Grace Ji-Sun Kim

Grace Ji-Sun Kim received her Ph.D. from the University of Toronto and is a Professor of Theology at Earlham School of Religion. She is the author or editor of 19 books, Hope in Disarray; Keeping Hope Alive;Reimagining Spirit; Intersectional Theology; Healing Our Broken Humanity;The Homebrewed Christianity Guide to the Holy Spirit, Planetary Solidarity:Mother Daughter Speak; Intercultural Ministry; Making Peace with the Earth; Embracing the Other; Here I Am; Christian Doctrines for Global Gender Justice; Theological Reflections on “Gangnam Style”; Contemplations from the Heart; Reimagining with Christian Doctrines; Colonialism, Han and the Transformative Power; The Holy Spirit, Chi and the Other; and The Grace of Sophia. She is a Series Editor with Dr. Joseph Cheah for Palgrave Macmillan Series, “Asian Christianity in the Diaspora”. Kim was on the American Academy of Religion’s Board of Directors as an At-Large Director and was a co-chair of AAR’s “Women of Color Scholarship, Teaching and Activism Group. Kim writes for Sojourners, EthicsDaily.com, Wabash Center and Feminist Studies in Religion (co-editor). She has also written for TIME, The Feminist Wire, Feminism and Religion, The Forum for Theological Education and The Nation. Kim is an ordained PC (USA) minister and more of her writing can be found on her blog site https://gracejisunkim.wordpress.com/. She also writes regularly for The Huffington Post, and has been a guest on MSNBC, PBS Chicago, BBC World, ABC Soul Search, Keep Hope Alive radio show and numerous podcasts. You can follow her on twitter at https://twitter.com/Gracejisunkim.

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