Teaching and Traumatic Events

Welcome to the Wabash Center's blog series:

Teaching and Traumatic Events 

Current events are pressing conversations about trauma and traumatic events in classrooms across higher education, not just those associated with theology and religion, and the Wabash Center is seeking to be responsive to the need for faculty conversation about the topic and to provide effective teaching resources.

Over the course of the next semester and into the summer, weekly blog posts from a team of ten writers will address this topic. We look forward to their posts and encourage comments and conversations about “Teaching and Traumatic Events.” 

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If you would like to write for this blog series, please contact Dr. Paul Myhre, myhrep@wabash.edu

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More than once, a student has reported on a trauma unfolding in real time in the middle of class. Students with laptops open, or phones nearby, have shared breaking news of university lockdowns or school shootings. Just this semester, in the hours surrounding classes, we’ve seen gun violence and ...

Over the past few years, I’ve come to cherish the opportunity to observe others teach. Teaching my own courses, I don’t get the chance to do this as much as I would like, but it’s one of my favorite parts of the profession. I love a good ...

Over the past few months, the entries in this blog series have attempted to provide guidance and insight related to the pedagogical challenges of teaching traumatic materials. The series was initiated to provide a sense of reassurance about facing these challenges. By discussing the range of challenges, the variety of ...

Over the past several years, there have been any number of events that have prompted professors to abandon their syllabi and lesson plans and create space for addressing events unfolding outside the walls of the classroom. This in-breaking of the contemporary, this pressure of the immediate, is often traumatic in ...

I don’t recall ever meeting anyone who sought out their own trauma. Those most prepared for the causal event were still caught unawares. As I’ve said before, trauma insists on passivity. That’s why I am a bit weary of valorizing people who did the so-called right thing ...