty Center at the University of Chicago Divinity School

Journal Issue
2005
University of Chicago Divinity School, Chicago, IL
BL41.C473 2005
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
A letter from the dean and the director of undergraduate studies
Year One
The Place of Religious Studies in the Liberal Arts Curriculum
Year Two
The Theory and Practice of Comparative Work
Year Three
Religion and Religious Studies
Journal cover image

Reflections on a Teaching Career in Religion

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2005
Spotlight on Teaching 20, no. 4 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/oct2005sot.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/oct2005sot.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Reflections on a Teaching Career in Religion (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Evoking a World You Might Inhabit (Edward Mooney)
ch. 3 Delight in Learning is Infectious (Margaret Miles)
ch. 4 Against a Narrow View of the World (Peter Paris)
ch. 5 Loving the Future (Rebecca Chopp)
ch. 6 Allowing the Possibility of Multiple Truths (Daniel Boyarin)
ch. 7 Embracing Embodied, Mediated Knowledge (Katie Cannon)
ch. 8 Helping a Mind Grow (Mahmoud Ayoub)
ch. 9 Get Them Inspired First (Martin E. Marty)
Journal cover image

Embracing Disability in Teaching Religion

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2005
Spotlight on Teaching 20, no. 3 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/spotlight-2005-05may.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/spotlight-2005-05may.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Embracing Disability in Teaching Religion (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Integrating Disability in Religious Studies and Theological Education (Nancy L. Eiesland)
ch. 3 Disability Law and the Classroom (F. Rachel Magdalene)
ch. 4 Accommodating Disability in the Classroom (Kerry Wynn)
ch. 5 A Student’s Perspective on the Accessible Classroom (Kirk VanGilder)
ch. 6 New Bodies of Knowledge: Disability Studies and Teaching Biblical Studies (Hector Avalos)
ch. 7 Disability and the Tasks of Social Justice (Roger S. Gottlieb)
ch. 8 Teaching Students Who Are Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Impaired (Jane Hurst)
ch. 9 Students with Learning Disabilities (Kent A. Eaton)
ch. 10 He Who Has Ears to Hear (Rebecca Raphael)
ch. 11 An Academic’s Encounter with Chronic Illness: Teaching, Collegiality and Scholarship, and Students with Chronic Conditions (Mary Jo Iozzio)
ch. 12 The Future of Disability in the Teaching of Religion: Views from the Next Generation (Deborah Creamer)
Journal cover image

Teaching With Site Visits

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2004
Spotlight on Teaching 19, no. 4 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/oct04sot.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/oct04sot.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching with Site Visits (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Unexpected Learning Opportunities of the Site Visit (Joyce Burkhalter Flueckiger)
ch. 3 An Insider Perspective from the Temple (P. Ravi Sarma)
ch. 4 Site Visits and Epistemological Diversity in the Study of Religion (Jeffrey Carlson)
ch. 5 The Nuts and Bolts of Site Visits (Grace G. Burford)
ch. 6 Native American Site Visits in the Context of Service Learning (Michael D. McNally)
ch. 7 Site Visits to Synagogues (Michael S. Berger)
ch. 8 Site Visit to a Mosque (Amir Hussain)
ch. 9 Integrating Field Research in the Introductory Religion Course (Sheila E. McGinn)
ch. 10 Integrating Site Visits in the Pluralism Project at Connecticut College (Patrice C. Brodeur)
ch. 11 Site Visits from a Journalist’s Perspective (Gustav Niebuhr)
ch. 12 Temples of Culture: Using Museums for Site Visits (Lisa Bellan-Boyer)
Journal cover image

Teaching about Religions, Medicines, and Healing

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2004
Spotlight on Teaching 19, no. 3 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/may2004sot.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/may2004sot.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching about Religions, Medicines, and Healing (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Teaching Religion and Healing (Linda Barnes)
ch. 3 Religion, Healing, and the Embodied Subject (Suzanne J. Crawford)
ch. 4 Teaching Religion and Healing in a Southern University (Kaja Finkler)
ch. 5 Spirituality of Healing (Kwok Pui-lan)
ch. 6 Shamanism and Religious Healing (Christopher Carr, and Michael Winkelman)
ch. 7 Shamanism and Religious Healing (Amanda Porterfield)
ch. 8 Magic, Witchcraft, and Healing (Arvilla Payne-Jackson)
ch. 9 Teaching Chicanos/as and Religion: Traditions and Transformations (Lara Medina)
ch. 10 Medicines, Healing, and Spiritualities: A Cross-Cultural Exploration (Paula Arai)
Journal cover image

Spotlight on Teaching about Religion in the Schools: Multiculturalism and the Academic Study of Religion in the Schools

Journal Issue
Grelle, Bruce; Naylor, D. Keith; and Freund, Richard A., eds.
2002
Spotlight on Teaching 17, no. 2 March
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2002-02mar.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2002-02mar.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Spotlight on Teaching about Religion in the Schools: Multiculturalism and the Academic Study of Religion in the Schools (Bruce Grelle; D. Keith Naylor; and Richard A. Freund)
ch. 2 Guidelines on Religion in Public Schools: An Historic Moment (Marcia Beauchamp)
ch. 3 University Religion Departments and Teaching about the Bible in Public High Schools: A Report from Florida (David Levenson)
ch. 4 Interview: A Teacher’s Perspective (Martha Ball)
ch. 5 Weighty Matters and the Teenage Reader (Jenna Weissman Joselit)
ch. 6 The Program in Religion and Secondary Education at Harvard Divinity School (Diane L. Moore)
ch. 7 The Religion and Public Education Resource Center (Bruce Grelle)
ch. 8 God, gods, and Godot: Thoughts on Teaching about Religion in Secondary Education (Matthew Hicks)
ch. 9 Religion and Education (Michael D. Waggoner)
ch. 10 Moses Who? Literacy, Citizenship, and the Academic Study of Religion in the Schools (Bruce Grelle)
Cover image

Issues in Teaching Religion and Theology in Great Britain

Journal Issue
Pyper, Hugh, and Freund, Richard S., eds.
2001
Spotlight on Teaching 16, no. 3 Fall
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2001-03fall.pdf 
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2001-03fall.pdf 

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Issues in Teaching Religion and Theology in Great Britain (Hugh Pyper, Richard A. Freund)
ch. 2 An Introduction to the Philosophical and Religious Studies Learning and Teaching Support Network (PRS-LTSN) (Hugh Pyper)
ch. 3 Teaching Systematic Theology in Britain Today (David Fergusson)
ch. 4 Teaching South Asian Religions in Britain (Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad)
ch. 5 A British Higher Education Perspective on Widening Access to Religious Studies through the Application of Internet Resources (Gary Bunt)
ch. 6 The Mutual Influence of Religious Education in Schools and Religious Studies/Theology in Universities in the English Context (Denise Cush)
ch. 7 Teaching Biblical Studies to Non-Traditional Students in British Higher Education (Bill Campbell)
Journal cover image

Alter(ed) Sexualities: Bringing Lesbian and Gay Studies to the Religion Classroom

Journal Issue
Pippin, Tina, and Henking, Susan, eds.
1996
Spotlight on Teaching 4, no. 2 November
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Altered Sexualities: bringing lesbian and gay studies to the religion classroom: Editor's introduction (Tina Pippin, and Susan Henking)
ch. 2 Incorporating Gay and Lesbian Experience into Comparative Religion Courses (Carol S. Anderson)
ch. 3 Scenes From Lesbian and Gay Studies in Religion Classrooms (Carol Anderson, Carol White, and Susan Henking)
ch. 4 Same-Sex Sexualities and Chinese Religions (Miriam Levering)
ch. 5 Multiple Choices: Querying Pedagogy (Susan Henking)
ch. 6 Gay/ Lesbian Liberation and Religious Pedagogy (Carol Wayne White)
ch. 7 Addressing the Issue of Violence against Homosexuals in Ethics Courses (E. N. Gender)
ch. 8 Teaching Gay and Lesbian Issues in biblical Studies Courses (Tina Pippin)
ch. 9 Teaching Sexualities: A Conversation of the Affinity Group
Journal cover image

General Issues of Teaching Religious Studies

Journal Issue
Humphreys, W. Lee, ed.
1996
Spotlight on Teaching 4, no. 1 February
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Editor's Note (W. Lee Humphreys)
ch. 2 Teaching "Religion and Science": The Challenge of Developing a New Conceptual Landscape (Elizabeth Newman)
ch. 3 Open-Ended Pedagogy in a Multicultural Classroom: The Case for Theological Education (Dale T. Irvin)
ch. 4 Critical Insight (Susan E. Davies)
ch. 5 A Teacher in the Making by Gail B. Griffin (Paula M. Cooey)
Journal cover image

The Introductory Course

Journal Issue
Humphreys, W. Lee, ed.
1995
Spotlight on Teaching 3, no. 1 February
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Editor's Note (W. Le Humphreys)
ch. 2 From the Abstract to the Concrete and Back Again: the Introductory Course in Religious Studies (Erin Addison)
ch. 3 Autobiography and the Introductory Course (Stephen N. Dunning)
ch. 4 Black Elk Speaks in the Introductory Course (Richard Busse)
ch. 5 Knowing and Reasoning in College: Gender-Related Patterns in Students Intellectual Development (Baxter Magolda, and Phyllis H. Kaminski)
Journal cover image

Teaching African Religions

Journal Issue
Hackett, Rosalind I. J., ed.
1993
Spotlight on Teaching 1, no. 2 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching African Religions (Rosalind I. J. Hackett)
ch. 2 African Religions and Their Literary Representations (Sue E. Houchins, and Kathleen O' Brien Wicker)
ch. 3 Teaching the History of African Religions (Robert M. Baum)
ch. 4 The Institutionalizing of "The Other"; Teaching African Religions in the U.S. (Rosalind Shaw)
ch. 5 Mental Illness, Ritual Action, Ritual Failure: Teaching About Religion in Africa (E. Thomas Lawson)
ch. 6 More Bones Than Flesh: Teaching African Religion in Nigeria and the United States (Jacob K. Olupona)
ch. 7 Myths for "Myths": The Challenges of Africa to the Religious Studies Curriculum (Rosalind I. J. Hackett)
ch. 8 Persons in Community: An Approach to the Teaching of African Traditional Religion (Newell S. Booth, Jr.)
ch. 9 Teaching African Religion in the University (Joseph M. Murphy)
Cover image

General Issues of Teaching Religious Studies

Journal Issue
Humphreys, W. Lee, ed.
1992
Spotlight on Teaching 1, no. 1 November
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Editor's Note (W. Lee Humphreys)
ch. 2 Infusing Critical Thinking into the Study of Religion (Richard Penaskovic, and John F. vonEschenback)
ch. 3 Transforming Knowledge by Elizabeth Kamarack Minnich (Martha A. Crunkleton)
ch. 4 Tales of Terror: On Building a Course Around the Theme of Women, Christianity, and Abuse (Martha J. Reineke)
Cover image

Teaching the Bible: Practical Strategies for Classroom Instruction

Book
Roncace, Mark and Patrick Gray, eds.
2005
Society of Biblical Literature, Atlanta, GA
BS1193.T43 2005
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
While books on pedagogy in a theoretical mode have proliferated in recent years, there have been few that offer practical, specific ideas for teaching particular biblical texts. To address this need, Teaching the Bible, a collection of ideas and activities written by dozens of innovative college and seminary professors, outlines effective classroom strategies -with a focus on active learning - for the new teacher and veteran professor alike. It includes ...
Additional Info:
While books on pedagogy in a theoretical mode have proliferated in recent years, there have been few that offer practical, specific ideas for teaching particular biblical texts. To address this need, Teaching the Bible, a collection of ideas and activities written by dozens of innovative college and seminary professors, outlines effective classroom strategies -with a focus on active learning - for the new teacher and veteran professor alike. It includes everything from ways to incorporate film, literature, art, and music to classroom writing assignments and exercises for groups and individuals. The book assumes an academic approach to the Bible but represents a wide range of methodological, theological, and ideological perspectives. This volume is an indispensable resource for anyone who teaches classes on the Bible. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
List of Contributors

Part One: Prolegomena
Hermeneutics
1. Visual Exegesis: An Introduction to Biblical Interpretation (Julia Lambert Fogg)
2. Guernica and the Art of Biblical Hermeneutics (Daniel E. Goodman)
3. Interpretation and Interrogation (Patrick Gray)
4. Poetry and Exegesis (Jaime Clark-Soles)
5. Red Riding Hood and the Bible (Roy L. Heller)
6. Teaching Hermeneutics through Creative Communal Praxis (Carolyn J. Sharp)
7. Reading Inkblots (Mark Roncace)
8. Ancient Texts and Artifacts (Brent A. Strawn)
9. The Social Location of the Reader (F. V. Greifenhagen)
10. Social Location and Biblical Interpretation (Francisco Lozada, Jr.)
11. Genre: Interpretation, Recognition, Creation (Brent A. Strawn)
12. Simone Weil and Biblical Studies Courses (Jaime Clark-Soles)

Methodologies
13. Teaching Biblical Interpretation Methodologies (Frank M. Yamada)
14. Critical Methods: Historical Criticism (Brad E. Kelle)
15. Tom Lehrer and Historical Criticism (Donald C. Polaski)
16. Working with Primary Source Documents (Nicola Denzey)
17. Historical Memory and Biblical Narrative (Mary F. Foskett)
18. Source Criticism and Eye-Witness Accounts (Christine Shepardson)
19. Introducing Textual Criticism (Patrick Gray)
20. Textual Criticism (Karoline Lewis)
21. Text Criticism and Translations (Elna K. Solvang)
22. Text Criticism with David and Goliath (F. V. Greifenhagen)
23. Colorful Semiotics (Sara Koenig)
24. Poetry and History (Brent A. Strawn)
25. The Narrative Analysis of Episodes (David Rhoads)

Approaches and Resources
26. Introducing the "Introduction to Biblical Literature" Course (Michael Barram)
27. Introductory Exercise: Bone, Stone, Bible, Flag (Nicola Denzey)
28. Introductory Site Visit: Finding Scripture in Stone (Nicola Denzey)
29. The Counterfactual Essay (Michael Philip Penn)
30. Taking a Stand (Michael Philip Penn)
31. Short Stories as Exegetical Tools (Jaime Clark-Soles)
32. Palestinian Geography (Scott Shauf)
33. Archaeology of the Bible (Ronald A. Simkins)
34. An Approach to a "Bible and Film" Course (Mary E. Shields)
35. Canon Formation (Bryan Whitfield)
36. Visual Art as a Teaching Tool (Ira Brent Driggers)
37. The Educative Power of the Rhetoric of Biblical Stories (Heather A. McKay)
38. The Bible, Slavery, and American Culture (Kyle Keefer)

Part Two: The Hebrew Bible
Torah
39. Genesis 1 and Ancient Cosmology (Joseph F. Scrivner)
40. Genesis 1:1-3: Translation and Interpretation (F. V. Greifenhagen)
41. Introducing the Documentary Hypothesis Using Genesis 1-2 (Julie Galambush)
42. Two Creation Stories?: Drawing the Israelite Cosmos (Michael R. Cosby)
43. Teaching the Creation Stories in Genesis (Glenna S. Jackson)
44. The Human Condition in Genesis 2-3 and in Blade Runner (Tod Linafelt)
45. Cain and Abel: Intercanonical, Midrashic, and Artistic Comparison (F. V. Greifenhagen)
46. The Flood as Jigsaw Puzzle: Introducing Source Criticism (Donald C. Polaski)
47. The Three Worlds of the Bible: The Tower of Babel (F. V. Greifenhagen)
48. Genesis 1-11 as Myth (Emily R. Cheney)
49. Traditional Tales (Gen 12:10-20; 20:1-8; 26:6-11) (Ronald A. Simkins)
50. Reading Hagar (Todd Penner)
51. The Importance of Social Location: A Study Guide on Sarah and Hagar (Mary E. Shields)
52. Kinship in Genesis 16 and 21 and Numbers 27 and 36 (Ronald A. Simkins)
53. Sodom and Gomorrah: An Exegetical Exercise (Kyle Keefer)
54. Hospitality in Genesis 18:1-15 and 19:1-11 (Ronald A. Simkins)
55. Lot's Wife: Bringing Minor Biblical Characters Out of the Shadows (F. V. Greifenhagen)
56. Abraham and His Son: Using the Qur'an in the Biblical Studies Classroom (John Kaltner)
57. Genesis 22: When the Meaning is Not Moral (Roger Newell)
58. Genesis 22: Artists' Renderings (Sandie Gravett)
59. The Near-Sacrifice of Isaac (James K. Mead)
60. Limited Good in Genesis 23 (Ronald A. Simkins)
61. Jacob: Saint or Sinner? (Michael Barram)
62. Some Striking Textual Parallels in Genesis 34 and 2 Samuel 13 (Nicolae Roddy)
63. Honor and Shame in Genesis 34 and 1 Samuel 25 (Ronald A. Simkins)
64. Genesis and The Red Tent (Michael Barram)
65. Debating Joseph's Character (Karla G. Bohmbach)
66. Exodus from Egypt: Universal Story of Freedom? (F. V. Greifenhagen)
67. Israelite and/or Egyptian? Ethnic Identity in Exodus (F. V. Greifenhagen)
68. Israelite or Egyptian? (Susanne Hofstra)
69. Exodus 1:1-5: Explaining Variation in Small Details (F. V. Greifenhagen)
70. The Historicity of the Exodus: What's at Stake? (Julie Galambush)
71. Multiple Perspectives on Exodus 15 (Mark Roncace)
72. Acting Out Exodus 19-20 (Elna K. Solvang)
73. The Fourth Commandment and Etiologies (Mark Roncace)
74. The Development of Israelite Law (J. Bradley Chance) 75. The Relevance of the Laws (Mark Roncace)
76. "Does Tithing Make any Sense?": Exploring the Relevance of Law Codes (Michael R. Cosby)
77. "Decoding" Laws Still on the Books of Moses (Ryan Byrne)
78. Why Leviticus is the Most Important Book in the Bible (Tod Linafelt)
79. Holiness as an Unknown Culture (Donald C. Polaski)
80. Remembering Deuteronomy (Brad E. Kelle)
81. Learning About the Laws of Kashrut and Kosher Food (Heather A. McKay)
82. Teaching the Documentary Hypothesis to Skeptical Students (William L. Lyons)
83. The Documentary Hypothesis and Sampling (Guy D. Nave, Jr.)
84. The Authorship of the Pentateuch (T. Perry Hildreth)

Prophets
85. The Conquest of Canaan (Nicolae Roddy)
86. The Book of Joshua and Issues of War and Peace (Leonard Greenspoon)
87. The Book of Joshua and Popular Culture (Leonard Greenspoon)
88. The Book of Joshua and Bible Translation (Leonard Greenspoon)
89. The Book of Joshua and Jewish Exegetical Traditions (Leonard Greenspoon)
90. A Short Story of the Judges (Mark Roncace)
91. Ehud and Eglon: Dramatization (F. V. Greifenhagen)
92. The United Monarchy (Samuel and Kings) (Brad E. Kelle)
93. Who Decides What's in the Bible? The Case of 1 Samuel 11 (Megan Bishop Moore)
94. Apology of David (Ronald A. Simkins)
95. David's Rise to Power (Sandie Gravett)
96. David at the Movies (Michael R. Cosby)
97. David and Goliath (1 Samuel 16-17): The Ideology of Biblical Popular Culture (Roland Boer)
98. David and Bathsheba: A Case of Mis-Sent Power (F. Scott Spencer)
99. A Controversial King (Nicolae Roddy)
100. Patronage in 1 Kings 17 and 2 Kings 8 (Ronald A. Simkins)
101. The Siege of Jerusalem: Both Sides of the Story (Nicolae Roddy)
102. What is a Prophet? (Rolf Jacobson)
103. The Prophets and Two Good Doctors (Brent A. Strawn)
104. On Becoming Prophets (John R. Levison)
105. Prophetic Call Narratives (Brad E. Kelle)
106. M&Ms, Play-doh, Plumb Bobs, How You Got Your Name-and Prophets (Rolf Jacobson)
107. Modern Poetry and Prophetic Form Criticism (Roy L. Heller)
108. Victims' Testimonies and Prophetic Literature (Ron Clark)
109. Introducing the Book of Isaiah (Brad E. Kelle)
110. Isaiah and Bob Dylan on the Watchtower (Mark McEntire)
111. Second Isaiah and the Exilic Imagination (Brent A. Strawn)
112. The Depiction of Jeremiah (Mark Roncace)
113. Diagnosing Ezekiel (Johanna Stiebert)
114. Ezekiel's Inaugural Vision (Johanna Stiebert)
115. The Abusive God (L. Juliana M. Claassens)
116. Hosea Meets Hank Williams (Donald C. Polaski)
117. Amos and "Economic Justice for All" (Michael Barram)
118. Preaching Amos: The Rhetoric of Amos 1:3-2:16 (Frank M. Yamada)
119. Jonah and a New Pair of Glasses: An Introduction to Hermeneutics and Humility (John R. Levison)
120. Jonah: How the Bible Tells a Great Story (Megan Bishop Moore)
121. "Go straight to Sheol!": A Discovery Exercise on Sheol Using Jonah 2 (Michael R.Cosby)
122. The Many Voices of Prophecy (Micah 6) (D. Matthew Stith)
123. Tithing in Malachi 3 (Joseph F. Scrivner)

Writings
124. Creative Writing and Interpreting Biblical Poetry (Rolf Jacobson)
125. Searching Through the Psalms (Mark McEntire)
126. Imagery and the Psalms (Rolf Jacobson)
127. Psalm 13 and Psalms of Lament (James K. Mead)
128. Lament Psalms (Elna K. Solvang)
129. Lament and Praise, Top Forty and Psychology (Brent A. Strawn)
130. Imprecatory Psalms: Ancient and Modern (Brent A. Strawn)
131. Psalm 23 and Modern Worldviews (Mark Roncace)
132. Canonicity, Musical Polyphony, and the Book of Psalms (Sara Koenig)
133. Introduction to Wisdom Literature (D. Matthew Stith)
134. The Social Settings of Ancient and Modern Wisdom (Donald C. Polaski)
135. Sayings of the Wise (Guys): An Approach to the Book of Proverbs (Gail P. C. Streete)
136. Proverbs and Proverbs of the World (Timothy J. Sandoval)
137. Feeling the Heat in Job by Rewriting the Speeches with Modern Expressions (Michael R. Cosby)
138. Job: Putting God on Trial (F. V. Greifenhagen)
139. Editing the End of Job (Mark Roncace)
140. On Covering (the Song of) Songs and the Importance of (Canonical) Context (Brent A. Strawn)
141. Reading the Song of Songs (Mark Roncace)
142. Performing the Book of Ruth (Elna K. Solvang)
143. Questioning Ruth (Kyle Keefer)
144. What is the Angle? (Nyasha Junior)
145. "Why Would I Want to Marry My Sister-in-Law?": Cultural Diversity and Levirate Marriage (Michael R. Cosby)
146. Lamentations through Musical Interpretation (Amy C. Cottrill)
147. Entering Into Lamentations (Anathea Portier-Young)
148. Lamentations: Reading Poetry of Distress in Distressing Times (Johanna Stiebert)
149. The Characterization of Qoheleth in Ecclesiastes (Frank M. Yamada)
150. Qoheleth Sings Stamps-Baxter (Donald C. Polaski)
151. The Structure of Ecclesiastes and the Views of the Teacher (Mark Roncace)
152. Fooling Around with Esther (Mark Roncace)
153. Chronological Displacements in Ezra-Nehemiah (J. Bradley Chance)
154. Ezra, Nehemiah, and the Foreign Women (L. Juliana M. Claassens)
155. Israel's Identity Crisis in the Post-Exilic Era (D. Matthew Stith)

Varia
156. Comparing Different Portrayals of God (Karla G. Bohmbach)
157. The Celebration and Commemoration of Jewish Holidays (John R. Levison)
158. Diaspora and Identity (Timothy J. Sandoval)
159. Ancient Near Eastern Literature and the Bible: The Stela of King Mesha of Moab (F. V. Greifenhagen)
160. Ancient Near Eastern Parallels and Hip Hop Sampling (Brent A. Strawn)
161. Role-playing Narratives from the Hebrew Bible (Karla G. Bohmbach)
162. 1 Maccabees: "That All should be One People" (Bernadette McNary-Zak)
163. The Book of Judith: To Deceive or Not to Deceive? (Bernadette McNary-Zak)

Part Three: The New Testament
The Gospels and Acts
164. Gospel or Gospels? (Richard Walsh)
165. Inductive Discovery of the Synoptic Problem, Or, Catching the Plagiarists (Thomas W. Martin)
166. Who's On First? Tracking Gospel Relations (F. Scott Spencer)
167. The Synoptic Problem (Jaime Clark-Soles)
168. Comparing Synoptic Texts Using "Jesus Film" Clips (Marianne Meye Thompson)
169. One of These Things is Not Like the Others: Introducing the Four Gospels (Daniel E. Goodman)
170. Bringing the Gospels into Conversation with One Another (Greg Carey)
171. The Four Gospels: Sensing Similarities and Differences (Emily R. Cheney)
172. Gospel Music (Patrick Gray)
173. Write Your Own Gospel (Jeffrey L. Staley)
174. Gospel Genre (Karoline Lewis)
175. Whither History? John F. Kennedy and the Gospels (Daniel E. Goodman)
176. The Gospels as Aural and Socio-Political Documents (Emily R. Cheney)
177. How to Read a Gospel by Viewing a Miracle Story in Film: An Exercise in Redaction/Narrative/Feminist Criticism (Jeffrey L. Staley)
178. Distinguishing Jesus' Resurrection from His Parousia in the Synoptic Gospels (Emily R. Cheney)
179. Introducing the Historical Jesus (Patrick Gray)
180. Create-A-Jesus: Scholarship and the Search for the Historical Jesus (Christine Shepardson)
181. Jesus and the Temple: Helping Students to Think Historically (C. D. Elledge)
182. Jesus in Jerusalem: Visualizing the Synoptic Accounts of Jesus' Final Week (Matthew L. Skinner)
183. Christology Slideshow (Jaime Clark-Soles)
184. Creating Comfort with Ambiguity about Jesus (Thomas W. Martin)
185. The Gospel Tradition and the Making of Messiahs (Richard Walsh)
186. The Diverse World of Jesus (John R. Levison)
187. Jesus' Teaching on Divorce and Remarriage (Matthew L. Skinner)
188. Forgiveness (Jaime Clark-Soles)
189. Jesus, Wealth, and Wall Street (Michael Barram)
190. "Wealth and Poverty" Sermon/Study Series (Michael Barram)
191. Teaching about Women in the Gospel Stories (Glenna S. Jackson)
192. The Social Functions of Parables (Guy D. Nave, Jr.)
193. Parable Project (Sandra Hack Polaski)
194. Teaching the Parables of Jesus from an African Context (Glenna S. Jackson)
195. Experiencing the Parables (Greg Carey)
196. How to Write a Parable (Kenneth L. Cukrowski)
197. "Exegeting" Christmas (Nicola Denzey)
198. Genealogies and Exegesis (Susan E. Hylen)
199. Acting Out the Sermon on the Mount (Roger Newell)
200. Jesus and the Law (Guy D. Nave, Jr.)
201. The Sermon on the Mount (Nicole Kelley)
202. Matthew's Jesus and the Pharisees: The Rhetoric of Social Identification (B. Diane Wudel)
203. Teaching through Role-Play: Matthew 23 as Test Case (Ira Brent Driggers)
204. What Did Jesus Think He Was Saying? (Matt 26:26) (Patrick Gray)
205. The Texas Two-Step: Introducing Mark's Gospel (John R. Levison)
206. The Collaborative Comic Strip (David Barnhart)
207. The Ending of the Gospel of Mark (Nicole Kelley)
208. Film as a Resource for Theological Reflection on Biblical Texts (Carleen Mandolfo)
209. Mark and the Movies (William Sanger Campbell)
210. Luke's Gospel and the Parable of the Good Samaritan (Kyle Keefer)
211. Engendering the Prodigal Son (Luke 15:11-32) (Audrey West)
212. Narrative Criticism: Interpreting the Parable of the Prodigal Son (Philip A. Quanbeck II)
213. Teaching the Unity of "Luke-Acts" (John B. Weaver)
214. Acts 1-8 and Life in the Early Church (Karla G. Bohmbach)
215. Paul and The Amazing Race (Sandie Gravett)
216. Tracking the Plot of Acts (Greg Carey)
217. The Nature of History in Acts of the Apostles (John B. Weaver)
218. Ancient Historiography and the Book of Acts (John Byron)
219. Just Like Magic: The Acts of the Apostles (Kenneth L. Cukrowski)

Letters
220. Reading Other People's Mail (Bryan Whitfield and Patrick Gray)
221. The Letters and Historical Context (Gregory Stevenson)
222. Will the Real Paul Please Stand Up? (Jeffrey L. Staley)
223. Saint Paul? (Richard Walsh)
224. Debating Pauline Theology (Mary E. Hinkle)
225. Paul's Religious Experience: Conversion or Call? (Emily R. Cheney)
226. Women's Ordination, the New Testament, and the Politics of Interpretation (Thomas W. Martin)
227. Epistle for Today (Raymond H. Reimer)
228. The Issue of Authenticity in the Pauline Writings: 2 Thessalonians as a Test Case (Thomas D. Stegman)
229. Literary Analysis and the Question of Authorship (Gregory Stevenson)
230. Authorship and Pseudonymity (Scott Shauf)
231. Pseudonymity and Pseudepigraphy in the New Testament (John Byron)
232. Writing to Paul (Greg Carey)
233. What Does Paul Mean by the Expression Pistis Christou? (Thomas D. Stegman)
234. The Letter to the Romans and Pauline Theological Concepts (Philip A. Quanbeck II)
235. Translation and Interpretation: Slave or Servant in Romans 1:1? (Philip A. Quanbeck II)
236. Romans 13:1-7: Church and State (Kenneth L. Cukrowski)
237. "The Righteousness of God" in Paul's Letter to the Romans (Thomas D. Stegman)
238. 1 Corinthians 10: Church and the City (Kenneth L. Cukrowski)
239. Discipline in Pauline Communities (1 Corinthians 5) (Kenneth L. Cukrowski)
240. A Theology of Sexuality (1 Corinthians 6:12-20) (Kenneth L. Cukrowski)
241. Recreating the Corinthian Community (Emily R. Cheney)
242. Paul and Women (1 Corinthians) (Audrey West)
243. Second Corinthians and Partition Theories (Thomas D. Stegman)
244. Paul's Letter to the Philippians: A Lesson in Citizenship (Julia Lambert Fogg)
245. The Thanksgiving as Epistolary Preview (Philemon) (Audrey West)
246. Reading Philemon (Guy D. Nave, Jr.)
247. Paul's Rhetoric in Philemon (Emily R. Cheney)
248. The Pastoral Epistles (L. Stephanie Cobb)
249. Guide to a Happy Home (B. Diane Wudel)
250. Exploring Intertexture in the Letter to the Hebrews (David A. deSilva)
251. The Great Cloud of Witnesses in Hebrews 11 (Sara Koenig)
252. Antichrists and Little Children: Imagining the Johannine Epistles (Lynn R. Huber)
Revelation
253. The Symbolism of the Apocalypse through Political Cartoons (Marianne Meye Thompson)
254. Symbolism in Revelation (Mark Roncace)
255. Ancient Apocalyptic and Its Contemporary Expressions (Jeffrey L. Staley)
256. Apocalyptic Literature and Testimonies of Suffering (Ron Clark)
257. Teaching the Book of Revelation as a Screen Play (Thomas W. Martin)
258. Revelation and Pop Culture (Kyle Keefer)
259. Pascal on Reading Revelation (Roger Newell)
260. Introducing Revelation through the Visual Arts (Lynn R. Huber)
261. The Book of Revelation: A Board Game? (Nicola Denzey)
262. All the Senses of Revelation 8: Experiencing First-Century Rhetorical Strategies (Julia Lambert Fogg)
263. Reading Revelation 14 and 19: Trampling Out the Vintage (Philip A. Quanbeck II)

Varia
264. The New Testament Canon: Unity and Diversity (John Byron)
265. Journaling in Character (Stanley P. Saunders and William Sanger Campbell)
266. One-Source Social History (Michael Philip Penn)
267. Women and Early Christianity (Guy D. Nave, Jr.)
268. The Importance of the Septuagint (Scott Shauf)
269. Greek Athletes and Athletic Analogies in the New Testament (Russell B. Sisson)
270. Notions of "the Messiah" within First-Century Judaism (Matthew L. Skinner)
271. Use of a Lexicon and the Anchor Bible Dictionary (Audrey West)
272. Non-Canonical Writings (L. Stephanie Cobb)
273. The Origin and Source of Scripture (Guy D. Nave, Jr.)

Indices
Biblical Texts
Art
Music
Film
Literature
Article cover image

"'For the Bible Tells Me So': Using Developmental Theory to Teach the Bible"

Article
Howell, David B.
2004
Perspectives in Religious Studies 27, no. 4 (2004): 399-411
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Teaching Buddhism in the West

Book
Hori, Victor Sogen, Richard P. Hayes and J. Mark Shields, eds.
2002
RoutledgeCurzon, Taylor & Francis Group, New York, NY
BQ 158.T43 2002
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
At a time when the popularity of Buddhism is at a peak in the west, both inside and outside the university setting, scholars and students alike are searching for guidance: How should Buddhism, a religion which is ultimately 'foreign' to western experience, be taught? How should one teach central Buddhist doctrines and ideas? Should one teach Buddhist practise; if so how? Until now, those interested in these and other related ...
Additional Info:
At a time when the popularity of Buddhism is at a peak in the west, both inside and outside the university setting, scholars and students alike are searching for guidance: How should Buddhism, a religion which is ultimately 'foreign' to western experience, be taught? How should one teach central Buddhist doctrines and ideas? Should one teach Buddhist practise; if so how? Until now, those interested in these and other related matters have been left with little guidance. Despite the wealth of scholarly publications on Buddhist traditions and the plethora of books about meditation and enlightenment, a serious lacuna exists in the sphere of teaching Buddhism.

This book fills this lacuna, by providing a series of thematically arranged articles written by contemporary scholars of Buddhism throughout North America. Some of the major themes covered are the history of teaching Buddhism in Europe and North America (Reynolds, Prebish), the problem of representations of Buddhism in undergraduate teaching (Lewis), the problem of crossing cultural and historical divides (Jenkins), the place of the body and mind in the Buddhist classroom (Waterhouse), alternative pedagogical methods in teaching Buddhism (Wotypka, Jarow, Hori, Grimes) and the use of the Internet as a resource, and metaphor for teaching Buddhism (Fenn, Grieder). (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

Introduction (Victor Sogen Hori)

List of Contributors

Part I: Teaching Buddhism: Past and Present

ch. 1 Teaching Buddhism in the Postmodern University: Understanding, Critique, Evaluation (Frank E. Reynolds)

ch. 2 Buddhist Studies in the Academy: History and Analysis (Charles S. Prebish)

Part II: What is "Buddhism"

ch. 3 Representations of Buddhism in Undergraduate Teaching: The Centrality of Ritual and Story Narratives (Todd T. Lewis)
ch. 4 Moving Beyond the "ism": A Critique of the Objective Approach to teaching Buddhism (O'Hyun Park)

Part III: Cultural Divides
ch. 5 Black Ships, Blavatsky, and the Pizza Effect: Critical Self-Consciousnes as a Thematic Foundation for Courses in Buddhist Studies (Stephen Jenkins)

ch. 6 An End-run round Entities: Using Scientific Analogies to Teach Basic Buddhist Concepts (William S. Waldron)

Part IV Skillful Means

ch. 7 Engaging Buddhism: Creative Tasks and Student Participation (Joanne Wotypka)

ch. 8 The Peripaetetic Class: Buddhist Traditions and Myths of Pedagogy (E. H. Rick Jarow)

Part V: Buddha Body, Buddha Mind

ch. 9 Buddhism and the Teaching of Jūdō (David Waterhouse)

ch. 10 Introducing Buddhism in a Course of Postmodernism (Susan Mattis)

ch. 11 Liberal Education and the Teaching of Buddhism (Victor Sōgen Hori)

Part VI: The Wheel Comes to the Web

ch. 12 Teaching Buddhism by Distance Education: Traditional and Web-based Approaches (Mavis L. Fenn)

ch. 13 Academic Buddhology and the Cyber-Sangha: Researching and Teaching Buddhism on the Web (Brett Greider)

Article cover image

"Religion/s Between Covers: Dilemmas of the World Religions Textbook"

Article
MacWilliams, Waghorne, Sommer, Shattuck, et al
2005
Religious Studies Review 31, no 1 & 2 (2005): 1-36
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Teaching African American Religions

Book
Jones, Carolyn J. and Theodore Louis Trost, eds.
2005
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
BR563.N4T389 2005
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
The variety and complexity of its traditions make African American religion one of the most difficult topics in religious studies to teach to undergraduates. The sheer scope of the material to be covered is daunting to instructors, many of whom are not experts in African American religious traditions, but are called upon to include material on African American religion in courses ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
The variety and complexity of its traditions make African American religion one of the most difficult topics in religious studies to teach to undergraduates. The sheer scope of the material to be covered is daunting to instructors, many of whom are not experts in African American religious traditions, but are called upon to include material on African American religion in courses on American Religious History or the History of Christianity. Also, the unfamiliarity of the subject matter to the vast majority of students makes it difficult to achieve any depth in the brief time allotted in the survey courses where it is usually first encountered. The essays in this volume will supply functional, innovative ways to teach African American religious traditions in a variety of settings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction : mining the motherlode of African American religious experience

ch. 1 Teaching in the contact zone : the African American religions course in the large public university (Carolyn M. Jones)
ch. 2 On the plantation (Nancy A. Hardesty)
ch. 3 Border disputes : honoring our ancestors, honoring ourselves (Stephanie Y. Mitchem)
ch. 4 Incorporating the African American religious experience into the community college curriculum and classroom (Mary Jane Horton)
ch. 5 "I want to be ready!" : teaching Christian education in the African American experience (Yolanda Y. Smith)
ch. 6 "Testifying" and "testimony" : autobiographical narratives and African American religions (Moses N. Moore, Jr.)
ch. 7 Rethinking the core : African and African American religious perspectives in the seminary curriculum Edwin David Aponte)
ch. 8 Acknowledging diversity in the American Catholic experience (Bernadette McNary-Zak)
ch. 9 "Making a way out of no way" : interpreting the Praxis of the black church for theological education (Daphne C. Wiggins)
ch. 10 Tribal talk : African ancestral spirituality as a resource for wholeness (Will "Esuyemi" Coleman)
ch. 11 Teaching from the crossroads : on religious healing in African diaspora contexts in the Americas (Linda L. Barnes)
ch. 12 Teaching African American religions as learning to resist racism (Peter R. Gathje)
ch. 13 Teaching African religions at a traditionally white institution in the south (Ralph C. Watkins)
ch. 14 Watching for religion and race at the movies (Theodore Louis Trost)

Afterword : teaching the religion behind the Veil (Emilie M. Townes)
Additional Info:
This article explores congregational studies as a valuable teaching tool for contextualizing theological education across disciplines. As a form of pedagogy, congregational studies situates learning in a particular local ministry context. In addition, such a pedagogy apprentices learners within a particular "community of practice" – namely, that of professional church leaders of various types (lay, clergy, professional educators, etc.) having the knowledge and skills that allow them to read diverse contexts ...
Additional Info:
This article explores congregational studies as a valuable teaching tool for contextualizing theological education across disciplines. As a form of pedagogy, congregational studies situates learning in a particular local ministry context. In addition, such a pedagogy apprentices learners within a particular "community of practice" – namely, that of professional church leaders of various types (lay, clergy, professional educators, etc.) having the knowledge and skills that allow them to read diverse contexts of ministry and improvise appropriate and faithful strategies of action within those contexts. After describing one seminary teaching experience in which congregational studies methods formed the pedagogical framework for an interdisciplinary course on the Bible and religious education, the article puts forward a practice-based theory of adult learning to explain why congregational studies methods are particularly helpful to adult learners engaged in theological education. The article concludes by briefly addressing some problems and limitations to pedagogical processes based upon congregational studies. (The research for this article and its writing were supported by a grant from the Wabash Center for which I am deeply appreciative. An earlier version of this article was presented at the 2004 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion's Academic Teaching and the Study of Religion Section.)
Cover image

Teaching the Bible in the Church

Book
Bracke, John M. and Karen B. Tye
2003
Chalice Press, St. Louis, MO
BS600.3.B72 2003
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
John Bracke and Karen Tye, a biblical scholar and a religious educator, have come together to offer a vital new work of practical insight into the task of teaching the Bible in the church. Intended for pastors, church educators, lay teachers, and those in seminary, this book provides a blueprint for effective teaching that lead beyond just conveying information to opening oneself and the learner to transformation through the text. ...
Additional Info:
John Bracke and Karen Tye, a biblical scholar and a religious educator, have come together to offer a vital new work of practical insight into the task of teaching the Bible in the church. Intended for pastors, church educators, lay teachers, and those in seminary, this book provides a blueprint for effective teaching that lead beyond just conveying information to opening oneself and the learner to transformation through the text. It is teaching the Bible in its most faithful form, as an invitation to fully encounter the scriptures and the God who empowers transformation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Teaching the Bible: How We Learn
ch. 2 Teaching the Bible: How We Teach
ch. 3 Teaching the Bible: An Intercultural Education Experience
ch. 4 Teaching the Bible: Issues of Interpretation
ch. 5 Teaching the Bible: Putting It All Together

Notes
TTR cover image

"Teaching Liberal Arts Undergraduates about Hinduism amid Theoretical and Political Contestation Today"

TTR
Fort, Andrew O.
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 3 (2006): 148-155
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
As the number of people of South Asian heritage in America has greatly increased over recent decades, the study and teaching of Hinduism has come under ever greater scrutiny. During this time, the number of students of Indian background has vastly increased in some schools in some parts of the United States. This increased presence and scrutiny has had some salutary effects, including greater attention to and accountability in our ...
Additional Info:
As the number of people of South Asian heritage in America has greatly increased over recent decades, the study and teaching of Hinduism has come under ever greater scrutiny. During this time, the number of students of Indian background has vastly increased in some schools in some parts of the United States. This increased presence and scrutiny has had some salutary effects, including greater attention to and accountability in our field, but has also led to some unwelcome conflict and feelings of misrepresentation by both academics and adherents. Some of us are in the perplexing position of being keenly aware of and in conversation about tensions elsewhere, yet still having few (or no) Hindu students in our own classrooms. This essay will discuss two matters given this background: first, I will describe how I present Hindu religious traditions in my local context, and then I will offer some more general reflections on teaching and researching Hinduism in the United States today.
TTR cover image

"Teaching and Learning Forgiveness: A Multidimensional Approach"

TTR
Malcolm, Lois and Janet Ramsey
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 3 (2006): 148-155
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
This essay seeks to illumine the teaching and learning of the practice of forgiveness by relating a range of theoretical perspectives (theological, psychological, and socio-cultural) to the process of cultivating the practical wisdom needed for forgiveness. We discuss how a Trinitarian "epistemology of the cross" might lead one to a new way of perceiving life's constraints and possibilities and relate this theological epistemology to three psychological approaches for understanding forgiveness – ...
Additional Info:
This essay seeks to illumine the teaching and learning of the practice of forgiveness by relating a range of theoretical perspectives (theological, psychological, and socio-cultural) to the process of cultivating the practical wisdom needed for forgiveness. We discuss how a Trinitarian "epistemology of the cross" might lead one to a new way of perceiving life's constraints and possibilities and relate this theological epistemology to three psychological approaches for understanding forgiveness – a narrative approach, object-relations theory, and consciousness development theory. Our discussion of these theoretical perspectives is explicitly related to the practice of teaching and learning forgiveness, outlining learning activities we have used in a course we taught (which ranged from case studies and film to lectures and discussions based on close readings of biblical and theological texts) and reporting highlights in our students' work.
TTR cover image

"Scientology and Catholicism Do Mix: A Note on Teaching New Religions in a Catholic Classroom"

TTR
Schmalz, Mathew N.
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 1 (2006): 29-36
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Learning Designs

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This note from the classroom explores teaching new or alternative religions within the context of a Roman Catholic Liberal Arts College. The essay will specifically focus on a section of a course entitled "Modern Religious Movements" in which students were asked to consider different methodological approaches to the teaching and study of Scientology and the Catholic cult of the Virgin Mary. This note from the classroom details how this rather ...
Additional Info:
This note from the classroom explores teaching new or alternative religions within the context of a Roman Catholic Liberal Arts College. The essay will specifically focus on a section of a course entitled "Modern Religious Movements" in which students were asked to consider different methodological approaches to the teaching and study of Scientology and the Catholic cult of the Virgin Mary. This note from the classroom details how this rather unexpected comparison prompted students to reconsider the category cult and argues that encouraging self-reflexivity in a largely Catholic classroom can become a crucial means for engaging a broader discussion of new religions, cult discourse, and the academic study of religion itself.
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"Vanishing Boundaries: When Teaching About Religion Becomes Spiritual Guidance in the Classroom"

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Simmons, John K.
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 1 (2006): 37-43
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Mentoring Students   |   Faith in the Classroom

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This article revisits the pedagogical dilemma of maintaining neutrality in the religious studies/theology classroom. I argue that if the boundary between teaching about religion and actually teaching spirituality seems to be vanishing, it is because the boundary was inappropriately constructed in the first place. To the extent that the religious concepts, even when compressed into religious studies categories, inherently inspire personal transformation, how can a boundary exist between the ...
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This article revisits the pedagogical dilemma of maintaining neutrality in the religious studies/theology classroom. I argue that if the boundary between teaching about religion and actually teaching spirituality seems to be vanishing, it is because the boundary was inappropriately constructed in the first place. To the extent that the religious concepts, even when compressed into religious studies categories, inherently inspire personal transformation, how can a boundary exist between the ideas students encounter and the power of those ideas to transform? Spiritual guidance emerges naturally in the academic study of religion, and those of us who teach in the field might as well get used to it. In explaining my position, I draw on my experience as a teaching assistant in Professor Walter Capps's course, "Religion and the Impact of the Vietnam War." I, then, develop a pragmatic teaching strategy, neutral enthusiasm, which preserves the important neutrality of classroom presentation in religious studies courses, yet recognizes the unavoidable evocative power present in the intellectual territory that is religion. Neutral enthusiasm allows the content to do the work.
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"Learning to Teach Islam as a Non-Muslim in the Twin Cities"

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Burr, Elizabeth G.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 3 (2005): 155-163
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Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
In this essay I reflect on my experience thus far of teaching Islam as a non-Muslim at Metropolitan State University and at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. I begin by narrating a conversation about conversion that I had with one of my Muslim students. Then I introduce the theme of multiplicity as a way of being, teaching, and learning. The third section illustrates the ...
Additional Info:
In this essay I reflect on my experience thus far of teaching Islam as a non-Muslim at Metropolitan State University and at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. I begin by narrating a conversation about conversion that I had with one of my Muslim students. Then I introduce the theme of multiplicity as a way of being, teaching, and learning. The third section illustrates the theme of multiplicity pedagogically with reference to institutional identity, choice of textbooks, topical organization of the course, the "mosque visit" assignment, and class composition and student roles in the classroom. I conclude in the fourth section with personal reflections on multiplicity in relation to credibility and identity, politics and transformation. The essay was inspired by my realization that I embody multiple religious identities, and that one of my purposes is to build community inside and outside the classroom in an effort not only to transcend the tendency of our culture to adopt an essentialist view of Islam as suspect and alien, but also to recover Islam as a universal religion and to consider its agenda for world transformation alongside those of other religions.
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"Towards a Non-Essentialist Pedagogy of "Islam""

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Samman, Khaldoun
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 3 (2005): 164-171
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Religious Diversity

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Traversing a rock-strewn terrain of essentialist methodologies historically employed for teaching Islam, the author espouses a non-Essentialist pedagogy that combines critical reflection, analysis of historical methods, and development of an appreciation for alternative notions about Islam and global interdependence. In this essay the author contends that teaching Islam ought to avoid our and their language and instead aim at helping students think in critically reflective, creative, and relational ways so ...
Additional Info:
Traversing a rock-strewn terrain of essentialist methodologies historically employed for teaching Islam, the author espouses a non-Essentialist pedagogy that combines critical reflection, analysis of historical methods, and development of an appreciation for alternative notions about Islam and global interdependence. In this essay the author contends that teaching Islam ought to avoid our and their language and instead aim at helping students think in critically reflective, creative, and relational ways so that they might learn to "think of civilizations as transformative, reflexive, and fluid entities."
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"Approaches to Jewish Studies: Teaching a Methods Class"

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Hochman, Leah
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 2 (2005): 78-85
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Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

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Like religious studies, Jewish studies is an academic exploration of literature, ritual, history, philosophy, and experience across disciplinary boundaries. As with all area studies, Jewish studies balances itself – often precariously – as a bridge across that range of methodological options. The breadth of theories employed by each has complicated the teaching of an upper level seminar in Jewish studies. Conceived as a cross between a parade of scholars course and a ...
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Like religious studies, Jewish studies is an academic exploration of literature, ritual, history, philosophy, and experience across disciplinary boundaries. As with all area studies, Jewish studies balances itself – often precariously – as a bridge across that range of methodological options. The breadth of theories employed by each has complicated the teaching of an upper level seminar in Jewish studies. Conceived as a cross between a parade of scholars course and a senior capstone experience, the class employed the broad thematic principle of "identity." In doing so, it exposed the biases of the students, the subject, and the instructor.
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"A Non-Muslim Teaching Islam: Pedagogical and Ethical Challenges"

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Berkson, Mark
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 2 (2005): 86-98
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Religious Diversity

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This paper is a reflection on the two most significant challenges that I have faced teaching the introductory course in Islam. The first is the challenge of teaching Islam after September 11, 2001, the events of which gave rise to such pedagogical questions as how much and in what ways the course syllabus should change, and in particular how we should address issues such as extremism and terrorism. The second is the ...
Additional Info:
This paper is a reflection on the two most significant challenges that I have faced teaching the introductory course in Islam. The first is the challenge of teaching Islam after September 11, 2001, the events of which gave rise to such pedagogical questions as how much and in what ways the course syllabus should change, and in particular how we should address issues such as extremism and terrorism. The second is the challenge of being a non-Muslim teaching Islam, which raises issues of authority (particularly when there are Muslim students in the classroom). The limitations and advantages of teaching a tradition as an outsider are explored, and strategies for compensating for the limitations are suggested. The final section of the essay explores the following question: When, if ever, can (or should) we as teachers move from explaining and analyzing the positions taken by members of a tradition to criticizing them?
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"Thinking Out Loud about Teaching Bioethics: A Contribution from the Edge"

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Solberg, Mary M.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 2 (2005): 99-106
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Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals

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Teaching bioethics might be likened to a rollercoaster ride of twists, turns, and dips that invite teachers and students to experience something of their own edges of fear and comfort. Here the author provides readers with a glimpse into her distinctive approach to teaching bioethics that encourages students to move beyond boundaries of personal comfort zones by willfully transgressing traditional or comfortable boundaries. The essay describes how this is accomplished ...
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Teaching bioethics might be likened to a rollercoaster ride of twists, turns, and dips that invite teachers and students to experience something of their own edges of fear and comfort. Here the author provides readers with a glimpse into her distinctive approach to teaching bioethics that encourages students to move beyond boundaries of personal comfort zones by willfully transgressing traditional or comfortable boundaries. The essay describes how this is accomplished through a variety of methods – provocative readings, classroom discussion, student response papers, and student ethics committees. The author contends that teaching bioethics ought to include critical pedagogical methods and an alertness for real-life intersections of science and ethics. Teaching bioethics can be a subversive activity that encourages students and teachers to engage in making life morally livable.
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"Studying the Historical Jesus Through Service"

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Batten, Alicia
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 2 (2005): 107-113
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Topics: Service Learning   |   Teaching Religion

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Service learning pedagogy often assumes a variety of forms when connected with classroom teaching. Through a creative use of service learning pedagogy, the author constructs learning designs that foster student engagement with course content and prompts interrelated connections between the subjects and their own service learning experiences. The author highlights the importance of setting a context for service learning through creating activities linked to learning goals, integrating service learning components ...
Additional Info:
Service learning pedagogy often assumes a variety of forms when connected with classroom teaching. Through a creative use of service learning pedagogy, the author constructs learning designs that foster student engagement with course content and prompts interrelated connections between the subjects and their own service learning experiences. The author highlights the importance of setting a context for service learning through creating activities linked to learning goals, integrating service learning components with classroom teaching methods, and proactively engaging student apathy, resistance, and faith perspectives through specific assignments that combine experience, analysis, and subject matter. The course described in this essay directly contributed to the author's receiving the 2004 Fortress Press Award for Undergraduate Teaching.
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"The Arts, Midrash, and Biblical Teaching"

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Birch, Bruce C.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 2 (2005): 114-122
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Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

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Biblical texts have been handed on to us through a long history of interpretation. Awareness of this rich but complex process is one of the goals of biblical teaching. Since the earliest centuries of the church there has been a parallel history of artistic interaction with the biblical text. These artistic treatments of biblical subjects have had a great cultural impact and have deeply influenced public perceptions and understandings of ...
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Biblical texts have been handed on to us through a long history of interpretation. Awareness of this rich but complex process is one of the goals of biblical teaching. Since the earliest centuries of the church there has been a parallel history of artistic interaction with the biblical text. These artistic treatments of biblical subjects have had a great cultural impact and have deeply influenced public perceptions and understandings of the Bible. Unfortunately, seldom does this history of artistic interpretation become a part of Bible courses. In this paper, I reflect on learnings from a serious effort to take artistic resources and methodologies into account in teaching Hebrew Bible in a theological school. My most successful efforts have employed the ancient Jewish interpretive method of midrash. Use of midrash opens new, imaginative possibilities that can enliven and extend our usual exegesis of texts. More specifically, midrash provides the ideal category for understanding artistic interactions with biblical texts. Through midrash students can understand artists to be both profound respecters of the power and integrity of biblical texts, while at the same time extending and entering into imaginative encounter with those texts. This article will appear as a chapter in the forthcoming book Arts, Theology, and the Church: New Intersections.
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"Thinking Developmentally: The Bible, the First-Year College Student, and Diversity"

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Solvang, Elna K.
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 4 (2004): 223-229
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

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The Bible is a non-western text subject to a variety of interpretations and applications – constructive and destructive. The academic study of the Bible, therefore, requires critical thinking skills and the ability to engage with diversity. The reality is that most first-year college students have not yet developed these skills. Rather than bemoan students' lack of development, the essay explores ways of teaching and applying critical thinking within the context of ...
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The Bible is a non-western text subject to a variety of interpretations and applications – constructive and destructive. The academic study of the Bible, therefore, requires critical thinking skills and the ability to engage with diversity. The reality is that most first-year college students have not yet developed these skills. Rather than bemoan students' lack of development, the essay explores ways of teaching and applying critical thinking within the context of an introductory Religion course. The essay claims that first-year college students can better learn the content of the discipline and function in a pluralistic world if the teaching of critical thinking skills is a part of the pedagogy.
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"Preachers and Prophets: Using Film to Teach American Religious History"

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Rowe, David L.
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 4 (2004): 230-237
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Student Learning Goals

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Can students learn religious history from movies? While using film as text is likely to attract students' interest, will such a course be able to negotiate the complex intertwining of film with religion and history to provide students with more than mere entertainment? Will students respond to a challenge to move beyond a movie's surface visual experience to address the core lessons history posits: it's not always been this way, ...
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Can students learn religious history from movies? While using film as text is likely to attract students' interest, will such a course be able to negotiate the complex intertwining of film with religion and history to provide students with more than mere entertainment? Will students respond to a challenge to move beyond a movie's surface visual experience to address the core lessons history posits: it's not always been this way, we are the product of what has come before us, I/we are being called to change? This article discusses one attempt to answer these questions and examines both the opportunities and difficulties of using movies to teach religious history.
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"Teaching about Religion with Food"

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Desjardins, Michel
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 3 (2004): 153-158
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

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This article presents a particular teaching strategy that involves using food playfully in the classroom in order to change the mood, generate different forms of learning, and prod students to connect food and religion. I offer a rationale for teaching with food, then provide an application from a university course on Gnosticism. My goal is to encourage college and university teachers of religion to take food, and play, more seriously ...
Additional Info:
This article presents a particular teaching strategy that involves using food playfully in the classroom in order to change the mood, generate different forms of learning, and prod students to connect food and religion. I offer a rationale for teaching with food, then provide an application from a university course on Gnosticism. My goal is to encourage college and university teachers of religion to take food, and play, more seriously in their teaching.
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"Beyond the "Critical" Curtain: Community-based Service Learning in an African Context"

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West, Gerald Oakley
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 2 (2004): 71-82
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Topics: Service Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Alternative Classrooms

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A case of community-based service learning in the School of Theology at the University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa is analyzed for what it means to teach biblical studies in an African context where biblical scholarship is partially constituted by ordinary African readers of the Bible and where context is a central pedagogical concept. Reflecting on a series of experiments over the past ten years in two second-year University level ...
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A case of community-based service learning in the School of Theology at the University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa is analyzed for what it means to teach biblical studies in an African context where biblical scholarship is partially constituted by ordinary African readers of the Bible and where context is a central pedagogical concept. Reflecting on a series of experiments over the past ten years in two second-year University level modules, the article analyzes the contours of a partnership between the academy and local communities of the poor, working-class, and marginalized through community-based service learning. This partnership provides a form of contextualization that enables students to integrate the forms of engagement with the Bible they bring to their formal theological studies and the forms of critical distance that characterize the discipline of biblical studies.
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"Confronting Ghosts of the Christ-Haunted South: Teaching Theology through Teaching Story Lawanda Smith"

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Smith, Lawanda
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 2 (2004): 95-100
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals

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Southern fiction writer Flannery O'Connor once characterized the South as Christ-haunted, and having taught in the South for eight years now, I have come to appreciate O'Connor's evaluation. Most of the students I encounter understand one predominant way to practice Christian faith: assent to propositional theology. Most of them either accept this view uncritically or reject Christian thought completely, seeing it as stifling. My goal is to introduce the diversity ...
Additional Info:
Southern fiction writer Flannery O'Connor once characterized the South as Christ-haunted, and having taught in the South for eight years now, I have come to appreciate O'Connor's evaluation. Most of the students I encounter understand one predominant way to practice Christian faith: assent to propositional theology. Most of them either accept this view uncritically or reject Christian thought completely, seeing it as stifling. My goal is to introduce the diversity of Christian thought in a non-threatening way. Knowing story's potential to draw people into community as well as to transform consciousness, I believe story offers a less threatening way to invite students to explore diversity. This paper describes a course titled "Christian Thought and Contemporary Short Fiction," a course I developed to try to introduce students to a variety of ways to understand Christian thought and practice Christian faith. The paper describes development and facilitation of the course, including student responses to the course content and evaluation of the course.
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"A Pedagogy of Dealienation: A Case Study in the Application of Peter Berger's The Sacred Canopy"

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Chance, J. Bradley
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 2 (2004): 101-107
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Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

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This paper explores the use of Peter Berger's theory of religion and its features of alienation and dealienation to lead students to the critical awareness of the role that human beings play in the construction of social worlds, including most especially our religious worlds. After summarizing Berger's theory of the alienating and potentially dealienating capacity of religion, the paper describes how the author used the study of certain biblical texts, ...
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This paper explores the use of Peter Berger's theory of religion and its features of alienation and dealienation to lead students to the critical awareness of the role that human beings play in the construction of social worlds, including most especially our religious worlds. After summarizing Berger's theory of the alienating and potentially dealienating capacity of religion, the paper describes how the author used the study of certain biblical texts, the Wisdom of Solomon and the pericope of the controversy over clean and unclean foods, as presented in both Matthew and Mark, to explore both the alienating and dealienating aspects of religion as presented in these selected biblical texts. The paper also describes how the author encouraged students to embrace as the most responsible stance a dealienating stance toward religion, especially one's own.
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"Teaching Students to Interpret Religious Poetry (and to Expand their Avenues of Thinking)"

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Jacobson, Rolf A.
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 1 (2004): 38-44
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

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Teaching religion and theology requires interpretation of the vast corpus of religious poetry that is found in every religious tradition, but students are generally ill-equipped to interpret this material. Therefore teachers would do well to teach the students how to interpret religious poetry. This article discusses some of the challenges of teaching this material to students and discusses techniques and exercises that have been found useful in teaching students how ...
Additional Info:
Teaching religion and theology requires interpretation of the vast corpus of religious poetry that is found in every religious tradition, but students are generally ill-equipped to interpret this material. Therefore teachers would do well to teach the students how to interpret religious poetry. This article discusses some of the challenges of teaching this material to students and discusses techniques and exercises that have been found useful in teaching students how to navigate the terrain of religious poetry.
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"Enhancing the Learning and Retention of Biblical Languages for Adult Students"

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Morse, MaryKate
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 1 (2004): 45-50
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Adult Learners   |   Cognitive Development

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Finding ways to reduce students' anxiety and maximize the value of learning Greek and Hebrew is a continual challenge for biblical language teachers. Some language teachers use technology tools such as web sites or CDs with audio lessons to improve the experience. Though these tools are helpful, this paper explores the value gained from understanding first how students learn and then how technology tools best support that learning. Developments in ...
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Finding ways to reduce students' anxiety and maximize the value of learning Greek and Hebrew is a continual challenge for biblical language teachers. Some language teachers use technology tools such as web sites or CDs with audio lessons to improve the experience. Though these tools are helpful, this paper explores the value gained from understanding first how students learn and then how technology tools best support that learning. Developments in cognitive psychology and neuroscience offer many insights concerning adult learning and retention. After a presentation of key insights, several ideas are suggested for enhancing the learning and retention experience of biblical language students.
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"Can Communicative Methods Enhance Ancient Language Acquisition?"

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Overland, Paul
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 1 (2004): 51-57
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

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For several years the field of Second Language Acquisition has benefited from methods associated with communicative language learning. However, these benefits have largely been overlooked when teaching ancient languages, likely because the objective for ancient languages is literacy, not oral fluency. This article outlines an experiment that capitalized on communicative language methods to accelerate literacy for beginning students of Biblical Hebrew.
Additional Info:
For several years the field of Second Language Acquisition has benefited from methods associated with communicative language learning. However, these benefits have largely been overlooked when teaching ancient languages, likely because the objective for ancient languages is literacy, not oral fluency. This article outlines an experiment that capitalized on communicative language methods to accelerate literacy for beginning students of Biblical Hebrew.
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"Teaching Religion in Its Contemporary Contexts: A Case Study"

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Gravett, Sandra L.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 4 (2003): 198-201
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Student Learning Goals

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After the disheartening results of an informal investigation of content knowledge and reading comprehension among her students, the author ponders the implications for her teaching objectives. What are we, as educators in religious studies, really teaching and how are we doing it? How are we accommodating students with less traditionally honed academic skills without diminishing content? She describes her experiments with several new teaching strategies for enhancing student learning by ...
Additional Info:
After the disheartening results of an informal investigation of content knowledge and reading comprehension among her students, the author ponders the implications for her teaching objectives. What are we, as educators in religious studies, really teaching and how are we doing it? How are we accommodating students with less traditionally honed academic skills without diminishing content? She describes her experiments with several new teaching strategies for enhancing student learning by helping them improve basic skills, develop cultural literacy, and relate course content to their personal experience.
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"Pedagogy and Practice: Using Wisdom Ways in the Classroom"

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Fiorenza, Elisabeth Schüssler
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 4 (2003): 208-210
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

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The Academic Teaching and Biblical Studies Section of the Society of Biblical Literature chose Wisdom Ways, by Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, as the basis for a discussion on teaching at its November 1902 meeting in Toronto. Each presenter commented on the underlying pedagogy of the book, sharing exercises and assignments they had used in their classrooms to help students interpret the materials, especially from a feminist and/or liberationist perspective. Adapted ...
Additional Info:
The Academic Teaching and Biblical Studies Section of the Society of Biblical Literature chose Wisdom Ways, by Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, as the basis for a discussion on teaching at its November 1902 meeting in Toronto. Each presenter commented on the underlying pedagogy of the book, sharing exercises and assignments they had used in their classrooms to help students interpret the materials, especially from a feminist and/or liberationist perspective. Adapted from the SBL presentations, this is a different type of review essay that describes the use of a book in three different settings: a free-standing seminary, a state university, and a university-affiliated divinity school. These three distinct contexts are in turn the settings for three individual pedagogical styles. The result is a conversation among author, teachers, text, and students that illustrates the interplay of teaching, learning, and context.
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"Transformational Travel for Seminarians: Reading James in Haiti"

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Grieb, A. Katherine
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 151-158
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Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Alternative Classrooms

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How will we teach the Bible in the twenty-first century? This essay is intended to contribute to that larger discussion in three ways: after a brief introduction, I will, first, state some general working assumptions about the present situation of the church and about teaching the New Testament in the context of a seminary or divinity school; second, I will describe the course "Reading James in Haiti" which I designed ...
Additional Info:
How will we teach the Bible in the twenty-first century? This essay is intended to contribute to that larger discussion in three ways: after a brief introduction, I will, first, state some general working assumptions about the present situation of the church and about teaching the New Testament in the context of a seminary or divinity school; second, I will describe the course "Reading James in Haiti" which I designed and taught in the Spring of 2002; finally, and much more briefly, I will comment on the implications of transformational travel experiences like this one for the ability of seminarians to understand New Testament texts more deeply than the classroom setting allows.
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"Doing It Differently: Unleashing Student Creativity"

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O'Donovan, Theresa
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 159-163
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Assessing Students

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Student assignments and assessment – is there life beyond the ten-page essay? Drawing on the theory of multiple intelligences and experience with an assignment in which students were asked to address course content in anything but an essay, the author considers the challenges and virtues of a creative format that does not rely exclusively on linguistic intelligence. The process, presentations, and evaluative approach employed in an assignment that called upon student ...
Additional Info:
Student assignments and assessment – is there life beyond the ten-page essay? Drawing on the theory of multiple intelligences and experience with an assignment in which students were asked to address course content in anything but an essay, the author considers the challenges and virtues of a creative format that does not rely exclusively on linguistic intelligence. The process, presentations, and evaluative approach employed in an assignment that called upon student creativity in a "Women and the Bible" course are described, and pedagogical and practical considerations explored. The analysis of a particularly memorable student submission reveals layers of complexity seldom achieved in a conventional essay format.
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"Teaching Music in the Seminary"

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Yardley, Anne Bagnall
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 169-175
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Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Teaching music in certain seminary contexts poses particular challenges for teaching and learning. The theme of disjuncture between teacher and student in courses that aim to incorporate music in the seminary curriculum are more vital than ever before because of the extreme cultural diversity of our population and integral nature of music in the worship life of religious communities. This essay tackles the difficulties associated with teaching worship music in ...
Additional Info:
Teaching music in certain seminary contexts poses particular challenges for teaching and learning. The theme of disjuncture between teacher and student in courses that aim to incorporate music in the seminary curriculum are more vital than ever before because of the extreme cultural diversity of our population and integral nature of music in the worship life of religious communities. This essay tackles the difficulties associated with teaching worship music in seminaries where there are a plurality of religious traditions represented and a host of expectations held by diverse student bodies about what connotes worship music. Topics addressed include issues concerning terminology, repertoire, pedagogical methods for teaching worship music, and current issues in church music.
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"Rethinking the Educational Practices of Biblical Doctoral Studies"

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Fiorenza, Elisabeth Schüssler
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 65-75
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Mentoring Students   |   Changes in Higher Education

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The paper explores the impact of the change in populations, the impact of electronic communication, and the multiplicity of methodological approaches on the ethos and practices of biblical studies. It proposes a rhetorical emancipatory educational paradigm and explores its possibilities for the professional education of biblical scholars on the doctoral level. Since both college and seminary teachers are shaped in and through their doctoral studies, it is necessary to focus ...
Additional Info:
The paper explores the impact of the change in populations, the impact of electronic communication, and the multiplicity of methodological approaches on the ethos and practices of biblical studies. It proposes a rhetorical emancipatory educational paradigm and explores its possibilities for the professional education of biblical scholars on the doctoral level. Since both college and seminary teachers are shaped in and through their doctoral studies, it is necessary to focus on doctoral education in order to address the growing recognition that the discipline of biblical studies in its present form needs to cultivate transformative intellectuals who are not only at home in the academy but also can critically intervene in the public discourses and uses of the Bible in religious communities, democratic publics, or global inter-religious relations.
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"As If Religion Matters: Teaching the Introductory Course as if it Does"

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Thompson, Deanna A.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 85-92
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Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This essay chronicles the academic odyssey of a young professor who sets out to revise the department's Introduction to Religion course only to realize that she must first clarify her vocational commitments before she can create a teachable course. She is convinced through working with many students who express disdain or even hostility toward the subject matter that she wants to model a relationship to the subject matter that says ...
Additional Info:
This essay chronicles the academic odyssey of a young professor who sets out to revise the department's Introduction to Religion course only to realize that she must first clarify her vocational commitments before she can create a teachable course. She is convinced through working with many students who express disdain or even hostility toward the subject matter that she wants to model a relationship to the subject matter that says religion matters, but is uncertain how to do this. After an autobiographical foray into her academic upbringing in active learning, the author articulates four values to model in her teaching: personal relevance, academic responsibility, ethics, and community. The author then engages current scholarship in active learning, and narrates the process of translating those four values into concrete course goals and particular assignments. The essay concludes with an assessment of teaching the revised course.
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"Making the Most of a Good Story: Effective Use of Film as a Teaching Resource for Ethics"

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Marshall, Ellen Ott
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 93-98
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Many faculty members reach for powerful clips or entire films to give background information to a topic or to provoke discussion. We do this because we have a sense that such materials engage students in a way that more theoretical texts, speculative discussions, or even case studies do not. In the field of ethics, however, one meets resistance to employing narratives that are too engaging. The wary ethicist doubts that ...
Additional Info:
Many faculty members reach for powerful clips or entire films to give background information to a topic or to provoke discussion. We do this because we have a sense that such materials engage students in a way that more theoretical texts, speculative discussions, or even case studies do not. In the field of ethics, however, one meets resistance to employing narratives that are too engaging. The wary ethicist doubts that a medium that manipulates the viewer, engages the emotions, and elicits a personal connection to the characters is the best resource for ethical reflection. This paper argues that film, like other narrative forms, is indeed an appropriate medium for teaching ethics and suggests methods for doing so effectively.
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"Stacking the Deck to Teach Methodological Parallels in Science and Religion"

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Gathman, Allen and Andrew Pratt
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 99-104
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This essay describes an introductory class exercise to help prepare students to critically examine both religious beliefs and scientific findings. Using a published pedagogical exercise originally designed to teach Popperian falsificationism and modified to encompass a variety of schools of thought about hypothesis testing, the paper explores how groups of students utilized assigned philosophical approaches such as neojustificationism, falsificationism, or conventionalism. A description of the exercise and some of the ...
Additional Info:
This essay describes an introductory class exercise to help prepare students to critically examine both religious beliefs and scientific findings. Using a published pedagogical exercise originally designed to teach Popperian falsificationism and modified to encompass a variety of schools of thought about hypothesis testing, the paper explores how groups of students utilized assigned philosophical approaches such as neojustificationism, falsificationism, or conventionalism. A description of the exercise and some of the learning outcomes are included.
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"Ethnography as Pedagogy: Learning and Teaching in a Religion Department Internship Class"

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Patterson, Barbara A. B.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 1 (2003): 24-34
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Internships and other experiential education courses in Religious Studies departments particularly benefit from careful pedagogical preparation. In addition to the usual components of conceptual content and skills, these courses require knowledge about and understanding of human communication and interaction and organizational function. To be successfully collaborative in the classroom and with Community Partners for learning and service, students and teachers need tools for participant observation, integration of data and response, ...
Additional Info:
Internships and other experiential education courses in Religious Studies departments particularly benefit from careful pedagogical preparation. In addition to the usual components of conceptual content and skills, these courses require knowledge about and understanding of human communication and interaction and organizational function. To be successfully collaborative in the classroom and with Community Partners for learning and service, students and teachers need tools for participant observation, integration of data and response, and reflection. This article proposes and discusses using 10 strategies of ethnography as a pedagogical frame. Developed in an internship class, these ten tools are demonstrated through teacher discussion and reflection and students' written work. Specific connections to the field of Religious Studies are highlighted. The article is written in the hopes of stimulating additional conversations on how experiential learning and teaching, specifically the use of ethnography, can be effectively and appropriately used in Religious Studies courses.
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"Reading Images in the Religious Studies Classroom"

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Engler, Steven and Irene Naested
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 3 (2002): 161-168
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This note presents a method for teaching students to analyze and interpret images in the religious studies classroom. The technique uses two separate exercises: first analyzing images as works of art and then as conveyors of discipline-specific information. Drawing on the work of Edmund Feldman, our technique grounds interpretation in a methodical description of the basic components and characteristics of images. By helping students to conceptualize the formal qualities of ...
Additional Info:
This note presents a method for teaching students to analyze and interpret images in the religious studies classroom. The technique uses two separate exercises: first analyzing images as works of art and then as conveyors of discipline-specific information. Drawing on the work of Edmund Feldman, our technique grounds interpretation in a methodical description of the basic components and characteristics of images. By helping students to conceptualize the formal qualities of an image as a first exercise, this technique allows them to more confidently address the challenging task of relating aspects of a given image with key concepts of religious studies. This simple first step toward interpreting religious images can help students profit more from texts, videos, lectures, field trips, and further studies in the field.
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"Wading Through the Quagmire of Religious History"

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McNary-Zak, Bernadette
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 2 (2002): 66-70
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
How should we teach religious history? What is the impact of our methodology on what, and on how, our students learn? Is there a methodology that cultivates an awareness of the multiculturalism and the need for deeper social interaction that characterizes many of our classrooms? This essay proposes and briefly explores the potential value of empathetic engagement as a pedagogical tool in response to these concerns. A specific application of ...
Additional Info:
How should we teach religious history? What is the impact of our methodology on what, and on how, our students learn? Is there a methodology that cultivates an awareness of the multiculturalism and the need for deeper social interaction that characterizes many of our classrooms? This essay proposes and briefly explores the potential value of empathetic engagement as a pedagogical tool in response to these concerns. A specific application of empathetic engagement is made to teaching and learning about the history of American Catholicism.
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"Teaching Pilgrims to Walk"

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Webb-Mitchell, Brett
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 2 (2002): 105-112
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Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Alternative Classrooms

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The creation and implementation of a Christian theological seminary course, "The Education of Christian Pilgrims," in which the purpose was to prepare students to teach members of a church to be and become a consciously "pilgrim Church." This article describes the genesis of the course, creating a syllabus, the actual pilgrimage undertaken by students and professor, and suggested modifications.
Additional Info:
The creation and implementation of a Christian theological seminary course, "The Education of Christian Pilgrims," in which the purpose was to prepare students to teach members of a church to be and become a consciously "pilgrim Church." This article describes the genesis of the course, creating a syllabus, the actual pilgrimage undertaken by students and professor, and suggested modifications.
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"Discoveries and Dangers in Teaching Theology with PowerPoint"

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Pauw, Amy Plantinga
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 1 (2002): 39-41
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Lectures and Large Classes

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PowerPoint can be a genuine aid to theological education by providing a medium for employing visual art in the classroom. But PowerPoint does not and should not replace the ordinary stuff of teaching and learning theology: reading, lecturing, discussing texts, and writing papers. Like any other tool, its pedagogical benefit depends on discerning use. Particular care must be used to blunt PowerPoint's tendency to produce a disembodied, decontextualized learning environment. ...
Additional Info:
PowerPoint can be a genuine aid to theological education by providing a medium for employing visual art in the classroom. But PowerPoint does not and should not replace the ordinary stuff of teaching and learning theology: reading, lecturing, discussing texts, and writing papers. Like any other tool, its pedagogical benefit depends on discerning use. Particular care must be used to blunt PowerPoint's tendency to produce a disembodied, decontextualized learning environment. Using PowerPoint to incorporate art into theology classes is not merely a strategy for making verbal points more powerfully. Art can sometimes go where theological words cannot.
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"Ancient Christianity in Cyberspace: A Digital Media Lab for Students"

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Royalty, Robert M.
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 1 (2002): 42-48
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Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
"Ancient Christianity, Ancient Cities – and Cyberspace?" was a teaching experiment combining the study of theology, religion, history, and new computer technologies. The course included both a regular class meeting and a concurrent digital media lab. All student assignments were digital. Students came in with a wide variety of technical knowledge and backgrounds in classical and religious studies. In addition to learning about the history and theology of early Christianity, students ...
Additional Info:
"Ancient Christianity, Ancient Cities – and Cyberspace?" was a teaching experiment combining the study of theology, religion, history, and new computer technologies. The course included both a regular class meeting and a concurrent digital media lab. All student assignments were digital. Students came in with a wide variety of technical knowledge and backgrounds in classical and religious studies. In addition to learning about the history and theology of early Christianity, students became critical learners of technology within the ideal of a liberal arts education.
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"Critical Encounters with Rabbinic Doctrines of Creation: The Teacher as Source of Authority or as Partner in Dialogue"

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Goshen-Gottstein, Alon
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 3 (2001): 155-165
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

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This is a case study based upon my experience of teaching an introduction to rabbinic thought to a group of Orthodox Jewish students. The study of one particular midrashic pericope allowed for major tensions between academic and religious approaches to the text to surface. The tension revolved around the apparent contradiction between the rabbinic mythical perception of creation as proceeding from primary negative matter and later philosophical belief in creatio ...
Additional Info:
This is a case study based upon my experience of teaching an introduction to rabbinic thought to a group of Orthodox Jewish students. The study of one particular midrashic pericope allowed for major tensions between academic and religious approaches to the text to surface. The tension revolved around the apparent contradiction between the rabbinic mythical perception of creation as proceeding from primary negative matter and later philosophical belief in creatio ex nihilo. This contradiction touches upon issues of authority and of interpretation. The article explores various strategies dealing with issues of authority in general and of the meaning of the individual text in particular. Following a presentation of these strategies I offer my reflections upon my role as a teacher in this context. Dialogue emerges as an important element in the teaching process, creating a common ground between teachers and students and making them partners in a common quest for the truth of the text. Traditional dialogical modes of Jewish learning serve as the basis for the introduction of the academic agenda. This agenda is introduced as an extension of classical religious concerns rather than as an alternative to them.
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"Study Abroad: Teaching Christology in an Area of Conflict"

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Barclift, Philip L.
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 3 (2001): 166-173
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

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Theological study abroad programs in countries like Israel can actually benefit from the political tensions in those countries when the tensions are treated with due caution and when the course is designed to account for them. Focusing on Israel as its test case, this article offers suggestions for ensuring safety in countries of conflict. At the same time, it lays the groundwork for assuring a balanced approach to studying the ...
Additional Info:
Theological study abroad programs in countries like Israel can actually benefit from the political tensions in those countries when the tensions are treated with due caution and when the course is designed to account for them. Focusing on Israel as its test case, this article offers suggestions for ensuring safety in countries of conflict. At the same time, it lays the groundwork for assuring a balanced approach to studying the present conflict in Israel within the framework of a course in christology while addressing the demands of Seattle University's Catholic Jesuit philosophy.
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"Using the Wesleyan Quadrilateral to Teach Biblical Studies in Christian Liberal Arts Colleges"

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Cosby, Michael R.
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 2 (2001): 71-80
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

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Biblical studies professors in Christian liberal arts colleges typically face greater hostility from students nurtured in fundamentalist churches than they do from those who attend mainline churches. Guiding them through their first academic study of the Bible poses many challenges. To avoid the course becoming a battlefield, and to facilitate integration on a higher level, the Wesleyan Quadrilateral provides a middle way between right-wing and left-wing extremes. This approach gives ...
Additional Info:
Biblical studies professors in Christian liberal arts colleges typically face greater hostility from students nurtured in fundamentalist churches than they do from those who attend mainline churches. Guiding them through their first academic study of the Bible poses many challenges. To avoid the course becoming a battlefield, and to facilitate integration on a higher level, the Wesleyan Quadrilateral provides a middle way between right-wing and left-wing extremes. This approach gives priority to the Bible as the primary source for determining theology and practice, but relies heavily on tradition, reason, and experience as well. It also promotes interaction with the spiritual, moral, and ethical concerns expressed in the biblical texts. To adopt the Quadrilateral involves active concern for character formation, inspiring students to become better people. If we merely dispense historical-critical or literary information without considering contemporary relevance, we bore students and fail in our duties as educators.
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"Problem-based Learning in Biblical Studies: Reflections from Classroom Experience"

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Harding, James E.
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 2 (2001): 89-97
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Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

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This article reflects critically on the introduction of a form of problem-based learning into a first-year Hebrew course. It begins by outlining the problems inherent in the way this course had previously been taught, and proceeds to consider the factors that needed to be taken into account in developing a solution. In particular, the need to develop a course that promotes deep rather than surface learning is emphasized. A description ...
Additional Info:
This article reflects critically on the introduction of a form of problem-based learning into a first-year Hebrew course. It begins by outlining the problems inherent in the way this course had previously been taught, and proceeds to consider the factors that needed to be taken into account in developing a solution. In particular, the need to develop a course that promotes deep rather than surface learning is emphasized. A description is then given of problem-based learning and the advantages it offers. An account of problem-based learning in the context of the Hebrew course is given, followed by critical reflections based on comments put forward by students involved with the course and the teacher's reflective partners. Without ignoring the problems presented by problem-based learning, this article defends this educative strategy on the basis that it stimulates student motivation and promotes deep learning on a number of levels.
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"Teaching Buddhism in the Postmodern University: Understanding, Critique, Evaluation"

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Reynolds, Frank E.
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 1 (2001): 9-14
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Student Learning Goals

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A contemporary liberal education in the humanities and social sciences should introduce students to the serious exploration of various kinds of worlds that human beings articulate and within which they live. Teachers in Buddhist studies can make a significant contribution by offering courses that focus attention on distinctively Buddhist worlds that are directly relevant to postmodern interests and concerns. These courses should also be designed to empower students with the ...
Additional Info:
A contemporary liberal education in the humanities and social sciences should introduce students to the serious exploration of various kinds of worlds that human beings articulate and within which they live. Teachers in Buddhist studies can make a significant contribution by offering courses that focus attention on distinctively Buddhist worlds that are directly relevant to postmodern interests and concerns. These courses should also be designed to empower students with the kind of interpretive skills that are needed in a postmodern environment to generate viable modes of sympathetic understanding, convincing forms of critical analysis, and the capacity to formulate and defend responsible personal and social judgments. This article is a revised version of the keynote lecture given at a McGill University conference on "Teaching Buddhism: The State of the Art," October 8–10, 1999.
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"New Testament Scholarship and the "Jesus Seminar""

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Denzey, Nicola
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 1 (2001): 23-26
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This classroom exercise developed out of an effort to make the methodology and practical techniques of our field come alive for students of New Testament at a variety of undergraduate levels. Adapting the controversial "voting" technique of the Westar Institute's "Jesus Seminar," students vote with colored beads on the authenticity of Jesus' sayings in Matthew's Beatitudes (Matt. 5:3–12). The point of the exercise is not to judge or dismiss Biblical text, ...
Additional Info:
This classroom exercise developed out of an effort to make the methodology and practical techniques of our field come alive for students of New Testament at a variety of undergraduate levels. Adapting the controversial "voting" technique of the Westar Institute's "Jesus Seminar," students vote with colored beads on the authenticity of Jesus' sayings in Matthew's Beatitudes (Matt. 5:3–12). The point of the exercise is not to judge or dismiss Biblical text, but to work actively and thoughtfully with the critical tools and methods of New Testament scholarship, to ponder the implications of academic assessments of "authenticity" when it comes to Biblical text, and to stimulate discussion concerning how we, as professional scholars of the Bible, approach the Gospels.
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"The Tao of Textbooks: Taoism in Introductory World Religion Texts"

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Dippmann, Jeffrey
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 1 (2001): 40-54
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Topics: Teaching Religion

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Despite an abundance of new pedagogical techniques and technological innovations, textbooks remain a vital part of education at the secondary and post-secondary levels. Students generally accept the authority of their texts, at times believing them to be more reliable than the instructor. Consequently, we must be confident that the presentation of religious traditions is both accurate and balanced. This is particularly true for Taoism, which has become increasingly popular and ...
Additional Info:
Despite an abundance of new pedagogical techniques and technological innovations, textbooks remain a vital part of education at the secondary and post-secondary levels. Students generally accept the authority of their texts, at times believing them to be more reliable than the instructor. Consequently, we must be confident that the presentation of religious traditions is both accurate and balanced. This is particularly true for Taoism, which has become increasingly popular and popularized. Following up Russell Kirkland's Note from the Classroom in the June 1998 issue of this journal, "Teaching Taoism in the 1990s," this study examines the coverage of Taoism in the thirteen most widely used Introductory World Religion textbooks. Through a quantitative analysis of the accounts, we can determine which texts give our students the most responsible description of a long misunderstood tradition. This review focuses on the amount of text devoted to (1) "religious" and "philosophical" Taoism, (2) the Tao Te Ching and Chuang Tzu, (3) quotations and sources, (4) Taoist schools, (5) women, and (6) morality.
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"After the Facts: Alternative Student Evaluation for Active Learning Pedagogies in the Undergraduate Biblical Studies Classroom"

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Aspan, Paul F. and Faith Kirkham Hawkins
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 3 (2000): 133-151
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

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After laying a theoretical basis for an active learning orientation in the classroom, the co-authors describe methods they developed to evaluate active learning in two different settings of introductory courses in biblical studies. They argue that honoring diverse learning and communication styles among students does not need to compromise academic rigor. The authors show how portfolio-based assessment of student learning allows students a range of ways to demonstrate their mastery ...
Additional Info:
After laying a theoretical basis for an active learning orientation in the classroom, the co-authors describe methods they developed to evaluate active learning in two different settings of introductory courses in biblical studies. They argue that honoring diverse learning and communication styles among students does not need to compromise academic rigor. The authors show how portfolio-based assessment of student learning allows students a range of ways to demonstrate their mastery of the material. Examples are provided of components of student portfolios from their undergraduate classes.
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"American Scripture and Christian Scripture: The Use of Analogy to Introduce the Critical Study of the Bible"

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Chance, J. Bradley
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 3 (2000): 157-163
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Topics: Teaching Religion

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This paper explores the use of analogy to introduce students to the critical study of scripture. It describes how Pauline Maier's book American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence can offer students an analogous framework for critical study of the Bible. Maier examines four features, necessary to make good sense of this piece of 'American scripture': its historical background, its genre, its process of composition, including the editing of sources, ...
Additional Info:
This paper explores the use of analogy to introduce students to the critical study of scripture. It describes how Pauline Maier's book American Scripture: Making the Declaration of Independence can offer students an analogous framework for critical study of the Bible. Maier examines four features, necessary to make good sense of this piece of 'American scripture': its historical background, its genre, its process of composition, including the editing of sources, and the subsequent reception of the text. Professors can apply her method for studying the Declaration to introduce students to what a critical study of scripture entails: historical backgrounds, genres, composition, and subsequent reception by later readers.
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"Teaching Students by Having Students Teach: Dealing with the 'Problem' Sections of a Course"

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Bohmbach, Karla G.
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 3 (2000): 170-176
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Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

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The author describes a positive turnaround that occurred in working with both the Prophets unit of her Hebrew Bible course and the Paul unit in her New Testament course. She initiated this turnaround by challenging the students to take over the teaching of those units through small group presentations. The emphasis on length and creativity in these presentations prompted some exemplary work on the part of students. And students now ...
Additional Info:
The author describes a positive turnaround that occurred in working with both the Prophets unit of her Hebrew Bible course and the Paul unit in her New Testament course. She initiated this turnaround by challenging the students to take over the teaching of those units through small group presentations. The emphasis on length and creativity in these presentations prompted some exemplary work on the part of students. And students now identify these units as both the most memorable of the course and where their most effective learning takes place.
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"Match or Mismatch? Attempting a Feminist Pedagogy for a Course on Biblical Criticisms"

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McKinlay, Judith E.
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 2 (2000): 88-95
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
This paper reports on a project undertaken as part of a wider group exploration of feminist pedagogy. It reflects on the issues this raised in teaching a course on contemporary biblical criticisms, an area of biblical studies where questions of power and ideology are frequently asked of texts. The project therefore asked the question whether there was a match or mismatch between the teaching process and the content of the ...
Additional Info:
This paper reports on a project undertaken as part of a wider group exploration of feminist pedagogy. It reflects on the issues this raised in teaching a course on contemporary biblical criticisms, an area of biblical studies where questions of power and ideology are frequently asked of texts. The project therefore asked the question whether there was a match or mismatch between the teaching process and the content of the course. Of particular concern was the understanding of the role of the teacher, the lecturer's 'what am I doing in this class?' question. The move to open up the student space led to the matter of boundaries. Who decides upon and regulates the limits of what can be discussed? What allows trust in a class and how does one deal with feelings and emotions? This paper engages the class members on all these issues, drawing on their comments gained from the questionnaire that was part of the project design.
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"Metaphorical Mapping: The Arts in Graduate Theological Education"

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Vann, Jane Rogers
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 2 (2000): 103-107
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Doctoral students in Bible, theology, ethics, history, preaching, worship, pastoral care, and Christian education come together for a required seminar in teaching. Assignments include reading and discussion, student-led teaching demonstrations, and the 'metaphorical mapping' of each student's field of study. In developing their 'metaphorical maps' students use artistic and expressive media to demonstrate their understanding of their field. The assignment has been successful in establishing an open and mutually respectful ...
Additional Info:
Doctoral students in Bible, theology, ethics, history, preaching, worship, pastoral care, and Christian education come together for a required seminar in teaching. Assignments include reading and discussion, student-led teaching demonstrations, and the 'metaphorical mapping' of each student's field of study. In developing their 'metaphorical maps' students use artistic and expressive media to demonstrate their understanding of their field. The assignment has been successful in establishing an open and mutually respectful climate in the classroom, in fostering a pattern of critical reflection on teaching, and in demonstrating appropriate inclusion of personal experience in the academic classroom.
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"Using Legal Materials in Teaching Religion"

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Sullivan, Winnifred Fallers
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 1 (2000): 33-41
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Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
This note argues for the importance of using primary legal sources, trial transcripts, opinions, law codes, and so forth, in teaching religion. The advantages of using legal documents in the religious studies classroom include: highlighting the importance of church/state issues, the existential givenness of law for religion; serving as mini-ethnographies, a slice-of-life view of religion; and, displaying a range of voices about a particular event, tradition, or idea. The ...
Additional Info:
This note argues for the importance of using primary legal sources, trial transcripts, opinions, law codes, and so forth, in teaching religion. The advantages of using legal documents in the religious studies classroom include: highlighting the importance of church/state issues, the existential givenness of law for religion; serving as mini-ethnographies, a slice-of-life view of religion; and, displaying a range of voices about a particular event, tradition, or idea. The note also describes two possible courses, an introductory course in American religion and a seminar in religion and law, listing recommended sample materials and showing how legal documents could be used in the classroom.
Additional Info:
In an effort to create a context in which my students might have the opportunity to touch, and to be touched by, the richness, texture, and power of different religious worlds, I have experimented throughout the years with a wide variety of experiential and participatory exercises in the classroom. For example, the students and I (at times with the assistance of an invited expert practitioner) have drummed, danced, gone on ...
Additional Info:
In an effort to create a context in which my students might have the opportunity to touch, and to be touched by, the richness, texture, and power of different religious worlds, I have experimented throughout the years with a wide variety of experiential and participatory exercises in the classroom. For example, the students and I (at times with the assistance of an invited expert practitioner) have drummed, danced, gone on shamanic journeys, made masks, done tai chi and hatha yoga, performed dhikr, engaged in mythic psychodramas, practiced different styles of meditation, and so on. In this paper, I examine some of the difficulties and rewards of utilizing these techniques within a university setting. I also explore some of the ways in which a willingness to incorporate these types of exercises into the classroom challenges several current academic pedagogical assumptions.
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"Teaching the Prophetic Marriage Metaphor Texts"

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Day, Linda
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 3 (1999): 173-179
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Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
This article considers those passages in the prophetic writings of the Hebrew Bible that present the relationship between God and the people by means of a metaphor of a man and his promiscuous female partner. It reflects upon how these texts may fruitfully be taught in a seminary or college introductory Bible course, arguing that they should be included in the curriculum and not ignored. Practical recommendations of methods for ...
Additional Info:
This article considers those passages in the prophetic writings of the Hebrew Bible that present the relationship between God and the people by means of a metaphor of a man and his promiscuous female partner. It reflects upon how these texts may fruitfully be taught in a seminary or college introductory Bible course, arguing that they should be included in the curriculum and not ignored. Practical recommendations of methods for presenting such biblical passages in the classroom are suggested.
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"Liberal Theology and Transformative Pedagogy"

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Hodgson, Peter C.
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 2 (1999): 65-76
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
The author makes a case for the contributions of liberal theology to the transformative pedagogy that is essential for the flourishing of human beings in the twenty-first century. First he advocates the retention of liberal theology, but in a postmodern form that is open, critical, experiential, visionary, and culturally transformative. Then he demonstrates points of contact between this revisioned theology and liberal education, particularly those connections manifested in five elements ...
Additional Info:
The author makes a case for the contributions of liberal theology to the transformative pedagogy that is essential for the flourishing of human beings in the twenty-first century. First he advocates the retention of liberal theology, but in a postmodern form that is open, critical, experiential, visionary, and culturally transformative. Then he demonstrates points of contact between this revisioned theology and liberal education, particularly those connections manifested in five elements of transformative pedagogy: education and life-formation, the rhythm of education, constructive and interactive knowledge, connected and imaginative teaching, and education as the practice of freedom. The author concludes that a revisioned liberal theology can contribute significantly to the recovery and explication of the religious dimension of education and its incumbent power of transformation.
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"Mortimer Adler, Paulo Freire, and Teaching Theology in a Democracy"

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Malcolm, Lois
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 2 (1999): 77-88
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Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
In view of the current attention being given to "practices," this paper argues that Mortimer Adler and Paulo Freire have developed pedagogical practices that are relevant for the task of teaching theology in a democracy. Emphasizing the connection between education and democratic life, both reject a facile relativism or pragmatism, on the one hand, and an uncritical adherence to either a traditionalist or revolutionary agenda, on the other. Indeed, both ...
Additional Info:
In view of the current attention being given to "practices," this paper argues that Mortimer Adler and Paulo Freire have developed pedagogical practices that are relevant for the task of teaching theology in a democracy. Emphasizing the connection between education and democratic life, both reject a facile relativism or pragmatism, on the one hand, and an uncritical adherence to either a traditionalist or revolutionary agenda, on the other. Indeed, both present their pedagogies not simply as a means for advocating certain types of religious and ethical practice (whether traditional or revolutionary) but as a means for critically examining those practices in light of the truth and justice – and for believers, the reality of God – they presuppose. This essay examines precisely how they do this and what their relevance might be for the teaching of theology in a democracy where the co-existence of competing religious and ethical claims is a given.
TTR cover image

"Hebrew Exegesis Online Using Information Technology to Enhance Biblical Language Study"

TTR
Klipowicz, Steven W. and Tim Laniak
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 2 (1999): 109-115
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Information technology is bringing change to theological education. Computer-mediated instruction has been employed for teaching basic factual materials and for providing study resources. Information technology has been helpful as an instructional aid using the drill and practice format, but how can it promote learning in more complex areas of knowledge acquisition such as analysis, synthesis, and creative judgment? Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in Charlotte, N.C. developed an online course to ...
Additional Info:
Information technology is bringing change to theological education. Computer-mediated instruction has been employed for teaching basic factual materials and for providing study resources. Information technology has been helpful as an instructional aid using the drill and practice format, but how can it promote learning in more complex areas of knowledge acquisition such as analysis, synthesis, and creative judgment? Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in Charlotte, N.C. developed an online course to teach Hebrew exegesis. A theory-driven pedagogy was employed that used a Web-based instructional design to promote asynchronous learning, collaborative projects, and peer review. This article presents the rationale and design for the class, a narrative of the class experience, and an evaluation of results. Outcomes of the class experience and suggestions for application of technology to other subject areas are included.
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"Integrating Asian Christianity into History of Christianity Courses"

TTR
Keck, David
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 1 (1999): 3-13
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This essay begins with diverse arguments for modifying history of Christianity courses to include the experiences of Asian Christianity. After discussing fundamental assumptions, several problems are articulated. The major portion of the essay describes three different strategies for integrating new materials into current curricular offerings. By conceptualizing the relationships between Asian Christianity and the history of Christianity in terms of (1) parallels, (2) supplements, and (3) challenges, material from theformer can be more ...
Additional Info:
This essay begins with diverse arguments for modifying history of Christianity courses to include the experiences of Asian Christianity. After discussing fundamental assumptions, several problems are articulated. The major portion of the essay describes three different strategies for integrating new materials into current curricular offerings. By conceptualizing the relationships between Asian Christianity and the history of Christianity in terms of (1) parallels, (2) supplements, and (3) challenges, material from theformer can be more readily incorporated into the teaching of the latter. Such strategies can be utilized in different teaching contexts, depending on the needs of students and instructors.
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"New Approaches to Teaching Early Confucianism"

TTR
Knapp, Keith N.
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 1 (1999): 45-54
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Teachers are often tempted to present early Confucianism as an abstract ethical philosophy whose wisdom stands outside of time and space. Nevertheless, this kind of rarefied treatment makes it difficult for students to understand. Instead, one should try to make Confucianism more tangible by firmly placing it in its historical and intellectual context. This can be done in the following ways: ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Teachers are often tempted to present early Confucianism as an abstract ethical philosophy whose wisdom stands outside of time and space. Nevertheless, this kind of rarefied treatment makes it difficult for students to understand. Instead, one should try to make Confucianism more tangible by firmly placing it in its historical and intellectual context. This can be done in the following ways: Use indigenous nomenclature for words like "Confucius" and "Confucianism." Closely examine the history and character of the Confucian community. Draw attention to the overwhelming importance of ritual in Confucian doctrine. Underline the all-encompassing nature of Confucian religiosity. Show the popular stories and images by which Confucians transmitted their teachings. Although these methods focus on the otherness of early Confucianism and thereby might make it less appealing to modern tastes, they will provide students with a lively and vivid image of the early tradition and its advocates.
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"The Bible in African American Perspectives"

TTR
Bellis, Alice Ogden
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 3 (1998): 161-165
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This modified "note from the classroom" is a dialogue between two scholars about African American study of the Bible. Bellis introduces the subject by advocating the primacy of social location and the African American student's religious experience in the method that she uses in her classes. (Her sample bibliography, syllabus and course outline for teaching about the Bible in African American perspectives can be found on the Wabash Center web ...
Additional Info:
This modified "note from the classroom" is a dialogue between two scholars about African American study of the Bible. Bellis introduces the subject by advocating the primacy of social location and the African American student's religious experience in the method that she uses in her classes. (Her sample bibliography, syllabus and course outline for teaching about the Bible in African American perspectives can be found on the Wabash Center web page: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu.) Brown's response takes a different stance with regard to the relative importance for exegesis of historical-critical method and the reader's social location. While Bellis and Brown agree on the appeal that the King James Version holds for many African Americans (but for different reasons), their differing assessments of translations, the distinctiveness of African American interpretations, and the ethnicity of Biblical characters models a lively discussion of issues in teaching and learning.
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"Are We Missing a Truly Multicultural Moment? Comments on "The Bible in African American Perspectives""

TTR
Brown, Michael Joseph
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 3 (1998): 165-168
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This modified "note from the classroom" is a dialogue between two scholars about African American study of the Bible. Bellis introduces the subject by advocating the primacy of social location and the African American student's religious experience in the method that she uses in her classes. (Her sample bibliography, syllabus and course outline for teaching about the Bible in African American perspectives can be found on the Wabash Center web ...
Additional Info:
This modified "note from the classroom" is a dialogue between two scholars about African American study of the Bible. Bellis introduces the subject by advocating the primacy of social location and the African American student's religious experience in the method that she uses in her classes. (Her sample bibliography, syllabus and course outline for teaching about the Bible in African American perspectives can be found on the Wabash Center web page: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu.) Brown's response takes a different stance with regard to the relative importance for exegesis of historical-critical method and the reader's social location. While Bellis and Brown agree on the appeal that the King James Version holds for many African Americans (but for different reasons), their differing assessments of translations, the distinctiveness of African American interpretations, and the ethnicity of Biblical characters models a lively discussion of issues in teaching and learning.
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"Response to Michael Brown's Comments"

TTR
Bellis, Alice Ogden
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 3 (1998): 168-170
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Teaching the Bible in the Context of General Education"

TTR
Smith, Jonathan Z.
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 2 (1998): 73-78
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Three conceptions of general education developed under the titles 'general,' 'generalist,' and 'generalizing' are matched with appropriate strategies for teaching the Bible. These provide the basis for two points relevant to teaching the Bible in colleges and universities: first, that the prime object of attention is not the Bible, but rather a corporate agreement regarding an educational project; and second, that the ways in which the Bible might ...
Additional Info:
Three conceptions of general education developed under the titles 'general,' 'generalist,' and 'generalizing' are matched with appropriate strategies for teaching the Bible. These provide the basis for two points relevant to teaching the Bible in colleges and universities: first, that the prime object of attention is not the Bible, but rather a corporate agreement regarding an educational project; and second, that the ways in which the Bible might be taught will vary, appropriately, according to the ways in which that educational enterprise is understood. A corollary is stated: teachers of the Bible need to be as informed about research in teaching as they are in biblical research.
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"The Ethics of Ambition: A Pedagogy of the Spirit"

TTR
Mahan, Brian J.
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 2 (1998): 87-98
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
This article presents an overview of a course entitled 'The Ethics of Ambition' which over the period of the last fifteen years the author has taught to undergraduates and seminarians, as well as in church-sponsored adult education programs. It summarizes and describes a number of pedagogical strategies that have evolved over time in response to the exigencies of these varying educational environments. More topically, the article offers a brief criticism ...
Additional Info:
This article presents an overview of a course entitled 'The Ethics of Ambition' which over the period of the last fifteen years the author has taught to undergraduates and seminarians, as well as in church-sponsored adult education programs. It summarizes and describes a number of pedagogical strategies that have evolved over time in response to the exigencies of these varying educational environments. More topically, the article offers a brief criticism of certain 'neo-conservative' assumptions regarding the pedagogical efficacy of the Christian narrative as these impinge upon the actual teaching situation.
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"Redescribing "Religion and …" Film: Teaching the Insider/Outsider Problem"

TTR
McCutcheon, Russell T.
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 2 (1998): 99-110
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Classes organized by means of the 'religion and …' rubric cut both ways: they are elastic enough to attract wide student interest, thereby enhancing a department's enrollment statistics, but they are often theoretically unsophisticated, thereby hampering the future development of scholars of religion. After discussing the costs and benefits of such classes, this article focuses on one particular example of this ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Classes organized by means of the 'religion and …' rubric cut both ways: they are elastic enough to attract wide student interest, thereby enhancing a department's enrollment statistics, but they are often theoretically unsophisticated, thereby hampering the future development of scholars of religion. After discussing the costs and benefits of such classes, this article focuses on one particular example of this popular rubric that would benefit from redescription: the use of films in the religious studies class. After identifying two competing approaches to using films, the essay concludes by discussing three feature films that can be used in all of our classes to teach a fundamental theoretical topic in our field: the insider/outsider problem.
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"Teaching Taoism in the 1990s"

TTR
Kirkland, Russell
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 2 (1998): 111-119
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
To help non-specialists ensure that their teaching of Taoism is state-of-the-art, the author offers six suggestions: (1) Teach real Chinese Taoism, as it has been revealed by the social, textual, and historical research of Asian and Western specialists since the 1970s. (2) Use textbooks that reflect current scholarship. (3) Cover all phases of the Taoist tradition, not just the long-fetishized Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu. The classical text entitled Nei-yeh helps students understand modern forms ...
Additional Info:
To help non-specialists ensure that their teaching of Taoism is state-of-the-art, the author offers six suggestions: (1) Teach real Chinese Taoism, as it has been revealed by the social, textual, and historical research of Asian and Western specialists since the 1970s. (2) Use textbooks that reflect current scholarship. (3) Cover all phases of the Taoist tradition, not just the long-fetishized Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu. The classical text entitled Nei-yeh helps students understand modern forms of Taoist meditation, such as those in Ch'üan-chen Taoism, which has been neglected in our textbooks. (4) Use reliable translations by responsible scholars. (5) Use real Taoist texts, such as now appear in Livia Kohn's anthology, The Taoist Experience, and other new sourcebooks. (6) Make responsible choices. The author compares different pedagogical models and explains his own approach, designed to provide accurate knowledge of Taoist history and practices in a form that students will appreciate.
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"Teaching Christian Theology"

TTR
Placher, William C.
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 1 (1998): 36-38
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Three scholars present narrative descriptions of their syllabi for the first year course in theology. David Goatley discusses the challenges of teaching theology amid the many kinds of diversity characteristic of Memphis Theological Seminary and emphasizes the importance of teaching students how to think theologically. Amy Plantinga Pauw describes the strengths and ongoing problems of an introductory course at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary which combines theology and church history. Linda ...
Additional Info:
Three scholars present narrative descriptions of their syllabi for the first year course in theology. David Goatley discusses the challenges of teaching theology amid the many kinds of diversity characteristic of Memphis Theological Seminary and emphasizes the importance of teaching students how to think theologically. Amy Plantinga Pauw describes the strengths and ongoing problems of an introductory course at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary which combines theology and church history. Linda Woodhead's account of teaching Christian theology in a religious studies context at Lancaster University focuses on the embodiedness of theology as key to teaching students for whom it really is a foreign language. Surveying the other essays, William Placher notes positive news about the place of Christian theology within a religious studies department and the ongoing challenges faced in many seminaries of teaching theology in less time to less well prepared students.
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"Teaching Theology: Humility and Dynamism"

TTR
Goatley, David Emmanuel
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 1 (1998): 39-41
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

"CHATS about Theology"

TTR
Pauw, Amy Plantinga
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 1 (1998): 42-43
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

"Teaching Theology as a Foreign Language"

TTR
Woodhead, Linda
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 1 (1998): 44-47
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

"Classroom Exercise: Interpreting Sacred Texts"

TTR
Oden, Amy G.
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 1 (1998): 48-50
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
The author uses a contemporary functional document (a campus map) to design an imaginative exercise which teaches students the limits of map (or text) as a guide to reliable information. Through the exercise, students learn about gaps in information and the limits of what any text reveals, even one which is ostensibly designed as a reliable guide for navigating a campus.
Additional Info:
The author uses a contemporary functional document (a campus map) to design an imaginative exercise which teaches students the limits of map (or text) as a guide to reliable information. Through the exercise, students learn about gaps in information and the limits of what any text reveals, even one which is ostensibly designed as a reliable guide for navigating a campus.
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Teaching The Biblical Languages

Journal Issue
Goetchius, Eugene V., Walter Harrelson, and George M. Landes
1967
Theological Education 3, no. 4 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
I. Introduction (Walter Harrelson)
A. Origin of Study
B. Procedures
C. Purpose of Study
D. The Basic Problem

II. Biblical Languages in the Theological Curriculum (Walter Harrelson)
A. The Authority of the Bible and Biblical Languages
B. Languages and Exegesis
C. Openness to the “World”
D. Language, Word of God, and Theology—the “New Hermeneutic”

III. What is Happening
A. In the Seminary Curricula (Eugene V. N. Goetchius)
B. In the Classroom (Eugene V. N. Goetchius)
C. In the Colleges (George M. Landes)
D. In the Work of Seminary Graduates (George M. Landes)
E. In Continuing Education (George M. Landes)

IV. New Developments in Language Teaching (Eugene V. N. Goetchius)
A. The Objectives of Biblical Language Teaching
B. Modern Linguistics
C. Teaching Aids

V. An Assessment of the Situation
A. What Can and Cannot Be Done in the Regular Academic Curriculum (Eugene V. N. Goetchius)
B. What Can and Cannot Be Expected From College Language Work (George M. Landes)
C. How Alumni Assess the Importance of Language Study (George M. Landes)
D. What Colleagues Outside the Biblical Field Expect From Languages Study (George M. Landes)
E. Prospects for Required Language Study (George M. Landis)
F. The Need For Specialists (Eugene V. N. Goetchius)
G. Proposed Summer Programs (Eugene V. N. Goetchius)

VI. Recommendations (Walter Harrelson)
A. State Purposed and Objectives Clearly
B. Provide Flexibility in Curriculum to Enable Students to learn one or more biblical languages well to use the language(s) in exegetical work
C. Cooperate with College and University Teachers of Religion in the Development of Undergraduate Courses in the Biblical Language
D. Cooperate in Summer Programs
E. Continue and Accelerate Experimentation
1. in teaching method
2. in the use of modern linguistics
3. in philosophical and theological analyses of language

Notes to:
Administrators (Paul M. Robinson)
Trustees (Harry M. Moffett)
Seminary Staff Officers (Roland C. Matthies)
Librarians (Calvin H. Schmitt)
Professors (David S. Schuller)
Cover image

Film & Religion: An Introduction

Book
Flesher, Paul V. M. and Robert Torry
2007
Abingdon Press, Nashville, TN
PN1995.5.F54 2007
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Is there such a thing as too much historical context? Flesher and Torry, both academics, make an important point at the start of these loosely confederated essays about the religious themes of American major-release films since World War II: that it is crucial to understand films in the historical context in which they were written and released. Fair enough, but the execution can be clunky and obvious: historical overviews about ...
Additional Info:
Is there such a thing as too much historical context? Flesher and Torry, both academics, make an important point at the start of these loosely confederated essays about the religious themes of American major-release films since World War II: that it is crucial to understand films in the historical context in which they were written and released. Fair enough, but the execution can be clunky and obvious: historical overviews about religion in America could be more seamlessly integrated into the much better discussions of various films, ranging from the overtly religious (The Last Temptation of Christ; The Ten Commandments; Little Buddha) to the prophetically spiritual (Field of Dreams; Close Encounters of the Third Kind). The book is worth it for the film discussions, because whether they are analyzing supernatural horror flicks like The Exorcist and The Omen or dissecting the surprising Hindu themes latent in The Legend of Bagger Vance, Flesher and Torry often have valuable and incisive observations about the ways films both reflect and shape religious culture. Though of use primarily for the college classroom (and with a teacher's preface to this end), serious students of film and religion will discover interpretive nuggets. (June) (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface for Teachers
Introduction

ch. 1 Christmas Films: The Search for Meaning
...How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1967)

Section One: Ultimate Destruction and the Cold War in the 1950s
ch. 2 Religion, Science Fiction, and the Bomb
...When Worlds Collide (1951)
...The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
ch. 3 Making Rome Christian
...Quo Vadis (1951)
...The Robe (1953)
ch. 4 The Ten Commandments and America's Fight against Tyranny
...The Ten Commandments (1956)

Section Two: Filming Jesus
ch. 5 The Messiah of Peace
...King of Kings (1961)
ch. 6 The Accidental Superstar
...Jesus Christ, Superstar (1973)
ch. 7 Tormenting Christ
...The Last Temptation of Christ (1988)
ch. 8 Violence and Redemption
...The Passion of the Christ (2004)

Section Three: Varieties of Religion in American Film
ch. 9 The Devil: Screening Humanity's Enemy
...The Exorcist (1973)
...The Omen (1976)
ch. 10 God as Alien: Humanity's Helper
...2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
...Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)
ch. 11 Religion and Scandal, Crime and Innocence
...Agnes of God (1985)
...The Apostle (1998)
ch. 12 The Religion of Baseball
...The Natural (1984)
...Field of Dreams (1989)

Section Four: World Religions in Film
ch. 13 American Dharma
...Little Buddha (1993)
...The Legend of Bagger Vance (2000)
ch. 14 Jewish Films: Finding the Path Between Torah and Modernity
...The Chosen (1982)
...The Quarrel (1990)
ch. 15 Islam and Fanaticism: Only in the Eye of the Beholder?
...Destiny (1997)
...My Son the Fanatic (1997)

Appendix
Filmography
Cover image

Faith and Film: A Guidebook for Leaders

Book
McNulty, Edward N.
2007
Westminster John Knox Press, Louisville, KY
BV1643.M36 2007
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Growing numbers of church leaders are discovering that many films are able to impact viewers with gospel truths almost as well as a good sermon. Former pastor and longtime reviewer of films Ed McNulty offers this insightful guide to help church leaders enter into dialogue with contemporary films. McNulty carefully crafts a theology of movies and then provides practical suggestions for creating and leading movie discussions with groups. In addition, ...
Additional Info:
Growing numbers of church leaders are discovering that many films are able to impact viewers with gospel truths almost as well as a good sermon. Former pastor and longtime reviewer of films Ed McNulty offers this insightful guide to help church leaders enter into dialogue with contemporary films. McNulty carefully crafts a theology of movies and then provides practical suggestions for creating and leading movie discussions with groups. In addition, he provides people from all across the theological spectrum with a framework to understand whether the overall message of a film outweighs concerns over profanity, violence, or sex in the film. He concludes by introducing twenty-seven films and including provocative questions about each that will prepare leaders to assemble and facilitate a group. Popular films explored include The Color Purple; Crash; Hotel Rwanda; The Matrix; Million Dollar Baby, O Brother, Where Art Thou? and Shawshank Redemption. Faith and Film accessibly and comprehensively helps readers and moviegoers develop "eyes that see and ears that hear" how God's messages of hope and love are revealed in contemporary films. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1: Looking for the Light of the World While Sitting in the Dark
Introduction: Developing a Theology of Seeing
What Has Jerusalem to Do with Hollywood?
Four Types of Films
More on Parable and Film
Help for Becoming Your Own Critic
Settings for a Film Discussion
Using the Guides in This Book

Part II: Movie Discussion Guides
American Beauty
Amistad
Babe: Pig in the City
Beyond the Sea
Chocolat
The Color Purple
Crash
Dogma
Erin Brockovich
Final Solution
The Grapes of Wrath
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
Hotel Rwanda
The Insider
The Iron Giant
Les Miserables
The Matrix
Million Dollar Baby
O Brother, Where Art Thou?
Pieces of April
Road to Perdition
Shawshank Redemption
The Spitfire Grill
Tender Mercies
The Thin Red Line
To End all Wars
Walking across Egypt

Appendix 1: List of Films and Their DVD Distributors
Appendix 2: Church and Theater

Notes
Bibliography
Cover image

Teaching Religion and Healing

Book
Barnes, Linda L., and Ines M. Talamantez, eds.
2006
Oxford University Press, New York NY
BL41.T43 2006
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
The study of medicine and healing traditions is well developed in the discipline of anthropology. Most religious studies scholars, however, continue to assume that "medicine" and "biomedicine" are one and the same and that when religion and medicine are mentioned together, the reference is necessarily either to faith healing or bioethics. Scholars of religion also have tended to assume that religious ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
The study of medicine and healing traditions is well developed in the discipline of anthropology. Most religious studies scholars, however, continue to assume that "medicine" and "biomedicine" are one and the same and that when religion and medicine are mentioned together, the reference is necessarily either to faith healing or bioethics. Scholars of religion also have tended to assume that religious healing refers to the practices of only a few groups, such as Christian Scientists and pentecostals. Most are now aware of the work of physicians who attempt to demonstrate positive health outcomes in relation to religious practice, but few seem to realize the myriad ways in which healing pervades virtually all religious systems.
This volume is designed to help instructors incorporate discussion of healing into their courses and to encourage the development of courses focused on religion and healing. It brings together essays by leading experts in a range of disciplines and addresses the role of healing in many different religious traditions and cultural communities. An invaluable resource for faculty in anthropology, religious studies, American studies, sociology, and ethnic studies, it also addresses the needs of educators training physicians, health care professionals, and chaplains, particularly in relation to what is referred to as "cultural competence" - the ability to work with multicultural and religiously diverse patient populations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch 1 Religion, healing, and the body (Suzanne J. Crawford)
ch 2 Teaching religion and healing at a southern university (Kaja Finkler)
ch 3 Shanti : peace for the mind, body, and soul (Vasudha Narayanan)
ch 4 Keeping it all in balance : teaching Asian religions through illness and healing (Ivette Vargas-O'Bryan)
ch 5 Teaching the history of Chinese healing traditions (Linda L. Barnes)
ch 6 Teaching native American religious traditions and healing (Ines M. Talamantez)
ch 7 Ometeotl moyocoyatzin : Nahuatl spiritual foundations for holistic healing (Ines Hernandez-Avila)
ch 8 Chicanos/as, religion, and healing : traditions and transformations (Lara Medina)
ch 9 Shamanism as a point of departure : two courses on Christianity and healing (Amanda Porterfield)
ch 10 Teaching about shamanism and religious healing : a cross-cultural, biosocial-spiritual approach (Michael Winkelman and Christopher Carr)
ch 11 Anthropology of experience : the way to teach religion and healing (Edith Turner)
ch 12 Medicine, healing, and spirituality : a cross-cultural exploration Paula K. R. Arai)
ch 13 Religious healing as pedagogical performance (Stephanie Y. Mitchem)
ch 14 Magic, witchcraft, and healing (Arvilla Payne-Jackson)
ch 15 Spirituality of healing (Kwok Pui-lan)
ch 16 Worldviews seminar : an intensive survey of American urban religious diversity (Lucinda A. Mosher and Claude Jacobs)
ch 17 Teaching religion and healing : spirituality and aging in the San Francisco Japanese community (Ronald Y. Nakasone)
ch 18 Religion and healing for physician's assistants (Fred Glennon)
ch 19 A medical school curriculum on religion and healing (Linda L. Barnes
ch 20 Religion, ritual, and healing in North America (Pamela E. Klassen)
ch 21 World religions and healing (Linda L. Barnes)
Resource Bibligraphies
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching and Learning in College Introductory Religion Courses

Book
Walvoord, Barbara E.
2008
Blackwell Publishing, Malden MA
BL41.W35 2008
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Introductory courses in theology and religion are taught at most colleges and universities across the US and UK. From public to private, non-sectarian to faith-based institutions, theology courses fulfill humanities general education requirements, and provide a foundational education for students intending further theological study. This book describes the best and most effective ways of teaching these courses. Offering practical, realistic, research-based guidance, this volume explores the best and most recent ...
Additional Info:
Introductory courses in theology and religion are taught at most colleges and universities across the US and UK. From public to private, non-sectarian to faith-based institutions, theology courses fulfill humanities general education requirements, and provide a foundational education for students intending further theological study. This book describes the best and most effective ways of teaching these courses. Offering practical, realistic, research-based guidance, this volume explores the best and most recent methods in teaching-theory. This book addresses the questions and concerns frequently posed by the professors and graduate students who instruct these multifaceted courses. It covers issues such as a teacher's role in defining theology and religion, the teaching and learning process, course structure, and content. The volume also examines recent case studies of theology and religious studies courses at various institutions, including a private non-sectarian university, a public research university, a Catholic masters-level university, and at a Protestant baccalaureate college. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Faculty and Student Goals for Learning: The Great Divide
ch. 2 Were the Goals Met? Students’ Academic and Spiritual Development
ch. 3 Pedagogies: What Influenced Student Learning?
ch. 4 Case Studies: Large Classes
ch. 5 Case Studies: Small Classes in World Religions, Introduction to Religion
ch. 6 Case Studies: Small Classes in Theology, Bible, Christian Formation

Appendix A: Faculty Demographics
Appendix B: Student Demographics
Appendix C: IDEA Surveys
Appendix D: Discipline-Specific Surveys Administered to Highly Effective Classes
Appendix E: Choosing Highly-Effective Faculty
Appendix F: Data Tally for Highly-Effective Classes
Appendix G: Prompts for Student In-Class Reflections
Appendix H: Suggestions for Leading Faculty Workshops

References
Index
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"Secularism, Criticism, and Religious Studies Pedagogy"

TTR
Britt, Brian
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 4 (2006): 203-210
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
Secularization, the idea that religion would gradually diminish over time, was once widely assumed to be true by scholars of religion, but the unexpected resurgence of religious traditions has called it into question. Related debates on the distinction between religion and the secular have destabilized religious studies further. What does the crisis of secularization and secularism mean for the religious studies classroom? This essay proposes a model of religious criticism ...
Additional Info:
Secularization, the idea that religion would gradually diminish over time, was once widely assumed to be true by scholars of religion, but the unexpected resurgence of religious traditions has called it into question. Related debates on the distinction between religion and the secular have destabilized religious studies further. What does the crisis of secularization and secularism mean for the religious studies classroom? This essay proposes a model of religious criticism in the wake of secularism. No longer simply claiming a "view from nowhere," students and instructors can (by observing standards of evidence, reason, and self-disclosure) combine criticism with learning. Drawn from aesthetic and ethical traditions of criticism, religious criticism can be practiced by "teaching the conflicts" and through the pedagogical models of Freire and hooks.
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"Critiquing Borders: Teaching About Religions in a Postcolonial World"

TTR
Ramey, Steven W.
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 4 (2006): 211-220
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
In a postcolonial environment, our students will encounter multiple representations and diverse followers of various religions outside the classroom. Students need to think critically about the representations of all religions and recognize the humanity of all people. Too often, students leave courses discussing one or more world religions with an idealized view of other religions that draws strict boundaries around the components of each religion. Bringing postcolonial thought into introductory ...
Additional Info:
In a postcolonial environment, our students will encounter multiple representations and diverse followers of various religions outside the classroom. Students need to think critically about the representations of all religions and recognize the humanity of all people. Too often, students leave courses discussing one or more world religions with an idealized view of other religions that draws strict boundaries around the components of each religion. Bringing postcolonial thought into introductory and survey courses highlights the diversity within each lived religion and encourages students to critique those strict borders and all representation of religions. Based on continuing experiments with critical theory in undergraduate classes, the six strategies presented here use the diversity of lived religions to promote critical analysis of representations of religions. These strategies move beyond the rejection of common representations by introducing set theory as an alternative framework that students can use to theorize about the complexity within religions.
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"Teaching Religion and Material Culture"

TTR
Carp, Richard M.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 1 (2007): 2-12
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Because religions discipline and interpret bodies; create and define sacred spaces; generate, adore and study images in all media; regulate the intake of food; structure temporal experience; and in general interpenetrate and are permeated by the cultural landscapes in which they exist, religious studies must engage material religion and religious materiality. We encounter bodily realities of other religions and cultures through our own disciplined bodies, which are both necessary and ...
Additional Info:
Because religions discipline and interpret bodies; create and define sacred spaces; generate, adore and study images in all media; regulate the intake of food; structure temporal experience; and in general interpenetrate and are permeated by the cultural landscapes in which they exist, religious studies must engage material religion and religious materiality. We encounter bodily realities of other religions and cultures through our own disciplined bodies, which are both necessary and problematic for those encounters. This article connects theoretical and practical resources needed to help students discover the stuff of religion – flesh and blood, bread and wine, songs and sound, knives and body parts, movement and music, human bodies, time, space, cosmograms composed of and composing the bodies of the religious – uncovering the materiality of religion, existing underneath, alongside, without, and amidst religious textuality and verbal ideation.
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"Successfully Teaching Biblical Languages Online at the Seminary Level: Guiding Principles of Course Design and Delivery"

TTR
Harlow, Joel
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 1 (2007): 13-24
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Reformed Theological Seminary's Virtual Campus has successfully taught the biblical languages online since 1999. This article describes the theoretical principles that underlie the design and asynchronous delivery of online Greek and Hebrew to part-time adult distance students. The structure and administration of the courses is discussed, as well as how the students interact with their instructor and with the material. The fields of Adult Education, Learner Autonomy, and Distance Education suggest ...
Additional Info:
Reformed Theological Seminary's Virtual Campus has successfully taught the biblical languages online since 1999. This article describes the theoretical principles that underlie the design and asynchronous delivery of online Greek and Hebrew to part-time adult distance students. The structure and administration of the courses is discussed, as well as how the students interact with their instructor and with the material. The fields of Adult Education, Learner Autonomy, and Distance Education suggest that online students must learn differently than traditional in-class students by being more responsible for their learning. Research also suggests that online instructors must teach differently, assuming a role more like a learning coach. Finally, the literature suggests that institutions must interact with distance students differently than traditional in-class students. The article concludes with a definition of "success" in these courses and description of the time commitment expected of faculty in these courses.
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"Why Do Students Keep Writing Me Sermons? Teaching Biblical Studies Cross-Culturally in New Zealand "

TTR
Wall, Lynne
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 1 (2007): 34-41
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Students from different cultural backgrounds respond in a variety of ways to my teaching of biblical studies. Some sermonize or plagiarize quite unselfconsciously in their written assignments, while others consistently hand in work late or are silent members of the class. As I struggled with what these behaviors were saying about my teaching, I came to realize that limited ability in spoken and written English was not the only barrier. ...
Additional Info:
Students from different cultural backgrounds respond in a variety of ways to my teaching of biblical studies. Some sermonize or plagiarize quite unselfconsciously in their written assignments, while others consistently hand in work late or are silent members of the class. As I struggled with what these behaviors were saying about my teaching, I came to realize that limited ability in spoken and written English was not the only barrier. Deeper issues were at stake here about the nature of cross-cultural communication, teaching, and learning. In this note I analyze the issues of faith, authority, and styles of teaching and learning which underlie the "clash of educational cultures" (Ballard and Clanchy 1997, viii) occurring in the cross-cultural classroom. Then I suggest a number of strategies that I have developed to build bridges of understanding between the various educational cultures, to encourage deeper participation and to develop critical thinking.
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"The Familiar Made Strange: An Orientation to Biblical Study in Vancouver"

TTR
Maier, Harry O.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 2 (2007): 80-86
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
The paper describes an orientation to teaching New Testament Studies at Vancouver School of Theology, a theologically liberal school in the context of Vancouver, Canada – paradoxically one of the most secular and multi-religious cities in the world. Guided by Denise Levertov's poem, "Overland to the Islands," it explores the promises and challenges of biblical study grounded in the material reality of the world, amidst older students who bear the marks ...
Additional Info:
The paper describes an orientation to teaching New Testament Studies at Vancouver School of Theology, a theologically liberal school in the context of Vancouver, Canada – paradoxically one of the most secular and multi-religious cities in the world. Guided by Denise Levertov's poem, "Overland to the Islands," it explores the promises and challenges of biblical study grounded in the material reality of the world, amidst older students who bear the marks of secularity, who are impatient with traditional orthodoxies, and who long more for life before the grave than after it. Adopting ideas from Roland Barthes, Paul Ricoeur, and Julia Kristeva, it explores teaching the Bible in a way that promotes the polyvalence, strangeness, and irreducibility of biblical texts, in order to move students away from exegetical and hermeneutical theories content with recovering authorial intent and reconstructing historical origins as the primary tasks of biblical study. The paper describes a model of teaching that celebrates the materiality of the New Testament together with its textual, social, theological, and historical complexity, as well as a tradition-constituted means of apprehending the world, and which treasures students as living texts who in the course of interpretation awaken ever-fresh meanings relevant to their own communal and personal identities.
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"Learning to Read the Bible with Desire: Teaching the Eros of Exegesis in the Theological Classroom"

TTR
Vaage, Leif E.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 2 (2007): 87-94
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
The article begins with two brief theoretical descriptions of a pedagogy of desire vis-à-vis the Christian Bible. The first of these is a poem; the second summarizes the conversation constituted by four quite different books: the Confessions by Augustine of Hippo, Freud & Philosophy by Paul Ricoeur, Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire, and The Ethnography of Reading edited by Jonathan Boyarin. There follows, then, a case in point: ...
Additional Info:
The article begins with two brief theoretical descriptions of a pedagogy of desire vis-à-vis the Christian Bible. The first of these is a poem; the second summarizes the conversation constituted by four quite different books: the Confessions by Augustine of Hippo, Freud & Philosophy by Paul Ricoeur, Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire, and The Ethnography of Reading edited by Jonathan Boyarin. There follows, then, a case in point: an account of my most recent effort to teach the eros of exegesis at Emmanuel College (Toronto), using the Song of Songs. This account includes discussion of the (pre)conception(s) of the (biblical) text that inform(s) this undertaking and of the practice of communal reading as a specific type of bodily activity and social experience. In conclusion, the question of evaluation is addressed. How does one learn to love – when, by, in, with, and under – reading the Bible?
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"Of Alchemy and Authenticity: Teaching About Daoism Today"

TTR
Miller, James, and Elijah Siegler
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 2 (2007): 101-108
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
The authors discuss the complexities and responsibilities of teaching about Daoism in contemporary North American colleges and universities. Expanding and revising the findings of Kirkland (1998), they argue that enough has changed in educational and cultural contexts to warrant new strategies for teaching about Daoism. Textbooks are now available that offer more accurate and responsible presentations of Daoist history, and this enables a richer appreciation of Daoist culture and religion, and ...
Additional Info:
The authors discuss the complexities and responsibilities of teaching about Daoism in contemporary North American colleges and universities. Expanding and revising the findings of Kirkland (1998), they argue that enough has changed in educational and cultural contexts to warrant new strategies for teaching about Daoism. Textbooks are now available that offer more accurate and responsible presentations of Daoist history, and this enables a richer appreciation of Daoist culture and religion, and its significance within broader areas of Chinese culture such as art, politics, and science. On the other hand, students have a far greater possibility of interacting outside the classroom with North Americans of Chinese and European background who claim affiliation to the Daoist tradition especially through techniques of moving meditation such as Qigong and internal alchemy. This situation poses challenges in the classroom concerning claims of authenticity, tradition, and representation. Rather than shying away from these contemporary North American cultural forms, the authors argue that the skilled teacher can use these interactions to facilitate a deeper inquiry into questions of authenticity and tradition. Moreover, the authors discuss the use of an interactive website designed specifically to assist in reflecting on these issues in the classroom.
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"Teaching Creation: A Modular Approach"

TTR
Bosworth, David A.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 4 (2007): 231-234
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
The present article describes a modular approach to teaching Genesis 1–3 that values depth over breadth even in an introductory class. The module allows students to learn about the text and its original context by orienting discussion around contemporary issues of practical concern. Specifically, the creation-evolution debates provide an opportunity for students to learn about contemporary political, social, and legal implications of interpreting Genesis 1–3. The conflict of traditional and modern values ...
Additional Info:
The present article describes a modular approach to teaching Genesis 1–3 that values depth over breadth even in an introductory class. The module allows students to learn about the text and its original context by orienting discussion around contemporary issues of practical concern. Specifically, the creation-evolution debates provide an opportunity for students to learn about contemporary political, social, and legal implications of interpreting Genesis 1–3. The conflict of traditional and modern values emerges also in issues surrounding gender and autonomy in Genesis 2–3. This pedagogical approach challenges various student worldviews to promote discussion and greater intellectual sophistication. The correlation of the text with ongoing contemporary issues engages student interest and motivates learning. It also allows the class to explore both the ancient text and its interpretation in diverse communities. Finally, the module allows considerable flexibility for student and teacher interest and the needs of a given class.
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"Debating Paul"

TTR
Torbett, David
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 4 (2007): 244-250
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
This classroom note describes the lessons I learned from the use of formal debates during the two semesters I taught "Paul and Early Christianity" to undergraduates at a liberal arts college in Ohio. The purpose of the course was primarily to give students the exegetical skills to understand Paul in his own context. The secondary purpose was to help students understand the role that exegetical differences play in different moral ...
Additional Info:
This classroom note describes the lessons I learned from the use of formal debates during the two semesters I taught "Paul and Early Christianity" to undergraduates at a liberal arts college in Ohio. The purpose of the course was primarily to give students the exegetical skills to understand Paul in his own context. The secondary purpose was to help students understand the role that exegetical differences play in different moral and theological uses of Paul. I found that the debates helped students understand the controversial nature of biblical exegesis, to read the course material carefully, to develop clear arguments, and to empathize with different points of view. The debates also entailed certain problems, some of which were hindrances that needed to be corrected. However, some apparent problems actually turned out to be teaching opportunities and even served as their own solutions. Appendices, including the course syllabus and debate questions and readings, can be found at: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu/journal/article2.aspx?id=11362
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The Promise of Scriptural Reasoning

Book
Ford, David C. and C.C. Pecknold, eds.
2006
Blackwell Publishing, Malden, MA
BL71.P76 2006
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
In 'scriptural reasoning', Jews, Christians and Muslims study their scriptures in conversation with one another. This innovative practice brings core identities into deep engagements with one another by returning to the sacred texts that give rise to their differences and their family resemblances. 'Scriptural reasoning' enables these differences, and agreements, to be worked through in a collegial context. It has already begun to produce fresh approaches to one of the ...
Additional Info:
In 'scriptural reasoning', Jews, Christians and Muslims study their scriptures in conversation with one another. This innovative practice brings core identities into deep engagements with one another by returning to the sacred texts that give rise to their differences and their family resemblances. 'Scriptural reasoning' enables these differences, and agreements, to be worked through in a collegial context. It has already begun to produce fresh approaches to one of the great issues of the 21st century: how can the Abrahamic faiths understand each other and live together in peace?In this book, twelve contributors distil their critical and constructive thinking on 'scriptural reasoning' after nearly a decade of study and discussion. Their reflections range from introductory accounts and guidelines for the practice to literary-critical discussions and interpretations of texts. Several chapters draw on contemporary philosophies, such as pragmatism, phenomenology, and idealism. A critical conclusion invites readers to reflect on the promise of 'scriptural reasoning'. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface : The Promise of Scriptural Reasoning (C. C. Pecknold)

ch. 1 An Interfaith Wisdom : Scriptural Reasoning Between Jews, Christians and Muslims (David F. Ford)
ch. 2 A Handbook For Scriptural Reasoning (Steven Kepnes)
ch. 3 Making Deep Reasonings Public(Nicholas Adams)
ch. 4 Heavenly Semantics: Some Literary-Critical Approaches To Scriptural Reasoning (Ben Quash)
ch. 5 Scriptural Reasoning and The Formation of Identity (Susannah Ticciati)
ch. 6 Reading The burning Bush : Voice, World and Holiness (Oliver Davies)
ch. 7 Qur'anic Reasoning As An Academic Practice (Tim Winter)
ch. 8 Philosophic Warrants For Scriptural Reasoning (Peter Ochs)
ch. 9 Scriptural Reasoning and The Philosophy of Social Science (Basit Bilal Koshul)
ch. 10 The Phenomenology of Scripture : Patterns of Reception and Discovery Behind Scriptural Reasoning (Gavin D. Flood)
ch. 11 Reading With Others : Levinas' Ethics and Scriptural Reasoning (Robert Gibbs)
ch. 12 The Promise of Scriptural Reasoning (Daniel W. Hardy)
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Archaeology to Delight and Instruct: Active Learning in the University Classroom

Book
Burke, Heather and Claire Smith, eds.
2007
Left Coast Press, Walnut Creek, CA
CC83.A73 2007
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This book presents novel and interesting ways of teaching archaeological concepts and processes to college and university students. Seeking alternatives to the formal lecture format, the various contributions seek better ways of communicating the complexities of human behavior and of engaging students in active learning about the past. This collection of imaginative exercises designed by 20 master instructors on three continents includes role-playing, games, simulations, activities, and performance, all designed to ...
Additional Info:
This book presents novel and interesting ways of teaching archaeological concepts and processes to college and university students. Seeking alternatives to the formal lecture format, the various contributions seek better ways of communicating the complexities of human behavior and of engaging students in active learning about the past. This collection of imaginative exercises designed by 20 master instructors on three continents includes role-playing, games, simulations, activities, and performance, all designed to teach archaeological ideas in interesting and engaging ways. Sponsored by the World Archaeological Congress. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Lectures as Usual? Teaching Archaeology for Fun (Claire Smith and Heather Burke)

Part 1 - Role Play
ch. 2 Seven Degrees of Archaeology, or Diverse Ways of Interpreting the Past (Heather Burke and Claire Smith)
ch. 3 The Great Debate: Archaeology, Repatriation, and Nationalism (Morag Kersel)

Part 2 - Games
ch. 4 Grasp, or Happy Families, the Archaeological Way (Gail Higginbottom)
ch. 5 The Skin Game: Teaching to Redress Stereotypes of Indigenous People (Claire Smith and Heather Burke)
ch. 6 The Big Dig: Theoretically Speaking (Gail Higginbottom)
Part 3 - Simulations
ch. 7 The Game of Context: Teaching the History of Archaeology Without Foregone Conclusions (John Carman)
ch. 8 The Simulated Excavation: An Alternative to Archaeological Site Destruction (Bradley F. Bowman and Glenna Dean)
ch. 9 Digging Your Own Grave: Generic Skills from an Archaeological Simulation (Clive Orton)

Part 4 - Hands-on Activities
ch. 10 Playing with Ochre: Some Problems Associated with the Analysis of Indigenous Rock Markings (Michael Diplock and Abigail Stein)
ch. 11 Perspectives from a Pot: IntroducingArchaeological Theory Through Visual Interpretation (Melinda Leach)
ch. 12 Culture of Litterbugs (M. Jay Stottman, Sarah E. Miller and A. Gwynn Henderson)
ch. 13 Toilets as Tools of Teaching (H. Martin Wobst)
ch. 14 Simple Ideas to Teach Big Concepts: 'Excavating' and Analyzing the Professor's Desk Drawer and Wastebasket (Larry J. Zimmerman)

Part 5 - Creative Construction and Performance
ch. 15 The Draw-an-Archaeologist Test: Eliciting Student's Ideas About Archaeology (Susan D. Renoe)
ch. 16 Using the Fictional Tale as a Learning Tool (Caryn M. Berg)
ch. 17 Telling Stories About the Past: Archaeology and Museum Interpretation (Jane Lydon)
ch. 18 Scenarios for Archaeologists: A Teaching Tool (Mitch Allen)

Part 6 - Critical Reflection
ch. 19 The Scrapbook Exercise: Teaching Archaeology of Death as Critical Thinking (Patricia Rubertone)
ch. 20 Brain Candy (K. Anne Pyburn)

Index
About the Contributors
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How to Talk About Hot Topics on Campus: From Polarization to Moral Conversation

Book
Nash, Robert J., DeMethra LaSha Bradley and Arthur W. Chickering
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LC72.2.N37 2008
Topics: Discussion   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
How to Talk About Hot topics on Campus fills a gap in the literature by providing a resource that shows how to construct and carry out difficult conversations from various vantage points in the academy. It offers a theory-to practice model of conversation for the entire college campus that will enable all constituencies to engage in productive and civil dialogue on the most difficult and controversial social, religious political and ...
Additional Info:
How to Talk About Hot topics on Campus fills a gap in the literature by providing a resource that shows how to construct and carry out difficult conversations from various vantage points in the academy. It offers a theory-to practice model of conversation for the entire college campus that will enable all constituencies to engage in productive and civil dialogue on the most difficult and controversial social, religious political and cultural topics.
How to Talk About Hot Topic on Campus covers teaching highly controversial, potentially, provocative, subject matter as well as creating an institutional culture that welcomes and nourishes difficult conversations throughout campus life. The book speaks to faculty student affairs staff, administrators and students in all campus venues. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part I Laying the Theoretical Groundwork for Moral Conversation
ch. 1 Igniting the Fire of Moral Conversation
ch. 2 Promoting a Spirit of Pluralism on College Campuses

Part II Practicing the Moral Conversation
ch. 3 A Faculty Member's View on Moral Conversation from the Classroom
ch. 4 An Administrator's View on Moral Conversation from the Division of Student Affairs
ch. 5 A Senior Administrator's Systemic View on Facilitating Moral Conversations Across Campus

Part III Final Words on Moral Conversation
ch. 6 Opportunities, Risks, and Caveats for Moral Conversation

App. A A Step-by-Step How-To Guide for Facilitators and Participants When Doing Moral Conversation
App. B Additional Text References and Internet Resources
App. C Western Stereotypes About Islam from Both the Left and the Right
App. D A Whole-Campus Teaching and Learning Rationale for Moral Conversation: Inspired by the 2004 NASPA Report Learning Reconsidered: A Campus-Wide Focus on the Student Experience
App. E Naturalistic and Narrativistic Paradigms in Academia: Implications for Moral Conversation

References
Index
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Pedagogy of the Bible: An Analysis and Proposal

Book
Martin, Dale B.
2008
Westminster John Knox Press, Louisville
BS600.3.M323 2008
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
For generations, most seminary teaching of the Bible has focused on the historical-critical method. While this method has been the assumption in almost every seminary curriculum, the actual effects of this approach to Scripture have hardly been examined. From studying the biblical studies courses at ten different seminaries and divinity schools, Dale Martin learned what faculties were doing and what students were hearing. This book presents his discoveries, offering the ...
Additional Info:
For generations, most seminary teaching of the Bible has focused on the historical-critical method. While this method has been the assumption in almost every seminary curriculum, the actual effects of this approach to Scripture have hardly been examined. From studying the biblical studies courses at ten different seminaries and divinity schools, Dale Martin learned what faculties were doing and what students were hearing. This book presents his discoveries, offering the best-ever inside look into the teaching of the Bible for ministry. Going beyond mere description, Martin argues for a new emphasis on interpreting Scripture within the context of church history and theology. Such a reading would be more theological, more integrated into the whole theological curriculum, and more theoretical (as it would focus on whats at stake in interpretation); however, Martin surprisingly argues, it would be more practical at the same time. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface and Acknowledgments
The Bible in Theological Education
Readers and Texts
Premodern Biblical Interpretation
Theological Interpretation of Scripture
Curricular Dreams
Notes
Bibliography
Scripture Index
Author and Subject Index
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Teaching Preaching as a Christian Practice: A New Approach to Homiletical Pedagogy

Book
Long, Thomas G. and Leonora Tubbs Tisdale, eds.
2008
Westminster John Knox Press, Louisville, KY
BV4211.3.T43 2008
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Preaching's most able practitioners gather in this book to call for a radical change in how Christian preaching is taught. Arguing that preaching is a living practice with a long tradition, an identifiable shape, and a broad set of norms and desired outcomes, these scholars propose that teachers initiate their students into the larger practice of preaching-the habits of mind, patterns of action, and ways of being that are integral ...
Additional Info:
Preaching's most able practitioners gather in this book to call for a radical change in how Christian preaching is taught. Arguing that preaching is a living practice with a long tradition, an identifiable shape, and a broad set of norms and desired outcomes, these scholars propose that teachers initiate their students into the larger practice of preaching-the habits of mind, patterns of action, and ways of being that are integral to the ministry of preaching. The book concludes with designs for a basic preaching course and addresses the question of how preaching courses fit into the larger patterns of seminary curricula. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Sect. I Preaching as a Christian practice
ch. 1 A new focus for teaching preaching (Thomas G. Long)
ch. 2 Why the idea of practice matters (James Nieman)
ch. 3 Teaching preaching as a Christian practice (David J. Lose)

Sect. II The components of the practice of preaching
ch. 4 Interpreting texts for preaching (James W. Thompson)
ch. 5 Exegeting the congregation (Leonora Tubbs Tisdale)
ch. 6 Interpreting the larger social context (James Henry Harris)
ch. 7 The use of language (Teresa Fry Brown)
ch. 8 The preaching imagination (Anna Carter Florence)
ch. 9 Creation of form (Lucy Hogan)
ch. 10 Cultivating historical vision( Joseph R. Jeter, Jr.)
ch. 11 Voice and diction (Teresa Fry Brown)

Sect. III Assessment and formation
ch. 12 Marks of faithful preaching practice (Paul Scott Wilson)
ch. 13 Methods of assessment (Daniel E. Harris)

Sect. IV Preaching in the curriculum
ch. 14 Designing the introductory course in preaching (Barbara K. Lundblad)
ch. 15 Finding support from school, denomination, and academy (Gregory Heille)
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Being Black Teaching Black: Politics and Pedagogy in Religious Studies

Book
Westfield, Nancy Lynne, ed.
2008
Abingdon Press, Nashville, TN
BT82.7.B45 2007
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
A group of eminent African American scholars of religoius and theological studies examines the problems and prospects of Black scholarhip in the theological academy. They assess the role that prominent African American scholars have played in transforming the study and teaching of religion and theology, the need for a more thorough-going incorporation of the fruits of black scholarship into the mainstream of the academic study of religion, and the challenges ...
Additional Info:
A group of eminent African American scholars of religoius and theological studies examines the problems and prospects of Black scholarhip in the theological academy. They assess the role that prominent African American scholars have played in transforming the study and teaching of religion and theology, the need for a more thorough-going incorporation of the fruits of black scholarship into the mainstream of the academic study of religion, and the challenges and opportunities of bringing black art, black intellectual thought, and black culture into predominantly white classrooms and institutions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Nancy Lynne Westfield)
Views

ch. 1 Visible/Invisible: Teaching Popular Culture and the Vulgar Body in Black Religious Studies (Carol B. Duncan)
ch. 2 Using Novels of Resistance to Teach Intercultural Empathy and Cultural Analysis (Arthur L. Pressley)
ch. 3 E-Racing While Black (Stephen G. Ray, Jr.)
ch. 4 Called Out My Name, or Had I Known You Were Somebody: The Pain of Fending Off Stereotypes (Nancy Lynne Westfield)
ch. 5 Reading the Signs: The Body as Non-Written Text (Anthony B. Pinn)
ch. 6 Emancipatory Historiography as Pedagogical Praxis: The Blessing and the Curse of Theological Education for the Black Self and Subject (Juan M. Floyd-Thomas and Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas)
ch. 7 Black Rhythms and Consciousness: Authentic Being and Pedagogy (Lincoln E. Galloway)
ch. 8 From Embodied Theodicy to Embodied Theos (Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas)
ch. 9 Teaching Black: God-Talk with Black Thinkers (Arthur L. Pressley and Nancy Lynne Westfield)

Responses
ch. 10 Teaching Black, Talking Back (Carolyn M. Jones)
ch. 11 Together in Solidarity: An Asian American Feminist's Response (Boyung Lee)
ch. 12 Influences of "Being Black, Teaching Black" On Theological Education (Charles R. Foster)

Notes
Select Bibliography
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"Theorizing in the Introductory Course: A Survey of Resources"

Article
McCutcheon, Russell T.
2001
In Critics Not Caretakers: Redescribing the Public Study of Religion (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2001)
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
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"Our "Special Promise" as Teachers: Scholars of Religion and the Politics of Tolerance"

Article
McCutcheon, Russell T.
2001
In Critics Not Caretakers: Redescribing the Public Study of Religion (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2001)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
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"Methods and Theories in the Classroom: Teaching the Study of Myths and Rituals"

Article
McCutcheon, Russell T.
2001
In Critics Not Caretakers: Redescribing the Public Study of Religion (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2001)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
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"Redescribing "Religion and ..." Film: Teaching the Insider/Outsider Problem"

Article
McCutcheon, Russell T.
2001
In Critics Not Caretakers: Redescribing the Public Study of Religion (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2001)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
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Teaching New Religious Movements

Book
Bromley, David G., ed.
2007
Oxford University Press, Oxford & New York
BP603.T43 2007
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Since its inception around 1970, the study of New Religious Movements (NRMs) has evolved into an established multidisciplinary field. At the same time, both the movements and the scholars who study them have been the subjects of intense controversy. In this volume, a group of senior NRM scholars who have been instrumental in the development of the field will offer pivotal essays ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Since its inception around 1970, the study of New Religious Movements (NRMs) has evolved into an established multidisciplinary field. At the same time, both the movements and the scholars who study them have been the subjects of intense controversy. In this volume, a group of senior NRM scholars who have been instrumental in the development of the field will offer pivotal essays that present the basics of NRM scholarship along with guidance for teachers on classroom use.
The book is organized topically around subjects that are both central to the study of NRMs and likely to be useful to non-specialists. Part I contains examinations of the definitional boundaries of the area of study, varying disciplinary perspectives on NRMs, unique methodological/ethical problems encountered in the study of NRMs, and the controversies that have confronted scholars studying NRMs and the movements themselves. Part II examines a series of topics central to teaching about NRMs: the larger sociocultural significance of the movements, their distinctive symbolic and organizational features, the interrelated processes of joining and leaving NRMs, the organization of gender roles in NRMs, media and popular culture portrayals of the movements, the occurrence of corruption and abuse within movements, and violence by and against NRMs. Part III provides informational resources for teaching about NRMs, which are particularly important in a field where knowing the biases of sources is crucial.
With its interdisciplinary approach, the volume provides comprehensive, accessible information and perspectives on NRMs. It is an invaluable guide for instructors navigating this scholarly minefield. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Teaching New Religious Movements/Learning from New Religious Movements (David G. Bromley)

Part 1 Orienting Perspectives in Teaching New Religious Movements
Introducing and Defining the Concept of a New Religion (J. Gordon Melton)
Disciplinary Perspectives on New Religious Movements: Views from the Humanities and Social Sciences (John A. Saliba)
Methodological Issues in the Study of New Religious Movements, (David G. Bromley)
New Religious Movements, Countermovements, Moral Panics, and the Media (James T. Richardson, and Massimo Introvigne)

Part 2 Central Issues in Teaching New Religious Movements
The Meaning and Significance of New Religious Movements (Lorne L. Dawson)
Deliberate Heresies: New Religious Myths and Rituals as Critiques (Susan J. Palmer, and David G. Bromley)
Social Building Blocks of New Religious Movements: Organization and Leadership (E. Burke Rochford Jr.)
The Dynamics of Movement Membership: Joining and Leaving New Religious Movements (Stuart A. Wright)
Gender in New Religions (Sarah M. Pike)
Abuse in New Religious Movements: Challenges for the Sociology of Religion (Janet Jacobs)
New Religious Movements and Violence (Thomas Robbins, and John R. Hall)

Part 3 Resources for Teaching New Religious Movements
Responding to Resistance in Teaching about New Religious Movements (Eugene V. Gallagher)
Teaching New Religious Movements on the World Wide Web (Douglas E. Cowan)
Charting the Information Field: Cult-Watching Groups and the Construction of Images of New Religious Movements (Eileen Barker)
New Religious Movements: A Bibliographic Essay (William Sims Bainbridge)

Index
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Teaching Durkheim

Book
Godlove, Terry F., Jr., ed.
2005
Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York
BL60.T45 2005
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Emile Durkheim's work on religion occupies a central place in religious studies classrooms today. At the undergraduate level, Durkheim is widely taught in large Introduction to Religion courses and in upper division seminars in "theory and method." His work is also taught in graduate Religious Studies departments of all stripes, from those grounded in the social sciences to those rooted in ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Emile Durkheim's work on religion occupies a central place in religious studies classrooms today. At the undergraduate level, Durkheim is widely taught in large Introduction to Religion courses and in upper division seminars in "theory and method." His work is also taught in graduate Religious Studies departments of all stripes, from those grounded in the social sciences to those rooted in phenomenology and history of religions. This diverse classroom use within religious studies is reproduced in neighboring disciplines, where Durkheim's work on religion is regularly introduced in courses in sociology, anthropology, history, and philosophy, as well as in such interdisciplinary programs as Jewish studies and women's studies. This volume is designed as a resource for teachers and students of Durkheim on religion, providing practical advice about productive ways to approach central texts and difficult pedagogical issues. It represents diverse points of views and a range of disciplines. The essays in Part One address large issues arising from the whole of Durkheim's work on religion, such as what material to assign in what sorts of courses, and on how to present the material to students of varying background and motivation. Part Two turns to context, with essays assessing the available English translations of the Elementary Forms of Religious Life, and exploring how to teach the historical, critical, and biographical framework of Durkheim's work on religion. Part Three takes up questions of how to incorporate Durkheim's work in courses concerned with ethics, gender studies, and social theory. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introducing Durkheim (Jonathan Z. Smith)

ch. 2 Durkheim sings : teaching the "new" Durkheim on religion (Ivan Strenski)
ch. 3 Three levels of teaching Durkheim (Edward A. Tiryakian)
ch. 4 Translating Durkheim on religion : what teachers and students should know (Karen E. Fields)
ch. 5 Putting Durkheim's texts to work (Roberto Alun Jones)
ch. 6 Teaching the critics : one route through The elementary forms (Terry F. Godlove, Jr.)
ch. 7 Durkheim as a teacher of religion (Warren Schmaus)
ch. 8 The Socratic Durkheim : teaching Durkheim on moral obligation (Stephen P. Turner and Carlos Bertha)
ch. 9 Confronting the canon in the classroom : approaches to teaching the significance of women, sex, and gender in the work of Emile Durkheim (Jean Elisabeth Pedersen)
ch. 10 Durkheim's theory of misrecognition : in praise of arrogant social theory (Jacques Berlinerblau)
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Teaching Death and Dying

Book
Moreman, Christopher M., ed.
2008
Oxford University Press, Oxford
BL504.T43 2008
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
The academic study of death rose to prominence during the 1960s. Courses on some aspect of death and dying can now be found at most institutions of higher learning. These courses tend to stress the psycho-social aspects of grief and bereavement, however, ignoring the religious elements inherent to the subject. This collection is the first to address the teaching of courses ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
The academic study of death rose to prominence during the 1960s. Courses on some aspect of death and dying can now be found at most institutions of higher learning. These courses tend to stress the psycho-social aspects of grief and bereavement, however, ignoring the religious elements inherent to the subject. This collection is the first to address the teaching of courses on death and dying from a religious-studies perspective.

The book is divided into seven sections. The hope is that this volume will not only assist teachers in religious studies departments to prepare to teach unfamiliar and emotionally charged material, but also help to unify a field that is now widely scattered across several disciplines. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Introduction

Part One: What Ought a Course on Death Accomplish?
ch. 1 What Should a Course on Death and Dying Accomplish? ``Death Education'' in an Undergraduate Religion Course (Lucy Bregman)
ch. 2 Ethical Issues in Teching Death and Dying: Pedagogical Aims in End-of-Life Ethics (Christian Perring)
ch. 3 Teaching Death and Dying in the Context of Religious Studies

Part Two: Practical Applications of a Course on Death
ch. 4 Teaching Death and Dying: A Pastoral Theological Approach (G. Lee Ramsey)
ch. 5 Death, Loss, and Bereavement: The Role of Social Work (Estelle Hopmeyer)
ch. 6 Psychology, Grief, and the Student (David E. Balk)

Part Three: Media as Teacher and Aid to Teaching
ch. 7 The Virtual Resurrection: Technology, Violence, and Interpretations of Death in a Southern University Classroom (Diana Walsh Pasulka)
ch. 8 What Would Spielberg Do? Using Mianstream Films to Teach Visions of the Afterlife (Michael McKenzie)

Part Four: Death in Context
ch. 9 Death and Dying in History (Albert N. Hamscher)
ch. 10 Teaching Outside the Classroom (Kathleen Garces-Foley)

Part Five: Literatures of Death and on Death
ch. 11 Literature, Textbook, and Primary Source: Constructing the Reading List (Sarah Pinnock)
ch. 12 ``Listen to the Dark'': Death and Dying in Music, Film, and Literature (Amir Hussain)
ch. 13 Love Letters to the Dead: Immortal Gifts for the Lifeling Learner (Dorothy Lander and John Graham-Pole)

Part Six: Life After Death
ch. 14 Life After Death: An Overview of Contemporary Beliefs for Teachers (Paul Badham)
ch. 15 Why an Investigation of Paranormal Experience Should Be an Essential Component of a Course on Death (L. Stafford Betty)

Appendix
Index
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Teaching Religion and Film

Book
Watkins, Gregory J., ed.
2008
Oxford University Press, Oxford
PN1995.9.T37 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
In a culture increasingly focused on visual media, students have learned not only to embrace multimedia presentations in the classroom, but to expect them. Such expectations are perhaps more prevalent in a field as dynamic and cross-disciplinary as religious studies, but the practice nevertheless poses some difficult educational issues — the use of movies in academic coursework has far outpaced the scholarship on teaching religion and film. What does it mean ...
Additional Info:
In a culture increasingly focused on visual media, students have learned not only to embrace multimedia presentations in the classroom, but to expect them. Such expectations are perhaps more prevalent in a field as dynamic and cross-disciplinary as religious studies, but the practice nevertheless poses some difficult educational issues — the use of movies in academic coursework has far outpaced the scholarship on teaching religion and film. What does it mean to utilize film in religious studies, and what are the best ways to do it?
In Teaching Religion and Film, an interdisciplinary team of scholars thinks about the theoretical and pedagogical concerns involved with the intersection of film and religion in the classroom. They examine the use of film to teach specific religious traditions, religious theories, and perspectives on fundamental human values. Some instructors already teach some version of a film-and-religion course, and many have integrated film as an ancillary to achieving central course goals. This collection of essays helps them understand the field better and draws the sharp distinction between merely "watching movies" in the classroom and comprehending film in an informed and critical way. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction Teaching Religion and Film Gregory J. Watkins

Part I Establishing Shot: Viewing the Field of Religion and Film
ch. 1 What Are We Teaching When We Teach "Religion and Film"? (William L. Blizek and Michele Desmarais)
ch. 2 Teaching Religion and Film: A Fourth Approach (Conrad Ostwalt)

Part II Film and the Teaching of Religious Traditions
ch. 3 Teaching Biblical Tourism: How Sword-and-Sandal Films Clouded My Vision (Alice Bach)
ch. 4 Designing a Course on Religion and Cinema in India (Gayatri Chatterjeee)
ch. 5 Buddhism, Film, and Religious Knowing: Challenging the Literary Approach to Film (Francisca Cho)
ch. 6 The Pedagogical Challenges of Finding Christ Figures in Film (Christopher Deacy)
ch. 7 Film and the Introduction to Islam Course (Amir Hussain)
ch. 8 Is It All about Love Actually? Sentimentality as Problem and Opportunity in the Use of Film for Teaching Theology and Religion (Clive Marsh)
ch. 9 Women, Theology, and Film: Approaching the Challenge of Interdisciplinary Teaching (Gaye Williams Ortiz)

Part III The Religious Studies Approach
ch. 10 Seeing Is Believing, but Touching's the Truth: Religion, Film, and the Anthropology of the Senses (Richard M. Carp)
ch. 11 There Is No Spoon? Teaching The Matrix, Postperennialism, and the Spiritual Logic of Late Capitalism (Gregory Grieve)
ch. 12 Teaching Film as Religion (John Lyden)
ch. 13 Filmmaking and World Making: Re-Creating Time and Space in Myth and Film (S. Brent Plate)
ch. 14 Introducing Theories of Religion through Film: A Sample Syllabus (Greg Watkins)

Part IV The Values Approach
ch. 15 Touching Evil, Touching Good (Irena S. M. Makarushka)
ch. 16 Teaching Ethics with Film: A Course on the Moral Agency of Women (Ellen Ott Marshall)
ch. 17 Searching for Peace in Films about Genocide (Jolyon Mitchell)

Index
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Teaching Ritual

Book
Bell, Catherine, ed.
2007
Oxford University Press, Oxford
BL600.T43 2007
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Many teachers share an interest in bringing a better appreciation of ritual into their religious studies classes, but are uncertain how to do it. Religious studies faculty know how to teach texts, but they often have difficulty teaching something for which the meaning lies in the doing. How do you teach such "doing"? How much need be done? How does the ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Many teachers share an interest in bringing a better appreciation of ritual into their religious studies classes, but are uncertain how to do it. Religious studies faculty know how to teach texts, but they often have difficulty teaching something for which the meaning lies in the doing. How do you teach such "doing"? How much need be done? How does the teacher talk about the religiosity that exists in personalized relationships, not textual descriptions or prescriptions?
These practical issues also give rise to theoretical questions. Giving more attention to ritual effectively suggests a reinterpretation of religion itself-an understanding less focused on what people have thought and written, and more focused on how they engage their universe. Many useful analyses of ritual derive from anthropological and sociological premises, which may be foreign to religious studies faculty and even seen by some as theologically problematic. This is the first resource to address the issues specific to teaching this subject. A stellar cast of contributors, all scholars of ritual and teachers experienced in using ritual in a wide variety of courses and settings, explain what has worked for them in the classroom, what has not, and what they have learned from the experience of being more real about religion. Their voices range from personal to formal, their topics from ways to use field trips to the role of architecture. The result is a rich guide for teachers who are new to the subject as well as the experienced willing to think about new angles and fresh approaches. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Contributors' Biographies
Introduction (Catherine Bell, editor)

Part I. Teaching the Experience through Encounter and Reflection
ch. 1 "Living A Double Consciousness" (R. Schechner)
ch. 2 "Still Liminal After All These Years: Teaching Ordeals and Peregrinations" (A. Grodzins Gold)
ch. 3 "Dancing Ritual, Ritual Dancing: Experiential Teaching", S. Gill
ch. 4 "The Fieldtrip and Its Role in Teaching Ritual" (D. Pinault)
ch. 5 "Experience, Purpose, Pedagogy and Theory: Ritual Activities in the Classroom" (M. Wallace)
ch. 6 "Ritualizing Zen and the Art of Writing" (R. Grimes)

Part II. Teaching the Questions through Issues and Theories
ch. 7 "Teaching Ritual Propriety and Authority through Japanese Religions" (J. Nelson)
ch. 8 "The Camp-Meeting and the Paradoxes of Evangelical Protestant Ritual" (A. Taves)
ch. 9 "Ritual from Five Angles: A Tool for Teaching" (A. Strathern, and P. Stewart)
ch. 10 "Teaching Rites Ritually" (M. McGann)
ch. 11 "Teaching the Cognitive Approach" (T. Vial)
ch. 12 "Religion as Ritual" (C. Bell)

Part III. Teaching the Medium through Contrast and Engagement
ch. 13 "Teaching Healing Rituals/Ritual Healing" (S. Sered and L. Barnes)
ch. 14 "Reflections on Ritual in Noh and Kyogen" (R. Gardner)
ch. 15 "Ritual Performance and Ritual Practice: Teaching the Multiple Forms and Dimensions of Ritual" (L. Ekstrom and R. Hecht)
ch. 16 "Eventfulness of Space: Teaching about Sacred Architecture IS Teaching about Ritual" (L. Jones)
ch. 17 "Ritual and the Writing Class" (C. Lehrich)

Bibliography
Index
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Teaching Confucianism

Book
Richey, Jeffrey L., ed.
2008
Oxford University Press, Oxford
BL1852.T43 2008
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Even the most casual observer of Chinese society is aware of the tremendous significance of Confucianism as a linchpin of both ancient and modern Chinese identity. Furthermore, the Confucian tradition has exercised enormous influence over the values and institutions of the other cultures of East Asia, an influence that continues to be important in the global Asian diaspora. If forecasters are correct in labeling the 21st century 'the Chinese century,...
Additional Info:
Even the most casual observer of Chinese society is aware of the tremendous significance of Confucianism as a linchpin of both ancient and modern Chinese identity. Furthermore, the Confucian tradition has exercised enormous influence over the values and institutions of the other cultures of East Asia, an influence that continues to be important in the global Asian diaspora. If forecasters are correct in labeling the 21st century 'the Chinese century,' teachers and scholars of religious studies and theology will be called upon to illuminate the history, character, and role of Confucianism as a religious tradition in Chinese and Chinese-influenced societies. The essays in this volume will address the specifically pedagogical challenges of introducing Confucian material to non-East Asian scholars and students. Informed by the latest scholarship as well as practical experience in the religious studies and theology classroom, the essays are attentive to the various settings within which religious material is taught and sensitive to the needs of both experts in Confucian studies and those with no background in Asian studies who are charged with teaching these traditions. The authors represent all the arenas of Confucian studies, from the ancient to the modern. Courses involving Confucius and Confucianism have proliferated across the disciplinary map of the modern university. This volume will be an invaluable resource for instructors not only in religious studies departments and theological schools, but also teachers of world philosophy, non-Western philosophy, Asian studies, and world history. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Introduction: Teaching Confucianism as a Religious Tradition (John H. Berthrong & Jeffrey L. Richey)
Teaching Confucianism in Practice
The Social and Religious Context of Early Confucian Practice (Mark Csikszentmihalyi)
Learning Confucianism through Filial Sons, Loyal Retainers, and Chaste Wives (Keith N. Knapp)
Divination and Sacrifice in Song Neo-Confucianism (Joseph A. Adler)
Teaching Confucianism in History
The Mencius-Xunzi Debate in Early Confucian Ethics (Aaron Stalnaker)
Understanding the Ethical Universe of Neo-Confucianism (Robert W. Foster)
Problematizing Contemporary Confucianism in East Asia (Yiu-ming Fung)
Teaching Confucianism in Dialogue
Reenchanting Confucius: A Western-Trained Philosopher Teaches the Analects (John J. Furlong)
Teaching Confucianism in Christian Contexts (Judith A. Berling)
Index
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Teaching the Daode Jing

Book
Gary D. DeAngelis and Warren G. Frisina, eds.
2008
Oxford University Press, Oxford
BL1900.L35.T35 2008
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
The Daode Jing, a highly enigmatic work rooted in ancient Chinese cosmology, ontology, metaphysics, and moral thinking, is regularly offered to college and high-school students in religion, philosophy, history, literature, Asian studies, and humanities courses. As a result, an ever-expanding group of faculty with very different backgrounds and training routinely confront the question: "How should I teach the Daode Jing?"
...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
The Daode Jing, a highly enigmatic work rooted in ancient Chinese cosmology, ontology, metaphysics, and moral thinking, is regularly offered to college and high-school students in religion, philosophy, history, literature, Asian studies, and humanities courses. As a result, an ever-expanding group of faculty with very different backgrounds and training routinely confront the question: "How should I teach the Daode Jing?"
Written for non-specialists who may not have a background in ancient Chinese culture, the essays collected in this volume provide up-to-date information on contemporary scholarship and classroom strategies that have been successful in a variety of teaching environments.
A classic text like the Daode Jing generates debate among scholars and teachers who ask questions like: Should we capitalize on popular interest in the Daode Jing in our classrooms? Which of the many translations and scholarly approaches ought we to use? Is it appropriate to think of the Daode Jing as a religious text at all? These and other controversies are addressed in this volume.
Contributors are well-known scholars of Daoism, including Livia Kohn, Norman Girardot, Robert Henricks, Russell Kirkland, Hans-Georg Moeller, Hall Roth, and Michael LaFargue. In addition, there are essays by Eva Wong (Daoist practitioner), David Hall (philosophy), Gary DeAngelis (mysticism), and a jointly written essay on pedagogical strategies by Judith Berling, Geoffrey Foy, and John Thompson (Chinese religion). (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Introduction, Hans-Georg Moeller
Approaching the Daode Jing
Third-Person and First-Person Approaches to the Study of the Laozi (Harold D. Roth)
The Dao and the Field: Exploring an Analogy (Robert G. Henricks)
The Daode Jing and Comparative Philosophy (David L. Hall)
Mysticism in the Daode Jing (Gary D. DeAngelis)
The Daode Jing in Practice (Eva Wong)
Imagine Teaching the Daode Jing! (Judith Berling, Geoffrey Foy, John Thompson)
Recent Scholarship and Teaching the Daode Jing
My Way: Teaching the Daode Jing at the Beginning of a New Millenium (Norman J. Girardot)
The Reception of Laozi (Livia Kohn)
Hermeneutics and Pedagogy: Methodological Issues in Teaching the Daode Jing (Russell Kirkland)
Hermeneutics and Pedagogy: Gimme That Old-Time Historicism (Michael LaFargue)
Selected Bibliography
Index
Article cover image
Wabash tree

"How to Help Students Confront Life's 'Big Questions'" (pdf)

Article
Walvoord, Barbara E.
2008
In The Chronicle of Higher Education (Washington, DC, August 15, 2008)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Many college students are interested in spirituality and the "big questions" about life's meaning and values, but many professors seem not to know how to respond to that interest. In this article, the author offers several strategies to help students confront the "big questions". One way is to structure assignments and discussions so that students can have a chance to bring critical thinking directly into relationship with their own experiences ...
Additional Info:
Many college students are interested in spirituality and the "big questions" about life's meaning and values, but many professors seem not to know how to respond to that interest. In this article, the author offers several strategies to help students confront the "big questions". One way is to structure assignments and discussions so that students can have a chance to bring critical thinking directly into relationship with their own experiences and beliefs.
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Democratizing Biblical Studies: Toward an Emancipatory Educational Space

Book
Fiorenza, Elisabeth Schussler
2009
Westminster John Knox Press, Louisville
BV4020.S38 2009
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
In this book, Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza continues her exploration of a radical democratic ethos in graduate biblical education. She argues that it is necessary to reframe the field of biblical studies and replace the competitive teaching models prevalent in graduate programs with an emancipatory, radical democratic pedagogical model that fosters collaboration, participation, and critical engagement. To achieve constructive engagement with the differences of social location and diversity of perspectives ...
Additional Info:
In this book, Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza continues her exploration of a radical democratic ethos in graduate biblical education. She argues that it is necessary to reframe the field of biblical studies and replace the competitive teaching models prevalent in graduate programs with an emancipatory, radical democratic pedagogical model that fosters collaboration, participation, and critical engagement. To achieve constructive engagement with the differences of social location and diversity of perspectives that exist both in the Bible and in our contexts, we must become aware of the pitfalls of one-dimensional thinking that seeks to use the Bible to find definite answers and to exclude different understandings. Schüssler Fiorenza addresses such questions as, What are the educational practices and procedures that are advocated by traditional educational models and how can they be changed? What kind of educational and communicative practices do biblical studies need to develop in order to fashion an emancipatory democratizing rhetorical space and a forum of many voices? To envision, articulate, debate, and practice a radical democratic ethos of biblical studies, she identifies emerging didactic models that can foster such a radical democratic style of learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Toward a Radical Democratic Self-Understanding of Biblical Studies
Contextualizing Arguments for a Radical Democratic Educational Space
Toward a Radical Democratic Pedagogy of Biblical Studies

ch. 1 The Rhetorical Space of Graduate Biblical Studies
Charting the Problem
The Need to Transform the Discourses of Biblical Studies
Proposals for Re-Visioning Biblical Studies
Problematizing the Dualistic-Domain Construction of the Field of Biblical Studies

ch. 2 A Republic of Many Voices: Paradigms of Biblical Studies
Paradigm Criticism
Redescribing and Renaming the Four Paradigms of Biblical Studies
Conclusion

ch. 3 Fashioning a Radical Democratic Discourse
Delineating the Fourth Emancipatory Paradigm
Discursive Struggles within the Fourth Paradigm: From Margin to Postcolonialism
Toward a Shared Analytic: Intersectional Analysis of Kyriarchy
A Pedagogical Model of Agency and Conscientization

ch. 4 Changing Biblical Studies: Toward a Radical Democratic Pedagogy and Ethos
Transforming Malestream Pedagogical Models
Toward a Radical Democratic Emancipatory Pedagogy
Transforming the Didactic Triangle
Toward a Radical Democratic Emancipatory Ethos-Space
Instead of a Conclusion
Metalogue: From Theory to Practice
Creating a Radical Democratic Space: Forum
Creating a Radical Democratic Space: Seminar
A Forum of Many Voices / A Kaleidoscope of Personal Reflections

Index
Cover image

Wabash Symposium: Consultation on Teaching: Visual Arts in the Theology or Religious Studies Classroom

Journal Issue
Haynes, Wren, Myhre, Mason, et al
2009
Arts In Religious and Theological Studies, no. 20:2 2009 (New Brighton, MN
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Deborah J. Haynes
Contemplative Practice: Views from the Religion Classroom and Artist's Studio (Linnea Wren)
Can Religious Faith and Contemporary Art Flourish Together? An Academic, Collaborative, and Experiential Seminar Culminating in Student-Based Art Commissions (Paul O. Myhre)
Encountering Navajo Cosmology Through Sand Painting: Teaching a Method for Engaging Visual Texts (Theresa Mason)
Opening Eyes To The Emmaus Story: A Case Study of Visual Art in Biblical Studies (Daniel G. Deffenbaugh)
Humans In The Landscape (Kimberly Vrundy)
The Dissonant Gaze: Redemption, Liberation, and the Theological Imagination (Rebecca Berru Davis)
Image Resources: An Inventory
TTR cover image

"Theology in Ecological Perspective: An Interdisciplinary, Inquiry-Based Experiment"

TTR
Butkus, Russell A., and Kolmes, Steven A.
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 1 (2008): 42-53
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
As the result of an extensive self-study for the purpose of reaccreditation, the Department of Theology at The University of Portland began offering a new series of courses called Theological Perspective Courses (THEP). THEP courses are upper division and offered by theology faculty in conjunction with another department that has required core courses in the College of Arts and Sciences. They are intended to be interdisciplinary, with two faculty members ...
Additional Info:
As the result of an extensive self-study for the purpose of reaccreditation, the Department of Theology at The University of Portland began offering a new series of courses called Theological Perspective Courses (THEP). THEP courses are upper division and offered by theology faculty in conjunction with another department that has required core courses in the College of Arts and Sciences. They are intended to be interdisciplinary, with two faculty members from different disciplines collaborating on new course design and implementation. THEP 482, Theology in Ecological Perspective, was one of the first two THEP courses taught. This article describes and reflects on the nature of this religion and science course in terms of subject matter, learning theory, and development of community. Several additional appendices to this article appear online at: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu/journal/article2.aspx?id=12397
TTR cover image

"Words with Power" for Social Transformation: An Anatomy of Biblical Criticism for Theological Education"

TTR
Walker-Jones, Arthur
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 2 (2008): 75-81
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
The proliferation of methods of literary criticism in biblical studies raises the question of how to introduce students to the field. This article argues that the work of Northrop Frye is useful for teaching the existential meaning and social impact of the Bible. The first section introduces relevant aspects of Frye's literary theory. The second presents the author's teaching as a case study. The third section concludes with implications for ...
Additional Info:
The proliferation of methods of literary criticism in biblical studies raises the question of how to introduce students to the field. This article argues that the work of Northrop Frye is useful for teaching the existential meaning and social impact of the Bible. The first section introduces relevant aspects of Frye's literary theory. The second presents the author's teaching as a case study. The third section concludes with implications for a philosophy of theological education.
TTR cover image

"The Sage and the South: Teaching Confucianism in Dixie"

TTR
Richey, Jeffrey L.
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 2 (2008): 82-86
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
White and African-American students in the American South are able to meet and learn from Confucianism on its own terms much more readily than their peers elsewhere. This is because of their tendency to respect authority, participate in intergenerational ritual performances (especially those concerned with manners, meals, and mortuary practices), and judge the present in terms of the past (especially the U.S. Civil War). This is true despite the ...
Additional Info:
White and African-American students in the American South are able to meet and learn from Confucianism on its own terms much more readily than their peers elsewhere. This is because of their tendency to respect authority, participate in intergenerational ritual performances (especially those concerned with manners, meals, and mortuary practices), and judge the present in terms of the past (especially the U.S. Civil War). This is true despite the incompatibility that many southern students sense between Confucianism and their own religious doctrines. Instead, southern students' grasp of Confucianism rests on the grounds of lived religious experience. When southern students learn to see in Confucianism a set of beliefs, practices, and experiences that, in some ways, mirror their own, they are empowered to identify the tradition as "religious" in a way that renders "religion" a descriptive category of comparison rather than a limiting category of unique identity.
TTR cover image

"Tell Me a Story of Jesus: Teaching as Storytelling and Four Recent Short Histories of Christianity"

TTR
Clingerman, Forrest
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 3 (2008): 134-140
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Offering a review of four short introductory books on Christianity, this essay discusses how introductory textbooks, and introductory religion courses more generally, are like storytelling. Books by Lindberg, Tomkins, Norris, and Woodhead are reviewed with an emphasis on their classroom use. These books share several things in common – most notably, each is a "short," popular text. Dealing with the topic of Christianity in abbreviated form presents certain challenges and possibilities ...
Additional Info:
Offering a review of four short introductory books on Christianity, this essay discusses how introductory textbooks, and introductory religion courses more generally, are like storytelling. Books by Lindberg, Tomkins, Norris, and Woodhead are reviewed with an emphasis on their classroom use. These books share several things in common – most notably, each is a "short," popular text. Dealing with the topic of Christianity in abbreviated form presents certain challenges and possibilities in the task of teaching. After examining these short histories, the essay reflects on several questions that emerge: When should we use textbooks in college classrooms? What are the goals that teachers have in the use of textbooks? How do textbooks define the subject matter of a course? And finally, how do teachers use texts to aid in telling a story in the classroom?
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"E-jing: Using Information Technology to Teach about Chinese Religions"

TTR
Deitrick, Jim
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 3 (2008): 153-158
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This article discusses ways in which modern online information technologies may be used to enhance students' understanding of Chinese religions and religious texts. This discussion is predicated upon a model of linguistic communication that places significant weight on the structures and "sedimented presuppositions" of language in determining the meanings of discourse. Assignments are presented that use online technologies to give even beginning students insight into the presuppositions of Chinese religious ...
Additional Info:
This article discusses ways in which modern online information technologies may be used to enhance students' understanding of Chinese religions and religious texts. This discussion is predicated upon a model of linguistic communication that places significant weight on the structures and "sedimented presuppositions" of language in determining the meanings of discourse. Assignments are presented that use online technologies to give even beginning students insight into the presuppositions of Chinese religious discourse, while also allowing them to explore, kinesthetically, one of Confucianism's central practices, the reading and writing of Chinese characters. Appendices providing additional materials related to the course are available online: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu/journal/article2.aspx?id=14153.
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"Learning About Teaching from the Traditions We Teach: Reflections on an Undergraduate Buddhism Course"

TTR
Tsai, Julius N.
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 3 (2008): 153-158
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Can one engage in pedagogical reflection from within the worldviews and practices of the religious traditions that one teaches? This essay explores the possibility of generating comparative models for teaching and learning via the Buddhist concepts of no-self (an tman), skilful means (up ya-kau alya), and awakening (bodhi).
Additional Info:
Can one engage in pedagogical reflection from within the worldviews and practices of the religious traditions that one teaches? This essay explores the possibility of generating comparative models for teaching and learning via the Buddhist concepts of no-self (an tman), skilful means (up ya-kau alya), and awakening (bodhi).
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"Teaching Religious Doubt with Toulmin's Model of Reasoning"

TTR
Horne, Milton P.
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 4 (2008): 203-212
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Teaching students to doubt, that is, to "test," theological arguments as one might test any other kind of knowledge is challenging in that the warrant for such testing is not immediately clear. Stephen Toulmin, Richard Rieke, and Allan Janik's model of reasoning provides a conceptual framework that demonstrates the logical relationships between a claim, its grounds, warrants, and backing for warrants. Against such a model, the instructor and students may ...
Additional Info:
Teaching students to doubt, that is, to "test," theological arguments as one might test any other kind of knowledge is challenging in that the warrant for such testing is not immediately clear. Stephen Toulmin, Richard Rieke, and Allan Janik's model of reasoning provides a conceptual framework that demonstrates the logical relationships between a claim, its grounds, warrants, and backing for warrants. Against such a model, the instructor and students may study religious claims, both biblical and theological, with the aim of analyzing the ways such claims find support or a lack of support depending upon the particular ways that claims and evidence have competing warrants. Several pedagogical benefits ensue. First, students see that the validity for theological claims rests as much upon warrants as it does upon grounding. Second, searching for ancient warrants privileges historical-critical investigation. Third, competing warrants for contradictory theological claims summon pedagogical metaphors of process and development.
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"Murder, He Wrote: Introducing Christian Ethics through One Question in the Summa"

TTR
George, William P.
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 4 (2008): 222-229
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
The topic of murder fascinates and haunts undergraduates just as it does our culture. But even as murder violently closes doors on a human life, as a topic of discussion it can also open minds, provoking, extending, and refining students' questions about the moral life, theologically and religiously understood. The aim of this essay is to explain how the brief treatment of murder found in Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica offers ...
Additional Info:
The topic of murder fascinates and haunts undergraduates just as it does our culture. But even as murder violently closes doors on a human life, as a topic of discussion it can also open minds, provoking, extending, and refining students' questions about the moral life, theologically and religiously understood. The aim of this essay is to explain how the brief treatment of murder found in Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica offers an extraordinary introduction to the entire field of Christian ethics. "Of Murder" (Aquinas 1920, II-II 64) may be suited to courses in theological, religious, or comparative ethics as well.
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"The AAR Teaching Series"

TTR
Gallagher, Eugene V.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 1 (2009): 24-36
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching

Additional Info:
The first seven volumes of the American Academy of Religion's "Teaching Religious Studies" series provide informative glimpses of how teachers in very different contexts understand the intellectual decisions, strategies, and actions that constitute their craft. Although individual volumes have different formats, the dominant image of good teaching that emerges is that it is founded on deep and sophisticated knowledge of the particular subject matter. Beyond that, many essays provide instructive ...
Additional Info:
The first seven volumes of the American Academy of Religion's "Teaching Religious Studies" series provide informative glimpses of how teachers in very different contexts understand the intellectual decisions, strategies, and actions that constitute their craft. Although individual volumes have different formats, the dominant image of good teaching that emerges is that it is founded on deep and sophisticated knowledge of the particular subject matter. Beyond that, many essays provide instructive anatomies of particular syllabi, moments in the classroom, or other aspects of teaching. Much of the material in the essays comes from reflective practitioners and there is relatively little sustained engagement with the contemporary literature on teaching and learning. Nonetheless, virtually any teacher can find in these volumes stimulating reflections on the intersections of substantive research and pedagogy in a variety of classroom contexts.
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"Comparative Sacred Texts and Interactive Interpretation: Another Alternative to the "World Religions" Class"

TTR
Patton, Laurie L.; Robbins, Vernon K., and Newby, Gordon D.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 1 (2009): 37-50
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
In this article we argue for an introductory course in the study of religion that proceeds through interactive interpretation as a responsible form of comparison. Interactive interpretation proceeds provisionally, and encourages students to formulate new questions of the materials instead of making final categories about the materials. We use examples from a typical classroom to show how we work with three pedagogical principles: (1) critical reading; (2) pluralism within religious traditions as ...
Additional Info:
In this article we argue for an introductory course in the study of religion that proceeds through interactive interpretation as a responsible form of comparison. Interactive interpretation proceeds provisionally, and encourages students to formulate new questions of the materials instead of making final categories about the materials. We use examples from a typical classroom to show how we work with three pedagogical principles: (1) critical reading; (2) pluralism within religious traditions as well as between religious traditions; and (3) the use of the working hypothesis as a tool in analyzing religious texts. We also make an argument for textual reading as a form of living intellectual practice, which can work alongside of, and not in opposition to, other approaches to the study of religion, such as ethnographic or historical approaches.
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"Teaching Through Creation Stories"

Tactic
Winden-fey, Julia
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 1 (2009): 51
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: discussion prompts for small group work in a world religions course.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: discussion prompts for small group work in a world religions course.
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"Introducing History"

Tactic
Stacy, Patty
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 1 (2009): 52
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students write a history of the course to learn about historical methodology.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students write a history of the course to learn about historical methodology.
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"A Big Fish Story: Using Media in the Introductory Theory Course"

TTR
Crawford O'Brien, Susanne
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 1 (2009): 56-57
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using media to teach theory.
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using media to teach theory.
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"Dreaded Monoliths: Rudolf Otto's Das Heilige and 2001: A Space Odyssey"

TTR
Fuller, Jason D.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 1 (2009): 58-59
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using media to teach theory.
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using media to teach theory.
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"Don't Leave Home Without It! Using Umbrellas in Teaching the Theory of Religion"

TTR
Agnew, Elizabeth N.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 1 (2009): 60-62
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using media to teach theory.
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using media to teach theory.
Additional Info:
This article reflects on an effort to incorporate constructivist pedagogies (learner-centered, inquiry-guided, problem-based models of teaching) into an introductory class on Christian Ethics in an M.Div. curriculum. Although some students preferred more traditional pedagogies, the majority found that constructivist pedagogies better accommodated different life experiences, diverse learning styles, and other features of the M.Div. curriculum. Further, a qualitative assessment of one student exercise indicates that constructivist pedagogies have ...
Additional Info:
This article reflects on an effort to incorporate constructivist pedagogies (learner-centered, inquiry-guided, problem-based models of teaching) into an introductory class on Christian Ethics in an M.Div. curriculum. Although some students preferred more traditional pedagogies, the majority found that constructivist pedagogies better accommodated different life experiences, diverse learning styles, and other features of the M.Div. curriculum. Further, a qualitative assessment of one student exercise indicates that constructivist pedagogies have benefits over traditional pedagogies. Specifically, students' work on a learning-group research project displayed creativity, depth, and breadth not found in individual research papers. Nonetheless, lukewarm student feedback also demonstrated the need to consider wider factors when attempting such innovations.
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"Sustained Experiential Learning: Modified Monasticism and Pilgrimage"

TTR
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 2 (2009): 109-122
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This article outlines a template for sustained experiential learning designed to provide a context for learning the affective and performative as well as intellectual power of religion. This approach was developed for a traditional academic framework, adapting pedagogies developed for experiential learning, aesthetic training, and study abroad, and draws on personal experiences of teaching East Asian religions. The approach integrates intellectual learning with out of class experience to stimulate and ...
Additional Info:
This article outlines a template for sustained experiential learning designed to provide a context for learning the affective and performative as well as intellectual power of religion. This approach was developed for a traditional academic framework, adapting pedagogies developed for experiential learning, aesthetic training, and study abroad, and draws on personal experiences of teaching East Asian religions. The approach integrates intellectual learning with out of class experience to stimulate and enrich the highly personal and often significant questions that may arise upon studying religion and encountering religious practices both in and out of the classroom.
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"Embodying Learning: Post-Cartesian Pedagogy and the Academic Study of Religion"

TTR
Lelwica, Michelle Mary
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 2 (2009): 123-136
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
This paper explores the concept and practice of "embodied pedagogy" as an alternative to the Cartesian approach to knowledge that is tacitly embedded in traditional modes of teaching and learning about religion. My analysis highlights a class I co-teach that combines the study of Aikido (a Japanese martial art) with seminar-style discussions of texts that explore issues pertaining to embodiment in the context of diverse spiritual traditions. The physicality of ...
Additional Info:
This paper explores the concept and practice of "embodied pedagogy" as an alternative to the Cartesian approach to knowledge that is tacitly embedded in traditional modes of teaching and learning about religion. My analysis highlights a class I co-teach that combines the study of Aikido (a Japanese martial art) with seminar-style discussions of texts that explore issues pertaining to embodiment in the context of diverse spiritual traditions. The physicality of Aikido training makes it an interesting "case study" of embodied pedagogy and the lessons it offers both teachers and students about the academic study of religion. Ultimately, the questions and insights this class generates illustrate how post-Cartesian pedagogies can expose, challenge, and correct epistemological assumptions that contribute to one-dimensional views of religion and that fail to address our students as whole persons. A final part of the paper considers other possible venues for embodying teaching and learning in the academic study of religion.
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"The Matrix as Sacred Canopy: Teaching Theory in Religion"

TTR
Wellman, Jr., James, K., and Richter, Charles
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 2 (2009): 141-150
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using media to teach theory.
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using media to teach theory.
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"Teaching Biblical Hermeneutics Through Salman Rushdie's Haroun and the Sea of Stories"

TTR
Gilmour, Michael J.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 2 (2009): 151-161
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using media to teach theory.
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using media to teach theory.
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"Should We Be Teaching the Historical Critical Method?"

TTR
Adam, A.K.M.; Ascough, Richard; Gravett, Sandra; Hunt, Alice; Martin, Dale; Wimberly, Edward, and Yang, Seung Ai
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 2 (2009): 162-187
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
This manuscript is an edited transcript of a panel discussion held at a Society of Biblical Literature conference (Boston, Massachusetts, November 22 to 24, 2008). Alice Hunt begins the discussion by summarizing the content and significance of a new book by Dale Martin, The Pedagogy of The Bible (Westminster John Knox Press, 2008) in which he argues that biblical studies in seminaries and divinity schools give too much emphasis to teaching the historical critical ...
Additional Info:
This manuscript is an edited transcript of a panel discussion held at a Society of Biblical Literature conference (Boston, Massachusetts, November 22 to 24, 2008). Alice Hunt begins the discussion by summarizing the content and significance of a new book by Dale Martin, The Pedagogy of The Bible (Westminster John Knox Press, 2008) in which he argues that biblical studies in seminaries and divinity schools give too much emphasis to teaching the historical critical method and not enough to preparing students for ministry by teaching them to be self-reflective practioners of the improvisational skills of interpreting scripture. Then a panel of bible scholars, including the author, conduct a wide-ranging discussion that raises questions about how biblical studies might better prepare students for ministry, as well as the proper role and appropriate pedagogies for introducing biblical studies in the undergraduate liberal arts curriculum.
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"Teaching for Religious Literacy"

TTR
Gallagher, Eugene V.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 208-221
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
Stephen Prothero's Religious Literacy makes a strong case that minimal religious literacy is an essential requirement for contemporary U. S. citizens. He argues further that high schools and colleges should offer required courses in the study of religion in order to help students reach that baseline literacy. Beyond the general recommendation that such courses focus on biblical literacy and the history of Christianity, however, Prothero does not sketch out his ...
Additional Info:
Stephen Prothero's Religious Literacy makes a strong case that minimal religious literacy is an essential requirement for contemporary U. S. citizens. He argues further that high schools and colleges should offer required courses in the study of religion in order to help students reach that baseline literacy. Beyond the general recommendation that such courses focus on biblical literacy and the history of Christianity, however, Prothero does not sketch out his proposal for teaching religious literacy. This essay argues that in addition to providing factual knowledge, teaching for religious literacy needs to involve sustained attention to how religious people use that factual information to orient themselves in the world, express their individual and group self-understanding, and give their lives direction and meaning. Such attention to the dynamics of religious life can also help students understand why human beings have persisted in this mode of behavior.
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"Documentary Visions, Theological Insights"

TTR
Alderman, Isaac M., and Beyers, Donald J.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 233-247
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
In an attempt to engage students' higher-order thinking skills, we developed a documentary filmmaking project for our introduction to theology course. By documenting certain aspects of the theology of John Wesley and John Henry Newman (God, creation, revelation, Jesus, the church), students were able to delve deeply into these themes, better understanding them and their interrelationships. The project helped the students to actively practice historical theology, rather than passively learn ...
Additional Info:
In an attempt to engage students' higher-order thinking skills, we developed a documentary filmmaking project for our introduction to theology course. By documenting certain aspects of the theology of John Wesley and John Henry Newman (God, creation, revelation, Jesus, the church), students were able to delve deeply into these themes, better understanding them and their interrelationships. The project helped the students to actively practice historical theology, rather than passively learn about it through lectures. In addition, the project emphasized research skills, quality of writing and creative production, and a professional presentation at a screening.
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"Centered Diversity in Systematic Theology"

Tactic
Peterson, James
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 248
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students compare two theology textbooks to gain a new understanding of diversity.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students compare two theology textbooks to gain a new understanding of diversity.
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"Finding the Treasure of God's Attributes"

Tactic
Long, Jude
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 249
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a treasure hunt by which students learn about the attributes of God.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a treasure hunt by which students learn about the attributes of God.
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"A Surprising Enterprise"

Tactic
Irons, Kendra Weddle
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 250
BL41.T4
Topics: Discussion   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: an exercise that treats student groups unequally, to learn about empathetic identification with biblical figures.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: an exercise that treats student groups unequally, to learn about empathetic identification with biblical figures.
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"Accepting Our Limitations: The Textbook as Crutch and Compromise"

TTR
Blanchard, Kathryn D.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 252-253
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
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"Teaching an Introductory Hebrew Bible Course without a Textbook"

TTR
Cowan, Margaret Parks
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 254-255
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
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"Textbooks in the Introductory Course"

TTR
Forbes, Bruce David
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 256-257
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
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"Teaching the History of Christianity: Critical Themes and Challenges"

TTR
Killen, Patricia O'Connell; Duntley, Madeline; Furey, Constance; Gilpin, W. Clark, and Six-Means, Horace E.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 258-286
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
At the November 2008 meeting of the American Academy of Religion, the History of Christianity section sponsored a panel around the question: "What are the key challenges, opportunities, and goals in the History of Christianity classroom today and how best should teachers respond to them?" Beginning with brief sketches of institutional context and identification of one or more pivotal choices each makes in the course they teach, the panelists explored critical ...
Additional Info:
At the November 2008 meeting of the American Academy of Religion, the History of Christianity section sponsored a panel around the question: "What are the key challenges, opportunities, and goals in the History of Christianity classroom today and how best should teachers respond to them?" Beginning with brief sketches of institutional context and identification of one or more pivotal choices each makes in the course they teach, the panelists explored critical themes and issues that arise in teaching the history of Christianity, first with each other and then through interchange with the audience.
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"Theological Dialogue Partners (or Study Buddies for Graduate Students)"

Tactic
Coleman, Monica A.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 351
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students learn theology by working in pairs through the semester.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students learn theology by working in pairs through the semester.
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"Teaching the Facts, Inculcating Knowledge, or Instilling Wisdom? Rationale for a Textbook in BS101"

TTR
Bulkeley, Tim
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 352-353
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
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"How to Learn from World Religion Textbooks"

TTR
Derris, Karen
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 356-357
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
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"Introducing Exegesis with the OIDA Method"

TTR
Toney, Carl N.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 358-365
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Human Timeline: A Spatial-Kinesthetic Exercise in Biblical History"

TTR
Wolfe, Lisa M.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 366-370
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
The Human Timeline invites students to physically re-create biblical history. Each student holds a card that denotes an event randomly selected from the biblical timeline. They then arrange themselves chronologically to learn the correct flow of biblical history. Because of the movement involved and the arbitrary layout of the cards among their classmates, learners engage their spatial-kinesthetic intelligences through this activity. The exercise proves popular among students who identify themselves ...
Additional Info:
The Human Timeline invites students to physically re-create biblical history. Each student holds a card that denotes an event randomly selected from the biblical timeline. They then arrange themselves chronologically to learn the correct flow of biblical history. Because of the movement involved and the arbitrary layout of the cards among their classmates, learners engage their spatial-kinesthetic intelligences through this activity. The exercise proves popular among students who identify themselves as "visual" learners, and ultimately serves the biblical studies classroom by reinforcing biblical history as a necessary framework for understanding the biblical text.
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"The Pedagogy of Slowing Down: Teaching Talmud in a Summer Kollel"

TTR
Kanarek, Jane
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 1 (2010): 15-34
BL41.T4
Topics: Discussion   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This article explores a set of practices in the teaching of Talmud called “the pedagogy of slowing down.” Through the author’s analysis of her own teaching in an intensive Talmud class, “the pedagogy of slowing down” emerges as a pedagogical and cultural model in which the students learn to read more closely and to investigate the multiplicity of meanings inherent in the Talmudic text, thus bridging the gap between ...
Additional Info:
This article explores a set of practices in the teaching of Talmud called “the pedagogy of slowing down.” Through the author’s analysis of her own teaching in an intensive Talmud class, “the pedagogy of slowing down” emerges as a pedagogical and cultural model in which the students learn to read more closely and to investigate the multiplicity of meanings inherent in the Talmudic text, thus bridging the gap between an ancient text and its contemporary students. This article describes the specific techniques in the pedagogy of slowing down, and the ways in which this teaching practice contributes both to students’ becoming more attentive readers and to the ongoing development of their religious voices.
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"Making List of What You Know About . . . "

TTR
Miller, Charles William
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 1 (2010): 53
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 36, no. 2

Journal Issue
2009
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC383.S65 2009
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface
Guest Editor's Introduction

ch. 1 Where Religion Faculty Meet Students' Worlds: Lessons from the GTU Preparing Future Faculty Project
ch. 2 Engaging the Institution: Mentoring Future Faculty, Big Questions of Vocation, and the Reality of Assessment
ch. 3 Reengineering the Teaching Machine: Big Questions from the Inside Out and the Outside In
ch. 4 The Stakes Involved in 'Going Spiritual': Mentoring Future Faculty toward Meaning and Value
ch. 5 Big Questions of Vocation, Professional Identity, and Classroom Practice: A Conversation Between Colleagues
ch. 6 Conflations and Confrontations: Spirituality, Religion, and Values in the Liberal Arts Classroom
ch. 7 The Spectre of Spirituality: On the (In) Utility of 'Spirituality' as an Analytical Category
ch. 8 Spirituality in Higher Education?
ch. 9 The Question is the Answer
ch. 10 Pedagogy of Reverence: A Narrative Account
ch. 11 Does Spirituality Have a Place in Higher Education?: A Response
ch. 12 Spirituality in Higher Education: Problem, Practices, and Programs: A Response
ch. 13 Spirituality in Higher Education: Toward a Holistic Approach to the Development of Future Faculty in Theology and Religion
ch. 14 Fuzzy But Not Warm: On the (Continuing) Descriptive and Analytical Inutility of 'Spirituality'
ch. 15 A Contemplative Response: The Part Is the Whole

Contributors
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Teaching Difficult Subjects

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2006
Spotlight on Teaching 21, no. 4 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/oct2006sot.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/oct2006sot.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching Difficult Subjects (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Gurus, Swamis, and Others (Cynthia Ann Humes)
ch. 3 Hinduism Here (Jack Hawley)
ch. 4 Cosmology Hopping: Engaging and Avoiding Controversy in the Religious Studies Classroom (Jennifer Rycenga)
ch. 5 Teaching Religion in a Changing World That Needs Changing (Randal Cummings)
ch. 6 Orientalism and Islam in the Post-9/11 Classroom (Zayn Kassam)
ch. 7 The Problem of Pluralism: Teaching Islamic Diversity (Vernon James Schubel)
ch. 8 Difficult Knowledges: Sexuality, Gender, Religion (Susan E. Henking)
ch. 9 Teaching, Voic(ing), Silenc(ing): Toward a Polyglot Pedagogy (Robert D. Maldonado)
ch. 10 Teaching “Native American Religions” in Central New York (Philip P. Arnold)
ch. 11 Teaching on War (Larry Kent Graham)
ch. 12 Teaching the Unteachable: Cassandra’s Paradox (Michael Dobkowski and Richard C. Salter)
Journal cover image

News, Media, and Teaching Religion

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2007
Spotlight on Teaching 22, no. 3 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/rsnsotfinal.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/rsnsotfinal.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 News, Media, and Teaching Religion (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Ways of Truth-Telling in a Wired World (Rachel Wagner)
ch. 3 Deconstructing the Media in a Virtual Classroom (Claire Badaracco)
ch. 4 Dolly, Fluffy, and Teaching Ethics 101 (Kiki Kennedy-Day)
ch. 5 Swimming in the Sea of News (Whitney Bodman)
ch. 6 "Authentic Material" Ads, Pictures and Krishna Utensils (Rebecca J. Manring)
ch. 7 News, Popular Media, and Orientalist Islam (Rubina Ramji)
ch. 8 Teaching Religion, Media Culture and Haifa (Michele Rosenthal)
ch. 9 Reporting on Religion: A Journalistic View (Adelle M. Banks)
Journal cover image

Diversifying Knowledge Production: The Other within Christianity

Journal Issue
Kassam, Zayn, ed.
2007
Spotlight on Teaching 22, no. 4 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/sotoct07.pdf 
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/sotoct07.pdf 

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Diversifying Knowledge Production: The Other within Christianity (Zayn Kassam)
ch. 2 Hegemonies of Knowledge Production (Zayn Kassam)
ch. 3 On Being the Academic Other (Miguel A. De La Torre)
ch. 4 Redemptive Difference: What Can a Black Woman Teach Me? (Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas)
ch. 5 The Other within Mexican-American Religious Studies (Gastón Espinosa)
ch. 6 Whose Religion? Immigrants and the First Amendment (Simeon O. Ilesanmi)
ch. 7 Homosexualized and Racialized Enemy as Anti/Christ (Erin Runions)
ch. 8 Dialectic Emptying: Self and the Other Within (Andrew Sung Park)
ch. 9 Transmodern, Transnational, Transdisciplinary, Trans (Kwok Pui Lan)
ch. 10 From Theorizing the Other to Theories of Others (Elizabeth A. Castelli)
ch. 11 Survival Strategies for an Ethnic Studies Professor (Andrea Smith)
Journal cover image

Signifying (on) Scriptures: Text(ures) and Orientations

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2008
Spotlight on Teaching 23, no. 3 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2008MaySOT.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2008MaySOT.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Signifying (on) Scriptures: Text(ures) and Orientations (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Signifying (on) Scriptures: Text(ures) and Orientations (Vincent L. Wimbush)
ch. 3 Roundtable Discussion: (Grey Gundaker; Tat-siong Benny Liew; Margaret Aymer; Yan Shoucheng; and Nikky-Guninder Singh)
ch. 4 Conversations
Journal cover image

The Tenth Anniversary of the AAR Excellence in Teaching Award

Journal Issue
Pippin, Tina, ed.
2009
Spotlight on Teaching 24, no. 4 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2009OctSpotlightonTeaching.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2009OctSpotlightonTeaching.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The Tenth Anniversary of the AAR Excellence in Teaching Award (Tina Pippin)
ch. 2 A Pedagogy of Incompleteness (Tina Pippin)
ch. 3 Literacy and Resistance: On Introducing Religion (Eugene V. Gallagher)
ch. 4 The Pedagogical Value of Our Existential "Why" (Timothy Renick)
ch. 5 Reaffirming Teaching as an Act of Composition (Patricia O’Connell Killen)
ch. 6 Cultivating a Pedagogy of Possibility: The Moral Wisdom and Ethical Practice of Teaching as a Vocation (Stacey Floyd-Thomas)
ch. 7 Ignatius, Dewey, and Me: How Ignatian and Experiential Pedagogies Have Transformed My Teaching (Fred Glennon)
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Teaching Critical Thinking and Praxis

Journal Issue
Golemon, ed., Lawrence
2008
Spotlight on Theological Education 2, no. 1 March
BV4019.S66
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2008MarchSpotlightonTheologicalEducation.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2008MarchSpotlightonTheologicalEducation.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Theology as Critical Inquiry (Paul E. Capetz)
ch. 2 Reenacting Ancient Pedagogy in the Classroom (Marjorie Lehman)
ch. 3 Forming a Critical Imagination (Karen-Marie Yust)
ch. 4 Critical Thinking and Prophetic Witness, Historically-Theologically Based (Glen H. Stassen)
ch. 5 Social Theory as a Critical Resource (Paul Lakeland)
ch. 6 Ethnography as Critical Theological Resource (Mary McClintock Fulkerson)
ch. 7 Contextualizing Womanist/Feminist Critical Thought and Praxis (Rosetta E. Ross)
ch. 8 Critical Perspective in Biblical Studies (Robert Coote)
ch. 9 Liturgical Theology as Critical Practice (Bruce T. Morrill)
ch. 10 The Parish Context: A Critical Horizon for Teaching and Learning Ethics (Cheryl J. Sanders)
ch. 11 Critical Reflection and Praxis in Developing Ministerial Leaders (Emily Click)
ch. 12 New Wine in Old Vessels: Enabling Students to Enter an Age-old Conversation (Norman J. Cohen)
Cover image

Theological Illiteracy and Its Effect on the Enterprise of Theological Education

Journal Issue
Talvacchia, ed., Kathleen
2009
Spotlight on Theological Education 3, no. 1 May
BV4019.S66
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Theological Education   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2009MaySpotlightonTheologicalEducation.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2009MaySpotlightonTheologicalEducation.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Called to Educate (Lee H. Butler)
ch. 2 Daring to Engage the World (Daisy L. Machado)
ch. 3 The Cultivation of Imagination as Literacy for Theological Education (Emily Click)
ch. 4 Theological Literacy through World Religions (Elizabeth Conde-Frazier)
ch. 5 The Challenge of Theological Illiteracy for Teaching Comparative Theology (John J. Thatamanil)
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 28, no. 2

Journal Issue
2001
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2001 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Letters from the Council on Islamic Education

ch. 2 In Search of an Establishment Principle: The Original Understanding, Pre-Game Prayers, and Aid to Religious Schools

ch. 3 A "Perfect Standard?" Exploring Perceptions of Student Life and Culture at Wheaton College

ch. 4 Hecate Does Harvard: Notes on Academic Criticism of Wiccan Practice

ch. 5 An End to the Heckler's Veto: Good News Club v. Milford Central School

ch. 6 Thayer S. Warshaw - A Tribute

ch. 7 Does Why Religion Matters Really Matter?

Contributors
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 28, no. 1

Journal Issue
2001
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2001 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Constructing a Spirituality of Teaching: A Personal Perspective

ch. 2 A Vision of Schools with Spirit

ch. 3 Building a Comfort Zone: Teacher Training and Standards-Based Education about Religion

ch. 4 Ex Corde Ecclesiae and American Catholic Higher Education: Dead on Arrival?

ch. 5 Spiritually Committed Public School Teachers: Their Beliefs and Practices Concerning Religious Expression in the Classroom

ch. 6 Cognitive Emotions and Emotional Cognitions

Field Notes

Contributors
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 29, no. 1

Journal Issue
2002
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2002 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 How September 11, 2001 Transformed My Course on Religious Pluralism, Spirituality, and Education

ch. 2 The Peripatetic Class: Buddhist Traditions and Myths of Pedagogy

ch. 3 John Dewey and His Religious Critics

ch. 4 The Role of Religion in Korean Higher Education

ch. 5 How Do We Respond When All Our Ways of Knowing Converge on Subversive Truths?

ch. 6 Nord's Net: "Ways of Knowing" for the Science Classroom

ch. 7 Response to: A 'Perfect Standard'

ch. 8 Review of Whose Kids Are They Anyway?" Religion and Morality in America's Public Schools

Books Received

Contributors
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 29, no. 2

Journal Issue
2002
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2002 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 The School Voucher Decision

ch. 2 School Vouchers and the Original Understanding of the Establishment Clause

ch. 3 Zelman vs. Simmons-Harris: Remarks from a National Press Club Panel

ch. 4 Our Public Schools: Inclusive Mission Brings Us All Together

ch. 5 Chuang Tzu as Teacher: Pedagogical Insights from the Chuang Tzu

ch. 6 Openly Addressing the Reality: Homosexuality and Catholic Seminary Policies

ch. 7 The Living Color of Student's Lives: Bringing Cajitas into the Classroom

ch. 8 Two Preachers, a Trial Lawyer, ad Aristotle

ch. 9 Maintaining a Christian Institutional Identity while Embracing Religious Diversity

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 30, no.1

Journal Issue
2003
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2003 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Inviting Atheists to the Table: A Modest Proposal for Higher Education

ch. 2 Teaching Spirituality in Public Higher Education

ch. 3 Spirituality and Religion: Through the Eyes of the "Hidden Educators"

ch. 4 Understanding Women's Spirituality in the Context of a Progressive Campus-Based Catholic Community

ch. 5 Faith and Public Education: Immigrants, Iowa, and the Biblical Mandate to Welcome the Stranger

ch. 6 'Moral Victories': Ronald Reagan and the Debate over School Prayer

Contributors
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 30, no.2

Journal Issue
2003
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2003 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Religion and Public Schools: A Forty Year Retrospective

ch. 2 Defining Spirituality in Public Education: A Response to R. J. Nash from a Spirituality Engaged Atheist

ch. 3 Challenges To Discernment in Religious Education

ch. 4 The Austin TEA Party: Homeschooling Controversy in Texas, 1986-1994

ch. 5 The Sense of Spiritual Calling Among Teacher Education Program Students

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 31, no.1

Journal Issue
2004
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2004 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Taking the Tournament of Worldviews Seriously in Education: Why Teaching about Religion Is Not Enough

ch. 2 Fostering Spiritual Depth in a Trans-traditional Context: Communicating Across Differences

ch. 3 God's People and Fundamentalist Ideology in the Classroom: an Examination of Free Presbyterian Schooling in Northern Ireland

ch. 4 In the Matter of Race, Memory and Transformation: The Use of Sacred Sites to Teach Social Justice

ch. 5 Spirituality and School Leaders: The Value of Spirituality in the Lives of Aspiring School Leaders

ch. 6 Evangelical Students in Public Schools: They Don't Stand Out, But Don't Fit In

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 31, no.2

Journal Issue
2004
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2004 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Studying Religious Diversity in Public Education: An Interpretive Approach to Religious and Intercultural Understanding

ch. 2 The Complex and Rich Landscape of Student Spirituality: Findings from the Goucher College Spirituality Survey

ch. 3 Being Religious at Knox College: Attitudes Toward Religion, Christian Expression, and Conservative Values on Campus

ch. 4 Religious Autonomy and World Religious Education

ch. 5 Comparing the Influence of Religion on Education in the United States and Overseas: A Meta-Analysis

ch 6. The Religious Free Speech Rights of Public School Teachers: Wigg vx. Sioux Falls School District

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 32, no.2

Journal Issue
2005
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2005 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Evangelicals on Campus: An Exploration of Culture, Faith and College Life

ch. 2 The Big Chill: Are Campuses Turning a Cold Shoulder to Religious Students?

ch. 3 Jesus, the Enlightenment and Teaching World History: The Struggles of an Evangelical Scholar

ch. 4 Listening to Teacher Voices: Religion in Schools in the Rural South

ch. 5 In The World But Not of It? Voices and Experiences of Conservative Christian Students in Public Schools

Contributors

Coming in Future Issues

Books Received
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 32, no.1

Journal Issue
2005
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2005 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

Special Focus Section


Rethinking Religion, Education, and Pluralism in Europe and the United States


ch. 1 Rethinking Religious Education and Plurality: Issues in Public Religious Education

ch. 2 Religion, Pluralism, and Public Education in America

ch. 3 Defining and Promoting the Study of Religion in British and American Schools

ch. 4 Engaging the Believer A Contribution to the Discussion of Robert Jackson's Rethinking Religious Education and Plurality

ch. 5 The Study of Religion in American Schools Response to Robert Jackson's Religious Education and Plurality

ch. 6 European and Danish Religious Education: Human Rights, the Secular State, and Rethinking Religious Education and Plurality

ch. 7 Recasting Agreements that Govern Teaching and Learning: An Intellectual and Spiritual Framework for Transformation

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 33, no.2

Journal Issue
2006
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2006 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

Special Issue Spirituality in Higher Education

ch. 1 Guest Editor's Preface

ch. 2 Learning With Heart And Mind: Embracing Wholeness in Learning Communities

ch. 3 Integrating Religion and Spirituality in Higher Education: Meeting the Global Challenges of the 21st Century

ch. 4 Equanimity and Spirituality

ch. 5 How Colleges Differ in their Efforts to Promote Moral and Ethical Development in College

ch. 6 Understanding the "Interior" Life of Faculty: How Important is Spirituality?

ch. 7 The Dynamics of Spirituality and the Religious Experience

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 33, no.3

Journal Issue
2006
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2006 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 God, Darwin, and the Courts: An Evolving Debate

ch. 2 Teaching the Contexts: Why Evolution Should Be Taught As An Argument and How it Might be Done

ch. 3 Problems in the Philosophical Bases of Intelligent Design

ch. 4 Challenging the Myth of Human Superiority

ch. 5 "This Evolution Bit is Straight from Satan": McLean v. Arkansas Board of Education and the Democratization of Southern Christianity

ch. 6 A Clash of Opposing Worldviews: How One Professor Teaches the Intelligent Design/Evolution Controversy

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 33, no.1

Journal Issue
2006
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2006 Winter
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Exploring Religious Pluralism in Higher Education: Non-Majority Religious Perspectives among Entering First-Year College Students

ch. 2 Teaching Adolescents about Religious Pluralism in a Post- 9/11 World

ch. 3 Diversity and Spirituality in Secular Higher Education: The Teaching Paradox

ch. 4 Evoke: Remembering an Institution's Mission Through Soulful Renewal

ch. 5 Social Studies Teacher Educators: A Survey of Attitudes Toward Religion in the Curriculum

Contributors

Coming in Future Issues
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 34, no.1

Journal Issue
2007
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2007 Winter
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 "Do You Believe in the Whole Idea of 'God the Father'?" How College Students Talk about Spiritual Transformation

ch. 2 Bible Bills, Bible Curricula, and Controversies of Biblical Proportions: Legislative Efforts to Promote Bible Courses in Public Schools

ch. 3 The Philosophy of Baha'i Education

ch. 4 Religion and High Academic Achievements in Puerto Rican High School Students

ch. 5 Government Involvement in Religious Education: Perspectives from Abraham Kuyper on School Choice

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 34, no.2

Journal Issue
2007
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2007 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Talking With Students About Faith in an Era of Religious Extremes

ch. 2 Exploring Religion and Christianity as Points of Diversity Within Counseling Training Programs

ch. 3 Addressing the Identity-Relevance Dilemma: Religious Particularity and Pluralism as Presbyterian Church-Related Colleges

ch. 4 Planning for Change in Christian Colleges: Learnings from Lilly's PTEV

ch. 5 Islamic and Liberal Visions of Citizenship Education: Religion and State in the National Curriculum of Pakistan

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 34, no.3

Journal Issue
2007
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2007 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Measuring Faculty Spirituality and its Relationship to Teaching Style

ch. 2 Learning to Teach about Religion in Public Schools: Perspectives and Experiences of Student Teachers in the Program for Religion and Secondary Education at Harvard Divinity School

ch. 3 Rain and Snow, Bless the Lord: Quaker Theology and Teacher Education Practice

ch. 4 Life on Campus after September 11th: Undergraduates' Attitudes Regarding War and Religious Discrimination

ch. 5 Review of the Bible in History and Literature

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 35, no.3

Journal Issue
2008
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2008 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Dueling Weltanschauungen: Contemporary Collegiate Worldviews Part 1

ch. 2 Between Secularism and Pluralism: Religious Clubs on the Queen's University Campus

ch. 3 John Haught and the New Atheists

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 35, no.2

Journal Issue
2008
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2008 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 The Developmental Pathways of Evangelical Christian Students

ch. 2 Talking with Students about Truth: Using Heidegger to Loosen the Grip of Literal Absolutes

ch. 3 Public Funding, Religious Education, and Multiculturalism in Canada

ch. 4 Latino/a Participation and Engagement in Community Events, in Church Settings, and in Educational Settings

ch. 5 The Servant and Teacher: "Poured Out Like Water" An Essay on Teaching and Living

ch. 6 Judical "hostility to all things religious in public life" or Healthy Separation of Religion and Public Education?

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 35, no.1

Journal Issue
2008
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2008 Winter
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 "Complete Victory is Our Objective": The National Council on Bible Curriculum in Public Schools

ch. 2 Community, Freedom, and Commitment: Student Discipline at Religiously- Affiliated Colleges and Universities

ch. 3 World Religions in Modesto: Findings from a Curricular Innovation

ch. 4 Teaching from the Edge

ch. 5 Wholeness and Creativity in Religious Studies Teaching

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 36, no.1

Journal Issue
2009
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2009 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Dueling Weltanschauungen: Contemporary Collegiate Worldviews Part II Toleration and Diversity as Defining Values?

ch. 2 Race Through Religious Eyes: Focusing Teacher Reflectivity on Race, Culture, and Spiritual Belief

ch. 3 Faith-Based Charter Schools: An Idea Whose Time is Unlikely to Come

ch. 4 Bible Electives in Public Schools: A Guide From the Society of Biblical Literature

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 36, no.3

Journal Issue
2009
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2009 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 The Quest for Meaning: Teaching Spirituality in Communication, Social Work, Nursing, and Leadership

ch. 2 The 'Invisible Institution' and a Disappearing Achievement Gap

ch. 3 An Empirical Study on Factors Influencing Parents' School Choice

ch. 4 Religion Inside the Schoolhouse Gate: Gatekeeping Forces and Religion Coverage in Public High School Newspapers

ch. 5 Teaching and the Seasons of Time: The Final Days of an Art Class

Contributors
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Debating Moral Education: Rethinking the Role of the Modern University

Book
Kiss, Elizabeth and J. Peter Euben, eds.
2010
Duke University Press, Durham, NC
LC311.D43 2010
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
After decades of marginalization in the secularized twentieth-century academy, moral education has enjoyed a recent resurgence in American higher education, with the establishment of more than 100 ethics centers and programs on campuses across the country. Yet the idea that the university has a civic responsibility to teach its undergraduate students ethics and morality has been met with skepticism, suspicion, and even outright rejection from both inside and outside the academy. ...
Additional Info:
After decades of marginalization in the secularized twentieth-century academy, moral education has enjoyed a recent resurgence in American higher education, with the establishment of more than 100 ethics centers and programs on campuses across the country. Yet the idea that the university has a civic responsibility to teach its undergraduate students ethics and morality has been met with skepticism, suspicion, and even outright rejection from both inside and outside the academy. In this collection, renowned scholars of philosophy, politics, and religion debate the role of ethics in the university, investigating whether universities should proactively cultivate morality and ethics, what teaching ethics entails, and what moral education should accomplish. The essays quickly open up to broader questions regarding the very purpose of a university education in modern society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Noah Pickus)
Acknowledgments

I. Introduction: Why the Return to Ethics? Why Now?
ch. 1 Debating Moral Education: An Introduction (Elizabeth Kiss and J. Peter Euben)
ch. 2 The Changing Contours of Moral Education in American Colleges and Universities (Julie Reuben)

II. What Are Universities For?
ch. 3 Aim High: A Response to Stanley Fish (Elizabeth Kiss and J. Peter Euben)
ch. 4 I Know It When I See It: A Reply to Kiss and Euben (Stanley Fish)
ch. 5 The Pathos of the University: The Case of Stanley Fish (Stanley Hauerwas)
ch. 6 On the Distribution of Moral Badges: A Few Worries (Elizabeth V. Spelman)

III. The Politics and Ethics of Higher Education
ch. 7 Pluralism and the Education of the Spirit (Wilson Carey McWilliams and Susan McWilliams)
ch. 8 Multiculturalism and Moral Education (Lawrence Blum)
ch. 9 Against Civic Education (James Bernard Murphy)
ch. 10 Education, Independence, and Acknowledgment (Patchen Markell)
ch. 11 The Power of Morality (George Shulman)
ch. 12 Hunger, Ethics, and the University: A Radical Democratic Goad in Ten Pieces (Romand Coles)

IV. Which Virtues? Whose Character?
ch. 13 Is There an Ethicist in the House? How Can We Tell? (David A. Hoekema)
ch. 14 The Possibility of Moral Education in the University Today (J. Donald Moon)
ch. 15 Is a Humanistic Education Humanizing? (Ruth W. Grant)
ch. 16 Players and Spectators: Sports and Ethical Training in the American University (Michael Allen Gillespie)

Bibliography
Contributors
Index
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 37, no. 1

Journal Issue
2010
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 Spring 2010
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

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Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

Articles, Essays

ch. 1 How School Law Scholars Teach about Religion in Public Schools: An Analysis of Graduate and Undergraduate Textbooks (Suzanne E. Eckes)

ch. 2 Finding Congruence, Finding Meaning: Value Intersections and Transforming Relationships among Faculty and Staff at a Religious College (Alyssa N. Bryant, Christy Moran Craft)

ch. 3 Asking Sacred Questions: Understanding Religion's Impact on Teacher Belief and Action (Kimberly White)

ch. 4 The Evolving Place of Research on Religion in the American Educational Research Association (Jason Nelson)

Resource Reviews
ch. 5 A Buddhist in the Classroom

ch. 6 American Educational History: School, Society, and the Common Good

ch. 7 Education about Religions and Beliefs (ERB) Clearninghouse
Additional Info:
University teaching and learning take place within ever more specialized disciplinary settings, each characterized by its unique traditions, concepts, practices and procedures. It is now widely recognized that support for teaching and learning needs to take this discipline-specificity into account. However, in a world characterized by rapid change, complexity and uncertainty, problems do not present themselves as distinct subjects but increasingly within trans-disciplinary contexts calling for graduate outcomes that go ...
Additional Info:
University teaching and learning take place within ever more specialized disciplinary settings, each characterized by its unique traditions, concepts, practices and procedures. It is now widely recognized that support for teaching and learning needs to take this discipline-specificity into account. However, in a world characterized by rapid change, complexity and uncertainty, problems do not present themselves as distinct subjects but increasingly within trans-disciplinary contexts calling for graduate outcomes that go beyond specialized knowledge and skills. This ground-breaking book highlights the important interplay between context-specific and context-transcendent aspects of teaching, learning and assessment. It explores critical questions, such as:

What are the ‘ways of thinking and practicing’ characteristic of particular disciplines? How can students be supported in becoming participants of particular disciplinary discourse communities?

Can the diversity in teaching, learning and assessment practices that we observe across departments be attributed exclusively to disciplinary structure?

To what extent do the disciplines prepare students for the complexities and uncertainties that characterize their later professional, civic and personal lives?

Written for university teachers, educational developers as well as new and experienced researchers of Higher Education, this highly-anticipated first edition offers innovative perspectives from leading Canadian, US and UK scholars on how academic learning within particular disciplines can help students acquire the skills, abilities and dispositions they need to succeed academically and also post graduation.

Carolin Kreber is Professor of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education and the Director of the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Assessment at the University of Edinburgh (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Figures and tables
Contributors
Forword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I: Introduction - Setting The Context
ch. 1 Supporting Student Learning in the Context of Diversity, Complexity and Uncertanity
ch. 2 The Modern Research University and its Disciplines: The Interplay between Contextual and Context-transcendent Influences on Teaching

Part II: Disciplines and Their Epistemological Structure
ch. 3 (research-based) The Commons: Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Encounters
ch. 4 (reactive) Academic Disciplines: Homes or Barricades?
ch. 5 (reactive) Hard and Soft - A Useful Way of Thinking about Disciplines? Reflections from Engineering Education on Disciplinary Identities

Part III: Ways of Thinking and Practicing
ch. 6 (researched-based) Ways of Thinking and Practicing in Biology and History: Disciplinary Aspects of Teaching and Learning Environments
ch. 7 (reactive) Exploring Disciplinary in Academic Development: Do Ways of Thinking and Practicing Help Faculty to Think about Learning and Teaching?
ch. 8 (reactive) Opening History's Black Boxes: Decoding the Disciplinary Unconscious of Historians

Part IV: Exploring Disciplinary Teaching and Learning From a Socio-Cultural Perspective
ch. 9 (research-based) Guiding Students into a Discipline: The Significance of the Teacher
ch. 10 (reactive) Diverse Student Voices within Disciplinary Discourses
ch. 11 (reactive) Guiding Students into a Discipline: The Significance of the Student's View

Part V: Learning Partnerships In Disciplinary Learning
ch. 12 (research-based) Educating Students for Self-Authorship: Learning Partnerships to Achieve Complex Outcomes
ch. 13 (reactive) Supporting Student Development In and Beyond the Disciplines: The Role of the Curriculum
ch. 14 (reactive) Constraints to Implementing Learning Partnership Models and Self-Authorship in the Arts and Humanities

Part VI: Disciplines And Their Interactions With Teaching And Learning Regimes
ch. 15 (research-based) Beyond Epistemological Essentialism: Academic Tribes in the Twenty-First Century
ch. 16 (reactive) Exploring Teaching and Learning Regimes in Higher Education Settings
ch. 17 (reactive) Teaching and Learning Regimes from Within: Significant Networks as a Locus for the Social Construction of Teaching and Learning

Part VII: General Observations On Previous Themes
ch. 18 Assessment for Career and Citizenship
ch. 19 Teaching Within and Beyond the Disciplines: The Challenge for Faculty

Index
Cover image

Writing Theology Well

Book
Yaghjian, Lucretia
2006
Continuum International London
BR44.Y34 2006
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Religion   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
In its creative integration of the disciplines of writing, rhetoric, and theology, Writing Theology Well provides a standard text for theological educators engaged in the teaching and mentoring of writing across the theological curriculum. As a theological rhetoric, it will also encourage excellence in theological writing in the public domain by helping to equip students for their wider vocations as writers, preachers, and communicators in a variety of ministerial and ...
Additional Info:
In its creative integration of the disciplines of writing, rhetoric, and theology, Writing Theology Well provides a standard text for theological educators engaged in the teaching and mentoring of writing across the theological curriculum. As a theological rhetoric, it will also encourage excellence in theological writing in the public domain by helping to equip students for their wider vocations as writers, preachers, and communicators in a variety of ministerial and professional contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface

Part I Writing Theological Rhetorics Well
ch. 1 Writing Theology Well in Its Own Context
ch. 2 Writing Theological Reflection Well: Rhetorics of Process, Problem Solving, and Proclamation
ch. 3 Writing Theological Argument Well: Rhetorics of Inquiry, Reading, Reflection, and Persuasion
ch. 4 Writing the Theological Essay Well: Rhetorics of Identification, Correlation, Suspicion, and Construction

Part II Writing Theological and Biblical Research Well
ch. 5 Writing Theological Research Well (I): Rhetorics of Research and Investigation
ch. 6 Writing Theological Research Well (II): Rhetorics of Organization and Documentation
ch. 7 Writing the Biblical Essay Well (I): Rhetorics of Exegesis and Interpretation
ch. 8 Writing the Biblical Essay Well (II): A Critical-Hermeneutical Rhetoric

Part III Toward a Theological Style and Voice of Your Own
ch. 9 Writing with Theological Imagination Well: Rhetorics of Analogy, Metaphor, and Symbol
ch. 10 Rewriting Theology Well (I): Rhetorics of Style and Voice
ch. 11 Rewriting Theology Well (II): Rhetorics of Words, Sentences, and Paragraphs
ch. 12 Rewriting Theology Well (III): A Rhetoric of Revision

Epilogue: Writing Theology Well in Your New Context: From Writing for Professors to Writing with a Professional Voice
Notes
Index
TTR cover image

"Teaching the Material and Teaching the Students: Reflections on Introductory Courses for Non-Majors"

TTR
Kirkpatrick, Shane
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 125-136
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Teaching a required introductory Bible course to non-majors at a church-related college presents a number of pedagogical challenges. When considering how to teach such a course in the context of concerns common to the liberal arts, I find myself reflecting on authority. My thoughts on the teaching of this course in my own context are organized around authority understood as a developmental issue, an educational issue, and a religious issue. ...
Additional Info:
Teaching a required introductory Bible course to non-majors at a church-related college presents a number of pedagogical challenges. When considering how to teach such a course in the context of concerns common to the liberal arts, I find myself reflecting on authority. My thoughts on the teaching of this course in my own context are organized around authority understood as a developmental issue, an educational issue, and a religious issue. In each case, I seek to use my discipline and the primary and secondary materials of the course as occasions for the development of capacities that will contribute to the life of students as critical thinkers, creative problem-solvers, and responsible global citizens.
TTR cover image

"Between Guru and Deceiver? Responding to Unchosen Metaphors in the Religious Studies Classroom"

TTR
Carr, Amy, and Simmons, John K.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 156-168
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Two troublesome portraits of religious studies professors often exist in the minds of some students at any given time: the Guru, or wise spiritual teacher, and the Deceiver. These metaphors capture student perceptions of us that may be ill-informed and beyond our control. We will examine and compare how our own chosen metaphors for teaching – theological typologist and neutral enthusiast – respond creatively to the unchosen metaphors of guru or deceiver. ...
Additional Info:
Two troublesome portraits of religious studies professors often exist in the minds of some students at any given time: the Guru, or wise spiritual teacher, and the Deceiver. These metaphors capture student perceptions of us that may be ill-informed and beyond our control. We will examine and compare how our own chosen metaphors for teaching – theological typologist and neutral enthusiast – respond creatively to the unchosen metaphors of guru or deceiver. We cannot avoid being cast as gurus/deceivers, but we can discern how our own metaphors for teaching engage "unchosen" student metaphors for us. This exercise can enhance our self-awareness about our own normative agendas in the classroom, and help to sharpen colleagues' conversations about our sometimes differing assumptions regarding the discipline and teaching of religious studies.
Tactics cover image

"Defining "Religion"

Tactic
Conroy, Melissa
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 137-137
BL41.T4
Topics: Discussion   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: encouraging discussion of significant course material on the first day of class.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: encouraging discussion of significant course material on the first day of class.
TTR cover image

"Teaching the Bible and Film: Pedagogical Promises, Pitfalls, and Proposals"

TTR
Rindge, Matthew S., Runions, Erin, and Ascough, Richard S.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 140-155
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
This article begins by recognizing the increasing use of film in Religion, Theology, and Bible courses. It contends that in many Biblical Studies (and Religious Studies and Theology) courses, students are neither taught how to view films properly, nor how to place films into constructive dialogue with biblical texts. The article argues for a specific pedagogical approach to the use of film in which students learn how to view a ...
Additional Info:
This article begins by recognizing the increasing use of film in Religion, Theology, and Bible courses. It contends that in many Biblical Studies (and Religious Studies and Theology) courses, students are neither taught how to view films properly, nor how to place films into constructive dialogue with biblical texts. The article argues for a specific pedagogical approach to the use of film in which students learn how to view a film closely, in its entirety, on its own terms, and in its own voice. Viewing a film in this manner by attending to its aesthetic integrity is a prerequisite for constructing a fruitful dialogue between films and biblical texts. The essay concludes with three specific examples of what this approach might look like. Two responses follow the essay; Erin Runions of Pomona College considers two additional learning goals we might consider, and Richard Ascough of Queens University at Kingston helpfully distinguishes a range of possible pedagogical goals for introducing film into the Biblical Studies classroom.
Tactics cover image

"Bursts of Imagination: A Teaching Strategy for Interfaith Ritual Planning"

Tactic
Walton, Janet
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 245-247
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: a group process to design an interfaith ritual in which every religion is respected and no religion is privileged.
Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: a group process to design an interfaith ritual in which every religion is respected and no religion is privileged.
TTR cover image

Beyond the Classroom ("Taking it to the Streets"): Practicing the Art of Philosophical Conversation"

TTR
Schell, Hannah
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 266-267
BL41.T4
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 37, no.2

Journal Issue
2010
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 August 2010
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

Articles, Essays

ch. 1 The Impact of Pedophile Priests on American Catholic Education: Reflections of a Cradle Catholic (Charles J. Russo)

ch. 2 University Student Affairs Staff and Their Spiritual Discussions with Students (Jill A. Burchell, Jenny J. Lee, Sara M. Olson )

ch. 3 "Anthropology-Lite": An Education Perspective on the Ideology of Religious Studies (Edward Dutton)

ch. 4 Exploring the Spiritual Needs of Adolescent Girls (Kaili Chen Zhang, Charlene Tan)

ch. 5 Yoga in the Public Schools: Diversity, Democracy and the Use of Critical Thinking in Educational Debates (Laura Douglass)

Resource Reviews

ch. 6 Religion in Education: A Contribution to Dialogue or a Factor of Conflict in Transforming Societies of European Countries

ch. 7 Materials Used to Teach about World Religions in Schools in England: A Summary
Cover image

Teaching the Bible Through Popular Culture and the Arts

Book
Roncace, Mark, and Gray, Patrick, eds.
2007
Society of Biblical Literature, Atlanta, GA
BS600.3.T43 2007
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This resource enables biblical studies instructors to facilitate engaging classroom experiences by drawing on the arts and popular culture. It offers brief overviews of hundreds of easily accessible examples of art, film, literature, music, and other media and outlines strategies for incorporating them effectively and concisely in the classroom. Although designed primarily for college and seminary courses on the Bible, the ideas can easily be adapted for classes such as ...
Additional Info:
This resource enables biblical studies instructors to facilitate engaging classroom experiences by drawing on the arts and popular culture. It offers brief overviews of hundreds of easily accessible examples of art, film, literature, music, and other media and outlines strategies for incorporating them effectively and concisely in the classroom. Although designed primarily for college and seminary courses on the Bible, the ideas can easily be adapted for classes such as Theology and Literature or Religion and Art as well as for nonacademic settings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Contributors
Introduction

Part 1: Music
Introduction: Teaching the Bible with Music (Mark Roncace and Dan W. Clanton, Jr.)
ch. 1 Popular Music (Mark Roncace and Dan W. Clanton, Jr.)
ch. 2 Classical Music (Dan W. Clanton Jr. and Bryan Bibb)

Part 2: Film
Introduction: Teaching the Bible with Film
ch. 3 The Bible in Film (Nicola Denzey and Patrick Gray)
ch. 4 Nonbiblical Narrative in Film (Nicola Denzey and Patrick Gray)

Part 3: Art
Introduction: Teaching the Bible with Art
ch. 5 Biblical Subjects in Art (Lynn R. Huber, Dan W. Clanton Jr., and Jane S. Webster)
ch. 6 Abstract and Nonbiblical Art (Lynn R. Huber)

Part 4: Literature
Introduction: Teaching the Bible with Literature (Jaime Clark-Soles)
ch. 7 Poetry (Ira Brent Driggers and Brent A. Strawn)
ch. 8 Prose: Fiction and Nonfiction (Jaime Clark-Soles, Patrick Gray, and Brent A. Strawn)

Part 5: Other Media
Introduction (
ch. 9 Cartoons and Comics (Dan W. Clanton, Jr.)
ch. 10 Youth Literature, Programming, and Entertainment (Mark Roncace)
ch. 11 Animated Television (Dan W. Clanton, Jr, and Mark Roncace)
ch. 12 Television Dramas and Documentation (Dan W. Clanton Jr. and Mark Roncace)
ch. 13 Internet Websites (Mark Roncace)

Indexes
Biblical Texts
Noncanonical Texts
Music
Film
Art
Literature
TTR cover image

"A Spectrum Pedagogy for Christian Ethics: Respecting Difference without Resorting to Relativism"

TTR
Heim, Joel J., and Scovill, Nelia Beth
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 4 (2010): 350-370
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
This paper presents an overview of a newly developed spectrum pedagogy of Christian ethics that emerged from the authors' experience of teaching a contemporary Christian ethics course for seven years. A spectrum pedagogy is a comprehensive approach to teaching Christian ethics that combines the modeling of key dispositions using specific tools (issue-specific spectrums and ethical theories) and learning experiences (engaging multiple positions and responding to concrete situations). The pedagogy gains ...
Additional Info:
This paper presents an overview of a newly developed spectrum pedagogy of Christian ethics that emerged from the authors' experience of teaching a contemporary Christian ethics course for seven years. A spectrum pedagogy is a comprehensive approach to teaching Christian ethics that combines the modeling of key dispositions using specific tools (issue-specific spectrums and ethical theories) and learning experiences (engaging multiple positions and responding to concrete situations). The pedagogy gains its name from the issue-specific spectrums used by instructors to orient students to contemporary debate on a given issue and by students in their ethical reflection. The goal of this pedagogy is to empower students to construct their own responses while respecting differing viewpoints without resorting to relativism. This article surveys the essential elements of a “spectrum pedagogy,” describes its implementation into a semester-long course, and identifies multiple benefits of using this pedagogy.
TTR cover image

“I Did Not Wash My Feet with that Woman”: Using Dramatic Performance to Teach Biblical Studies"

TTR
Torbett, David
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 4 (2010): 307-319
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
The student dramatic performance is an effective way for undergraduates to learn biblical studies. In this article I will give an example of a dramatic performance assignment that I developed over a number of courses and used most recently and most successfully in an undergraduate course in the Hebrew Bible at a small liberal arts college in the Midwest/Appalachian region in 2008. Drawing on my own experience as a teacher, ...
Additional Info:
The student dramatic performance is an effective way for undergraduates to learn biblical studies. In this article I will give an example of a dramatic performance assignment that I developed over a number of courses and used most recently and most successfully in an undergraduate course in the Hebrew Bible at a small liberal arts college in the Midwest/Appalachian region in 2008. Drawing on my own experience as a teacher, as well as on the ideas of philosophers, educators, playwrights, and biblical scholars, I will explain why such performances are effective teaching tools. I will also give guidance on how to use dramatic performances effectively. I intend to show that the success of this assignment depends on, and ultimately validates, two basic trusts: trust in the intellectual and creative capacity of students, as well as trust in the wealth of meaning in the biblical text.
TTR cover image

"Erotic Education: Elaborating a Feminist and Faith-Based Pedagogy for Experiential Learning in Religious Studies"

TTR
Carbine, Rosemary P.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 4 (2010): 320-338
BL41.T4
Topics: Service Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
This essay explores intersections among Jesuit, Quaker, and feminist theologies and pedagogies of social justice education in order to propose and elaborate an innovative theoretical and theological framework for experiential learning in religious studies that prioritizes relationality, called erotic education. This essay then applies the relational rationale of erotic education to interpret the author's design of a service or community-based learning component in a course about contemporary U.S. Christian ...
Additional Info:
This essay explores intersections among Jesuit, Quaker, and feminist theologies and pedagogies of social justice education in order to propose and elaborate an innovative theoretical and theological framework for experiential learning in religious studies that prioritizes relationality, called erotic education. This essay then applies the relational rationale of erotic education to interpret the author's design of a service or community-based learning component in a course about contemporary U.S. Christian social justice movements, offered in both religiously-affiliated and religiously-inspired liberal arts colleges. The course case study not only chronicles the author's evolving pedagogical praxis as a feminist theologian teaching in Jesuit and Quaker institutions, but also is grounded in how the author's course embodies erotic education, that is, how specific objectives, learning practices, and assignments build and bolster relationships among students (in peer-to-peer small groups inside and outside the classroom) as well as among students and their community sites. In developing this framework and implementing it within this particular course, the author argues that erotic education emphasizes the naming and training of our existential desires for interpersonal relations in order to upbuild not only the individual but also the common good.
Tactics cover image

"Moving Student Research into the Community"

Tactic
Hequet, Suzanne
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 4 (2010): 372
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students learn about Lutheranism by doing historical research of local congregations.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students learn about Lutheranism by doing historical research of local congregations.
Cover image

Teaching The Bible: Perspectives and Practices

Book
2010
Conrad Grebel Review, volume 28, number 2, Spring 2010 Conrad Grebel University College, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
BS601.T4 2010
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Articles and book reviews
Additional Info:
Articles and book reviews

Table Of Content:
Foreword

ch. 1 The Power of the Spoken Word: Performance-Based Pedagogy (Jo-Ann A. Bran)
ch. 2 Teaching the Bible: Bridging Ancient and Modern Worlds (Dietmar Neufeld)
ch. 3 Getting Along When We Don't Agree: Interpreting Romans Using Simulation and Controversy (Reta Halteman Finger)
ch. 4 Enhancing Student Engagement in a Course on the Book of Acts (Gary Yamasaki)
ch. 5 Faith and Historical-Critical Pursuits in Teaching (Loren L. Johns)
ch. 6 "Your Daughters Shall Prophesy": How Can We Keep Silent? (Laura L. Brenneman)
ch. 7 Jonah, the "Whale," and Dr. Seuss: Asking Historical Questions without Alienating Conservative Students (Eric A. Seibert)
ch. 8 Anabaptist Thoughts on Teaching the New Testament as an Anabaptist in a Non-Anabaptist Setting: Enough Already (Wes Bergen)

Afterword
Teaching the Bible: Goals for Student Learning (Nadine S. Pence)
TTR cover image

"Mahatma Gandhi and Character Education in Non-Violence: Its Relevance in Religious Studies Today"

TTR
Damm, Alexander
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 1 (2011): 3-12
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
This essay presents educational principles of Mahatma Gandhi, specifically principles of character education, as a model for strengthening non-violence in students. Its major concern is to show that Gandhi's ideal of non-violent character education is important for university teaching in disciplines including religious studies, and that Gandhi offers methods for fostering non-violent character, namely the teaching of world religions, service learning, and setting an example. The effectiveness of Gandhi's views, ...
Additional Info:
This essay presents educational principles of Mahatma Gandhi, specifically principles of character education, as a model for strengthening non-violence in students. Its major concern is to show that Gandhi's ideal of non-violent character education is important for university teaching in disciplines including religious studies, and that Gandhi offers methods for fostering non-violent character, namely the teaching of world religions, service learning, and setting an example. The effectiveness of Gandhi's views, moreover, finds some support in contemporary teaching practices, including my own experiences in the classroom.
Tactics cover image
Wabash tree

"Higher Order Thinking Through the Synthesis of Theological Models"

Tactic
Woodard, Randall, and Woodard, Rose
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 1 (2011): 23
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students learn to create models in order to increase their grasp of nuanced theological arguments.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students learn to create models in order to increase their grasp of nuanced theological arguments.
Cover image

Transforming Graduate Biblical Education: Ethos and Discipline

Book
Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza, author, ed., Kent Harold Richards, ed.
2010
Society of Biblical Literature, Atlanta, GA
BV4020.T73 2010
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This unique collection of essays, originating in seminars held at SBL’s Annual and International Meetings, explores the current ethos and discipline of graduate biblical education from different social locations and academic contexts. It includes international voices of well-established scholars who have urged change for some time alongside younger scholars with new perspectives. The individual contributions emerge from a variegated set of experiences in graduate biblical studies and a critical ...
Additional Info:
This unique collection of essays, originating in seminars held at SBL’s Annual and International Meetings, explores the current ethos and discipline of graduate biblical education from different social locations and academic contexts. It includes international voices of well-established scholars who have urged change for some time alongside younger scholars with new perspectives. The individual contributions emerge from a variegated set of experiences in graduate biblical studies and a critical analysis of those experiences. The volume is divided into four areas of investigation. The first section discusses the ethos of biblical studies and social location, and the second explores different cultural-national formations of the discipline. The third section considers the experiences and visions of graduate biblical studies, while the last section explores how to transform the discipline. All the contributions offer ways to transform graduate biblical education so that it becomes a socializing power that, in turn, can transform the present academic ethos of biblical studies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Abbreviations
Introduction: Transforming Graduate Biblical Studies: Ethos and Discipline

Part I: Changing The Ethos of Graduate Biblical Studies
ch. 1 From "Mono" - to "Multi" - Culture: Reflections on a Journey (Elaine M. Wainwright)
ch. 2 Cross-Textural Biblical Studies in Multiscriptural Contexts (Archie C. C. Lee)
ch. 3 Social Location: Dis-ease and/or Dis-cover(y) (Yakhwee Tan)
ch. 4 Taking Spaces Seriously: The Politics of Space and the Future of Western Biblical Studies (Abraham Smith)
ch. 5 Biblical Studies and Public Relevance: Hermeneutical and Pedagogical Consideration in Light of the Ethos of the Greater China Region (GCR)
(Phillip Chia)
Part 2: Cultural-National Locations of Graduate Biblical Studies
ch. 6 Graduate Studies Now: Some Reflections from Experience (Athalya Brenner)
ch. 7 Graduate Biblical Studies in India (Monica Jyotsna Melanchthon)
ch. 8 Biblical Study in Korea in the Twenty-First Century (Kyung Sook Lee)
ch. 9 The Practice and Ethos of Postgraduate Biblical Education: A Glance at Europe and in Particular Switzerland (Gabriella Gelardini)

Part 3: New Voices From The Margins
ch. 10 Biblical Studies: A View from the Feminist Margins and the Jewish Fringes (Cynthia M. Baker)
ch. 11 On the Fringes of the "Big Tent" of Graduate New Testament Studies (Thomas Fabisiak)
ch. 12 Giving an Account of a Desirable Subject: Critically Queering Graduate Biblical Education (Joseph A. Marchal)
ch. 13 To a Black Student in First-Year Hebrew (Nyasha Junior)
ch. 14 Intoxicating Teaching as Transformational Pedagogy (Wil Gafney)
ch. 15 Beyond Socialization and Attrition: Border Pedagogy in Biblical Studies (Roberto Mata)

Part 4: Transforming The Curriculum
ch. 16 Redesigning the Biblical Studies Curriculum: Toward a "Radical-Democratic" Teaching Model (Susanne Scholz)
ch. 17 Biblical Studies for Ministry: Critical and Faithful Interpretation of Scripture in an Either/Or World (Cynthia Briggs Kittredge)
ch. 18 Placing Meaning-Making at the Center of New Testament Studies (Hal Taussig, Brigitte Kahl)
ch. 19 Mapping the Field, Shaping the Discipline: Doctoral Education as Rhetorical Formation (Melanie Johnson-DeBaufre)
ch. 20 The Work We Make Scriptures Do for Us: An Argument for Signifying (on) Scriptures as Intellectual Project (Vincent L. Wimbush)
ch. 21 Breadth and Depth: A Hope for Biblical Studies (Kent Harold Richards)

Appendix
Rethinking The Educational Practices of Biblical Doctoral Studies (Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza)
Contributors
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

"Learning Hebrew by Writing in English"

TTR
Jacobson, Rolf A.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 2 (2011): 125-136
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This essay explores a midrange teaching and learning issue regarding the teaching of biblical languages and one strategy for addressing the issue. Seminary students do not yield a great enough return in exchange for the investment they are required to make in learning biblical languages. Students invest great time and money, but they do not learn to use the biblical languages to think critically about the Bible. This essay argues ...
Additional Info:
This essay explores a midrange teaching and learning issue regarding the teaching of biblical languages and one strategy for addressing the issue. Seminary students do not yield a great enough return in exchange for the investment they are required to make in learning biblical languages. Students invest great time and money, but they do not learn to use the biblical languages to think critically about the Bible. This essay argues that a fruitful strategy for addressing this midrange issue is to require students to write in English about the Hebrew language. This strategy fosters students' ability to think critically about the biblical text. It also fosters their ability to use their budding knowledge of a biblical language to engage questions of meaning and issues of interpretation.
Tactics cover image

"What do people say the Bible says? And you, what do you say?"

Tactic
Ngwa, Kenneth
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 2 (2011): 157
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students learn some of the difficulties of translation when interpreting the bible.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students learn some of the difficulties of translation when interpreting the bible.
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 38, no.1

Journal Issue
2011
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 2011 Jan.-Apr.
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Special Issue on Warren A. Nord's
Does God Make a Difference? Taking Religion Seriously in Our Schools and Universities


Editor's Preface

Essays
ch. 1 Does God Make a Difference? Taking Religion Seriously in Our Schools and Universities: An Excerpt (Warren A. Nord)
ch. 2 Taking Warren Nord Seriously (Charles C. Haynes)
ch. 3 Even So, Keep Looking at That (MArtin E. Marty)
ch. 4 Teaching About Religion in Public Schools: Where Do We Go From Here? (Melissa Rogers)
ch. 5 Educational and Legal Perspectives: How Do They Differ? (Kent Greenawalt)
ch. 6 The Place of Religious Studies in Warren Nord's Does God Make a Difference (Bruce Grelle)
ch. 7 The Examined Life (Emile Lester)
ch. 8 Does Warren A. Nord Make a Difference? (Robert J. Nash)
ch. 9 Taking Religion Seriously: Another Approach (James C. Carper, Thomas C. Hunt)
Article cover image

"Teaching Religion(s) in the Community College: Students Can Handle Theory Early"

Article
Gadsby, Blair A.
2006
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 35, Number 4, November 2006
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Putting Religious Studies on the Map at a Community College"

Article
Cronk, George
2005
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 34, Numbers 1&2, February & April 2005
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Acting Religious: Theatre as Pedagogy in Teaching Religious Studies"

Article
Rue, Victoria
2003
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 32, Number 3, September 2003
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Reflections on Teaching about September 11"

Article
Berkwitz, Stephen C.; Beckman, Patricia Zimmerman; McAlister, Elizabeth; and Salter, Richard
2001
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 30, Number 4, November 2001
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"So, What Are We Professing Here? Religion, the Liberal Arts, and Civic Life"

Article
Williams, Raymond B.
2000
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 29, Number 3, November 2000
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

"Deepening College Students' Engagement with Religion and Theology through Community Service Learning"

TTR
Seider, Scott
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 3 (2011): 205-225
BL41.T4
Topics: Service Learning   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
The Serve Program at Ignatius University combines academic study of theology with a year-long community service project focused on combating poverty. An analysis of the Serve Program during the 2008-09 academic year revealed that participating students demonstrated a significant increase in their interest in theology; a greater desire to enroll in theology coursework; and a deeper interest in theology than classmates not participating in the service-learning program. Interviews with Serve ...
Additional Info:
The Serve Program at Ignatius University combines academic study of theology with a year-long community service project focused on combating poverty. An analysis of the Serve Program during the 2008-09 academic year revealed that participating students demonstrated a significant increase in their interest in theology; a greater desire to enroll in theology coursework; and a deeper interest in theology than classmates not participating in the service-learning program. Interviews with Serve participants revealed that their exposure to poverty and inequality through their service placements led them to read the program’s assigned theological texts with a particular focus on the authors’ messages about individual and social responsibility for struggling fellow citizens.
Tactics cover image

"Netnography and the Study of Religion"

Tactic
Love, Velma
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 3 (2011): 247
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students work in groups to study on line presence of African-American religious groups.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students work in groups to study on line presence of African-American religious groups.
Tactics cover image

"The Religious Experience Project: Bringing an Experiential Dimension to Teaching Religion"

Tactic
Loving, Gregory D.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 3 (2011): 249
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students reflect on a religious practice they have selected to experience.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students reflect on a religious practice they have selected to experience.
TTR cover image

"If I Can Major in Religion, Why Can’t I Define Religion?"

TTR
Pinnock, Sarah K.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 3 (2011): 250-251
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
TTR cover image

"Forum: Teaching Biblical Studies Online"

TTR
Gravett, Sandra L.; Ulrich, Daniel W.; Nysse, Richard W.; Polaski, Sandra Hack
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 3 (2011): 256-283
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
In this edited transcript of a panel at the Society of Biblical Literature (November 23, 2009, Boston, Massachusetts), five Bible scholars give brief presentations on various challenges and opportunities encountered when teaching academic biblical studies courses online in both undergraduate and theological education contexts. Each presentation is followed by questions from the audience and discussion. Topics include: a typology of different approaches to online teaching, advantages and disadvantages of online compared to ...
Additional Info:
In this edited transcript of a panel at the Society of Biblical Literature (November 23, 2009, Boston, Massachusetts), five Bible scholars give brief presentations on various challenges and opportunities encountered when teaching academic biblical studies courses online in both undergraduate and theological education contexts. Each presentation is followed by questions from the audience and discussion. Topics include: a typology of different approaches to online teaching, advantages and disadvantages of online compared to face-to-face classrooms (for both students and faculty), opportunities for imaginative exercises online, the advantages of online threaded discussions, and the joys and pitfalls of bringing your course into an online environment for the first time.
Article cover image

"Wisdom, Sophia, and The Fear of Knowing"

Article
Moore, Mary Elizabeth Mullino
1997
Religious Education, Vol. 92, No. 2, Spring 1997
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Wisdom or questing to know God and the world evokes fear through case studies of the controversial Reimagining Conference and the race related responses to the O. J. Simpson verdict, the fear of knowing God (which included the fear of questioning dominant metaphors of God) and the fear of knowing ourselves are explored. From this analysis, a view of wisdom is proposed and also an approach to education that inspires ...
Additional Info:
Wisdom or questing to know God and the world evokes fear through case studies of the controversial Reimagining Conference and the race related responses to the O. J. Simpson verdict, the fear of knowing God (which included the fear of questioning dominant metaphors of God) and the fear of knowing ourselves are explored. From this analysis, a view of wisdom is proposed and also an approach to education that inspires and encourages people to seek to know and respond to God and the world.
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Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies: Pedagogical Challenges and Strategies

Journal Issue
McNary-Zak, Bernadette, and Peters, Rebecca Todd, eds.
2010
Spotlight on Teaching 25, no. 3 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies: Pedagogical Challenges and Strategies (Bernadette McNary-Zak and Rebecca Todd Peters)
ch. 2 Learning Contracts in Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies (Lynn R. Huber)
ch. 3 Close Reading for Undergraduate Research (Carolyn Jones Medine)
ch. 4 Journal Writing for Undergraduate Research (Jeffrey Brackett)
ch. 5 Transferring Undergraduate Research Pedagogies to the Classroom (John R. Lanci)
ch. 6 Undergraduate Research as Collaborative Pedagogy and Research (Paul O. Myhre, and Brandon Cornett)
ch. 7 Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies: References and Resources
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Teaching for Civic Engagement: Background and Overview

Journal Issue
Posman, Ellen, and Locklin, Reid B., eds.
2010
Spotlight on Teaching 25, no. 4 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching for Civic Engagement: Background and Overview (Ellen Posman, and Reid B. Locklin)
ch. 2 Engaged Pedagogy and Civic Engagement (Swasti Bhattacharyya)
ch. 3 Site Visits and Civic Engagement (Marianne Delaporte, and Hans Wiersma)
ch. 4 Civic Engagement and International Service-Learning (Philip Wingeier-Rayo)
ch. 5 Civic Engagement and Civic Spaces (Rebekka King)
ch. 6 Reflections on Engaged Civic Learning and Teaching (Bobbi Patterson)
ch. 7 Teaching for Civic Engagement: Suggested Resources
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Wabash tree

Meditation and the Classroom: Contemplative Pedagogy for Religious Studies

Book
Simmer-Brown, Judith, and Grace, Fran
2011
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
BL627.M397 2011
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
A groundbreaking book on using meditation in education and how it can enhance teaching and learning.

Meditation and the Classroom inventively articulates how educators can use meditation to educate the whole student. Notably, a number of universities have initiated contemplative studies options and others have opened contemplative spaces. This represents an attempt to address the inner life. It is also a sign of a new era, one in ...
Additional Info:
A groundbreaking book on using meditation in education and how it can enhance teaching and learning.

Meditation and the Classroom inventively articulates how educators can use meditation to educate the whole student. Notably, a number of universities have initiated contemplative studies options and others have opened contemplative spaces. This represents an attempt to address the inner life. It is also a sign of a new era, one in which the United States is more spiritually diverse than ever before. Examples from university classrooms and statements by students indicate benefits include increased self-awareness, creativity, and compassion.

The religious studies scholars who have contributed to this book often teach about meditation, but here they include reflections on how meditation has affected them and their teaching. Until recently, though, even many religious studies professors would find sharing meditation experiences, let alone teaching meditation techniques, a breach of disciplinary and academic protocols. The value of teaching meditation and teaching about meditation is discussed. Ethical issues such as pluralism, respect, qualifications, power and coercion, and avoiding actual or perceived proselytization are also examined. While methods for religious studies are emphasized, the book provides valuable guidance for all those interested in this endeavor. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Editors’ Introduction

I. Why Contemplatives Pedagogy? The Religious Studies Dialogue
ch. 1 The Convergence of Liberal Education and Contemplative Education—Inevitable?
ch. 2 Meditation and Education: India, Tibet, and Modern America
ch. 3 Contemplative Studies: Can It Flourish in the Religious Studies Classrom?
ch. 4 Contemplative Studies and the Art of Persuasion: The Institutional Challenge

II. The Contemplative Professor
ch. 5 From Content, to Context, to Contemplation: One Professor’s Journey
ch. 6 The Collective Dynamics of Contemplative Practice
ch. 7 The Mindful Teacher as the Foundation of Contemplative Pedagogy
ch. 8 Compassion Beyond Fatigue: Contemplative Training for Educators and Other Helping Professionals
ch. 9 Field Notes from a Daoist Professor

III. Critical Issues In Contemplative Teaching
ch. 10 Training the Heart Responsibly: Ethical Considerations in Contemplative Teaching
ch. 11 Invitation and Coercion in Contemplative Pedagogy
ch. 12 Interiority and Higher Education: The Neurophenomenology of Contemplation

IV. Contemplative-Based Courses
ch. 13 Embodied Contemplative Learning: Aikido as a Case Study
ch. 14 Reflections on Theory and Practice: The Case of Modern Yoga
ch. 15 Sustaining Life: Contemplative Pedagogies in a Religion and Ecology Course
ch. 16 Adab: Courteous Behavior in the Classroom
ch. 17 Experiencing Medieval Christian Spirituality

V. Contemplative Exercises For The Classroom
ch. 18 Awareness Practices in an Undergraduate Buddhism Course
ch. 19 Contemplative Inquiry: Beyond the Disembodied Subject
ch. 20 Love of Wisdom Puts You on the Spot: The Warrior Exam
ch. 21 A Meeting of the Minds in Cyberspace: Eco-contemplative Methods for Online Teaching
ch. 22 Mindfulness in the History Classroom: Teaching as Interbeing
ch. 23 Two Contemplative Practices That Animate the Study of Religion
ch. 24 Mindfulness and Contemplative Practice in Art and Religion

VI. Conclusion: Does It Work? Evaluations From Our Students
ch. 25 Emotional Learning: Re-cognizing Emotion and Thought in a Buddhism Course
ch. 26 Meditation in the Classroom: What Do the Students Say They Learn?

Selected Bibliography List of Contributors Index
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 38, no. 2

Journal Issue
2011
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45.v38 no. 2
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

Articles, Essays
ch. 1 Integrating Religious and Professional Identities: Christian Faculty at Public Institutions of Higher Education (Christy Moran Craft, John D. Foubert, Jessica Jelkin Lane)
ch. 2 Teaching: Tolerance in Public Education: Organizing the Exposure to Religious and Life-Stance Diversity (Ole Henrik Borchgrevink Hansen)
ch. 3 Measuring Faculty Spirituality and Its Relationship to Teaching Style (John J. Cecero, Tracy A. Prout)
ch. 4 Reinvention and Context: Freirean Approaches to Pedagogical Dialogue in Catholic, Jewish, and Public Schools (John L. Watzke, Maria Fernanda Montes Valencia)
ch. 5 Spirituality as a Pragmatic Science: Toward the Establishment of a Holistic Educational Rationale (Oren Ergas)

Resource Review
ch. 6 Neither Jew Nor Gentile: Exploring Issues of Racial Diversity on Protestant College Campuses
ch. 7 A Kindly Providence: An Alaskan Missionary's Story, 1926-2006 by Fr. Louis L. Renner, S. J.
Article cover image

"Empirics On The Origins of Preferences: The Case of College Major and Religiosity" (pdf)

Article
Kimball, Miles S.; Mitchell, Colter M.; Thornton, Arland D.; and Young-Demarco, Linda C.
2009
National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge MA, July 2009
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Early life experiences are likely to be important for the formation of preferences. Religiosity is a key dimension of preferences, affecting many economic outcomes. This paper examines the effect of college major on religiosity, and the converse effect of religiosity on college major, using panel data from the Monitoring the Future survey as a way of gauging the extent to which various streams of thought, as taught in college, affect ...
Additional Info:
Early life experiences are likely to be important for the formation of preferences. Religiosity is a key dimension of preferences, affecting many economic outcomes. This paper examines the effect of college major on religiosity, and the converse effect of religiosity on college major, using panel data from the Monitoring the Future survey as a way of gauging the extent to which various streams of thought, as taught in college, affect religiosity. Two key questions, based on the differences in college experience across majors, are whether either (a) the Scientific worldview or (b) Postmodernism has negative effects on religiosity as these streams of thought are actually transmitted at the college level. The results show a decline in religiosity of students majoring in the social sciences and humanities, but a rise in religiosity for those in education and business. After initial choices, those respondents with high levels of religiosity are more likely to enter college. Of those who are in college, people with high levels of religiosity tend to go into the humanities and education over other majors.
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Teaching Jung

Book
Bulkeley, Kelly, and Weldon, Clodagh, eds.
2011
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
BL53.T43 2011
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961) has made a major, though still contested, impact on the field of religious studies. Alternately revered and reviled, the subject of adoring memoirs and scathing exposes, Jung and his ideas have had at least as much influence on religious studies as have the psychoanalytic theories of his mentor, Sigmund Freud. Many of Jung's key psychological terms (...
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AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961) has made a major, though still contested, impact on the field of religious studies. Alternately revered and reviled, the subject of adoring memoirs and scathing exposes, Jung and his ideas have had at least as much influence on religious studies as have the psychoanalytic theories of his mentor, Sigmund Freud. Many of Jung's key psychological terms (archetypes, collective unconscious, individuation, projection, synchronicity, extroversion and introversion) have become standard features of religious studies discourse, and his extensive commentaries on various religious traditions make it clear that Jung's psychology is, at one level, a significant contribution to the study of human religiosity. His characterization of depth psychology as a fundamentally religious response to the secularizing power of modernity has left a lasting imprint on the relationship between religious studies and the psychological sciences. This book offers a collection of original articles presenting several different approaches to Jung's psychology in relation to religion, theology, and contemporary culture. The contributors describe their teaching of Jung in different academic contexts, with special attention to the pedagogical and theoretical challenges that arise in the classroom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part I. Different Educational Settings
ch. 1 The Challenge of Teaching Jung in the University (David Tacey)
ch. 2 Misprision: Pitfalls in Teaching Jung in a University Religious Studies Department (David L. Miller)
ch. 3 Teaching Jung in a Theological Seminary and a Graduate School of Religion (Ann Belford Ulanov)
ch. 4 Teaching Jung in an Analytic Psychology Institute (Murray Stein)

Part II. The Interpretation of Religious Texts and Experiences
ch. 5 Jung's Approach to Myth ( Robert Alan Segal)
ch. 6 Jung's Engagement with Christian Theology (Charlene Burns)
ch. 7 God on the Couch: Teaching Jung's Answer to Job (Clodagh Weldon)
ch. 8 Type-wise: Using Jung's Theory of Psychological Types in Teaching Religious Studies Undergraduate and Graduate Students (Christopher Ross)

Part III. Jung's Life, Work, and Critics
ch. 9 Personal Secrets, Ethical Questions (John Haule)
ch. 10 Anima, Gender, Feminism (Susan Rowland)
ch. 11 Jung as Nature Mystic ( Meredith Sabini)
ch. 12 Teaching Jung in Asia ( Jeremy Taylor)

Part IV. Jungian Practices in the Classroom and Beyond
ch. 13 Teaching Jung and Dreams (Kelly Bulkeley)
ch. 14 Jung and Winnicott in the Classroom: Holding, Mirroring, Potential Space and the Self ( Laurel McCabe)
ch. 15 Jung and the Numinous Classroom (Bonnelle Strickling)
ch. 16 Can There Be a Science of the Symbolic? (John Beebe)
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"Seeing and Hearing the Otherness of Sacred Texts"

Tactic
Anderson, Bradford A.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 4 (2011): 355-356
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students are exposed to a reading of sacred text in the native language.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students are exposed to a reading of sacred text in the native language.
Tactics cover image

“Cult” or Religion?"

Tactic
Hall, Airen
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 4 (2011): 355-356
BL41.T4
Topics: Discussion   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students discuss the nature of religion by comparing brief descriptions of founders.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students discuss the nature of religion by comparing brief descriptions of founders.
Tactics cover image

"Make a List of What You Know About . . . "

Tactic
Miller, Charles William
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 1 (2010): 53-53
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Discussion   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: to introduce and discuss course content on the first day of class, students work in groups to list what they know about the topic.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: to introduce and discuss course content on the first day of class, students work in groups to list what they know about the topic.
Cover image

Teaching Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies

Book
McNary-Zak, Berenadette, and Peters, Rebecca Todd, eds.
2011
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
BL41.T455 2011
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Religion   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Teaching Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies offers an introduction to the philosophy and practice of Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies and takes up several significant ongoing questions related to it. This volume emerges from sustained conversations about the pedagogy of Undergraduate Research by a group of teacher-scholars in the discipline, and it seeks to extend those conversations. For those new to ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Teaching Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies offers an introduction to the philosophy and practice of Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies and takes up several significant ongoing questions related to it. This volume emerges from sustained conversations about the pedagogy of Undergraduate Research by a group of teacher-scholars in the discipline, and it seeks to extend those conversations. For those new to Undergraduate Research, this book provides an overview of fundamental issues and pedagogical questions and practical models for application in the classroom. For seasoned mentors, it acts as a dialogue partner on emerging issues and offers insight into pertinent questions in the field based on the experience of recognized experts. Individual chapters focus on select theoretical and practical topics including the nature of collaboration between faculty and students, what it means for undergraduate students to make an "original contribution" in their research, how to identify and shape a research project that is appropriate and manageable, the types of institutional and professional support systems needed to adequately support and reward faculty who participate in this kind of pedagogy, and procedures for adequate and appropriate assessment. Student perspectives highlight the importance of Undergraduate Research to student learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
ch. 1 Theorizing Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies (Bernadette McNary-Zak and Rebecca Todd Peters)

Part I - Defining Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies
ch. 2 Contributing to the Discipline (Rebecca Todd Peters and Bernadette McNary-Zak)
ch. 3 Mentoring Undergraduate Research (Lynn Huber and John Lanci)
ch. 4 Thinking about Method (Robin Rinehart)

Part II - Approaching Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies
ch. 5 Exploring Archival Material (Paul O. Myhre)
ch. 6 Reading Religion and Culture (Carolyn M. Jones)
ch. 7 Sending Students into the Field (Jeffrey M. Brackett)
ch. 8 Examining History (David C. Ratke)
ch. 9 Working with Texts (Lynn R. Huber and Robin Rinehart)

Part III - Proposing Standards for Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies
ch. 10 Training the Undergraduate Scholar (Nadia M. Lahutsky)
ch. 11 Promoting Institutional Support (Mark Gstohl)
ch. 12 Afterword: Mastering Undergraduate Research (Ann Marie Chilton)

Appendix I: Working Statements on Undergraduate Research in Religious Studies
Appendix II: Learning Contract
Bibliography
Index
Article cover image

"Windows into Faith: Theology and Religious Studies at the University"

Article
D'Costa, Gavin
2011
Communicating Faith, ch. 14, pgs 214-228
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Communicating Faith and Online Learning"

Article
Stuart-Buttle, Ros
2011
Communicating Faith, ch. 21, pgs 328-342
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Teaching Mysticism

Book
Parsons, William B., ed.
2011
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
BL625.T38 2011
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)s
The term ''mysticism'' has never been consistently defined or employed, either in religious traditions or in academic discourse. The essays in this volume offer ways of defining what mysticism is, as well as methods for grappling with its complexity in a classroom.

This volume addresses the diverse literature surrounding mysticism in four interrelated parts. The first part includes ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)s
The term ''mysticism'' has never been consistently defined or employed, either in religious traditions or in academic discourse. The essays in this volume offer ways of defining what mysticism is, as well as methods for grappling with its complexity in a classroom.

This volume addresses the diverse literature surrounding mysticism in four interrelated parts. The first part includes essays on the tradition and context of mysticism, devoted to drawing out and examining the mystical element in many religious traditions. The second part engages traditions and religio-cultural strands in which ''mysticism'' is linked to other terms, such as shamanism, esotericism, and Gnosticism. The volume's third part focuses on methodological strategies for defining ''mysticism,'' with respect to varying social spaces. The final essays show how contemporary social issues and movements have impacted the meaning, study, and pedagogy of mysticism.

Teaching Mysticism presents pedagogical reflections on how best to communicate mysticism from a variety of institutional spaces. It surveys the broad range of meanings of mysticism, its utilization in the traditions, the theories and methods that have been used to understand it, and provides critical insight into the resulting controversies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Introduction - Teaching Mysticism: Frame and Content

Part One: Presenting the Mystical Element: Tradition and Context
ch. 1 Teaching ''Hindu Mysticism" (hugh B. Urban)
ch. 2 Mysticism Before Mysticism: Teaching Christian Mysticism as a Historian of Religion (April Deconick)
ch. 3 Teaching Chinese Mysticism (Livia Kohn)
ch. 4 The Mystical Dimensions of Buddhism (David B. Gray)
ch. 5 Teaching Islam, Teaching Islamic Mysticism (David Cook)
ch. 6 Teaching Jewish Mysticism: Concealing the Concealment and Disclosure of Secrets (Elliot R. Wolfson)

Part Two: Negotiating Mysticism: Expanding the Map
ch. 7 Chosen by the Spirits: Visionary Ecology and Indigenous Wisdom (Lee Irwin)
ch. 8 Teaching African American Mysticism (Joy R. Bostic)
ch. 9 Teaching Experiential Dimensions of Western Esotericism (Wouter J. Hanegraaff)

Part Three: Investigating Mysticism: Perspectives, Theories and Institutional Spaces
ch. 10 Teaching the Graduate Seminar in Comparative Mysticism: A Participatory Integral Approach (Jorge N. Ferrer)
ch. 11 Teaching Mysticism in Dialogue with Gender and Embodiment at a Quaker Seminary: A Feminist Approach (Stephanie Ford)
ch. 12 Mysticism, Spirituality and the Undergraduate: Reflections on the Use of Psychosocial Theory (William B. Parsons)
ch. 13 Mysticism in Ecumenical Dialogue: Questions on the Nature and Effects of Mystical Experience (Michael Stoeber)

Part Four: Tracking Mysticism: Pedagogy and Contemporary Culture
ch. 14 From ''Comparative Mysticism'' to ''New Age Spirituality:'' Teaching New Age as the Raw Materials of Religion (Steven J. Sutcliffe)
ch. 15 Mystical Education: Social Theory and Pedagogical Prospects (Philip Wexler)
ch. 16 Secrets in the Seats: The Erotic, the Paranormal, and the Free Spirit (Jeffrey J. Kripal)
Tactics cover image
Wabash tree

"Structural Analysis of Text"

Tactic
Doyle, Dominic
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 1 (2012): 40
BL41.T4 v.15 no. 1 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students increase comprehension of reading by learning to analyze the structure of a text.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students increase comprehension of reading by learning to analyze the structure of a text.
Tactics cover image

"Convince the Professor – Classroom Debate with a Twist"

Tactic
Nichols, Michael D.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 1 (2012): 41
BL41.T4 v.15 no. 1 2012
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using debate to introduce a topic.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using debate to introduce a topic.
TTR cover image

"Narratives or Sources? Active Learning and the Teaching of Ancient Jewish History and Texts"

TTR
Satlow, Michael L.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 1 (2012): 48-60
BL41.T4 v.15 no. 1 2012
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
During my career, I have regularly taught a survey course on the history of Jews and Judaism in the Persian, Greek, and early Roman periods (ca. 520 BCE – 70 CE). Student performance in the course has long concerned and puzzled me. By the end of the course students demonstrated familiarity with the narratives and concepts we covered, but most did not really “think historically.” They had great difficulties using and applying the ...
Additional Info:
During my career, I have regularly taught a survey course on the history of Jews and Judaism in the Persian, Greek, and early Roman periods (ca. 520 BCE – 70 CE). Student performance in the course has long concerned and puzzled me. By the end of the course students demonstrated familiarity with the narratives and concepts we covered, but most did not really “think historically.” They had great difficulties using and applying the historical tools they learned to new situations and evidence. In 2006 and again in 2010 I overhauled the course not only to improve it, but also to figure out how my students learned history. Using a wiki exercise, I traced how students learned and then applied these insights the next time I taught the course. In this essay I report on what I learned.
TTR cover image

"Home is My Area Code: Thinking About, Teaching and Learning Globalization in Introductory World Religions Classes"

TTR
DeTemple, Jill
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 1 (2012): 61-71
BL41.T4 v.15 no. 1 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
There has been significant and growing interest in teaching religious studies, and specifically world religions, in a “global” context. Bringing globalization into the classroom as a specific theoretical and pedagogical tool, however, requires not just an awareness that religions exist in an ever-globalizing environment, but a willingness to engage with globalization as a cultural, spatial, and theoretical arena within which religions interact. This article is concerned with the ways that ...
Additional Info:
There has been significant and growing interest in teaching religious studies, and specifically world religions, in a “global” context. Bringing globalization into the classroom as a specific theoretical and pedagogical tool, however, requires not just an awareness that religions exist in an ever-globalizing environment, but a willingness to engage with globalization as a cultural, spatial, and theoretical arena within which religions interact. This article is concerned with the ways that those of us interested in religion employ globalization in the classroom conceptually and pedagogically, and argues that “lived religion” provides a useful model for incorporating globalization into religious studies settings.
Additional Info:
This bibliography lists articles and books on teaching produced by workshop participants and grant recipients of the Wabash Center. It updates a similar list produced in 2007 and published in volume 10 number 3 of this journal.
Additional Info:
This bibliography lists articles and books on teaching produced by workshop participants and grant recipients of the Wabash Center. It updates a similar list produced in 2007 and published in volume 10 number 3 of this journal.
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 38, no. 3

Journal Issue
2011
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Special Issue on the Quebec Ethics and Religious Culture Program

Preface
Articles, Essays

Perspectives from Quebec
ch. 1 Cultivating Reflection and Understanding: Foundations and Orientations of Quebec's Ethics and Religious Culture Program (Ronald W. Morris)
ch. 2 From Confessional to Cultural: Religious Education in the Schools of Quebec (Spencer Boudreau)
ch. 3 "Voluntary and Secret Choices of the Mind": The ERG and Liberal-Democratic Aims of Education (Kevin McDonough)
ch. 4 On the Front Lines: A Teacher's Experience with Quebec's Ethics and Religious Culture Program (Eric Van der Wee)
ch. 5 Enthusiasm and Ambivalence: Elementary School Teacher Perspectives on the Ethics and Religious Culture Program (Ronald W. Morris, Nancy Bouchard, Anne-Marie de Silva)

Perspectives from Europe, Asia, and the United States
ch. 6 On Ethics and Religious Culture in Quebec: Comments and Comparative Perspectives from a Norwegian and European Context (Bengt-Ove Andreassen)
ch. 7 Deconfessionalization Been Completed? Some Reflections upon Quebec's Ethics and Religious Culture (ERC) Program (Satoko Fujiwara)
ch. 8 Deweyan Democracy and Education About Religion (Emile Lester)
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Teaching Sustainability/Teaching Sustainably

Book
Bartles, Kirsten Allen, and Parker, Kelly A., eds.
2012
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
GE70.T42 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
Over the coming decades, every academic discipline will have to respond to the paradigm of more sustainable life practices because students will be living in a world challenged by competition for resources and climate change, and will demand that every academic discipline demonstrate substantial and corresponding relevance.

This book takes as its point of departure that integrating a component of sustainability into a discipline-specific course arises from an ...
Additional Info:
Over the coming decades, every academic discipline will have to respond to the paradigm of more sustainable life practices because students will be living in a world challenged by competition for resources and climate change, and will demand that every academic discipline demonstrate substantial and corresponding relevance.

This book takes as its point of departure that integrating a component of sustainability into a discipline-specific course arises from an educator asking a simple question: in the coming decades, as humanity faces unprecedented challenges, what can my discipline or area of research contribute toward a better understanding of these issues? The discipline need not be future-oriented: an archaeologist, for instance, could incorporate into a course some aspects of sustainable archaeological practices in areas threatened by rapid climate change, as well as examples of sustainable or unsustainable ways of living practiced by members of the long-gone society under investigation.

This book also argues that courses about sustainability need to cross disciplinary boundaries, both because of the inter-relatedness of the issues, and because students will require the ability to use interdisciplinary approaches to thrive through the multiple careers most of them will face.

The contributions to this book are presented under four sections. “Sustainability as a Core Value in Education” considers the rationale for incorporating sustainability in disciplinary courses. “Teaching Sustainability in the Academic Disciplines” presents eight examples of courses from disciplines as varied as agriculture, composition, engineering, and teacher education. “Education as a Sustainable Practice” reviews how the physical environment of the classroom and the delivery of instruction need themselves to reflect the values being taught. The final section addresses the issues of leadership and long-term institutional change needed to embed sustainable practice as a core value on campus. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
I. Sustainability as a Core Value in Education
ch. 1 Sustainability for Everyone: Trespassing Disciplinary Boundaries (Douglas Klahr)
ch. 2 Sustainability as a Core Issue in Diversity and Critical Thinking Education (Danielle Lake)
ch. 3 Sustainable Happiness and Education: Educating Teachers and Students in the 21st Century (Catherine O’Brien)
ch. 4 A Christian Approach to Sustainability (Chris Doran)

II. Teaching Sustainability in the Academic Disciplines
ch. 5 Re-Envisioning Ecocomposition: The Rhetoric of Sustainable Energy and the Ecology of Writing (Kimberly R. Moekle)
ch. 6 Sustainably Growing Farmers of the Future: Undergraduate Curriculum in Sustainable Agriculture at the University of Kentucky (Keiko Tanaka, Mark Williams, Krista Jacobson and Mike Mullen)
ch. 7 Using a Multi-level Approach to Teach Sustainability to Undergraduate Students in Engineering and Environmental Science (Bruce I. Dvorak, Stacey A. Hawkey and Valdeen Nelsen)
ch. 8 Environmental Sustainability in Healthcare Management Education (Carrie Rich)
ch. 9 Teaching Ecotourism in the Backyard of Waikiki, Hawai‘I (John Cusick)
ch. 10 Writing Banana Republics and Guano Bonanzas: Consumerism and Globalization in the Composition Classroom (George E. Brooks)
ch. 11 The Hungry Text: Toward a Sustainable Literary Food Pedagogy (Tom Hertweck and Kyle Bladow)
ch. 12 Who Will Teach the Teachers? Re-orienting Teacher Education for the Values of Sustainability (Patrick Howard)

III. Education as a Sustainable Practice
ch. 13 Eportfolios in a Liberal Studies Program: An Experiment in Sustainability (P. Sven Arvidson)
ch. 14 The Paperless Classroom (Kirsten Bartels and Justin Pettibone)
ch. 15 Communicating Sustainability: Teaching Sustainable Media Practice (Alex Lockwood)
ch. 16 Unsustainable Aspects of Sustainability (Bart Bartels)

IV. Leadership and Reform Strategies for Long-term Institutional Change
ch. 17 Teaching Sustainability Leadership (Courtney Quinn and Gina Matkin )
ch. 18 Teaching Sustainability to Future Professionals in Cultural Resource Organizations (Sarah S. Brophy)
ch. 19 Breaking the “Methodological Trap” of Sustainability in Academia with Global Learning Environments (Tamara Savelyeva)
ch. 20 Making Sustainability a Core Value (Christine Drewel)
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Fostering Religious Literacy across Campus

Book
Diamond, Miriam Rosalyn
2011
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LC383.F67 2011
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
In June of 2008, teams from diverse campuses across the country came together to explore and create programs aimed at enhancing the religious literacy of their students. The Society for Values in Higher Education sponsored this Institute for Religion on Campus and Community, with funding from the Jesse Ball duPont foundation. This publication is a description of the diverse curricular and co-curricular projects developed at these institutions.

Miriam Diamond ...
Additional Info:
In June of 2008, teams from diverse campuses across the country came together to explore and create programs aimed at enhancing the religious literacy of their students. The Society for Values in Higher Education sponsored this Institute for Religion on Campus and Community, with funding from the Jesse Ball duPont foundation. This publication is a description of the diverse curricular and co-curricular projects developed at these institutions.

Miriam Diamond and her colleagues in the Society for Values in Higher Education have produced a wonderful little volume that deals with a major contemporary problem in higher education: how to foster religious literacy across the American academic landscape. This is a vexed (and vexing) problem in the American academy, and the authors have made a major contribution – which continues the tradition of Bellah, Wuthnow, and Prothero. To quote contributor Nancy Thomas, “American civil society seems less than civil”. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Religious Literacy: The Project
Appendices:
A. Wingspread Declaration
B. Institute on Religion in Curriculum and Culture Guiding Questions

Part One - Why Religious
ch. 1 Religious Literacy across the Disciplines
ch. 2 A More Perfect Union: Religion, public life, and higher education

Part Two - Campus Initiatives
Section One - Course-specific projects
ch. 3 A Module on Islam
ch. 4 Environmental Stewardship: A dialog between religion and the environment
Appendix: Course Syllabus (Excerpts)
ch. 5 An Online Course in Religious Literacy
Appendices:
A. Religious Literacy for the Public and Professions Sample Lessons
B. Religious Literacy for the Public and Professions Sample Case Study: Instructions and writing prompts
C. Pre- and Post-test Results
Section Two - Co-curricular/Integrated Learning
ch. 6 Creating Interfaith & Social Justice Co-Curricular Programs
ch. 7 Human Moral Development Living Learning Community: A brief biography
Section Three - University-Wide/Interdisciplinary Programs
ch. 8 Monotheistic Religions and the Public Square
Appendix: Course Syllabus
ch. 9 Responsible Belief: Students in a pervasively-Christian university engaging in interfaith dialogue
Appendices:
A. Fall 2008 Interfaith Dialogue Series
B. Sample Interfaith Project 1
C. Sample Interfaith Project 2
ch. 10 "Let Everyone Remain Free": The Difficult Dialogues Project at LaGuardia Community College
Appendix: Agenda for Conversation Circle Sessions
ch. 11 Development of a Religious Studies Program at Portland State University
Appendix: Proposal for a New Academic Program

Part Three - Moving Forward
ch. 12 Religious Literacy and Public Schools

Afterword - Lessons Learned, Looking Ahead
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"Pedagogy with the Repressed: Critical Reflections from a Post-9/11 Biblical Studies Classroom"

Article
Lopez, Davina C.
2011
Faith, Feminism, and Scholarship: The Next Generation, Ch. 10, pp. 163-180, Palgrave Macmillan, New York
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

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Religion & Education Volume 39, no.1

Journal Issue
2012
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 Jan/Feb 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial
Religion, Education, and Public Reason

An Exchange and Evaluating Religious Truth Claims in Public Schools
ch. 1 Epistemic Evaluation of Religious Claims in Public Schools: A Response to Suzanne Rosenblith (Emery J. Hyslop-Margison, Philip Peterson)
ch. 2 Beyond Belief: Epistemic Evaluation of Religious Experiences (Suzanne Rosenblith)
ch. 3 Epistemology or Self-Delusion? A Final Word on Evaluating Religious Truth Claims (Phillip Peterson, Emery J. Hyslop- Margison)

Articles, Essays
ch. 4 Spirituality and Academic Success: Perceptions of African American Males in the Community College (J. Luke Wood, Adriel A. Hilton)
ch. 5 Multi-Faith Religious Spaces on College and University Campuses (Karla Johnson, Peter Laurence)
ch. 6 Religious Affiliation and College Student Development: A Literature Review and Synthesis (Jenny L. Small, Nicholas A. Bowman)
ch. 7 Self-Knowledge Development as a Cognitive, Affective, Relational and Spiritual Journey (Terry Murray)
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"A Communities of Practice Approach to the Synoptic Problem"

TTR
Madrigal, Ramon Anthony
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 125-144
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

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Although the study of the Synoptic Problem has been the focus of scholarly attention for over two hundred years, the social learning theory known as Communities of Practice is a relatively recent phenomenon. This article describes a communities of practice approach to the study of the Synoptic Problem in an upper-division undergraduate course at a private, liberal arts college. Students with little or no prior knowledge of the Synoptic Problem ...
Additional Info:
Although the study of the Synoptic Problem has been the focus of scholarly attention for over two hundred years, the social learning theory known as Communities of Practice is a relatively recent phenomenon. This article describes a communities of practice approach to the study of the Synoptic Problem in an upper-division undergraduate course at a private, liberal arts college. Students with little or no prior knowledge of the Synoptic Problem were introduced to the salient issues of the Synoptic Problem as well as a theoretical framework in which to interpret them. Data were collected using a variety of mixed methods, including pre- and post-treatment tests, written survey questions, interviews, field notes, and focus group sessions. The results of this study suggest that a communities of practice approach can enhance students' knowledge of the Synoptic Problem and also foster an awareness of scholarly and personal presuppositions that influence the interpretation of the gospels.
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"Race, Ethnicity, and the Bible: Pedagogical Challenges and Curricular Opportunities"

TTR
Byron, Gay L.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 105-124
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Theological educators are now fostering dialogues, projects, and practices that are designed to acknowledge the challenges and opportunities resulting from the shifting racial and ethnic demographic climate in the U.S. and Canada. As well-intentioned as these efforts are, most of the scholarship focuses on the contemporary experiences of underrepresented minorities, current institutional concerns, or practical classroom scenarios, leaving Scripture courses, which have long been the backbone of theological education, ...
Additional Info:
Theological educators are now fostering dialogues, projects, and practices that are designed to acknowledge the challenges and opportunities resulting from the shifting racial and ethnic demographic climate in the U.S. and Canada. As well-intentioned as these efforts are, most of the scholarship focuses on the contemporary experiences of underrepresented minorities, current institutional concerns, or practical classroom scenarios, leaving Scripture courses, which have long been the backbone of theological education, beyond the scope of critical engagement. In this article I argue that the existing scholarship on teaching and learning in general, and among biblical scholars in particular, does not adequately address the specific challenges that arise when questions about race and ethnicity are exposed in Scripture courses. Therefore, based on my own classroom experiences, I develop a pedagogy of (Emb)Racing the Bible that seeks to bridge the gap between theoretical readings and practical applications of ancient and contemporary discourses about race and ethnicity.
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"Learning by Reciting"

Tactic
Thompson, John M.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 157
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

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One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students memorize and recite a selection from another tradition's scripture.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students memorize and recite a selection from another tradition's scripture.
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"PEC2K-ing Away at Old Testament Illiteracy"

Tactic
Thompson, Jeremy P.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 158
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

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One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using an acronym to help students remember basic biblical chronology and plot outline.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using an acronym to help students remember basic biblical chronology and plot outline.
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"The Where and Who of Values"

Tactic
Marmon, Ellen L.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 156
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

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One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a free write exercise helps students reflect on and articulate their values.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a free write exercise helps students reflect on and articulate their values.
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Teaching World Religions without Teaching “World Religions”

TTR
Locklin, Reid B., Tiemeier, Tracy, and Vento,, Johann M.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 159-181
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of “religion” and “world religions” and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach world religions without teaching “world religions.” That is, we attempt to promote student engagement with the empirical study of a plurality ...
Additional Info:
Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of “religion” and “world religions” and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach world religions without teaching “world religions.” That is, we attempt to promote student engagement with the empirical study of a plurality of religious traditions without engaging in the rhetoric of pluralism or the reification of the category “religion.” The first two essays focus on topical courses taught at the undergraduate level in self-consciously Christian settings: the online course “Women and Religion” at Georgian Court University and the service-learning course “Interreligious Dialogue and Practice” at St. Michael's College, in the University of Toronto. The final essay discusses the integration of texts and traditions from diverse traditions into the graduate theology curriculum more broadly, in this case at Loyola Marymount University. Such confessional settings can, we suggest, offer particularly suitable – if somewhat counter-intuitive – contexts for bringing the otherwise covert agendas of the world religions discourse to light and subjecting them to a searching inquiry in the religion classroom.
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Catholic/Jesuit Values in an Introductory Religious Studies Course

TTR
Lynch, S.J., Patrick, and Mizak, Pat
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 3 (2012): 225-240
BL.T4 v.15 no. 3 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
A growing interest in the communication to students of the mission and identity of a higher education institution prompted this study about the presence of Catholic, Jesuit values in the introductory religious studies course at a faith-based university. To conduct this study a survey instrument was developed, piloted, further refined, and then administered again to about four hundred and fifty students. The study's results showed that the introductory course had ...
Additional Info:
A growing interest in the communication to students of the mission and identity of a higher education institution prompted this study about the presence of Catholic, Jesuit values in the introductory religious studies course at a faith-based university. To conduct this study a survey instrument was developed, piloted, further refined, and then administered again to about four hundred and fifty students. The study's results showed that the introductory course had a positive effect on the majority of students surveyed, namely, those who had no Catholic schooling or only had a Catholic elementary school education. Statistically significant advances in several areas of knowledge about Catholic teachings endorsed by Catholic bishops and the pope occurred. Although less extensive, knowledge of Jesuit values also advanced in the course.
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Needs and Nonviolent Communication in the Religious Studies Classroom

TTR
Agnew, Elizabeth N.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 3 (2012): 210-224
BL.T4 v.15 no. 3 2012
Topics: Discussion   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Religious studies classrooms are microcosms of the public square in bringing together individuals of diverse identities and ideological commitments. As such, these classrooms create the necessity and opportunity to foster effective modes of conversation. In this essay, I argue that communication attuned to shared human needs – among them needs for safety, respect, and belonging – offers a transformative response to the potential self-silencing and peer-conflict to which religious studies classrooms are ...
Additional Info:
Religious studies classrooms are microcosms of the public square in bringing together individuals of diverse identities and ideological commitments. As such, these classrooms create the necessity and opportunity to foster effective modes of conversation. In this essay, I argue that communication attuned to shared human needs – among them needs for safety, respect, and belonging – offers a transformative response to the potential self-silencing and peer-conflict to which religious studies classrooms are prone. I develop this claim with reference to the research on teaching religious studies conducted by Barbara Walvoord and the pedagogy of theologian and Swarthmore University President Rebecca Chopp in formulating an “ethics of conversation” with her students. Building on this foundation, I make a case for developing an “ethos of conversation” in the religious studies classroom based on psychologist and peace activist Marshall Rosenberg's method of “nonviolent communication.” While addressing the roles of conflict and toleration in the classroom through the perspectives of Alasdair MacIntyre and Jeffrey Stout, I argue that Rosenberg's approach to communication is a powerful asset to education that models constructive engagement in the macrocosm of civic life.
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Student Learning Outcomes for Biblical Studies in the Liberal Arts

TTR
Webster, Jame S.; Runions, Erin; Gallagher, Eugene V.; Lopez, Davina C.; McGinn, Sheila E. Penner, Todd C. and Howell, David B.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 3 (2012): 262-283
BL.T4 v.15 no. 3 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Liberal Arts

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"Apprenticing Wise Interpreters"

Tactic
Eilers, Kent
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 3 (2012): 258
BL.T4 v.15 no. 3 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a worksheet to help students place each new theological text into its broader conversation partners.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a worksheet to help students place each new theological text into its broader conversation partners.