Teaching On The Pulse

Welcome to the Wabash Center's blog series:
Teaching On The Pulse

About Lynne

Hello! As Director of the Wabash Center, I celebrate the opportunity to express myself through writing. I am a scholar who wants my work on pedagogy to be accessible to a wide gamut of readers and colleagues.  My blog column for the Wabash Center, entitled “Teaching on the Pulse,” is meant to engage colleagues in the craft of teaching and to assist during the challenging seasons of the teaching life. The stories I tell, the politics I engage, the poetic prose I offer, is meant to inspire, provide humor, and insight.  I hope you find, in my writing, a little bit of encouragement. I believe that, with intent and hard work, teaching can be improved. I hope my blog conversation assists you with improving your understanding and practice of teaching.

 

 

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