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Free Speech on Campus

Book
Ben-Porath, Sigal R.
2017
University of Pennsylvania Press
LC72.2.B46 2017
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Changes in Higher Education

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From the University of California, Berkeley, to Middlebury College, institutions of higher learning increasingly find themselves on the front lines of cultural and political battles over free speech. Repeatedly, students, faculty, administrators, and politically polarizing invited guests square off against one another, assuming contrary positions on the limits of thought and expression, ...
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From the University of California, Berkeley, to Middlebury College, institutions of higher learning increasingly find themselves on the front lines of cultural and political battles over free speech. Repeatedly, students, faculty, administrators, and politically polarizing invited guests square off against one another, assuming contrary positions on the limits of thought and expression, respect for differences, the boundaries of toleration, and protection from harm.

In Free Speech on Campus, political philosopher Sigal Ben-Porath examines the current state of the arguments, using real-world examples to explore the contexts in which conflicts erupt, as well as to assess the place of identity politics and concern with safety and dignity within them. She offers a useful framework for thinking about free-speech controversies both inside and outside the college classroom, shifting the focus away from disputes about legality and harm and toward democracy and inclusion. Ben-Porath provides readers with strategies to de-escalate tensions and negotiate highly charged debates surrounding trigger warnings, safe spaces, and speech that verges on hate. Everyone with a stake in campus controversies—professors, students, administrators, and informed members of the wider public—will find something valuable in Ben-Porath's illuminating discussion of these crucially important issues. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Ch 1. The State of the Debate

Ch 2. Inclusive Freedom

Ch 3. Identity and Free Speech on the Quad

Ch 4. Putting Civility in Its Place: Free Speech in the Classroom

Conclusion and Practical Guidelines

Acknowledgments
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Reimagining the Academic Library

Book
Lewis, David W.
2016
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
Z675.U5L42 2016
Topics: Librarians as Teachers   |   Changes in Higher Education

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Abstract: Academic libraries are in the midst of significant disruption. Academic librarians and university administrators know they need to change, but are not sure how. Bits and pieces of what needs to happen are clear, but the whole picture is hard to grasp.

Reimagining the Academic Library paints a simple ...
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Abstract: Academic libraries are in the midst of significant disruption. Academic librarians and university administrators know they need to change, but are not sure how. Bits and pieces of what needs to happen are clear, but the whole picture is hard to grasp.

Reimagining the Academic Library paints a simple straightforward picture of the changes affecting academic libraries and what academic librarians need to do to respond to the changes would help to guide future library practice. The aim is to explain where academic libraries need to go and how to get there in a book that can be read in a weekend.

David Lewis provides a readable survey of the current state of academic library practice and proposes where academic libraries need to go in the future to provide value to their campuses. His primary focus is on collections as this is the area with the greatest opportunity for change and is the driver of most library cost. Lewis provides an accessible framework for thinking about how library practice needs to adjust in the digital environment.

The book will be useful not only to academic librarians, but also for librarians to share with presidents and provosts who a concise source for understanding where and how to focus their expenditures on libraries. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction: There is a Road

Part One: The Forces We Face
ch. 1 Force One: Disruption
ch. 2 Force Two: Digital Documents
ch. 3 Force Three: The Book is Changing
ch. 4 Force Four: The New Scholarly Record
ch. 5 Force Five: The Economics of Information
ch. 6 Force Six: Demographics
Interlude: A Conjecture on the Nature of Digital Information

Part Two: Steps Down the Road
ch. 7 Step One: Defining the Job
ch. 8 Step Two: Creating the Library as Place
ch. 9 Step Three: Retiring the Legacy Print Collection
ch. 10 Step Four: Preserving Digital Content
ch. 11 Step Five: Making the Money Work
ch. 12 Step Six: Working with the Smart Machine

Conclusion: Ten Things to Do Now
Bibliography
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The Idea of the PhD: The Doctorate in the Twenty-First-Century Imagination

Book
Kelly, Frances Jennifer
2017
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2386.K46 2017
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

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The Idea of the PhD: The doctorate in the twenty-first-century imagination analyses the PhD as it is articulated in diverse areas of contemporary discourse at a time in which the degree is undergoing growth, change and scrutiny worldwide. It considers not just institutional ideas of the PhD, but those of the broader ...
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The Idea of the PhD: The doctorate in the twenty-first-century imagination analyses the PhD as it is articulated in diverse areas of contemporary discourse at a time in which the degree is undergoing growth, change and scrutiny worldwide. It considers not just institutional ideas of the PhD, but those of the broader cultural and social domain as well as asking whether, and to what extent, the idea of the Doctor of Philosophy, the highest achievable university award, is being reimagined in the twenty-first century.

In a world where the PhD is undergoing significant radical change, and where inside universities, doctoral enrolments are continually climbing, as the demand for more graduates with high-level research skills increases, this book asks the following questions:

How do we understand how the PhD is currently imagined and conceptualised in the wider domain?

Where will we find ideas about the PhD, from its purpose, to the nature of research work undertaken and the kinds of pedagogies engaged, to the researchers who undertake it and are shaped by it?

International in scope, this is a text that explores the culturally inflected representation of the doctorate and its graduates in the imagination, literature and media. The Idea of the PhD contributes to the research literature in the field of doctoral education and higher education. As such, this will be a fascinating text for researchers, postgraduates and academics interested in the idea of the university. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: The Doctor of Philosophy in the Twenty-First-Century Imagination

Ch 1. The nature of doctoral research
Ch 2. The idea of the PhD researcher
Ch 3. The idea of PhD pedagogy
Ch 4. The spaces of doctoral research

Concluding remarks: Future Imaginings
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The Last Professors: The Corporate University and the Fate of the Humanities (Tenth Anniversary Edition)

Book
Donoghue, Frank
2018
Fordham University Press, New York
LB2335.7.D66 2018
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

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What makes the modern university different from any other corporation?' asked Columbia's Andrew Delbanco recently in the New York Times. 'There is more and more reason to think: less and less,' he answered.In this provocative book, Frank Donoghue shows how this growing corporate culture of higher education threatens its most fundamental values by erasing one of its defining features: the tenured professor.Taking a clear-eyed look at ...
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What makes the modern university different from any other corporation?' asked Columbia's Andrew Delbanco recently in the New York Times. 'There is more and more reason to think: less and less,' he answered.In this provocative book, Frank Donoghue shows how this growing corporate culture of higher education threatens its most fundamental values by erasing one of its defining features: the tenured professor.Taking a clear-eyed look at American higher education over the last twenty years, Donoghue outlines a web of forces—social, political, and institutional—dismantling the professoriate. Today, fewer than 30 percent of college and university teachers are tenured or on tenure tracks, and signs point to a future where professors will disappear. Why? What will universities look like without professors? Who will teach? Why should it matter? The fate of the professor, Donoghue shows, has always been tied to that of the liberal arts —with thehumanities at its core. The rise to prominence of the American university has been defined by the strength of the humanities and by the central role of the autonomous, tenured professor who can be both scholar and teacher. Yet in today's market-driven, rank- and ratings-obsessed world of higher education, corporate logic prevails: faculties are to be managed for optimal efficiency, productivity, and competitive advantage; casual armies of adjuncts and graduate students now fill the demand for teachers.Bypassing the distractions of the culture wars and other 'crises,' Donoghue sheds light on the structural changes in higher education—the rise of community colleges and for-profit universities, the frenzied pursuit ofprestige everywhere, the brutally competitive realities facing new Ph.D.s —that threaten the survival of professors as we've known them. There are no quick fixes in The Last Professors; rather, Donoghue offers his fellow teachers and scholarsan essential field guide to making their way in a world that no longer has room for their dreams. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface

ch. 1 Rhetoric, History, and the Problems of the Humanities
ch. 2 Competing in Academia
ch. 3 The Erosion of Tenure
ch. 4 Professors of the Future
ch. 5 Prestige and Prestige Envy

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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The Lives of Campus Custodians Insights into Corporatization and Civic Disengagement in the Academy

Book
Magolda, Peter M.
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB3235.M25 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

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This unique study uncovers the lives and working conditions of a group of individuals who are usually rendered invisible on college campuses--the custodians who daily clean the offices, residence halls, bathrooms and public spaces. In doing so it also reveals universities’ equally invisible practices that frequently contradict their espoused values of inclusion ...
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This unique study uncovers the lives and working conditions of a group of individuals who are usually rendered invisible on college campuses--the custodians who daily clean the offices, residence halls, bathrooms and public spaces. In doing so it also reveals universities’ equally invisible practices that frequently contradict their espoused values of inclusion and equity, and their profession that those on the margins are important members of the campus community.

This vivid ethnography is the fruit of the year’s fieldwork that Peter Magolda’s undertook at two universities. His purpose was to shine a light on a subculture that neither decision-makers nor campus community members know very much about, let alone understand the motivations and aspirations of those who perform this work; and to pose fundamental questions about the moral implications of the corporatization of higher education and its impact on its lowest paid and most vulnerable employees.

Working alongside and learning about the lives of over thirty janitorial staff, Peter Magolda becomes privy to acts of courage, resilience, and inspiration, as well as witness to their work ethic, and to instances of intolerance, inequity, and injustices. We learn the stories of remarkable people, and about their daily concerns, their fears and contributions.

Peter Magolda raises such questions as: Does the academy still believe wisdom is exclusive to particular professions or classes of people? Are universities really inclusive? Is addressing service workers’ concerns part of the mission of higher education? If universities profess to value education, why make it difficult for those on the margins, such as custodians, to “get educated.”

The book concludes with the research participants’ and the author’s reflections about ways that colleges can improve the lives of those whose underpaid and unremarked labor is so essential to the smooth running of their campuses.

Appendices provide information about the research methodology and methods, as well as a discussion of the influence of corporate managerialism on ethnographic research. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Foreword
Preface: “I See You”

Part I: The Research Study, Research Sites and Researcher
ch. 1 You Must Have Done Something Wrong
The Right Kind Of Wrong
What’s Wrong?
Writing Wrongs

ch. 2 Research Sites Insights
Cleaning Insights
Research Sites
Historical And Political Insights
Insights Unseen

ch. 3 Coming Clean—Ethnographic Origins and Milieus
The Subjective “I” And “Eye”
Lessons Learned

Part II: The Custodial Life: Family and Fear
ch. 4 Pathways To A Cleaner [’s] Life
Career Immobility
Upward Mobility
Downward Mobility
The Allure Of Custodial Work On College Campuses
Left Behind And Losing Ground

ch. 5 The Custodian Life
Grime Scenes

ch. 6 The Supervising Life
The Clean Team
The Buffer
Worker-Manager Strife

ch. 7 Fear the Worst
Primal Fear
Fear Factors
Caste-Away Fears

ch. 8 Family Matters
Family Feuds
The Compton University Family
The Harrison University Family
Family Therapy

Part III: Corporate Managerialism and Civic Disengagement
ch. 9 The Corporate Creep
Business As [Un] Usual
How’s Business? Not So Good
Getting Down To Business
A Corporate Managerialism Business Model
Going Out Of Business

ch. 10 Soiled Educational Aspirations and Civic Disengagement
Doing More Harm Than Good
The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly
Too Bad

Part IV Education and Possibilities
ch. 11 The Courage to Be [In Trouble]
Urine Trouble
Trouble Makers
Trouble In Paradise

ch. 12 A Dog’s Life
Having A Dog’s Chance
Teaching Old Dogs New Tricks
Dog-Ma

Epilogue

Compton University Staff Updates
Harrison University Updates
Miami University Updates

Appendix A: Research Methodologies And Methods
Philosophical Foundations
Fieldwork Methods Influences
Writing
Goodness Criteria

Appendix B: Unsanitized Tales From The Field
Omissions Accomplished
Fools Rush In Where Angels Fear to Tread

Conclusion
References
Index
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Transforming Understandings of Diversity in Higher Education: Demography, Democracy, and Discourse

Book
Pasque, Penny A.; Ortega, Noe; Burkhardt, John C.; Ting, and Marie P., eds.
2016
LC1099.3.T725 2016
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: This exciting new text examines one of the most important and yet elusive terms in higher education and society: What do we mean when we talk in a serious way about “diversity”?

A distinguished group of diversity scholars explore the latest discourse on diversity and how it is reflected ...
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Abstract: This exciting new text examines one of the most important and yet elusive terms in higher education and society: What do we mean when we talk in a serious way about “diversity”?

A distinguished group of diversity scholars explore the latest discourse on diversity and how it is reflected in research and practice. The chapters trace how the discourse on diversity is newly shaped after many of the 20th century concepts of race, ethnicity, gender and class have lost authority. In the academic disciplines and in public discourse, perspectives about diversity have been rapidly shifting in recent years. This is especially true in the United States where demographic changes and political attitudes have prompted new observations - some which will clash with traditional frameworks.

This text brings together scholars whose research has opened up new ways to understand the complexities of diversity in higher education. Because the essential topic under consideration is changing so quickly, the editors of this volume also have asked the contributors to reflect on the paths their own scholarship has taken in their careers, and to see how they would relate their current conceptualization of diversity to one or more of three identified themes (demography, democracy and discourse). Each chapter ends with a candid graduate student interview of the author that provides an engaged picture of how the authors wrestle with one of the most complicated topics shaping them (and all of us) as individuals and as scholars. Of interest to anyone who is following the debates about diversity issues on our campuses, the book also offers a wonderful introduction to graduate students entering a discipline where critically important ideas are still very much alive for discussion. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Phillip J. Bowman)
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Transforming Understandings of Diversity in Higher Education: History and Context (John C. Burkhardt, Christina Morton, Marie P. Ting, Penny A. Pasque, and Noe Ortega)

ch. 1 Color-Blind Ideology and the Disconnected Power-Analysis Frame Considerations for Historically Black Colleges and Universities’ Diversification (Uma M. Jayakumar and Annie S. Adamian)
ch. 2 An Interview With Uma M. Jayakumar: Social Agency and the Power of Resistance (Diane M. Back)
ch. 3 A Theory of Equity: A Social and Legal Analysis of College Access for Low-Income Students (Jarrett T. Gupton and Karen Miksch)
ch. 4 An Interview With Jarrett T. Gupton: The Value of Uncertainty and the Need for Nuance (Sheela Linstrum)
ch. 5 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Students on Campus: Fostering Inclusion Through Research, Policy, and Practice (Michael R. Woodford, Jessica Joslin, and Kristen A. Renn)
ch. 6 An Interview With Michael R. Woodford: Bringing Invisible Communities to Light: Disciplinary Norms, Collaboration and the Quest for Legitimacy (Timothy Hickey-LeClair)
ch. 7 Racially and Socioeconomically Diverse Students’ Pathways to College: An Exploration of Latin@ Students (Angela M. Locks, Dawn Person, Michelle Cuellar, Jeanette Maduena, and Melba Schneider Castro)
ch. 8 An Interview With Angela M. Locks: Understanding the Complexities of the College-Going Process (James M. Ellis)
ch. 9 Architecture of Diversity: Using the Lens and Language of Space to Examine Racialized Experiences of Students of Color on College Campuses (Michelle Samura)
ch. 10 An Interview With Michelle Samura: How the “Blue Wall” Changes Our Discourses on Race in Higher Education: Stepping Out of the Comfort Zone and Seeing Things in a Different Light (Jimin Kwon)
ch. 11 Including Disability in the Discourse: Extending and Advancing the Defi nition of Diversity in Higher Education (Allison Lombardi and Adam Lalor)
ch. 12 An Interview With Allison Lombardi: Including Disability in the Discourse (Lloyd Edward Shelton)
ch. 13 The Impact of Media Imagery on Academic Identity Development for Black Male Student Athletes (LaVar J. Charleston and Jerlando F. L. Jackson)
ch. 14 An Interview With Jerlando F. L. Jackson: An Instrumental Diversity Researcher (Carly Wegner)
ch. 15 Racialized and Gendered Experiences of African American Female Faculty at Public Community Colleges (Tamara Nichele Stevenson and Eboni M. Zamani-Gallaher)
ch. 16 An Interview With Tamara Nichele Stevenson, Surviving Racial Battle Fatigue: Cultivating Safe Spaces in Radicalized Environments (Tonya Kneff)
ch. 17 Unpacking the Mandate Rhetoric of Historically Black Colleges and Universities’ Diversity Discourses (Courtney Carter)
ch. 18 An Interview With Courtney Carter: Unpacking the Mandate Rhetoric of Historically Black Colleges and Universities’ Diversity Discourses (Demar F. Lewis IV)
ch. 19 Transforming Demography, Democracy, and Discourse Through Diversity in Education and Society (John C. Burkhardt and Marie P. Ting)

Contributors
Index
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Well-Being and Higher Education: A Strategy for Change and the Realization of Education's Greater Purposes

Book
Harward, Donald W., ed.
2016
Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C.
LA229W44.2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia   |   Changes in Higher Education

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The newest release from Bringing Theory to Practice, Well-Being and Higher Education, explores the multiple connections of well-being to higher education and why those connections matter—for the individual lives of students and those who teach; for the institution; and for whether or not the unique promise of higher education to a ...
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The newest release from Bringing Theory to Practice, Well-Being and Higher Education, explores the multiple connections of well-being to higher education and why those connections matter—for the individual lives of students and those who teach; for the institution; and for whether or not the unique promise of higher education to a democratic society can be advanced and realized.

The publication’s thirty-five original essays and provocations—by some of the most highly respected voices within and beyond the academy—address the theoretical underpinnings and practical expressions of these connections. Articles include “Higher Education, the Struggle for Democracy, and the Possibility of Classroom Grace”; “Why Well-Being is Fundamental to Liberal Learning”; “Honoring the Humanity of Our Students”; “Thriving: Expanding the Goal of Higher Education”; and “College Makes Me Feel Dangerous: On Well-Being and Nontraditional Students.”

Well-Being and Higher Education opens the discussion on learning’s connection to well-being; responds to current challenges against the state of higher education today; and brings to the forefront a conversation considering the greater purposes of higher education and the need to preserve and revive the institution’s role to look beyond itself to a greater good. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Preface
Foreword
Introduction

PART 1: Analysis and Meaning
Essays
ch. 1 Measuring and Improving the Effect of Higher Education on Subjective Well-Being (John Bronsteen)
ch. 2 Eudaimonic Well-being and Education: Probing the Connections (Carol D. Ryff)
ch. 3 Higher Education and Education in Virtue (Barry Schwartz)
ch. 4 Higher Education, the Struggle for Democracy, and the Possibility of Classroom Grace (Henry Giroux)

Provocations
ch. 5 Against the Culture of Acquiescence: Why Students Need Liberal Learning for their own Well-Being as well as the Well-Being of Society (William M. Sullivan)
ch. 6 Is Well-Being an Individual Matter? (Kazi Joshua)
ch. 7 Understanding the Complexities of Well-Being (Elizabeth Minnich)
ch. 8 The University as the Common Enemy of Opposing Views of Well-Being (Jerzy Axer)
ch. 9 Education for Well-Being (Todd Gitlin)
ch. 10 Why Well-being is Fundamental to Liberal Learning (Alexander Astin)

PART 2: Manifestation and Implementation
Essays
ch. 11 Why Flourishing? (Corey Keyes)
ch. 12 College Makes Me Feel Dangerous: On Well-Being and Nontraditional Students (David Scobey)
ch. 13 What Constitutes Indices of Well-Being Among College Students? (Sara E. Dahill-Brown & Eranda Jayawickreme)
ch. 14 Thriving: Expanding the Goal of Higher Education (Laurie Schreiner)
ch. 15 Well-Being and Student Persistence: Reframing Student Success (Tricia Seifert)
ch. 16 What Does Doing Good Mean? Well-Being and the Civic Purpose of Higher Education (Andrew Seligsohn)

Provocations
ch. 17 Student Well-Being as a Function of Identity Development (Elsa M. Núñez)
ch. 18 Student Narratives and Well-Being (Thia Wolf & Amalia Rodas)
ch. 19 Well-Being and Agency: Political Education in a Time of Crisis (Brian Murphy)
ch. 20 Spirit, Truth, and The Bright Colors of Books: Institutional Well-Being and Productive Disorder at a Black Women’s College (Mona Taylor Phillips)

PART 3: Facilitation: Curricular, Pedagogic and Across Boundaries
Essays
ch. 21 The Well-Being University (Nance Lucas & Paul Rogers)
ch. 22 Curricular Infusion of Well-Being and Science (Heidi G. Elmendorf & Joan B. Riley)
ch. 23 Bringing Together the Humanities and the Science of Well-Being to Advance Human Flourishing (James O. Pawelski)
ch. 24 Honoring the Humanity of Our Students (David Schoem)

Provocations
ch. 25 Well-Being and Being Safe: Do Guns Change Social Interactions? A Missouri Case Study (Jonathan M. Metzl)
ch. 26 Well-Being and the Community College Mission (Amanda Hyberger)
ch. 27 The Morehouse Mystique and the Collective Well-being Imperative (John Silvanus Wilson, Jr.)
ch. 28 Mobilizing Campus Communities for Well-Being (Theodore Long)
ch. 29 Why Institutional Commitment to Well-Being Bridges the Academic and Student Affairs Divide (Kevin Kruger & Stephanie A. Gordon)
ch. 30 Distilling Career Advice from the Happiness Literature (Robert H. Frank)

PART 4: The Logic of Change: Why, What, and How?
Essays
ch. 31 Institutional Transformation in the Service of Well-being: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (Eric Lister)
ch. 32 Reinventing Higher Education for the 21st Century (Peter Leyden)
ch. 33 Transforming Learning: The LEAP Challenge and the Well-Being of Students (Carol Schneider)

Provocations
ch. 34 Well-being, Disintegration and the Rebundling of Higher Education (Randy Bass)

Contributors
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