Assessing Teaching

Scholarship On Teaching - Topic: Assessing Teaching - 84 results

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Making Teaching Community Property: A Menu for Peer Collaboration and Peer Review

Book
Hutchings, Pat
1996
American Association for Higher Education, Washington, D.C.
LB1778.2.H87 1996
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Describes strategies through which faculty can document and "go public" with their teaching - be it for purposes of improvement or evaluation. Each of nine chapters features a different strategy - from the fairly simple, low-risk "teaching circle," to "course portfolios," to more formal departmental occasions such as faculty hiring - with reports by faculty who have actually tried each strategy, guidelines for good practice, and an annotated list of ...
Additional Info:
Describes strategies through which faculty can document and "go public" with their teaching - be it for purposes of improvement or evaluation. Each of nine chapters features a different strategy - from the fairly simple, low-risk "teaching circle," to "course portfolios," to more formal departmental occasions such as faculty hiring - with reports by faculty who have actually tried each strategy, guidelines for good practice, and an annotated list of resources. Offers lessons campuses can use to create more effective systems for the formal evaluation and reward of teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface by Russell Edgerton
Introduction

ch. 1 Teaching Circles: Starting the Conversation; Setting a Scholarly Tone Teaching Circles in the History Department at Kent State University by John Jameson; Fostering Collective Responsibility for Student Learning Teaching Seminars in the University of North Carolina at Charlotte Mathematics Department by Charles Burnap and Miriam Leiva; Learning Together An Online Faculty Conversation About Online Student Conversation at Rio Hondo College by Susan Obler

ch. 2 Reciprocal Visits and Observations: Opening the Classroom Door; Reciprocal Classroom Visits An Experiment in the Temple University History Department by William Cutler and Howard Spodek; The Teacher Observation/Peer Support (TOPS) Program at California State University-Dominguez Hills by Kathleen McEnerney and Jamie L. Webb; The Featured Faculty Program at Eastern Michigan University byDeborah DeZure

ch. 3 Mentoring: Teachers Teaching Other Teachers; A New Faculty Mentoring Program in the Stanford English Department byDavid Halliburton;The Faculty Tutorial Program at Saint Olaf College by Jonathan Hill; The Issue of Supply Fostering Senior Faculty Leadership at The College of Saint Catherine by Marilou Eldred

ch. 4 A Focus on Student Learning; Interviewing Each Other's Students in the Legal Studies Program at the University of Georgia by Peter Shedd; Classroom Assessment as a Context for Faculty Conversation and Collaboration at California State University-Long Beach by Susan Nummedal; Making Students More Active Agents in Their Learning TQM in the Syracuse University School of Business by Frances Zollers

ch. 5 Portfolios: Putting the Pieces Together; Inventing a New Genre The Course Portfolio at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse by William Cerbin; Developing a Course Portfolio in Math A Report From the University of Nebraska-Lincoln by Steve Dunbar

ch. 6 Team Teaching and Teaching Teams; Teaching Teams in the Math Department at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln by Steve Dunbar; A Team Approach to Course Design and Teaching in an Integrated Arts and Humanities Course at Alverno College by Kevin Casey; Coordinated Studies A Model for Faculty Collaboration and Team Teaching in a Consortium of Washington Campuses by Jean MacGregor; Team Teaching About Teaching the Disciplines The Pedagogy Seminar at Millersville University by Barbara Stengel

ch. 7 Collaborative Inquiry and Pedagogical Scholarship; Collaborative Inquiry in the Teaching of Writing Theory and Practice at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln by Joy Ritchie; Collaborative Inquiry in an Early Childhood Education Course at the University of Wyoming by Jane Nelson; A Collaborative, Comparative Study of Student Learning in Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison by John Wright

ch. 8 Departmental Occasions for Collaboration; The Pedagogical Colloquium Focusing on Teaching in the Hiring Process in the Stanford University History Department by Richard Roberts; A Professional Development Program for Graduate Students Fostering Collaboration in the Writing Program at Northern Arizona University by Geoffrey Chase; The Departmental Teaching Library A Mathematics Course File at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte by Charles Burnap

ch. 9 Intercampus Collaboration and external Review of Teaching External Peer Review of Teaching A New Effort in the Chemistry Department at IUPUI by David Malik; Piloting Long Distance Interviews With Students as a Potential Component of the External Peer Review of Teaching by Jere Morehead

Conclusion: From Peer Collaboration to Peer Review
About the AAHE Teaching Initiative
About the AAHE’s Peer Review of Teaching Project
Additional Info:
This book is an attempt to take an overview of reflection, both in terms of the literature, the common meaning of reflection and, in particular, in terms of its value in practical ways of improving learning and professional practice. The existence of an enormous gap in the literature between an identification of the nature of reflection and the processes of learning means that the many applications of reflection in educational ...
Additional Info:
This book is an attempt to take an overview of reflection, both in terms of the literature, the common meaning of reflection and, in particular, in terms of its value in practical ways of improving learning and professional practice. The existence of an enormous gap in the literature between an identification of the nature of reflection and the processes of learning means that the many applications of reflection in educational and professional situations are guided by assumption or guesswork. The book begins by addressing this issue. In doing so, the authors do not attempt to pull the ideas in the literature into one precise definition. They establish boundaries that can be placed around the term to provide it with greater coherency. The book concludes with the practical use of reflection to improve learning and practice. The author considers the conditions of the learning environment which encourage reflection and presents two case studies in professional development and practice where deliberate and carefully designed exercise of reflection contributed to the greater impact of short courses and to effective decision making. The book includes practical activities and exercises which encourage learners to reflect on their learning or practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Pt. I The literature of reflection
ch. 1 Some background to the study of reflection
ch. 2 The 'backbone philosophies' of reflection - Dewey and Habermas
ch. 3 Reflection in experiential learning
ch. 4 Reflection in professional practice - the work of Donald Schon
ch. 5 Reflective practice in the professions - a theoretical stance
ch. 6 Reflective practice in the professions - a practical stance
ch. 7 The role of reflection in counseling, therapy and personal development

Pt. II Reflection and learning
ch. 8 Taking stock of reflection
ch. 9 Reflection in learning - some fundamentals of learning, part 1
ch. 10 Reflection in learning - some fundamentals of learning, part 2
ch. 11 Reflection in learning - mapping learning
ch. 12 The place of reflection in learning

Pt. III Using reflection to improve learning and practice
ch. 13 The conditions for reflection
ch. 14 Reflection in professional situations - two case studies
ch. 15 Learning through reflection - the use of learning journals
ch. 16 Learning through reflection - more ways and means

References
Index
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How Am I Teaching? Forms and Activities for Acquiring Instructional Input

Book
Weimer, Maryellen, Joan L.Parrett and Mary Margaret Kerns
2002
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB2838.W45 2002
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
If you're like most instructors, this is a question that you've asked yourself many times. That's why Weimer, Parrett, and Kerns have compiled this guide–so it's easier to get the answers that you need to this crucial question.

How Am I Teaching? contains nine forms and activities that allow you to gather information about what you're doing and how well you're doing it. The authors begin with ...
Additional Info:
If you're like most instructors, this is a question that you've asked yourself many times. That's why Weimer, Parrett, and Kerns have compiled this guide–so it's easier to get the answers that you need to this crucial question.

How Am I Teaching? contains nine forms and activities that allow you to gather information about what you're doing and how well you're doing it. The authors begin with a simple diagnostic matrix to guide you to the form or activity which best suits your needs. Then they summarize each of the nine tools, highlighting the value and limitations. Make copies of whichever tool(s) you've selected and you're on your way to better teaching! (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Section 1 Classroom Environment Inventory
Section 2 Course Materials Review (Peer Version)
Section 3 Course Materials Review (Student Version)
Section 4 How Do You Teach?
Section 5 Instructor Self-Evaluation
Section 6 Made-to-Order Form for Instructional Observation (Peer Version)
Section 7 Made-to-Order Form for Instructional Observation (Student Version)
Section 8 Open-Ended Questionnaire
Section 9 Self- or Colleague-Analysis of Videotaped Teaching Sample
Section 10 Specifically, What Needs Improvement? (Instructor Version)
Section 11 Specifically, What Needs Improvement? (Student Version)
Section 12 Teacher Behaviors Inventory
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"Student Ratings of Teaching: The Research Revisited" (pdf)

Article
Cashin, William E.
1995
Idea Paper No. 32, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1995)
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
Exhaustive and annotated review of the literature on student evaluation of teaching. Idea Paper no. 32, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Exhaustive and annotated review of the literature on student evaluation of teaching. Idea Paper no. 32, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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"Student Ratings of Teaching: Recommendations for Use" (pdf)

Article
Cashin, William E.
1990
Idea Paper No. 22, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1990)
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
Reviews scholarly literature to recommend how to use student evaluations effectively to improve teaching. Idea Paper no. 22, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Reviews scholarly literature to recommend how to use student evaluations effectively to improve teaching. Idea Paper no. 22, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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"Developing an Effective Faculty Evaluation System" (pdf)

Article
Cashin, William E.
1996
Idea Paper No. 33, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1996)
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Reviews 20 principles or steps in an effective faculty evaluation system, arguing that while most institutions’ claim that the purpose of their fculty evaluation system is the improvement of teaching, the primary purpose is actually almost always to make personnel decisions. Idea Paper no. 33, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Reviews 20 principles or steps in an effective faculty evaluation system, arguing that while most institutions’ claim that the purpose of their fculty evaluation system is the improvement of teaching, the primary purpose is actually almost always to make personnel decisions. Idea Paper no. 33, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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"Packet on the Teaching Portfolio"

Article
Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, Harvard University
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The following content and formatting suggestions have been compiled to help give you ideas about your own Teaching Portfolio. There are many possibilities, and other formation and/or content could suite your situation better. The aim is not necessarily to come up with a standardized document, but one which has coherence and simplicity and which also gives, like a good CV, the best picture of your history and experience. The ...
Additional Info:
The following content and formatting suggestions have been compiled to help give you ideas about your own Teaching Portfolio. There are many possibilities, and other formation and/or content could suite your situation better. The aim is not necessarily to come up with a standardized document, but one which has coherence and simplicity and which also gives, like a good CV, the best picture of your history and experience. The Derek Bok Center is happy to help you with a Teaching Portfolio to suit your needs. Keep in mind the following possibilities and limitations of our services:

What We Cannot Provide:
Editorial advice
Packaging
Duplicating
Filing
Distribution

What We Can Provide:
Help with documentation of teaching
Help with developing teaching strategies, techniques, skills
Consultations on broadening teaching repertoire
Help in developing syllabi, special content, entire courses or aspects of courses
Help with teaching innovations, development/implementation
Templates and sample portfolios
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"Teaching in Action: Criteria for Effective Practice"

Article
Smith, Ronald, and Fred Schwartz
1990
Teaching Excellence 1, no. 7 (1990)
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
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"The Teaching Portfolio"

Article
Seldin, Peter, and Linda Annis
1991
Teaching Excellence 3, no. 2 (1991)
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
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"Handbook for Peer Review"

Article
Morano, Cathleen K., and Julie-Ann McFann
2000
Teaching Enhancement Center, Temple University (2000)
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
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"Classroom Observation Techniques" (pdf)

Article
Acheson, Keith A.
1981
Idea Paper No. 4, IDEA Center, Kansas State University
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Techniques for observing the classroom behavior of teachers and students are examined. These techniques provide a framework for analyzing and understanding classroom interaction, for making decisions about what should be happening, and for changing instructional behavior when it is necessary. The observation methods allow collection, analysis, and presentation of accurate, objective, useful, and persuasive data. Persuasive data contain no value judgments. One method is the selective verbatim technique, which involves ...
Additional Info:
Techniques for observing the classroom behavior of teachers and students are examined. These techniques provide a framework for analyzing and understanding classroom interaction, for making decisions about what should be happening, and for changing instructional behavior when it is necessary. The observation methods allow collection, analysis, and presentation of accurate, objective, useful, and persuasive data. Persuasive data contain no value judgments. One method is the selective verbatim technique, which involves having the observer record what is actually said within the confines of a category previously specified by the teacher. Some common categories for selective verbatim include: teacher questions, teacher responses to student statements, teacher directions and assignments, teacher responses to questions, verbal mannerisms, teacher reward and praise statements, teacher criticism, student responses to teacher questions, student questions, and student initiated statements. Examples are presented as illustration. A seating chart can be the basis for several types of informal records about the teachers' and students' classroom behavior. It is primarily used to measure nonverbal behavior, but it is sometimes useful for measuring verbal behavior. The basic element is a diagram, examples of which are included. Seating charts are useful for analyzing "at task" behavior: data indicating whether or not individual students were engaged in the task or tasks the teacher indicated were appropriate. A verbal flow chart is one way of analyzing how classroom procedures inhibit, encourage, or allow students to participate in classroom interactions. A list of common teaching activities and a technique for recording them for analysis is included.
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"Preparing for Peer Observation: A Guidebook"

Article
Svinicki, Marilla
The Center for Teaching Effectiveness, University of Texas, Austin, http://www.utexas.edu/academic/cte/PeerObserve.html
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
Walks through the entire process, covering issues such as: peer observation versus peer evaluation; formative versus summative peer observation process, key issues to remember, recommendations, etc.
Additional Info:
Walks through the entire process, covering issues such as: peer observation versus peer evaluation; formative versus summative peer observation process, key issues to remember, recommendations, etc.
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"Evaluating an Uncertain Craft: Faculty Assessment and Theological Education"

Journal Issue
Boys, Mary C.
1995
Theological Education 31, no. 2: 37-50
Topics: Theological Education   |   Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
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"Developing an Effective Teaching Portfolio"

Article
Wolf, Kenneth
1996
Educational Leadership 53, no. 6 (1996): 34-37
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Discusses the development of an effective teaching portfolio. Selecting the contents; Developing profile; Objective of portfolios.
Additional Info:
Discusses the development of an effective teaching portfolio. Selecting the contents; Developing profile; Objective of portfolios.
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"Preparing A Teaching Portfolio: A Guidebook"

Article
Center for Teaching Effectiveness
2000
Center for Teaching Effectiveness, University of Texas at Austin (2000) http://www.utexas.edu/academic/cte/teachfolio.html
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Very helpful overview, followed by more detailed and extended discussion as well as references.
Additional Info:
Very helpful overview, followed by more detailed and extended discussion as well as references.
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"Designing a Teaching Portfolio" (pdf)

Article
Center for Excellence in Learning & Teaching
2000
Center for Excellence in Learning & Teaching, Penn State University (2000) http://www.schreyerinstitute.psu.edu/ pdf/Designing_a_Teaching_Portfolio.pdf
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A brief review and annotated bibliography on designing a teaching portfolio.
Additional Info:
A brief review and annotated bibliography on designing a teaching portfolio.
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Techniques and strategies for interpreting student evaluations

Book
Lewis, Karron G., ed,
2001
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.T435 2001
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
Examines the critical subject of student evaluations of teaching, furnishing both the research base behind the use of student ratings and practical suggestions for interpreting the data they provide. Focuses on all phases of the student rating process - from data gathering methods to presentation of results. Topics include methods of encouraging meaningful evaluations, midsemester feedback, uses of quality teams and focus groups, and creating questions that target individual faculty ...
Additional Info:
Examines the critical subject of student evaluations of teaching, furnishing both the research base behind the use of student ratings and practical suggestions for interpreting the data they provide. Focuses on all phases of the student rating process - from data gathering methods to presentation of results. Topics include methods of encouraging meaningful evaluations, midsemester feedback, uses of quality teams and focus groups, and creating questions that target individual faculty needs and interest. With a humorous look at the popular myths surrounding student evaluations and emerging research on what is known concerning student evaluations and their use, this volume argues that the evaluation of teaching is a learning process in itself. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
EDITOR'S NOTES (Karron G. Lewis).
ch. 1. Faculty Thoughts and Concerns About Student Ratings (John C. Ory)
ch. 2. Encouraging Your Students to Give Feedback (Marilla D. Svinicki).
ch. 3. Making Sense of Student Written Comments (Karron G. Lewis).
ch. 4. Using Midsemester Student Feedback and Responding to It (Karron G. Lewis).
ch. 5. Use of Electronic Tools to Enhance Student Evaluation Feedback (Devorah Lieberman, Nancy Bowers, David R. Moore).
ch. 6. Taking Student Criticism Seriously: Using Student Quality Teams to Guide Critical Reflection (Larry Spence, Lisa Firing Lenze).
ch. 7. Making Sense and Making Use of Feedback from Focus Groups (Richard Tiberius).
ch. 8. Writing Teaching Assessment Questions for Precision and Reflection (William L. Rando)
. ch. 9. Interpreting the Numbers: Using a Narrative to Help Others Read Student Evaluations of Your Teaching Accurately (Jennifer Franklin).
INDEX.
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Fresh Approaches to the Evaluation of Teaching

Book
Knapper, Christopher and Patricia Cranton, eds.
2001
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.F73 2001
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
Student ratings have long been the primary means of evaluating teaching in higher education, but are they sufficient to meet the increasing demands in public accountability and the changes in learning needs? This volume explores a wide range of alternative approaches to assessing teaching performance and presents methods for documenting and judging teaching that have often been overlooked in the sometimes acrimonious debate about the reliability and validity of student ...
Additional Info:
Student ratings have long been the primary means of evaluating teaching in higher education, but are they sufficient to meet the increasing demands in public accountability and the changes in learning needs? This volume explores a wide range of alternative approaches to assessing teaching performance and presents methods for documenting and judging teaching that have often been overlooked in the sometimes acrimonious debate about the reliability and validity of student questionnaires. Contributors discuss the underlying issue and principals that affect all forms of evaluation - making links between teaching methods and learning outcomes. They explore the goals and applications of the teaching portfolio, a widely used alternative to the sole reliance on student ratings; and discuss the strength and weaknesses of evaluating teaching through teaching awards. They also examine technology and its importance in automated evaluation systems, the role of formative evaluation in the scholarship of teaching; the role of evaluation in the accreditation of university teachers; and the evaluation of teaching for entire programs, departments, and institutions. Presenting a concept of interpretive and critical evaluation that considers knowledge about teaching as communicative and emancipatory, this volume is a frank and invigorating analysis of the emerging theories and applications of teaching evaluation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes
ch. 1 Broadening Out Approach to Teaching Evaluation (Christopher Knapper)
ch. 2 Interpretive and Critical Evaluation (Patricia Cranton)
ch. 3 Using Portfolios to Document Good Teaching: Premises, Purposes, Practices (Christopher Knapper, W. Alan Wright)
ch. 4 Evaluating Teaching Through Teaching Awards (Ellen Carusetta)
ch. 5 Using Technology to Facilitate Evaluation (Michael Theall, Jennifer Franklin)
ch. 6 Formative Evaluation and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (Ronald Smith)
ch. 7 Using Student Outcomes to Evaluate Teaching: A Cautious Exploration (Tara J. Fenwick)
ch. 8 Teaching Evaluation and Accreditation (Liz Beaty)
ch. 9 Broadening the Context for Teaching Evaluation (Robert Cannon)
Index
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"Guidelines for Presentation of a Teaching Portfolio"

Article
Staff
2002
Teaching and Learning Centre, Murdoch University, Perth, Western Australia
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
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"Embracing Student Evaluations of Teaching: A Case Study"

Article
Gallagher, Timothy J.
2000
Teaching Sociology 28, no. 2 (2000): 140-147
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
Examines the author's teaching evaluations to help understand what they measure and how they may be used to make changes in classroom performance. States that teachers should view teaching evaluations as an opportunity to develop as teachers.
Additional Info:
Examines the author's teaching evaluations to help understand what they measure and how they may be used to make changes in classroom performance. States that teachers should view teaching evaluations as an opportunity to develop as teachers.
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"Graded by My Students"

Article
Marcus, Ben
2001
Time 157, no. 1 (2001): 51
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
Presents the teaching philosophy of a Columbia University assistant professor who has learned to win good evaluations from his students. Opinion that, as of January, 2001, colleges are following a business model which allows parents and students to think of courses as services; Statement that instructors need to teach the teachable and please the unteachable, in the interest of getting high ratings.
Additional Info:
Presents the teaching philosophy of a Columbia University assistant professor who has learned to win good evaluations from his students. Opinion that, as of January, 2001, colleges are following a business model which allows parents and students to think of courses as services; Statement that instructors need to teach the teachable and please the unteachable, in the interest of getting high ratings.
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"Some Resources on Student Evaluation of Teaching"

Article
Hunt, Russell A.
2002
St. Thomas University (2003) http://www.stu.ca/~hunt/evalbib.htm
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
Exhaustive list of scholarly papers and websites (some with annotations) that deal with this controversial issue
Additional Info:
Exhaustive list of scholarly papers and websites (some with annotations) that deal with this controversial issue
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"Teaching Goals Inventory and Self-Scorable Worksheet"

Article
Angelo, Thomas, and Patricia Cross
1993
in Classroom Assessment Techniques (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1993), 393-397
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
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"Defining and Evaluating College Teaching" (pdf)

Article
Cashin, William E.
1989
Idea Paper No. 21, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1989)
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Describes the seven areas that should be considered when evaluating teaching: subject matter mastery, curriculum development, course design, delivery instruction, assessment of instruction, availability to students, and administrative requirements. Idea Paper no. 21, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Describes the seven areas that should be considered when evaluating teaching: subject matter mastery, curriculum development, course design, delivery instruction, assessment of instruction, availability to students, and administrative requirements. Idea Paper no. 21, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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"Appraising Teaching Effectiveness: Beyond Student Ratings" (pdf)

Article
Hoyt, Donald P., and William H. Pallett
1999
Idea Paper No. 36, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1999)
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
Reviews the importance of departmental evaluation of teaching and provides an overview of options for putting an evaluation process in place. References and appendices with real examples of evaluative forms and processes. Idea Paper no. 36, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Reviews the importance of departmental evaluation of teaching and provides an overview of options for putting an evaluation process in place. References and appendices with real examples of evaluative forms and processes. Idea Paper no. 36, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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"Teaching Squares"

Article
Rhem, James
2003
The National Teaching & Learning Forum 13, no. 1(2003): 1-3
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
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Successful Faculty Development and Evaluation: The Complete Teaching Portfolio

Book
Murray, John P.
1997
Graduate School of Education and Human Development, George Washington University, Washington, DC
LB2333.M86 1997
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This report relates to the concept of teaching portfolios. It discusses the importance of accounting for institutional culture when introducing the concept of teaching portfolios. Includes information on how the department chair can help to improve teaching. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This report relates to the concept of teaching portfolios. It discusses the importance of accounting for institutional culture when introducing the concept of teaching portfolios. Includes information on how the department chair can help to improve teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction
What is a Teaching Portfolio?
What Goes into a Teaching Portfolio?
Evaluating Portfolios
Formative Evaluation Techniques
Shaping an Institutional Definition of Good Teaching
The Organizational Culture and Teaching Portfolios
The Role of Department Chairs
Conclusion
References
Index
Additional Info:
Assessment Clear and Simple is "Assessment 101" in a book -- a concise, step-by-step guide written for everyone who participates in the assessment process. This practical book helps to make assessment simple, cost-efficient, and useful to the institution, while at the same time meeting the requirements of accreditation agencies, legislatures, review boards, and others. Assessment Clear and Simple can help your institution employ assessment as a powerful instrument for improvement and ...
Additional Info:
Assessment Clear and Simple is "Assessment 101" in a book -- a concise, step-by-step guide written for everyone who participates in the assessment process. This practical book helps to make assessment simple, cost-efficient, and useful to the institution, while at the same time meeting the requirements of accreditation agencies, legislatures, review boards, and others. Assessment Clear and Simple can help your institution employ assessment as a powerful instrument for improvement and provide a basis for wiser planning, budgeting, and change in curriculum, pedagogy, staffing, programming, and student support. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
About the Author
ch. 1 For Everyone: The Basics of Assessment
ch. 2 For Institution-Wide Planners
ch. 3 For Departments and Programs
ch. 4 For General Education
App. A Sample Rubrics for Evaluating Student Classroom Work
App. B Guidelines for Program Review of Departments, Incorporating Assessment
App. C Guidelines for the Evaluations of Teaching, Incorporating Assessment of Learning
App. D Sample Analysis of Audiences and Purposes for Assessment
App. E Institution-Wide Data to Assess Institution-Wide Goals
App. F Departmental Assessment Reports
App. G Matrix for Analyzing Professional Accreditation
App. H Matrix for Analyzing Institution-Wide Departmental Assessment Information
App. I Analysis of Assessment in Institution, Departments, and General Education
App. J Departmental Learning Goals
App. K Identifying Classroom Assessment in the Department
App. L Sample General Education Assessment Matrix
Resources: A Short List
References
Index
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"Peer Observation: Learning from One Another"

Article
Richardson, Matthew O.
2000
Thought and Action 16, no. 1 (2000): 9-20.
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Describes an approach to faculty development that relies on faculty learning from one another through peer observation. Rather than equating such observation with evaluating a colleague's performance, faculty observers are urged to approach the assignment as "students of teaching."
Additional Info:
Describes an approach to faculty development that relies on faculty learning from one another through peer observation. Rather than equating such observation with evaluating a colleague's performance, faculty observers are urged to approach the assignment as "students of teaching."
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"Looking for Good Teaching: A Guide to Peer Observation"

Article
Helling, Barbara B.
1988
Journal of Staff, Program, and Organization Development 6, no. 4 (1998): 147-158
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This observation guide lists 270 separate items, in checklist format, to be used for informal evaluation of classroom teachers by their peers. Items for observation are given for mechanics of teaching, scholarship, organization, classroom relationships, and miscellaneous teaching functions, as well as for preparation, topic choice, quality of interaction, quality of content and discussion, and method and efficiency of question-asking on the part of the teacher.
Additional Info:
This observation guide lists 270 separate items, in checklist format, to be used for informal evaluation of classroom teachers by their peers. Items for observation are given for mechanics of teaching, scholarship, organization, classroom relationships, and miscellaneous teaching functions, as well as for preparation, topic choice, quality of interaction, quality of content and discussion, and method and efficiency of question-asking on the part of the teacher.
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"Reviewing Faculty Competency and Educational Outcomes: The Case of Doctor of Ministry Education"

TTR
Lincoln, Timothy D.
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 1 (2004): 13-19
BL41.T4
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
This research report interprets data from a 1902 survey of directors of Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) programs regarding the competency of faculty members viewed through the interpretive lens of peer review. According to directors, faculty members are more competent in teaching theological reflection than in teaching social science methods, despite the expectation that such methods are part of D.Min. education. The article discusses implications of the data for improving ...
Additional Info:
This research report interprets data from a 1902 survey of directors of Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) programs regarding the competency of faculty members viewed through the interpretive lens of peer review. According to directors, faculty members are more competent in teaching theological reflection than in teaching social science methods, despite the expectation that such methods are part of D.Min. education. The article discusses implications of the data for improving faculty performance, and suggests how the concept of critical friendship might assist those who teach in religious studies to give and receive criticism from peers. The article concludes with suggestions for further research in D.Min. education.
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"Practice Talks Back to Theory: A Critical Reflection on Teaching"

TTR
Mahan, Brian J.
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 4 (2002): 201-210
BL41.T4
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The article is a reflection on what I perceive to be a confusion about the relation between theoretical judgments and judgments of pedagogical efficacy. My interest in the issue originated with my own confusion over persistent student resistance to certain assigned texts that I had initially felt confident would prove valuable in the classroom. The essay unfolds in three segments. In the first, I recount how this concern about the ...
Additional Info:
The article is a reflection on what I perceive to be a confusion about the relation between theoretical judgments and judgments of pedagogical efficacy. My interest in the issue originated with my own confusion over persistent student resistance to certain assigned texts that I had initially felt confident would prove valuable in the classroom. The essay unfolds in three segments. In the first, I recount how this concern about the relation between theoretical judgments and judgments of pedagogical efficacy evolved out of my own teaching. I next list three tentative conclusions about the correlation or lack of correlation between theoretical judgments and judgments of pedagogical efficacy. In the concluding segment, I call for concerted resistance to the tendency of pure rationality to colonize the aesthetic and dramatic components of experience so essential to transformative teaching and learning.
Article cover image

"The Classroom as a Negotiated Social Setting: An Empirical Study of the Effects of Faculty Members' Behavior on Students' Participation"

Article
Auster, Carol J. and Mindy MacRone
1994
Teaching Sociology 22 (1994): 289-300
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
Asserts that the relationship between students and faculty is the result of responses to a negotiated social setting. Reports on a study of 132 college students on factors that might affect class participation. Offers four recommendations for faculty to encourage student participation and responses to questions.
Additional Info:
Asserts that the relationship between students and faculty is the result of responses to a negotiated social setting. Reports on a study of 132 college students on factors that might affect class participation. Offers four recommendations for faculty to encourage student participation and responses to questions.
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Teachers Bringing Out the Best in Teachers: A Guide to Peer Consultation for Administrators and Teachers

Book
Blase, Jo and Joseph J. Blase
2006
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1775.2.B58 2006
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
From the Publisher Most teachers have experienced some kind of formal mentoring or induction program. What these programs can miss is the meaningful daily interaction with peers that builds mutual trust and instructional collaboration-the organic, coachable moments that boost professional learning. Based on a unique investigative study of nearly 300 teachers, this powerful new resource provides informative teacher perspectives of informal, naturally occurring, teacher-to-teacher professional development. Jo and Joseph Blase use ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher Most teachers have experienced some kind of formal mentoring or induction program. What these programs can miss is the meaningful daily interaction with peers that builds mutual trust and instructional collaboration-the organic, coachable moments that boost professional learning. Based on a unique investigative study of nearly 300 teachers, this powerful new resource provides informative teacher perspectives of informal, naturally occurring, teacher-to-teacher professional development. Jo and Joseph Blase use this research to identify the following five teacher behaviors that can positively influence other teachers’ morale, teaching skills, and professional growth:

* Building healthy relationships by communicating, caring, and developing trust
* Using five guiding principles for structuring learning experiences
* Planning and organizing for learning
* Showing and sharing
* Guiding for classroom management

This excellent resource helps school leaders promote a culture that encourages lasting professional development. Each chapter presents practical concepts and strategies that can occur in and out of the classroom. Educators share specific experiences and examples, showing each skill in action.

School leaders will learn what strong teacher peer "consultants" actually do that leads to improved teacher confidence and motivation, enhanced trust and mutual respect, and reflective instructional behavior among their colleagues. These cost-effective, authentic strategies will build camaraderie and leadership in your school, engaging colleagues as a team in the vital mission of all schools-educating our youth.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teachers helping teachers : the case for peer consultation
ch. 2 Peer consultation skill #1 : building healthy relationships by communicating, caring, and developing trust
ch. 3 Peer consultation skill #2 : using the five guiding principles for structuring learning experiences
ch. 4 Peer consultation skill #3 : planning and organizing for learning
ch. 5 Peer consultation skill #4 : showing and sharing
ch. 6 Peer consultation skill #5 : guiding for classroom management
ch. 7 Unleashing the hidden potential of peer consultation
Resource : research methods and procedures
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Criteria for Excellence in Theological Faculties

Journal Issue
1990
Theological Education 26, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial Introduction (W. Clark Gilpin)
Theological Faculties as Mentors of Ministers for the Church (Roy I. Sano)
Theological Foundations for Ethnic and Gender Diversity in Faculties or Excellence and the Motley Crew (Marjorie H. Suchocki)
Theology in the Context of the University (Stephen Toulmin)
The Future of an Illusion: An Inquiry into the Contrast between Theological and Religious Studies (Ronald F. Thiemann)
Research for a Theological Faculty (John B. Cobb, Jr.)
Emerging Issues and Theological Education (Rebecca S. Chopp)
Responses to Issues Research Seminar (Garth M. Rosell and George P. Schner)
The More Things Change—The More Things Change: Theological Education in the 1990s (Stephen L. Peterson)
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Peer Review of Teaching: A Sourcebook, 2nd Edition

Book
Chism, Nancy Van Note
2007
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2333.C49 2007
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
The new edition of this bestselling book builds on the author’s extensive administrative and consulting experience as well as scholarship on faculty rewards. It includes additional discussion of important foundational issues as well as practical forms and ideas gleaned from disciplinary groups and campuses throughout the nation. Like the first edition of Peer Review of Teaching, this new edition is offered in the hope that providing examples and suggestions ...
Additional Info:
The new edition of this bestselling book builds on the author’s extensive administrative and consulting experience as well as scholarship on faculty rewards. It includes additional discussion of important foundational issues as well as practical forms and ideas gleaned from disciplinary groups and campuses throughout the nation. Like the first edition of Peer Review of Teaching, this new edition is offered in the hope that providing examples and suggestions will not reduce the important work of peer review to mere forms or rigid procedures, but will empower faculty to articulate criteria and standards, perform the reviews systematically and thoughtfully, and realize that engaging in peer review is an approachable and worthwhile professional task. Updated to reflect the emphasis on student learning as the ultimate goal of college teaching, it incorporates new ideas and references from the literature. The most notable change in this edition is a discussion of peer review within special contexts for teaching, such as clinics, studios, and practice settings. The turn to active engagement in learning has also led to increased use of problem-based learning, the case study method, and other approaches that traditional forms for peer review do not address. Similarly, the explosion of the use of instructional technology calls for an articulation of new approaches to evaluating web-based instruction. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author.
Foreword.
Preface.
Part I: An Overview of Peer review.
ch. 1 Developing a rationale and Understanding of Peer Review.
ch. 2 Setting Up a System for Peer review.
ch. 3 Major Design Elements of a Peer Review of Teaching System.
ch. 4 Roles and Goals of a Peer Review System.
Part II: Resources and Forms.
ch. 5 Peer Review of Course materials.
ch. 6 Classroom Observation.
ch. 7 Peer Review in Special Contexts
ch. 8 Leadership for Teaching: Contributions to Scholarship of Teaching and Departmental Teaching Efforts.
ch. 9 Teaching Portfolios.
ch. 10. Summary.
References.
Index.
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Evaluating Faculty Performance: A Practical Guide to Assessing Teaching, Research, and Service

Book
Seldin, Peter, ed.
2006
Anker Publishing Company, now part of Jossey-Bass, an Imprint of John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco
LB2333.S438 2006
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Written by experts in teaching and administration, this guide offers practical, research-based information for faculty members and administrators in search of new approaches for assessing and improving faculty potential. By recognizing that faculty evaluation can be a difficult, time-consuming, and costly process, the authors of Evaluating Faculty Performance have distilled existing evaluation practices into useful recommendations for strengthening the overall system.

Offering numerous suggestions for improving evaluation methods, ...
Additional Info:
Written by experts in teaching and administration, this guide offers practical, research-based information for faculty members and administrators in search of new approaches for assessing and improving faculty potential. By recognizing that faculty evaluation can be a difficult, time-consuming, and costly process, the authors of Evaluating Faculty Performance have distilled existing evaluation practices into useful recommendations for strengthening the overall system.

Offering numerous suggestions for improving evaluation methods, assessing program weaknesses, and avoiding common problems, the book

* Examines compelling reasons for developing effective and systematic faculty assessment processes
* Discusses how to create a climate for positive change by favoring performance counseling over performance evaluation
* Identifies the essential elements and best practices in assessment, while also revealing what not to do in evaluating performance
* Explains the value of the professional portfolio in assessment teaching, and offers advice on how to complete a portfolio
* Outlines key issues, dangers, and benchmarks for success in straightforward language

Included are field-tested forms and checklists that can be used to measure faculty performance in teaching, research, and service. The suggestions for improving faculty assessment are clear and practicable—sensible advice for strengthening a process that is of increasing importance in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Building a Successful Evaluation Program (Peter Seldin)
ch. 2 Essential Operating Principles and Key Guidelines (Peter Seldin)
ch. 3 Building a Climate For Faculty evaluation That Improves Teaching (Mary Lou HJiggerson)
ch. 4 Uses and Abuses of Student Ratings (William Pallett)
ch. 5 Institutional Service (Clement A. Seldin)
ch. 6 Peer Observations as a Catalyst for Faculty Development (Barbara J. Millis)
ch. 7 Self-Evaluation: Composing an Academic Life Narrative (Thomas V. McGovern)
ch. 8 Teaching Portfolios (Monica A. Devanas)
ch. 9 Evaluating Faculty Research (Teck-Kah Lim)
ch. 10 Teaching Evaluation Follies: Misperception and Misbehavior in Student Evaluations of Teachers (Jane S. Halonen, Geroge B. Ellenberg)
ch. 11 Using Evaluation Data to Improve Teaching effectiveness (Todd Zakrajsek)
ch. 12 Using Evaluation Data for Personnel Decisions (David Fite)
ch. 13 The Professional Portfolio: Expanding the Value of Portfolio Development (John Zubizarreta)
ch. 14 Summary and Recommendations for Evaluating Faculty Performance (J. Elizabeth Miller)

Appendix: Selected Forms to Evaluate Teaching, Advising, Research, and Service
Index
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Teaching, Learning and Research in Higher Education: A Critical Approach

Book
Mark Tennant, Cathi McMullen and Dan Kaczynski
2010
Routledge, New York
LB2331.T4295 2010
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Teaching, Learning and Research in Higher Education offers a combination of critical perspectives and practical advice that is ideally suited for individuals interested in enhancing their practice through analysis and critique. The aim is to promote a critical understanding of one's own practices: to foster personal and professional formation through a reflexive engagement with one's environment and circumstances. At a practical level this means to continuously think about how to ...
Additional Info:
Teaching, Learning and Research in Higher Education offers a combination of critical perspectives and practical advice that is ideally suited for individuals interested in enhancing their practice through analysis and critique. The aim is to promote a critical understanding of one's own practices: to foster personal and professional formation through a reflexive engagement with one's environment and circumstances. At a practical level this means to continuously think about how to adjust practice rather than following a formulaic approach derived from any particular educational theory.

Teaching, Learning and Research in Higher Education argues that academics can find space for their own agency in the midst of institutional policies and practices that serve to frame, as well as delimit and constrain, what counts as good academic work in teaching and research. This text bridges a gap between those books that provide a high-level analysis of contemporary higher education, the more practical texts on how to be a good teacher in higher education, and those texts which aim to improve teaching through better understanding of the learning process.

Topical chapters include:

Teacher-learner relationship, Learning groups, Practice-oriented learning, Teaching for diversity, e-learning, Assessment, Approaches to Staff Development, Quality assurance, Supervision and Research education, Doing research, and Teaching & Research.

A must-have resource for higher education professions, academic developers, professionals, and anyone looking to improve their teaching and learning practices, Teaching,Learning and Research in Higher Education is also appropriate for continuing and professional development courses in the UK and teaching and learning courses in the US.

Mark Tennant is Dean of the University Graduate School, University of Technology, Sydney.

Cathi McMullen is Lecturer in the School of Marketing and Management at Charles Sturt University.

Dan Kaczynski is Professor in the Educational Leadership department at Central Michigan University. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Illustrations
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Perspectives on Quality Teaching
ch. 3 Reconceptualising the Development of University Teaching Expertise
ch. 4 Framing Teacher-Learner Relationships
ch. 5 Learning Groups
ch. 6 Teaching for Diversity
ch. 7 Assessment
ch. 8 Promoting Workplace-Oriented Learning
ch. 9 Learning in the Digital Age
ch. 10 Postgraduate Research Education
ch. 11 Teaching and Research

Reference
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Self-Study Teacher Research: Improving Your Practice Through Collaborative Inquiry

Book
Samaras, Anastasia P.
2011
Sage Publications, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1028.24.S36 2011
Topics: Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The first textbook to offer novice and experienced teachers guidelines for the “how” and “why” of self-study teacher research

Designed to help pre- and in-service teachers plan, implement, and assess a manageable self-study research project, this unique textbook covers the foundation, history, theoretical underpinnings, and methods of self-study research. Author Anastasia Samaras encourages readers to think deeply about both the “how” and the “why” of this essential professional ...
Additional Info:
The first textbook to offer novice and experienced teachers guidelines for the “how” and “why” of self-study teacher research

Designed to help pre- and in-service teachers plan, implement, and assess a manageable self-study research project, this unique textbook covers the foundation, history, theoretical underpinnings, and methods of self-study research. Author Anastasia Samaras encourages readers to think deeply about both the “how” and the “why” of this essential professional development tool as they pose questions and formulate personal theories to improve professional practice.

Written in a reader-friendly style and filled with interactive activities and examples, the book helps teachers every step of the way as they learn and refine research skills; conduct a literature review; design a research study; work in validation groups; collect and analyze data; interpret findings; develop skills in peer critique and review; and write, present, and publish their studies.

Key Features

• A Self-Study Project Planner assists teachers in understanding both the details and process of conducting self-study research.

• A Critical Friends Portfolio includes innovative critical collaborative inquiries to support the completion of a high quality final research project.

• Advice from the most senior self-study academics working in the U.S. and internationally is included, along with descriptions of the self-study methodology that has been refined over time.

• Examples demonstrate the connections between self-study research, teachers’ professional growth, and their students’ learning.

• Tables, charts, and visuals help readers see the big picture and stay organized.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
List of Tables

Part I: The 6 Ws of Self-Study Research
ch. 1 Understanding Self-Study: What and Why
ch. 2 Overview of the Self-Study Process: What and How
ch. 3 The Self-Study Community: When and Where and Who
ch. 4 The Self-Study Research Methodology: Why and How
ch. 5 Self-Study Methods: Why and How

Part II: Your Self-Study Project
ch. 6 Design
ch. 7 Protect
ch. 8 Organize Data
ch. 9 Collect Data
ch. 10 Analyze Data
ch. 11 Assess Research Quality
ch. 12 Write
ch. 13 Present and Publish

Appendix A: Sample of a Self-Study Teacher Research Exemplar Brief Highlighting Five Foci
Appendix B: Self-Study is Not Just for Classroom Teachers

Glossary
References
Index
About the Author
Tactics cover image

"Using the Mid-Course Assessment of Teaching to Connect Learning across the Curriculum"

Tactic
Harkins, Angela Kim
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 138-138
BL41.T4
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: take home writing prompts to get mid-semester feedback on the course while simultaneously helping students to make connections to their other courses.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: take home writing prompts to get mid-semester feedback on the course while simultaneously helping students to make connections to their other courses.
TTR cover image

"The Absent Professor: The Class Interview"

TTR
Grooters, Stacy, and Lanci, John R.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 4 (2010): 378-379
BL41.T4
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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A Teacher's Reflection Book: Exercises, Stories, Invitations

Book
Peters, Jean Koh, and Weisberg, Mark
2011
Carolina Academic Press, Durham, NC
LB1025.3.P466 2011
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In university teachers’ hectic lives, finding space to reflect, restore, renew, and recommit can seem impossible. Jean Koh Peters and Mark Weisberg believe regular reflection is critical and have designed A Teacher’s Reflection Book to help teachers and other professionals find that space. Growing out of the authors’ extensive experience facilitating retreats and leading teaching and learning workshops, the book builds on their discoveries in those settings, supporting and ...
Additional Info:
In university teachers’ hectic lives, finding space to reflect, restore, renew, and recommit can seem impossible. Jean Koh Peters and Mark Weisberg believe regular reflection is critical and have designed A Teacher’s Reflection Book to help teachers and other professionals find that space. Growing out of the authors’ extensive experience facilitating retreats and leading teaching and learning workshops, the book builds on their discoveries in those settings, supporting and promoting teachers’ self-directed development.

Inviting that development, A Teacher’s Reflection Book is a cornucopia of stories, exercises, and examples that will inspire teachers to make reflection a cornerstone of their daily lives. With its multiple suggestions and strategies, it offers something for every reader, and is responsive to teachers’ needs at all stages of their careers.

The book’s six chapters offer readers several perspectives from which to reflect. Some sections offer glimpses of teachers in the midst of their daily teaching lives, while others step away, inviting readers to reflect on what it means to have a vocation as a teacher.

The book explores how we listen, a crucial yet rarely taught skill, essential for reflecting, as well as for learning and teaching. And it invites teachers to reflect on their students: who they are, and what and how they learn. For those latter reflections, the authors turn the focus on fear, which so pervades university life and which can distort learners’ and teachers’ perspectives and responses. Throughout this book, readers will visit several classrooms and listen to the evocative voices of several thoughtful students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Gratitudes

ch. 1 How Does a Teacher Say Hello?
I. A Look at Several First Classes II. Exercises to Focus on Hello
II. Exercises to Focus on Hello
A. What Is the First Experience Students Have in Your Course? What Is Their First Experience in Class?
B. What Are the Dispositions of Your Classroom?
C. Fast Forward Through the Semester You’re about to Start
D. Consider “Entrainment” and the Rhythms of Your Semester
E. Think about Hellos in Popular Culture
F. How Will You Deal with Fluctuating Student Attendance During “Shopping Periods”?
G. What Will Be the Role of Technology in Your Classroom, and Will You Make Space to Express That in Your Hello?
H. Will You Know Your Students’ Names?
I. How Will You Handle Your Announcements?
J. As You Begin, How Do You Want the Central Ideas of the Course to Emerge?
K. Consider Generating Ideas by Using Beginning Rituals in Other Settings
III. Final Thoughts about Hello
IV. Conclusion Notes

ch. 2 Reflection: What It Is and How to Practice It
I. Introduction: A Reflection on the Need for Reflection
II. Essential Elements of Reflection—What Makes Reflection Work for You?
A. Identify Meaningful Elements of Reflection That Uniquely Suit Your Needs
B. Three Recommended Elements of Reflection: Starting Focal Point, Experience, Non-judgment
1. A Starting Focal Point
2. Experience
3. Non-judgment
III. A Session of Reflection: The Individual Reflection Event
A. Individual Reflection Event: The Retreat Model
B. Examples of Individual Reflection Events
1. Reflection Event — With a Group, at Our Retreat
2. Reflection Event — Alone, at a Conference, Further Reflected Upon Alone, after the Conference
IV. What a Practice of Mindful Reflection Might Look Like
A. The Spirit of Mindful Reflection — A Practice, Not a Habit
B. The Structure of Mindful Reflection — Useful Strategies
C. Additional Suggestions for Developing a Reflection Practice
1. Downshifting, Making the Transition
2. Giving Oneself Permission
3. Dealing with Technology and Time
D. Creating Conditions for Reflection
V. Conclusion
Notes

ch. 3 Experiments in Listening
I. Looking Retrospectively at Your Experiences of Listening
A. Ask Analytical or General Questions about Your Listening
1. Ten Freewriting/Brainstorming Prompts
2. Explore Your Listening on a Doubting and Believing Spectrum
B. Explore Critical Incidents from the Past
1. High Points and Low Points as a Listener
2. Profile of the Three Best Listeners I Know
3. High Points and Low Points as a Person Being Listened To
II. Looking Prospectively: Analyzing Your Listening for New Insights
A. Collect New Data
B. Experiment with Your Listening
1. Use the Doubting-Believing Spectrum: Two Variants
2. Wait Five Seconds before Responding
3. Don’t Offer Advice
4. Listen with Your Hands Occupied
5. Practice Non-judgment
6. Try a Group Exercise

ch. 4 Who Are Our Students, and How and What Do They Learn in Our Classrooms?
I. Who Were We as Students: Our Best/Worst Moments as Students
II. Student Voices
III. A Culture of Fear and Its Consequences
A. Three Classrooms, Three Nightmare Scenarios
IV. What Can We Do to Facilitate Learning?
A. Teach Non-judgmentally/Teach Non-judgment
B. Discern the Gift, Not the Gifted
C. Use Midstream, or Formative, Assessment
D. Anticipate Difficult Incidents
E. Take One More Minute
F. Trust Ourselves
V. Conclusion
Notes

ch. 5 The Teacher and Vocation
I. Discovering Vocation
A. UnderstandingVocation
B. FindingYourVocation:FourExercises
1. Write Your Obituary
2. Find and Explore a Governing Metaphor
3. Compose a Job Description
4. Visit or Write Your Future Self
C. A Life Lived in Vocation: Implications
II. Nurturing Vocation in Ordinary Times: Two Sets of Processes You Can Trust
A. Internal Processes You Can Trust
B. ExternalProcessesYouCanTrust
III. Some Elements of a Teacher’s Vocation
A. Writing
B. ClassroomTeaching
IV. Conclusion
Notes

ch. 6 How Does a Teacher Say Goodbye?
I. Introduction
II. Invitations for Thinking about Goodbye
III. Ideas for Last Classes/Meetings
A. A Closing Circle
B. Completing the Circle
C. Jean’s Goodbye and Coupon
D. Postcards and Silent Witness
IV. Goodbye: A Unique Moment of Reflection
V. Conclusion
Notes

Appendix • Resources for Reflecting
About the Authors
Index
Article cover image

"Pedagogy and Social Justice: Race and Gender Bias In Higher Education: Could Faculty Course Evaluations Impede Further Progress Toward Parity?"

Article
Huston, Therese A.
2006
Seattle Journal for Social Justice, Spring/Summer 2006
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Wabash tree

Student Evaluations: A Critical Review

Article
Huemer, Michael
2011
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Informal student evaluations of faculty were started in the 1960's by enterprising college students.(1) Since then, their use has spread so that now they are administered in almost all American colleges and universities and are probably the main source of information used for evaluating faculty teaching performance.(2) There is an enormous literature on the subject of student evaluations of faculty (SEF).(3) The following is a summary of some developments in ...
Additional Info:
Informal student evaluations of faculty were started in the 1960's by enterprising college students.(1) Since then, their use has spread so that now they are administered in almost all American colleges and universities and are probably the main source of information used for evaluating faculty teaching performance.(2) There is an enormous literature on the subject of student evaluations of faculty (SEF).(3) The following is a summary of some developments in that literature that should be of special interest to faculty, with particular emphasis on criticisms of SEF that have emerged recently. But I begin with the arguments in favor of the use of SEF.
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Research Report: Race and Gender Bias in Student Evaluations of Teaching

Article
Huston, Therese
2005
Seattle University Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

Bias, The Brain, and Student Evaluations of Teaching

Article
Merritt, Deborah J.
2007
CP Merrit Doc (2007)
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Student evaluations of teaching are a common fixture at American law schools, but they harbor surprising biases. Extensive psychology research demonstrates that these assessments respond overwhelmingly to a professor’s appearance and nonverbal behavior; ratings based on just thirty seconds of silent videotape correlate strongly with end-of-semester evaluations. The nonverbal behaviors that influence teaching evaluations are rooted in physiology, culture, and habit, allowing characteristics like race and gender to affect ...
Additional Info:
Student evaluations of teaching are a common fixture at American law schools, but they harbor surprising biases. Extensive psychology research demonstrates that these assessments respond overwhelmingly to a professor’s appearance and nonverbal behavior; ratings based on just thirty seconds of silent videotape correlate strongly with end-of-semester evaluations. The nonverbal behaviors that influence teaching evaluations are rooted in physiology, culture, and habit, allowing characteristics like race and gender to affect evaluations. The current process of gathering evaluations, moreover, allows social stereotypes to filter students’ perceptions, increasing risks of bias. These distortions are inevitable products of the intuitive, “system one” cognitive processes that the present process taps. The cure for these biases requires schools to design new student evaluation systems, such as ones based on facilitated group discussion, that enable more reflective, deliberative judgments. This article draws upon research in cognitive decision making, both to present the compelling case for reforming the current system of evaluating classroom performance and to illuminate the cognitive processes that underlie many facets of the legal system.
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Critical Response Process: A Method For Getting Useful Feedback On Anything You make, From Dance to Dessert, First Edition

Book
Lerman, Liz; and Borstel, John
2003
Liz Lerman Dance Exchange, Takoma Park, MD
BF319.5.F4 L47 2003
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process is a multi-step, group system for giving and receiving useful feedback on creative processes and artistic work-in-progress. Originated in the early 1990's by choreographer and MacArthur "Genius Grant" Fellow Liz Lerman, the Process has been widely embraced by artists, educators, and administrators. It has been applied in such diverse contexts as choreography classes, post-performance discussions, actor/playwright collaborations, curatorial decision-making, and university level curriculum assessment. ...
Additional Info:
Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process is a multi-step, group system for giving and receiving useful feedback on creative processes and artistic work-in-progress. Originated in the early 1990's by choreographer and MacArthur "Genius Grant" Fellow Liz Lerman, the Process has been widely embraced by artists, educators, and administrators. It has been applied in such diverse contexts as choreography classes, post-performance discussions, actor/playwright collaborations, curatorial decision-making, and university level curriculum assessment. In addition to reflection on the work at hand, the Critical Response Process affords artists a voice and a degree of control within the critique of their work promoting dialogue with audiences, fellow artists, students, mentors, and other colleagues.

This book, Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process, offers a detailed introduction to the Process, beginning with its three roles and four core steps. With particular emphasis on the role of the facilitator, this illustrated publication offers guidance on how artists and participants can get the most out of the Process and the opportunities it offers to ask question, give answers, and voice opinions. A final chapter discusses adaptations and variations. Charts and annotated sample dialogues demonstrate the inner workings of the Process. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction by Liz Lerman

ch. 1 The Process
ch. 2 The Roles
ch. 3 The Steps
ch. 4 Facilitation Fundamentals
ch. 5 Deepening the Dialogue
ch. 6 Variations
ch. 7 Conclusion
ch. 8 Sample Dialogues
ch. 9 Acknowledgements

Charts
ch. 10 Forming Neutral Questions
ch. 11 The Three Roles
ch. 12 Steps & Sequence
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Evaluating Gender Bias in Ratings of University Instructor's Teaching Effectiveness

Article
Young, Suzanne, Rush, Leslie, and Shaw, Dale
2009
International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Vol. 3, No. 2, July 2009
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
The purpose of this study was to examine the gender bias in student ratings of effective teaching. Students in five colleges were invited to rate instructors on three factors: interpersonal characteristics, pedagogical characteristics, and course content characteristics. We analyzed group differences based on student gender, instructor gender, and student level. Ratings of pedagogical characteristics and course content characteristics yielded significant interactions between student gender and instructor gender, but no differences ...
Additional Info:
The purpose of this study was to examine the gender bias in student ratings of effective teaching. Students in five colleges were invited to rate instructors on three factors: interpersonal characteristics, pedagogical characteristics, and course content characteristics. We analyzed group differences based on student gender, instructor gender, and student level. Ratings of pedagogical characteristics and course content characteristics yielded significant interactions between student gender and instructor gender, but no differences were found among groups on interpersonal characteristics. We concluded that gender bias plays a role in students’ views of effective teaching in terms of how students evaluate pedagogical and content characteristics and that this bias generalizes across student levels.
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"Assessing Student Perceptions of Inappropriate and Appropriate Teacher Humor"

Article
Frymier, Ann Bainbridge; Melissa Bekelja Wanzer, and Ann M. Wojtaszczyk
2007
Eric Ed.gov ies Institiution of Education of Sciences Online Submission, 2007, November 22
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
This study replicated and extended Wanzer et al.'s (2006) typology of appropriate and inappropriate teacher humor and advanced explanations for student interpretations of teacher humor. Three explanations were advanced for why teacher humor may be perceived as inappropriate by students. First, disposition and incongruity-resolution theories were used to explain the cognitive and affective elements of teacher humor, second, student communication predispositions were advanced as an explanation, and the third explanation ...
Additional Info:
This study replicated and extended Wanzer et al.'s (2006) typology of appropriate and inappropriate teacher humor and advanced explanations for student interpretations of teacher humor. Three explanations were advanced for why teacher humor may be perceived as inappropriate by students. First, disposition and incongruity-resolution theories were used to explain the cognitive and affective elements of teacher humor, second, student communication predispositions were advanced as an explanation, and the third explanation was teacher communication predispositions. ..PAT.-Unpublished Manuscript
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Self-assessment of instructional goals to help faculty become more aware of what they want to accomplish in individual courses, locate Classroom Assessment Techniques they can adapt and use to assess how well they are achieving these goals, and provide a starting point for discussion of teaching and learning goals among colleagues.
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Self-assessment of instructional goals to help faculty become more aware of what they want to accomplish in individual courses, locate Classroom Assessment Techniques they can adapt and use to assess how well they are achieving these goals, and provide a starting point for discussion of teaching and learning goals among colleagues.
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Contains several versions of a rubric designed for peer review (and thus design and development) of online courses. Includes annotations demonstrating the criteria in practice.
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Contains several versions of a rubric designed for peer review (and thus design and development) of online courses. Includes annotations demonstrating the criteria in practice.
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An assessment tool for teachers to determine the “dominant” perspectives in their teaching. Can help teachers understand and summarize their own ideas about teaching.
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An assessment tool for teachers to determine the “dominant” perspectives in their teaching. Can help teachers understand and summarize their own ideas about teaching.
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The University of North Dakota provides this online “handbook” to its faculty to help them navigate the university’s teaching evaluation process. The site provides lots of helpful reminders of what to keep in mind when critically evaluating your own teaching.
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The University of North Dakota provides this online “handbook” to its faculty to help them navigate the university’s teaching evaluation process. The site provides lots of helpful reminders of what to keep in mind when critically evaluating your own teaching.
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University of Texas guidebook for teacher portfolio.
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University of Texas guidebook for teacher portfolio.
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Describes the seven areas that should be considered when evaluating teaching: subject matter mastery, curriculum development, course design, delivery instruction, assessment of instruction, availability to students, and administrative requirements. Idea Paper no. 21, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Describes the seven areas that should be considered when evaluating teaching: subject matter mastery, curriculum development, course design, delivery instruction, assessment of instruction, availability to students, and administrative requirements. Idea Paper no. 21, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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Reviews 20 principles or steps in an effective faculty evaluation system, arguing that while most institutions’ claim that the purpose of their fculty evaluation system is the improvement of teaching, the primary purpose is actually almost always to make personnel decisions. Idea Paper no. 33, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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Reviews 20 principles or steps in an effective faculty evaluation system, arguing that while most institutions’ claim that the purpose of their fculty evaluation system is the improvement of teaching, the primary purpose is actually almost always to make personnel decisions. Idea Paper no. 33, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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Very helpful overview, followed by more detailed and extended discussion as well as references.
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Very helpful overview, followed by more detailed and extended discussion as well as references.
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Walks through the entire process, covering issues such as: peer observation versus peer evaluation; formative versus summative peer observation process, key issues to remember, recommendations, etc.
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Walks through the entire process, covering issues such as: peer observation versus peer evaluation; formative versus summative peer observation process, key issues to remember, recommendations, etc.
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Exhaustive list of scholarly papers and websites (some with annotations) that deal with this controversial issue.
Additional Info:
Exhaustive list of scholarly papers and websites (some with annotations) that deal with this controversial issue.
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Reviews scholarly literature to recommend how to use student evaluations effectively to improve teaching. Idea Paper no. 22, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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Reviews scholarly literature to recommend how to use student evaluations effectively to improve teaching. Idea Paper no. 22, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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Exhaustive and annotated review of the literature on student evaluation of teaching. Idea Paper no. 32, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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Exhaustive and annotated review of the literature on student evaluation of teaching. Idea Paper no. 32, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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The EPAC Community of Practice provides a huge store of resources on electronic teaching portfolios, as well as a viritual community of webcasts, blogs, queries, and conferences.
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The EPAC Community of Practice provides a huge store of resources on electronic teaching portfolios, as well as a viritual community of webcasts, blogs, queries, and conferences.
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A quick review of the concept and basic contents of a teaching portfolio, by Boston University's Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching.
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A quick review of the concept and basic contents of a teaching portfolio, by Boston University's Center for Excellence and Innovation in Teaching.
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Interpreting student ratings of instruction can be challenging, but these guidelines and suggestions will help you extract useful information from your student ratings.
Additional Info:
Interpreting student ratings of instruction can be challenging, but these guidelines and suggestions will help you extract useful information from your student ratings.
Additional Info:
While student ratings of instruction (commonly called course evaluations) are usually seen as a form of summative evaluation of a course and an instructor, they can also be used to improve a course and an instructor’s teaching.
Additional Info:
While student ratings of instruction (commonly called course evaluations) are usually seen as a form of summative evaluation of a course and an instructor, they can also be used to improve a course and an instructor’s teaching.
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Teaching portfolios: formatively, the portfolio helps you reflect systematically and regularly upon your teaching; summatively, portfolios provide a much more comprehensive and accurate picture of your teaching than any other single device.
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Teaching portfolios: formatively, the portfolio helps you reflect systematically and regularly upon your teaching; summatively, portfolios provide a much more comprehensive and accurate picture of your teaching than any other single device.
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Peer review provides informed considerations of a candidate’s teaching that student ratings cannot address: breadth, depth, and rigor of course objectives and materials; patterns of and procedures for course management; and a contextualized sense of the interactions between teacher and students as a whole.
Additional Info:
Peer review provides informed considerations of a candidate’s teaching that student ratings cannot address: breadth, depth, and rigor of course objectives and materials; patterns of and procedures for course management; and a contextualized sense of the interactions between teacher and students as a whole.
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BYU Podcasts on Teaching

Web
BYU Center for Teaching and Learning
Topics: Assessing Teaching

Additional Info:
This podcast series includes interviews with BYU faculty as well as excerpts from invited speakers. We offer them in multiple formats to make it easy to watch and listen at work, home, or on your iPod. You might even choose to use a clip from one of the presentations in your teaching.
Additional Info:
This podcast series includes interviews with BYU faculty as well as excerpts from invited speakers. We offer them in multiple formats to make it easy to watch and listen at work, home, or on your iPod. You might even choose to use a clip from one of the presentations in your teaching.
Additional Info:
Student ratings of instruction are hotly debated on many college campuses. Unfortunately these debates are often uninformed by the extensive research on this topic.
Additional Info:
Student ratings of instruction are hotly debated on many college campuses. Unfortunately these debates are often uninformed by the extensive research on this topic.
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Assessing and Improving Your Teaching: Strategies and Rubrics for Faculty Growth and Student Learning

Book
Blumberg, Phyllis
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1025.3.B595 2014
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   General Overviews   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In order to make appropriate changes to improve your teaching and your students’ learning, first you need to know how you’re teaching now. Figure it out for yourself and invigorate your teaching on your own terms!

This practical evidence-based guide promotes excellence in teaching and improved student learning through self-reflection and self-assessment of one’s teaching. Phyllis Blumberg starts by ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In order to make appropriate changes to improve your teaching and your students’ learning, first you need to know how you’re teaching now. Figure it out for yourself and invigorate your teaching on your own terms!

This practical evidence-based guide promotes excellence in teaching and improved student learning through self-reflection and self-assessment of one’s teaching. Phyllis Blumberg starts by reviewing the current approaches to instructor evaluation and describes their inadequacies. She then presents a new model of assessing teaching that builds upon a broader base of evidence and sources of support. This new model leads to self-assessment rubrics, which are available for download, and the book will guide you in how to use them. The book includes case studies of completed critical reflection rubrics from a variety of disciplines, including the performing and visual arts and the hard sciences, to show how they can be used in different ways and how to explore the richness of the data you’ll uncover. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author

ch. 1 Growing Your Teaching Effectiveness: An Overview

Part I - A Teaching Model That Promotes Better Learning
ch. 2 Beliefs Leading to Better Teaching
ch. 3 Essential Aspects of Effective Teachingv ch. 4 Documenting Critical Self-Refl ection of Teaching
ch. 5 Evidence-Based Approaches to Enhance Teaching
ch. 6 Finding and Using Literature to Promote Better Teaching

Part 2 - A Model To Assess Teaching To Promote Better Learning
ch. 7 Principles of Assessing Teaching
ch. 8 Model for Assessing Teaching

Part 3 - Self Assessment Rubrics
ch. 9 How to Assess Teaching Using Rubrics Based on the Assessment Model
ch. 10 What These Rubrics Assess, and How That Improves Teaching

Part 4 - Cases Showing Effective Uses For the Rubrics
Introduction
ch. 11 How a Beginning Assistant Professor Used Rubrics to Plan and Track Her Personal Faculty Development
ch. 12 How a Faculty Developer Used the Rubrics with a Pretenure Instructor to Facilitate Improvement
ch. 13 How an Experienced Professor Used the Rubrics to Document Her Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
ch. 14 How a Pretenured Professor Used the Rubrics to Assess His Mentoring Undergraduate and Graduate Students in Research
ch. 15 How an Experienced Clinical Professor Used the Rubrics to Assess His Changed Roles While Precepting or Supervising Students in Hospital Settings

Comparisons among the Cases
References
Appendix: Rubrics for Self-Assessment of Teaching: Tools for Improving Different Types of Teaching
Index
Additional Info:
Effective teachers appear again and again to display certain characteristics, while ineffective teachers tend to make the same mistakes repeatedly.
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Effective teachers appear again and again to display certain characteristics, while ineffective teachers tend to make the same mistakes repeatedly.
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Don't wait for an end-term course evaluation. Find out how your course is working in time to make improvements.
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Don't wait for an end-term course evaluation. Find out how your course is working in time to make improvements.
Additional Info:
A helpful checklist of good teaching practices, organized around Stanford University's standard course evaluation questions.
Additional Info:
A helpful checklist of good teaching practices, organized around Stanford University's standard course evaluation questions.
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Actual students weigh-in on what they like and dislike in how a syllabus is constructed.
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Actual students weigh-in on what they like and dislike in how a syllabus is constructed.
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Advice from students on how faculty can best reach them through email.
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Advice from students on how faculty can best reach them through email.
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Mid-course evaluations allow students to reflect on course goals and individual progress, inform the instructor about what is working or not working in the course, and recognize that the instructor cares about their learning experience.
Additional Info:
Mid-course evaluations allow students to reflect on course goals and individual progress, inform the instructor about what is working or not working in the course, and recognize that the instructor cares about their learning experience.
Additional Info:
2012 bibliography compiled on the POD listserv
Additional Info:
2012 bibliography compiled on the POD listserv
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Guidance on the process of university peer observation, with a selection of instruments that faculty and department can adapt for assessment of teaching. By the University of Texas at El Paso. 
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Guidance on the process of university peer observation, with a selection of instruments that faculty and department can adapt for assessment of teaching. By the University of Texas at El Paso. 
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This SUNY Albany site considers, the role of peer observation of teaching in both formative and summative assessment, developing a departmental plan, and choosing or designing an instrument to guide peer observation (including downloadable forms).
Additional Info:
This SUNY Albany site considers, the role of peer observation of teaching in both formative and summative assessment, developing a departmental plan, and choosing or designing an instrument to guide peer observation (including downloadable forms).
Additional Info:
A collection of instruments for conducting peer review of teaching, provided by the university of Minnesota
Additional Info:
A collection of instruments for conducting peer review of teaching, provided by the university of Minnesota
Additional Info:
Provides a structured and practical model that combines inquiry into the intellectual work of a course, careful investigation of student understanding and performance, and faculty reflection on teaching effectiveness. This website is designed to serve as an international repository for course portfolios written by faculty who teach at postsecondary institutions. 
Additional Info:
Provides a structured and practical model that combines inquiry into the intellectual work of a course, careful investigation of student understanding and performance, and faculty reflection on teaching effectiveness. This website is designed to serve as an international repository for course portfolios written by faculty who teach at postsecondary institutions. 
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Achieving Excellence in Teaching: A Self-help Guide

Book
Sweet, Charlie; Blythe, Hal; :Phillips, Bill; and Daniel, Chris
2014
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2331.A25 2014
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book is designed not only to provide you with a tightly focused set of strategies, selecting only the most fundamental and powerful, but also to offer you a user-friendly method to access your level of success through employment of the strategies.

With the authors’ goal of measurable self-improvement in mind, they’ve developed a set of rubrics keyed to each ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book is designed not only to provide you with a tightly focused set of strategies, selecting only the most fundamental and powerful, but also to offer you a user-friendly method to access your level of success through employment of the strategies.

With the authors’ goal of measurable self-improvement in mind, they’ve developed a set of rubrics keyed to each chapter, allowing you to assess where you currently stand as an instructor. Using a Likert scale, the rubrics ask you to evaluate such things as your attitude toward teaching, your alignment of student learning outcomes (SLOs) in your classes with those of larger academic units, and your delivery of class material. At the book’s end you’ll find a series of rubrics that replicate those in the earlier chapters. Comparison of your responses after experimenting with the various strategies offered throughout the text should provide a solid assessment of the handbook’s effectiveness.

So, you may start today on a focused, fast path to achieving teaching excellence in your classrooms. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Using R.A.T.E. (a Rubric for Achieving Teaching Excellence
ch. 3 Deep Learning
ch. 4 Dispositions
ch. 5 Passion
ch. 6 Caring
ch. 7 Rapport
ch. 8 Excellence
ch. 9 Organization
ch. 10 Teaching Paradigms and Authority
ch. 11 Technology
ch. 12 Scholarly Teaching
ch. 13 Teaching Creatively
ch. 14 Synthesizing an Optimal Learning Environment

Afterword
Appendix A:  R.A.T.E.s
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The Scholarship of Teaching: What's the Problem?

Article
Bass, Randy
1999
Creative Thinking About Learning and Teaching, Vol. 1, No. 1
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
An early demonstration of the value to teachers (and students) of writing the scholarship of teaching (SoTL) by defining a challenge to classroom learning, a “problem” to be investigated (much as we define a problem for our guild research to address) – in this case: learning goals and student pre-knowledge.
Additional Info:
An early demonstration of the value to teachers (and students) of writing the scholarship of teaching (SoTL) by defining a challenge to classroom learning, a “problem” to be investigated (much as we define a problem for our guild research to address) – in this case: learning goals and student pre-knowledge.
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Midterm Chats

Web
2016
Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology, Illinois State University
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Formally known as a “Small Group Instructional Diagnosis” (SGID), specialists from the Illinois State Center for Teaching, Learning and Technology visit a classroom and interview the students in a consensus-building process that enables instructors to gain insights into students' perceptions about the class and their learning.
Additional Info:
Formally known as a “Small Group Instructional Diagnosis” (SGID), specialists from the Illinois State Center for Teaching, Learning and Technology visit a classroom and interview the students in a consensus-building process that enables instructors to gain insights into students' perceptions about the class and their learning.