Re/Kindling Creativity and Imagination

Welcome to the Wabash Center's new blog series:
Re/Kindling Creativity and Imagination

The teaching life can mean encounters of wonder, an unfolding mystery replete with the occasional healing, and ever shifting awareness of the human experience.

This blog column invites reflections on the inner-workings of teaching that depends upon creativity and imagination – by both teacher and learner.

  • What approaches, habits and practices of ingenuity and courage support the (un)common experience of teaching?
  • What does it mean to incorporate creative thought and praxis in meaningful and effective ways?

Submitted reflections may be written in creative non-fiction or fiction. With any submission to this column, we encourage related submissions of original interrelated art pieces (e.g., poetry, video, visual art, music).

We invite bloggers and video-loggers across the fields of religion and theology, as well as interdisciplinarians, to engage the conversation on "Rekindling Creativity and Imagination."

Instructions for blog writers and vlog makers: 

https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu/resources/blog/instructions-for-blog-writers/. The instructions are focused on written blogs, yet the same principles apply to vlog creation as well.

Honorarium: Writers will be provided with a $100 honorarium for each blog or vlog post that is published on the Wabash Center website.

Send blogs or vlogs and questions to: Dr. P. Kimberleigh Jordan, jordank@wabash.edu.

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Recent Posts

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“Write your name, for me, please,” she asked, a sturdy index finger tapping on a piece of paper, on the table at my aunt’s house. She was my paternal grandmother, Johanna, or Teacher Kate, as many people called her, and she was visiting her family in Toronto from Guyana. ...

During the past year, two of my favorite Brazilian writers and educators, Luiz Antonio Simas and Luiz Rufino collaborated on yet another book: Encantamento: Sobre a Política da Vida (Incantation: On the Politics of Life).  One of the central affirmations of their work (which follows their previous co-authored publications: ...

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