Course Design

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Going Online: Perspectives on Digital Learning

Journal Issue
Ubell, Robert
2017
Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group
BL41.T48 1997
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Note
Foreword

Articles
Ch. 1 Identification Questions
Ch. 2 Critical Representations
Ch. 3 On Teaching Religion: A Symposium
Ch. 4 The Voice of Theology: Rethinking the Personal and the Objective in Christian Pedagogy
Ch. 5 Three-Ring Circus at a Combustible Crossroads: Teaching Religion as Core Curriculum
Ch. 6 Moments of Transformation: The Process of Teaching and Learning
Ch. 7 "Stumbling Along between the Immensities": Reflections on Teaching in the Study of Religion
Ch. 8 Postscript

Responses and Rejoinders
Ch. 9 Ethics, Biblical and Denominational: A Response to Mark Smith
Ch. 10 Pederasty and Romans 1:27: A Response to Mark Smith
Ch. 11 Paul and Ancient Bisexuality: A Rejoinder

Book Reviews
Abe, Masao, Buddhism and Interfaith Dialogue
Boccaccini, Gabriele, Middle Judaism: Jewish Thought, 300 B.C.E. to 200 C.E.
Bounds, Elizabeth M., Coming Together, Coming Apart: Religion, Community and Modernity
Bynum, Caroline Walker, The Resurrection of the Body in Western Christianity, 200-1336
Campbell, June, Traveller in Space: In Search of Female Identity in Tibetan Buddhism
Dawson, Lorne L. ed. Cults in Context: Readings in the Study of New Religious Movements
Deutsch, Nathaniel, The Gnostic Imagination: Gnosticism, Mandaeism, and Merkabah Mysticism
Gardell, Mattias, In the Name of Elijah Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam
Goodblatt, David, The Monarchic Principle: Studies in Jewish Self-Government in Antiquity
Ingraffia, Brian, Postmodern Theory and Biblical Theology: Vanquishing God's Shadow
Katz, Jonathan G., Dreams, Sufism and Sainthood: The Visionary Career of Muhammad al-Zawawi
Keenan, John P., The Gospel of Mark: A Mahayana Reading
Kuschel, Karl-Josef, Abraham: A Sign of Hope for Jews, Christians and Muslims
Lindley, Susan Hill, You Have Stept Out of Your Place: A History of Women and Religion in America
Lucas, Phillip Charles, The Odyssey of a New Religion: The Holy of MANS from New Age to Orthodoxy
Mugambi, J.N.K., From Liberation to Reconstruction: African Christian Theology after the Cold War
Parkhill, Thomas, The Forrest Setting in Hindu Epics: Princes, Sages, Demons
Peterson, Richard T., Democratic Philosophy and the Politics of Knowledge
Russell, L. M., and J. S Clarkson, eds., Dictionary of Feminist Theologies
Schuon, Frithijof, The Transfiguration of Man
Villa-Vicencio, Charles, The Spirit of Freedom: South African Leaders on Religion and Politics

Books Received
Index To Volume
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Designing & Assessing Courses & Curricula: A Practical Guide

Book
Diamond, Robert M.
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2361.5.D5 1998
Topics: Course Design   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Designing and Assessing Courses and Curricula reflects the best current knowledge and practice in course and curriculum design and connects this knowledge with the critical task of assessing and learning outcomes at both course and curricular levels. Tested and refined through long-term use and study, the change model presented in this book shows how to move from concept to actualization, from theory to practice. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Designing and Assessing Courses and Curricula reflects the best current knowledge and practice in course and curriculum design and connects this knowledge with the critical task of assessing and learning outcomes at both course and curricular levels. Tested and refined through long-term use and study, the change model presented in this book shows how to move from concept to actualization, from theory to practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author

ch. 1 A Learning-Centered Approach to Course and Curriculum Design
ch. 2 Systematic Design: Model and Benefits
ch. 3 Making the Decision to Go Ahead
ch. 4 Getting Started
ch. 5 Linking Goals, Courses, and Curricula
ch. 6 Gathering and Analyzing Essential Data
ch. 7 Developing a Design for an Ideal Course or Curriculum
ch. 8 Adjusting from the Ideal to the Possible
ch. 9 Clarifying Instructional Goals and Objectives
ch. 10 Designing Assessment Instruments and Procedures
ch. 11 Designing the Learning Experience
ch. 12 Selecting and Using Technology
ch. 13 Developing a Learning-Centered Syllabus
ch. 14 Cultivating a Respect for Diversity
ch. 15 Implementing, Evaluating, and Refining the Course or Curriculum
ch. 16 Learning from Experience

Resource A Questions for Evaluating a College Course
Resource B Case Studies in Developing Learning Outcomes
Resource C Mathematics Prerequisites and Student Success in Introductory Courses: Final Report
Resource D Sample Alumni Survey for Evaluating Program Effectiveness and Needs
Resource E Additional Case Studies in Course Design
Resource F Developing an Institutional Assessment Culture at Truman State University
Resource G Qualities of the Liberally Educated Person: A Description of Important Competencies
Resource H Sample Copyright Agreement
Resource I Teaching Goals Inventory: Self-Scorable Version

References
Name Index
Subject Index
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Building Learning Communities in Cyberspace: Effective Strategies for the Online Classroom

Book
Palloff, Rena M., and Keith Pratt
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5805.P35 1999
Topics: Course Design   |   Collaborative Learning   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Written for faculty, instructors, and trainers in any distance learning environment, Building Learning Communities in Cyberspace shows how to create a virtual classroom environment that helps students excel academically, while fostering a sense of community. This practical, hands-on guide is filled with illustrative case studies, vignettes, and examples from a wide variety of successful online courses. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Written for faculty, instructors, and trainers in any distance learning environment, Building Learning Communities in Cyberspace shows how to create a virtual classroom environment that helps students excel academically, while fostering a sense of community. This practical, hands-on guide is filled with illustrative case studies, vignettes, and examples from a wide variety of successful online courses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures, Tables, and Exhibits
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Authors

Pt. 1 The Learning Community in Cyberspace
ch. 1 When Teaching and Learning Leave the Classroom
ch. 2 Defining and Redefining Community
ch. 3 What We Know About Electronic Learning
ch. 4 Time and Group Size
ch. 5 Managing the Technology

Pt. 2 Building an Electronic Learning Community
ch. 6 Making the Conversion from the Classroom to Cyberspace
ch. 7 Building Foundations
ch. 8 Promoting Collaborative Learning
ch. 9 Transformative Learning
ch. 10 Evaluation
ch. 11 Lessons Learned and a Look Ahead

Resource A Examples of Course Syllabi
Resource B Glossary of Terms Used in Computer-Mediated Distance Education
Resource C Internet Resources for Distance Education

Bibliography
Index
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Charting Your Course: How to Prepare to Teach More Effectively

Book
Pregent, Richard
2000
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB2331.P6813 2000
Topics: Course Design

Additional Info:
Good teaching begins with good preparation. But many instructors and teaching assistants are unsure about how to plan their courses in order to teach more effectively.

Charting Your Course is a systematic approach to course planning that applies to all disciplines and course types. Prégent stresses analysis, planning, critical thinking, and careful evaluation and provides step-by-step examples of how actual new courses were designed and prepared. Whatever ...
Additional Info:
Good teaching begins with good preparation. But many instructors and teaching assistants are unsure about how to plan their courses in order to teach more effectively.

Charting Your Course is a systematic approach to course planning that applies to all disciplines and course types. Prégent stresses analysis, planning, critical thinking, and careful evaluation and provides step-by-step examples of how actual new courses were designed and prepared. Whatever type of course you teach, use Charting Your Course to complement your current planning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1: Analyzing the Conditions of Your Teaching Situation
ch. 2: Formulating Course Objectives
ch. 3: Planning to Evaluate Learning
ch. 4: Choosing Your Teaching Methods
ch. 5: Choosing Your Teaching Materials
ch. 6: Detailed Course Planning
ch. 7: Preparing and Delivering a Lecture
ch. 8: Training Students for Group Work
ch. 9: Evaluating Your Teaching

Conclusion
Bibliography
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Designing Courses for Higher Education

Book
Toohey, Susan
1999
Open University Press, Philadelphia, PA
LB2361.T56 1999
Topics: Course Design   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Susan Toohey focuses not on teaching techniques but on the strategic decisions which must be made before a course begins. She provides realistic advice for university and college teachers on how to design more effective courses without underestimating the complexity of the task facing course developers. In particular, she examines fully the challenges involved in leading course design teams, getting agreement among teaching staff and managing organizational politics. (From the ...
Additional Info:
Susan Toohey focuses not on teaching techniques but on the strategic decisions which must be made before a course begins. She provides realistic advice for university and college teachers on how to design more effective courses without underestimating the complexity of the task facing course developers. In particular, she examines fully the challenges involved in leading course design teams, getting agreement among teaching staff and managing organizational politics. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

ch. 1 Pressures for Change
ch. 2 The Course Design Process
ch. 3 Beliefs, Values and Ideologies in Course Design
ch. 4 Thinking about Goals and Content
ch. 5 The Structure of the Course
ch. 6 Making Learning Opportunities More Flexible
ch. 7 Deciding on Goals and Objectives for Units of Study
ch. 8 Choosing Teaching Strategies
ch. 9 Assessment
ch. 10 Implementing the New Course

References
Index
The Society for Research into Higher Education
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Teaching and Learning at a Distance: What It Takes to Effectively Design, Deliver and Evaluate Programs

Book
Cyrs, Thomas
1997
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 71)
LC5800.T4 1997
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Teaching and learning at a distance is an area of education that is growing rapidly alongside the technology that makes it possible. But success in this area requires more than advanced technology; it requires skillful instructors, well-designed courses, and students ready to learn from the format. This issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning provides insights from experienced practitioners into what is needed to make teaching and learning at ...
Additional Info:
Teaching and learning at a distance is an area of education that is growing rapidly alongside the technology that makes it possible. But success in this area requires more than advanced technology; it requires skillful instructors, well-designed courses, and students ready to learn from the format. This issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning provides insights from experienced practitioners into what is needed to make teaching and learning at a distance successful for everyone involved. This is the 71st issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part One: Issues and Trends
ch. 1. Issues and TrAnds to Take Us into the Twenty-First Century (George P. Connick).

Part Two: Instructional Design Principles for Distance Learning.
ch. 2. Competence in Teaching at a Distance (Thomas E. Cyrs).
ch. 3. Interactivity: From Agents to Outcomes (Ellen D. Wagner).
ch. 4. Visual Thinking: Let Them See What You Are Saying (Thomas E. Cyrs)
ch. 5. Student-Centered Instruction for the Design of Telecourses (M. Winston Egan, Gordon S. Gibb).
ch. 6. Learner Development: Beyond the Technology (Darcy Walsh Hardy, Mary H. Boaz).

Part Three: Alternative Delivery Systems for Distance Learning.
ch. 7. Teaching by Television (Virginia A. OstAndorf).
ch. 8. Teaching by Telephone (Christine H. Olgren).
ch. 9. The Internet: A Learning Environment (Rory McGreal).
ch. 10. Networked Learning Environments (Alan G. Chute, Pamela K. Sayers, Richard P. Gardner).

Part Four: Administrative Issues for the Distance Instructor.
ch. 11. Evaluating Teaching and Learning at a Distance (Michael R. Simonson).
ch. 12. Copyright: Opportunities and Restrictions for the Teleinstructor (Janis H. Bruwelheide).
ch. 13. Distance Learning and the Digital Library: Transforming the Library into an Information Center (Roberta L. Derlin, Edward Erazo).
ch. 14. Managing Information Resources and Services in a Distance Environment (Robert S. Tolsma)
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"Challenges of the Introductory Course"

Article
Dunham, Robert E., and Maryellen Gleason
1984
in Rejuvenating Introductory Courses (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1984), 39-51
Topics: Course Design

Additional Info:
This introductory course fulfills a number of goals for students and colleges, including recruitment ad screening of majors, provision of prerequisite knowledge, explorations of learning, commitment to college, and cognitive development.
Additional Info:
This introductory course fulfills a number of goals for students and colleges, including recruitment ad screening of majors, provision of prerequisite knowledge, explorations of learning, commitment to college, and cognitive development.
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"Education for Freedom of Spirit"

Article
Sloan, Douglas
1991
Fetzer Institute (1991)
Topics: Course Design   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"So Much Content, So Little Time"

Article
Svinicki, Marilla D.
1990
Teaching Excellence 2, no. 8 (1990)
Topics: Course Design

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Cases and Course Design

Book
Stivers, Robert L., ed.
1997
Spotlight on Teaching 5, no. 1 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Cases and Course Design (Robert L. Stivers)
ch. 2 Case Writing and Teaching in a Seminary: Reflecting on Ministry Experience (V. Sue Zabel)
ch. 3 Law and Order: Waco, Texas, 1993, Revisited (Leland E. Elhard)
ch. 4 Sopater's Body (David E. Frederickson)
ch. 5 Adult Learners, Feminist Practices, and the Use of Cases (Carol Allen)
ch. 6 A Study of Case Studies (Anne Reissner)
ch. 7 Case Studies and the Teaching of History (Garth M. Rosell)
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"Interactive Phases of Curricular and Personal Re-Vision with Regard to Race"

Article
McIntosh, Peggy
1990
Working Paper no. 219, Center for Research on Women, Wellesley College (1990)
Topics: Course Design   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Most white, middle-class citizens see society from a monocultural perspective, a perspective that assumes, often unconsciously, that persons of all races are in the same cultural system together. This single-system form of seeing the world, is blind to its own cultural specificity. People who see persons of other races monoculturally cannot imagine the reality that those "others" think of themselves not in relation to the majority race but in terms ...
Additional Info:
Most white, middle-class citizens see society from a monocultural perspective, a perspective that assumes, often unconsciously, that persons of all races are in the same cultural system together. This single-system form of seeing the world, is blind to its own cultural specificity. People who see persons of other races monoculturally cannot imagine the reality that those "others" think of themselves not in relation to the majority race but in terms of their own culturally specific identities. This paper presents an "interactive phase theory" with regard to race that is intended to reassess school curricula in terms of heightened levels of consciousness concerning race. In the context of U.S. history courses, five phases are presented: phase one: all-white history; phase two: exceptional minority individuals in U.S. history; phase three: minority issues, or minority groups as problems, anomalies, absences, or victims in U.S. history; phase four: the lives and cultures of people of color everywhere as history; and phase five: history redefined and reconstructed to include all people. (DB)
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"Pedagogical Principles and Practices for Asynchronous On-line Sociology Courses"

Article
Jaffee, David
2000
Dept. of Sociology, State University of New York, New Paltz (2000)
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
This paper will discuss some pedagogical principles and practices that can be employed in a particular type of distance learning that I refer to as asynchronous learning networks (ALNs). ALNs are courses offered exclusively on-line via the internet or a remote server in an asynchronous mode that involves no face-to-face interaction and no conventional classroom sessions. The pedagogical techniques described below were developed while participating in a Sloan Foundation supported ...
Additional Info:
This paper will discuss some pedagogical principles and practices that can be employed in a particular type of distance learning that I refer to as asynchronous learning networks (ALNs). ALNs are courses offered exclusively on-line via the internet or a remote server in an asynchronous mode that involves no face-to-face interaction and no conventional classroom sessions. The pedagogical techniques described below were developed while participating in a Sloan Foundation supported distance learning project at the State University of New York at New Paltz (under the auspices of the SUNY Learning Network) and teaching a ALN sociology course titled "Social and Economic Development". Many of the ideas and strategies presented stem from conversations with, and the advice and comments of, teaching colleagues in the SUNY Learning Network and instructional developers at the Center for Learning and Technology at Empire State College.
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"The Learning Covenant: Promoting Freedom and Responsibility in the Religious Studies Classroom"

Article
Glennon, Fred
1995
Council of Societies for the Study of Religion Bulletin 24, no. 2 (1995): 32-37
Topics: Course Design

Additional Info:
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"Planning Your Course: A Decision Guide"

Article
Dee Fink
Brigham Young University Faculty Center, http://fc.byu.edu/tpages/planning/pycguide.doc.
Topics: Course Design

Additional Info:
A handout from BYU's Faculty Center, based on the work of L. Dee Fink, provides a series of detailed questions to guide you through the construction of a course, organized in categories such as: where are you? where do you want to go? how would you know if the students got there? how can you help them get there? what are the students going to do? etc.
Additional Info:
A handout from BYU's Faculty Center, based on the work of L. Dee Fink, provides a series of detailed questions to guide you through the construction of a course, organized in categories such as: where are you? where do you want to go? how would you know if the students got there? how can you help them get there? what are the students going to do? etc.
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Religion and Film: Capturing the Imagination

Journal Issue
Matties, Gordon, ed.
1998
Spotlight on Teaching 6, no. 1 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Religion and Film: Capturing the Imagination (Gordon Matties)
ch. 2 Apocalyptic Visions: Beyond Corporeality (Ann Pearson)
ch. 3 Seduction by Visual Image (Barbara DeConcici)
ch. 4 Teaching Film and Religion (Paul V. Flesher, and Robert Torry)
ch. 5 Teaching Field of Cosmogonic Myth (Mara E. Donaldson)
ch. 6 A Picture's Worth: Teaching Religion and Film (Irena S. M. Makarushka)
ch. 7 Religion and Popular Movies (Conrad Ostwalt)
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How Scholars Trumped Teachers: Change without Reform in University Curriculum, Teaching, and Research, 1890-1990

Book
Cuban, Larry
1999
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LD3013.C83 1999
Topics: Course Design   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 How the Invention of the University-College Led to a Century of Dilemmas and a Tradition of Reform at Stanford
ch. 2 How Universities Tame Reform to Preserve the Research Imperative: Or Why There Is Change Without Reform
ch. 3 Scholar-Teachers in the Stanford History Department, 1891-1990
ch. 4 A Sturdy Way of Preparing Physicians: The School of Medicine, 1908-1990
ch. 5 How Research Trumped Teaching in History and Medicine
ch. 6 Scholars or Teachers: How Much Change is Possible?

Notes
References
Index
About the Author
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Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning: Service-Learning Course Design Workbook

Book
2001
OCSL Press, Ann Arbor, MI
LC220.5.M532 2001
Topics: Course Design   |   Service Learning

Additional Info:
This companion volume to the Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning clarifies the conceptualization of academic service-learning (and how it is different from other community-based pedagogical models), establishes clear criteria to determine bona fide service-learning courses, and provides a resource that walks an instructor through the process of designing and developing a service-learning course. Rich with planning worksheets, this workbook is a must-have resource for faculty and those responsible for ...
Additional Info:
This companion volume to the Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning clarifies the conceptualization of academic service-learning (and how it is different from other community-based pedagogical models), establishes clear criteria to determine bona fide service-learning courses, and provides a resource that walks an instructor through the process of designing and developing a service-learning course. Rich with planning worksheets, this workbook is a must-have resource for faculty and those responsible for faculty development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
A Growing Problem
Purpose of this Workbook
Using this Workbook
Section 1: Clarifying the Conceptualization
Section 2: Foundational Resources
Section 3: Relevant and Meaningful Service with the Community
Section 4: Enhanced Academic Learning
Section 5: Purposeful Civic Learning
Section 6: Final Thoughts
Section 7: Companion Resources
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Assessment & Learning: The Ice Approach

Book
Young, Sue Fostaty and Robert J. Wilson
2000
Portage and Main Press, Winnipeg, Canada
LB1060.F67 2000
Topics: Course Design   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Assessment and Learning: The ICE Approach shows how to maximize learning potential through an improved understanding and appreciation of the learning process. ICE represents the three stages of learning: Ideas: The building blocks of learning Connections: Establishing and articulating the relationships among Ideas Extensions: Learning is internalized and used in novel ways. The authors show how to recognize the stages of learning development--from a state of beginning to one of ...
Additional Info:
Assessment and Learning: The ICE Approach shows how to maximize learning potential through an improved understanding and appreciation of the learning process. ICE represents the three stages of learning: Ideas: The building blocks of learning Connections: Establishing and articulating the relationships among Ideas Extensions: Learning is internalized and used in novel ways. The authors show how to recognize the stages of learning development--from a state of beginning to one of competence and expertise--and demonstrate how educators can foster that development in their classrooms. ICE is a framework for assessing learning growth--across students, across subjects, across ages, and across levels of schooling. To encourage and assess learning progress, the authors provide comprehensive guidelines for developing effective discussion questions, developing qualitative rubrics, selecting and using experiential learning activities, journals in the classroom, projects, presentations, and assignments, grading and reporting. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
vii Acknowledgments
1 1. Ideas, Connections, and Extensions
1 Introduction to ICE
6 The Theory Behind ICE
9 2. Applying ICE to Teaching and Learning
13 Monitoring Progress in Hard-to-Assess Areas
15 Class Discussions
17 Sample Question Starters
18 Guidelines for Developing Good Discussion Questions
19 Group and Experiential Work
21 Guidelines for Selecting and Using Experiential Learning Activities
23 Journal Assessment
27 Guidelines for Effective Use of Journals
28 Projects, Presentations, and Assignments
29 Guidelines for Successful Use of Projects, Presentations, and Assignments
30 Mapping Progress Through Rubrics
31 Constructing ICE Rubrics
33 Differences Between Quantitative and Qualitative Rubrics
38 Differences Between Checklists and ICE Rubrics
40 Summarizing Progress with Tests
42 Tables of Specifications
47 Grading and Reporting Progress
52 A Final Note About Grading
53 Sharing ICE With Learners
59 A Final Note About Sharing ICE with Learners
60 Students' Reactions to ICE
63 3. The Versatility of ICE
63 Across Curriculum Areas
63 Drama and Music
65 Trades and Technology
67 Sports and Physical Education
68 Across Products of Learning
69 Language Arts
72 Second Language Acquisition
74 Social Studies
75 Sciences
77 Math and Math Readiness
79 Music
81 Conclusion
83 Black Line Masters
85 Bibliography
Additional Info:
Offering methods for improving teaching practices in higher education, Fink challenges educators to shift from the content-oriented "information dump" approach toward one that is learning-centered. Fink outlines his taxonomy of significant learning and shows how to combine new and traditional techniques to create powerful learning experiences. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Offering methods for improving teaching practices in higher education, Fink challenges educators to shift from the content-oriented "information dump" approach toward one that is learning-centered. Fink outlines his taxonomy of significant learning and shows how to combine new and traditional techniques to create powerful learning experiences. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author

ch. 1 Creating Significant Learning Experiences
ch. 2 A Taxonomy of Significant Learning
ch. 3 Designing Significant Learning Experiences I: Getting Started
ch. 4 Designing Significant Learning Experiences II: Shaping the Learning Experience
ch. 5 Changing the Way We Teach
ch. 6 Better Organizational Support for Faculty
ch. 7 The Human Significance of Good Teaching and Learning

App. A Planning Your Course: A Decision Guide
App. B: Suggested Readings

References
Index
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"'Learning Styles' and Instructional Design"

Article
Sadler-Smith, Eugene
1996
Innovations in Education and Training International 33, no. 4 (1996): 185-193
Topics: Course Design   |   Cognitive Development   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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A Post-Modern Perspective on Curriculum

Book
Doll, William E., Jr.
1993
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LB1570.D616 1993
Topics: Course Design   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Doll offers a post-modernist, process-oriented vision of teaching and curriculum built from the base of a constructivist and experiential epistemology where we engage ourselves in a conversation with each other in the context of our collective history and seek meaning through alternative interpretations and transformations. In this book he ably demonstrates the power of historical reflection to illuminate our present position on the cusp of change, and he provides a ...
Additional Info:
Doll offers a post-modernist, process-oriented vision of teaching and curriculum built from the base of a constructivist and experiential epistemology where we engage ourselves in a conversation with each other in the context of our collective history and seek meaning through alternative interpretations and transformations. In this book he ably demonstrates the power of historical reflection to illuminate our present position on the cusp of change, and he provides a powerful vision of what might be. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Introduction

Part I The Modern Paradigm: A Closed Vision
ch. 1 Descartes' and Newton's World Views
Pre-Modern Order
Descartes' Method
Newton's Stable Universe
ch. 2 Curriculum Carryovers
America and Technology
The Scientific Curriculum
The Tyler Rationale

Part II The Post-Modern Paradigm: An Open Vision
ch. 3 Piaget and Living Systems
The Biological World-View
Evolution and Entropy - Problems and Promises
Piaget's Equilibrium Model
ch. 4 Prigogine and Chaotic Order
Concepts of Chaos
Ilya Prigogine, Self-Organization, and Dissipative Structures
ch. 5 The Cognitive Revolution, Bruner, and a New Epistemology
Concepts of Cognition
Bruner
A New Epistemology
ch. 6 Dewey, Whitehead, and Process Thought
Traditions of Permanence, Change, and Interpretation
John Dewey and the Concept of Process
Alfred North Whitehead and the Concept of Process
Process Thought Beyond Dewey and Whitehead

Part III An Educational Vision
ch. 7 Constructing a Curriculum Matrix
Curriculum Concepts
The Four R's - An Alternative to the Tyler Rationale

References
Index
About the Author
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Interdisciplinary Studies Today

Book
Klein, Julie Thompson and William G. Doty, eds.
1994
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 58)
LB2361.5.I68 1994
Topics: Course Design   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning is a practical compendium of advice and information on the development, administration, and assessment of interdisciplinary studies programs and schools. A bibliographic orientation to hands-on access, including electronic retrieval of information, precedes chapters reviewing the design of interdisciplinary courses, and how the role of administrators in interdisciplinary programs can further institutitonal goals. The final chapter looks beyond the local campus to ...
Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning is a practical compendium of advice and information on the development, administration, and assessment of interdisciplinary studies programs and schools. A bibliographic orientation to hands-on access, including electronic retrieval of information, precedes chapters reviewing the design of interdisciplinary courses, and how the role of administrators in interdisciplinary programs can further institutitonal goals. The final chapter looks beyond the local campus to national and international support networks. The contributors, who share their extensive experience in the teaching and administration of interdisciplinary studies, provide many examples of good (and bad) praxis. This is the 58th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Finding Interdisciplinary Knowledge and Information (Julie Thompson Klein)
ch. 2 Designing Interdisciplinary Courses (William H. Newell)
ch. 3 The Administration and Governance of Interdisciplinary Programs (Beth A. Casey)
ch. 4 Assessing Interdisciplinary Learning (Michael Field, Russell Lee, Mary Lee Field)
ch. 5 Organizational Networking: Taking the Next Step (Nelson E. Bingham)

Index
Additional Info:
An overview of the research on “universal design,” which aims to design instruction to maximize the learning of students from a wide variety of ethnic and racial backgrounds, English language skills, learning styles, and disabilities.
Additional Info:
An overview of the research on “universal design,” which aims to design instruction to maximize the learning of students from a wide variety of ethnic and racial backgrounds, English language skills, learning styles, and disabilities.
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"Teaching and Learning Issues on Instructional Technology and Theological Education" (pdf)

Journal Issue
Cormode, Scott
1999
Theological Education 36, no. 1, (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh): 101-115
Topics: Course Design   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1999-theological-education-v36-n1.pdf
Article cover image

"Religion in Southern Culture: Classroom Notes"

Article
Lippy, Charles
2002
Journal of Southern Religion 5 (2002)
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Matching Instructional Objectives, Subject Matter, Tests, and Score Interpretations" (pdf)

Article
Hanna, Gerald S., and William E. Cashin
1987
Idea Paper No. 18, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1987)
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
This article explores the implications for a particular model of teaching, by looking at differences between students, types of subject material, types of instruction, instructional objectives, texts, and ways to interpret test results. Idea Paper no. 18, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
This article explores the implications for a particular model of teaching, by looking at differences between students, types of subject material, types of instruction, instructional objectives, texts, and ways to interpret test results. Idea Paper no. 18, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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Wabash tree

Understanding by Design

Book
Wiggins, Grant and Jay McTighe
1998
Assn. for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, VA
LB2806.15.W54
Topics: Course Design

Additional Info:
What is understanding and how does it differ from knowledge? How can we determine the big ideas worth understanding? Why is understanding an important teaching goal, and how do we know when students have attained it? How can we create a rigorous and engaging curriculum that focuses on understanding and leads to improved student performance in today's high-stakes, standards-based environment?

Authors Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe answer these ...
Additional Info:
What is understanding and how does it differ from knowledge? How can we determine the big ideas worth understanding? Why is understanding an important teaching goal, and how do we know when students have attained it? How can we create a rigorous and engaging curriculum that focuses on understanding and leads to improved student performance in today's high-stakes, standards-based environment?

Authors Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe answer these and many other questions in this second edition of Understanding by Design. Drawing on feedback from thousands of educators around the world who have used the UbD framework since its introduction in 1998, the authors have revised and expanded their original work to guide educators across the K16 spectrum in the design of curriculum, assessment, and instruction. With an improved UbD Template at its core, the book explains the rationale of backward design and explores in greater depth the meaning of such key ideas as essential questions and transfer tasks. Readers will learn why the familiar coverage- and activity-based approaches to curriculum design fall short, and how a focus on the six facets of understanding can enrich student learning. With an expanded array of practical strategies, tools, and examples from all subject areas, the book demonstrates how the research-based principles of Understanding by Design apply to district frameworks as well as to individual units of curriculum.

Combining provocative ideas, thoughtful analysis, and tested approaches, Understanding by Design, Expanded 2nd Edition, offers teacher-designers a clear path to the creation of curriculum that ensures better learning and a more stimulating experience for students and teachers alike. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
ch. 1 What Is Backward Design?
ch. 2 What Is a Matter of Understanding?
ch. 3 Understanding Understanding
ch. 4 The Six Facets of Understanding
ch. 5 Thinking Like an Assessor
ch. 6 How Is Understanding Assessed in Light of the Six Facets?
ch. 7 What Is Uncoverage?
ch. 8 What the Facets Imply for Unit Design
ch. 9 Implications for Organizing Curriculum
ch. 10 Implications for Teaching
ch. 11 Putting It All Together: A Design Template
Afterword
Bibliography
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"What A Course Will Look Like After Multicultural Change"

Article
Kitano, Margie K.
in Multicultural Course ransformation in Higher Education: A Broader Truth (Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon, 1997), 18-34
Topics: Course Design   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Doing Multiculturalism: Conceptualizing Curricular Change"

Article
Rosenfelt, Deborah S.
1996
in Handbook for Multicultural Infusion in Higher Education (New York: Allyn & Bacon, 1996), 35-55
Topics: Course Design   |   Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Designing Courses and Teaching on the Web: A "How-To" Guide to Proven, Innovative Strategies

Book
Fisher, Mercedes
2003
ScarecrowEducation, Lanham, MD
LB1044.87.F57 2003
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Here is a practical, how to book written for new online web instructors. It will also be helpful to course designers, trainers, administrators, or anyone interested in the potential of online learning and training by providing an excellent introduction to the online education arena. The format provided will easily fit into any course design while utilizing a variety of current resources and tools. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Here is a practical, how to book written for new online web instructors. It will also be helpful to course designers, trainers, administrators, or anyone interested in the potential of online learning and training by providing an excellent introduction to the online education arena. The format provided will easily fit into any course design while utilizing a variety of current resources and tools. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Illustrations
Tables
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 The Constructivist Approach to Online Learning with Technology
Constructivist Learning Environments and New Technologies
Social Nature of Learning

ch. 2 Effective Planning and Design for Online Teaching
Web-enhanced Teaching
Translating Content to Web-based Environments
Conclusions

ch. 3 Foundation for Instructional Screen Design
Figure-Ground Relationships
Principles of Graphic Design for Your "Web Office" or Class
Conclusions

ch. 4 Communication and Community Create Online Success
Creating Community
Strategies for Successful Online Learning
Best Practices
Translating Instructor Presence Online
Continuous Improvement

ch. 5 Evaluating the Student
Creating and Optimizing Assessment Strategies
How to Measure Student Learning
Types of Assessments
Designing Performance Assessments
Feedback
Assessing the Student
Technology Piece Evaluation
Exhibition
Conclusions

ch. 6 Conclusion
Course Maintenance Checklist
Five Challenges for Online Learning
Online Teaching and Learning: The Winning Combination

App. A Technology Resources
App. B Tools
App. C Online Tutorials
App. D Journals
App. E Instructor's Web Site
App. F Real-time Chat Activity

Glossary
Bibliography
Index
About the Author
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Disciplines as Frameworks for Student Learning: Teaching the Practice of the Disciplines

Book
Riordan, Tim and James Roth, eds.
2005
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2331.D544 2005
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Liberal Arts   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Creating ways to make a discipline come alive for those who are not experts - even for students who may not take more than one or two courses in the disciplines they study - requires rigorous thought about what really matters in a field and how to engage students in its practice.

Faculty from Alverno College representing a range of liberal arts disciplines - chemistry, economics, history, literature, ...
Additional Info:
Creating ways to make a discipline come alive for those who are not experts - even for students who may not take more than one or two courses in the disciplines they study - requires rigorous thought about what really matters in a field and how to engage students in its practice.

Faculty from Alverno College representing a range of liberal arts disciplines - chemistry, economics, history, literature, mathematics and philosophy - here reflect on what it has meant for them to approach their disciplines as frameworks for student learning.

The authors all demonstrate how the ways of thinking they have identified as significant for their students in their respective disciplines have affected the way they design learning experiences. They show how they have shaped their teaching around the ways of thinking they want their students to develop within and across their disciplines; and what that means in terms of designing assessments that require students to demonstrate their thinking and understanding through application and use. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Common ground : how history professors and undergraduate students learn through history (James Roth)
ch. 2 Learning to think mathematically (Susan Pustejovsky)
ch. 3 Teaching students to practice philosophy (Donna Englemann)
ch. 4 Making economics matter to students (Zohreh Emami)
ch. 5 Reading and responding to literature: developing critical perspectives (Lucy Cromwell)
ch. 6 Articulating the cognitive processes at the heart of chemistry (Ann van Heerden)
ch. 7 Because Hester Prynne was an existentialist, or why using disciplines as frameworks for learning clarifies life (Rebecca Valentine)
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Teaching With Site Visits

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2004
Spotlight on Teaching 19, no. 4 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/oct04sot.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/oct04sot.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching with Site Visits (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Unexpected Learning Opportunities of the Site Visit (Joyce Burkhalter Flueckiger)
ch. 3 An Insider Perspective from the Temple (P. Ravi Sarma)
ch. 4 Site Visits and Epistemological Diversity in the Study of Religion (Jeffrey Carlson)
ch. 5 The Nuts and Bolts of Site Visits (Grace G. Burford)
ch. 6 Native American Site Visits in the Context of Service Learning (Michael D. McNally)
ch. 7 Site Visits to Synagogues (Michael S. Berger)
ch. 8 Site Visit to a Mosque (Amir Hussain)
ch. 9 Integrating Field Research in the Introductory Religion Course (Sheila E. McGinn)
ch. 10 Integrating Site Visits in the Pluralism Project at Connecticut College (Patrice C. Brodeur)
ch. 11 Site Visits from a Journalist’s Perspective (Gustav Niebuhr)
ch. 12 Temples of Culture: Using Museums for Site Visits (Lisa Bellan-Boyer)
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Essential Elements: Prepare, Design, and Teach Your Online Course

Book
Elbaum, Bonnie, Cynthia McIntyre, and Alese Smith
2002
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB1044.87.E4 2002
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
There’s no doubt that a great classroom lecturer can be an inspiration to students. But almost all lecturers worry that their students are not learning how to discover, how to make connections on their own. If you have never taught an online course you’ll be surprised to learn that teaching online, as described by the authors, has the potential for providing students with a truly comprehensive learning experience. ...
Additional Info:
There’s no doubt that a great classroom lecturer can be an inspiration to students. But almost all lecturers worry that their students are not learning how to discover, how to make connections on their own. If you have never taught an online course you’ll be surprised to learn that teaching online, as described by the authors, has the potential for providing students with a truly comprehensive learning experience. An online course can offer students the chance to learn through exploration, to pursue related areas of interest, to participate in a community of learners, and to take advantage of opportunities to excel.

This book, ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS: Prepare, Design, and Teach Your Online Course offers an easy-to-follow guide that is based on a model developed from experience with hundreds of online courses. The authors are members of The Concord Consortium, a nonprofit educational technology lab dedicated to improving teaching practices through the appropriate integrated use of technology in the classroom.

Based on their experience, the authors offer the Concord Consortium e-Learning Model — which provides a working overview of online teaching — and seventeen essential elements that take you step-by-step through everything you’ll need to know for successful online teaching. The essential elements describe the necessary steps to put the Concord model into practice with these results:

* You will use courseware to display your course assignments and reference materials as text, with graphics, colors, and multimedia to enhance the presentation.
*Your course will have clearly written assignments that engage your students in active learning with each other.
*You, as the instructor, will play an integral roll as a facilitator of that learning.
*Your will use the Internet both as a resource and as a means for connecting yourself and your students based on your mutual interest in the content — regardless of your individual schedules, geographic location, or physical ability to come to class.
*You and your students will communicate and collaborate on a regular basis in a discussion area that allows for student-to-student and student-to-instructor interaction.
*Students will assess their own growth and learning through group discussion and reflection, peer review, instructor feedback, and self-evaluation.

The essential elements are presented in three sections — prepare, design, and teach — that will take you from the starting gate to the finishing line, offering complete assistance for the new online teacher and new techniques and tips for those who have taught online before.

With tips addressing everything from technology to student assessments, from online community building to collaborative teaming, and from scheduling and pacing to facilitating online discussions, the authors have the virtual classroom covered. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
The Concord Consortium e-Learning Model for Online Courses
Pre-Questionnaire 1: Goals
Pre-Questionnaire 2: Instructor Training and Requirements
Pre-Questionnaire 3: Technical Requirements and Administrative Support

Section 1. Prepare for Your Online Course
1 Prepare to teach online
2 Build a course outline
3 Create a course schedule with clear deadlines
4 Plan for ongoing quality assurance
5 Ensure support from your administration
6 Provide technical support

Section 2. Design Your Online Course
7 Format your course so that students can focus on the content
8 Design a learning community that is collaborative, engaging, and inclusive
9 Find and use appropriate course materials and resources
10 Develop rich, relevant activities to support your learning objectives
11 Include a balanced mixture of individual and group learning activities
12 Recognize that pacing in an online course is different
13 Provide equal accessibility to all students

Section 3. Teach Your Online Course
14 Provide a comprehensive set of informational materials
15 Facilitate discussions in a way that keeps students on-task, promotes full participation, and encourages peer collaboration
16 Engage with your students without over-engaging
17 Assess student work and provide feedback

Appendix A: Accessibility Web Sites
Appendix B: List of Resources
Appendix C: Essential Checklist
TTR cover image

"Teaching and Learning Forgiveness: A Multidimensional Approach"

TTR
Malcolm, Lois and Janet Ramsey
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 3 (2006): 148-155
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
This essay seeks to illumine the teaching and learning of the practice of forgiveness by relating a range of theoretical perspectives (theological, psychological, and socio-cultural) to the process of cultivating the practical wisdom needed for forgiveness. We discuss how a Trinitarian "epistemology of the cross" might lead one to a new way of perceiving life's constraints and possibilities and relate this theological epistemology to three psychological approaches for understanding forgiveness – ...
Additional Info:
This essay seeks to illumine the teaching and learning of the practice of forgiveness by relating a range of theoretical perspectives (theological, psychological, and socio-cultural) to the process of cultivating the practical wisdom needed for forgiveness. We discuss how a Trinitarian "epistemology of the cross" might lead one to a new way of perceiving life's constraints and possibilities and relate this theological epistemology to three psychological approaches for understanding forgiveness – a narrative approach, object-relations theory, and consciousness development theory. Our discussion of these theoretical perspectives is explicitly related to the practice of teaching and learning forgiveness, outlining learning activities we have used in a course we taught (which ranged from case studies and film to lectures and discussions based on close readings of biblical and theological texts) and reporting highlights in our students' work.
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"Divine Therapy: Teaching Reflective and Meditative Practices"

TTR
Carroll, Mary
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 4 (2005): 232-238
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Reflective and meditative practices, whether Eastern or Western, are being taught in multiple places – retreat houses, hospitals, Zen centers – but are rarely included in the theology classroom. What would be the rationale for inclusion of reflective/meditative practices in a theology curriculum that does not include such a theory/praxis course? What might a mystical tradition/reflective practice course look like? The author first explores the implications of a three-semester ...
Additional Info:
Reflective and meditative practices, whether Eastern or Western, are being taught in multiple places – retreat houses, hospitals, Zen centers – but are rarely included in the theology classroom. What would be the rationale for inclusion of reflective/meditative practices in a theology curriculum that does not include such a theory/praxis course? What might a mystical tradition/reflective practice course look like? The author first explores the implications of a three-semester pilot program – using guided imagery, spiritual journaling, iconography, and centering prayer – that was conducted with volunteers outside the classroom. Then, based on the experimental project, the author describes a course that blends global traditions with the best of the practices. The author concludes with an evaluation of the reflective/meditative practices and the praxis-inclusive course in terms of possible long-term effects on the personal development of the participants and the ministry of teaching and learning itself.
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"Experiencing the Other as the Self: Cultural Diversity Courses as Liberating Praxis"

TTR
Owens, Pamela Jean
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 4 (2005): 245-252
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Liberal Arts   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
In response to our increasingly global and multicultural world, undergraduate degree plans have come to include courses, which meet the Diversity requirement. While diversity may have a variety of definitions, clearly the educational institution believes that all students earning a degree should complete course work that exposes them to cultures not their own. Courses that fulfill Diversity requirements often include "Introduction to World Religions," among others. Even a traditional-style teaching ...
Additional Info:
In response to our increasingly global and multicultural world, undergraduate degree plans have come to include courses, which meet the Diversity requirement. While diversity may have a variety of definitions, clearly the educational institution believes that all students earning a degree should complete course work that exposes them to cultures not their own. Courses that fulfill Diversity requirements often include "Introduction to World Religions," among others. Even a traditional-style teaching of such a course will accomplish a certain degree of broadening of students' perspectives. The risk, however, is that at the end of the course the students are simply better informed about sets of people whom they would still objectify as the other. This article describes an experiential method of teaching which enables students to begin to change their consciousness, as well as their body of information, by learning to experience the other as self. The author calls this the identification/participation method.
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"Exploring Positive Learning Experiences in the Context of Practical Theological Education"

TTR
Lynch, Gordon and Stephen Pattison
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 3 (2005): 144-154
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This article presents findings from an empirical study exploring student and teacher perspectives on positive learning experiences in practical theological education. Forty-five students and twenty teachers were interviewed in focus groups in four educational institutions delivering programs in practical theology. The findings indicated that students valued practical theological education when it enabled them to think critically in relation to their personal or professional experience, and that students valued tutors, their ...
Additional Info:
This article presents findings from an empirical study exploring student and teacher perspectives on positive learning experiences in practical theological education. Forty-five students and twenty teachers were interviewed in focus groups in four educational institutions delivering programs in practical theology. The findings indicated that students valued practical theological education when it enabled them to think critically in relation to their personal or professional experience, and that students valued tutors, their peers and a flexible curriculum design in promoting this kind of learning. There was a high correlation between students' views of positive learning experiences and what tutors perceived as important qualities that they hoped their students would develop. Difficulties associated with the students' lack of clarity about the learning process and the tensions between academic and professional contexts are also discussed.
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"Learning to Teach Islam as a Non-Muslim in the Twin Cities"

TTR
Burr, Elizabeth G.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 3 (2005): 155-163
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
In this essay I reflect on my experience thus far of teaching Islam as a non-Muslim at Metropolitan State University and at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. I begin by narrating a conversation about conversion that I had with one of my Muslim students. Then I introduce the theme of multiplicity as a way of being, teaching, and learning. The third section illustrates the ...
Additional Info:
In this essay I reflect on my experience thus far of teaching Islam as a non-Muslim at Metropolitan State University and at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. I begin by narrating a conversation about conversion that I had with one of my Muslim students. Then I introduce the theme of multiplicity as a way of being, teaching, and learning. The third section illustrates the theme of multiplicity pedagogically with reference to institutional identity, choice of textbooks, topical organization of the course, the "mosque visit" assignment, and class composition and student roles in the classroom. I conclude in the fourth section with personal reflections on multiplicity in relation to credibility and identity, politics and transformation. The essay was inspired by my realization that I embody multiple religious identities, and that one of my purposes is to build community inside and outside the classroom in an effort not only to transcend the tendency of our culture to adopt an essentialist view of Islam as suspect and alien, but also to recover Islam as a universal religion and to consider its agenda for world transformation alongside those of other religions.
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"Teaching the Dance of World Religions"

TTR
Sautter, Cia
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 3 (2005): 176-183
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
In the past decade, critical scholars such as Ronald Grimes and Talal Asad stated that there is a need to recognize the cultural and spiritual dimensions of religion, especially in an age of pluralism. While they call for an increased knowledge and application of techniques from anthropology, ethnology, and performance studies, what actually happens when one teaches from this perspective? As a religious scholar with training in dance anthropology, I ...
Additional Info:
In the past decade, critical scholars such as Ronald Grimes and Talal Asad stated that there is a need to recognize the cultural and spiritual dimensions of religion, especially in an age of pluralism. While they call for an increased knowledge and application of techniques from anthropology, ethnology, and performance studies, what actually happens when one teaches from this perspective? As a religious scholar with training in dance anthropology, I created a class on World Religions that was based on these principles. Taught at interfaith and ecumenical seminaries, as well as a California university, the results were interesting, varied, and insightful. This paper discusses the problems, questions, and positive results of these classes, offering a base model for teaching religion in a multicultural, pluralistic age.
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"Using Student Consultants to Re-envision Teaching Christian History and Theology"

TTR
Brunner, Daniel L.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 3 (2005): 184-188
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
When it came time to reevaluate and restructure the introductory year in Christian history and theology, I decided to use a roundtable of student consultants to help me in that work. Our research and reflection focused on the impact of postmodern thinking and learning, feedback from pastors in ministry, a desire to bring appropriate praxis into academically focused courses, and a hope to make greater use of technology. This article ...
Additional Info:
When it came time to reevaluate and restructure the introductory year in Christian history and theology, I decided to use a roundtable of student consultants to help me in that work. Our research and reflection focused on the impact of postmodern thinking and learning, feedback from pastors in ministry, a desire to bring appropriate praxis into academically focused courses, and a hope to make greater use of technology. This article discusses the consultative process and sketches out key learnings from student research. Concluding reflections focus on technology, a topical, praxis-oriented approach to teaching, the process of utilizing student advisors, and personal, internal changes that resulted from the project.
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"Approaches to Jewish Studies: Teaching a Methods Class"

TTR
Hochman, Leah
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 2 (2005): 78-85
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Like religious studies, Jewish studies is an academic exploration of literature, ritual, history, philosophy, and experience across disciplinary boundaries. As with all area studies, Jewish studies balances itself – often precariously – as a bridge across that range of methodological options. The breadth of theories employed by each has complicated the teaching of an upper level seminar in Jewish studies. Conceived as a cross between a parade of scholars course and a ...
Additional Info:
Like religious studies, Jewish studies is an academic exploration of literature, ritual, history, philosophy, and experience across disciplinary boundaries. As with all area studies, Jewish studies balances itself – often precariously – as a bridge across that range of methodological options. The breadth of theories employed by each has complicated the teaching of an upper level seminar in Jewish studies. Conceived as a cross between a parade of scholars course and a senior capstone experience, the class employed the broad thematic principle of "identity." In doing so, it exposed the biases of the students, the subject, and the instructor.
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"Thinking Out Loud about Teaching Bioethics: A Contribution from the Edge"

TTR
Solberg, Mary M.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 2 (2005): 99-106
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
Teaching bioethics might be likened to a rollercoaster ride of twists, turns, and dips that invite teachers and students to experience something of their own edges of fear and comfort. Here the author provides readers with a glimpse into her distinctive approach to teaching bioethics that encourages students to move beyond boundaries of personal comfort zones by willfully transgressing traditional or comfortable boundaries. The essay describes how this is accomplished ...
Additional Info:
Teaching bioethics might be likened to a rollercoaster ride of twists, turns, and dips that invite teachers and students to experience something of their own edges of fear and comfort. Here the author provides readers with a glimpse into her distinctive approach to teaching bioethics that encourages students to move beyond boundaries of personal comfort zones by willfully transgressing traditional or comfortable boundaries. The essay describes how this is accomplished through a variety of methods – provocative readings, classroom discussion, student response papers, and student ethics committees. The author contends that teaching bioethics ought to include critical pedagogical methods and an alertness for real-life intersections of science and ethics. Teaching bioethics can be a subversive activity that encourages students and teachers to engage in making life morally livable.
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"The Arts, Midrash, and Biblical Teaching"

TTR
Birch, Bruce C.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 2 (2005): 114-122
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Biblical texts have been handed on to us through a long history of interpretation. Awareness of this rich but complex process is one of the goals of biblical teaching. Since the earliest centuries of the church there has been a parallel history of artistic interaction with the biblical text. These artistic treatments of biblical subjects have had a great cultural impact and have deeply influenced public perceptions and understandings of ...
Additional Info:
Biblical texts have been handed on to us through a long history of interpretation. Awareness of this rich but complex process is one of the goals of biblical teaching. Since the earliest centuries of the church there has been a parallel history of artistic interaction with the biblical text. These artistic treatments of biblical subjects have had a great cultural impact and have deeply influenced public perceptions and understandings of the Bible. Unfortunately, seldom does this history of artistic interpretation become a part of Bible courses. In this paper, I reflect on learnings from a serious effort to take artistic resources and methodologies into account in teaching Hebrew Bible in a theological school. My most successful efforts have employed the ancient Jewish interpretive method of midrash. Use of midrash opens new, imaginative possibilities that can enliven and extend our usual exegesis of texts. More specifically, midrash provides the ideal category for understanding artistic interactions with biblical texts. Through midrash students can understand artists to be both profound respecters of the power and integrity of biblical texts, while at the same time extending and entering into imaginative encounter with those texts. This article will appear as a chapter in the forthcoming book Arts, Theology, and the Church: New Intersections.
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"Conceptions and Misconceptions about "Western Buddhism": Issues and Approaches for the Classroom"

TTR
Berkwitz, Stephen C.
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 3 (2004): 141-152
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
This article responds to the exponential growth in academic textbooks on Western or American Buddhism by arguing that popular trade books written by Buddhist teachers in the West make more effective tools for teaching and learning about the growth of Buddhism in western societies. The use of such texts in the classroom provides students with opportunities to exercise critical thinking and permits instructors to avoid conveying misleading interpretations about the ...
Additional Info:
This article responds to the exponential growth in academic textbooks on Western or American Buddhism by arguing that popular trade books written by Buddhist teachers in the West make more effective tools for teaching and learning about the growth of Buddhism in western societies. The use of such texts in the classroom provides students with opportunities to exercise critical thinking and permits instructors to avoid conveying misleading interpretations about the practice, thought, and identities of Buddhists in North America and Europe. The pedagogical advantages of using what could be described as primary sources on Western Buddhism include promoting active learning techniques, muting the differences drawn between convert and ethnic Buddhist communities, and encouraging students to become aware of and refrain from Orientalist approaches towards describing and knowing the religious and/or cultural Other. A list of practical suggestions for classroom exercises using trade books written by Buddhist teachers is provided at the end.
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"A Pedagogy of Dealienation: A Case Study in the Application of Peter Berger's The Sacred Canopy"

TTR
Chance, J. Bradley
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 2 (2004): 101-107
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
This paper explores the use of Peter Berger's theory of religion and its features of alienation and dealienation to lead students to the critical awareness of the role that human beings play in the construction of social worlds, including most especially our religious worlds. After summarizing Berger's theory of the alienating and potentially dealienating capacity of religion, the paper describes how the author used the study of certain biblical texts, ...
Additional Info:
This paper explores the use of Peter Berger's theory of religion and its features of alienation and dealienation to lead students to the critical awareness of the role that human beings play in the construction of social worlds, including most especially our religious worlds. After summarizing Berger's theory of the alienating and potentially dealienating capacity of religion, the paper describes how the author used the study of certain biblical texts, the Wisdom of Solomon and the pericope of the controversy over clean and unclean foods, as presented in both Matthew and Mark, to explore both the alienating and dealienating aspects of religion as presented in these selected biblical texts. The paper also describes how the author encouraged students to embrace as the most responsible stance a dealienating stance toward religion, especially one's own.
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"Becoming Pilgrims: Engaging Theory Through Practice in the Introductory World Religions Course"

TTR
Hill, Susan E.
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 2 (2004): 108-114
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This paper explores the use of the educational pilgrimage as an active learning strategy in the introductory world religions course. As we study pilgrimages from different religious traditions throughout the semester using Victor Turner as our theoretical guide, students also plan their own campus pilgrimage, paying homage to sites that help them reach their educational goals. Using student comments and my own observations, I highlight the ways in which the ...
Additional Info:
This paper explores the use of the educational pilgrimage as an active learning strategy in the introductory world religions course. As we study pilgrimages from different religious traditions throughout the semester using Victor Turner as our theoretical guide, students also plan their own campus pilgrimage, paying homage to sites that help them reach their educational goals. Using student comments and my own observations, I highlight the ways in which the educational pilgrimage both affirms and raises critical questions about Turner's theory of pilgrimage. In this way, the educational pilgrimage is an opportunity for students to enhance and clarify their understanding of theory through practice.
Additional Info:
This essay discusses the process and findings of an experiment on the scholarship of teaching and learning conducted in a religious ethics classroom that utilized an experiential approach to teaching and learning about social justice. The first part lays out the focus of the investigation and the pedagogical principles drawn from experiential learning theory that provided the foundation for the experiment. The second part describes all of the components of ...
Additional Info:
This essay discusses the process and findings of an experiment on the scholarship of teaching and learning conducted in a religious ethics classroom that utilized an experiential approach to teaching and learning about social justice. The first part lays out the focus of the investigation and the pedagogical principles drawn from experiential learning theory that provided the foundation for the experiment. The second part describes all of the components of the pedagogical strategy used in the experiment, the social justice action project. The third part discusses the qualitative methodology used to gather evidence and the findings drawn from that evidence. What the evidence shows is that an experiential approach to teaching and learning about social justice can be quite effective. The essay concludes with discussions of areas for further study and the implications for the practice of others.
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"Spiritual Formation for Ordained Ministry: An Ecumenical Approach"

TTR
Keely, Barbara Anne
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 4 (2003): 202-207
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Seminaries have a responsibility to engage students in reflecting upon the spiritual life, as well as providing opportunities to deepen their own spiritual journeys. It also is important that they consider the intentional ways that their understandings and experiences of the spiritual life influence their leadership in the Church. Spiritual formation of seminarians provides particular challenges to faculty of liberal, ecumenical seminaries. This article describes a course designed to address ...
Additional Info:
Seminaries have a responsibility to engage students in reflecting upon the spiritual life, as well as providing opportunities to deepen their own spiritual journeys. It also is important that they consider the intentional ways that their understandings and experiences of the spiritual life influence their leadership in the Church. Spiritual formation of seminarians provides particular challenges to faculty of liberal, ecumenical seminaries. This article describes a course designed to address these issues and argues that spiritual formation can be effectively integrated into the curricula of liberal, ecumenical seminaries.
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"Transformational Travel for Seminarians: Reading James in Haiti"

TTR
Grieb, A. Katherine
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 151-158
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
How will we teach the Bible in the twenty-first century? This essay is intended to contribute to that larger discussion in three ways: after a brief introduction, I will, first, state some general working assumptions about the present situation of the church and about teaching the New Testament in the context of a seminary or divinity school; second, I will describe the course "Reading James in Haiti" which I designed ...
Additional Info:
How will we teach the Bible in the twenty-first century? This essay is intended to contribute to that larger discussion in three ways: after a brief introduction, I will, first, state some general working assumptions about the present situation of the church and about teaching the New Testament in the context of a seminary or divinity school; second, I will describe the course "Reading James in Haiti" which I designed and taught in the Spring of 2002; finally, and much more briefly, I will comment on the implications of transformational travel experiences like this one for the ability of seminarians to understand New Testament texts more deeply than the classroom setting allows.
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"Teaching Music in the Seminary"

TTR
Yardley, Anne Bagnall
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 169-175
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Teaching music in certain seminary contexts poses particular challenges for teaching and learning. The theme of disjuncture between teacher and student in courses that aim to incorporate music in the seminary curriculum are more vital than ever before because of the extreme cultural diversity of our population and integral nature of music in the worship life of religious communities. This essay tackles the difficulties associated with teaching worship music in ...
Additional Info:
Teaching music in certain seminary contexts poses particular challenges for teaching and learning. The theme of disjuncture between teacher and student in courses that aim to incorporate music in the seminary curriculum are more vital than ever before because of the extreme cultural diversity of our population and integral nature of music in the worship life of religious communities. This essay tackles the difficulties associated with teaching worship music in seminaries where there are a plurality of religious traditions represented and a host of expectations held by diverse student bodies about what connotes worship music. Topics addressed include issues concerning terminology, repertoire, pedagogical methods for teaching worship music, and current issues in church music.
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"As If Religion Matters: Teaching the Introductory Course as if it Does"

TTR
Thompson, Deanna A.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 85-92
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This essay chronicles the academic odyssey of a young professor who sets out to revise the department's Introduction to Religion course only to realize that she must first clarify her vocational commitments before she can create a teachable course. She is convinced through working with many students who express disdain or even hostility toward the subject matter that she wants to model a relationship to the subject matter that says ...
Additional Info:
This essay chronicles the academic odyssey of a young professor who sets out to revise the department's Introduction to Religion course only to realize that she must first clarify her vocational commitments before she can create a teachable course. She is convinced through working with many students who express disdain or even hostility toward the subject matter that she wants to model a relationship to the subject matter that says religion matters, but is uncertain how to do this. After an autobiographical foray into her academic upbringing in active learning, the author articulates four values to model in her teaching: personal relevance, academic responsibility, ethics, and community. The author then engages current scholarship in active learning, and narrates the process of translating those four values into concrete course goals and particular assignments. The essay concludes with an assessment of teaching the revised course.
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"The Role of Moral Exemplars in the Teaching and Learning of Practical Reason in a Catholic University"

TTR
Ingrando, Carla
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 105-112
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
The content of Catholic social teaching suggests that an appropriate pedagogy for the teaching and learning of Catholic social thought is the teaching and learning of practical reason. This article explores the role of moral exemplars in the teaching and learning of practical reason in a Catholic university. Specifically, the article details the use of moral exemplars in the "Profiles in the Catholic Social Tradition" course taught at the University ...
Additional Info:
The content of Catholic social teaching suggests that an appropriate pedagogy for the teaching and learning of Catholic social thought is the teaching and learning of practical reason. This article explores the role of moral exemplars in the teaching and learning of practical reason in a Catholic university. Specifically, the article details the use of moral exemplars in the "Profiles in the Catholic Social Tradition" course taught at the University of Notre Dame in the Fall semester of 2000. After a brief explanation of the appeal to practical reason as an appropriate pedagogy for teaching and learning the content of Catholic social teaching, the article turns to a discussion of our particular experience of using moral exemplars in the classroom.
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"Mining the Archive: Evaluating and Improving a Course"

TTR
Chalmers, John
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 1 (2003): 35-42
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
This classroom note demonstrates that a course may be improved by paying specific attention to Elliot Eisner's distinction between a course's explicit, implicit and null criteria. In an attempt to ground and identify those notoriously slippery curricula, this paper appropriates French philosopher Michel Foucault's concepts of practice, discourse and archival research. Having explored Foucault's understanding of these concepts, the paper analyses the course Communication and Processes within Groups at two ...
Additional Info:
This classroom note demonstrates that a course may be improved by paying specific attention to Elliot Eisner's distinction between a course's explicit, implicit and null criteria. In an attempt to ground and identify those notoriously slippery curricula, this paper appropriates French philosopher Michel Foucault's concepts of practice, discourse and archival research. Having explored Foucault's understanding of these concepts, the paper analyses the course Communication and Processes within Groups at two distinctive phases in its twenty–year history. The resulting excavation of the course's implicit and null curricula twenty years apart shows that two different sets of facilitators teaching the same explicit curriculum to a very different student body, in vastly changed venues, are working out of two different understandings of what competence in the practice of ministry entails, two very different ministerial education discourses. This paper demonstrates that with students' questions, a teacher's intentional probing and Foucault's framework in hand, it is possible to access and articulate a course's hidden curricula. In such ways, the practice of mining the archive offers an imaginative way of both evaluating and improving a course that has been taught for many years.
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"Teaching Pilgrims to Walk"

TTR
Webb-Mitchell, Brett
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 2 (2002): 105-112
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The creation and implementation of a Christian theological seminary course, "The Education of Christian Pilgrims," in which the purpose was to prepare students to teach members of a church to be and become a consciously "pilgrim Church." This article describes the genesis of the course, creating a syllabus, the actual pilgrimage undertaken by students and professor, and suggested modifications.
Additional Info:
The creation and implementation of a Christian theological seminary course, "The Education of Christian Pilgrims," in which the purpose was to prepare students to teach members of a church to be and become a consciously "pilgrim Church." This article describes the genesis of the course, creating a syllabus, the actual pilgrimage undertaken by students and professor, and suggested modifications.
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"Ancient Christianity in Cyberspace: A Digital Media Lab for Students"

TTR
Royalty, Robert M.
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 1 (2002): 42-48
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
"Ancient Christianity, Ancient Cities – and Cyberspace?" was a teaching experiment combining the study of theology, religion, history, and new computer technologies. The course included both a regular class meeting and a concurrent digital media lab. All student assignments were digital. Students came in with a wide variety of technical knowledge and backgrounds in classical and religious studies. In addition to learning about the history and theology of early Christianity, students ...
Additional Info:
"Ancient Christianity, Ancient Cities – and Cyberspace?" was a teaching experiment combining the study of theology, religion, history, and new computer technologies. The course included both a regular class meeting and a concurrent digital media lab. All student assignments were digital. Students came in with a wide variety of technical knowledge and backgrounds in classical and religious studies. In addition to learning about the history and theology of early Christianity, students became critical learners of technology within the ideal of a liberal arts education.
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"Teaching What I'm Not: Embodiment, Race, and Theological Conversation in the Classroom"

TTR
Thompson, Deanna A.
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 3 (2000): 164-169
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This article examines the theoretical and practical concerns of a White professor who teaches a course on African American religious thought. It begins with a discussion of what it means to be embodied White, and how that affects the teaching of another embodied reality. From there it moves to the major assignment of the course, the evolutionary essay, and how this assignment facilitates student reflection upon their own embodied existence, ...
Additional Info:
This article examines the theoretical and practical concerns of a White professor who teaches a course on African American religious thought. It begins with a discussion of what it means to be embodied White, and how that affects the teaching of another embodied reality. From there it moves to the major assignment of the course, the evolutionary essay, and how this assignment facilitates student reflection upon their own embodied existence, particularly in terms of race. The article concludes with a brief reflection on the continuing challenges the author faces when teaching such a course.
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"Practicing the Common Good: The Pedagogical Implications of Catholic Social Teaching"

TTR
Whitmore, Todd D.
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 1 (2000): 3-19
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design

Additional Info:
A persistent question for pedagogy is that of whether and how the content of a course ought to shape the teaching method. Both the understanding of practical reason and the substantive concepts of modern Catholic social teaching support a classroom dynamic of a relatively egalitarian dialectic. The author grounds the case for this pedagogy in the understanding of practical reason as found in Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas, and shows that ...
Additional Info:
A persistent question for pedagogy is that of whether and how the content of a course ought to shape the teaching method. Both the understanding of practical reason and the substantive concepts of modern Catholic social teaching support a classroom dynamic of a relatively egalitarian dialectic. The author grounds the case for this pedagogy in the understanding of practical reason as found in Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas, and shows that such an understanding is continued in modern Catholic social teaching. He then shows how the social teaching's substantive move to a more egalitarian social theory reinforces the egalitarian mode of reasoning. The author and others are attempting to practice this pedagogy in the context of the University of Notre Dame's new Program in Catholic Social Tradition. The investigation as a whole raises the question of whether colleges and universities that have actively maintained religious affiliations have a decided advantage in sustaining an academic culture where faculty and students can practice practical reason.
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"Using Legal Materials in Teaching Religion"

TTR
Sullivan, Winnifred Fallers
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 1 (2000): 33-41
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
This note argues for the importance of using primary legal sources, trial transcripts, opinions, law codes, and so forth, in teaching religion. The advantages of using legal documents in the religious studies classroom include: highlighting the importance of church/state issues, the existential givenness of law for religion; serving as mini-ethnographies, a slice-of-life view of religion; and, displaying a range of voices about a particular event, tradition, or idea. The ...
Additional Info:
This note argues for the importance of using primary legal sources, trial transcripts, opinions, law codes, and so forth, in teaching religion. The advantages of using legal documents in the religious studies classroom include: highlighting the importance of church/state issues, the existential givenness of law for religion; serving as mini-ethnographies, a slice-of-life view of religion; and, displaying a range of voices about a particular event, tradition, or idea. The note also describes two possible courses, an introductory course in American religion and a seminar in religion and law, listing recommended sample materials and showing how legal documents could be used in the classroom.
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"Redescribing "Religion and …" Film: Teaching the Insider/Outsider Problem"

TTR
McCutcheon, Russell T.
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 2 (1998): 99-110
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Classes organized by means of the 'religion and …' rubric cut both ways: they are elastic enough to attract wide student interest, thereby enhancing a department's enrollment statistics, but they are often theoretically unsophisticated, thereby hampering the future development of scholars of religion. After discussing the costs and benefits of such classes, this article focuses on one particular example of this ...
Additional Info:
AAR Teaching Religious Studies Series (Oxford University Press)
Classes organized by means of the 'religion and …' rubric cut both ways: they are elastic enough to attract wide student interest, thereby enhancing a department's enrollment statistics, but they are often theoretically unsophisticated, thereby hampering the future development of scholars of religion. After discussing the costs and benefits of such classes, this article focuses on one particular example of this popular rubric that would benefit from redescription: the use of films in the religious studies class. After identifying two competing approaches to using films, the essay concludes by discussing three feature films that can be used in all of our classes to teach a fundamental theoretical topic in our field: the insider/outsider problem.
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Wabash tree

Tom's New Teaching Resource

Book
Thomas Pearson
Dynamo Publishers
this is the call number
Topics: Course Design   |   Service Learning   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
taking off web now (km 6-6)
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"The Syllabus as Passport into a Common Culture of Teaching and Learning: Developing and Assessing Strategies for Dealing with Diversity"

TTR
Green, Barbara and Martha Stortz
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 4 (2006): 221-228
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Finding themselves teaching to increasingly diverse student populations, two mid-career faculty from different disciplines embarked on a common voyage to make their foundational courses more sensitive to student learning styles. Adrift in the seas of multiple intelligences and multiculturalism, the researchers quickly abandoned any hope of developing distinctive teaching portfolios for individual learning profiles. Instead, they structured the syllabus to be the passport into a common culture of teaching and ...
Additional Info:
Finding themselves teaching to increasingly diverse student populations, two mid-career faculty from different disciplines embarked on a common voyage to make their foundational courses more sensitive to student learning styles. Adrift in the seas of multiple intelligences and multiculturalism, the researchers quickly abandoned any hope of developing distinctive teaching portfolios for individual learning profiles. Instead, they structured the syllabus to be the passport into a common culture of teaching and learning in the classroom. Syllabus design and on-going "spot" assessments proved trusty guides in re-centering learning on the students' needs. In the process of outlining these two strategies for creating a common culture of teaching and learning, the article offers testimony that old dogs can learn new tricks! Additional materials, including syllabi used in these courses and in class assessment tools, can be found on the Web page of the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu/journal/greenstortz.html
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"Converting My Course Converted Me: How Reinventing an On-campus Course for an Online Environment Reinvigorated My Teaching"

TTR
Ruth, Lester
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 4 (2006): 236-242
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
The challenge of learning to teach online leads a junior faculty person to achieve greater levels of teaching satisfaction and proficiency overall. For this professor transitioning an on-campus pastoral liturgy course to an online environment brings about serendipitous discoveries that allow him to do more than survive as a frustrated teacher. The transition creates a revolution in one professor's whole approach to teaching.
Additional Info:
The challenge of learning to teach online leads a junior faculty person to achieve greater levels of teaching satisfaction and proficiency overall. For this professor transitioning an on-campus pastoral liturgy course to an online environment brings about serendipitous discoveries that allow him to do more than survive as a frustrated teacher. The transition creates a revolution in one professor's whole approach to teaching.
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"Welcoming Design – Hosting a Hospitable Online Course "

TTR
Ascough, Richard
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 131-136
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
A discussion about how instructors can host a hospitable online learning environment can address one of the fundamental philosophical and theological concerns frequently expressed about online learning – the loss of face-to-face interaction and, with it, the loss of community building (cf. Delamarter 2005, 138). This perceived link between physical presence and community creation, sometimes articulated, frequently assumed, often stands in the way of instructors, administrators, and even institutions fully embracing online learning. ...
Additional Info:
A discussion about how instructors can host a hospitable online learning environment can address one of the fundamental philosophical and theological concerns frequently expressed about online learning – the loss of face-to-face interaction and, with it, the loss of community building (cf. Delamarter 2005, 138). This perceived link between physical presence and community creation, sometimes articulated, frequently assumed, often stands in the way of instructors, administrators, and even institutions fully embracing online learning. This article will argue that when one gives due attention to hospitality, the potential for building online community is greatly enhanced, and with it comes a more effective pedagogical strategy for deep learning. It will conclude with some general recommendations for employing hospitality for building online learning communities.
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"Teaching Creation: A Modular Approach"

TTR
Bosworth, David A.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 4 (2007): 231-234
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
The present article describes a modular approach to teaching Genesis 1–3 that values depth over breadth even in an introductory class. The module allows students to learn about the text and its original context by orienting discussion around contemporary issues of practical concern. Specifically, the creation-evolution debates provide an opportunity for students to learn about contemporary political, social, and legal implications of interpreting Genesis 1–3. The conflict of traditional and modern values ...
Additional Info:
The present article describes a modular approach to teaching Genesis 1–3 that values depth over breadth even in an introductory class. The module allows students to learn about the text and its original context by orienting discussion around contemporary issues of practical concern. Specifically, the creation-evolution debates provide an opportunity for students to learn about contemporary political, social, and legal implications of interpreting Genesis 1–3. The conflict of traditional and modern values emerges also in issues surrounding gender and autonomy in Genesis 2–3. This pedagogical approach challenges various student worldviews to promote discussion and greater intellectual sophistication. The correlation of the text with ongoing contemporary issues engages student interest and motivates learning. It also allows the class to explore both the ancient text and its interpretation in diverse communities. Finally, the module allows considerable flexibility for student and teacher interest and the needs of a given class.
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Wabash tree

The Course Syllabus: A Learning-Centered Approach, Second Edition

Book
O'Brien, Grunert, Judith, Barbara J. Millis, and Margaret W. Cohen
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2361.G78 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Syllabus Construction

Additional Info:
When it was first published in 1997, The Course Syllabus became the gold standard reference for both new and experienced college faculty. Like the first edition, this book is based on a learner-centered approach. Because faculty members are now deeply committed to engaging students in learning, the syllabus has evolved into a useful, if lengthy, document. Today's syllabus provides details about course objectives, requirements and expectations, and also includes information about ...
Additional Info:
When it was first published in 1997, The Course Syllabus became the gold standard reference for both new and experienced college faculty. Like the first edition, this book is based on a learner-centered approach. Because faculty members are now deeply committed to engaging students in learning, the syllabus has evolved into a useful, if lengthy, document. Today's syllabus provides details about course objectives, requirements and expectations, and also includes information about teaching philosophies, specific activities and the rationale for their use, and tools essential to student success. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I Focus on Learning
Planning Your Learning-Centered Syllabus: An Overview of the Process
Composing a Learning-Centered Syllabus
Using a Learning-Centered Syllabus

Part II Examples
Checklist
Title Page
Table of Contents
Instructor Information
Letter to the Student
Purpose of the Coarse
Course Description
Course and Unit Objectives
Resources
Readings
Course Calendar
Course Requirements
Evaluation
Grading Procedures
How to Use the Syllabus
How to Study for this Course
Content Information
Learning Tools
Checklist

Part III Resources
Suggested Readings

References
Index
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Meaningful Course Revision: Enhancing Academic Engagement Using Student Learning Data

Book
Wehlburg, Catherine M.
2006
Anker Publishing Company, Inc., Bolton, MA
LB2822.75.W44 2006
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Teaching   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Faculty are often motivated to change the activities and design of their courses for reasons not based on data. In Meaningful Course Revision, the author seeks instead to illustrate how the appropriate use of multiple, direct measures of student-learning outcomes can lead to enhanced course development and revision. While providing an outline of methods for creating significant learning experiences, the book also includes practical suggestions for shaping the design of ...
Additional Info:
Faculty are often motivated to change the activities and design of their courses for reasons not based on data. In Meaningful Course Revision, the author seeks instead to illustrate how the appropriate use of multiple, direct measures of student-learning outcomes can lead to enhanced course development and revision. While providing an outline of methods for creating significant learning experiences, the book also includes practical suggestions for shaping the design of a course to meet student needs.

Meaningful Course Revision urges a rethinking of teaching and learning. By making student advancement its focal point, it offers guidance through

* Data-based decision making
* Designing course-based assessment activities
* Using data to enhance innovation in course redesign
* Rethinking teaching and learning
* Embedding assessment activities in meaningful ways
* Planning the course
* Closing the feedback loop
* Moving from course-level decision making to departmental curriculum planning
* Creating a culture of student-learning outcomes assessment

Written for faculty seeking advice on how to keep their teaching interesting and effective, Meaningful Course Revision is a practical guide for collecting information about how well students are reaching course goals, learning what impact course changes are having on student learning, and putting courses into a cycle of continual revision and improvement. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Preface

ch. 1 Date-Based Decision-Making
Engaged Students

ch. 2 Designing Course-Based
Assessment Activities
Measures you Already Have
Measures You Can Create
Student Satisfaction Measures
Specific Methods for Course-Based Assessment

ch. 3 Using Data Enhance Innovation in Course Redesign
What is innovation in course redesign?
Getting Innovative

ch. 4 Rethinking Teaching and Learning
Student-Centered Teaching
Student Engagement
Transfer of Learning
The "Guide on the Side."
Active Learning
Applying Rubrics to Enhance Learning
Conclusion

ch. 5 Embedding Assessment Activities in Meaningful Ways
Outline Your Teaching Goals
Review Current Teaching and In-Class Activities
Consider Adapting Existing Activities
Create New Methods to Assess Student Learning
The Importance of Embedding Activities

ch. 6 Planning The Course
Student Learning Outcomes and Other Data Sources
Teaching and Learning Activities
Grading Policies and Process
Enjoyment of Teaching

ch. 7 Closing the Feedback Loop
Collecting Informal Feedback
Embedded Assessment Items
Closing the Feedback Loop

ch. 8 Moving from Course-Level Decision-Making to Departmental Curriculum Planning
Mission Statement
Development of Student Learning Outcomes
Determining When Specific Outcomes Should Be Met
Sharing Objectives with Students
Collecting Information on Specific Objectives
Identifying Other Sources of Data
Using Data to Make Departmental Curricular Decisions
Conclusion

ch. 9 Creating a Culture of Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
Benefits of a Culture of Assessment
Possible Obstacles to Building a Culture of Assessment
Transforming an Institution's Culture
Accreditation Issues
Characteristics of an Institutional Culture of Assessment
Conclusion

Suggested Reading
Bibliography
Cover image

Conquering the Content: A Step-by-Step Guide to Online Course Design

Book
Smith, Robin M.
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB1044.87.S617 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Conquering the Content is a practical resource for faculty who tackle overwhelming amounts of course content that must be tailored for Web-based learning. This important guide offers step-by-step instructions for creating online learning experiences that are manageable, effective, and of the highest quality.
Written by Robin M. Smith, an expert in the field on online learning, Conquering the Content provides guidance for incorporating learning theory into practical online courses. ...
Additional Info:
Conquering the Content is a practical resource for faculty who tackle overwhelming amounts of course content that must be tailored for Web-based learning. This important guide offers step-by-step instructions for creating online learning experiences that are manageable, effective, and of the highest quality.
Written by Robin M. Smith, an expert in the field on online learning, Conquering the Content provides guidance for incorporating learning theory into practical online courses. Designed for online instructors at all levels of experience, the book is filled with the templates, learning guides, and sample files that can be easily applied to construct and manage course content. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author

ch. 1 Design with Learning in Mind
Learning in the Twenty-First Century
Advantages to Having a Course Online
How Web-based Learning Is the Same as Classroom Learning
Learning Styles
Think "Learning," Not "Teaching"
The Online Student's Environment
How Web-Based Learning Is Different from Classroom Learning
Action Steps

ch. 2 Design with the Future in Mind
It's Okay to Be Uncomfortable
The Future Will Be Here Sooner Than You Think
Creating the Outline
The Learning Guide
The Modules
File Systems
Managing Course Structure
Action Steps

ch. 3 Design with Assessment in Mind
Self-Assessment
Authentic Assessments
Quizzes
Teaching for the Long Term
Questions for First-Time Web-Based Instructors
Action Steps

ch. 4 Design with Organization in Mind
Learning Guide Development
Elements of the Learning Guide
Prioritizing in Creating Your Course
Resource Gathering
Web-Based Aspects of the Course
Choosing the Most Important Topics
Instructional Guidance
Action Steps

ch. 5 Design with Content in Mind
Introduction to Chunking
How the Brain Processes Information
Chunking for a Text-Based Lecture or Content Presentation
Bridges
Active Learning Opportunities
Prioritizing Course Development and Revisions
Evaluating the Effectiveness of Chunking
Action Steps

ch. 6 Design with Process in Mind
Best Practices
Design Using Someone Else's Mind
Action Step

ch. 7 Design with Navigation in Mind
Student Access to Module Components
Continuous Improvement
Documenting for Revisions
Link Rot
Where to Go from Here
0 Action Steps
1 What You Have Conquered!
Forms
Action Steps
American Association for Higher Education's Nine Principles of Good Practice for Assessing Student Learning
Design and Development Tasks

Notes: Ideas for Application
References
Index
Cover image

The Practice of Problem-Based Learning: A Guide to Implementing PBL in the College Classroom

Book
Amador, Jose A., Libby Miles and C. B. Peters
2006
Anker Publishing Company, Inc., Bolton, MA
LB1027.42.A76 2006
Topics: Course Design   |   Problem-Based Learning

Additional Info:
This book is a guide for the development and implementation of problem-based learning (PBL) in college-level courses. It provides practical advice from real professors, includes examples of PBL in action through every stage from problem development to implementation, and integrates cross-disciplinary experiences into the practice of PBL in the college classroom.
Its nuts-and-bolts approach makes it valuable to faculty, graduate teaching assistants, and faculty development professionals interested in learning ...
Additional Info:
This book is a guide for the development and implementation of problem-based learning (PBL) in college-level courses. It provides practical advice from real professors, includes examples of PBL in action through every stage from problem development to implementation, and integrates cross-disciplinary experiences into the practice of PBL in the college classroom.
Its nuts-and-bolts approach makes it valuable to faculty, graduate teaching assistants, and faculty development professionals interested in learning how to do PBL, as well as to those already using PBL who would like to learn more about what other practitioners do in their classrooms.
Readers will learn what really is and isn’t PBL and why some choose to use it, what is its effect on the learning landscape, and how to overcome tricky issues such as class size, student resistance, controlling classroom chaos, conservative colleagues, assessment, and student evaluations. Extensive examples and resources for further study are included, making it a concise, yet comprehensive guide to launching a successful problem-based learning course on your own. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Foreword
Preface
Why (We) Use PBL
Why We Switched
What Is PBL?
Issues
Changing the Landscape
Changing Ourselves
Changing Our Courses
Changing Our Students
No Problems? No Problem
The Basics
Sources for Problems
Designing a Successful Problem
Controlling Chaos in PBL: The Messy Middle
Conducting Class
Our Role
Student Contribution
What Now? Evaluation, Revision, and Reflection
The Students
What Worked-and What Didn't
The Sustainability of PBL
Epilogue
Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Promoting Integrated and Transformative Assessment: A Deeper Focus on Student Learning

Book
Wehlburg, Catherine M.
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2822.75.W445 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Assessment plays a key role in institutions of higher education. However, many colleges and universities simply add their assessment plans onto other teaching, learning, service, and research activities in order to prepare for an impending accreditation visit. In this important resource, Catherine M. Wehlburg outlines an integrated and ongoing system for assessment that both prepares for an accreditation visit and truly enhances student learning. This innovative approach can be adapted ...
Additional Info:
Assessment plays a key role in institutions of higher education. However, many colleges and universities simply add their assessment plans onto other teaching, learning, service, and research activities in order to prepare for an impending accreditation visit. In this important resource, Catherine M. Wehlburg outlines an integrated and ongoing system for assessment that both prepares for an accreditation visit and truly enhances student learning. This innovative approach can be adapted for use in a wide variety of situations to transform a department or an entire institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 What Is Transformative Assessment?
ch. 2 Transformative Assessment: A Historical Perspective
ch. 3 Institutional Dynamics: Using Organizational Structure and Campus Climate
ch. 4 Encouraging Faculty Support for Transformative Assessment
ch. 5 Transformative Assessment Across Student and Academic Affairs
ch. 6 Aligning Institutional Mission with Assessment: Elements of a Meaningful Institutional Effectiveness Program
ch. 7 Institutional Implementation of Transformative Assessment
ch. 8 Embedding Transformative Assessment Activities Across the Institution
ch. 9 Transformative Assessment as a Method to Support Ongoing Accreditation and Accountability
ch. 10 The Future of Transformative Assessment in Higher Education
References
Index
Cover image

Designing Learning from Module Outline to Effective Teaching

Book
Butcher, Christopher, Clara Davies and Melissa Highton
2006
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2362.G7D47 2006
Topics: Course Design

Additional Info:
New lecturers, part-time teachers and graduate teaching assistants are often required to both deliver an existing course and design their own teaching based on a module description. But where do they start?
Underpinned by sound theory, Designing Learning is a practical guide that aims to help busy professionals design, develop and deliver a course, from module outcome outline to effective teaching. Illustrated with useful checklists and action points, this ...
Additional Info:
New lecturers, part-time teachers and graduate teaching assistants are often required to both deliver an existing course and design their own teaching based on a module description. But where do they start?
Underpinned by sound theory, Designing Learning is a practical guide that aims to help busy professionals design, develop and deliver a course, from module outcome outline to effective teaching. Illustrated with useful checklists and action points, this book covers the essentials of designing learning: supporting and promoting student learning, matching content to outcomes, selecting effective teaching and learning methods, assessment that supports and promotes learning and provides feedback, learning materials and resources for diverse learners, C&IT tools and how to use them best, creating an inclusive learning environment, managing and evaluating your course, quality enhancement and assurance processes. Guided by principles of good practice and reflecting the educational research that underpins them, this book is essential reading for anyone new to teaching in higher education.(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of illustrations
Foreword
Series preface
List of abbreviations
The higher education context
How your teaching fits into the bigger picture
What are your students supposed to learn and be able to do?
Matching your content to outcomes and not the other way around
Horses for courses: selecting the appropriate teaching and learning methods
Matching your assessment to outcomes
Learning materials and resources for diverse learners
Supporting your learners
Managing your course
Does the course work?
References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Developing Learner-Centered Teaching: A Practical Guide for Faculty

Book
Blumberg, Phyllis
2009
Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Imprint, San Francisco
LB2331.B55 2009
Topics: Course Design   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Developing Learner-Centered Teaching offers a step-by-step plan for transforming any course from teacher-centered to the more engaging learner-centered model. Filled with self-assessments and worksheets that are based on each of the five practices identified in Maryellen WeimerÕs Learner-Centered Teaching, this groundbreaking book gives instructors, faculty developers, and instructional designers a practical and effective resource for putting the learner-centered model into action. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Developing Learner-Centered Teaching offers a step-by-step plan for transforming any course from teacher-centered to the more engaging learner-centered model. Filled with self-assessments and worksheets that are based on each of the five practices identified in Maryellen WeimerÕs Learner-Centered Teaching, this groundbreaking book gives instructors, faculty developers, and instructional designers a practical and effective resource for putting the learner-centered model into action. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables, Exhibits, and Boxes
Foreword Maryellen Weimer

Part I Transforming Teaching to Be More Learner-Centered
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Understanding the Rubrics
ch. 3 Tools for Facilitating Change and Assessment

Part II The Five Dimensions of Learner-Centered Teaching
ch. 4 The Function of Content
ch. 5 The Role of the Instructor
ch. 6 The Responsibility for Learning
ch. 7 The Purposes and Processes of Assessment
ch. 8 The Balance of Power

Part III Discussion and Conclusion
ch. 9 Can All Courses Be Learner-Centered?
ch. 10 Strategies for Overcoming Obstacles and Resistance
ch. 11 Conclusion

References

Appendix A Glossary of Terms
Appendix B Rubrics, Planning for Transformation Exercise, and Documentation to Support the Selected Status Form
Appendix C Development of the Rubrics

Index
Cover image

On Teaching and Learning: Putting the Principles and Practices of Dialogue Education into Action

Book
Vella, Jane
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LC196.V46 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
On Teaching and Learning takes the ideas explored in renowned educator Jane Vella’s best-selling book Learning to Listen, Learning to Teach to the next level and explores how dialogue education has been applied in educational settings around the world. Throughout the book, she shows how to put the principles and practices of dialogue education into action and uses illustrative stories and examples from her extensive travels. Dialogue education values ...
Additional Info:
On Teaching and Learning takes the ideas explored in renowned educator Jane Vella’s best-selling book Learning to Listen, Learning to Teach to the next level and explores how dialogue education has been applied in educational settings around the world. Throughout the book, she shows how to put the principles and practices of dialogue education into action and uses illustrative stories and examples from her extensive travels. Dialogue education values inquiry, integrity, and commitment to equity—values that are also central to democracy. Learners are treated as beings worthy of respect, recognized for the knowledge and experience they bring to the learning experience. Dialogue education emphasizes the importance of safety and belonging. It is an approach that welcomes one’s certainties and one’s questions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Author
Introduction

Part One: Structured
ch. 1 Why Structure?
ch. 2 Learning Needs and Resources Assessment
ch. 3 The Seven Design Steps

Part Two: Social
ch. 4 The Learning Task in a Small Group
ch. 5 Individual Learning Enhanced

Part Three: Sound
ch. 6 Principles and Practices: Current State of the Art
ch. 7 Open Questions Invite Dialogue
ch. 8 The Designer’s Skill: Trust Your Design

Part Four: Sure
ch. 9 Indicators of Learning, Transfer, and Impact
ch. 10 Impact and the Seven Design Steps

Part Five: Synthesis: Putting It All Together
ch. 11 Putting It All Together: Examples of Dialogue Education Designs
ch. 12 An On-Line Course Using Dialogue Education
ch. 13 Dialogue Education in School Leadership
ch. 14 Dialogue Education in Health Care Settings
ch. 15 Dialogue Education in a College Classroom

Appendix A: Glossary of Terms Used in Dialogue Education
Appendix B: Tough Verbs for Learning Tasks

References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Designing and Assessing Courses and Curricula: A Practical Guide, Third Edition

Book
Diamond, Robert M.
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2361.5.D5 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Designing and Assessing Courses and Curricula reflects the most current knowledge and practice in course and curriculum design and connects this knowledge with the critical task of assessing learning outcomes at both course and curricular levels. This thoroughly revised and expanded third edition of the best-selling book positions course design as a tool for educational change and contains a wealth of new material including new chapters, case examples, and resources. (...
Additional Info:
Designing and Assessing Courses and Curricula reflects the most current knowledge and practice in course and curriculum design and connects this knowledge with the critical task of assessing learning outcomes at both course and curricular levels. This thoroughly revised and expanded third edition of the best-selling book positions course design as a tool for educational change and contains a wealth of new material including new chapters, case examples, and resources. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1 A Frame of Reference
ch. 1 A Learning-Centered Approach to Course and Curriculum Design
ch. 2 The Expanding Role of Faculty in Accreditation and Accountability
ch. 3 Staying Informed
ch. 4 Scholarship and Faculty Rewards
ch. 5 An Introduction to the Model and Its Benefits
ch. 6 Diagramming

Part 2 The Process
ch. 7 Making the Decision to Go Ahead
ch. 8 Getting Started
ch. 9 Linking Goals, Courses, and Curricula
ch. 10 Gathering and Analyzing Essential Data
ch. 11 Thinking in the Ideal
ch. 12 Adjusting from the Ideal to the Possible
ch. 13 Clarifying Instructional Goals and Learning Outcomes
ch. 14 Designing and Implementing Your Assessment Plan: Overview and Assessing a Curriculum
ch. 15 Designing and Implementing Your Assessment Plan: Assessing a Course

Part 3 Designing, Implementing, and Assessing the Learning Experience
ch. 16 Designing the Learning Experience: The Research on Teaching and Learning
ch. 17 Designing the Learning Experience: Your Instructional Options
ch. 18 Using Technology to Support Learning Wallace Hannum
ch. 19 Distance Learning Wallace Hannum
ch. 20 Meeting the Needs of Adult Learners G. Roger Sell
ch. 21 Addressing Diversity G. Roger Sell
ch. 22 Developing a Learning-Centered Syllabus

Part 4 Your Next Steps
ch. 23 Using Your Data: Curriculum and Course Revision
ch. 24 Learning from Experience

Resources
Case Studies
References
Index
Cover image

Enhancing Learning through Formative Assessment and Feedback

Book
Irons, Alastair
2008
Routledge, Taylor & Francis, New York
LB3051.I76 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
This book is based on the argument that detailed and developmental formative feedback is the single most useful thing teachers can do for students. It helps to clarify the expectations of higher education and assist all students to achieve their potential.

This book promotes student learning through formative assessment and feedback, which:

* enables self-assessment and reflection in learning
* encourages teacher-student dialogue
* helps clarify what ...
Additional Info:
This book is based on the argument that detailed and developmental formative feedback is the single most useful thing teachers can do for students. It helps to clarify the expectations of higher education and assist all students to achieve their potential.

This book promotes student learning through formative assessment and feedback, which:

* enables self-assessment and reflection in learning
* encourages teacher-student dialogue
* helps clarify what is good performance
* provides students with quality information to help improve their learning
* encourages motivation and self-confidence in students
* aids the teacher in shaping teaching

Underpinned by the relevant theory, the practical advice and examples in this book directly address the issues of how to motivate students to engage in formative assessment effectively and shows teachers how they can provide further useful formative feedback. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Student Learning Environment
ch. 3 Principles of Formative Assessment and Feedback
ch. 4 Using Formative Assessment and Formative Feedback in Learning and Teaching
ch. 5 Formative Feedback and Reflective Learning
ch. 6 Types of Formative Assessment and Feedback
ch. 7 Making Use of ICTs for Formative Feedback
ch. 8 Benefits of Formative Feedback for Academic Staff
ch. 9 Conclusions
Cover image

Teaching Religion and Film

Book
Watkins, Gregory J., ed.
2008
Oxford University Press, Oxford
PN1995.9.T37 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
In a culture increasingly focused on visual media, students have learned not only to embrace multimedia presentations in the classroom, but to expect them. Such expectations are perhaps more prevalent in a field as dynamic and cross-disciplinary as religious studies, but the practice nevertheless poses some difficult educational issues — the use of movies in academic coursework has far outpaced the scholarship on teaching religion and film. What does it mean ...
Additional Info:
In a culture increasingly focused on visual media, students have learned not only to embrace multimedia presentations in the classroom, but to expect them. Such expectations are perhaps more prevalent in a field as dynamic and cross-disciplinary as religious studies, but the practice nevertheless poses some difficult educational issues — the use of movies in academic coursework has far outpaced the scholarship on teaching religion and film. What does it mean to utilize film in religious studies, and what are the best ways to do it?
In Teaching Religion and Film, an interdisciplinary team of scholars thinks about the theoretical and pedagogical concerns involved with the intersection of film and religion in the classroom. They examine the use of film to teach specific religious traditions, religious theories, and perspectives on fundamental human values. Some instructors already teach some version of a film-and-religion course, and many have integrated film as an ancillary to achieving central course goals. This collection of essays helps them understand the field better and draws the sharp distinction between merely "watching movies" in the classroom and comprehending film in an informed and critical way. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction Teaching Religion and Film Gregory J. Watkins

Part I Establishing Shot: Viewing the Field of Religion and Film
ch. 1 What Are We Teaching When We Teach "Religion and Film"? (William L. Blizek and Michele Desmarais)
ch. 2 Teaching Religion and Film: A Fourth Approach (Conrad Ostwalt)

Part II Film and the Teaching of Religious Traditions
ch. 3 Teaching Biblical Tourism: How Sword-and-Sandal Films Clouded My Vision (Alice Bach)
ch. 4 Designing a Course on Religion and Cinema in India (Gayatri Chatterjeee)
ch. 5 Buddhism, Film, and Religious Knowing: Challenging the Literary Approach to Film (Francisca Cho)
ch. 6 The Pedagogical Challenges of Finding Christ Figures in Film (Christopher Deacy)
ch. 7 Film and the Introduction to Islam Course (Amir Hussain)
ch. 8 Is It All about Love Actually? Sentimentality as Problem and Opportunity in the Use of Film for Teaching Theology and Religion (Clive Marsh)
ch. 9 Women, Theology, and Film: Approaching the Challenge of Interdisciplinary Teaching (Gaye Williams Ortiz)

Part III The Religious Studies Approach
ch. 10 Seeing Is Believing, but Touching's the Truth: Religion, Film, and the Anthropology of the Senses (Richard M. Carp)
ch. 11 There Is No Spoon? Teaching The Matrix, Postperennialism, and the Spiritual Logic of Late Capitalism (Gregory Grieve)
ch. 12 Teaching Film as Religion (John Lyden)
ch. 13 Filmmaking and World Making: Re-Creating Time and Space in Myth and Film (S. Brent Plate)
ch. 14 Introducing Theories of Religion through Film: A Sample Syllabus (Greg Watkins)

Part IV The Values Approach
ch. 15 Touching Evil, Touching Good (Irena S. M. Makarushka)
ch. 16 Teaching Ethics with Film: A Course on the Moral Agency of Women (Ellen Ott Marshall)
ch. 17 Searching for Peace in Films about Genocide (Jolyon Mitchell)

Index
Cover image

Wabash Symposium: Consultation on Teaching: Visual Arts in the Theology or Religious Studies Classroom

Journal Issue
Haynes, Wren, Myhre, Mason, et al
2009
Arts In Religious and Theological Studies, no. 20:2 2009 (New Brighton, MN
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Deborah J. Haynes
Contemplative Practice: Views from the Religion Classroom and Artist's Studio (Linnea Wren)
Can Religious Faith and Contemporary Art Flourish Together? An Academic, Collaborative, and Experiential Seminar Culminating in Student-Based Art Commissions (Paul O. Myhre)
Encountering Navajo Cosmology Through Sand Painting: Teaching a Method for Engaging Visual Texts (Theresa Mason)
Opening Eyes To The Emmaus Story: A Case Study of Visual Art in Biblical Studies (Daniel G. Deffenbaugh)
Humans In The Landscape (Kimberly Vrundy)
The Dissonant Gaze: Redemption, Liberation, and the Theological Imagination (Rebecca Berru Davis)
Image Resources: An Inventory
Additional Info:
Written for Higher Education teaching and learning professionals, Learning with Digital Games provides an accessible, straightforward introduction to the field of computer game-based learning. Up to date with current trends and the changing learning needs of today’s students, this text offers friendly guidance, and is unique in its focus on post-school education and its pragmatic view of the use of computer games with adults.

Learning with Digital ...
Additional Info:
Written for Higher Education teaching and learning professionals, Learning with Digital Games provides an accessible, straightforward introduction to the field of computer game-based learning. Up to date with current trends and the changing learning needs of today’s students, this text offers friendly guidance, and is unique in its focus on post-school education and its pragmatic view of the use of computer games with adults.

Learning with Digital Games enables readers to quickly grasp practical and technological concepts, using examples that can easily be applied to their own teaching. The book assumes no prior technical knowledge but guides the reader step-by-step through the theoretical, practical and technical considerations of using digital games for learning. Activities throughout guide the reader through the process of designing a game for their own practice, and the book also offers:

A toolkit of guidelines, templates and checklists.

Concrete examples of different types of game-based learning using six case studies.

Examples of games that show active and experiential learning

Practical examples of educational game design and development.

This professional guide upholds the sound reputation of the Open and Flexible Learning series, is grounded in theory and closely links examples from practice. Higher Education academics, e-learning practitioners, developers and training professionals at all technical skill levels and experience will find this text is the perfect resource for explaining how to integrate computer games into their teaching practice.

A companion website is available and provides up-to-date technological information,additional resources and further examples. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editor's Foreword
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction

Part I
Theory
ch. 2 Recognizing the Characteristics of Digital Games
ch. 3 Understanding the Pedagogy of Digital Games
ch. 4 Identifying Types of Digital Games for Learning

Part II
Practice
ch. 5 Integrating Digital Games Into the Curriculum
ch. 6 Designing a Digital Game for Learning
ch. 7 Assessing the Impact of Digital Games on Learning

Part III
Technology
ch. 8 Using Existing Digital Games for Learning
ch. 9 Developing New Digital Games for Learning
ch. 10 Evaluating Digital Games for Learning
ch. 11 Case Studies
ch. 12 Conclusions

Glossary
References
Index
TTR cover image

"Promoting Freedom, Responsibility, and Learning in the Classroom: The Learning Covenant a Decade Later"

TTR
Glennon, Fred
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 1 (2008): 32-41
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This essay discusses an approach to teaching religious studies in a general education or core curriculum that I have experimented with for the last decade, which I call the "Learning Covenant." The Learning Covenant brings together various pedagogical theories, including transformational, experiential, contract, and cooperative learning, in an attempt to address diverse learning styles, multiple intelligences, and student learning assessment. It has advantages over more traditional teacher-directed approaches to teaching, ...
Additional Info:
This essay discusses an approach to teaching religious studies in a general education or core curriculum that I have experimented with for the last decade, which I call the "Learning Covenant." The Learning Covenant brings together various pedagogical theories, including transformational, experiential, contract, and cooperative learning, in an attempt to address diverse learning styles, multiple intelligences, and student learning assessment. It has advantages over more traditional teacher-directed approaches to teaching, including meeting student resistance to "required" courses head-on by inviting them to identify learning needs regardless of chosen vocation and meeting them in the context of a religious studies course, recognizing the multiple ways in which students learn and providing a variety of opportunities for students to express their learning, and allowing students opportunity to take increased responsibility for their own learning. The essay will focus on the Learning Covenant's development, components, strengths, and drawbacks.
TTR cover image

"Tell Me a Story of Jesus: Teaching as Storytelling and Four Recent Short Histories of Christianity"

TTR
Clingerman, Forrest
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 3 (2008): 134-140
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Offering a review of four short introductory books on Christianity, this essay discusses how introductory textbooks, and introductory religion courses more generally, are like storytelling. Books by Lindberg, Tomkins, Norris, and Woodhead are reviewed with an emphasis on their classroom use. These books share several things in common – most notably, each is a "short," popular text. Dealing with the topic of Christianity in abbreviated form presents certain challenges and possibilities ...
Additional Info:
Offering a review of four short introductory books on Christianity, this essay discusses how introductory textbooks, and introductory religion courses more generally, are like storytelling. Books by Lindberg, Tomkins, Norris, and Woodhead are reviewed with an emphasis on their classroom use. These books share several things in common – most notably, each is a "short," popular text. Dealing with the topic of Christianity in abbreviated form presents certain challenges and possibilities in the task of teaching. After examining these short histories, the essay reflects on several questions that emerge: When should we use textbooks in college classrooms? What are the goals that teachers have in the use of textbooks? How do textbooks define the subject matter of a course? And finally, how do teachers use texts to aid in telling a story in the classroom?
TTR cover image

"Comparative Sacred Texts and Interactive Interpretation: Another Alternative to the "World Religions" Class"

TTR
Patton, Laurie L.; Robbins, Vernon K., and Newby, Gordon D.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 1 (2009): 37-50
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
In this article we argue for an introductory course in the study of religion that proceeds through interactive interpretation as a responsible form of comparison. Interactive interpretation proceeds provisionally, and encourages students to formulate new questions of the materials instead of making final categories about the materials. We use examples from a typical classroom to show how we work with three pedagogical principles: (1) critical reading; (2) pluralism within religious traditions as ...
Additional Info:
In this article we argue for an introductory course in the study of religion that proceeds through interactive interpretation as a responsible form of comparison. Interactive interpretation proceeds provisionally, and encourages students to formulate new questions of the materials instead of making final categories about the materials. We use examples from a typical classroom to show how we work with three pedagogical principles: (1) critical reading; (2) pluralism within religious traditions as well as between religious traditions; and (3) the use of the working hypothesis as a tool in analyzing religious texts. We also make an argument for textual reading as a form of living intellectual practice, which can work alongside of, and not in opposition to, other approaches to the study of religion, such as ethnographic or historical approaches.
Additional Info:
This article reflects on an effort to incorporate constructivist pedagogies (learner-centered, inquiry-guided, problem-based models of teaching) into an introductory class on Christian Ethics in an M.Div. curriculum. Although some students preferred more traditional pedagogies, the majority found that constructivist pedagogies better accommodated different life experiences, diverse learning styles, and other features of the M.Div. curriculum. Further, a qualitative assessment of one student exercise indicates that constructivist pedagogies have ...
Additional Info:
This article reflects on an effort to incorporate constructivist pedagogies (learner-centered, inquiry-guided, problem-based models of teaching) into an introductory class on Christian Ethics in an M.Div. curriculum. Although some students preferred more traditional pedagogies, the majority found that constructivist pedagogies better accommodated different life experiences, diverse learning styles, and other features of the M.Div. curriculum. Further, a qualitative assessment of one student exercise indicates that constructivist pedagogies have benefits over traditional pedagogies. Specifically, students' work on a learning-group research project displayed creativity, depth, and breadth not found in individual research papers. Nonetheless, lukewarm student feedback also demonstrated the need to consider wider factors when attempting such innovations.
TTR cover image

"Accepting Our Limitations: The Textbook as Crutch and Compromise"

TTR
Blanchard, Kathryn D.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 252-253
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
TTR cover image

"Teaching an Introductory Hebrew Bible Course without a Textbook"

TTR
Cowan, Margaret Parks
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 254-255
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
TTR cover image

"Textbooks in the Introductory Course"

TTR
Forbes, Bruce David
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 256-257
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
TTR cover image

"Teaching the Facts, Inculcating Knowledge, or Instilling Wisdom? Rationale for a Textbook in BS101"

TTR
Bulkeley, Tim
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 352-353
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
TTR cover image

"Yes, I Use a Textbook (Now)"

TTR
Cloutier, David
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 354-355
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
TTR cover image

"How to Learn from World Religion Textbooks"

TTR
Derris, Karen
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 356-357
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Cover image

Designing Courses for Significant Learning: Voices of Experience

Book
L. Dee Fink, Arletta Knight Fink, eds.
2009
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 119)
LB2361.D47 2009
Topics: Course Design   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Higher education today is being called on to deliver a new and more powerful kind of education, one that prepares students to be more engaged citizens, better equipped to solve complex problems at work and better prepared to lead meaningful lives individually.

To respond to this call, teachers in colleges and universities need to learn how to design more powerful kinds of learning into their courses. In 2003, Dee ...
Additional Info:
Higher education today is being called on to deliver a new and more powerful kind of education, one that prepares students to be more engaged citizens, better equipped to solve complex problems at work and better prepared to lead meaningful lives individually.

To respond to this call, teachers in colleges and universities need to learn how to design more powerful kinds of learning into their courses. In 2003, Dee Fink published a seminal book, Creating Significant Learning Experiences, that offered teachers two major tools for meeting this need: the Taxonomy of Significant Learning and the model of Integrated Course Design. Since that time, educators around the world have found Finks ideas both visionary and inspiring.

This issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning contains multiple stories of how college-level teachers have used these ideas in a variety of teaching situations, with subject matter ranging from the sciences to the humanities. Their conclusion? The ideas in Finks book truly make a difference. When used properly, they lead to major improvements in the level of student engagement and the quality of student learning! This is the 119th volume of the Jossey-Bass higher education quarterly report series New Directions for Teaching and Learning, which offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Shoeboxes and Taxes: Integrated Course Design Unleashes New Creativity for a Veteran Teacher (Marsha M. Huber)
ch. 2 Bringing Language to Life in Second-Year Spanish (Debra Dimon Davis)
ch. 3 More Significant and Intentional Learning in the Economics Classroom (Laurence Miners, Kathryn Nantz)
ch. 4 Inspiration and Intellect: Significant Learning in Musical Forms and Analysis (Bruce C. Kelly)
ch. 5 Using Fink's Integrated Course Design: How a Book Changed Our Students' Learning, Our University, and Ourselves (Carolyn R. Fallahi, Laura E. Levine, Joan M. Nicoll-Senft, Jack T. Tessier , Cheryl L. Watson, Rebecca M. Wood)
ch. 6 Using Integrated Course Design to Build Student Communities of Practice in a Hybrid Course (Harriet R. Fayne)
ch. 7 Integrating Big Questions with Real-World Applications: Gradual Redesign in Philosophy and Art History (Marice Rose, Roben Torosyan)
ch. 8 Integrated Design of a Virology Course Develops Lifelong Learners (Joseph C. Mester)
ch. 9 An "Extreme Makeover" of a Course in Special Education (Joan M. Nicoll-Senft)
ch. 10 Sooner City: Reflections on a Curriculum Reform Project (Randall L . Kolar, David A. Sabatini, K.K. Muraleetharan)
ch. 11 Still Learning (L. Dee Fink)
ch. 12 Lessons We Can Learn from the Voices of Experience (Arletta Knight Fink, L. Dee Fink)

Index
Cover image

A Guide to Course Design & Assessment of Student Learning: A basic guide for professors and instructors at the Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond

Book
Galindo, Israel
2009
Israel Galindo
BV4020.G34 2009
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
"This guide is primarily for the Master of Divinity degree program ... and the M.Div. concentrations"--P. 1.
Additional Info:
"This guide is primarily for the Master of Divinity degree program ... and the M.Div. concentrations"--P. 1.

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 A Quick Start Guide to Designing Your Course
ch. 2 Constructivist Teaching and Learning
ch. 3 Teaching for Understanding
ch. 4 Designing Your Course for Understanding
ch. 5 Using Learning Objectives to Design Your Course
ch. 6 Organizing Your Course
ch. 7 Assessing Student Learning

Appendices
Tactics cover image

"The Question Bag: An Active Learning Strategy"

Tactic
Glennon, Fred
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 260-262
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Learning Designs   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: allowing students to establish parts of the curriculum of a course.
Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: allowing students to establish parts of the curriculum of a course.
Cover image

Instructional-Design Theories and Models, Volume III: Building a Common Knowledge Base

Book
Reigeluth, Charles M., Carr-Chellman, Alison A., eds.
2009
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1025.2.I646 1983 v.3
Topics: Course Design   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Instructional-Design Theories and Models, Volume III: Building a Common Knowledge Base is perhaps best described by its new subtitle. Whereas Volume II sought to comprehensively review the proliferating theories and models of instruction of the 1980’s and 1990’s, Volume III takes on an even more daunting task: starting to build a common knowledge base that underlies and supports the vast array of instructional theories, models and strategies that constitute the ...
Additional Info:
Instructional-Design Theories and Models, Volume III: Building a Common Knowledge Base is perhaps best described by its new subtitle. Whereas Volume II sought to comprehensively review the proliferating theories and models of instruction of the 1980’s and 1990’s, Volume III takes on an even more daunting task: starting to build a common knowledge base that underlies and supports the vast array of instructional theories, models and strategies that constitute the field of Instructional Design. Unit I describes the need for a common knowledge base, offers some universal principles of instruction, and addresses the need for variation and detailed guidance when implementing the universal principles. Unit II describes how the universal principles apply to some major approaches to instruction such as direct instruction or problem-based instruction. Unit III describes how to apply the universal principles to some major types of learning such as understandings and skills. Unit IV provides a deeper understanding of instructional theory using the structural layers of a house as its metaphor and discusses instructional theory in the broader context of paradigm change in education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Preface

Unit 1 Frameworks for Understanding Instructional Theory
ch. 1 Understanding Instructional Theory (Charles M. Reigeluth, and Alison A. Carr-Chellman)
ch. 2 Understanding Instruction (Charles M. Reigeluth, and John B. Keller)
ch. 3 First Principles of Instruction (M. David Merrill)
ch. 4 Situational Principles of Instruction (Charles M. Reigeluth, and Alison A. Carr-Chellman)

Unit 2 Theories for Different Approaches to Instruction
ch. 5 Direct Approach to Instruction (William G. Huitt, David M. Monetti, and John H. Hummel)
ch. 6 Discussion Approach to Instruction (Joyce Taylor Gibson)
ch. 7 Experiential Approach to Instruction (Lee Lindsey, and Nancy Berger)
ch. 8 Problem-Based Approach to Instruction (John R. Savery)
ch. 9 Simulation Approach to Instruction (Andrew S. Gibbons, Mark McConkie, Kay Kyeongju Seo, and David A. Wiley)

Unit 3 Theories for Different Outcomes of Instruction
ch. 10 Fostering Skill Development Outcomes (Alexander Romiszowski)
ch. 11 Fostering Understanding Outcomes (Martha Stone Wiske, and Brian J. Beatty)
ch. 12 Fostering Affective Development Outcomes: Emotional Intelligence (Barbara A. Bichelmeyer, James Markin Tamar Harris, Melanie Misanchuk, and Emily Hixon)
ch. 13 Fostering Integrated Learning Outcomes across Domains (Brian J. Beatty)

Unit 4 Tools for Building a Common Knowledge Base
ch. 14 The Architecture of Instructional Theory (Andrew S. Gibbons, and P. Clint Rogers)
ch. 15 Domain Theory for Instruction: Mapping Attainments to Enable Learner-Centered Education (C. Victor Bunderson, David A. Wiley, and Reo H. McBride)
ch. 16 Learning Objects and Instructional Theory (David A. Wiley)
ch. 17 Theory Building (Charles M. Reigeluth, and Yun-Jo An)
ch. 18 Instructional Theory for Education in the Information Age (Charles M. Reigeluth)

Author Index
Subject Index
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Connected Minds, Emerging Cultures: Cybercultures in Online Learning

Book
Wheeler, Steve, ed.
2009
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB1044.87.C64 2009
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
A volume in Perspectives in Instructional Technology and Distance Education Series Editors: Charles Schlosser and Michael Simonson Nova Southeastern University As the title indicates, this book highlights the shifting and emergent features that represent life online, specifically in and around the territory of e-learning. Cybercultures in themselves are complex conglomerations of ideas, philosophies, concepts, and theories, some of which are fiercely contradictory. As a construct, cyberculture is a result of ...
Additional Info:
A volume in Perspectives in Instructional Technology and Distance Education Series Editors: Charles Schlosser and Michael Simonson Nova Southeastern University As the title indicates, this book highlights the shifting and emergent features that represent life online, specifically in and around the territory of e-learning. Cybercultures in themselves are complex conglomerations of ideas, philosophies, concepts, and theories, some of which are fiercely contradictory. As a construct, cyberculture is a result of sustained attempts by diverse groups of people to make sense of multifarious activities, linguistic codes, and practices in complicated and ever-changing settings. It is an impossibly convoluted field. Any valid understanding of cyberculture can only be gained from living within it, and as Bell suggests, it is made up of people, machines and stories in everyday life. Although this book contains a mix of perspectives, as the chapters progress, readers should detect some common threads. Technology-mediated activities are featured throughout, each evoking its particular cultural nuances and, as Derrick de Kerckhove (1997) has eloquently argued, technology acts as the skin of culture.

All the authors are passionate about their subjects, every one engages critically with his or her topics, and each is fully committed to the belief that e-learning is a vitally important component in the future of education.

All of the authors believe that digital learning environments will contribute massively to the success of the information society we now inhabit.

Each is intent on exploration of the touchstone of any time, any place learning where temporal and spatial contextscease to become barriers to learning, and where the boundaries are blurring between the formal and informal.

This book is divided into four sections. In Part I, which has been titled Digital Subcultures, we begin an exploration of culture and attempt to locate the learner within a number of digital subcultures that have arisen around new and emerging technologies such as mobile and handheld devices, collaborative online spaces, and podcasting. The chapters in this section represent attempts by the authors to demonstrate that there are many subdivisions present on the Web, and that online learners cannot and should not be represented as one vast amorphous mass of Internet users. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction

Part I Digital Subcultures
ch. 1 Learning in Collaborative Spaces: Encouraging a Culture of Sharing (Steve Wheeler)
ch. 2 Mobile Subcultures (John Traxler)
ch. 3 Podcasting: A Listening Culture (Palitha Edirisingha)
ch. 4 The Emergence of Ubiquitous and Pervasive Learning Cultures (Mark A. M. Kramer)

Part II Roles and Identities
ch. 5 Identity of Cyberspace (Hugh Miller and Jill Arnold)
ch. 6 Digital Tribes, Virtual Clans (Steve Wheeler)
ch. 7 Gaming and the Network Generation (Nichola Whitton)
ch. 8 Creating an Online Course Generational Community (Leon James)
ch. 9 The Social Impact of Personal Learning Environments (Graham Attwell)

Part III Cyber Perspectives
ch. 10 Emerging Online Practices: An Endo-Aesthetic Approach to E-tutoring and E-learning
ch. 11 Cyberculture and Poststructural Approaches
ch. 12 Cyborg Theory and Learning
ch. 13 Transfer Through Learning Flexibility and Hypertextuality

Part IV Narratives and Case Studies
ch. 14 Cybercrime in Society
ch. 15 Language Evolution in Txting Enviornments
ch. 16 The Cultural Impact of E-learning and Intranets on Corporate Employees
ch. 17 Imagined Worlds, Emerging Cultures

Author the Authors
Cover image

Learning to Learn with Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT): A Practical Guide for Academic Success

Book
Kitsantas, Anastasia, and Dabbagh, Nada
2009
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB2395.7.K57 2009
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
The purpose of this practical guide is to facilitate college students' academic success by fostering self-regulated learning skills or learning to learn through the use of Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT). It enables the college instructor, online instructor, instructional developer, or educator to envision, plan for, and implement customized instructional and curricular designs that foster learning to learn and motivate students to take ownership of their own learning. Specifically, this book ...
Additional Info:
The purpose of this practical guide is to facilitate college students' academic success by fostering self-regulated learning skills or learning to learn through the use of Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT). It enables the college instructor, online instructor, instructional developer, or educator to envision, plan for, and implement customized instructional and curricular designs that foster learning to learn and motivate students to take ownership of their own learning. Specifically, this book demonstrates how college faculty who use Learning Management Systems (LMS) as well as emerging technologies such as Web 2.0 applications and social software can design learning tasks and course assignments that support and promote student: goal setting use of effective task strategies self-monitoring and self-evaluation time management help seeking motivation and affect Given the emphasis on retention of freshmen as a measure of institutional effectiveness, the focus on student success, and the increasing use of ILT in higher education, this book fulfills a dire need in the literature on the integration of technology and self-regulated learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction to Learning How to Learn
ch. 2 Defining Integrative Learning Technologies
ch. 3 Self-Regulatory Training with Integrative Learning Technologies: A Theory-Based Model
ch. 4 Goal Setting
ch. 5 Task Strategies
ch. 6 Self-Monitoring and Self-Evaluation
ch. 7 Time Management
ch. 8 Help Seeking
ch. 9 Motivation, Affect, and Learning Communities
ch. 10 New Approaches to Integrative Learning Technologies
Additional Info:
Our goal in writing this book was to validate teachers for strong efforts in their life's work. We often observe teachers' frustrations with what they perceive to be a multitude of different hot topics in education that they must attend to now, but which they expect to come and go, like the last hot topics. So, we wanted to help readers see similarities between many of these hot topics-differentiation, multiple ...
Additional Info:
Our goal in writing this book was to validate teachers for strong efforts in their life's work. We often observe teachers' frustrations with what they perceive to be a multitude of different hot topics in education that they must attend to now, but which they expect to come and go, like the last hot topics. So, we wanted to help readers see similarities between many of these hot topics-differentiation, multiple intelligences, culturally responsive teaching, brain-friendly strategies, authentic assessment, and ethical classroom management which we feel are not flashes in the pan. And we trust that serious practitioners will not oversimplify the findings of neuroscientists and their application to education. Reading studies and books by scientists, a number of which are user-friendly, can help ensure that teachers separate the hype from credible information. We have seen this professionally judicious approach in the work of graduate students (Kolinski, 2007) in adopting brain-friendly strategies.

We have intentionally packed both theoretical/research-based and practical information in this book because professional educators want to know why they should use certain approaches, models, and strategies. In turn, as professionals, we should be able to explain why we teach the way we do-not to justify, but to educate others about our knowledge-based, reflective, decision-making processes and the impact on student learning. Thus, it is important to read Chapter 1 because it lays a foundation.

Each succeeding chapter (2-6) has unique and compelling twists and turns-chock full of ideas to use or to adapt. It is possible to gain lots of ideas, processes, and strategies from reading and implementing (or adapting) even one of the unit chapters, or a part of it. While some of the units are explicitly about literacy, others focus on content using reading, writing, speaking, and listening as critical in the learning process. Thus, literacy skills are reinforced and strengthened. Additionally, some of our colleagues and public school partners have given us feedback that they wanted to implement some of the units and activities themselves. So, feel free to use this book for self-exploration and professional development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Foreword
Preface

ch. 1 A Case for Differentiation and Much More
ch. 2 The Fabric of My Life: Using Poetry, Prose, and Graphic Novels to Help Students Reflect Upon Their Identities
ch. 3 Choices That Change Our Lives: Using Realistic Fiction and Nonfiction to Help Students Reflect on Difficult Decisions
ch. 4 Community and Culture: Understanding Ourselves and Others in the Global Community
ch. 5 A Journey from Innocence to Experience: A Course in Young Adult Literature for Future Teachers
ch. 6 Convince Me: A Syllabus for a Freshman Composition Course Focused on Writing Arguments

About the Authors
Index
Cover image

Idea-Based Learning: A Course Design Process to Promote Conceptual Understanding

Book
Hansen, Edmund J.
2011
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB2361.5.H354 2011
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Synthesizing the best current thinking about learning, course design, and promoting student achievement, this is a guide to developing college instruction that has clear purpose, is well integrated into the curriculum, and improves student learning in predictable and measurable ways.

The process involves developing a transparent course blueprint, focused on a limited number of key concepts and ideas, related tasks, and corresponding performance criteria; as well as on ...
Additional Info:
Synthesizing the best current thinking about learning, course design, and promoting student achievement, this is a guide to developing college instruction that has clear purpose, is well integrated into the curriculum, and improves student learning in predictable and measurable ways.

The process involves developing a transparent course blueprint, focused on a limited number of key concepts and ideas, related tasks, and corresponding performance criteria; as well as on frequent practice opportunities, and early identification of potential learning barriers.

Idea-based Learning takes as its point of departure the big conceptual ideas of a discipline that give structure and unity to a course and even to the curriculum, as opposed to a focus on content that can lead to teaching sequences of loosely-related topics; and aligns with notions of student-centered and outcomes-based learning environments.

Adopting a backwards design model, it begins with three parallel processes: first, identifying the material that is crucial for conceptual understanding; second, articulating a clear rationale for how to choose learning outcomes based on student needs and intellectual readiness; and finally, aligning the learning outcomes with the instructional requirements of the authentic performance tasks.

The resulting syllabi ensure cohesion between sections of the same course as well as between courses within a whole curriculum, assuring the progressive development of students’ skills and knowledge.

Key elements of IBL include:
* Helping students see the big picture
* Building courses around one or more authentic performance tasks that illuminate the core concepts of the discipline
* Clearly identifying performance criteria for all tasks
* Incorporating practice in the competencies that are deemed important for students’ success
* By placing the onus of learning on the student, liberating faculty to take on the role of learning coaches
* Designing tasks that help students unlearn simplistic ideas and replace them with improved understandings

Edmund Hansen expertly guides the reader through the steps of the process, providing examples along the way, and concluding with a sample course design document and syllabus that illustrate the principles he propounds. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Practical Benefits of Course Design
Faculty stressors in teaching
Benefits from idea-based course design

ch. 2 Backward Design
Traditional course design
Critique of the traditional design
The Backward Design Model
The importance of course design

ch. 3 Learning Outcomes
Problems with (conceptualizing) Learning Outcomes
Identifying Big Ideas
Deriving Enduring Understandings
Determining Learning Outcomes

ch. 4 Critical Thinking
Significance of critical thinking
Lay definitions of critical thinking
The confusing state of the critical thinking literature
Need for teaching critical thinking
Barrier 1: Human development
Barrier 2: Habits of mind
Barrier 3: Misconceptions
Barrier 4: Complex reasoning
Conclusion

ch. 5 Content, Part 1: Guiding Questions and Concepts
Topics
Two parts of course content
Essential Questions
Guiding concepts
Course content and critical thinking

ch. 6 Assessment, Part 1: Educative Assessment
Assessment for grading
Assessment for learning
A continuum of assessments
Assessment as coaching
Principles of assessing for understanding

ch. 7 Assessment, Part 2: Rubrics
Examples of assignments lacking clear criteria
The main parts of a rubric
Sample rubric: Critical Thinking
Common misunderstandings about rubrics
The triple function of rubrics for:

ch. 8 Content, Part 2: Learning Experiences
Examples of poor assignments
Authentic performance tasks
Assignment-centered instruction
Assignment-related competencies
Building-block designs
Principles for designing effective learning experiences

ch. 9 Course Design Document
Why create course design documents?
Elements of the course design document
Sample Design Document: Psychology 624 - Theories of Motivation
Summary of course design features and benefits
Translating the Course Design Document into a Syllabus

ch. 10 Implementing Course Design with Online Technology
Key characteristics of online teaching
Course design elements enhanced by online technology
Conclusion

References
Appendix
Syllabus for Theories of Motivation course
Cover image

The Multiplayer Classroom: Designing Coursework as a Game, 1st Edition

Book
Sheldon, Lee
2012
Course Technology/Cenage Learning, Boston, MA
LB1027.23.S53 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Discover how to engage your students and raise their grades and attendance in your classroom. The Multiplayer Classroom: Designing Coursework as a Game is your detailed guide to designing any structured learning experience as a game. Written for professional educators or those learning to be educators, here are the tools to engage and excite students by using principles learned in the development of popular video games. Suitable for use in ...
Additional Info:
Discover how to engage your students and raise their grades and attendance in your classroom. The Multiplayer Classroom: Designing Coursework as a Game is your detailed guide to designing any structured learning experience as a game. Written for professional educators or those learning to be educators, here are the tools to engage and excite students by using principles learned in the development of popular video games. Suitable for use in the classroom or the boardroom, the book features a reader-friendly style that introduces game concepts and vocabulary in a logical way. You don't need any experience making games or even playing games to use this book. Yet, you will learn how to create multiplayer games for any age on any subject. Bring your classroom into the 21st century! (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part I: Introduction
ch. 1 Level 1: "Good Morning. You All Have an F"
ch. 2 Level 2: Games in the Classroom

Part II: Multiplayer Classrooms
ch. 3 Level 3: Theory and Practice of Game Design Syllabi
ch. 4 Level 4: Theory and Practice of Game Design Class
ch. 5 Case Histories Introduction
ch. 6 Case History 1: Marked Tree High School
ch. 7 Level 5: Multiplayer Game Design Syllabi
ch. 8 Level 6: Multiplayer Game Design Class
ch. 9 Case History 2: University of Arizona South: Teaching with Technology
ch. 10 Level 7: Introduction to Game Design Syllabus
ch. 11 Level 8: Introduction to Game Design Class
ch. 12 Case History 3: Louisiana State University: Introduction to the Study of Education
ch. 13 Level 9: Designing Interactive Characters Syllabus
ch. 14 Level 10: Designing Interactive Characters Class
ch. 15 Case History 4: Valencia Community College: United States History to 1877

Part III: Game Design and Development
ch. 16 Level 11: Identifying Learning Objectives and Student Needs
ch. 17 Case History 5: Robert Louis Stevenson Middle School: General Math
ch. 18 Level 12: Student Demographics
ch. 19 Case History 6: Texas Tech University: History of Higher Education in the United States
ch. 20 Level 13: How Games are Designed
ch. 21 Case History 7: Ohio Valley College of Technology: Introduction to Keyboarding & Business Writing, Introduction to Computers
ch. 22 Level 14: Production

Part IV: After The Launch
ch. 23 Level 15: Playing the Game
ch. 24 Case History 8: Waunakee Community High School: Computer Science Classes

Part V: After This Book
ch. 25 Level 16: Designing the Future
ch. 26 Level 17: Resources

Index
Cover image

It Works for Me, Creatively: Shared Tips for the Classroom

Book
Blythe, Hal, and Sweet, Charlie
2011
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB1062.B596 I8 2011
Topics: Course Design   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
The authors’ purpose in this seventh book in the “It Works for Me” series is to demonstrate that “everyone possesses creative talent, though it may be latent in some and difficult to bring out in others.  It’s not just a talent possessed by artists and engineers, mind you, but everyone.”  Furthermore, “Creative people have figured out consciously or un- that a small seed of creativity can be made to ...
Additional Info:
The authors’ purpose in this seventh book in the “It Works for Me” series is to demonstrate that “everyone possesses creative talent, though it may be latent in some and difficult to bring out in others.  It’s not just a talent possessed by artists and engineers, mind you, but everyone.”  Furthermore, “Creative people have figured out consciously or un- that a small seed of creativity can be made to grow by having the proper environment and a minimal set of skills.  And people can be taught or self-taught this process.”

The authors/editors also believe that “all creative ideas link themselves to other creative ideas to develop something new and useful, be it a concept, a process, or a product.  In order to disseminate and perpetuate [their] belief that the creative impulse resides in all of us, [they] have asked a host of friends to demonstrate it with essays and practical tips touching on supportive creative environments, strategies that foster and enhance creativity, and assessments that demonstrate creativity has indeed taken place.” (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Forward: A Space for the Rising Creative Class
Introduction: Creativity R Us

I. Overviews
Creativity—Defining the Undefinable
Dispelling Some Myths of Creativity
A Good Question
Teaching Creativity: A Call to Action
Collaborative Creativity
The Meddler in the Middle
Developing a Space for Creativity

II. The Creative Process
Introduction: Process
Creating Acronymic Processes
How To Expand Without Losing Focus
Creativity in Faculty Development: EXPLORE
Design Thinking is Creative Thinking
Creative Strategies Inherent to Scholarship
What Makes Creative Writing Creative
Communication Fosters Creative Thinking
Creative Connections in a Graduate Advanced
Health Assessment Course
Bending the Realities of Iron
Inventing Parables to Use as Pedagogical Tools
The Creative Classroom: A Model for Developing Creative Students
Sorting It Out: A Hands-On Approach for Promoting Higher-Order Thinking
The Play’s the Thing: Being Creative in the Teaching of Lit
Wait … You Want To Do What?
Creative Use of Film: Students as Hollywood Consultants
Hey! My Dad Takes That: Making
Pharmaceuticals Relevant to Non-Majors
Using Guided Imagery To Cultivate
Creativity in Learners
Unlearning Rules and Embracing Creativity: Using Prezi to Rethink PowerPoint
An Online Debate
A Creative Exercise: A Joke-Telling Simulation to Learn About Capitalism
Le’go My Ego: An Exercise for Ego Separation and Team Building
Creative Options for Characterization
Engaging with Text and Eliminating Highlighting
A Creative Way to Choose a Research Topic
“In Which Ways” Can You Foster Creativity?
Beach Ball
Center Managers
Natural Disasters
Field Connections
Changing Perspectives: A Negotiated Agreements Scavenger Hunt
Using Inquiry to Spark Creativity

III. The Creative Environment
Introduction: Environment
But I’m Not Creative
Practicalities in Teaching Creativity
Unleashing Student Creativity by Unveiling the Mystique of General Education
Developing a Creative Environment
Going Green: Creating a Creative Environment
Trust as a Foundation of Creativity
A Creative Use of Student Evaluations
Building Creative Learning Environments in Higher Education
Using Culturally Relevant Pedagogy to Create a Bridge to Learning
The Reality-Based Approach to Learning
Channeling Your Inner Ms. Frizzle
Something New and Imaginative in Student Learning
Modeling the Creative Process in the Classroom
Finding the Strength in All Types of Learners
Creativity as a Disposition
Creative Networking
Roleplaying as Creativity
Music in the Key of See
Got Character?

IV. The Creative Product
Introduction: Product
Creating Musical Group Names to Aid Student Memory
“It’s Only Words, and Words Are All I Have …” 
Creating Theory Stories
Challenging Developmental Writers to Use Their Creativity
A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Bucks, But Maybe Not in Creative Writing Classes
What’s Wrong With This Picture
Promoting Creativity in the Learning Process
Creneology
TIP for a Creative Summary Project
Shifting Perception
Changing Student Perceptions: The Family History Museum
An Exercise for Creating a Poem
Discovering Creativity Through Color Exploration
Fundamental and Powerful Concepts
Play It Again: A Creative Technique for Creative Writing and Literary Analysis
 
V. Assessing Creativity
Introduction to Assessment
Assessing the Creative Environment
Assessing Creative Strategies
Assessing Instructors of Creativity
She Blinded Me with Science
Obtaining Mid-semester Feedback from Students
Issuing Creative License
 
VI. Afterword
TTR cover image

Teaching World Religions without Teaching “World Religions”

TTR
Locklin, Reid B., Tiemeier, Tracy, and Vento,, Johann M.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 159-181
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of “religion” and “world religions” and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach world religions without teaching “world religions.” That is, we attempt to promote student engagement with the empirical study of a plurality ...
Additional Info:
Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of “religion” and “world religions” and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach world religions without teaching “world religions.” That is, we attempt to promote student engagement with the empirical study of a plurality of religious traditions without engaging in the rhetoric of pluralism or the reification of the category “religion.” The first two essays focus on topical courses taught at the undergraduate level in self-consciously Christian settings: the online course “Women and Religion” at Georgian Court University and the service-learning course “Interreligious Dialogue and Practice” at St. Michael's College, in the University of Toronto. The final essay discusses the integration of texts and traditions from diverse traditions into the graduate theology curriculum more broadly, in this case at Loyola Marymount University. Such confessional settings can, we suggest, offer particularly suitable – if somewhat counter-intuitive – contexts for bringing the otherwise covert agendas of the world religions discourse to light and subjecting them to a searching inquiry in the religion classroom.
TTR cover image

"An 8-Week Online Capstone Experience"

TTR
Spencer, James
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 184-185
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Liberal Arts   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
Cover image

The Complete Step-by-Step Guide to Designing and Teaching Online Courses

Book
Thormann, Joan, and Zimmerman, Isa Kaftal
2012
Teachers College Press, New York
LB1044.87.T57 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
In this valuable resource, experts share deep knowledge including practical “how-to” and preventive trouble-shooting tips. Instructors will learn about course design and development, instructional methods for online teaching, and student engagement and community building techniques. The book contains successful teaching strategies, guidance for facilitating interactions and responding to diversity, and assessments, as well as future directions for online learning. With many field-tested examples and practice assignments, and with voices from ...
Additional Info:
In this valuable resource, experts share deep knowledge including practical “how-to” and preventive trouble-shooting tips. Instructors will learn about course design and development, instructional methods for online teaching, and student engagement and community building techniques. The book contains successful teaching strategies, guidance for facilitating interactions and responding to diversity, and assessments, as well as future directions for online learning. With many field-tested examples and practice assignments, and with voices from students, teachers, and experts, this book arms instructors and administrators with the tools they need to teach effective and empowering online courses. This one-stop resource addresses all of the core elements of online teaching in terms that are universally applicable to any content area and at any instructional level. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction; and How to Use This Book
Impact of Online Teaching and Learning
Transformations in Schooling
How to Use This Book
Chapter Descriptions
Summary

ch. 2 Course Design and Development
Philosophy of Education for Teaching Online
Pedagogy of Online Instruction
Summary

ch. 3 Instructional Methods, Models, and Strategies
Blended Versus Totally Online:
Choosing a Delivery Method
Instructional Strategies
Summary

ch. 4 Assignment Templates and Examples
Templates for Innovative Exercises and Experiences
Sample Successful Online Assignment Templates Summary

ch. 5 Facilitation and Building Online Community
Student and Faculty Interaction
Developing Online Communication and Facilitation Skills
Building Online Community
Summary

ch. 6 Evaluation and Assessment in Online Teaching
Testing for Learning
Formative and Summative Evaluation
Ways of Evaluating Student Learning
Evaluating Various Student Activities and Products
Technology Choices for Evaluation
Grading Criteria
High-Stakes Testing
Summary

ch. 7 Teaching Diverse Students Online
Students with Special Needs
Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
ELL (English Language Leaners) or ESOL (English for Speakers of a Second Language)
Gifted and Talented
At-Risk Students
Summary

ch. 8 Dealing with Dilemmas
Resistance to Online Learning
Skills Readiness
Access and Availability
Student Integrity Issues
Professional Issues Facing Istructors
Educator Preparation Models
Student Retention
Summary

ch. 9 Looking to, and at, the Future; and Conclusions
Gaming as Learning
Home Schooling (K-12)
Impact of Online Learning on Formal Schooling
Diversity and Globalization
Mobile Phones and M-Learning
Preparing for Teaching Online
Summary

Appendix A: Glossary
Appendix B: Course Guidelines
References
Index
About the Authors
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The Mobile Academy: mLearning for Higher Education

Book
Quinn, Clark N.
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2395.7.Q56 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In MindMeld, Jon D. Aleckson and Penny Ralston-Berg draw on a great many years of experience in educational technology to describe how the benefits of learning from an accomplished expert (a professor, for instance) can be translated into an online format. Industry professionals know that the online format presents an opportunity for highly interactive pedagogy, a pedagogy by which students synchronize learning with doing, replicating the information-processing habits that come ...
Additional Info:
In MindMeld, Jon D. Aleckson and Penny Ralston-Berg draw on a great many years of experience in educational technology to describe how the benefits of learning from an accomplished expert (a professor, for instance) can be translated into an online format. Industry professionals know that the online format presents an opportunity for highly interactive pedagogy, a pedagogy by which students synchronize learning with doing, replicating the information-processing habits that come from real-life work in the field. According to Aleckson, the key to creating an ideal eLearning product is to meet the challenge of micro-collaboration.

In order to develop sophisticated online learning activities, we must find a way to convey the tacit knowledge of someone with real-life experience using the tools of software design. This requires us to micro-collaborate: individuals with very different backgrounds and very different skills sets have to work in harmony to achieve a common goal. It may sound simple, but anyone who has labored on an eLearning project knows otherwise. In MindMeld, Aleckson and Ralston-Berg take us step by step through the leadership, management, and communication strategies that make effective micro-collaboration possible, using stories of actual projects to illustrate his points. In addition, they provide a collection of documentation tools to assist in keeping an eLearning project on spec, on time, and on budget.

This concise, readable volume contextualizes each aspect of eLearning development and highlights the ways in which different team members interact. It will prove invaluable to readers in both the business and academic worlds.

As a bonus to readers, the authors have created an exciting set of "tools" for helping conceptualize and implement the process. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

ch. 1 TheMobile Revolution
Context
Related Experiences
Why Higher Education Needs to Pay Attention
The Rest of This Book
Practice

ch. 2 Foundations: Mobile
Devices
Of Platforms and Processing Power
Four C’S and Thinking Differently
Definition
Summary
Practice

ch. 3 Foundations: Learning
Making Learning Work
Beyond the Basics
Summary
Practice

ch. 4 Administration ‘‘To Go’’
Principles
Delivery
Summary
Practice
Task Checklist

ch. 5 Content Is King
Media
Media Specifics
Accessing
Summary
Practice
Content Form

ch. 6 Practice: Interactivity and Assessment
Design
Interactions
Meta-learning
Summary
Practice
Category Checklist

ch. 7 Going Social
Learning Interactions
Social Media
Meta-learning
Summary
Practice
Channel Checklist

ch. 8 Going Beyond
Augmented Reality
Alternate Reality
Adaptive Delivery
Moving Forward
Practice

ch. 9 Getting Going: Organizational Issues
Design
Development
Implementation
Policies
You Gotta Be in It to Get It
Practice

Bibliography
Index
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Teaching Intensive and Accelerated Courses: Instruction that Motivates Learning

Book
Wlodkowski, Raymond J., and Ginsberg, Margery B.
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1029.A22 W63 2010
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   Adult Learners

Additional Info:
In this comprehensive resource, Raymond J. Wlodkowski and Margery B. Ginsberg describe how to meet the challenge of teaching intensive and accelerated courses to nontraditional learners and working adults. By making motivation and cultural relevance essential to instruction, they clearly show what instructors can do to enhance learning in classes that can last from three to six hours. Teaching Intensive and Accelerated Courses makes full use of the authors' twenty ...
Additional Info:
In this comprehensive resource, Raymond J. Wlodkowski and Margery B. Ginsberg describe how to meet the challenge of teaching intensive and accelerated courses to nontraditional learners and working adults. By making motivation and cultural relevance essential to instruction, they clearly show what instructors can do to enhance learning in classes that can last from three to six hours. Teaching Intensive and Accelerated Courses makes full use of the authors' twenty years of experience researching and teaching accelerated courses, along with selected strategies from Wlodkowski's classic Enhancing Adult Motivation to Learn, to offer tried-and-true practices instructors can use to provide continuously engaging learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Authors

ch. 1 Understanding Accelerated and Intensive Courses as Excellent Learning Experiences
ch. 2 Using a Motivational Framework to Enhance Learning in Accelerated and Intensive Courses
ch. 3 Being a Motivating Instructor
ch. 4 Establishing Inclusion in a Learning Environment
ch. 5 Developing Positive Attitudes Toward Learning
ch. 6 Enhancing Meaning in Learning
ch. 7 Engendering Competence Among Learners
ch. 8 Designing Instruction for Intensive and Accelerated Courses
ch. 9 Strengthening Instruction and Retention

References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Developing a Learning Classroom: Moving Beyond Management Through Relationships, Relevance, and Rigor

Book
Cooper, Nic, and Garner, Betty K.
2012
Corwin Press, A SAGE Publications Company, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB3013.C5655 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   Classroom Management   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
All too often, managing a classroom means gaining control, dictating guidelines, and implementing rules. Designed for any teacher struggling with student behavior, motivation, and engagement, Developing a Learning Classroom explores how to create a thriving, learning-centered classroom through three critical concepts?relationships, relevance, and rigor. Discover how you can:

• Develop an interactive learning mindset
• Create a safe environment where students question, explore, and discover
• Uncover a ...
Additional Info:
All too often, managing a classroom means gaining control, dictating guidelines, and implementing rules. Designed for any teacher struggling with student behavior, motivation, and engagement, Developing a Learning Classroom explores how to create a thriving, learning-centered classroom through three critical concepts?relationships, relevance, and rigor. Discover how you can:

• Develop an interactive learning mindset
• Create a safe environment where students question, explore, and discover
• Uncover a student's learning profile as well as your own teaching style
• Use student input to create classroom practices and procedures
• Apply brain-based instructional strategies to keep students engaged
• Use student surveys and a personal education plan to improve learning environments

Filled with classroom stories, starter worksheets, and action steps, this book reveals the secrets to transforming an ordinary classroom into an extraordinary learning community! (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
About the Authors

ch. 1 What Is a Learning Classroom? How to Develop Relationships, Relevance, and Rigor
ch. 2 Who Am I Who Teaches? How Knowing Oneself Impacts Practice
ch. 3 Who Are the Students We Teach? How Knowing Our Students Affects Teaching and Learning
ch. 4 How Do We Reach Our Students? How Procedures and Clear Expectations Develop a Learning Classroom
ch. 5 How Do We Teach Our Students? How to Engage Students in Their Own Learning With Rigor and Relevance
ch. 6 How Do We Know If Our Students Are Learning? How to Assess and Motivate Students
ch. 7 How Do We Stay in the Game? How to Cultivate Learning Communities for Continual Professional Growth

Appendix A - Introductory Student Survey
Appendix B - Advanced Student Survey
Appendix C - Sample Socratic Questions: Tools to Stimulate Critical Thinking
Appendix D - Flexible Lesson Design
Appendix E - Personal Education Plan

References
Index
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Critical Response Process: A Method For Getting Useful Feedback On Anything You make, From Dance to Dessert, First Edition

Book
Lerman, Liz; and Borstel, John
2003
Liz Lerman Dance Exchange, Takoma Park, MD
BF319.5.F4 L47 2003
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process is a multi-step, group system for giving and receiving useful feedback on creative processes and artistic work-in-progress. Originated in the early 1990's by choreographer and MacArthur "Genius Grant" Fellow Liz Lerman, the Process has been widely embraced by artists, educators, and administrators. It has been applied in such diverse contexts as choreography classes, post-performance discussions, actor/playwright collaborations, curatorial decision-making, and university level curriculum assessment. ...
Additional Info:
Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process is a multi-step, group system for giving and receiving useful feedback on creative processes and artistic work-in-progress. Originated in the early 1990's by choreographer and MacArthur "Genius Grant" Fellow Liz Lerman, the Process has been widely embraced by artists, educators, and administrators. It has been applied in such diverse contexts as choreography classes, post-performance discussions, actor/playwright collaborations, curatorial decision-making, and university level curriculum assessment. In addition to reflection on the work at hand, the Critical Response Process affords artists a voice and a degree of control within the critique of their work promoting dialogue with audiences, fellow artists, students, mentors, and other colleagues.

This book, Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process, offers a detailed introduction to the Process, beginning with its three roles and four core steps. With particular emphasis on the role of the facilitator, this illustrated publication offers guidance on how artists and participants can get the most out of the Process and the opportunities it offers to ask question, give answers, and voice opinions. A final chapter discusses adaptations and variations. Charts and annotated sample dialogues demonstrate the inner workings of the Process. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction by Liz Lerman

ch. 1 The Process
ch. 2 The Roles
ch. 3 The Steps
ch. 4 Facilitation Fundamentals
ch. 5 Deepening the Dialogue
ch. 6 Variations
ch. 7 Conclusion
ch. 8 Sample Dialogues
ch. 9 Acknowledgements

Charts
ch. 10 Forming Neutral Questions
ch. 11 The Three Roles
ch. 12 Steps & Sequence
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Social Media for Educators: Strategies and Best Practices

Book
Joosten, Tanya
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB1044.87.J667 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Tap into the power of social media and increase course effectiveness! Faculty will learn to choose the appropriate social media tool for the intended learning outcome, design engaging and innovative activities, and better meet pedagogical needs. In addition, the author offers strategies for assessing and documenting the effectiveness of using these tools in your course. Administrators and student affairs professionals will also find a wealth of information useful for planning ...
Additional Info:
Tap into the power of social media and increase course effectiveness! Faculty will learn to choose the appropriate social media tool for the intended learning outcome, design engaging and innovative activities, and better meet pedagogical needs. In addition, the author offers strategies for assessing and documenting the effectiveness of using these tools in your course. Administrators and student affairs professionals will also find a wealth of information useful for planning faculty development programs and communicating with students.

Although the book focuses on higher education, tools and techniques presented here can be easily generalized for K–12 classrooms or organizational learn­ing. The best practices and faculty development tips can be informative for individuals involved in any kind of professional development or network-building. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables, Figures, and Exhibits
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

Part One: Background
ch. 1 Why Social Media?
ch. 2 Preparing to Use Social Media

Part Two: Social Media: What Do We Do with It?
ch. 3 Increasing Communication and Encouraging Contact
ch. 4 Developing a Richer Learning Experience
ch. 5 Building Cooperation and Feedback Through Dialogue

Part Three: Other Considerations in Implementation
ch. 6 Guiding Social Media in Our Institutions
ch. 7 Evaluating Social Media

Appendix A Sample Social Bookmarking Activity
Appendix B Sample Survey Items
References
Resources
Index
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Essentials of Online Course Design: A Standards-Based Guide

Book
Vai, Marjorie, and Sosulski, Kristen
2011
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1044.87.V35 2011
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
In spite of the proliferation of online learning in higher education, creating online courses can still evoke a good deal of frustration, negativity, and wariness in those who need to create them.

Essentials of Online Course Design takes a fresh, thoughtfully designed, step-by-step approach to online course development. At its core is a set of standards that are based on best practices in the field of online learning ...
Additional Info:
In spite of the proliferation of online learning in higher education, creating online courses can still evoke a good deal of frustration, negativity, and wariness in those who need to create them.

Essentials of Online Course Design takes a fresh, thoughtfully designed, step-by-step approach to online course development. At its core is a set of standards that are based on best practices in the field of online learning and teaching. Pedagogical, organizational and visual design principles are presented and modeled throughout the book and users will quickly learn from the guide’s hands-on approach. The course design process begins with the elements of a classroom syllabus which, after a series of guided steps, easily evolve into an online course outline.

The guide’s key features include:

• a practical approach informed by theory
• clean interior design that offers straightforward guidance from page one
• clear and jargon-free language
• examples, screen shots, and illustrations to clarify and support the text
• a Companion Website with examples, adaptable templates, interactive learning features, and online resources
• a checklist of online course design standards that readers can use to self-evaluate.

Essentials of Online Course Design serves as a best-practice model for designing online courses. After reading this book, readers will find that preparing for online teaching is, contrary to popular belief, a satisfying and engaging experience. The core issue is simply good design: pedagogical, organizational, and visual. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction to this guide

ch. 1 Orientation to online teaching and learning
ch. 2 Tour – Online Course Setup
ch. 3 Writing for an online course
ch. 4 Visual design basics
ch. 5 Engaging the online learner
ch. 6 Activities that engage
ch. 7 Using engaging resources
ch. 8 Assessment and feedback
ch. 9 Building the course foundation – Outcomes, syllabus, and course online
ch. 10 Creating the Structure – The Online Lessons

Appendix A – Devising and Writing Learning Outcomes
Appendix B – Using the Standards Checklist
Article cover image
Wabash tree

When the Text Is the Problem: A Postcolonial Approach to Biblical Pedagogy

Article
Lee, Boyung
2007
Religious Education, Vol. 106, No. 1, Winter 2007, pgs 44-61
Topics: Course Design   |   Religious Education   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Postcolonial biblical scholars use the hermeneutics of decolonization to reinterpret the biblical text. One goal is to find contemporary applications for an age-old message. This article explores the challenges and implications of postcolonial hermeneutics for biblical pedagogy. First, the author explores fundamental hermeneutical principles of postcolonial biblical criticism. Then she reviews its challenges for a liberative biblical pedagogy. Finally, the author applies these principles to a Bible study using the ...
Additional Info:
Postcolonial biblical scholars use the hermeneutics of decolonization to reinterpret the biblical text. One goal is to find contemporary applications for an age-old message. This article explores the challenges and implications of postcolonial hermeneutics for biblical pedagogy. First, the author explores fundamental hermeneutical principles of postcolonial biblical criticism. Then she reviews its challenges for a liberative biblical pedagogy. Finally, the author applies these principles to a Bible study using the story of Hagar.
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Streamlined ID: A Practical Guide to Instructional Design

Book
Larson, Miriam; and Lockee, Barbara B.
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1028.38.L37 2014
Topics: Course Design

Additional Info:
Streamlined ID: A Practical Guide to Instructional Design presents a focused and generalizable approach to instructional design and development – one that addresses the needs of ID novices, as well as practitioners in a variety of career environments. Emphasizing the essentials and "big ideas" of ID, Streamlined ID presents a new perspective – one that aims to produce instruction that is sustainable, optimized, appropriately redundant, and targeted at continuous improvement.

...
Additional Info:
Streamlined ID: A Practical Guide to Instructional Design presents a focused and generalizable approach to instructional design and development – one that addresses the needs of ID novices, as well as practitioners in a variety of career environments. Emphasizing the essentials and "big ideas" of ID, Streamlined ID presents a new perspective – one that aims to produce instruction that is sustainable, optimized, appropriately redundant, and targeted at continuous improvement.

The book features an enhanced version of the classic ADDIE model (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation) that emphasizes the iterative nature of design and the role of evaluation throughout the design/development process. It clearly lays out a systematic approach that emphasizes the use of research-based theories, while acknowledging the need to customize the process to address a variety of pedagogical approaches: Instructivist, Constructivist, and Connectivist.

The book opens with an overview of the basics of ID and each subsequent chapter describes major activities in the ID process with step-by-step instructions and tips for streamlining the process. Numerous job aids serve to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your design efforts. Each chapter highlights key concepts and provides additional exercises and assignments based on the work of Benjamin Bloom. Streamlined ID is an ideal reference guide for optimizing professional practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
This Book: At a Glance
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Mastering the Basics
ch. 2 Analyzing Needs to Define the Project
ch. 3 Analyzing to Identify the Learners
ch. 4 Analyzing the Contexts of Instruction
ch. 5 Analyzing the Content & Project Scope
ch. 6 Identifying the Outcomes & Aligning Instructionv ch.7 Assessing Learning
ch. 8 Selecting Strategies: The Heart of Instructional Design
ch. 9 Selecting Technologies that Support Instruction
ch. 10 Designing & Delivering an Effective Message
ch. 11 Producing & Implementing Instruction

Glossary
Reference
Index
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Handbook of Design in Educational Technology

Book
Luckin, Rosemary; Puntambekar, Sadhana; Goodyear, Peter; Grabowski, Barbara L.; Underwood, Joshua; and Winters, Niall, eds.
2013
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1028.3.H354 2013
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The Handbook of Design in Educational Technology provides up-to-date, comprehensive summaries and syntheses of recent research pertinent to the design of information and communication technologies to support learning. Readers can turn to this handbook for expert advice about each stage in the process of designing systems for use in educational settings; from theoretical foundations to the challenges of implementation, the process of evaluating ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The Handbook of Design in Educational Technology provides up-to-date, comprehensive summaries and syntheses of recent research pertinent to the design of information and communication technologies to support learning. Readers can turn to this handbook for expert advice about each stage in the process of designing systems for use in educational settings; from theoretical foundations to the challenges of implementation, the process of evaluating the impact of the design and the manner in which it might be further developed and disseminated.

The volume is organized into the following four sections: Theory, Design, Implementation, and Evaluation.

The more than forty chapters reflect the international and interdisciplinary nature of the educational technology design research field. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Rosemary Luckin)

Part I. Foundations Design in Educational Technology: Foundations (Peter Goodyear )
ch. 1 The Practice of Educational/Instructional Design (Peggy A. Ertmer, Martin L. Parisio, and Dewa Wardak)
ch. 2 Principles for Design and Evaluation of Learning Spaces (Mike Keppell and Matthew Riddle)
ch. 3 The Ecology of Resources: A Theoretically Grounded Framework for Designing Next Generation Technology Rich Learning (Rosemary Luckin, Wilma Clark, and Joshua Underwood)
ch. 4 Design-Based Research—Designing as Research (Peter Reimann)
ch. 5 Understanding and Analysing 21st Century Skills Learning Outcomes Using Assessments (Patrick Griffin, My Van Bui and Esther Care)

Part II. Design Methods - Design in Educational Technology: The Design Process (Joshua Underwood and Rosemary Luckin)
ch. 6 Using Technology Probes to Understand Educational Design Spaces (Madeline Balaam)
ch. 7 Iterative Context Engineering to Inform the Design of Intelligent Exploratory Learning Environments for the Classroom (Manolis Mavrikis, Sergio Gutierrez-Santos, Eirini Geraniou, Richard Noss and Alex Poulovassilis)
ch. 8 Sketch-Ins: A Method for Participatory Design in TEL (Brock Craft)
ch. 9 Issues and Methods for Involving Young People in Design (Judy Robertson, Judith Good, Katy Howland, and Andrew Macvean)
ch. 10 Orchestrating Classroom CSCL: A Multi-level Pattern Approach for Design and Enactment (L. P. Prieto, S. Villagrá-Sobrino, Y. Dimitriadis, I. Jorrín-Abellán)
ch. 11 Empowering teachers to design learning resources with metacognitive interface elements (Judy Kay, Sabina Kleitman, and Roger Azevedo)
ch. 12 Meta-Design: Empowering All Stakeholder as Co-Designers (Gerhard Fischer)
ch. 13 Designing for Seamless Learning (Chee-Kit Looi and Lung-Hsiang Wong)
ch. 14 Putting the Ecology of Resources Design Framework to Use with Language Learners’ Contexts (Rosemary Luckin, Wilma Clark, Joshua Underwood)
ch. 15 Designing Affective and Cognitive Educational Interaction (Benedict du Boulay)
ch. 16 Activity Theory and Educational Technology Design (Daisy Mwanza-Simwami)
ch. 17 SNaP! Re-using, sharing and communicating designs and design knowledge using Scenarios, Narratives, and Patterns (Yishay Mor)
ch. 18 Going Native: Autoethnography as a Design Tool (Margot Duncan )

Part III. Implementation - Design in Educational Technology: Implementation Challenges (Barbara Grabowski and Niall Winters)
ch. 19 A Developmental Study for the Design of Creative Problem Solving Support System (Cheol Il Lim, Wan Chul Lim, and Miyoung Hong)
ch. 20 Case-Based Learning for Anesthesiology: Enhancing Dynamic Decision-Making Skills through Cognitive Apprenticeship and Cognitive Flexibility (Ikseon Choi, Yi-Chun Hong, Hyojin Park, Yunseok Lee)
ch. 21 Scaffolding Learning in an LMS: Learning to Write an Action Research Proposal (Priya Sharma and Alice E. Anderson)
ch. 22 Considering the Design of an Electronic Progress-Monitoring System (Simon Hooper, Charles Miller, and Susan Rose)
ch. 23 Designing for Awareness: Purposeful Interactions in the Next Generation of Distance Education (Jennifer A. Maddrell and Gary R. Morrison)
ch. 24 Learning with Facebook Group—Interaction in Action (Gila Kurtz, Hagit Meishar-Tal, and Efrat Pieterse)
ch. 25 Designing for Learning with Tangible Technologies (Sara Price and Paul Marshall)
ch. 26 An Introduction to Technology Enhanced Learning Design in Postgraduate Medical Education (Niall Winters)
ch. 27 The Convergence of Informal Learning and Formal Education in a Ubiquitous Environment (Heeok Heo, Il-Hyun Jo, Kyu Yon Lim, Hyeon Woo Lee, and Soonshik Suh)
ch. 28 Design for Museum Learning: Visitor-Constructed Trails Using Mobile Technologies (Kevin Walker)
ch. 29 A Blended Instructional Design Approach to Cyberlearning that Supports Persons with Disabilities (Marilyn P. Arnone, Jennifer T. Ellis, and Derrick L. Cogburn)
ch. 30 Cloud-based eLearning for Higher Education: Realizing the Potential (Alexander Romiszowski and Elvis Otamere)
ch. 31 Role of Web-Based Technologies in Framing Teaching Presence (Fengfeng Ke and Li Zhu)

Part IV. Evaluation - What Are Students Learning and How: Methods for Assessing Learning (Sadhana Puntambekar)
ch. 32 Measuring What Matters: Technology and the Design of Assessments that Support Learning (James W. Pellegrino)
ch. 33 Educational Design Research in the 21st Century (William A. Sandoval)
ch. 34 Lights, Camera, Learn: When the Set is as Important as the Actors (Iris Tabak)
ch. 35 Bidirectional artifact analysis: A method for analyzing digitally mediated creative processes (Erica Halverson and Alecia Magnifico)
ch. 36 Mass Collaboration and Learning (Ulrike Cress)
ch. 37 Emerging Technologies for Young Children: Evaluating the Learning Benefits of New Forms of Interaction (Andrew Manches)
ch. 38 Insight into Teaching and Learning: The Complex Face of Video Research (Mary J. Leonard and Sharon J. Derry)
ch. 39 Basic Concepts and Techniques in Social Work Analysis (Christophe Reffay and Alejandra Martínez-Monés)
ch. 40 Seeing to Understand: Using Visualizations to Understand Learning in Technology-Rich Learning Environments (Cindy E. Hmelo-Silver, Rebecca Jordan, and Suparna Sinha)
ch. 41 Using Process Mining for Understanding Learning (Peter Reimann and Kalina Yacef)
ch. 42 Self-Regulated Learning Engines: Software Technologies for Researching and Promoting Self-Regulated Learning (Philip H. Winne)
ch. 43 Assessing Socio-Emotional Learning Around Educational Technologies (Carolyn Penstein Rosé)

Index
Additional Info:
Self-assessment of instructional goals to help faculty become more aware of what they want to accomplish in individual courses, locate Classroom Assessment Techniques they can adapt and use to assess how well they are achieving these goals, and provide a starting point for discussion of teaching and learning goals among colleagues.
Additional Info:
Self-assessment of instructional goals to help faculty become more aware of what they want to accomplish in individual courses, locate Classroom Assessment Techniques they can adapt and use to assess how well they are achieving these goals, and provide a starting point for discussion of teaching and learning goals among colleagues.
Additional Info:
Online companion to the PBS weekly news show, with lots of resources for teachers (lesson plans, tips, additional links). Explicitly aimed at K-12, but helpful for college age students as well.
Additional Info:
Online companion to the PBS weekly news show, with lots of resources for teachers (lesson plans, tips, additional links). Explicitly aimed at K-12, but helpful for college age students as well.
Additional Info:
Lesson plans, classroom tips, and teaching resources, on the website of the popular PBS news show.
Additional Info:
Lesson plans, classroom tips, and teaching resources, on the website of the popular PBS news show.
Additional Info:
An index of more than 25,000 peace and conflict resolution related Web pages, books, articles, audio-visual materials, organizational profiles, events, and current news articles – including links for syllabi, simulations and case studies for use in higher education settings.
Additional Info:
An index of more than 25,000 peace and conflict resolution related Web pages, books, articles, audio-visual materials, organizational profiles, events, and current news articles – including links for syllabi, simulations and case studies for use in higher education settings.
Additional Info:
Comprehensive annotated guide to internet resources on religion and theology; helpful for research, class-use, student research, and e-texts.
Additional Info:
Comprehensive annotated guide to internet resources on religion and theology; helpful for research, class-use, student research, and e-texts.
Additional Info:
An online tutorial describing a methodology for creating online learning. Upon completion of the course you should be able to: explain why online education is an effective learning format for adult learners; write measurable learning objectives; organize content into an online format; and create assessment tools/exercises that measure achievement of learning objectives. University of Tennessee.
Additional Info:
An online tutorial describing a methodology for creating online learning. Upon completion of the course you should be able to: explain why online education is an effective learning format for adult learners; write measurable learning objectives; organize content into an online format; and create assessment tools/exercises that measure achievement of learning objectives. University of Tennessee.
Additional Info:
A short article in which a teacher-scholar defines what she means by “active and meaningful learning,” discusses unstructured cooperative learning and critical thinking, and reflects on experience in using these concepts in the courses she teaches and the textbooks she writes. Idea Paper no. 34, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
A short article in which a teacher-scholar defines what she means by “active and meaningful learning,” discusses unstructured cooperative learning and critical thinking, and reflects on experience in using these concepts in the courses she teaches and the textbooks she writes. Idea Paper no. 34, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Article cover image

Matching Instructional Objectives, Subject Matter, Tests, and Score Interpretations (pdf)

Article
1987
Idea Paper No. 18, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1987)
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
This article explores the implications for a particular model of teaching, by looking at differences between students, types of subject material, types of instruction, instructional objectives, texts, and ways to interpret test results. Idea Paper no. 18, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
This article explores the implications for a particular model of teaching, by looking at differences between students, types of subject material, types of instruction, instructional objectives, texts, and ways to interpret test results. Idea Paper no. 18, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Series of detailed questions to guide you through the construction of a course, organized in categories such as: where are you? where do you want to go? how would you know if the students got there? how can you help them get there? what are the students going to do? etc.
Additional Info:
Series of detailed questions to guide you through the construction of a course, organized in categories such as: where are you? where do you want to go? how would you know if the students got there? how can you help them get there? what are the students going to do? etc.
Additional Info:
Helps you: articulate goals for a course or portion of a course; build a course or portion of a course that meets those goals and assesses student learning; and explore a variety of teaching techniques that emphasize student engagement.
Additional Info:
Helps you: articulate goals for a course or portion of a course; build a course or portion of a course that meets those goals and assesses student learning; and explore a variety of teaching techniques that emphasize student engagement.
Additional Info:
This website is a rich repository of resources to support the design model advocated in the book "Understanding by Design" (Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, 1998), particularly around backwards design for effective "outputs."
Additional Info:
This website is a rich repository of resources to support the design model advocated in the book "Understanding by Design" (Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, 1998), particularly around backwards design for effective "outputs."
Additional Info:
A brief overview of the differences between measurable (good) and non-measurable (poor) learning outcomes and the importance of the former. "Learning outcomes should flow from a needs assessment. The needs assessment should determine the gap between an existing condition and a desired condition. Learning outcomes are statements which describe a desired condition -- that is, the knowledge, skills, or attitudes needed to fulfill the need."
Additional Info:
A brief overview of the differences between measurable (good) and non-measurable (poor) learning outcomes and the importance of the former. "Learning outcomes should flow from a needs assessment. The needs assessment should determine the gap between an existing condition and a desired condition. Learning outcomes are statements which describe a desired condition -- that is, the knowledge, skills, or attitudes needed to fulfill the need."
Additional Info:
Although this is a commercial site, it has many great summaries of major theorists and theories in easy to read charts and diagrams. Based on Robert Mager’s “Criterion Referenced Instruction (CRI) it demonstrates how instruction can be measurable and thus capable of being evaluated and systematically improved.
Additional Info:
Although this is a commercial site, it has many great summaries of major theorists and theories in easy to read charts and diagrams. Based on Robert Mager’s “Criterion Referenced Instruction (CRI) it demonstrates how instruction can be measurable and thus capable of being evaluated and systematically improved.
Additional Info:
A paper by Curtis Bonk of Indiana University discussing ways to use videos as 'Anchors and Enders' for learning experiences.
Additional Info:
A paper by Curtis Bonk of Indiana University discussing ways to use videos as 'Anchors and Enders' for learning experiences.
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Essentials for Blended Learning: A Standards-Based Guide

Book
Stein, Jared; and Graham, Charles R.
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LB 1028.5.S715 2014
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Essentials for Blended Learning: A Standards-Based Guide provides a practical, streamlined approach for creating effective learning experiences by blending online activities and the best of face-to-face teaching.

This guide is:

Easy to use: Clear, jargon-free writing; illustrations; and references to online resources help readers understand concepts.

Streamlined: A simple but effective design process focuses on creating manageable activities for the right environment.

...
Additional Info:
Essentials for Blended Learning: A Standards-Based Guide provides a practical, streamlined approach for creating effective learning experiences by blending online activities and the best of face-to-face teaching.

This guide is:

Easy to use: Clear, jargon-free writing; illustrations; and references to online resources help readers understand concepts.

Streamlined: A simple but effective design process focuses on creating manageable activities for the right environment.

Practical: Real-world examples from different subject areas help teachers understand principles in context.

Contemporary: The variety of modern, connected technologies covered in the guide addresses a range of teaching challenges.

Forward-Looking: The approach bridges the gap between formal classroom learning and informal lifelong learning.

Standards-based: Guidelines and standards are based on current research in the field, relevant learning theories, and practitioner experiences.

Effective blended learning requires significant rethinking of teaching practices and a fundamental redesign of course structure. Essentials for Blended Learning: A Standards-Based Guide simplifies these difficult challenges without neglecting important opportunities to transform teaching. This guide is suitable for teachers in any content area. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Orientation to Blended Teaching and Learning
ch. 2 Elements of Blended Courses: A Tour
ch. 3 Engaging Learners in a Blended Course
ch. 4 Designing Blended Courses
ch. 5 Planning Your Course from Goals and Outcomes
ch. 6 Blending Assessment and Feedback for Learning
ch. 7 Blending Content-Driven Learning Activities
ch. 8 Blending Community-Driven Learning Activities
Web cover image
Wabash tree

Avoiding the Mid-semester Doldrums

Web
Duffy, D.; and Jones, J.
Topics: Course Design   |   Collaborative Learning   |   Problem-Based Learning   |   Case Study Method

Additional Info:
What do you do when things get sluggish and everyone just wishes the course were over? Do something different
Additional Info:
What do you do when things get sluggish and everyone just wishes the course were over? Do something different
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Matching student learning activites to course outcomes is one of the most important parts of the learning design process. This brief note provides questions to help you select learning strategies that align with the course outcomes, assessments, and goals.
Additional Info:
Matching student learning activites to course outcomes is one of the most important parts of the learning design process. This brief note provides questions to help you select learning strategies that align with the course outcomes, assessments, and goals.
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Consider “flipping” the class—moving the content coverage to outside the class in order to devote precious, in-class time to practice of important course skills.This brief note gives a helpful overview of this emerging concept in higher education (with links).
Additional Info:
Consider “flipping” the class—moving the content coverage to outside the class in order to devote precious, in-class time to practice of important course skills.This brief note gives a helpful overview of this emerging concept in higher education (with links).
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Games help people develop a disposition toward collaboration, problem-solving, communication, experimentation, and exploration of identities, all attributes that promote success in a rapidly-changing, information-based culture
Additional Info:
Games help people develop a disposition toward collaboration, problem-solving, communication, experimentation, and exploration of identities, all attributes that promote success in a rapidly-changing, information-based culture
Additional Info:
How can instructors ensure that students come to class with course assignments prepared and readings completed?
Additional Info:
How can instructors ensure that students come to class with course assignments prepared and readings completed?
Additional Info:
In designing assessments or assignments for a course, instructors often think of exams or term papers, but there are many other types of assessments that may be appropriate for your course.
Additional Info:
In designing assessments or assignments for a course, instructors often think of exams or term papers, but there are many other types of assessments that may be appropriate for your course.
Additional Info:
When considering how to assess student learning in a course, most instructors would agree that the ideal assessment would be one that not only assesses students’ learning; it also teaches students and improves their skills and understanding of course content.
Additional Info:
When considering how to assess student learning in a course, most instructors would agree that the ideal assessment would be one that not only assesses students’ learning; it also teaches students and improves their skills and understanding of course content.
Additional Info:
Learning outcomes are user-friendly statements that tell students what they will be able to do at the end of a period of time.
Additional Info:
Learning outcomes are user-friendly statements that tell students what they will be able to do at the end of a period of time.
Additional Info:
Most anyone who has taught a college course more than once realizes that students' learning does not proceed in a uniformly smooth fashion. All instructors encounter bottlenecks, places where the learning of a significant number of students is blocked. We used to think these bottlenecks were simply conceptually difficult places.
Additional Info:
Most anyone who has taught a college course more than once realizes that students' learning does not proceed in a uniformly smooth fashion. All instructors encounter bottlenecks, places where the learning of a significant number of students is blocked. We used to think these bottlenecks were simply conceptually difficult places.
Additional Info:
In the backward design process you structure student learning based upon assessments that are intentionally designed to provide evidence that students have achieved the course goals.
Additional Info:
In the backward design process you structure student learning based upon assessments that are intentionally designed to provide evidence that students have achieved the course goals.
Additional Info:
Scaffolding is a teaching and learning process in which an instructor provides support that is tailored to students’ needs as they learn a skill or process, with the expectation that the scaffolding will be removed as students become more competent and independent at applying the skill or process.
Additional Info:
Scaffolding is a teaching and learning process in which an instructor provides support that is tailored to students’ needs as they learn a skill or process, with the expectation that the scaffolding will be removed as students become more competent and independent at applying the skill or process.
Additional Info:
By “Decoding” what an expert does so that he or she does not get stuck at the bottleneck, we can spell out crucial operations, the “critical thinking” of a discipline.
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By “Decoding” what an expert does so that he or she does not get stuck at the bottleneck, we can spell out crucial operations, the “critical thinking” of a discipline.
Additional Info:
There has been a lot of buzz in higher education lately about the flipped classroom model for teaching and learning. It's not as easy as it appears, and it's not as new as others would have us believe.
Additional Info:
There has been a lot of buzz in higher education lately about the flipped classroom model for teaching and learning. It's not as easy as it appears, and it's not as new as others would have us believe.
Additional Info:
Report on a course that is part contemplative and part active. “There is a 'What' focus of the class and there is also a 'How' component.” In other words, students are encouraged to start thinking about big questions, and then apply those in real-life situations.
Additional Info:
Report on a course that is part contemplative and part active. “There is a 'What' focus of the class and there is also a 'How' component.” In other words, students are encouraged to start thinking about big questions, and then apply those in real-life situations.
Additional Info:
The article looks at illusions of rigor we often accept in teaching our courses and what in fact are more realistic approaches that can provide the same high quality outcomes.
Additional Info:
The article looks at illusions of rigor we often accept in teaching our courses and what in fact are more realistic approaches that can provide the same high quality outcomes.
Additional Info:
The article looks at illusions of rigor we often accept in teaching our courses and what in fact are more realistic approaches that can provide the same high quality outcomes.
Additional Info:
The article looks at illusions of rigor we often accept in teaching our courses and what in fact are more realistic approaches that can provide the same high quality outcomes.
Additional Info:
I used to start the term with a lecture of review, and during each subsequence class I would give students a summary of what was covered in the previous class. When we collected data on this practice, it showed that this form of review was less than useless.
Additional Info:
I used to start the term with a lecture of review, and during each subsequence class I would give students a summary of what was covered in the previous class. When we collected data on this practice, it showed that this form of review was less than useless.
Additional Info:
In tiered classrooms (also sometimes called differentiated classrooms), the instructor’s approaches to teaching content and evaluating student performance are adjusted to accommodate for the diversity of students’ readiness, degree of interest, and learning profiles.
Additional Info:
In tiered classrooms (also sometimes called differentiated classrooms), the instructor’s approaches to teaching content and evaluating student performance are adjusted to accommodate for the diversity of students’ readiness, degree of interest, and learning profiles.
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Interactive Open Educational Resources: A Guide to Finding, Choosing, and Using What's Out There to Transform College Teaching

Book
Shank, John D.
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
ZA4228.S53 2014
Topics: Course Design   |   Librarians as Teachers   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Sponsored by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), this one-of-a-kind book demonstrates the best tools, resources, and techniques for discovering, selecting, and integrating interactive open educational resources (OERs) into the teaching and learning process. The author examines many of the best repositories and digital library websites for finding high quality materials, explaining in depth the best practices for effectively searching these ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Sponsored by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), this one-of-a-kind book demonstrates the best tools, resources, and techniques for discovering, selecting, and integrating interactive open educational resources (OERs) into the teaching and learning process. The author examines many of the best repositories and digital library websites for finding high quality materials, explaining in depth the best practices for effectively searching these repositories and the various methods for evaluating, selecting, and integrating the resources into the instructor’s curriculum and course assignments, as well as the institution’s learning management system. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: Transforming the Learning Experience through New Forms of Instructional Materials in the Digital Information Age
About the Author

Part One Interactive Learning Materials: Setting the Stage
ch. 1 Interactive Learning Materials: Engaging Learners in the Emerging Digital World
ch. 2 Defining an Emergent Class of Educational Resources: Interactive Multimedia Modules, Simulations, and Games

Part Two Finding ILMs: A Digital Exploration
ch. 3 The Discovery Process: The Art of Discovering ILMs
ch. 4 The Pioneers: Searching Online Educational Repositories in North America and the United Kingdom
ch. 5 The Educators: Searching College and University Educational Repositories
ch. 6 The Entrepreneurs: Textbook Publishers, Entertainment Media, and Educational Software Companies
ch. 7 The Exhibitors: Museums, Professional Organizations, and Governmental Organizations

Part Three Choosing and Using ILMs
ch. 8 The Selection Process: How to Choose and Evaluate ILMs
ch. 9 The Implementation Process: How to Instruct and Engage Students through ILMsv ch. 10 The Assessment Process: The Impact of ILMs on Student Learning

Epilogue: HowFaculty, Librarians, and Instructional Support Staff Transform Learning with ILMs in the Future
References
Index
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A Guide to Online Course Design: Strategies for Student Success

Book
Stavredes, Tina; and Herder, Tiffany
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1044.87.S73 2014
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book offers a much-needed resource for faculty and professional staff to build quality online courses by focusing on quality standards in instructional design and transparency in learning outcomes in the design of online courses. It includes effective instructional strategies to motivate online learners, help them become more self-directed, and develop academic skills to persist and successfully complete a program of study online. ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book offers a much-needed resource for faculty and professional staff to build quality online courses by focusing on quality standards in instructional design and transparency in learning outcomes in the design of online courses. It includes effective instructional strategies to motivate online learners, help them become more self-directed, and develop academic skills to persist and successfully complete a program of study online. It also includes a more in-depth understanding of instructional design principles to support faculty as they move their face-to-face courses to the online environment.

Table Of Content:
Exhibits and Figures
Preface
About the Authors

Authors: Tina Stavredes, Tiffany Herder
Part 1 An Introduction to Persistence and Quality Design
ch. 1 Quality Design to Support Learner Persistence
ch. 2 The Instructional Design Process

Part 2 Analysis of Learners and Learning Outcomes
ch. 3 Analysis of Online Learner Characteristics and Needs
ch. 4 Analysis of Learning Outcomes and Competencies

Part 3 Design of Course Assessments and Sequence
ch. 5 Design of Course Assessments
ch. 6 Sequence of Instruction

Part 4 Design of Instructional Strategies
ch. 7 Foundations of Transformative Learning
ch. 8 Selection of Instructional Materials
ch. 9 Design of Effective Course Activities

Part 5 Development of Instruction
ch. 10 Development of Instructional Materials
ch. 11 Organizing the Course Environment

Part 6 Implementation and Evaluation
ch. 12 Course Evaluations and Maintenance

Final Remarks
References
Index
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Designing Your Course: A Basic Guide to Designing and Delivering An Effective Course

Book
Galindo, Israel
2008
Baptist Theological Seminary, Richmond, VA
BV4020.G34 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Religious Education

Additional Info:
This guide will help you design your course in the Children and Family Ministry and the Youth and Student Ministry M.Div. concentrations at Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond. Using two proven educational frameworks for course design you will be able to create a powerful course that will facilitate a meaningful learning experience for your students, and a rewarding teaching adventure for you.

Using the frameworks of Understanding ...
Additional Info:
This guide will help you design your course in the Children and Family Ministry and the Youth and Student Ministry M.Div. concentrations at Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond. Using two proven educational frameworks for course design you will be able to create a powerful course that will facilitate a meaningful learning experience for your students, and a rewarding teaching adventure for you.

Using the frameworks of Understanding by Design (Wiggins and McTighe) and the learning principles of that classic educational theory of Constructivism you will be able to design a course that:
Is student-centered
Applies theory to practice
Is experiental
Leads toward self-understanding
Is congregationally focused
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Constructivist Teaching and Learning
ch. 2 Teaching for Understanding
ch. 3 Designing Your Course for Understanding
ch. 4 Using Learning Objectives
ch. 5 Organizing Your Course
ch. 6 Assessing Learning

Appendicies
Sample Course Syllabus
Sample Discussion Board Assessment Rubric
Teaching On-Line: Principles and Practices
Faculty and Instructor: Responsibilities for On-line Teaching
Additional Info:
"A short bulleted check list of good teaching practices to get a course off to a good start. "
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"A short bulleted check list of good teaching practices to get a course off to a good start. "
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Papers, projects, and presentations are excellent opportunities for students to demonstrate their learning and investment in a course.
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Papers, projects, and presentations are excellent opportunities for students to demonstrate their learning and investment in a course.
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Five ideas on how to structure your course so students will stay engaged in your classroom and in the learning process.
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Five ideas on how to structure your course so students will stay engaged in your classroom and in the learning process.
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Creating effective and engaging learning experiences has too often been viewed as an uninspiring task. Shouldn’t this be where our passion as teachers comes through? Could it be we are focusing on a limited aspect of learning?
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Creating effective and engaging learning experiences has too often been viewed as an uninspiring task. Shouldn’t this be where our passion as teachers comes through? Could it be we are focusing on a limited aspect of learning?
Additional Info:
This tip provides some important questions and considerations you should keep in mind as you undertake efforts to design your courses.
Additional Info:
This tip provides some important questions and considerations you should keep in mind as you undertake efforts to design your courses.
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Almost akin to the “first date,” the first day of class is critical both for students and for faculty.
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Almost akin to the “first date,” the first day of class is critical both for students and for faculty.
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A 3-part overview of easy to digest bulleted points. The flipped classroom is a learning workshop instead of a lecture stage.
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A 3-part overview of easy to digest bulleted points. The flipped classroom is a learning workshop instead of a lecture stage.
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Without practice and feedback, students often are in the dark about how well they are learning—sometimes overestimating their comprehension and skill, sometimes underestimating them.
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Without practice and feedback, students often are in the dark about how well they are learning—sometimes overestimating their comprehension and skill, sometimes underestimating them.
Additional Info:
According to author L.D. Fink, effective course design makes the biggest difference in classroom learning and success. Consider these strategies and resources for designing your course.
Additional Info:
According to author L.D. Fink, effective course design makes the biggest difference in classroom learning and success. Consider these strategies and resources for designing your course.
Additional Info:
This post offers ideas for different types of final exams and instructions for implementing them effectively. Try using one that fits your course and your students.
Additional Info:
This post offers ideas for different types of final exams and instructions for implementing them effectively. Try using one that fits your course and your students.
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Assessments are a necessary part of gaining knowledge, and they can help point students toward more learning in the future. Learn how to create inspiring assessments that do just that.
Additional Info:
Assessments are a necessary part of gaining knowledge, and they can help point students toward more learning in the future. Learn how to create inspiring assessments that do just that.
Additional Info:
Info page, with files and web links, on Understanding by Design, and approach to "backward course design" developed by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe.
Additional Info:
Info page, with files and web links, on Understanding by Design, and approach to "backward course design" developed by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe.
Additional Info:
Info page on Understanding by Design, on a site to which one of the developers of UbD (Grant Wiggins) contributes.
Additional Info:
Info page on Understanding by Design, on a site to which one of the developers of UbD (Grant Wiggins) contributes.
Additional Info:
Grant Wiggins, one of the developers of "Understanding by Design," proposes standards for course design and offers "prompts" toward a purposefully-designed course. Part of a series of blog posts on the topic.
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Grant Wiggins, one of the developers of "Understanding by Design," proposes standards for course design and offers "prompts" toward a purposefully-designed course. Part of a series of blog posts on the topic.
Additional Info:
How to extract "big picture" open-ended discussion questions (what Understanding by Design calls "Essential Questions") from one's stated learning goals, and to embed them into the syllabus and the course activities.
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How to extract "big picture" open-ended discussion questions (what Understanding by Design calls "Essential Questions") from one's stated learning goals, and to embed them into the syllabus and the course activities.
Additional Info:
A comparison of traditional ("forced-choice") assessment and authentic (performance-based) assessment. "Teaching to the test" ceases to be a problem when the test involves the performance of meaningful tasks that provide evidence of the understandings desired.
Additional Info:
A comparison of traditional ("forced-choice") assessment and authentic (performance-based) assessment. "Teaching to the test" ceases to be a problem when the test involves the performance of meaningful tasks that provide evidence of the understandings desired.
Additional Info:
The "School of the Future" (grades 6-12) describes "authentic assessment" as involving performances that are 1) real-life, 2) engaging for learners, and 3) requiring synthesis and critical thinking. Narrators situate "authentic assessment" in the context of "backward course design."
Additional Info:
The "School of the Future" (grades 6-12) describes "authentic assessment" as involving performances that are 1) real-life, 2) engaging for learners, and 3) requiring synthesis and critical thinking. Narrators situate "authentic assessment" in the context of "backward course design."
Additional Info:
Developed by Northwest Center for Public Health Practice at the University of Washington School of Public Health. Extensive PDF manual on teaching adult learners. Includes suggestions on preparing, teaching, and assessing material. Has worksheets to assist in course planning and delivery.
Additional Info:
Developed by Northwest Center for Public Health Practice at the University of Washington School of Public Health. Extensive PDF manual on teaching adult learners. Includes suggestions on preparing, teaching, and assessing material. Has worksheets to assist in course planning and delivery.
Additional Info:
In an attempt to build a better "intensive course," Torma "does the math" on credit hours, student-directed learning, and instructor-directed learning. This piece provides a helpful framework for anyone working through "seat hour" issues regarding fully online courses, blended/hybrid courses, face-to-face "intensives," or other game-changing learning contexts.
Additional Info:
In an attempt to build a better "intensive course," Torma "does the math" on credit hours, student-directed learning, and instructor-directed learning. This piece provides a helpful framework for anyone working through "seat hour" issues regarding fully online courses, blended/hybrid courses, face-to-face "intensives," or other game-changing learning contexts.
Additional Info:
Article that walks you through your own understandings of diversity, how to creat an inclusive classroom including assignments.
Additional Info:
Article that walks you through your own understandings of diversity, how to creat an inclusive classroom including assignments.
Additional Info:
University of Tennessee (Knoxville) site with a “course design chart” to guide you through the instructional design steps of analyzing, designing, developing delivering, and evaluating an online course. Plus a compendium of teaching tools and a glossary of definitions.
Additional Info:
University of Tennessee (Knoxville) site with a “course design chart” to guide you through the instructional design steps of analyzing, designing, developing delivering, and evaluating an online course. Plus a compendium of teaching tools and a glossary of definitions.
Additional Info:
A user-friendly and practical tool to assist faculty in planning and implementing online courses. Based on the principles of teaching and learning proposed by Chickering & Gamson (1987): Student-Faculty Contact, Cooperation Among Students, Active Learning, Prompt Feedback, Time on Task, High Expectations, and Diverse Talents and Ways of Learning. 
Additional Info:
A user-friendly and practical tool to assist faculty in planning and implementing online courses. Based on the principles of teaching and learning proposed by Chickering & Gamson (1987): Student-Faculty Contact, Cooperation Among Students, Active Learning, Prompt Feedback, Time on Task, High Expectations, and Diverse Talents and Ways of Learning. 
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Textbook Gods: Genre, Text and Teaching Religious Studies

Book
Andreassen, Bengt-Ove; and Lewis, James R., eds.
2014
Equinox Publishing, United Kingdom
BL48.T365 2014
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In recent years there has been a renewed interest in textbooks, partly because they have maintained their position as an important genre. Not too many years ago – and perhaps currently as well – many considered textbooks outdated or archaic compared with technological advances such as the Internet and different kinds of educational software. Despite these changes, textbooks for school subjects and for academic studies ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In recent years there has been a renewed interest in textbooks, partly because they have maintained their position as an important genre. Not too many years ago – and perhaps currently as well – many considered textbooks outdated or archaic compared with technological advances such as the Internet and different kinds of educational software. Despite these changes, textbooks for school subjects and for academic studies continue to be in demand. Textbooks seem to constitute a genre in which established truths are conveyed, and may thus represent stable forces in a world of flux and rapid changes. Textbook Gods offers perspectives on representations of religion and religions in textbooks. The contributions emerge from different contexts, ranging from European countries, to North America, Japan and Australia. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Theoretical Perspectives on Textbooks/Textbooks in Religious Studies Research (Bengt-Ove Andreassen)

ch. 1 Closed and Open Concepts of Religion: The Problem of Essentialism in Teaching about Relilgion (Torsten Hylén)
ch. 2 Establishing Religion through Textbooks: Religions in Japan's "Ethics" Program (Satoko Fujiwara)
ch. 3 Bad Religions and Good Religions: The Representation of Religion and Religious Traditions in a New Swiss Textbook (Katharina Frank)
ch. 4 To Learn about the Other and Get to Know Him: Judaism and the Jewish Community of Quebec as represented in Ethics and Religious Culture Textbooks (Sivane Hirsch and Marie Mc Andrew)
ch. 5 Researching Materials Used to Teach about World Religions in Schools in England (Barbara Wintersgill)
ch. 6 Representations of Indigenous Australian Religions in New South Wales (NSW) Higher School Certificate Studies of Religion Textbooks (Carole M. Cusack)
ch. 7 Visual Engagement: Textbooks and the Materiality of Religion (Mary Hayward)
ch. 8 Cartographic Representations of Religion(s) in Norwegian Textbooks (Suzanne Anett Thobro)
ch. 9 A Reservoir of Symbols: On the Conceptualization of "Religion" in Introductory Books for RE in Teacher Education in Norway (Bengt-Ove Andreasen)
ch. 10 Stones and Bones: Indigenous African Religions and the "Evolution" of World Religions (James R. Lewis)
ch. 11 "Christianity" for "the Christianity" - That is the Question (Annika Hvithamar)
ch. 12 School Bible in the Service of the Danish National Church - A Case Study (Jens-André P. Herbener)
Index
Additional Info:
An online journal publishing original syllabi, assessment instruments, assignments and activities, and articles related to college teaching. "A good syllabus is a piece of original scholarship; a great one is also an art form. A research or theory paper go through peer review process to be recognized and validated; the same process should be available to course materials. This is a small step towards taking college as seriously as we ...
Additional Info:
An online journal publishing original syllabi, assessment instruments, assignments and activities, and articles related to college teaching. "A good syllabus is a piece of original scholarship; a great one is also an art form. A research or theory paper go through peer review process to be recognized and validated; the same process should be available to course materials. This is a small step towards taking college as seriously as we take research."
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Building a Pathway for Student Learning: A How To Guide to Course Design

Book
Jones, Steven K.; Noyd, Robert K.; and Sagendorf, Kenneth S.
2014
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2361.5.J66 2014
Topics: Course Design   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book leads you through the process of designing a learning-centered course. It is written as a “how-to” handbook, providing step-by-step guidance on creating a pathway to student learning, including 26 workboxes (also available free online) that lead you through each element of the course design process and promote a rich reflection process akin to being in a workshop setting. The authors prompt you ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book leads you through the process of designing a learning-centered course. It is written as a “how-to” handbook, providing step-by-step guidance on creating a pathway to student learning, including 26 workboxes (also available free online) that lead you through each element of the course design process and promote a rich reflection process akin to being in a workshop setting. The authors prompt you to (1) consider the distinctive characteristics of your students; (2) clearly articulate your course learning goals; (3) create aligned summative assessments; (4) identify the specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes students will need in order to be successful; (5) craft effective learning experiences, informed by the well-documented research on how people learn; and (6) incorporate formative assessment to ensure you and your students are staying on track.

Completion of the sequence of worksheets leads to a poster as a visual display of your course design. This graphic depiction of your course ties the components together, provides a clear map of action for teaching your course, for modifying as you evaluate the success of particular strategies or want to introduce new concepts, and for developing your syllabus. A rubric for evaluating course posters is included.

For faculty developers, this book provides a proven and ready-made resource and text around which to design or redesign learner-centered course design workshops or multi-day course design retreats, replicating or modifying the renowned workshop that the authors have developed at the Air Force Academy for both faculty new to teaching and those with many years of teaching experience under their belt. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Peter Felten)
Acknowledgments

Part I – Introduction
ch. 1 Our Course Design System and Effective Ways to Use This Book
ch. 2 Principles of Learning-Centered Course Design

Part II – Elements of the Learning Pathway
ch. 3 The Starting Point: Student Learning Factors
ch. 4 Defining the Destination: Learning Goals
ch. 5 Students’ Successful Arrival: Summative Assessment
ch. 6 What Your Students Need to Be Successful: Learning Proficiencies
ch. 7 Travelling the Pathway: Learning Experiences
ch. 8 Staying on Track: Formative Assessment

Part III – Pulling the Elements Together
ch. 9 Visualizing the Learning Pathway: The Course Poster
ch. 10 Students’ Pathway to Success: The Course Syllabus
ch. 11 Anticipating the Challenges Ahead

Appendix A: Rubric for Evaluating Course Posters
Appendix B: Taxonomy of the Psychomotor and Affective domains
Appendix C: Sample Syllabus

References
About the Authors
Index
Article cover image

Can Communicative Principles Enhance Classical Language Acquisition?

Article
Overland, Paul; Fields, Lee; and Noonan, Jennifer
2011
Foreign Language Annals 44 (3), 583-598
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Is it feasible for nonfluent instructors to teach Biblical Hebrew by communicative principles? If it is feasible, will communicative instruction enhance postsecondary learning of a classical language? To begin answering these questions, two consultants representing second language acquisition (SLA) and technology-assisted language learning led 8 Biblical Hebrew instructors and a graduate assistant through a 3-year process involving study of SLA principles, development of Biblical Hebrew classroom manuals, training of teachers, and ...
Additional Info:
Is it feasible for nonfluent instructors to teach Biblical Hebrew by communicative principles? If it is feasible, will communicative instruction enhance postsecondary learning of a classical language? To begin answering these questions, two consultants representing second language acquisition (SLA) and technology-assisted language learning led 8 Biblical Hebrew instructors and a graduate assistant through a 3-year process involving study of SLA principles, development of Biblical Hebrew classroom manuals, training of teachers, and field-testing of materials with more than 90 students in 7 institutions. More than two-thirds of the students and all instructors found the communicative approach both effective and preferable to grammar-translation and audiolingual methods customarily employed for learning classical languages.
Additional Info:
Includes syllabi from a variety of college and university courses, across all disciplines, that have a strong flavor of “civic agency,” the capacity to work across differences to solve public problems, create lasting civic goods, and shape the world around us in democratic ways. The project emphasizes courses that speak to citizens as citizens, concerned about co-creating their communities of different scale.
Additional Info:
Includes syllabi from a variety of college and university courses, across all disciplines, that have a strong flavor of “civic agency,” the capacity to work across differences to solve public problems, create lasting civic goods, and shape the world around us in democratic ways. The project emphasizes courses that speak to citizens as citizens, concerned about co-creating their communities of different scale.
Journal cover image

Team Teaching at the Collegiate Level

Journal Issue
Posman, Ellen; and Locklin, Reid B., eds.
2013
Spotlight on Teaching, October
BL41.S72
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: https://www.aarweb.org/node/1608
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: https://www.aarweb.org/node/1608

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Team Teaching in Religious Studies: Editor's Introduction (Ellen Posman, and Reid B. Locklin)
ch. 2 Embodies Religion, Embodied Teaching: Team Teaching "Food Religion" (Norma Baumel Joseph, and Leslie C. Orr)
ch. 3 Brain, Stomach and Soul (Cara Anthony, and Elsie Amel)
ch. 4 Building Interdisciplinary Networks: Team Teaching Benefits for Religious Studies Professors (Melissa Stewart, and Deborah Field)
ch. 5 Jews and Christians Learn from Memoirs: A Collegially Taught Course (Mary C. Boys, and Sarah Tauber)
ch. 6 Team Teaching India's Identities across State and National Borders (Amy L. Allocco, and Brian K. Pennington)
ch. 7 Team Teaching in Religious Studies: Suggested Resources
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Teaching Asian American Religions and Religiosities

Journal Issue
Lee, Jonathan H. X., (Guest Editor)
2014
Spotlight on Teaching, May
BL41.S72
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: https://www.aarweb.org/node/1905
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: https://www.aarweb.org/node/1905

Table Of Content:
cb. 1 Teaching Asian American Religions and Religiosities: Guest Editor’s Introduction (Jonathan H. X. Lee)
ch. 2 Teaching Asian Religions from within the Asian American Community (Emily S. Wu)
ch. 3 Teaching and Learning through the Manzanar Pilgrimage (Joanne Doi)
ch. 4 Teaching about Asian American Sacred Spaces at a Catholic College (Linh Hoang)
ch. 5 On Learning and Teaching the Art of Sho (Ronald Y. Nakasone)
ch. 6 Asian American Music and Religion: Scaffolding to Teach Hybridity and to Reduce Anxiety (Brett J. Esaki)
ch. 7 Teaching Asian American Islam and Racialization through Film (Rabia Kamal)
ch. 8 Critical Pedagogy for Sikh American Religiosity and Race Jaideep Singh, Sikh American Legal Defense and Education Fund (SALDEF) and Islamophobia Research & Documentation Project at the University of California at Berkeley’s Center for Race & Gender
ch. 9 Vietnamese American Religions within a Transnational Framework (Thien-Huong T. Ninh)
ch. 10 Inserting Christianity into Asian American Studies (Dean Ryuta Adachi)
ch. 11 Suggested Resources
Cover image
Wabash tree

Understanding Bible by Design: Create Courses with Purpose

Book
Lester, G. Brooke
2014
Augsburg Fortress, Minneapolis, MN
BS600.3.L47 2014
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Today’s seminary and religious-education instructors are expected to design and redesign their courses more nimbly than in the past. We have to adapt our courses to novel learning environments, for more diverse learners, toward more diverse vocations. At the same time, institutional rewards for time invested in course design are fewer than ever. Understanding Bible by Design introduces the reader to Understanding ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Today’s seminary and religious-education instructors are expected to design and redesign their courses more nimbly than in the past. We have to adapt our courses to novel learning environments, for more diverse learners, toward more diverse vocations. At the same time, institutional rewards for time invested in course design are fewer than ever. Understanding Bible by Design introduces the reader to Understanding by Design: an approach to course design that is proven time-efficient and grounded in the instructor’s most closely-held convictions about her subject matter’s “big ideas and essential questions.” This book’s contributors (one in Old Testament, one in New Testament, and one in Jewish Studies) demonstrate the value of Understanding Bible by Design for the Biblical Studies instructor, whether at seminary or university, face-to-face or online, from the intimate seminar to the massive MOOC.

Lester’s synopsis of course design and suggested action is followed by a collaborative dialogue with Jane S. Webster and Christopher M. Jones. Webster and Jones provide practical commentary regarding the successful implementation of Lester’s proposed approaches. As a group, Lester, Webster, and Jones create a text that extends pedagogical innovation in inspiring but practical ways. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Setting the Problem (G. Brooke Lester)
ch. 2 Understanding by Design (G. Brooke Lester)
ch. 3 Understanding by Design: Old Testament in Seminary (G. Brooke Lester)
ch. 4 Understanding by Design: Putting Your Course Online(G. Brooke Lester)
ch. 5 Understanding by Design: New Testament at University(Jane S. Webster)
Exhibit 3: Annotated Sample Template for Essay in "New Testament" (Jane S. Webster)
ch. 6 Understanding by Design: Judaism Studies at University (Christopher M. Jones)

Appendix
Exhibit 1: Rubric for Presentations (G. Brooke Lester)
Exhibit 2: All-Purpose Rubric for "Introduction to the Old Testament" (G. Brooke Lester)
Exhibit 4: Interdisciplinary Institutional Rubric for Writing at Barton College (Jane S. Webster)
Exhibit 5: Rubric for Essays in "New Testament"(Jane S. Webster)
Exhibit 6: Rubric for Ritual Analysis Papers in "Ritual and Ritualization" (Christopher M. Jones)
Exhibit 7: Rubric for Drafts in "Space and Place in Early Jewish Literature" (Christopher M. Jones)
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Teaching With And About Games

Journal Issue
2015
Vol. 4, No. 1
Topics: Course Design   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Special issue of “Syllabus,” an online journal that posts annotated syllabi and short-article course descriptions submitted by college and university professors. 
Additional Info:
Special issue of “Syllabus,” an online journal that posts annotated syllabi and short-article course descriptions submitted by college and university professors. 

Table Of Content:
Editorial
Special Issue: Teaching with and about Games (Jennifer deWinter, Carly A. Kocurek)

Syllabi
Video Game Studies (Judd Ethan Ruggill)
How to Play Games of Truth: An Introduction to Video Studies (Bryan Geoffrey Behrenshausen)
Novel Interfaces for Interactive Environments (Robert W. Linderman)
Educational and Serious Game Design: Case Study in Collaboration (Jon A. Preston)
Introduction to Games Design (Nia Wearn)
Representing the Past: (Video Games Challenge to the Historical Narrative (Stephen Ortega)
Learning Through Making: Notes on Teaching Interactive Narrative (Anastasia Salter)
Video Games as a New Form of Interactive Literature (Anne Winchell)
Writing In and Around Games (Wendi Sierra)
Hints, Advice, and Maybe Cheat Codes: An English Topics Course About Computer Games (Kevin Moberly)

Tool Box
Teaching Network Game Programming with the Dragonfly Game Engine (Mark Claypool)
Root of play - Game design for digital humanists (Andy Keenan, Matt Bouchard)
Alternative Reality Games to Teach Game-Based Storytelling (Dean O’Donnell, Jennifer deWinter)
“Continue West and Ascent the Stairs”: Game Walkthroughs in Professional and Technical Communication (Stephanie Vie)
Annotated Bibliography for Game Studies: Modeling Scholarly Research in a Popular Culture Field (Cathlena Martin)
Article cover image

The Anthropology of Christianity Goes to Seminary

Article
King, Rebekka
2014
Religion and Society: Advances in Research, 5, 255-260
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Discoveries by both the professor and the students, in a seminar on the anthropology of Christianity at Candler School of Theology.
Additional Info:
Discoveries by both the professor and the students, in a seminar on the anthropology of Christianity at Candler School of Theology.
Article cover image

Open Space Technology and the Study of Religion: A Report on an Experiment in Pedagogy

Article
Dion, Nicholas; King, Rebekka; Baker, Tyler; Liang, Jingjing; McDonough, James; and Samuels, Joshua
2013
Bulletin For the Study of Religion, Vol. 42, No. 2, April, 28-32
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
This paper, co-authored by two instructors and four of their undergraduate students, details an experimental use of 'Open Space Technology' in a Religion course on social constructionism at the University of Toronto. In addition to describing the format and its purpose, four undergraduate evaluations of the course are offered.
Additional Info:
This paper, co-authored by two instructors and four of their undergraduate students, details an experimental use of 'Open Space Technology' in a Religion course on social constructionism at the University of Toronto. In addition to describing the format and its purpose, four undergraduate evaluations of the course are offered.
Additional Info:
A google docs wiki with effective questions to ask yourself when designing assignments for students when emergencies result in missing face-to-face meetings. Hosted by Suffolk University’s Center for Teaching and Scholarly Excellence. Includes links to other resources. 
Additional Info:
A google docs wiki with effective questions to ask yourself when designing assignments for students when emergencies result in missing face-to-face meetings. Hosted by Suffolk University’s Center for Teaching and Scholarly Excellence. Includes links to other resources. 
Additional Info:
A brief abridgement (37 pages) of Fink’s best-selling book, "Creating Significant Learning Experiences” (2003). A “workshop” to help faculty through the course-design process step by step.
Additional Info:
A brief abridgement (37 pages) of Fink’s best-selling book, "Creating Significant Learning Experiences” (2003). A “workshop” to help faculty through the course-design process step by step.
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Best Practices for Flipping the College Classroom

Book
Waldrop, Julee B. and Bowdon, Melody A., eds.
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2395.7 .B4698 2016
Topics: Course Design   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Best Practices for Flipping the College Classroom provides a comprehensive overview and systematic assessment of the flipped classroom methodology in higher education. The book:

• Reviews various pedagogical theories that inform flipped classroom practice and provides a brief history from its inception in K–12 to its implementation in higher education.

• Offers well-developed and instructive case studies chronicling the implementation of ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Best Practices for Flipping the College Classroom provides a comprehensive overview and systematic assessment of the flipped classroom methodology in higher education. The book:

• Reviews various pedagogical theories that inform flipped classroom practice and provides a brief history from its inception in K–12 to its implementation in higher education.

• Offers well-developed and instructive case studies chronicling the implementation of flipped strategies across a broad spectrum of academic disciplines, physical environments, and student populations.

• Provides insights and suggestions to instructors in higher education for the implementation of flipped strategies in their own courses by offering reflections on learning outcomes and student success in flipped classrooms compared with those employing more traditional models and by describing relevant technologies.

• Discusses observations and analyses of student perceptions of flipping the classroom as well as student practices and behaviors particular to flipped classroom models.

• Illuminates several research models and approaches for use and modification by teacher-scholars interested in building on this research on their own campuses.

The evidence presented on the flipped classroom methodology by its supporters and detractors at all levels has thus far been almost entirely anecdotal or otherwise unreliable. Best Practices for Flipping the College Classroomis the first book to provide faculty members nuanced qualitative and quantitative evidence that both supports and challenges the value of flipping the college classroom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction: Joining the Flipped Classroom Conversation (Erin Saitta, Brett Morrison, Julee B. Waldrop, and Melody A. Bowdon)
ch. 2 Flipping a Large First-Year Chemistry Class: Same-Semester Comparison with a Traditionally Taught Large-Lecture Class (Cherie Yestrebsky)
ch. 3 Flipped Calculus: A Gateway to Lifelong Learning in Mathematics (Robert Talbert)
ch. 4 Flipping the Graduate Course in Nursing: Application to Solve Patients’ Health Problems (Julee B. Waldrop)
ch. 5 Taking Ownership of the Past: Flipping the History Course as a Means of Increasing Student Engagement (Daniel Murphree)
ch. 6 Best Practices for Flipping the College Classroom: Elements of Psychology, an Introductory Psychology Course at the University of Oklahoma (Clarissa Thompson and April Martin)
ch. 7 Flip Don’t Flop: Best Practices for Flipping Marketing Courses (Michael S. Garver)
ch. 8 Don’t Flip Out: Inverting the Intermediate Microeconomics Course (Katherine M. Sauer)
ch. 9 Flipping the Creativity Class: Creating Active-Learning Environments for Student Innovations (Russell Carpenter)
ch. 10 Student Practices and Perceptions in Flipped Courses (Stacey Pigg and Brett Morrison)
ch. 11 Conclusion: Reflecting on the Flipping Experience (Melody A. Bowdon, Lissa Pompos Mansfield, and Julee B. Waldrop)

Contributors
Index
Article cover image

A Theory and Method of Comparison - Parts 1 and 2

Article
Bassett, Molly and Levine, Sarah
2015
Religious Studies News, September 14,
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Georgia State University associate professor of religious studies, Molly Bassett, writes about a dual-level course she's teaching for a third time this fall titled "Religious Dimensions in Human Experience.” Part 2, is a reflection by one of her former graduate students, Sarah Levine, who took the course the first time Bassett taught it in the fall of 2010.
Additional Info:
Georgia State University associate professor of religious studies, Molly Bassett, writes about a dual-level course she's teaching for a third time this fall titled "Religious Dimensions in Human Experience.” Part 2, is a reflection by one of her former graduate students, Sarah Levine, who took the course the first time Bassett taught it in the fall of 2010.
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Creating Courses for Adults: Design for Learning

Book
St. Clari, Ralf
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5215.S7425 2015
Topics: Course Design   |   Adult Learners

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Become an effective adult educator by approaching teaching systematically

As the author describes at the beginning of Creating Courses for Adults, "The big idea of this book is that education for adults has to be designed." Whether in basic skills training, English language classes, professional development workshops, personal interest courses, or formal degree programs, good teaching tends to conceal all the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Become an effective adult educator by approaching teaching systematically

As the author describes at the beginning of Creating Courses for Adults, "The big idea of this book is that education for adults has to be designed." Whether in basic skills training, English language classes, professional development workshops, personal interest courses, or formal degree programs, good teaching tends to conceal all the planning and decisions which had to be made in order to present participants with a seamless and coherent process for learning. The author posits that nobody is a completely intuitive teacher and that everybody has to make a series of choices as they put courses together. The decisions they make are important and far-reaching, and deserve to be considered carefully.

Starting with the three core factors which must be taken into account when creating courses, Creating Courses for Adults walks readers through a manageable process for addressing the key decisions which must be made in order to design effective learning.

- Instructor factors are what the teacher brings to the teaching and learning process, such as experience and preferences.
- Learner factors are the influences that students bring with them, including their past experiences and expectations for the class.
- Context factors include the educational setting, whether in-person or online, as well as the subject matter.

Readers of Creating Courses for Adults will learn a systematic approach to lesson and course design based on research into the ways adults learn and the best ways to reach them, along with pointers and tips for teaching adults in any setting. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Why Design?
Perspective on Learning
Further Information
Acknowledgments
About the Author

PART ONE - Core Factors in Teaching
ch. 1 All About You
Why Who You Are and What You’ve Done Matters
Reflecting on Your Approach
What Are We Doing It For?
Why Identity Matters
Going Further
Conclusion: Pulling It Together

ch. 2 Engaged and Involved Learners
How Do People Learn?
Engagement in Learning
Learner Diversity
Responding to Diversity
Conclusion: Making Difference Matter

ch. 3 Context Drives Design
Why Context Matters
Ball Gown or Boots: Formality
Wired Learning
Organizational Context
The Aims of the Course
Time, or the Lack Thereof
Somewhere to Sit: Physical Resources
Conclusion

PART TWO - The Key Decisions
ch. 4 Knowing Where You Are Going
Objectives—And Some Objections
The Educator
The Learners
The Context
Conclusion

ch. 5 Content and Resources for Learning
Information and Objects
Resources and Materials
The Educator
The Learners
The Context
Conclusion

ch. 6 Ways of Working Together
The Range of Methods
The Educator
The Learners
The Context
Conclusion

ch. 7 What Do the Learners Say?
Designing Evaluation
The Educator
The Learners
The Context
Conclusion

ch. 8 Making Learning Visible
Counting What Counts
The Educator
The Learners
The Context
Conclusion

ch. 9 You Can Take It with You!
Moving Learning beyond the Course
The Educator
The Learners
The Context
Conclusion

ch. 10 Design Frames Practice
The Book in a Box
An Example of a Program Design
For New Educators of Adults

Conclusion
References
Appendix A: A Blank Design Framework
Appendix B: Where to Find Further Resources
Index
TTR cover image

Teaching Introductory Upper-Level Religion and Theology Classes

TTR
Clingerman, Forrest and O'Brien, Kevin J.
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 4 (2015): 326-342
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 4 2015
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
The undergraduate study of religion is predominantly undertaken by non-majors who are meeting a general education requirement. This means that, while curricular discussions make important distinctions between the work of lower- and upper-division courses, many religion and theology faculty are teaching hybrid courses that we call “introductory upper-level courses.” These play an introductory role in general education while also serving the study of religion in a more advanced way. Attention ...
Additional Info:
The undergraduate study of religion is predominantly undertaken by non-majors who are meeting a general education requirement. This means that, while curricular discussions make important distinctions between the work of lower- and upper-division courses, many religion and theology faculty are teaching hybrid courses that we call “introductory upper-level courses.” These play an introductory role in general education while also serving the study of religion in a more advanced way. Attention to how these courses fit into multiple curricular goals will be important for the scholarship of teaching and learning in religious studies and theology. This essay draws on scholarship about introductory teaching and a survey of faculty about introductory upper-level courses to argue that the content of such courses should be understood as serving the study of religion at an advanced level, the context should be understood as introducing general education goals, and the goals for intellectual growth must strike a challenging balance between the two.
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Experiential Education in the College Context: What it is, How it Works, and Why it Matters

Book
Roberts, Jay W.
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2331.R53 2016
Topics: Course Design   |   Learning Designs   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Experiential Education in the College Context provides college and university faculty with pedagogical approaches that engage students and support high-impact learning. Organized around four essential categories—active learning, integrated learning, project-based learning, and community-based learning—this resource offers examples from across disciplines to illustrate principles and best practices for designing and implementing experiential curriculum in the college and university setting. Framed by theory, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Experiential Education in the College Context provides college and university faculty with pedagogical approaches that engage students and support high-impact learning. Organized around four essential categories—active learning, integrated learning, project-based learning, and community-based learning—this resource offers examples from across disciplines to illustrate principles and best practices for designing and implementing experiential curriculum in the college and university setting. Framed by theory, this book provides practical guidance on a range of experiential teaching and learning approaches, including internships, civic engagement, project-based research, service learning, game-based learning, and inquiry learning. At a time when rising tuition, consumer-driven models, and e-learning have challenged the idea of traditional liberal education, this book provides a compelling discussion of the purposes of higher education and the role experiential education plays in sustaining and broadening notions of democratic citizenship. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Foreword

Part One: Landscape of Experiential Education
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Defining Experiential Education
ch. 3 Models and Methodologies of Experiential Education
ch. 4 The Instructional Paradigm: Leaving Safe Harbors

Part Two: Principles and Practices of Experiential Education
ch. 5 Design and Experiential Education
ch. 6 Facilitation and Experiential Education
ch. 7 Assessment and Experiential Education
ch. 8 The Integrated, Experiential Campus

Afterword
TTR cover image

An Intriguing Third Way: Mapping Contextual Education for Curricular Integration

TTR
Wigg-Stevenson, Natalie
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 1 (2016): 41-56
BL41.T4 v.19 no.1
Topics: Course Design   |   Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
This article emerges from the experience of incorporating doctoral students into our Contextual Education (CXE) Program at Emmanuel College (Toronto). This change, I argue, helped us to distinguish more clearly among and thus distinctly orient the different kinds of relationships and theological practices that make up our program towards the often-elusive goal of curricular integration. After outlining a definition of integration, I contextualize that definition in our particular practices at ...
Additional Info:
This article emerges from the experience of incorporating doctoral students into our Contextual Education (CXE) Program at Emmanuel College (Toronto). This change, I argue, helped us to distinguish more clearly among and thus distinctly orient the different kinds of relationships and theological practices that make up our program towards the often-elusive goal of curricular integration. After outlining a definition of integration, I contextualize that definition in our particular practices at Emmanuel College using Kathryn Tanner's (1997) understanding of theology as a cultural practice as my guide. I then offer a brief overview of our CXE Programs to demonstrate how nurturing strategic partnerships within them has made certain forms of integration possible for our students. I close with some activities for practical application in other CXE contexts.
TTR cover image

Forum: Crafting the Introductory Course in Religious Studies

TTR
McCutcheon, Russell T.; Hollander, Aaron T.; Durdin, Andrew F.; Gardner, Kellli A.; Miller, Adam T.; and Crews, Emily D.
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 1 (2016): 78-98
BL41.T4 v.19 no.1
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
This series of short essays considers the complex choices and decision-making processes of instructors preparing to teach, and continuing to teach, introductory courses in religious studies. In a paper originally presented in the University of Chicago's “The Craft of Teaching in the Academic Study of Religion” series, Russell McCutcheon explores a “baker's dozen” of such choices and the larger pedagogical problems with which they are entwined, ranging from classic questions ...
Additional Info:
This series of short essays considers the complex choices and decision-making processes of instructors preparing to teach, and continuing to teach, introductory courses in religious studies. In a paper originally presented in the University of Chicago's “The Craft of Teaching in the Academic Study of Religion” series, Russell McCutcheon explores a “baker's dozen” of such choices and the larger pedagogical problems with which they are entwined, ranging from classic questions of skill development and content coverage to philosophical concerns around students' identification with their topics of study and institutional concerns around governance and assessment. Aaron Hollander provides a brief introduction and four doctoral students at the University of Chicago Divinity School respond to McCutcheon's essay, widening its scope, testing its applicability, and interrogating its undergirding suppositions from the perspective of early-career educators in the field.
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Sample Syllabi (and Other Resources) in Interfaith and Interreligious Studies

Web
Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC)
Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC), Chicago, IL
Topics: Course Design   |   Religious Diversity   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Syllabi of five courses taught within new interfaith and interreligious studies programs. Also  model student learning outcomes and curricular programs. 
Additional Info:
Syllabi of five courses taught within new interfaith and interreligious studies programs. Also  model student learning outcomes and curricular programs. 
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The Blended Course Design Workbook: A Practical Guide

Book
Linder, Kathryn E.
2017
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1028.5.L56 2017
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Blended (also called hybrid) classrooms, in which face-to-face interaction is intentionally combined with online activities to aid student learning, are becoming more and more common. Most recently, “flipped” classrooms have become a popular method for teaching because more time for active learning in-class can be gained by moving content delivery such as lecture to outside-of-class homework using technology tools such as video or lecture capture. The blended model is proving ...
Additional Info:
Blended (also called hybrid) classrooms, in which face-to-face interaction is intentionally combined with online activities to aid student learning, are becoming more and more common. Most recently, “flipped” classrooms have become a popular method for teaching because more time for active learning in-class can be gained by moving content delivery such as lecture to outside-of-class homework using technology tools such as video or lecture capture. The blended model is proving to be an environment that provides more self-directed, technology-mediated learning experiences for students who will be incorporating technology more and more into their professional lives post-college.

The Blended Course Design Workbook meets the need for a user-friendly resource that provides faculty members and administrators with instructions, activities, tools, templates, and deadlines to guide them through the process of revising their traditional face-to-face course into a blended format.

Providing a step-by-step course design process that emphasizes active learning and student engagement, this book will help instructors adapt traditional face-to-face courses to a blended environment by guiding them through the development of course goals and learning objectives, assignments, assessments, and student support mechanisms with technology integration in mind. It will also help instructors choose the right technologies based on an instructor’s comfort level with technology and their specific pedagogical needs. The book will help each instructor who uses the text to develop a unique course by making choices about their course design based on student learning needs for their chosen topic and discipline. Every component of the workbook has been piloted with faculty designing and implementing blended courses and then revised to better meet the needs of faculty across a range of comfort levels with technology use.

The Blended Course Design Workbook includes detailed instructions for each stage of course design alongside specific activities that the reader can complete. The book is unique because it facilitates a step-by-step process for blended course design with specific templates and tools that can be used across disciplines. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Tables, Figures and Boxes
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Why Blended, Why Now?
ch. 1 Fundamentals of Blended Teaching and Learning
ch. 2 Writing Course Goals and Learning Objectives--With Danny Fontaine
ch. 3 Assessing Student Learning in Your Blended Course
ch. 4 Online Assessment Tools--With Linda Bruenjes
ch. 5 Designing Effective Learning Activities
ch. 6 Mapping Your Blended Course
ch. 7 Getting to Know Your Learning Management System--With Sarah Smith
ch. 8 Creating Social Presence in Your Blended Course--With Victoria Wallace
ch. 9 Finding Resources Online
ch. 10 Creating Multimedia Resources
ch. 11 Mobile Devices, Apps, and Social Media--With Victoria Wallace
ch. 12 The Blended Course Syllabus
ch. 13 Preparing Your Students for Success

Conclusion: Getting Ready to Launch
Glossary
Appendices
References
About the Contributors
Index
Cover image

Cases and Course Design

Journal Issue
Stivers, Robert L., ed.
1990
Spotlight on Teaching 5, no. 1 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Cases and Course Design (Robert L. Stivers)
ch. 2 Case Writing and Teaching in a Seminary: Reflecting on Ministry Experience (V. Sue Zabel)
ch. 3 Law and Order: Waco, Texas, 1993, Revisited (Leland E. Elhard)
ch. 4 Sopater's Body (David E. Frederickson)
ch. 5 Adult Learners, Feminist Practices, and the Use of Cases (Carol Allen)
ch. 6 A Study of Case Studies (Anne Reissner)
ch. 7 Case Studies and the Teaching of History (Garth M. Rosell)
Cover image

Teaching Buddhism: New Insights on Understanding and Presenting the Traditions

Book
Lewis, Todd; and DeAngelis, Gary, eds.
2016
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
BQ158.T43 2017
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Buddhist studies is a rapidly changing field of research, constantly transforming and adapting to new scholarship. This creates a problem for instructors, both in a university setting and in monastic schools, as they try to develop a curriculum based on a body of scholarship that continually shifts in focus and expands to new areas.

Teaching Buddhism establishes a dialogue between the community of instructors of Buddhism and leading ...
Additional Info:
Buddhist studies is a rapidly changing field of research, constantly transforming and adapting to new scholarship. This creates a problem for instructors, both in a university setting and in monastic schools, as they try to develop a curriculum based on a body of scholarship that continually shifts in focus and expands to new areas.

Teaching Buddhism establishes a dialogue between the community of instructors of Buddhism and leading scholars in the field who are updating, revising, and correcting earlier understandings of Buddhist traditions. Each chapter presents new ideas within a particular theme of Buddhist studies and explores how courses can be enhanced with these insights. Contributors in the first section focus on the typical approaches, figures, and traditions in undergraduate courses, such as the role of philosophy in Buddhism, Nagarjuna, Yogacara Buddhism, tantric traditions, and Zen Buddhism. They describe the impact of recent developments-like new studies in the cognitive sciences-on scholarship in those areas. Part Two examines how political engagement and ritual practice have shaped the tradition throughout its history. Focus then shifts to the issues facing instructors of Buddhism-dilemmas for the scholar-practitioner in the academic and monastic classroom, the tradition's possible roles in teaching feminism and diversity, and how to present the tradition in the context of a world religions course. In the final section, contributors offer stories of their own experiences teaching, paying particular attention to the ways in which American culture has impacted them. They discuss the development of courses on American Buddhism; using course material on the family and children; the history and trajectory of a Buddhist-Christian dialog; and Buddhist bioethics, environmentalism, economic development, and social justice. In synthesizing this vast and varied body of research, the contributors in this volume have provided an invaluable service to the field (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1: Updating Perennial Course Subjects
1) Teaching Buddhism as Philosophy - Mark Siderits
2) Teaching Nagarjuna - Roger R. Jackson
3) Teaching Yogacara Buddhism Using Cognitive Science - William S. Waldron
4) Teaching Tantric Buddhism in an Undergraduate Classroom Context - David B. Gray
5) Rethinking the Teaching of Zen Buddhism - Steven Heine
Part 2: Reimagining the Content of "Buddhism"
6) In Defense of the Dharma: Buddhists and Politics - Thomas Borchert and Ian Harris
7) Conveying Buddhist Tradition through its Rituals - Todd Lewis
Part 3: Issues in Teaching, Practice, and Connecting Students with the Tradition
8) Teaching Buddhism in the Western Academy - Jan Willis
9) Teaching Buddhist History to Buddhist Practitioners - Rita M. Gross
10) Deconstructing Identity Categories and Cultivating Appreciation for Diversity: Teaching Buddhism and Feminism - Hsiao-Lan Hu
11) Teaching Buddhism in the World Religions Course - Challenges and Promise - Gary DeAngelis
Part 4: Buddhism and the American Context
12) When The Iron Bird Flies: Seeking Western Buddhism in the Classroom - Charles Prebish
13) Conveying Buddhism in the Classroom: Working with Assumptions on Family and Children - Vanessa R. Sasson
14) Teaching Engaged Buddhism in Uncertain Times - Christopher Queen
Part 5: Buddhism in New Academic Fields
15) History of Buddhist-Christian Dialogue - Paul O. Ingram
16) Teaching Buddhist Bioethics - Damien Keown
17) Buddhist Environmentalism - Leslie E. Sponsel and Poranee Natadecha-Sponsel
18) Buddhism and Economic Development - Laszlo Zsolnai
19) "We Can Do No Less:" Buddhism and Social Justice - Anna Brown
Cover image

Dancing in the Rain: Leading with Compassion, Vitality, and Mindfulness in Education

Book
Murphy, Jerome T.
2016
Harvard Education Publishing Group
LB1025.3.M875 2016
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Dancing in the Rain offers a lively and accessible guide aimed at helping education leaders thrive under pressure by developing the inner strengths of mindfulness and self-compassion, expressing emotions wisely, and maintaining a clear focus on the values that matter most. Jerome T. Murphy, a scholar and former dean who has written and taught about the inner life of education leaders, argues that the main barrier to thriving as leaders ...
Additional Info:
Dancing in the Rain offers a lively and accessible guide aimed at helping education leaders thrive under pressure by developing the inner strengths of mindfulness and self-compassion, expressing emotions wisely, and maintaining a clear focus on the values that matter most. Jerome T. Murphy, a scholar and former dean who has written and taught about the inner life of education leaders, argues that the main barrier to thriving as leaders is not the outside pressures we face, but how we respond to them inside our minds and hearts.

In this concise volume, Murphy draws on a combination of Eastern contemplative traditions and Western psychology, as well as his own experience and research in the field of education leadership. He presents a series of exercises and activities to help educators take discomfort more in stride, savor the joys and satisfactions of leadership work, and thrive as effective leaders guided by heartfelt values.

Every day, education leaders find themselves swamped in a maelstrom of pressures that add to the complex challenges of educating all students to a high level. With humor and compassion, Dancing in the Rain shows educators how to lead lives of consequence and purpose in the face of life’s inescapable downpours. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward
Introduction
PART I Drowning in the Rain
Ch 1. The Difficulties of Leadership
Ch 2. Making a Hard Job Harder

PART II Introducing MY DANCE
Ch 3. The MY DANCE Framework
Ch 4. Getting Ready to Dance

PART III MY DANCE, Step by Step< .b>
ch 5. Mind Your Values
ch 6. Yield to Now
Ch 7. Disentangle from Upsets
Ch 8. Allow Unease
Ch 9. Nourish Yourself
Ch 10. Cherish Self-Compassion Ch 11. Express Feelings Wisely

PART IV Putting It All Together
Ch 12. Pick Up Your Feet and Dance

Appendix
Cover image

Breakaway Learners Strategies for Post-Secondary Success with At-Risk Students

Book
Gross, Karen
2017
Teachers College Press
LC4069.6.G76 2017
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
This powerful book explores how institutions of higher education can successfully serve “breakaway” students—first-generation, low-income students who are trying to break away from the past in order to create a more secure future. The gap between low-SES and high-SES students persists as efforts to close it have not met with great success. In this provocative book, Gross offers a new approach to addressing ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
This powerful book explores how institutions of higher education can successfully serve “breakaway” students—first-generation, low-income students who are trying to break away from the past in order to create a more secure future. The gap between low-SES and high-SES students persists as efforts to close it have not met with great success. In this provocative book, Gross offers a new approach to addressing inequities by focusing on students who have succeeded despite struggling with the impacts of poverty and trauma. Gross draws on her experience as a college president to outline practical steps that postsecondary institutions can take to create structures of support and opportunity that build reciprocal trust. Students must trust their institutions and professors, professors must trust their students, and eventually students must learn to trust themselves. Visit the book’s website at breakawaylearners.com.(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Can You See the Stars at Night?
ch. 2 Anchoring Lasticity
ch. 3 Who Are Our Students?-Now and Into the Future
ch. 4 Breakaway Students and Culture Change
ch. 5 Yes, the Positives of Toxic Stress and Trauma
ch. 6 Elasticity: One of the Lasticity's Building Blocks
ch. 7 The Untapped Power of Plasticity
ch. 8 Pivoting right
ch. 9 Lasticity's Reciprocal Heart
ch. 10 Belief in Self Isn't Easy
ch. 11 Animating Lasticity on a College Campus
ch. 12 Lasticity Goes Big
ch. 13 Lasticity's Hurdles and How to Surmount Them
ch. 14 Money and Its Meaning
ch 15. Lasticity's Growing Urgency
ch. 16. Lasticity's Entrance into the Lexicon
ch. 17. Promises Made and Kept

Notes
Additional Relevant Readings
Index
About the Author
Books Received
Index To Volume
Cover image

Social Presence in Online Learning - Multiple Perspectives on Practice and Research

Book
Whiteside, Aimee L.;Garrett Dikkers, Amy; Swan, Karen
2017
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB1044.87.S6178 2017
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Social presence continues to emerge as a key factor for successful online and blended learning experiences. It is commonly described as the degree to which online participants feel connected to one another. Understanding social presence with its critical connections to community-building, retention, and learning outcomes allows faculty and instructional designers to better support and engage students. This volume, Social Presence in Online Learning, addresses ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Social presence continues to emerge as a key factor for successful online and blended learning experiences. It is commonly described as the degree to which online participants feel connected to one another. Understanding social presence with its critical connections to community-building, retention, and learning outcomes allows faculty and instructional designers to better support and engage students. This volume, Social Presence in Online Learning, addresses the evolution of social presence with three distinct perspectives, outlines the relevant research, and focuses on practical strategies that can immediately impact the teaching and learning experience. These strategies include creating connections to build community, applying content to authentic situations, integrating a careful mix of tools and media, leveraging reflective and interactive opportunities, providing early and continuous feedback, designing with assessment in mind, and encouraging change in small increments. Because student satisfaction and motivation plays a key role in retention rates and because increased social presence often leads to enriched learning experiences, it is advantageous to mindfully integrate social presence into learning environments.

Social Presence in Online Learning brings together eminent scholars in the field to distinguish among three different perspectives of social presence and to address how these viewpoints immediately inform practice. This important volume:

• Provides an overview of the evolution of social presence, key findings from social presence research, and practical strategies that can improve the online and blended learning experience

• Differentiates three distinct perspectives on social presence and explains the ideas and models that inform these perspectives

• Explores specific ways in which social presence relates to course satisfaction, retention, and outcomes

• Offers practical implications and ready-to-use techniques that are applicable to multiple disciplines

• Introduces current research on social presence by prominent researchers in the field with direct inferences to the practice of online and blended learning

• Looks at future directions for social presence

Social Presence in Online Learning is appropriate for practitioners, researchers and academics involved in any level of online learning program design, course design, instruction, support, and leadership as well as for graduate students studying educational technology, technology-enhanced learning, and online and blended learning. It brings together multiple perspectives on social presence from the most influential scholars in the field to help shape the future of online and blended learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword (Michael Grahame Moore, Series Editor)
Foreword (Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena)
Acknowledgements

Part One: Introduction to Social Presence in Online Learning
ch. 1. Multiple Perspectives on Social Presence in Online Learning: An Introduction to This Volume (Karen Swan)
ch. 2. Social Presence: Understanding Connections Among Definitions, Theory, Measurements, and Practice (Amy Garrett Dikkers,; Aimee L. Whiteside; Bethany Tap

Part Two: Understanding Social Presence as Technologically Facilitated
ch. 3. Understanding Social Presence as Technologically Facilitated: Introduction to Part Two (Karen Swan) ch. 4. Social Presence and Communication Technologies: Tales of Trial and Error (Patrick Lowenthal; Dave Mulder)
ch.. 5. Evolvements of Social Presence in Open and Networked Learning Environments (Chih-Hsiung Tu)

Part Three: Understanding Social Presence as Learners' Perceptions ch. 6. Understanding Social Presence as Learners’ Perceptions: Introduction to Part Three (Karen Swan)
ch. 7. Social Presence and the Community of Inquiry Framework (Karen Swan; Jennifer C. Richardson)
ch. 8. Social Presence and Student Success: Retention, Satisfaction, and Evolving Expectations (Phil Ice; Melissa Layne; Wally Boston)
ch. 9. Instructor Social Presence: Learners' Needs and a Neglected Component of the Community of Inquiry Framework (Jennifer C. Richardson; Patrick Lowenthal)
ch. 10. Creating Social Cues through Self-Disclosures, Stories, and Paralanguage: The Importance of Modeling High Social Presence Behaviors in Online Courses (Jessica Gordon)
ch. 11. Cultural Perspectives on Social Presence: Research and Practical Guidelines for Online Design (Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena)

Part Four: Understanding Social Presence as a Critical Literacy
ch. 12. Understanding Social Presence as a Critical Literacy: Introduction to Part Four (Aimee L. Whiteside)
ch. 13. Making Learning Relevant and Meaningful: Integrating Social Presence into Faculty Professional Development Programs (Aimee L. Whiteside)
ch. 14. Blending Face-to-Face and Online Instruction to Disrupt Learning, Inspire Reflection, and Create Space for Innovation (Amy Garrett Dikkers; Aimee L. Whiteside; Somer Lewis)
ch. 15. Personalized Learning to Meet the Needs of Diverse Learners (Somer Lewis; Amy Garrett Dikkers; Aimee L. Whiteside)
ch. 16. Overcoming Isolation Online: Strategies to Enhance Social Presence in Practice (Aimee L. Whiteside; Amy Garrett Dikkers; Somer Lewis)

Section V: Concluding Thoughts ch. 17. Future Directions for Social Presence: Shared Metacognition, Emerging Technologies, and the New Educational Ecosystem (Jason C. Vickers; Peter Shea)
ch. 18. The Future of Social Presence: Advancing Research, Uniting the Perspectives, and Allowing for Innovation in Practice (Aimee L. Whiteside; Karen Swan; Amy Garrett Dikkers)

Editors and Contributors
Index
Cover image

Jump-Start Your Online Classroom: Mastering Five Challenges in Five Days

Book
Stein, David S.; Wanstreet, Constance E.
2017
Stylus Publishing, Llc.
LB1044.87.S83 2017
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Every year, more online or technology-enhanced learning experiences are added to the landscape of education, and the number of students taking online courses on residential campuses continues to grow. In addition, new instructional tools are creating environments that are mobile, interactive, and collaborative. These trends present challenges to the online classroom, and this book will help instructors meet those challenges.

Jump-Start Your Online Classroom prepares a first-time online ...
Additional Info:
Every year, more online or technology-enhanced learning experiences are added to the landscape of education, and the number of students taking online courses on residential campuses continues to grow. In addition, new instructional tools are creating environments that are mobile, interactive, and collaborative. These trends present challenges to the online classroom, and this book will help instructors meet those challenges.

Jump-Start Your Online Classroom prepares a first-time online instructor to successfully manage the first few weeks of a course, including activities to help instructors plan, manage, and facilitate online instruction; and provides resources helpful during the beginning weeks of class. Each chapter is developed around the immediate challenges instructors face when teaching online. The authors address everyday problems and suggest solutions informed by their extensive research and experience. The five challenges, which are designed to be addressed in five days, are to:
• Make the transition to online teaching
• Build online spaces for learning
• Prepare students for online learning
• Manage and facilitating the online classroom
• Assess learner outcomes in an online classroom

The book is based on the authors’ design and facilitation model that identifies five elements comprising an online learning environment: digital tools, participants, social practices, learning community, and outcomes. The book shows how each of those aspects influences instructional practices and interacts to create an environment for a meaningful online educational experience. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch 1. The Online Environment

First Challenge: Making the Transition to Online Teaching
ch 2. Are You Ready to Teach Online?
ch 3. Addressing Concerns About Teaching Online
ch 4. Thinking and Acting Like an Online Instructor

Second Challenge: Building Online Spaces for Learning
ch 5. Building Spaces and Places for Learning

Third Challenge: Preparing Students for Online Learning
ch 6. Preparing Your Students for Online Learning

Fourth Challenge: Managing and Facilitating the Online Classroom
ch 7. Managing and Facilitating the Online Classroom

Fifth Challenge: Assessing Learner Outcomes
ch 8. Assessing Learning in the Online Classroom
ch 9. Reflecting on Your Experience
ch 10. Challenge for the Future: Building Knowledge

Appendices
References
About the Authors
Index
Article cover image

"Accelerated Learning: A Study of Faculty and Student Experiences"

Article
Lee, Nicolette; Horsfall, Briony
2010
Innovative Higher Education, Vol. 35, No. 3 (June 2010)
Topics: Course Design   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
In this study we explored faculty and student experiences of accelerated learning. We conducted interviews with faculty members who had delivered the same course in 12 and 6-week timeframes, and we analysed a student survey. Students reported overall positive experiences in the accelerated courses, particularly in the social aspects of learning, higher than usual motivation, and confidence in their learning. However, both faculty and students raised concerns about the scope and ...
Additional Info:
In this study we explored faculty and student experiences of accelerated learning. We conducted interviews with faculty members who had delivered the same course in 12 and 6-week timeframes, and we analysed a student survey. Students reported overall positive experiences in the accelerated courses, particularly in the social aspects of learning, higher than usual motivation, and confidence in their learning. However, both faculty and students raised concerns about the scope and timing of assessment tasks, student workload expectations, faculty workload, and administration of courses. We offer recommendations regarding implementation, assessment practices, and management of learning in an accelerated timeframe.
Article cover image

"Intensive Mode Teaching Good Practice Report"

Article
Male, Sally; Baillie, Caroline; Hancock, Phil; Leggoe, Jeremy; MacNish, Cara; Crispin, Stuart
2017
Topics: Course Design   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Intensive mode teaching involves classes on fewer days and for longer on each day than is traditional in the discipline. The mode is used increasingly in universities in Australia. In a national research project, we developed an Intensive Mode Teaching Guide based on a survey of 105 coordinators of intensive mode units at 26 universities, and investigations in 8 intensive mode units at 4 universities. The guide was reviewed by 161 university staff members at 10 ...
Additional Info:
Intensive mode teaching involves classes on fewer days and for longer on each day than is traditional in the discipline. The mode is used increasingly in universities in Australia. In a national research project, we developed an Intensive Mode Teaching Guide based on a survey of 105 coordinators of intensive mode units at 26 universities, and investigations in 8 intensive mode units at 4 universities. The guide was reviewed by 161 university staff members at 10 workshops, and 27 students in a survey. Threshold capability theory and threshold concept theory were used. We found that intensive mode offers opportunities including a retreat-like focus; development of learning communities; and time and flexibility for interactive, practical, and authentic activities that provide exposure to practice and/or practitioners. However, intensive mode also increases risks such as students falling behind. We recommend that teachers intentionally design to optimise the benefits and mitigate the risks.
Article cover image

"Teaching Compressed-Format Courses: Teacher-Based Best Practices"

Article
Kops, William J.
2014
Canadian Journal of University continuing Education, Vol. 40, No. 1 (Spring 2014)
Topics: Course Design   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This study provides insight into how highly rated instructors approached teaching compressed summer session courses, and offers a set of best practices that others might use when teaching in similar settings. Top-rated instructors indicated differences in the way they taught compressed-format summer session courses, with respect to course planning, classroom instruction, student assessment, and interaction with students. The study is of value to continuing educators, as universities are increasingly challenged ...
Additional Info:
This study provides insight into how highly rated instructors approached teaching compressed summer session courses, and offers a set of best practices that others might use when teaching in similar settings. Top-rated instructors indicated differences in the way they taught compressed-format summer session courses, with respect to course planning, classroom instruction, student assessment, and interaction with students. The study is of value to continuing educators, as universities are increasingly challenged to think about flexible delivery models, including teaching and learning in compressed formats.
Article cover image

"Attributes of High-Quality Intensive Courses"

Article
Scott, Patricia A.
2003
New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, No. 97 (Spring 2003)
Topics: Course Design   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This chapter outlines the best teaching strategies to use in intensive courses to achieve the best possible learning outcomes.
Additional Info:
This chapter outlines the best teaching strategies to use in intensive courses to achieve the best possible learning outcomes.