Changes in Higher Education

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Perspectives on Plagiarism and Intellectual Property in a Postmodern World

Book
Buranen, Lise and Alice M. Roy, eds.
1999
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
PN167.P47 1999
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Assessing Students   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This book offers a wealth of thinking about the complex and often contradictory definitions surrounding the concepts of plagiarism and intellectual property. The authors show that plagiarism is not nearly as simple and clear cut a phenomenon as we may think. Contributors offer many definitions and facets of plagiarism and intellectual property, demonstrating that if defining a supposedly "simple" concept is difficult, then applying multiple definitions is even harder, creating ...
Additional Info:
This book offers a wealth of thinking about the complex and often contradictory definitions surrounding the concepts of plagiarism and intellectual property. The authors show that plagiarism is not nearly as simple and clear cut a phenomenon as we may think. Contributors offer many definitions and facets of plagiarism and intellectual property, demonstrating that if defining a supposedly "simple" concept is difficult, then applying multiple definitions is even harder, creating practical problems in many realms. This volume exposes the range and breadth of these overlapping and complex issues, reflecting a postmodern sensibility of fragmentation, and clarifies some of the confusion, not by reducing plagiarism to ever-simpler definitions and providing new or better rules to apply, but by complicating the issue, examining what plagiarism and intellectual property are (and are not) in our more or less postmodern world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Pt. I Definitions
Legal and Historical Definitions
Copy Wrong: Plagiarism, Process, Property, and the Law (Laurie Stearns)
Originality, Authenticity, Imitation, and Plagiarism: Augustine's Chinese Cousins (C. Jan Swearingen)
Intellectual Property, Authority, and Social Formation: Sociohistorical Perspectives on the Author Function (James Thomas Zebroski)
Competing Notions of Authorship: A Historical Look at Students and Textbooks on Plagiarism and Cheating (Sue Carter Simmons)
Academic Definitions
Whose Words These Are I Think I Know: Plagiarism, the Postmodern, and Faculty Attitudes (Alice M. Roy)
"But I Wasn't Cheating": Plagiarism and Cross-Cultural Mythology (Lisa Buranen)
A Distant Mirror or Through the Looking Glass? Plagiarism and Intellectual Property in Japanese Education (L.M. Dryden)
The New Abolitionism Comes to Plagiarism (Rebecca Moore Howard)
Literary and Theoretical Definitions
The Illusion of Modernist Allusion and the Politics of Postmodern Plagiarism (Kevin J.H. Dettmar)
Poaching and Plagiarizing: Property, Plagiarism, and Feminist Futures (Deborah Halbert)
From Kant to Foucault: What Remains of the Author in Postmodernism (Gilbert Larochelle)
Imperial Plagiarism
Literary Borrowing and Historical Compilation in Medieval China (Robert André LaFleur)

Pt. II Applications
In the Writing Center
Writing Centers and Plagiarism (Irene L Clark)
Writing Centers and Intellectual Property: Are Faculty Members and Students Differently Entitled? (Carol Peterson Haviland and Joan Mullin)
Plagiarism, Rhetorical Theory, and the Writing Center: New Approaches, New Locations (Linda Shamoon and Deborah H. Burns)
In Academic Administration
Confusion and Conflict about Plagiarism in Law Schools and Law Practice (Terri LeClercq)
Student Plagiarism as an Institutional and Social Issue
When Collaboration Becomes Plagiarism: The Administrative Perspective (Edward M. White)
In Instruction and Research
Plagiarism as Metaphor (David Leight
The Ethics of Appropriation in Peer Writing Groups (Candace Spigelman)
The Role of Scholarly Citations in Disciplinary Economies (Shirley K. Rose)
In the Marketplace
Brand Name Use in Creative Writing: Genericide or Language Right? (Shawn M. Clankie)
GenX Occupies the Cultural Commons: Ethical Practices and Perceptions of Fair Use (John Livingston-Webber

Works Cited
Contributors
Index
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Power/Knowledge/Pedagogy: The Meaning of Democratic Education in Unsettling Times

Book
Carlson, Dennis and Michael Apple, eds.
1998
Westview Press, Boulder, CO
LC196.P68 1998
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The essays in this volume explore the educational implications of unsettling shifts in contemporary culture associated with postmodernism. These shifts include the fragmentation of established power blocs, the emergence of a politics of identity, growing inequalities between the haves and the have-nots in a new global economy, and the rise in influence of popular culture in defining who we are. In the academy, postmodernism has been associated with the emergence ...
Additional Info:
The essays in this volume explore the educational implications of unsettling shifts in contemporary culture associated with postmodernism. These shifts include the fragmentation of established power blocs, the emergence of a politics of identity, growing inequalities between the haves and the have-nots in a new global economy, and the rise in influence of popular culture in defining who we are. In the academy, postmodernism has been associated with the emergence of new theoretical perspectives that are unsettling the way we think about education. These shifts, the authors suggest, are deeply contradictory and may lead in divergent political directions—some of them quite dangerous
Power/Knowledge/Pedagogy examines these issues with regard to four broad domains of educational inquiry: state educational policy and curriculum reform, student identity formation, the curriculum as a text, and critical pedagogy. The book contributes to the dialogue on the forging of a new commonsense discourse on democratic educational renewal, attuned to the changing times in which we live. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Critical Educational Theory in Unsettling Times (Dennis Carlson and Michael W. Apple)

ch. 1 State Educational Policy And Curriculum Reform In Unsettling Times: Education in Unsettling Times: Public Intellectuals and the Promise of Cultural Studies (Henry Giroux)
ch. 2 Pulp Fictions: Education, Markets, and the Information Superhighway (Jane Kenway)
ch. 3 Citizens or Consumers? Continuity and Change in Contemporary Education Policy (Geoff Whitty)
ch. 4 Respondent: "Distressed Worlds": Social Justice Through Educational Transformations (Madeleine Arnot)

ch. 5 Becoming Right: Education and the Formation of Conservative Movements (Michael W. Apple and Anita Oliver)
ch. 6 On Shaky Grounds: Constructing White Working-Class Masculinities in the Late Twentieth Century (Michelle Fine, Lois Weis, and Judi Addelston)
ch. 7 Self and Education: Reversals and Cycles (Philip Wexler)
ch. 8 Respondent: Self Education: Identity, Self, and the New Politics of Education (Dennis Carlson)

ch. 9 Danger in the Safety Zone: Notes on Race, Resentment, and the Discourse of Crime, Violence, and Suburban Security (Cameron McCarthy, et al.)
ch. 10 Fiction, Fantasy, and Femininities: Popular Texts and Young Women’s Literacies (Linda K. Christian-Smith)
ch. 11 Image Is Nothing: Struggling to Unsettle Basal Readers and More (Patrick Shannon and Patricia Crawford)
ch. 12 Respondent: Loose Change: The Production of Texts (William G. Tierney)

ch. 13 On the Limits to Empowerment Through Critical and Feminist Pedagogies (Jennifer M. Gore)
ch. 14 Who Will Survive America? Pedagogy as Cultural Preservation (Gloria Ladson-Billings)
ch. 15 Global Politics and Local Antagonisms: Research and Practice as Dissent and Possibility (Peter McLaren and Kris Gutierrez)
ch. 16 Respondent: Pedagogy for an Oppositional Community (Kathleen Weiler)
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Organizing a Christian Mind: A Theology of Higher Education

Book
Carmody, Denise Lardner
1996
Trinity Press, Valley Forge, PA
BT738.17.C38 1996
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
"The sadness I feel," writes Denise Carmody, "stems from watching the capitulation of good schools, both Christian and secular, to the pragmatism of recent times and their concomitant loss of a pervasive vision of their enterprise." Such capitulation has produced a serious crisis in American higher education, including also church-sponsored higher education, leading to a preoccupation with research and publication instead of teaching and to frequent inattention to ultimate human ...
Additional Info:
"The sadness I feel," writes Denise Carmody, "stems from watching the capitulation of good schools, both Christian and secular, to the pragmatism of recent times and their concomitant loss of a pervasive vision of their enterprise." Such capitulation has produced a serious crisis in American higher education, including also church-sponsored higher education, leading to a preoccupation with research and publication instead of teaching and to frequent inattention to ultimate human questions. Following an introductory discussion of teaching, research and publication, and "the difference that God makes," the book moves through such topics as human nature, physical nature, politics, divinity or ultimate reality, and education (including community services, academic freedom, and the arts and sciences). A concluding chapter focuses on vision in higher education, that is, gaining a clear sense of what a collegiate venture wants to do and the kind of curriculum and teaching that squares with what a college is trying to achieve. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 On Human Nature
ch. 2 On Physical Nature
ch. 3 On Politics
ch. 4 On Divinity
ch. 5 Education Revisited

Conclusion
Index
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Ethics and the University

Book
Davis, Michael
1999
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2324.D38 1999
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Brings together two related topics: the practice of ethics in the university, and the teaching of practical or applied ethics in the university. Surveys practical ethics, offering an explanation of its recent emergence as a university subject, and identifies some problems that the subject generates for universities. Examines research ethics, including the problem of plagiarism, and discusses how ethics can be integrated into the university curriculum and what part particular ...
Additional Info:
Brings together two related topics: the practice of ethics in the university, and the teaching of practical or applied ethics in the university. Surveys practical ethics, offering an explanation of its recent emergence as a university subject, and identifies some problems that the subject generates for universities. Examines research ethics, including the problem of plagiarism, and discusses how ethics can be integrated into the university curriculum and what part particular cases should play in teaching of ethics. Also looks at sexual ethics. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The ethics boom, philosophy, and the university
ch. 2 Academic freedom, academic ethics, and professorial ethics
ch. 3 The new world of research ethics: a preliminary map
ch. 4 Science: after such knowledge, what responsibility?
ch. 5 University research and the wages of commerce
ch. 6 Of Babbage and kings: a study of a plagiarism complaint
ch. 7 Ethics across the curriculum
ch. 8 Case method
ch. 9 A moral problem in teaching of practical ethics
ch. 10 Sex and the university

Index
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The New Academic Generation: A Profession in Transformation

Book
Finkelstein, Martin, Robert Seal, Jack Schuster
1998
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB1778.2.F6 1998
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Higher education researchers Martin Finkelstein, Robert Seal, and Jack Schuster focus on the changing face of American academe, as women, foreign-born, and minority scholars enter the professorate in large numbers. Considering this trend, the authors argue that the next generation will usher in an era of dramatic changes and that the long-term implications of these changes will be profound. 7 illustrations. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Higher education researchers Martin Finkelstein, Robert Seal, and Jack Schuster focus on the changing face of American academe, as women, foreign-born, and minority scholars enter the professorate in large numbers. Considering this trend, the authors argue that the next generation will usher in an era of dramatic changes and that the long-term implications of these changes will be profound. 7 illustrations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Preface and Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Context: The Faculty at a Crossroads
ch. 2 Taking the Measure of a New Academic Generation
ch. 3 Demographic Contours of the New Academic Generation
ch. 4 The Preparation and Careers of the New Academic Generation
ch. 5 The New Academic Generation at Work
ch. 6 The Attitudes and Values of the New Academic Generation
ch. 7 The New Academic Generation and the Future of American Higher Education
App. A Extended Tables
App. B Selected Comparisons of New- and Senior-Faculty Cohorts
App. C 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty: Faculty Questionnaire

Notes
References
Index
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Computer Networking and Scholarly Communication in the Twenty-First-Century University

Book
Harrison, Teresa M. and Timothy Stephen, eds.
1996
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
T58.5.C655 1996
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This book explores the various ways in which computer networking, and more specifically the Internet, is changing the practices, the structure, and the products of academic scholarship. It considers research, teaching, and dissemination of knowledge across a range of disciplines in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences in order to identify particular uses of networking that will come to constitute the academic world of the future. The contributors consider such ...
Additional Info:
This book explores the various ways in which computer networking, and more specifically the Internet, is changing the practices, the structure, and the products of academic scholarship. It considers research, teaching, and dissemination of knowledge across a range of disciplines in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences in order to identify particular uses of networking that will come to constitute the academic world of the future. The contributors consider such themes as how networking and particular software environments can be used to support inquiry within research specialties and how scholars in diverse disciplines respond to the availability of new networked channels of scholarly communication. In the context of education, they argue that networking can reconfigure the process of learning, encompassing new audiences, new relationships with teachers, and new learning skills adapted for the network environment. The products of such new configurations are also discussed. The future of electronic journal publication is considered by innovators who have designed some of the first experiments in refereed electronic journal publication. Finally, the new responsibilities and roles of the academic library and academic publishers in a networked environment are debated. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Computer Networking, Communication, and Scholarship (Teresa M. Harrison and Timothy Stephen)
ch. 2 How Is the Medium the Message? Notes on the Design of Networked Communication (Peter Lyman)
ch. 3 Institutional and Policy Issues in the Development of the Digital Library (Brian Kahin)
ch. 4 Assessing the Costs of Technopoly: Constructing Scholarly Services in Today's Network Environment (Timothy Stephen and Teresa M. Harrison)
ch. 5 Computer Networking and Textual Sources in the Humanities (Susan Hockey)
ch. 6 Cooperative and Collaborative Mediated Research (Duncan Sanderson)
ch. 7 How Do You Get a Hundred Strangers to Agree?: Computer Mediated Communication and Collaboration (Fay Sudweeks and Sheizaf Rafaeli)
ch. 8 Living Inside the (Operating) System: Community in Virtual Reality (John Unsworth)
ch. 9 The Multifaceted and Novel Nature of Using Cyber-Texts as Research Data
ch. 10 Computer Networking in Ornithology (Jack P. Hailman)
ch. 11 Roadmap to Scholarly Electronic Communication and Publishing at the American Mathematical Society (David L. Rodgers, Kevin W. Curnow, Drury R. Burton, Greg S. Ullmann, William B. Woolf)
ch. 12 The Labyrinth: An Electronic Information Network for Medieval Studies (Deborah Everhart)
ch. 13 Online Education: The Future (Linda Harasim)
ch. 14 Hypermedia and Higher Education (J. L. Lemke)
ch. 15 Equal Access to Computer Networks for Students and Scholars with Disabilities (Sheryl E. Burgstahler)
ch. 16 Medieval Misfits: An Undergraduate Discussion List (Carolyn P. Schriber)
ch. 17 VICE in REST (William D. Graziadei)
ch. 18 The Solidarity Network: Universities, Computer-Mediated Communication, and Labor Studies in Canada (Jeff Taylor)
ch. 19 Creating a Virtual Academic Community: Scholarship and Community in Wide-Area Multiple-User Synchronous Discussions (Michael Day, Eric Crump, Rebeca Rickly)
ch. 20 Dimensions of Electronic Journals (Brian Gaines)
ch. 21 Electronic Academic Journals: From Disciplines to "Seminars"? (Jean-Claude Guédon)
ch. 22 The Electronic Journal and Its Implications for the Electronic Library (Cliff McKnight, Andrew Dillon, Brian Shackel)
ch. 23 The Role of Academic Libraries in the Dissemination of Scholarly Information in the Electronic Environment (Lyman Ross, Paul Philbin, Merri Beth Lavagnino, Albert Joy)
ch. 24 The Body in the Virtual Library: Rethinking Scholarly Communication (Kenneth Arnold)
ch. 25 Equality in Access to Network Information by Scholars with Disabilities (Tom McNulty)
ch. 26 Building New Tools for the Twenty-First-Century University: Providing Access to Visual Information (David L. Austin)
ch. 27 A Short Primer for Communicating on the Global Net (John December)

List of Contributors
Index
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Holocaust Education and the Church-Related College: Restoring Ruptured Traditions

Book
Haynes, Stephen R.
1997
Greenwood Press, Westport, CT
D804.33.H39 1997
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
American church-related liberal arts colleges are dedicated to two traditions: Christian thought and liberal learning. According to Haynes, the moral continuity of these traditions was severed by the Holocaust. Because so many representations of these traditions contributed to the Nazis' ideological and physical efforts to annihilate millions of men, women, and children, it is unclear whether these traditions can any longer be said to facilitate human flourishing. Haynes presents a ...
Additional Info:
American church-related liberal arts colleges are dedicated to two traditions: Christian thought and liberal learning. According to Haynes, the moral continuity of these traditions was severed by the Holocaust. Because so many representations of these traditions contributed to the Nazis' ideological and physical efforts to annihilate millions of men, women, and children, it is unclear whether these traditions can any longer be said to facilitate human flourishing. Haynes presents a convincing argument that the post-Holocaust church-related college can participate in the restoration of these ruptured traditions through a commitment to Holocaust Education. This book provides valuable information for teachers who already offer a Holocaust course or for those who are considering doing so. In addition, the author presents an accurate picture of Holocaust Education at church-related colleges through an analysis of his nationwide survey. This book will be an important resource for scholars, teachers, and administrators. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Preface

ch. 1 Holocaust Education in America: Reviewing, Assessing, Imagining
ch. 2 The Church-Related College: Identifying the Tradition, Privileging the Tradition
ch. 3 Ordinary, Educated Men: The Holocaust and the Liberal Arts Ideal
ch. 4 The Long Journey: The Holocaust and the Christian Scholar
ch. 5 The Postmodern Challenge: The Holocaust and Higher Education in the Twenty-first Century
ch. 6 Toward Effective Holocaust Education: Challenges and Strategies
ch. 7 A Radical Proposal for Holocaust Education

App A Survey of Holocaust Education at American Church-Related Liberal Arts Colleges
Bibliography
Index
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Dancing with the Devil: Information Technology and the New Competition in Higher Education

Book
Katz, Richard N.
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2341.K35 1999
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Today's Colleges and Universities face a new environment in which information technology is rapidly becoming the preferred mode of learning and academic institutions can no longer rely on traditional methods to survive and prosper. In this collection of essays, seven highly respected institutional, association, and financial leaders examine the formidable challenges facing all types of campuses. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Today's Colleges and Universities face a new environment in which information technology is rapidly becoming the preferred mode of learning and academic institutions can no longer rely on traditional methods to survive and prosper. In this collection of essays, seven highly respected institutional, association, and financial leaders examine the formidable challenges facing all types of campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Can Colleges and Universities Survive in the Information Age?
ch. 2 Competitive Strategies for Higher Education in the Information Age
ch. 3 Assessing the New Competitive Landscape
ch. 4 The New Technologies and the Future of Residential Undergraduate Education
ch. 5 Developing and Using Technology as a Strategic Asset
ch. 6 Tying Things Together: Advice for the Practitioner

Index
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The Growing Use of Part-Time Faculty: Understanding Causes and Effects

Book
Leslie, David W., ed.
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.72.G768 1998
Topics: Adjuncts   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Part-time and temporary faculty now constitute a majority of all those teaching in colleges and universities. This volume presents analyses of the changes in academic work, in faculty careers, and in the economic conditions in higher education that are associated with the shift away from full-time academic jobs. Issues for research, policy, and practice are discussed.

The chapters in this volume were originally prepared for a conference on ...
Additional Info:
Part-time and temporary faculty now constitute a majority of all those teaching in colleges and universities. This volume presents analyses of the changes in academic work, in faculty careers, and in the economic conditions in higher education that are associated with the shift away from full-time academic jobs. Issues for research, policy, and practice are discussed.

The chapters in this volume were originally prepared for a conference on part-time and adjunct faculty sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.This is the 104th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Higher Education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Using Part-Time Faculty More Effectively (F. Jacobs)
A Framework for Assessing Trends in Academic Careers (J. Lawrence)
The Changing Pattern of Employment Relations (M. Rasell & E. Appelbaum)
The Subfaculty (D. Langenberg)
Variations in the Characteristics of Part-Time Faculty by General Fields of Instruction and Research (E. Benjamin)
Implications for Knowledge Production and Careers in Science (C. Gaddy)
Two-Tiered Faculty Systems and Organizational Outcomes (P. Tolbert)
Part-Time Faculty, Quality Programs, and Economic Realities (J. Haeger)
Adjunct Faculty in the Community College: Realities and Challenges (B. Wyles)
New Directions for Research, Policy Development, and Practice (D. Leslie)
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A Professor's Work

Book
Melko, Matthew
1998
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LB1778.2.M45 1998
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
A Professor's Work attempts to clear up questions about the role of the college professor in society by providing a field study of what a professor actually does. The author organizes a year of his work and his colleagues into an overview of a years teaching, research, and service. The first section describes the service work, including a depiction of the search for a new faculty member, and a committee ...
Additional Info:
A Professor's Work attempts to clear up questions about the role of the college professor in society by providing a field study of what a professor actually does. The author organizes a year of his work and his colleagues into an overview of a years teaching, research, and service. The first section describes the service work, including a depiction of the search for a new faculty member, and a committee that investigated the appearance of extremely large general educational classes. Then the teaching section focuses on the teaching and evaluation of a single course, and the dealing with problems encountered by the wide variety of students who attend an urban university. Finally, the research section exposes the relationship of writing and publishing to the conflicts and interactions of scholars and with the impact the study had on the university community. The author also includes a representation of community activities, the relationship of a professor's work to his family life, and an evaluation of professors studied against two theoretical models of professional behavior and activity. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Perceptions of the Professor
ch. 2 Inside the Department
ch. 3 How an Intrepid Band of Professors Confronted the General Education Monsters
ch. 4 University Encounters
ch. 5 But Don't Professors Also Teach Courses
ch. 6 And Of Course There Were Students
ch. 7 The Scholar Writes War and Peace, Participates in the Scientific Enterprise, and Receives a Call From the East
ch. 8 A Professor's Work Photographs
ch. 9 Serving the Community
ch. 10 Even Professors Have Families
ch. 11 Is the Professor a Professional?

Cast
References
About the Author
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The Learning Revolution: The Challenge of Information Technology in the Academy

Book
Oblinger, Diana G. and Sean C. Rush, eds.
1997
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
T58.5.L43 1997
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This book addresses the fundamental changes occurring in higher education, centering on productivity, quality, access, and competitiveness. The 15 chapters illustrate how public and private institutions are providing leadership for the higher education revolution. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book addresses the fundamental changes occurring in higher education, centering on productivity, quality, access, and competitiveness. The 15 chapters illustrate how public and private institutions are providing leadership for the higher education revolution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 "The Learning Revolution: (Diana G. Oblinger and Sean C. Rush)
ch. 2 "The Transformation of Higher Education" (Michael Hooker)
ch. 3 "Another Paradigm Shift" (Charlie Tuller)
ch. 4 "Higher Education in the Information Age" (Gregory C. Farrington)
ch. 5 "Moving Toward a Mobile Teaching and Learning Environment: Using Notebook Computers" (Donald Sargeant)
ch. 6 "Project Vision: Toward More Active and Collaborative Learning" (Robert E. Dunham)
ch. 7 "Reengineering the Undergraduate Curriculum" (Jack M. Wilson)
ch. 8 "Collaborative Legal Education" (Steve H. Nickles and Craig Runde)
ch. 9 "Transforming the Community College" (Terry O'Banion)
ch. 10 "Tradition and Change in Quest of Excellence" (Thomas K. Hearn, Jr.)
ch. 11 "The Library of the Future" (Suzanne E. Thorin and Virginia D. Sorkin)
ch. 12 "A Learning Enterprise for the CyberCentury: The Western Governors University" (Michael O. Leavitt)
ch. 13 "Life on the Wired Campus: How Information Technology Will Shape Institutional Futures" (William F. Massy)
ch. 14 "Asynchronous Learning Networks: New Possibilities" (A. Frank Mayadas);
ch. 15 "Challenges of the Learning Revolution"
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The University in Ruins

Book
Readings, Bill
1996
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB 2322.2.R42 1996
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
It is no longer clear what role the University plays in society. The structure of the contemporary University is changing rapidly, and we have yet to understand what precisely these changes will mean. Is a new age dawning for the University, the renaissance of higher education under way? Or is the University in the twilight of its social function, the demise of higher education fast approaching? We can answer such ...
Additional Info:
It is no longer clear what role the University plays in society. The structure of the contemporary University is changing rapidly, and we have yet to understand what precisely these changes will mean. Is a new age dawning for the University, the renaissance of higher education under way? Or is the University in the twilight of its social function, the demise of higher education fast approaching? We can answer such questions only if we look carefully at the different roles the University has played historically and then imagine how it might be possible to live, and to think, amid the ruins of the University. Tracing the roots of the modern American University in German philosophy and in the work of British thinkers such as Newman and Arnold, Bill Readings argues that the integrity of the modern University has been linked to the nation-state, which it has served by promoting and protecting the idea of a national culture. But now the nation-state is in decline, and national culture no longer needs to be either promoted or protected. Increasingly, universities are turning into transnational corporations, and the idea of culture is being replaced by the discourse of "excellence." On the surface, this does not seem particularly pernicious. The author cautions, however, that we should not embrace this techno-bureaucratic approach too quickly. The new University of Excellence is a corporation driven by market forces, and, as such, is more interested in profit margins than in thought. Readings urges us to imagine how to think, without concession to corporate excellence or recourse to romantic nostalgia within an institution in ruins. The result is a passionate appeal for a new community of thinkers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 The Idea of Excellence
ch. 3 The Decline of the Nation-State
ch. 4 The University within the Limits of Reason
ch. 5 The University and the Idea of Culture
ch. 6 Literary Culture
ch. 7 Culture Wars and Cultural Studies
ch. 8 The Posthistorical University
ch. 9 The Time of Study: 1968
ch. 10 The Scene of Teaching
ch. 11 Dwelling in the Ruins
ch. 12 The Community of Dissensus

Notes
Index
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Apologia: Contextualization, Globalization, and Mission in Theological Education

Book
Stackhouse, Max L.
1988
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
BR118.S69 1988
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Apologia is about contemporary theological education--its current state and its future. While many current trends in seminaries and departments of theology bring important new insights to the study of religion, says Max Stackhouse they also erode-- sometimes unwittingly--the capacity to speak of God, truth, and justice with warranted confidence. Theology is thereby undermined in all arenas--not only in academia, but in the life of the church and society.
This ...
Additional Info:
Apologia is about contemporary theological education--its current state and its future. While many current trends in seminaries and departments of theology bring important new insights to the study of religion, says Max Stackhouse they also erode-- sometimes unwittingly--the capacity to speak of God, truth, and justice with warranted confidence. Theology is thereby undermined in all arenas--not only in academia, but in the life of the church and society.
This book not only exposes the frailties of several current ideologies, but also draws noted scholars from five continents and a seminary faculty into an interdisciplinary discussion of the most significant recent literature on theological education. The results are fresh proposals for the reconstructing of theological education on foundations that are contextually alert, globally concerned, and mission-oriented.
Apologia is a ground-breaking work, a book that begins and ends in dialogue, and points toward the ways in which Christian theology will have to redefine itself if it is to actively shape, and not merely reflect, the context in which we live. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

Part I A Dialogue
ch. 1 An Introduction
ch. 2 Our Context
ch. 3 Texts and Contexts
ch. 4 Affirmations and Translations

Part II Wider Discussions
ch. 5 Consultations and Globalization
ch. 6 Praxis and Solidarity
ch. 7 Poesis and Contextuality
ch. 8 Theoria and Phenomenology

Part III A Proposal
ch. 9 Apologia
ch. 10 Orthodoxy?
ch. 11 Praxiology?
ch. 12 Doxology

Appendix 1 A Response to Apologia, with Special Reference to Problems of Text and Context
Appendix 2 A Response to Apologia, with Special Reference to the Seminary as a Faith Community
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Wabash tree

Educating Citizens in a Multicultural Society

Book
Banks, James A.
1997
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC1099.3.B364 1997
Topics: Liberal Arts   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The thousands of immigrants who enter the United States each year, the increasing number of children who speak a first language other than English in the schools, and the ever-widening gap between rich and poor are some of the realities that educators face today. Given these conditions, it is increasingly difficult to prepare students for democratic citizenship. Bringing together years of work as an expert on multicultural education, James Banks ...
Additional Info:
The thousands of immigrants who enter the United States each year, the increasing number of children who speak a first language other than English in the schools, and the ever-widening gap between rich and poor are some of the realities that educators face today. Given these conditions, it is increasingly difficult to prepare students for democratic citizenship. Bringing together years of work as an expert on multicultural education, James Banks shows how we can prepare students to effectively participate in a society that reflects ethnic, cultural, and class diversity at the same time that we promote national unity and the public good. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword
Preface

Part I Citizenship Education and Diversity
ch. 1 Reconstructing Citizenship Education
ch. 2 Citizenship Education in a Multicultural Society
ch. 3 Teaching Social Studies for Decision-Making and Citizen Action

Pt. II Citizenship Education and Epistemological Issues
ch. 4 Ethnicity, Social Science Research, and Education
ch. 5 The Persistence of Ethnicity: Research and Teaching Implications
Pt. III Citizenship Education and the Dimensions of Multicultural Education
ch. 6 Multicultural Education and Curriculum Transformation
ch. 7 Equity Pedagogy and Multicultural Education
ch. 8 Citizenship Education and the Development of Democratic Racial Attitudes
Pt. IV Educating Teachers, Leaders, and Citizens
ch. 9 Teaching Multicultural Literacy to Teachers
ch. 10 Multicultural Education: Goals for the Twenty-First Century
ch. 11 Cultural Democracy and Citizenship Education

References
Index
About the Author
Cover image

Creating a Learning Society: Initiatives for Education and Technology

Book
Garmer and Firestone
1996
Aspen Institute, Washington, D.C.
LB1028.3.G37 1996
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The Aspen Institute's Forum on Communications and Society (FOCAS) is a group of chief executive officers or their equivalents from business, government and the nonprofit sector who meet annually to suggest innovative ways that business, government, and the nonprofit sector can collaborate to use communications and information goods and services for the betterment of society. This report incorporates the work of FOCAS members and their representatives to address specific issues ...
Additional Info:
The Aspen Institute's Forum on Communications and Society (FOCAS) is a group of chief executive officers or their equivalents from business, government and the nonprofit sector who meet annually to suggest innovative ways that business, government, and the nonprofit sector can collaborate to use communications and information goods and services for the betterment of society. This report incorporates the work of FOCAS members and their representatives to address specific issues of technology in the K-12 classroom, as well as broader issues of lifelong learning and technology outside the classroom. In particular, the report offers a range of initiatives for overcoming the barriers to funding the implementation of technology in schools and training teachers how to integrate technology in the classroom. Emphasis is placed on the creation of incentives for students and educators to use technology to enhance learning. The body of the report is divided into three main sections. The first section discusses learning and technology; the changing paradigm for learning; the challenge of universal access; the potential of educational technology; technology needs of American schools; barriers to equitable access; and the need for collaboration. The second section focuses on promoting equitable access to technology in the classroom; critical issues of funding; networking the classroom; creating a responsive local technology demand and delivery system; teacher support and training; and promoting public support. The third section discusses technology and learning outside the classroom; the need for a new learning environment; barriers to lifelong learning; public attitudes toward education/learning; the role of technology; developing community-based resources for learning; and building a society that values lifelong learning. Appendices include Societal Goals Working Group Report, FOCAS representatives and resources, and the Aspen Institute Communications and Society Program. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Report

Part 1- Learning and technology

Part 2 - Promoting equitable access to technology in the classroom
Teacher support and training
Promoting public support

Part 3 - Technology and learning outside the classroom

Endnotes
Appendices
Cover image

Increasing the Teaching Role of Academic Libraries

Book
Kirk, Thomas G., ed.
1984
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
Z675.U5I5 1984
Topics: Librarians as Teachers   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The quiet revolution that has occurred in academic libraries has resulted in the development of programs of bibliographic or library instruction. The chapters in this volume reflect the tremendous diversity and scope of activities that fall under the umbrella of a bibliographic or library instruction program. The goal of all of these activities is to help individuals develop the intellectual and manipulative skill needed for the retrieval, assimilation, and critical ...
Additional Info:
The quiet revolution that has occurred in academic libraries has resulted in the development of programs of bibliographic or library instruction. The chapters in this volume reflect the tremendous diversity and scope of activities that fall under the umbrella of a bibliographic or library instruction program. The goal of all of these activities is to help individuals develop the intellectual and manipulative skill needed for the retrieval, assimilation, and critical analysis of information. This volume is intended to provide a compact overview of this expanding area of library service. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching, research, and service : the academic library's role (Carla J. Stoffle, Alan E. Guskin, and Joseph A. Boisse)
ch. 2 Emerson's library legacy : concepts of bibliographic instruction (John Mark Tucker)
ch. 3 Library use and the development of critical thought (Stephen H. Plum)
ch. 4 Patterns for research (Cerise Oberman)
ch. 5 Alternatives to the term paper (Evan I. Farber)
ch. 6 The faculty/librarian partnership (Rose Ann Simon)
ch. 7 Bibliographic instruction programs in academic libraries (Hannelore B. Rader)
ch. 8 Improving teaching : how a clearinghouse helps (Carolyn A. Kirkendall)
ch. 9 More information : bibliographic instruction resources (Linda L. Phillips)
Concluding comments (Thomas G. Kirk)
Article cover image

"Why Universities Need Technology Strategies"

Article
Daniel, Sir John S.
1997
Change July/Aug (1997): 11-17
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Editorial. Explores the implications of mega-university for higher education in United States. Issues on higher education crisis; Propositions regarding higher education systems in United States; Discussion of technology strategy.
Additional Info:
Editorial. Explores the implications of mega-university for higher education in United States. Issues on higher education crisis; Propositions regarding higher education systems in United States; Discussion of technology strategy.
Article cover image

"Preserve and Transform: Integrating Technology Into Academic Life"

Article
Gilbert, Steven W.
1999
Leadership Abstracts 12, no. 4, 1999: (1-5)
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Collegiate Life: An Obituary"

Article
Levine, Arthur, and Jeanette S. Cureton
1998
Change May/Jun (1998): 14-17 & 51
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Presents surveys on what students want from their colleges and the kind of life they led in their respective universities. Things students are asking from their colleges; Why academic institutions are being forced to expand their psychological counselling services; Types of academic hurdles students face. INSETS: Studies used in this article;Resources.
Additional Info:
Presents surveys on what students want from their colleges and the kind of life they led in their respective universities. Things students are asking from their colleges; Why academic institutions are being forced to expand their psychological counselling services; Types of academic hurdles students face. INSETS: Studies used in this article;Resources.
Cover image
Wabash tree

Engines For Education

Book
Schank, Roger C. and Chip Cleary
1995
Lawrence Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ
LB1028.43.S32 1995
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Most six-year-olds can't wait to go to school on that first day in September. It's a sign of coming of age. They get to go to school like the big kids. For an alarmingly large number of these children, however, boredom, anxiety, and fear of learning quickly set in.

This happens because societies build schools that achieve much less than they promise, are frustrating for students, and generally ...
Additional Info:
Most six-year-olds can't wait to go to school on that first day in September. It's a sign of coming of age. They get to go to school like the big kids. For an alarmingly large number of these children, however, boredom, anxiety, and fear of learning quickly set in.

This happens because societies build schools that achieve much less than they promise, are frustrating for students, and generally fail to help children become adults who can think for themselves. The development of flexible, inquiring minds has rarely been the primary consideration in the design of educational systems. Making students into proper members of society has usually been of much greater concern than developing students who are creative thinkers. Today's schools are organized around yesterday's ideas, needs, and resources.

The purpose of this volume is to raise consciousness about the changes needed in the educational system. It is concerned with what is wrong with the educational system and how to improve it. It presents a pragmatic view of what education could be through the use of computer technology — technology permitting us to pursue the radical notion that children must be allowed to guide their own education because interested learners learn more. Children can and will become voracious learners if they are in charge of their own education. This does not mean letting them play video games all day, but it does mean allowing them to pursue the intellectual goals that interest them, rather than being force-fed knowledge according to someone else's schedule. The school system must face the responsibility of creating learning environments that are so much fun that children cannot wait to get up in the morning and go to school. This volume describes the progress being made at The Institute for the Learning Sciences using computers to provide motivating environments for learning — environments that enable students to explore new worlds, and learn things by doing them. This technology will allow society to support what is one of the most important parts of a good educational system: the cultivation of individual initiative in students. This text documents the authors' work from the cognitive psychology which underlies it on through to guided tours of a number of the software learning environments they've developed. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Colophon
Preface
Acknowledgments
ch. 1 Time for a Change
ch. 2 What Makes People Smart
ch. 3 Cultural Unliteracy
ch. 4 Natural Learning
ch. 5 Learning By Doing
ch. 6 Incidental Learning
ch. 7 Learning By Reflection
ch. 8 Case-Based Teaching
ch. 9 Learning By Exploring
ch. 10 Goal-Directed Learning and Creating the Software We Need
ch. 11 Goal-Based Scenarios and the Open Curriculum
ch. 12 A Look to the Future
Epilogue
References
Author Index
Subject Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Changing College Classrooms: New Teaching and Learning Strategies for an Increasingly Complex World

Book
Halpern, Diane F. et. al.
1994
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.C4543 1994
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
"This book is an exciting and highly useful addition to the literature on higher education and teaching. It provides concrete information and suggestions for the improvement of teaching, student learning, and the whole educational process" - from the foreword by Lee R. Kershner, former Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, California State University System (CSU), and Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley, co-chair, Advisory Board. CSU Institute for Teaching and Learning. Providing ...
Additional Info:
"This book is an exciting and highly useful addition to the literature on higher education and teaching. It provides concrete information and suggestions for the improvement of teaching, student learning, and the whole educational process" - from the foreword by Lee R. Kershner, former Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, California State University System (CSU), and Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley, co-chair, Advisory Board. CSU Institute for Teaching and Learning. Providing college students with the knowledge, skills, and abilities that will prepare them for today's complex world demands a major transformation in college classrooms - from passive to active learning, from traditional textbooks to hands-on use of technology, from restrictive ways of thinking to diverse multicultural perspectives. This book combines a range of promising instructional strategies with helpful guidelines for assessing the effectiveness of instruction. It will help faculty and administrators equip students with the creative, critical, technological, and problem-solving skills - as well as a coherent sense of multicultural awareness - necessary to thrive in a rapidly changing society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
The Editor
The Contributors

ch. 1 Rethinking College Instruction for a Changing World

Part 1 Instructional Strategies That Promote Active Learning
ch. 2 Inquiry as a Tool in Critical Thinking
ch. 3 Using Examples to Teach Concepts
ch. 4 Fostering Creativity Through Problem Solving
ch. 5 Cooperative Learning in the Classroom
ch. 6 Questioning Techniques for the Active Classroom

Part 2 Developing Multicultural Understanding
ch. 7 Cultural Diversity and Curricular Coherence
ch. 8 Experiential Approaches to Enhancing Cultural Awareness
ch. 9 Unmasking the Myths of Racism
ch. 10 Strategies for Teaching in a Multicultural Environment

Part 3 Teaching With and About New Technologies
ch. 11 Using the Internet for Teaching, Learning, and Research
ch. 12 Enhancing Learning with Interactive Video
ch. 13 Hypermedia as an Instructional Resource
ch. 14 Software Ethics: Teaching by Example

Part 4 Assessing Teaching Effectiveness and Learning Outcomes
ch. 15 Using Assessment to Develop a Culture of Evidence
ch. 16 How Classroom Assessment Can Improve Teaching and Learning
ch. 17 Student Portfolios as an Assessment Tool
ch. 18 Assessment's Role in Strengthening the Core Curriculum
ch. 19 Closing Thoughts: Creating a New Scholarship of College Teaching

Name Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Reaffirming Higher Education

Book
Neusner, Jacob and Noam M.M. Neusner
2000
Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick, NJ
LA227.4.N47 1999
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
The American college and university today must assess what difference scholarship makes to teaching and what teaching means to scholarship. Reaffirming Higher Education asks who teaches, what, to whom, and why. The authors maintain that what matters in higher learning is learning, while denying that scholarship detracts from teaching. The authors outline reform and renewal for both the institutional and personal dimensions of higher learning that would encompass the ideal ...
Additional Info:
The American college and university today must assess what difference scholarship makes to teaching and what teaching means to scholarship. Reaffirming Higher Education asks who teaches, what, to whom, and why. The authors maintain that what matters in higher learning is learning, while denying that scholarship detracts from teaching. The authors outline reform and renewal for both the institutional and personal dimensions of higher learning that would encompass the ideal of the academic ethic. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contents
Preface

ch. 1 Who Should Teach in a University?
ch. 2 What Should Universities Teach?
ch. 3 Who Should Go to College?
ch. 4 What is at Stake on Campus?

Epilogue: The Major Matters Most of All
Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Thinking Again: Education After Postmodernism

Book
Blake, Nigel, Paul Smeyers, Richard Smith, Paul Standish
1998
Bergin & Garvey, Westport, CT
LB14.7.T55 1998
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The postmodern condition, in which instrumentalism finally usurps all other considerations, has produced a kind of intellectual paralysis in the world of education. The authors of this book show how such postmodernist thinkers as Derrida, Foucault, and Lyotard illuminate puzzling aspects of education, arguing that educational theory is currently at an impasse. They argue that we need these new and disturbing ideas in order to "think again" fruitfully and creatively ...
Additional Info:
The postmodern condition, in which instrumentalism finally usurps all other considerations, has produced a kind of intellectual paralysis in the world of education. The authors of this book show how such postmodernist thinkers as Derrida, Foucault, and Lyotard illuminate puzzling aspects of education, arguing that educational theory is currently at an impasse. They argue that we need these new and disturbing ideas in order to "think again" fruitfully and creatively about education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword
Acknowledgments
Retrospect

ch. 1 Poststructuralism and the Spectre of Relativism
ch. 2 Foundations Demolished, Sovereigns Deposed: The New Politics of Knowledge
ch. 3 The Ascription of Identity
ch. 4 Literacy Under the Microscope
ch. 5 Shifting, Shifted, ... Shattered: The Ethical Self
ch. 6 Giving Someone a Lesson
ch. 7 Telling Stories Out of School
ch. 8 The Responsibility of Desire
ch. 9 Folly, Words, Wigs, Rags
ch. 10 Learning by Heart
ch. 11 The Learning Pharmacy
ch. 12 Reading Education

Prospect
References
Author Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Reforming the Higher Education Curriculum: Internationalizing the Campus

Book
Mestenhauser, Josef A. and Brenda J. Ellingboe, eds.
1998
Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LB2361.5.R43 1998
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
With the concept of a global village now a reality, institutions of higher learning must broaden their thinking beyond American social, cultural, and economic borders. Reforming the Higher Education Curriculum is a collection of papers that explores how a college or university can plan and implement a systemwide program for internationalizing the curriculum throughout the entire university. The contributors argue that a thorough overhaul of the higher education curriculum is ...
Additional Info:
With the concept of a global village now a reality, institutions of higher learning must broaden their thinking beyond American social, cultural, and economic borders. Reforming the Higher Education Curriculum is a collection of papers that explores how a college or university can plan and implement a systemwide program for internationalizing the curriculum throughout the entire university. The contributors argue that a thorough overhaul of the higher education curriculum is necessary to turn out graduates with true international skills and perspectives. Among the strategies recommended are courses and programs that involve study abroad, intensive study of foreign languages, and opportunities to cultivate intellectual, professional, and personal associations with people from other cultures. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributor Biographies
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Portraits of an International Curriculum: An Uncommon Multidimensional Perspective (Josef A. Mestenhauser)
ch. 2 Culture in Curriculum: Internationalizing Learning by Design (Kerry Freedman)
ch. 3 The Impossibility of Internationalizing Students by Adding Materials to Courses (Marion L. Lundy Dobbert)
ch. 4 Global Academies as Strategic Self-Organizing "Think Tanks"(Athur M. Harkins)
ch. 5 The Role of Foreign Languages in the Internationalization of the Curriculum (Michael F. Metcalf)
ch. 6 Teaching about Cognition and Cognitive Development: How to Internationalize the Topic (Herbert L. Pick, Jr.)
ch. 7 Internationalization through Networking and Curricular Infusion (John J. Cogan)
ch. 8 Mind Opening through Music: An Internationalized Music Curriculum (C. Victor Fung)
ch. 9 Internationalization of Course Work in Soil Science and Agronomy (Peter Graham)
ch. 10 Explaining Ourselves through Others' Cultural Visions: A Mini Course on America (Harvey B. Sarles)
ch. 11 Curriculum by Bytes - Using Technology to Enhance International Education (R. Michael Philson)
ch. 12 Internationalization through the Lens of Evaluation (Susan Lewis English)
ch. 13 Divisional Strategies to Internationalize a Campus Portrait: Results, Resistance, and Recommendations from a Case Study at a U.S. University (Brenda J. Ellinghoe)

Index
Cover image

Globalizing Education: Trends and Applications

Book
Mason, Robin
1998
Routledge, New York, NY
LC1090.M36 1998
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Globalising Education is a systematic and thoroughly researched study of how technologies have altered the delivery and reception of education. Mason examines how global education is actually delivered in practice, case studies which investigate current developments and applications in the USA, Europe, the UK and Australia, and conclusions drawn from the issues covered. She studies the huge impact of the World Wide Web on current educational practice, exploring the implications ...
Additional Info:
Globalising Education is a systematic and thoroughly researched study of how technologies have altered the delivery and reception of education. Mason examines how global education is actually delivered in practice, case studies which investigate current developments and applications in the USA, Europe, the UK and Australia, and conclusions drawn from the issues covered. She studies the huge impact of the World Wide Web on current educational practice, exploring the implications for students, teachers and the larger institutional framework, and provides an important overview of the current technology and the technologies to come. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of illustrations
Preface

Part I Issues in globalising education
ch. 1 The globalisation of education
ch. 2 Media for delivering global education
ch. 3 Pedagogy and global education
ch. 4 Students and technology-mediated education
ch. 5 Organising a global education programme

Part II Applications of global education
ch. 6 Global Executive MBA, Duke University, North Carolina
ch. 7 Graduate Certificate in Open and Distance Learning, USQ
ch. 8 Jones Education Company: from TV to the Internet
ch. 9 IBM global training and education
ch. 10 The UK Open University: from national to global education provider

Part III Trends in globalisation
ch. 11 Current trends
ch. 12 Future trends

Bibliography
Index
Cover image

How Scholars Trumped Teachers: Change without Reform in University Curriculum, Teaching, and Research, 1890-1990

Book
Cuban, Larry
1999
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LD3013.C83 1999
Topics: Course Design   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 How the Invention of the University-College Led to a Century of Dilemmas and a Tradition of Reform at Stanford
ch. 2 How Universities Tame Reform to Preserve the Research Imperative: Or Why There Is Change Without Reform
ch. 3 Scholar-Teachers in the Stanford History Department, 1891-1990
ch. 4 A Sturdy Way of Preparing Physicians: The School of Medicine, 1908-1990
ch. 5 How Research Trumped Teaching in History and Medicine
ch. 6 Scholars or Teachers: How Much Change is Possible?

Notes
References
Index
About the Author
Cover image

The Future Compatible Campus: Planning, Designing, and Implementing Information Technology in the Academy

Book
Oblinger, Diana G. and Sean C. Rush, eds.
1998
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB1028.3.F86 1998
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The Future Compatible Campus can assist all of us in framing a workable plan and translating that plan into action. We know that we must prepare for the future; Oblinger and Rush help us do so with intelligence and forethought. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The Future Compatible Campus can assist all of us in framing a workable plan and translating that plan into action. We know that we must prepare for the future; Oblinger and Rush help us do so with intelligence and forethought. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Preface and Chapter Summary
Acknowledgments

Part 1: The Rationale for the Future Compatible Campus
ch. 1 Transforming the Academy (Kristine A. Hafner and Diana G. Oblinger)

Part 2: Planning for the Future
ch. 2 A Strategy for I/T Investments (William H. Graves)
ch. 3 Strategic Information Technology Planning in Higher Education (Charles R. Moran)
ch. 4 Staging for the Launch: An Implementation Planning Framework (Thomas C. Wunderle)
ch. 5 Student Services for the 21st Century: Creating the Student-Centered Environment (Martha A. Beede and Darlene J. Burnett)

Part 3: Moving Toward the Future in Teaching and Learning
ch. 6 Student Mobile Computing (Diana G. Oblinger, Mark Resmer, and James R. Mingle)
ch. 7 Wake Forest University's Strategic Plan for Technology (David G. Brown)
ch. 8 Collaborative Learning (Edwin J. Pinheiro)
ch. 9 Instructional Technology and the Mainstream: The Risks of Success (William H. Geoghegan)
ch. 10 Making Ends Meet: A Faculty Perspective on Computing and Scholarship (James S. Noblitt)

Part 4: Developing the Infrastructure
ch. 11 The Importance of the Campus Network Infrastructure (Richard Nichols)
ch. 12 Planning for Success: Are You Ready for Clent/Server? (David L. Bellamy and Danuta C. McCall)
ch. 13 Designing Classrooms for the 21st Century (Kathryn L. Conway)
ch. 14 Prepare Today for the Digital Library of Tomorrow (Richard P. Hulser)
ch. 15 Managing Innovation: Project Implementation in Higher Education (D. Lawrence Bivins)

Part 5: Measuring Success
ch. 16 Knowing How It Is All Working: The Role of Performance Measurements (James W. Cortada)

Index
Cover image

Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation

Book
Howe, Neil and William Strauss
2000
Vintage Books, New York, NY
HQ796.H74 2000
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
By the authors of the bestselling 13th Gen, the first in-depth examination of the Millennials—the generation born after 1982.

In this remarkable account, certain to stir the interest of educators, counselors, parents, and people in all types of business as well as young people themselves, Neil Howe and William Strauss introduce the nation to a powerful new generation: the Millennials. They will also explain:

Why today's ...
Additional Info:
By the authors of the bestselling 13th Gen, the first in-depth examination of the Millennials—the generation born after 1982.

In this remarkable account, certain to stir the interest of educators, counselors, parents, and people in all types of business as well as young people themselves, Neil Howe and William Strauss introduce the nation to a powerful new generation: the Millennials. They will also explain:

Why today's teens are smart, well-behaved, and optimisitc, and why you won't hear older people say that.

Why they get along so well with their Boomer and Xer parents.

Why Millennial collegians will bring a new youth revolution to America's campuses.

Why names like "Generation Y" and "Echo Boom" just don't work for today's kids.

Having looked at oceans of data, taken their own polls, and talked to hundreds of kids, parents, and teachers, Howe and Strauss explain how Millennials are turning out to be so dramatically different from Xers and boomers and how, in time, they will become the next great generation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part One - where They come From
ch. 1 The Next Great Generation
ch. 2 From Babies on Board to Power Teens
ch. 3 The Coming Millennial Revolution

Part Two - who They are
ch. 4 The Baby Boomlet (demography)
ch. 5 Kinderpolitics (political economy)
ch. 6 Ground Zero of the Culture Wars (family)
ch. 7 Raising Standards for Regular Kids (school)
ch. 8 Jiggy with It (pace of life)
ch. 9 Zero Tolerance (conduct)
ch. 10 Junior Citizens (community)
ch. 11 The Happiness Business (culture)
ch. 12 Rocket Cash (commerce)
ch. 13 Planet Pokemon (world)

Part Three - where They're going
ch. 14 The Clock Is Tickin'
ch. 15 Hero Generations in History
ch. 16 A Capacity for Greatness

Millennials Rising
Afterword
Notes
Article cover image

"Unrolling Roles in Techno-Pedagogy: Toward New Forms of Collaboration in Traditional College Settings"

Article
Cook-Sather, Alison
2001
Innovative Higher Education 26, no. 2 (2001): 121-139
Topics: Using Technology   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Seminaries on the Information Highway"

Article
2001
Christian Century (Feb 7-14, 2001)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Former ATS Presidents Reflect on the Future of Theological Education in the New Millennium (pdf)

Journal Issue
2000
Theological Education 36, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.36no.2
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2000-theological-education-v36-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Some Reflections on Institutional and Cultural Issues Facing Theological Education (Vincent Cushing, OFM)
Theological Education Beyond 2000: A Canadian Perspective (C. Douglas Jay)
Reflections on My Twenty-Five Years in Theological Education (Barbara Brown Zikmund)
Theological Education at the Edge of a New Century (Russell H. Dilday)
Looking Forward, Looking Backward: A View of Theological Education at the Beginning of a New Millennium (James L. Waits)
Theological Education in the Twenty-First Century (Luder G. Whitlock, Jr.)

Open Forum
Our Words Are Beginning to Make It So: ATS Schools on Cross-Cultural Relationships and Globalization (Judith A. Berling)
Cover image

Educating Culturally Responsive Teachers

Book
Villegas, Ana Maria and Tamara Lucas
2002
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LC1099.3.V55 2002
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Offering a conceptual framework and practical strategies for teacher preparation in schools with increasingly diverse racial and ethnic student populations, this book presents a coherent approach to educating culturally responsive teachers. The authors focus on the importance of recruiting and preparing a diverse teaching force, as they propose a vision for restructuring the teacher education curriculum, reconceiving the pedagogy used to prepare prospective teachers, and transforming the institutional context in ...
Additional Info:
Offering a conceptual framework and practical strategies for teacher preparation in schools with increasingly diverse racial and ethnic student populations, this book presents a coherent approach to educating culturally responsive teachers. The authors focus on the importance of recruiting and preparing a diverse teaching force, as they propose a vision for restructuring the teacher education curriculum, reconceiving the pedagogy used to prepare prospective teachers, and transforming the institutional context in order to support the curricular and pedagogical changes they recommend. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 The Shifting Demographic Landscape
ch. 2 Developing Fundamental Orientations for Teaching a Changing Student Population
ch. 3 Fostering Culturally Responsive Teaching
ch. 4 Modeling the Practice of Culturally Responsive Teaching
ch. 5 The Institutional Context Needed to Educate Culturally Resposive

Teachers
Conclusion
Notes
References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching College in An Age of Accountability

Book
Lyons, Richard E., Meggin McIntosh and Marcella L.Kysilka
2003
Allyn & Bacon, Boston, MA
LB2331.L96 2003
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Teaching College in an Age of Accountability provides professors with the insights and tools necessary to achieve higher levels on accountability assessment outcomes while preparing students for enhancing their own career success in a more complex future. In recent years, many initiatives have been implemented by a number of state legislatures and boards of trustees to increase "institutional effectiveness." These measures have made colleges and universities aware that practices once ...
Additional Info:
Teaching College in an Age of Accountability provides professors with the insights and tools necessary to achieve higher levels on accountability assessment outcomes while preparing students for enhancing their own career success in a more complex future. In recent years, many initiatives have been implemented by a number of state legislatures and boards of trustees to increase "institutional effectiveness." These measures have made colleges and universities aware that practices once accepted as sacrosanct within the culture will, from this time forward, be assessed regularly for their contribution to achieving more accountable outcomes. Teaching College in an Age of Accountability is the first book that focuses exclusively on the implications of this trend on the work of individual professors. Accountability proponents generally call for increased access to higher education for all citizens, improved retention of students once they are enrolled, and graduation and placement rates that recognize the investment of tax and institutional funds in students' success. This book equips professors to address each of these outcome goals in a proactive manner. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 The Rise of Accountability in Higher Education
ch. 2 Implications of Accountability on Your Teaching
ch. 3 Today's College Students
ch. 4 Strategic Course Planning
ch. 5 Launching Your Course Effectively
ch. 6 Managing the Context of Your Course
ch. 7 Instructor-Directed Learning Methods
ch. 8 Student-Driven Learning Methods
ch. 9 Infusing Technology into Your Teaching
ch. 10 Managing the Examination Process
ch. 11 Alternative Methods of Assessing Student Learning
ch. 12 Bringing Your Course to an Effective Conclusion
ch. 13 Evaluating the Effectiveness of Your Teaching
ch. 14 Maintaining Your Edge

References
Index
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"Teaching and Learning in the New Millennium: Transformative Technologies in a Transformable World"

Article
Olliges, Ralph, and Sebastian Mahfood
2003
Communication Research Trends 22, no. 2 (2003): 3-27
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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A Classroom of One: How Online Learning is Changing Our Schools and Colleges

Book
Maeroff, Gene I.
2003
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
LC5803.C65M34 2003
Topics: Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This is Gene Maeroff's "report from the front" on the short history and status of online learning in the United States and around the world. Maeroff is a reporter who takes you to the schools from Penn State's World Campus to the Florida Virtual School to the newly emerging online learning initiatives in Afghanistan. His journey ultimately provides a snapshot of the way in which technology is changing the minds ...
Additional Info:
This is Gene Maeroff's "report from the front" on the short history and status of online learning in the United States and around the world. Maeroff is a reporter who takes you to the schools from Penn State's World Campus to the Florida Virtual School to the newly emerging online learning initiatives in Afghanistan. His journey ultimately provides a snapshot of the way in which technology is changing the minds of people with regard to the nature of higher education. He looks at the method of electronic delivery, the quality of the information being delivered and quality of interaction it engenders. He looks at the way learners are adapting to this new technology and how much responsibility is put on the student's shoulders. Finally, and maybe tellingly, he looks at the business of online learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 An Invitation to a Revolution
ch. 2 Delivering the Goods
ch. 3 The Nature of Interaction
ch. 4 Facilitating the Conversation
ch. 5 Adapting to the New
ch. 6 Responsibility for Learning
ch. 7 The Business of Online Education
ch. 8 Focusing E-Learning on Careers
ch. 9 But Is It Legitimate?
ch. 10 Controlling the Process
ch. 11 In School, on Campus
ch. 12 Serving Those Least Served
ch. 13 Redefining the Educational Institution
ch. 14 Online Courses across the Gamut
ch. 15 Educational Purposes in the Cyber Era

Notes
Bibliography
Index
Article cover image

"'Hybrid' Teaching Seeks to End the Divide Between Traditional and Online Instruction"

Article
Young, Jeffrey R.
2002
The Chronicle of Higher Education, 22 March 2002
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Focuses on the introduction of hybrid teaching which aims to end the gap between traditional and online instruction in the U.S. Advantages of hybrid courses and hybrid degree programs; Colleges offering hybrid instruction; Skepticism on online education projects.
Additional Info:
Focuses on the introduction of hybrid teaching which aims to end the gap between traditional and online instruction in the U.S. Advantages of hybrid courses and hybrid degree programs; Colleges offering hybrid instruction; Skepticism on online education projects.
Article cover image

"Learning and Teaching in the 21st Century: Trends and Implications for Practice"

Article
Magolda, Marcia Baxter, and Patrick T. Terenzini
2002
Journal of College Student Development (2002)
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning: Leading and Supporting the Transformation on Your Campus

Book
Barone, Carole A. and Paul R. Hagner, eds.
2001
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2395.7 .T43 2001
Topics: Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The ability of the Internet and the World Wide Web to provide a wealth of on-line information that can be easily accessed at any time is changing the basic structure and operations of organizations, especially educational institutions.

Written by a blue-ribbon panel of contributors -- thirteen experts in various fields of educational technology and teaching and learning -- Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning: Leading and Supporting the Transformation on ...
Additional Info:
The ability of the Internet and the World Wide Web to provide a wealth of on-line information that can be easily accessed at any time is changing the basic structure and operations of organizations, especially educational institutions.

Written by a blue-ribbon panel of contributors -- thirteen experts in various fields of educational technology and teaching and learning -- Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning: Leading and Supporting the Transformation on Your Campus offers academic leaders the advice they need to help their institutions initiate, implement, and manage the transformation in order to become Internet-based communication and learning environments. The authors show how leaders can meet the challenge of the information age and the student demand for interactive learning by creating supportive environments that allow faculty to adapt to and sustain this sweeping institutional transformation. This book offers the insights, practical suggestions, and strategies that are essential for engaging the campus community in the transformation process. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Authors

ch. 1. Engaging the Faculty (Paul R. Hagner, Charles A. Schneebeck)
ch. 2. Creating a Context for Consensus (David G. Brown, Sally Jackson)
ch. 3. Managing Complexity in a Transforming Environmen (Vicki N. Suter)
ch. 4. Transforming Traditional Faculty Roles (William H. Graves)
ch. 5. The Holy Grail: Developing Scalable and Sustainable Support Solutions (Joel L. Hartman, Barbara Truman-Davis)
ch. 6. Designing and Delivering Instructional Technology: A Team Approach (Gerard L. Hanley)
ch. 7. Responding to Intellectual Property and Legal Issues (James L. Hilton, James G. Neal )
ch. 8. Form Follows Function: Establishing the Necessary Infrastructure (Bret L. Ingerman)
ch. 9. Assessing Conditions for Campus Transformation (Carole A. Barone, Paul R. Hagner)

Index
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Student Learning in the Information Age

Book
Breivik, Patricia Senn
1998
American Council on Education and the Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
Z711.2 .B755 1998
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
The author offers an in-depth examination of resource-based learning as an important new paradigm for higher education. This concept shifts the focus from teaching to learning by requiring students to select their own learning materials from a wide range of real world information resources. A resource-based approach helps students assume more responsibility for their own learning. It also creates a strong partnership between faculty members and campus librarians. Breivik highlights ...
Additional Info:
The author offers an in-depth examination of resource-based learning as an important new paradigm for higher education. This concept shifts the focus from teaching to learning by requiring students to select their own learning materials from a wide range of real world information resources. A resource-based approach helps students assume more responsibility for their own learning. It also creates a strong partnership between faculty members and campus librarians. Breivik highlights examples of colleges and universities that are already using this approach successfully and offers a framework to help educators create their own resource-based learning programs. This work will be of significant interest to academic leaders, faculty, and campus information providers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Move Toward a New Literacy
ch. 2 Resource-Based Learning
ch. 3 Successful Information Literacy Programs
ch. 4 Discipline-Specific Models
ch. 5 The Challenges of Human Resources
ch. 6 Institutional Challenges
ch. 7 Moving Forward

Postscript for Early Leaders
App. A Final Report of the American Library Association Presidential Committee on Information Literacy
App. B National Forum on Information Literacy Membership List
App. C Data Collection on Information Literacy Programs at Higher Education Institutions: Analysis and Report by the Association of College and Research Libraries, 1994-1995
App. D Writing Syllabus for Wheaton College Psychology
App. E King's College Competency Growth Plan in Library and Information Literacy for Students Majoring in Marketing
Selected Resources
Index
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Excellent Teaching in a Changing Academy: Essays in Honor of Kenneth Eble

Book
Jussawalla, Feroza, ed.
1990
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.E93 1990
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Are the new elitism and conservatism that are creeping into academia degrading undergraduate education? This volume seeks not to resolve the issues surrounding academia today but rather to mark the contested points in the debates on whether to incorporate cultural diversity in the curriculum, whether to compete for the research dollar, and how to evaluate faculty humanely in a changing atmosphere. As Eble urged, in the 1990s it is imperative ...
Additional Info:
Are the new elitism and conservatism that are creeping into academia degrading undergraduate education? This volume seeks not to resolve the issues surrounding academia today but rather to mark the contested points in the debates on whether to incorporate cultural diversity in the curriculum, whether to compete for the research dollar, and how to evaluate faculty humanely in a changing atmosphere. As Eble urged, in the 1990s it is imperative that we find ways to foster good teaching and learning in an academy that must change to meet the needs of students from different demographic backgrounds and with different levels of preparedness, and academy that is facing continuing political and budgetary pressures. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The degradation of undergraduate education (Kenneth Eble)
ch. 2 The art of deliberalizing: A handbook for the true professional (Wayne C. Booth)
ch. 3 The transforming of the American mind (Henry Louis Gates, Jr.)
ch. 4 Miss grimp revisited: Reconfiguring composition, literature, and cultural literacy (Feroza Jussawalla)
ch. 5 A coaching model for the teaching of writing (Anthony J. Walsh)
ch. 6 The politics of the classroom: Toward an oppositional pedagogy (Minette Marcroft)
ch. 7 The lower end of higher education: Freshmen, sophomores, the research university, and the community college (Timothy R. Bywater)
ch. 8 What good are computers in the writing classroom?
Encouraging and evaluating scholarship for the college teacher (Michael Dobberstein)
ch. 9 Kenneth Eble on writing in college: Ahead of his time (William J. McCleary)
ch. 10 The bush foundation's faculty development projects (Humphrey Doermann)
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Steal This University: The Rise of the Corporate University and the Academic Labor Movement

Book
Johnson, Benjamin, Patrick Kavanagh, and Kevin Mattson, eds.
2003
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2335.865.U6S43 2003
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Steal This University explores the paradox of academic labor. Universities do not exist to generate a profit from capital investment, yet contemporary universities are increasingly using corporations as their model for internal organization. While the media, politicians, business leaders and the general public all seem to share a remarkable consensus that higher education is indispensable to the future of nations and individuals alike, within academia bitter conflicts brew over the ...
Additional Info:
Steal This University explores the paradox of academic labor. Universities do not exist to generate a profit from capital investment, yet contemporary universities are increasingly using corporations as their model for internal organization. While the media, politicians, business leaders and the general public all seem to share a remarkable consensus that higher education is indispensable to the future of nations and individuals alike, within academia bitter conflicts brew over the shape of tomorrow's universities. Contributors to the volume range from the star academic to the disgruntled adjunct and each bring a unique perspective to the discussion on the academy's over-reliance on adjuncts and teaching assistants, the debate over tenure and to the valiant efforts to organize unions and win rights. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Not Your Parents' University or Labor Movement Any Longer

Sect. 1 The Rise of the Corporate University
ch. 1 None of Your Business: The Rise of the University of Phoenix and For-Profit Education - and Why It Will Fail Us All (A.M. Cox)
ch. 2 Digital Diploma Mills (D. Noble)
ch. 3 Inefficient Efficiency: A Critique of Merit Pay
ch. 4 The Drain-O of Higher Education: Casual Labor and University Teaching (B. Johnson)

Sect. 2 Laboring Within
ch. 5 How I Became a Worker (K. Mattson)
ch. 6 The Art of Work in the Age of the Adjunct (A. Moore)
ch. 7 Blacklisted and Blue: On Theory and Practice at Yale (R. Corey)
ch. 8 Tenure Denied: Union Busting and Anti-Intellectualism in the Corporate University (J. Westheimer)

Sect. 3 Organizing
ch. 9 The Campaign for Union Rights at NYU (I. Jessup)
ch. 10 Democracy Is an Endless Organizing Drive: Learning from the Failure and Future of Graduate Student Organizing at the University of Minnesota (M. Brown, R. Copher and K. Gray Brown)
ch. 11 Moving River Barges: Labor Activism and Academic Organizations (C. Nelson)
ch. 12 Social Movement Unionism and Adjunct Faculty Organizing in Boston (G. Gottfired and G. Zabel)
ch. 13 Renewing Academic Unions and Democracy at the Same Time: The Case of the California Faculty Association (S. Meisenhelder)

Conclusion: The Future of Higher Education and Academic Labor
Notes
Notes on Contributors and Editors
Index
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Wabash tree

Teaching as Community Property: Essays on Higher Education

Book
Shulman, Lee S.
2004
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2305.S58 2004
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Lee Shulman has been president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching since 1997. He is a former president of the American Educational Research Association as well as past president of the National Academy of Education. In this second volume of a landmark two volume collection of Shulman's best work, he addresses such compelling questions as What are the most effective approaches to teaching? How important is knowledge of ...
Additional Info:
Lee Shulman has been president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching since 1997. He is a former president of the American Educational Research Association as well as past president of the National Academy of Education. In this second volume of a landmark two volume collection of Shulman's best work, he addresses such compelling questions as What are the most effective approaches to teaching? How important is knowledge of subject matter to a teacher's success? And, how do we measure success in teaching and learning? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Sources
About the Author
Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction

Pt. 1 Learning
ch. 1 Professing the Liberal Arts
ch. 2 Taking Learning Seriously
ch. 3 Problem-Based Learning: The Pedagogies of Uncertainty
ch. 4 Making Differences: A Table of Learning

Pt. 2 The Profession of Teaching
ch. 5 Knowledge and Teaching: Foundations of the New Reform
ch. 6 Learning to Teach
ch. 7 Toward a Pedagogy of Substance
ch. 8 Teaching as Community Property: Putting an End to Pedagogical Solitude
ch. 9 The Scholarship of Teaching: New Elaborations, New Developments
ch. 10 From Minsk to Pinsk: Why a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning?
ch. 11 Lamarck's Revenge: Teaching Among the Scholarships
ch. 12 From Idea to Prototype: Three Exercises in the Peer Review of Teaching
ch. 13 The Pedagogical Colloquium: Three Models
ch. 14 Course Anatomy: The Dissection and Analysis of Knowledge Through Teaching
ch. 15 Visions of the Possible: Models for Campus Support of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
ch. 16 The Doctoral Imperative: Examining the Ends of Erudition

Index
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Practical Wisdom on Theological Teaching and Learning

Book
Warford, Malcolm L., ed.
2004
Peter Lang, New York, NY
BV4022.P73 2004
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Contemporary theological education is facing profound changes. Fundamental shifts in both church and society have established a volatile context for theological teaching and learning. Seminaries are struggling with the growing diversity of their students, faculties, and institutional commitments. This book addresses these issues both contextually and historically, engages the nature of theological teaching and learning, and offers educational practices that strengthen the vocation of teaching and enhance the school as ...
Additional Info:
Contemporary theological education is facing profound changes. Fundamental shifts in both church and society have established a volatile context for theological teaching and learning. Seminaries are struggling with the growing diversity of their students, faculties, and institutional commitments. This book addresses these issues both contextually and historically, engages the nature of theological teaching and learning, and offers educational practices that strengthen the vocation of teaching and enhance the school as a place of conversation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Malcolm L. Warford)

ch. 1 The vocation of teaching : beyond the conspiracy of mediocrity (Raymond Brady Williams)
ch. 2 Evolving dynamics of formation (Victor Klimoski)
ch. 3 Faculty life and seminary culture : it's about time and money (Gretchen E. Ziegenhals)
ch. 4 From cordiality to candor : an ethnographic study of a faculty forming its life together (Stephen Ellingson)
ch. 5 The seminary dispersed : theological teaching in a changing world (Jane Shaw)
ch. 6 Historical influences on seminary culture (Glenn T. Miller
ch. 7 Do not be conformed to this age : biblical understandings of ministerial leadership (Jerry L. Sumney)
ch. 8 What is the ministry toward which we teach?(Samuel Escobar)
ch. 9 Formative learning in the classroom (Mary-Ann Winkelmes)
ch. 10 Engaging issues in course development (Garth M. Rosell)
ch. 11 Online education : an asset in a period of educational change (Richard W. Nysse)
ch. 12 Rehabilitating prejudice : framing issues of diversity in theological education (Diamond Cephus)
ch. 13 Faculties that listen, schools that learn : assessment in theological education (Gordon T. Smith)
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New Paradigms for Testing Student Learning: Addressing Faculty and Student Classroom Improprieties

Book
Braxton, John M. and Alan E. Bayer, eds.
2004
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1779.A3 2004
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Assessing Students   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Changes in instructional paradigms are leading to changes in the way student achievement is tested, including group testing, online testing and authentic testing. This issue discusses the theory and practice of these new forms of testing and offers practical suggestions for instructors considering their use. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Changes in instructional paradigms are leading to changes in the way student achievement is tested, including group testing, online testing and authentic testing. This issue discusses the theory and practice of these new forms of testing and offers practical suggestions for instructors considering their use. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction: Faculty and student classroom improprieties (John M. Braxton, Alan E. Bayer)
ch. 2 Sociological explanations for faculty and student classroom incivilities (Nathaniel J. Bray, Marietta Del Favero)
ch. 3 Dynamics of gender, ethnicity, and race in understanding classroom incivility (Mia Alexander-Snow)
ch. 4 Incidence and student response to faculty teaching norm violations (John M. Braxton, Melinda Rogers Mann)
ch. 5 The influence of teaching norm violations on the welfare of students as clients of college teaching (John M. Braxton, Alan E. Bayer, James A. Noseworthy)
ch. 6 Toward a code of conduct for undergraduate teaching (John M. Braxton, Alan E. Bayer)
ch. 7 Student norms of classroom decorum (Timothy C. Caboni, Amy S. Hirschy, Jane R. Best)
ch. 8 Effects of student classroom incivilities on students (Amy S. Hirschy, John M. Braxton)
ch. 9 Promulgating statements of student rights and responsibilities (Alan E. Bayer)
ch. 10 Conclusions and recommendations: Avenues for addressing teaching and learning improprieties (Alan E. Bayer, John M. Braxton)
Appendix: Description of research methods and analyses
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General Education and the Assessment Reform Agenda

Article
Ewell, Peter
2004
Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C.
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Written by national expert on assessment, Peter Ewell, this paper reflects on the challenges of general education and assessment reform in the context of recent calls for accountability in higher education. The author argues that by focusing on abilities, alignment, assessment, and action, campuses can both improve general education programs and demonstrate student achievement of learning outcomes key to success in the 21st century. This book is ideal for general ...
Additional Info:
Written by national expert on assessment, Peter Ewell, this paper reflects on the challenges of general education and assessment reform in the context of recent calls for accountability in higher education. The author argues that by focusing on abilities, alignment, assessment, and action, campuses can both improve general education programs and demonstrate student achievement of learning outcomes key to success in the 21st century. This book is ideal for general education or curricular reform committees and campus discussions about assessment, general education, and accountability. (From the Publisher)
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Our Underachieving Colleges: A Candid Look at How Much Students Learn and Why They Should Be Learning More

Book
Bok, Derek
2006
Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ
LB2322.2.B65 2006
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Drawing on a large body of empirical evidence, former Harvard President Derek Bok examines how much progress college students actually make toward widely accepted goals of undergraduate education. His conclusions are sobering. Although most students make gains in many important respects, they improve much less than they should in such important areas as writing, critical thinking, quantitative skills, and moral reasoning. Large majorities of college seniors do not feel that ...
Additional Info:
Drawing on a large body of empirical evidence, former Harvard President Derek Bok examines how much progress college students actually make toward widely accepted goals of undergraduate education. His conclusions are sobering. Although most students make gains in many important respects, they improve much less than they should in such important areas as writing, critical thinking, quantitative skills, and moral reasoning. Large majorities of college seniors do not feel that they have made substantial progress in speaking a foreign language, acquiring cultural and aesthetic interests, or learning what they need to know to become active and informed citizens. Overall, despite their vastly increased resources, more powerful technology, and hundreds of new courses, colleges cannot be confident that students are learning more than they did fifty years ago.

Looking further, Bok finds that many important college courses are left to the least experienced teachers and that most professors continue to teach in ways that have proven to be less effective than other available methods. In reviewing their educational programs, however, faculties typically ignore this evidence. Instead, they spend most of their time discussing what courses to require, although the lasting impact of college will almost certainly depend much more on how the courses are taught.

In his final chapter, Bok describes the changes that faculties and academic leaders can make to help students accomplish more. Without ignoring the contributions that America's colleges have made, Bok delivers a powerful critique--one that educators will ignore at their peril. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The evolution of American colleges
ch. 2 Faculty attitudes toward undergraduate education
ch. 3 Purposes
ch. 4 Learning to communicate
ch. 5 Learning to think
ch. 6 Building character
ch. 7 Preparation for citizenship
ch. 8 Living with diversity
ch. 9 Preparing for a global society
ch. 10 Acquiring broader interests
ch. 11 Preparing for a career
ch. 12 Improving the quality of undergraduate education
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The Student Assessment Handbook

Book
Morgan, Chris, Lee Dunn, Sharon Parry and Meg O'Reilly
2004
RoutledgeFalmer, London, UK
LB2368.S88 2004
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Aimed primarily at higher education professionals, this book is a comprehensive guide to assessment issues, particularly for those professionals who are coming to terms with the range of new pressures on their traditional teaching practices. Agents of change such as increased use of IT, flexible assessment methods and quality assurance all converge on the area of assessment, making new demands of assessors.

Outlining how traditional assessment practices can ...
Additional Info:
Aimed primarily at higher education professionals, this book is a comprehensive guide to assessment issues, particularly for those professionals who are coming to terms with the range of new pressures on their traditional teaching practices. Agents of change such as increased use of IT, flexible assessment methods and quality assurance all converge on the area of assessment, making new demands of assessors.

Outlining how traditional assessment practices can be updated and diversified to suit these contemporary teaching and learning methods, this book is a practical resource, with reflection boxes and diagnostic tools that encourage the reader to apply the principles to their own practice.

Other areas covered include: Assessing large groups, Authentication of student work, Maintaining assessment standards, Assessing generic skills and Quality assurance. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part A: Issues and themes in assessment
ch. 1 The link between assessment and learning
ch. 2 Roles and purposes of assessment
ch. 3 The grading game: norm- and criterion-referenced assessment
ch. 4 Valid assessment
ch. 5 Assessing in flexible modes
ch. 6 Assessing with new technology
ch. 7 Assessing in diverse contexts
ch. 8 Assessing large cohorts
ch. 9 Academic fraud and plagiarism
ch. 10 Maintaining standards in a consumer market
ch. 11 Accountability and the quality agenda: evaluative purposes of assessment

Part B: Assessing key learning outcomes
ch. 12 Communicating
ch. 13 Accessing and managing information
ch. 14 Demonstrating knowledge and understanding
ch. 15 Demonstrating procedures and techniques
ch. 16 Designing, creating, performing
ch. 17 Thinking critically and making judgements
ch. 18 Problem solving
ch. 19 Managing and developing oneself

Part C: Assessment in practice
ch. 20 Designing assessment tasks
ch. 21 Developing marking schemes
ch. 22 Communicating assessment tasks
ch. 23 Marking and grading
ch. 24 Evaluating assessment practices
ch. 25 Dealing with plagiarism

References
Index
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Higher Education and the Color Line: College Access, Racial Equity, and Social Change

Book
Orfield, Gary, Patricia Marin, and Catherine L. Horn, eds.
2005
Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, MA
LC3727.C65 2005
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This timely and comprehensive book outlines the agenda for achieving racial justice in higher education in the next generation. It focuses on the racial transformation of higher education and the structural barriers that perpetuate racial stratification in colleges and universities--and beyond. Taking on topical issues such as shifting patterns of financial aid, the growing importance of community colleges, and identifying model programs for retaining and supporting minority students, it lays ...
Additional Info:
This timely and comprehensive book outlines the agenda for achieving racial justice in higher education in the next generation. It focuses on the racial transformation of higher education and the structural barriers that perpetuate racial stratification in colleges and universities--and beyond. Taking on topical issues such as shifting patterns of financial aid, the growing importance of community colleges, and identifying model programs for retaining and supporting minority students, it lays the foundation for realizing the U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's goal of eliminating the need for affirmative action within 25 years. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Gary Orfield)

ch. 1 The racial transformation of higher education (Michal Kurlaender and Stella M. Flores)
ch. 2 Necessary but not sufficient : higher education as a strategy of social mobility (David Karen and Kevin J. Dougherty)
ch. 3 Equity in educational attainment : racial, ethnic, and gender inequality in the 50 states (Derek V. Price and Jill K. Wohlford)
ch. 4 Can minority students afford college in an era of skyrocketing tuition? (Donald E. Heller)
ch. 5 Illusions of opportunity? : from college access to job access at two-year colleges (Regina Deil Amen, James E. Rosenbaum, and Ann E. Person)
ch. 6 Diversity on campus : exemplary programs for retaining and supporting students of color (Dean K. Whitla, Carolyn Howard, Frank Tuitt, Richard J. Reddick, and Elizabeth Flanagan)
ch. 7 Potential or peril : the evolving relationship between large-scale standardized assessment and higher education (Catherine L. Horn)
ch. 8 After Grutter and Gratz : higher education, race, and the law (Angelo N. Ancheta)
ch. 9 From strict scrutiny to educational scrutiny : a new vision for higher education policy and research (Patricia Marin and John T. Yun)

About the Contributors
Index
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The American Faculty: The Restructuring of Academic Work and Careers

Book
Shuster, Jack H., and Martin J. Finklestein
2006
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2331.72.S36 2006
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Higher education is becoming destabilized in the face of extraordinarily rapid change. The composition of the academy's most valuable asset—the faculty—and the essential nature of faculty work are being transformed. Jack H. Schuster and Martin J. Finkelstein describe the transformation of the American faculty in the most extensive and ambitious analysis of the American academic profession undertaken in a generation.

A century ago the American research ...
Additional Info:
Higher education is becoming destabilized in the face of extraordinarily rapid change. The composition of the academy's most valuable asset—the faculty—and the essential nature of faculty work are being transformed. Jack H. Schuster and Martin J. Finkelstein describe the transformation of the American faculty in the most extensive and ambitious analysis of the American academic profession undertaken in a generation.

A century ago the American research university emerged as a new organizational form animated by the professionalized, discipline-based scholar. The research university model persisted through two world wars and greatly varying economic conditions. In recent years, however, a new order has surfaced, organized around a globalized, knowledge-based economy, powerful privatization and market forces, and stunning new information technologies. These developments have transformed the higher education enterprise in ways barely imaginable in generations past.

At the heart of that transformation, but largely invisible, has been a restructuring of academic appointments, academic work, and academic careers—a reconfiguring widely decried but heretofore inadequately described. This volume depicts the scope and depth of the transformation, combing empirical data drawn from three decades of national higher education surveys. The authors' portrait, at once startling and disturbing, provides the context for interpreting these developments as part of a larger structural evolution of the national higher education system. They outline the stakes for the nation and the challenging work to be done. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
List of Figures and Tables

Part One. Overview of the American Faculty
ch. 1. Establishing the Framework
ch. 2. The American Faculty in Perspective
ch. 3. The Professoriate in Profile
Part Two. The Faculty at Work
ch. 4. The Changing Complexion of Faculty Work
ch. 5. Academic Culture and Values and the Quality of Worklife

Part Three. The Academic Career
ch. 6. The Changing Academic Career
ch. 7. The Revolution in Academic Appointments: A Closer Look
ch. 8. Compensation and Academic Careers: Trends and Issues
ch. 9. Pathways to the Professoriate

Part Four. Contemporary Academic Life: An Assessment
ch. 10. American Academic Life Restructured
ch. 11. What's Ahead? Agendas for Policy Analysis, Research, and Action on Academic

Staffing

Appendixes
A. Descriptions of the National Faculty Surveys
B. Selected National Faculty Surveys: A Concordance of Contents
C. Understanding Faculty Trends: Challenges to and Strategies for Interpreting Survey Data
D. Variables for Classifying Faculty Subgroups
E. Master Notes on Contents of Tables and Figures
F. Academic Appointments: Historical Milestones
G. Faculty Compensation: Data Sources
H. Note on Accessing Survey Instruments
I. Faculty Diversity: Race and Ethnicity Categories
J. Appendix Tables and Figures

List of Tables
Tables

References
About the Authors
Index
Cover image

Putting Students First: How Colleges Develop Students Purposefully

Book
Braskamp, Larry M., Lois Calian Trautvetter and Kelly Ward
2006
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LC990.B73 2006
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Society is calling for higher education to take more responsibility for helping students find purpose and meaning in life. In this book, the authors argue that colleges should purposefully invest in students in ways that will foster their holistic development by recognizing and building on students' purpose in life, intellectually, spiritually, and morally. By using the "4C framework"— culture, curriculum, cocurriculum, and community— faculty, student affairs staff, and academic administrators ...
Additional Info:
Society is calling for higher education to take more responsibility for helping students find purpose and meaning in life. In this book, the authors argue that colleges should purposefully invest in students in ways that will foster their holistic development by recognizing and building on students' purpose in life, intellectually, spiritually, and morally. By using the "4C framework"— culture, curriculum, cocurriculum, and community— faculty, student affairs staff, and academic administrators will be able to discuss, plan, and create a college environment that effectively supports the learning and development of students. The book contains a set of themes and calls for consideration and action based on the findings of site visits at 10 colleges and a set of questions to help readers think about and plan how to develop students holistically on their own campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Introduction

ch. 1 Putting Students First
Introduction
Why Is It Important to Put Students and Their Development First?
Who Are Today's College Students?
Who Develops These Students?
In What Context Is Holistic Development Occurring?
Why Study Church-Related Colleges and Universities?
Summary

ch. 2 Conceptual Framework and Design of the Project
Introduction
Theoretical Bases for Holistic Student Development
Faith, Spirituality, and Student Development
Student Development and the Church-Related Context
Conceptual Framework: Personal Investment Theory
Project Design
Summary

ch. 3 Culture
Introduction
Discerning and Acting on Institutional Mission
Building on a Legacy
Communicating Institutional Mission and Identity
Leadership
College Location
Campus Facilities
Expectations and Contributions of Faculty
Faculty as Role Models
Using a Career Perspective on Faculty Development
Faculty Evaluation as a Reflection of Culture
Support and Challenge
Summary
Questions for Campus Conversations

ch. 4 Curriculum
Introduction
Philosophical Foundations of the Curriculum
Centrality of Liberal Arts Education
Integrating Faith and Learning
Worldviews
Pedagogy
Developmentally Tailored Experiences for Students
Pedagogy of Engagement: Field-Based and Community-Based Learning
Summary
Questions for Campus Conversations

ch. 5 Cocurriculum
Introduction
Mutual Reinforcement of Learning
Campus Rituals
Residence Life
Student Leadership
Relationships With Coaches, Professional Staff, and Campus Ministry
Faculty Interactions
Immersion Experiences
Summary
Questions for Campus Conversations

ch. 6 Community
Introduction
Shared Governance
Defining Community
Maintaining Community Amidst Change
Diversity Within Community
Communities Beyond the Campus
Dealing With Difference and External Communities
Summary
Questions for Campus Conversations

ch. 7 Creating Communities That Put Students First
Introduction
Chapter Overview
Mission Is Reality, Not Rhetoric
Learning and Development Are Integrated
The Campus Community Fosters Support and Challenge
Summary

Bibliography
Index
TTR cover image

"Funding and Assessment in British Universities: Impact on Theology and Religious Studies"

TTR
Hinnells, John R.
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 3 (2004): 124-133
BL41.T4
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This article looks at policies of the British Government relating to teaching, the curriculum, and research and how they impact Theology and Religious Studies (TRS). It reflects on the use of Government funding to steer research outputs and to focus such activity on a small number of selected institutions. It further discusses Government attempts to define degree standards and "the boundaries and the internal geography" of the subject by producing "...
Additional Info:
This article looks at policies of the British Government relating to teaching, the curriculum, and research and how they impact Theology and Religious Studies (TRS). It reflects on the use of Government funding to steer research outputs and to focus such activity on a small number of selected institutions. It further discusses Government attempts to define degree standards and "the boundaries and the internal geography" of the subject by producing "benchmarking guidelines" to which each department must adhere. The paper concludes with reflections on the fears of Government control of the curriculum. Underlying much of the discussion is a sense of the differences between Theology and Religious Studies in North America and Britain.

To emphasize the point that this paper expresses personal views based on my own experience I have used a more informal and personal style than is my custom in publications. It is relevant to outline the experience which has fashioned my views. Prior to moving to Liverpool I have held Chairs at Manchester in Comparative Religion, where I also served as Dean of the Faculty of Theology, and London University's School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) where I started the Department for the Study of Religion. I have served as President of the national body for the subject, the Association of University Departments of Theology and Religious Studies (AUDTRS) for three years; on the research panels of the two main bodies to which people in Theology and Religious Studies apply for research grants (the British Academy and the Arts and Humanities Research Board); on two national research assessment panels and co-chaired the Benchmarking Panel for Theology and Religious Studies (the work of the panels is outlined below). I was a member of a team funded by the Home Office to produce a report to inform Government policy on possible legislation on Religious Discrimination. The relevance of each of these will become clear in the course of the article.
TTR cover image

"Rethinking the Educational Practices of Biblical Doctoral Studies"

TTR
Fiorenza, Elisabeth Schüssler
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 65-75
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Mentoring Students   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The paper explores the impact of the change in populations, the impact of electronic communication, and the multiplicity of methodological approaches on the ethos and practices of biblical studies. It proposes a rhetorical emancipatory educational paradigm and explores its possibilities for the professional education of biblical scholars on the doctoral level. Since both college and seminary teachers are shaped in and through their doctoral studies, it is necessary to focus ...
Additional Info:
The paper explores the impact of the change in populations, the impact of electronic communication, and the multiplicity of methodological approaches on the ethos and practices of biblical studies. It proposes a rhetorical emancipatory educational paradigm and explores its possibilities for the professional education of biblical scholars on the doctoral level. Since both college and seminary teachers are shaped in and through their doctoral studies, it is necessary to focus on doctoral education in order to address the growing recognition that the discipline of biblical studies in its present form needs to cultivate transformative intellectuals who are not only at home in the academy but also can critically intervene in the public discourses and uses of the Bible in religious communities, democratic publics, or global inter-religious relations.
TTR cover image

"Interprofessional Education in Theology and Social Work: Postmodern and Practical Theological Dimensions"

TTR
Kamya, Hugo and Maureen O'Brien
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 1 (2000): 20-32
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
In this essay the authors posit that interprofessional education is inherently "post-modern"and thus will incorporate educational priorities compatible with postmodernism, and that practical theology is the preferred method for interprofessional teaching and learning when theology and ministry are explicit participants. In advancing this argument they draw upon their experience in team teaching an interprofessional course in pastoral ministry and social work designed for students pursuing a joint degree in ...
Additional Info:
In this essay the authors posit that interprofessional education is inherently "post-modern"and thus will incorporate educational priorities compatible with postmodernism, and that practical theology is the preferred method for interprofessional teaching and learning when theology and ministry are explicit participants. In advancing this argument they draw upon their experience in team teaching an interprofessional course in pastoral ministry and social work designed for students pursuing a joint degree in these two fields. They provide an overview of the contemporary postmodern context and interprofessional education as an emerging paradigm in higher education, a brief description of the major components of the joint course, and an exposition of appropriate educational priorities.
Cover image

Transforming Campus Life: Reflections on Spirituality & Religious Pluralism

Book
Miller, Vachel W. and Merle M. Ryan, eds.
2001
Peter Lang, New York, NY
BL625.9.C64T73 2001
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
How can campus life become more hospitable to the human spirit? This book invites everyone concerned with the quality and meaning of campus life to engage in new conversations about the spiritual and religious dimensions of diversity, leadership, student development, and learning. This book challenges conventions in higher education that neglect religious identity and spiritual exploration while perpetuating disconnection, competition, and separation from our natural and social environments. It offers ...
Additional Info:
How can campus life become more hospitable to the human spirit? This book invites everyone concerned with the quality and meaning of campus life to engage in new conversations about the spiritual and religious dimensions of diversity, leadership, student development, and learning. This book challenges conventions in higher education that neglect religious identity and spiritual exploration while perpetuating disconnection, competition, and separation from our natural and social environments. It offers innovative approaches for positive change, while addressing the complex legal, organizational, and cultural issues involved in this conversation. Grounded in original research and professional practice, this collection includes reflections from college presidents, campus leaders, student affairs staff members, and faculty. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part 1. Religious Pluralism and Spirituality in Campus Life: Issues and Approaches
ch. 1 "Losing Our Religion": Are Students Struggling in Silence? (Judy Raper)
ch. 2 Student Religious Organizations and the Public University (Jennifer L. Walters)
ch. 3 The Education as Transformation Project (Peter Laurence and Victor H. Kazanjian, Jr.)
ch. 4 Making and Maintaining a Religious Pluralism and Spirituality Group: A Case Study from a Jewish Sponsored Nonsectarian University(Ora Gladstone)
ch. 5 Religion, Spirituality, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Marie V. McDemond, Arthur R. Jackson and Jacqueline A. Curtis)
ch. 6 I Do and I Understand: The Self Knowledge Symposium Model for Spiritual (Mary Alice Scott, Georg Buehler and Kenny Felder))
ch. 7 Looking at Diversity through the Lens of Religion and Spirituality: The Manhattanville Experience (Margaret L. Causey and Richard A. Berman)
ch. 8 Dancing on the Edge (Leon Tilson Burrows)

Part 2. Spirituality and Leadership: Self and Organizational Transformation
ch. 9 Private Conversations about Public Spirituality (Sarah Stockton)
ch. 10 Learning to Connect: Spirituality and Leadership (Kathleen E. Allen and Gar Kellom)
ch. 11 The College Campus as a Web of Sociality (Gil Stafford)
ch. 12 Spirituality in Student Affairs: A Practitioner's Perspective (Margaret A. Jablonski)
ch. 13 Unpacking the Knapsack in Not a Picnic (Katja Hahn d'Errico)

Part 3. Integrating Spirituality into Learning and Life on Campus
ch. 14 Innate Mental Health: Tapping the Divine Gift for Learning and Well-being (Joel Grossman)
ch. 15 Creating a Learning Community and the Core Values of Spirituality (Fan Yihong)
ch. 16 Approaches to Conflict from Spiritual and Religious Perspectives: Lessons for Student Affairs (Patricia E. Martin)
ch. 17 Civility and Spirituality (Jane Fried)
ch. 18 Higher Education and Eco-Justice (Alberto Arenas)
ch. 19 Transforming Campus Life: Conclusions and Other Questions (Vachel W. Miller)

List of Contributors
Cover image

Declining by Degrees: Higher Education at Risk

Book
Hersh, Richard H. and Merrow, John, eds.
2005
Palgrave Macmillan, NY
LA227.4.D45 2005
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
What is actually happening on college campuses in the years between admission and graduation?

Not enough to keep America competitive, and not enough to provide our citizens with fulfilling lives.

When A Nation at Risk called attention to the problems of our public schools in 1983, that landmark report provided a convenient "cover" for higher education, inadvertently implying that all was well on America's campuses.

...
Additional Info:
What is actually happening on college campuses in the years between admission and graduation?

Not enough to keep America competitive, and not enough to provide our citizens with fulfilling lives.

When A Nation at Risk called attention to the problems of our public schools in 1983, that landmark report provided a convenient "cover" for higher education, inadvertently implying that all was well on America's campuses.

Declining by Degrees blows higher education's cover. It asks tough--and long overdue--questions about our colleges and universities. In candid, coherent, and ultimately provocative ways, Declining by Degrees reveals:
- how students are being short-changed by lowered academic expectations and standards;
-why many universities focus on research instead of teaching and spend more on recruiting and athletics than on salaries for professors;
-why students are disillusioned;
-how administrations are obsessed with rankings in news magazines rather than the quality of learning;
-why the media ignore the often catastrophic results; and
-how many professors and students have an unspoken "non-aggression pact" when it comes to academic effort.

Declining by Degrees argues persuasively that the multi-billion dollar enterprise of higher education has gone astray. At the same time, these essays offer specific prescriptions for change, warning that our nation is in fact at greater risk if we do nothing. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction (Richard H. Hersh and John Merrow)

ch. 1 The Media: Degrees of Coverage (Gene I. Maeroff)
ch. 2 Ready or Not? Where the Public Stands on Higher Education Reform (Deborah Wadsworth)
ch. 3 College Admissions: A Substitute for Quality? (James Fallows)
ch. 4 Caveat Lector: Unexamined Assumptions about Quality in Higher Education (Jay Mathews)
ch. 5 Liberal Education: Slip-Sliding Away? (Carol G. Schneider)
ch. 6 Six Challenges to the American University (Vartan Gregorian)
ch. 7 Beyond Markets and Individuals: A Focus on Educational Goals (Howard Gardner)
ch. 8 This Little Student Went to Market (David L. Kirp)
ch. 9 How Undergraduate Education Became College Lite-and a Personal Apology (Murray Sperber)
ch. 10 America's Modern Peculiar Institution (Frank Deford)
ch. 11 Worlds Apart: Disconnects Between Students and Their Colleges (Arthur Levine)
ch. 12 Leaving the Newcomers Behind (Roberto Suro and Richard Fry)
ch. 13 Talking the Talk: Rhetoric and Reality for Students of Color (Heather D. Wathington)
ch. 14 It is Only a Port of Call: Reflections on the State of Higher Education (Julie Johnson Kidd)
ch. 15 The Curriculum and College Life: Confronting Unfulfilled Promises (Leon Bostein)
ch. 16 Afterword: What Difference Does a College Make? (Richard H. Hersh and John Merrow)

Index
Journal cover image

Dimensions of Change

Journal Issue
1969
Theological Education 5, no. 4 (A Profile of Contemporary Seminarians Revisited)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
The Role of Seminaries in Recruitment (C. Douglas Lewis)
So Who Listens? (Eugene I. Van Antwerp)
A Reflection on Models (James V. Fisher)
Field Education as Locus for "Theological Reflection" (James W. Bergland)
Some Issues in Theological Education (Owen C. Thomas)
AATS, Educational Techniques, and Seminary Libraries (Calvin C. Klemt)
Self-Evaluation Guides in Clinical Pastoral Education (Thomas W. Klink)
The Grassroots Theologian (Carnegie Samuel Calian)
The Seminaries' Responsibility in Overseas Theological Training (Frances I. Andersen)
Notes to:
Administrators (Richard L. Rising)
Trustees (Matthew E. Welch)
Professors (Herman J. Ridder)
Librarians (Warren R. Mehl)
Seminary Staff Officers (Alvar L. Lindgren)
Journal cover image

Disconcerting Old and New Imperatives in Theological Education

Journal Issue
1982
Theological Education 19, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Disconcerting Old and New Imperatives in Theological Education (Robert N. Bellah)
Responses: (John H. Yoder; Paul H. Nichols; G. Russell Hatton; Michael J. Blecker)
Presidential Address (Harvey H. Guthrie, Jr.)
ATS and the Corporate Imperatives of Theological Education (Leon Pacala)
Internationalization: Global Mission (Shunji F. Nishi)
Maintaining Educational Quality in Economic Gridlock (Milton McC. Gatch)
Contemporary Challenges to Issues of Vocational Preparation (Sharon Parks)
Ecclesiastical Imperatives in Theological Education (Melinds Rope)r
A Theological Faculties Profile: 1981 Data Compared with the 1971 Study (Marvin J. Taylor)
Journal cover image

Globalizing Theological Education in North America

Journal Issue
1986
Theological Education 22, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
I. The Globalization of Theological Education: Setting the Task (Donald W. Shriver, Jr.)
II. Globalization in Theological Education: Summary and Analysis of Survey Data David S. Schuller)
III. Case Descriptions:
A. The Atlanta Theological Association (Erskine Clarke)
B. School of Theology at Claremont (Joseph C. Hough, Jr.)
C. Denver Conservative Baptist Seminary (Ralph R. Covell)
D. Fuller Theological Seminary (Paul E. Peirson)
E. Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary (J. Christy Wilson, Jr.)
F. Harvard Divinity School (Jane I. Smith)
G. Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (David L. Lindberg)
H. Princeton Theological Seminary (Samuel Hugh Moffett)
I. St. Vincent de Paul Regional Seminary (Pilar Aurensanz)
J. Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary (Russell Staples and Madeline Johnston)
K. Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (Justice C. Anderson)
L. Toronto School of Theology (Cyril Powles)
M. Union Theological Seminary, New York City (Kosuke Koyama)
Journal cover image

Global Challenges and Perspectives in Theological Education

Journal Issue
1986
Theological Education 23, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Globalization of Theological Education (Francis Cardinal Arinze)
Responses to Keynote Address (David A. Hubbard; Henry H. Mitchell; and Barbara Brown Zikmund)
Globalization and the Task of Theological Education (Don S. Browning)
On Bi-Nationalism and Globalization (C. Douglas Jay)
Contextualization and Theological Education (Max L. Stackhouse)
Journal cover image

Emerging Visions of the World and Theological Education

Journal Issue
1988
Theological Education 25, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial Introduction (David S. Schuller)
On Science, and What It Might Suggest for the Church (Charles H. Townes)
The Arts in Theological Education for the Church (John W. Cook)
Theological Education as Advocate (Barbara Brown Zikmund)
Reflections on Theological Education as Character Formation (David H. Kelsey)
Reading Recommendations:
Worship (Robert N. Schnaper)
Liturgy (Mary M. Schaefer)
Pastoral Theology (Rodney J. Hunter)
Practical Theology (Don Browning)
Homiletics (Thomas Long)
Journal cover image

Fundamental Issues in Globalization

Journal Issue
1990
Theological Education 26, supp. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial Introduction (William E. Lesher and Robert J. Schreiter)
Mapping Globalization for Theological Education (S. Mark Heim)
Pluralism at Home: Globalization within North America (Fumitaka Matsuoka)
Engaging the Other in the Global Village (Mark Kline Taylor and Gary Bekker)
Education for a Global Theology (Marsha Hewitt, Cyril Powles, Carolyn Charp, John Sivalon, John Webster, and Ray Whitehead)
Cover image

Student Success in College: Creating Conditions That Matter

Book
Kuh, George D., Jillian Kinzie, John H. Schuh, Elizabeth J. Whitt, and associates
2005
Jossey-Bass Publisheing
LB2343.32.S79 2005
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This book describes policies, programs, and practices that a diverse set of schools have used to promote student success, and shows how other schools can use them to improve student success in their context. Based on the Project DEEP (Documenting Effective Educational Practices) study, this book will provide concrete examples of what different types of institutions can do to help different types of students succeed in college at higher rates. ...
Additional Info:
This book describes policies, programs, and practices that a diverse set of schools have used to promote student success, and shows how other schools can use them to improve student success in their context. Based on the Project DEEP (Documenting Effective Educational Practices) study, this book will provide concrete examples of what different types of institutions can do to help different types of students succeed in college at higher rates. The broad spectrum of schools make the book applicable across institutional type, showing readers how to encourage a variety of desired outcomes including student satisfaction, persistence, learning and personal development. Coordinated by the NSSE Institute for Effective Educational Practice a the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research, the project was co-sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, the Pew Forum on Undergraduate Learning, and supported by grants from the Lumina Foundation and the Center for Inquiry in the Liberal Arts at Wabash College. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Pt. 1 Introduction
ch. 1 Student engagement : a key to student success

Pt. 2 Properties and conditions common to educationally effective colleges
ch. 2 "Living" mission and "lived" educational philosophy
ch. 3 An unshakeable focus on student learning
ch. 4 Environments adapted for educational enrichment
ch. 5 Clear pathways to student success
ch. 6 An improvement-oriented ethos
ch. 7 Shared responsibility for educational quality and student success

Pt. 3 Effective practices used at DEEP colleges and universities
ch. 8 Academic challenge
ch. 9 Active and collaborative learning
ch. 10 Student-faculty interaction
ch. 11 Enriching educational experiences
ch. 12 Supportive campus environment

Pt. 4 summary and recommendations
ch. 13 Principles for promoting student success
ch. 14 Recommendations

App. A Research methods
App. B Project DEEP research team
App. C National survey of student engagement
Cover image

No Place to Learn: Why Universities Aren't Working

Book
Pocklington,Tom and Allan Tupper
2002
University of British Columbia Press, Vancouver, BC
LB2329.8.C2P63 2002
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The Red Cross is studied and criticized. The Royal Family is studied and criticized. Churches and hospitals are studied and criticized. Canadian universities are seldom studied and criticized and are worse off for this neglect. This book seeks to repair this damage by casting a critical eye on how Canadian universities work - or fail to work. Arguing that too much emphasis is placed on absurdly specialized research and too ...
Additional Info:
The Red Cross is studied and criticized. The Royal Family is studied and criticized. Churches and hospitals are studied and criticized. Canadian universities are seldom studied and criticized and are worse off for this neglect. This book seeks to repair this damage by casting a critical eye on how Canadian universities work - or fail to work. Arguing that too much emphasis is placed on absurdly specialized research and too little on teaching, No Place to Learn contends that students seeking higher education in Canada are drastically short-changed. In clear, non-technical language, the book explains the current structure of the Canadian university and outlines several practical reforms that, if implemented, would greatly improve it. If you've never known what deans do, what tenure is, and what professors do when they're not teaching, No Place to Learn is a must-read: an eye-opening introduction that raises serious questions about the state of higher education in this country. No Place to Learn adds thought-provoking fuel to the incendiary debate about the role of the Canadian university today and in the future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 No Place to Learn
ch. 2 The Canadian University: From College to Knowledge Factory
ch. 3 Universities in Action: A Day in the Life
ch. 4 University Teaching
ch. 5 Research and Reflective Inquiry: Competing Principles
ch. 6 Teaching and Research at Canadian Universities: The Myth and Mutual Enrichment
ch. 7 Ethics in Canadian Universities
ch. 8 Universities in Business: Issues and prospects
ch. 9 Pseudo-Problems and Pseudo-Solutions
ch. 10 Real Problems, Real Solutions

Notes
Bibliography
Index
Cover image

The Academic Citizen: The Virtue of Service in University Life

Book
Bruce Macfarlane
2007
Routledge, New York
LC220.5.M33 2007
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Contemporary universities are very much an integral part of communities. However, while much has been written about teaching and research in universities, the "service" role of universities has been neglected. In an attempt to address this imbalance, The Academic Citizen looks at how these three roles interrelate and explores the idea of a compact between universities and society.
This book argues that in order to achieve a compact, we ...
Additional Info:
Contemporary universities are very much an integral part of communities. However, while much has been written about teaching and research in universities, the "service" role of universities has been neglected. In an attempt to address this imbalance, The Academic Citizen looks at how these three roles interrelate and explores the idea of a compact between universities and society.
This book argues that in order to achieve a compact, we need to re-evaluate the poorly rewarded aspects of service and leading academics need to set a new standard. Based on in-depth interviews with an international group of academics, it sets out to:
· outline the interconnecting communities served by university lecturers
· explore what the notion of "service" means for academic staff
· develop a moral basis for the "service" role in academic life as both a collegial and civic duty
· show how service supports teaching and research in a more competitive environment
·examine the ideal character required to fulfill the functions academic citizenship
Drawing on a range of university and service traditions, The Academic Citizen has a strong historical and comparative perspective that should prove stimulating for those interested in the role of the academic in modern society. It has international relevance and will appeal to staff and educational developers in universities and colleges, as well as students of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Book summary
Acknowledgements
About the author
Foreword
Introduction

The retreat from citizenship
The disengaged academic
The roots of service
The new compact
Service and citizenship
Interpretations of service
The call of service
Rewarding service
The academic citizen
Recovering academic citizenship
Re-valuing student service
Leading academic citizens
Recovering academic citizenship

Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Educations and Their Purposes: A Conversation among Cultures

Book
Ames, Roger T., and Peter D. Hershock, eds.
2008
University of Hawai'i Press, Honolulu
LB45.E15 2005
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religion and Academia   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Chapters included in Part One, Education, Relationality, and Diversity, examine the growing intellectual awareness of a pervasive interdependence amid diversity in all aspects of the human experience brought on by the unrelenting processes of globalization. One of the most distinguished voices in the philosophy of emotions offers a sustained reflection in the opening chapter to Part Two, Educating Emotions: The Phenomenology of Feelings. In Part Three, East Asian traditions of ...
Additional Info:
Chapters included in Part One, Education, Relationality, and Diversity, examine the growing intellectual awareness of a pervasive interdependence amid diversity in all aspects of the human experience brought on by the unrelenting processes of globalization. One of the most distinguished voices in the philosophy of emotions offers a sustained reflection in the opening chapter to Part Two, Educating Emotions: The Phenomenology of Feelings. In Part Three, East Asian traditions of thought that have never committed to the familiar mind-body dualism are appealed to as a resource for rethinking the body in education. The tension between personal authenticity and indoctrination in the role that education plays in preparing a person for a successful life is the subject of Part Four, Creativity and Habilitation, followed by chapters on the mutual accommodation of different approaches to education. The final essays discuss the role of aesthetic sensibilities in moral development with the theme of education and the aesthetics of moral cultivation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Roger T. Ames and Peter D. Hershock)

Part I Education, Relationality, and Diversity
ch. 1 Relating Freely: The Meaning of Educating for Equity and Diversity (Peter D. Hershock)
ch. 2 Philosophy and the Hybridization of Culture (Richard Rorty)
ch. 3 The Overdominance of English in Global Education: Is an Alternative Scenario Thinkable? (Tze-Wan Kwan)
ch. 4 Teaching Philosophy of Religion "Multiculturally": A Lokahi Approach? (Gwen Griffith-Dickson)
ch. 5 Democracy and Science in Education: Lacuna in China's Modernization (Sor-Hoon Tan)

Part II Education and Affectivity
ch. 6 Educating Emotions: The Phenomenology of Feelings (Robert C. Solomon)
ch. 7 Caring and Critical Thinking in Relational Ethics (Nel Noddings)
ch. 8 Cultivating the Mindful Heart: What We May Learn from the Japanese Philosophy of Kokoro (Thomas P. Kasulis)
ch. 9 The Dilemma of Skillful Means in Buddhist Pedagogy: Desire and Education in the Lotus Sutra (Tao Jiang)

Part III Education and Somaticity
ch. 10 With This Very Body: Or What Kukai Has to Teach Us about Ritual Pedagogy (Nikki Bado-Fralick)
ch. 11 The Confucian Body and Virtue Education: On the Balance between Inner Authenticity and Outer Expression (Seung-Hwan Lee)
ch. 12 Ethical Education as Bodily Training: Kitaro Nishida's Moral Phenomenology of "Acting-Intuition" (Joel W. Krueger)

Part IV Creativity and Habilitation
ch. 13 What's Wrong with Being "Creative"? (John Hope Mason)
ch. 14 Constructing Identities: The Shifting Role of Indoctrination in Chinese and American Education (Gay Garland Reed)
ch. 15 Initiating but not Proceeding to the end – a Confucian response to indoctrination (Geir Sigurdsson)
ch. 16 Either Self-realization or transmission of received wisdom in Confucian education? (Hoyt Cleveland Tillman)

Part V Education and Otherness
ch. 17 Oral traditions, African philosophical methods, and their contributions to education and our global knowledge (Workineh Kelbessa)
ch. 18 The ideas of “educating” and “learning” in Confucian thought (Chen Lai)
ch. 19 Spiritual transformation and transthetical life – thinking from advaita (John J. Thatamanil)
ch. 20 Education and responsiveness – On the agency of intersubjectivity (Brian J. Bruya)
ch. 21 Different encounter between teacher and student in Sankara’s Upadesa-Sahasri and in the teaching of Jiddu Krishnamurti (Daniel Raveh)

Part VI Education and Aesthetics of Moral Cultivation
ch. 22 Beautiful freedom – Schiller on the ‘Aesthetic Education’ of Humanity (Fred Dallmayr)
ch. 23 Musical Education for Peace (Kathleen Marie Higgins)
ch. 24 Fact and Value in the Analects – Education and Logic (Joel J. Kupperman)
ch. 25 Xunzi and the role of aesthetic experience in moral cultivation (Scott R. Stroud)
ch. 26 How is weakness of the will NOT possible? Cheng Yi’s Neo-confucian conception of moral knowledge (Yong Huang)

Contributors
Index
Cover image

A New Agenda for Higher Education: Shaping a Life of the Mind for Practice

Book
Sullivan, William M., and Matthew S. Rosin
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2322.2.S85 2008
Topics: Liberal Arts   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
In A New Agenda for Higher Education, the authors endorse higher education's utility for enhancing the practical as well as intellectual dimensions of life by developing a third, different conception of educational purpose. Based on The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching seminar that brought together educators from six professional fields with faculty from the liberal arts and sciences, A New Agenda for Higher Education proposes an educational aim ...
Additional Info:
In A New Agenda for Higher Education, the authors endorse higher education's utility for enhancing the practical as well as intellectual dimensions of life by developing a third, different conception of educational purpose. Based on The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching seminar that brought together educators from six professional fields with faculty from the liberal arts and sciences, A New Agenda for Higher Education proposes an educational aim of "practical reason," focusing on the interdependence of liberal education and professional training.
The book includes case studies of instructors from a wide array of disciplines including those who educate their students for practical responsibility. The authors document the process by which they learned to collaborate with one another across fields and, in the end, produced a new discourse of practical reason. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Authors
Introduction

ch. 1 Partners in the Field: Part One
ch. 2 Partners in the Field: Part Two
ch. 3 A Narrative of the Seminar
ch. 4 Practical Reason as an Educational Agenda

Conclusion: Taking Formative Action

Appendix 1 Partner Syllabi
Hessel Bouma III, "Human Biology," Calvin College
Elliot N. Dorff, "Issues in Jewish Ethics," American Jewish University
Gary Lee Downey and Juan Lucena, "Engineering Cultures," Virginia Tech and Colorado School of Mines
Daisy Hurst Floyd, "Advanced Legal Ethics: Finding Joy and Satisfaction in Legal Life," Mercer University School of Law
Allen S. Hammond IV, "Contracts," Santa Clara University School of Law
Robert McGinn, "Ethical Issues in Engineering," Stanford University
Timothy Murphy and Michele Oberman, Selected Cases from "Ethics and Law," University of Illinois College of Medicine
William C. Spohn, "Scripture and the Moral Life," Santa Clara University
Barbara S. Stengel, "Foundations of Modern Education," Millersville University

Appendix 2 Seminar Assignments
Assignment for Session One, September 2002
Assignment for Session Two, January 2003
Syllabus Narrative Writing Assignment, Summer 2003
Assignment for Session Three, November 2003
Follow-Up Reflection Questions, January 2004

References
Cover image

Faculty Development for Student Achievement: The QUE Project

Book
Henry, Ronald J., ed.
2006
Anker Publishing Co., Bolton, MA
LB1778.2.F319 2006
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This book describes a seven-year project—Quality in Undergraduate Education (QUE)—that produced important changes in departments and in the teaching of individual faculty in 21 two- and four-year institutions across four states. Rather than a blow-by-blow report of the project, it focuses on the problems that led to the development of QUE: concern about low levels of student learning in postsecondary institutions and demands by state legislatures that funds for ...
Additional Info:
This book describes a seven-year project—Quality in Undergraduate Education (QUE)—that produced important changes in departments and in the teaching of individual faculty in 21 two- and four-year institutions across four states. Rather than a blow-by-blow report of the project, it focuses on the problems that led to the development of QUE: concern about low levels of student learning in postsecondary institutions and demands by state legislatures that funds for postsecondary institutions be tied to assessment of student learning.
The story is told first from the organizational perspective in national and local campus meetings, and then from the point of view of faculty in five chapters, one for each discipline of biology, chemistry, English, history, and mathematics. This description of QUE is intended as a model for administrators and faculty seeking to meet the challenges of increasingly diverse students as well as the increasingly divergent ways to earn a degree. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction (Ronald J. Henry )
ch. 2 The Que Process at the National Level (Ruth Mitchell)
ch. 3 The Que Process at the Local Level (Gloria John, Ruth Mitchell)
ch. 4 Wandering Through the World of Standards: Evolution of a Biologist’s Perspective (Barbara Baumstark)
ch. 5 Chemical Education Today (Jerry Sarquis)
ch. 6 The English Chair’s Guide to a Learning-Centured Curriculum (Susan Albertine)
ch. 7 The QUE Project and History Learning and Teaching: The Case of Long Beach State (Tim Keirn, Brett Mizelle)
ch. 8 Mathematics and Que: Oil and Water? (Bernard L. Madison, Susan L. Ganter)
ch. 9 Reflections on Success and Recommendations to Ensure It (Ruth Mitchell, Ronald J. Henry)

Appendix A: A Brief Chronological History of QUE
Appendix B: Outcomes at Level 14 and Level 16 in Biology, Chemistry, English, History, and Mathematics
Appendix C: Constructing Effective Rubrics
Appendix D: Publications and Conference Presentations
Appendix E: QUE Personnel: Cluster Coordinators, Staff, and Consultants

Index
Additional Info:
If we are all becoming global citizens, what then are our civic responsibilities? Colleges and universities across the United States have responded to this question by making the development of global citizens part of their core mission. A key strategy for realizing this goal is study abroad. After all, there may be no better way for students to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to become effective change-agents in ...
Additional Info:
If we are all becoming global citizens, what then are our civic responsibilities? Colleges and universities across the United States have responded to this question by making the development of global citizens part of their core mission. A key strategy for realizing this goal is study abroad. After all, there may be no better way for students to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to become effective change-agents in international contexts.

The Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad is a comprehensive survey of the field. Each chapter eloquently conveys an enthusiasm for study abroad alongside a critical assessment of the most up-to-date research, theory and practice. This contributed volume brings together expert academics, senior administrators, practitioners of study abroad, and policy makers from across the United States, Canada and other part of the world, who meticulously address the following questions:

What do we mean by global citizenship and global competence?

What are the philosophical, pedagogical and practical challenges facing institutions as they endeavor to create global citizens?

How is study abroad and global citizenship compatible with the role of the academy?

What are the institutional challenges to study abroad, including those related to ethics, infrastructure, finances, accessibility, and quality control?

Which study abroad programs can be called successful?

The Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad is an indispensable reference volume for scholars, higher education faculty, study abroad professionals, policy makers, and the academic libraries that serve these audiences. It is also appropriate for a wide range of courses in Higher Education Master’s and Ph.D. Programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part 1 Defining Global Citizenship in Study Abroad
ch. 1 Global Citizenship in Theory and Practice (Hans Schattle)
ch. 2 Fostering Engagement: The Role of International Education in the Development of Global Civil Society (James M. Skelly)
ch. 3 Global Learning and the Making of Citizen Diplomats (Rebecca Hovey and Adam Weinberg)
ch. 4 International Studies and Foreign Languages: A Critical American Priority (Charles Kolb)
ch. 5 Global Citizenship Education: Challenges and Possibilities (Ian Davies and Graham Pike)

Part 2 Aligning Global Citizenship and Study Abroad With the MIssion of the Academy
ch. 6 Study Abroad and Language: From Maximal to Realistic Models (Dieter Wanner)
ch. 7 Constructive Disequilibrium: Cognitive and Emotional Development through Dissonant Experiences in Less Familiar Destinations (S. Megan Che, Mindy Spearman, and Agida Manizade)
ch. 8 The Liberal Arts and Global Citizenship: Fostering Intercultural Engagement Through Integrative Experiences and Structured Reflection ((Joseph L. Brockington and Margarete D. Wiedenhoeft)
ch. 9 Study Abroad and Nursing: From Cultural to Global Competence (Connie Currier, et. al)
ch. 10 The Role of Study Abroad in Preparing Globally Responsible Teachers (Kenneth Cushner)
ch. 11 Democratizing Study Abroad: Challenges of Open Access, Local Commitments, and Global Competence in Community Colleges (Robert A. Frost and Rosalind Latiner Raby)
ch. 12 North of 49: Global Citizenship a la canadienne (Roopa Desai Trilokekar and Adrian Shubert)
ch. 13 Global Citizenship and Study Abroad: A European Comparative Perspective (Hans de Wit)
ch. 14 Strategy for the Development of a Global City: Study Abroad in Singapore (Peter Pang)

Part 3 Institutional Challenges and Strategies for Fostering Global Citizenship Study Abroad
ch. 15 It Takes an Entire Institution: A Blueprint for the Global University (William Brustein)
ch. 16 Turning Our Back on the World: Study Abroad and the Purpose of U.S. Higher Education (Riall W. Nolan)
ch. 17 Faculty Beliefs and Institutional Values: Identifying and Overcoming These Obstacles to Education Abroad Growth (Joan Elias Gore)
ch. 18 Selling the World: Study Abroad Marketing and the Privatization of Global Citizenship (Talya Zemach-Bersin)
ch. 19 Global Citizenship for All: Low Minority Study Participation in Study Abroad - Seeking Strategies for Success (Earl Picard, Farrah Bernardino, and Kike Ehigiator)
ch. 20 Understanding the Challenges of Assessing Global Citizenship (Darla K. Deardorff)
ch. 21 Here to Stay: Increasing Acceptance of Short-Term Study Abroad Programs (Lisa Chieffor and Lesa Grifiths)
ch. 22 Going Global in the Sciences: A Case Study at Emory University (Philip Wainwright, et al.)
ch. 23 Undergraduate Research During Study Abroad: Scope, Meaning, and Potential (Bernhard T. Streitwieser)

Part 4 Innovative Global Citizenship Study Abroad Program Models
ch. 24 Georgia Tech's Comprehensive and Integrated Approach to Developing Global Competence (Howard Rollins)
ch. 25 Holistic Student Learning and Development Abroad: The IES 3-D Program Model (Joan Gillespie, Larry Braskamp, and Mary Dwyer)
ch. 26 It Takes a Curriculum: Bringing Global Mindedness Home (Kevin Hovland)
ch. 27 Educating Globally Competent Citizens through International Service Learning (William M. Plater, et al.)
ch. 28 Creating Deep Partnerships with Institutions Abroad: Bard College as Global Citizen (Susan H. Gillespie, et al.)
ch. 29 Creating Study Abroad Opportunities for First-Generation College Students (Maria D. Martinez, Bidya Ranjeet, and Helen A. Marx)
ch. 30 It's Not about You: The UConn Social Entrepreneur Corps Global Commonwealth Study Abroad Model (Ross Lewin and Greg Van Kirk)

Contributors
Index
Cover image

Higher Education Reconceived: A Geography of Change

Book
Sherrie Reynolds and Toni Craven
2009
TCU Press, Forth Worth, TX
LA 227.4.R48 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
In "Higher Education Reconceived: A Geography of Change", authors Sherrie Reynolds and Toni Craven examine the process of change in higher education as they engage the reader in conversation about how we relate to ourselves and to one another. They draw on modern and post-modern elements of higher education as well as personal narratives to address personal change, emergent change, and changing ideas about learning, curriculum, and communities of learning. ...
Additional Info:
In "Higher Education Reconceived: A Geography of Change", authors Sherrie Reynolds and Toni Craven examine the process of change in higher education as they engage the reader in conversation about how we relate to ourselves and to one another. They draw on modern and post-modern elements of higher education as well as personal narratives to address personal change, emergent change, and changing ideas about learning, curriculum, and communities of learning. The traditional view in higher education is that teaching causes learning. However, these authors assess how, as our ideas of student learning, research, and disciplines have developed, our understanding of teaching has evolved as well. Throughout, the authors intimate a sense of the spiritual in the processes of teaching and learning. This holistic volume encourages meditation on the multidimensional journey of teaching and learning, sheds new light on current paradigms of education, and presents ways of living together in a pluralistic and globally connected world. Opening each chapter with a labyrinth illustration to depict the winding and porous nature of the topic, this book should find a place on every educator's bookshelf. As teacher-scholars together discover a new understanding of higher education fit for our times, they should never forget that - as Reynolds put it - 'Being a university professor is a sacred trust'.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction Labyrinths

ch. 1 Personal Change
Sherri Reynolds: Change
Change as Process
Change Is Messy
Avoiding Change
Toni Craven: A Story of Change
Ezekiel and Transformative Change
Change and Conversation

ch. 2 Emergent Change
First and Second Order Change
Change as Fractal
Seeing through Old Ideas

ch. 3 Changing Ideas about Consciousness
Bedrock Ideas
The Mechanical Universe
A Transition
From Simple to Complex
From Hierarchy to Heterarchy
From Mechanical to Holographic
From Determinate to Indeterminate
From Linear toward Mutual Casuality
From Assembly toward Morphogenesis
From Objective toward Perspective
How Does This Affect Teaching and Scholarship?

ch. 4 Changing Ideas about Learning
Modern Learning
Darwinism and Neo-Darwinism
Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936)
John Broadus Watson (1878-1958)
B. F. Skinner (1904-1990)
Turning Points in Modern and Post-Modern Learning
Jean Piaget (1896-1980)
Lev Semyonovich Vygotsky (1896-1934)
Post-Modern Learning
Learning through Feedback
Learning Is Self-Organizing
Importance of Unconscious Thought in Learning
Learning as Emergent Order

ch. 5 Changing Ideas About Curriculum
Curriculum as Sequence
Post-Modern Curriculum
William Doll's Curriculum as Matrix
Richness
Recursion
Relations
Rigor
Curriculum as Autobiography
Relationships in a Complex System
Who Are Our Students?

ch. 6 Changing Ideas about Communities of Learning
Caring Relationships
Preparing Myself for Class
Using Feedback
Faculty and Community
Searching for Excellence
A New Story
Metaphors for Teaching
Seeing and More
Caring about Students
Relationality in Process

Notes
Lists of Works Cited
Index
About the Authors
Credits
Cover image

The Future of Higher Education: Policy, Pedagogy and the Student Experience

Book
Les Bill, Howard Stevenson and Mike Neary, eds.
2009
Continuum International Publishing Group, New York
LA637.F86 2009
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The definitive coursebook for Higher Education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The definitive coursebook for Higher Education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Notes on Contributors

ch. 1 Introduction - Universities in Transition: Themes in Higher Education Policy (Howard Stevenson, Les Bell)

Part 1 The Policy Context
ch. 2 Academic Freedom: Essential Liberty or Extravagant Luxury? (Terence Karran)
ch. 3 Learning Landscapes: Designing a Classroom of the Future (Mike Neary, Angela Thody)
ch. 4 Learning and Teaching for Sustainable Development in Higher Education: Examining Dissonance and instructional Strategy (Terfot Ngwana)

Part 2 Pedagogy And The Institutional Context
ch. 5 Educational Development Units: The Challenge of Quality Enhancement in a Changing Environment (Julian Beckton)
ch. 6 Continuing Professional Development in Higher Education: Tensions and Debates in a Changing Environment (Karin Crawford)
ch. 7 Technology-Enhanced Learning: A New Digital Divide? (Sue Watling)

Part 3 The Student Experience
ch. 8 The Stretched Academy: The Learning Experience of Mature Students from Under-represented Groups (Alieen Morris)
ch. 9 Student Intelligence: Challenging Received Wisdom in Student Surveys (Andy Hagyard)
ch. 10 The Student as Producer: Reinventing the Student Experience in Higher Education (Mike Neary, Joss Winn)
ch. 11 Conclusion - The Learning Landscape: Views with Endless Possibilities (Pam Locker)

References
Index
Additional Info:
This book significantly advances discussion of the mission of higher education in today's multicultural environment and global economy. It sets out the challenges and considerations that must be addressed by administrative leaders, by trustees, and others who shape the vision and direction of the institution but most particularly by academic deans and faculty.

The author makes the case that the inclusion of a diversity and globalization in disciplinary ...
Additional Info:
This book significantly advances discussion of the mission of higher education in today's multicultural environment and global economy. It sets out the challenges and considerations that must be addressed by administrative leaders, by trustees, and others who shape the vision and direction of the institution but most particularly by academic deans and faculty.

The author makes the case that the inclusion of a diversity and globalization in disciplinary work contributes to the research agendas of individual faculty and their departments, aligns with scholarly values, and promotes such student learning goals as tolerance of ambiguity and paradox, critical thinking and creativity. He offers a strategic vision of success, backed by theory and examples of effective application, for creating transformative change; and provides a roadmap to implementing inclusive pedagogical practices and curricula.

With implementation dependent on leadership and participation at every level of an institution, everyone with a stake in its future should read this book. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction

ch. 1 Defining Diversity in Learning-Centered Contexts
ch. 2 Shifting the Organizational Perspective on Diversity: Institutional and Academic Change
ch. 3 Shaping the Academic Discussion About Diversity
ch. 4 Accounting for Diversity Within the Teaching and Learning Paradigm
ch. 5 Practical Teaching Strategies That Engage Student Differences
ch. 6 Balancing the Traditional Curriculum with Inclusion and Diversity
ch. 7 Empowering the Voice of Diverse Students in the College Classroom
ch. 8 Responsibility and Accountability: A Willingness to Examine Our Promises and Processes

Appendix A
Summary of Findings in Relation to Research Questions
Appendix B
Perceptions of Academic Leadership and Competency and Diversity Outcomes
Appendix C
Organizational Assessment of Diversity and Leadership
Appendix D
Student Survey on Classroom Environment

Index
Cover image

Grade Inflation: Academic Standards in Higher Education

Book
Hunt, Lester, H., ed.
2008
State University of New York Press, Albany
LB2368.G73 2008
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This book provides a provocative look at the issues and controversies surrounding grade inflation, and, more generally, grading practices in American higher education. The contributors confront the issues from a number of different disciplines and varying points of view. Topics explored include empirical evidence for and against the claim that there is a general upward trend in grading, whether grade inflation (if it exists) is a problem, which ethical considerations ...
Additional Info:
This book provides a provocative look at the issues and controversies surrounding grade inflation, and, more generally, grading practices in American higher education. The contributors confront the issues from a number of different disciplines and varying points of view. Topics explored include empirical evidence for and against the claim that there is a general upward trend in grading, whether grade inflation (if it exists) is a problem, which ethical considerations are relevant to grading, and whether heavy reliance on anonymous student evaluations of teaching excellence has a distorting effect on grading practices. Finally, the contributors offer contrasting perspectives on the prospects for reform.

"As state and federal agencies begin to talk about accountability for universities, the topic of grade inflation could become even more politicized. This timely book addresses a topic of significant public interest and does it well. The fact that the contributors disagree, take different approaches, and address different aspects of grade inflation is a virtue." - Kenneth A. Strike, author of Ethical Leadership in Schools: Creating Community in an Environment of Accountability

"This book encourages academic communities to engage in constructive debate over their professional responsibilities as evaluators of student academic work. Its greatest strength is that it presents disparate perspectives on the complex topics of grading and grade inflation. The contributors are in a real sense engaged in a discussion on the subject, which makes the book refreshing and intellectually stimulating." - Matthew Hartley, University of Pennsylvania

Contributors include CliffordAdelman, David T. Beito, Mary Biggs, Harry Brighouse, Lester H. Hunt, Richard Kamber, Alfie Kohn, Charles W. Nuckolls, Francis K. Schrag, and John D. Wiley.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Dangerous Myth of Grade Inflation (Alfie Kohn)
ch. 2 Undergraduate Grades: A More Complex Story Than "Inflation" (Clifford Adelman)
ch. 3 Understanding Grade Inflation (Richard Kamber)
ch. 4 Grade Inflation and Grade Variation: What's All the Fuss About? (Harry Brighouse)
ch. 5 From Here to Equality: Grading Policies for Egalitarians (Francis K. Schrag)
ch. 6 Grade "Inflation" and the Professionalism of the Professoriate (Mary Biggs)
ch. 7 Fissures in the Foundation: Why Grade Conflation Could Happen (Mary Biggs)
ch. 8 Grading Teachers: Academic Standards and Student Evaluations (Lester H. Hunt)
ch. 9 Combating Grade Inflation: Obstacles and Opportunities (Richard Kamber)
ch. 10 Grade Distortion, Bureaucracy, and Obfuscation at the University of Alabama (David T. Beito and Charles W. Nuckolls)

Afterword: Focusing on the Big Picture (Lester H. Hunt)
List of Contributors
Index
Cover image

Pedagogy and the University: Critical Theory and Practice

Book
McLean, Monica
2006
Continuum International Publishing Company, NY
LB2322.2.M395 2006
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
An investigation of how the contemporary university should develop and the form of pedagogy used. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
An investigation of how the contemporary university should develop and the form of pedagogy used. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 University pedagogy for a better world
ch. 2 Critical theory and the transformation of university pedagogy
ch. 3 Socio-historical options and constraints
ch. 4 Accounting for pedagogic quality
ch. 5 Pedagogic justice
ch. 6 Student experience as the development of communicative reason
ch. 7 Intellectualizing university teaching and student learning
ch. 8 Creating the environment for critical pedagogy
ch. 9 University pedagogy for justice, communication and reason

References
Index
Cover image

Ivory Tower Blues: A University System in Crisis

Book
James E. Cote and Anton L Allahar
2007
University of Toronto Press, Toronto
LA417.5.C68 2007
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The present state of the university is a difficult issue to comprehend for anyone outside of the education system. If we are to believe common government reports that changes in policy are somehow making life easier for university graduates, we cannot help but believe that things are going right and are getting better in our universities. Ivory Tower Blues gives a decidedly different picture, examining this optimistic attitude as it ...
Additional Info:
The present state of the university is a difficult issue to comprehend for anyone outside of the education system. If we are to believe common government reports that changes in policy are somehow making life easier for university graduates, we cannot help but believe that things are going right and are getting better in our universities. Ivory Tower Blues gives a decidedly different picture, examining this optimistic attitude as it impacts upon professors, students, and administrators in charge of the education system.

Ivory Tower Blues is a frank account of the contemporary university, drawing on the authors' own research and personal experiences, as well as on input from students, colleagues, and administrators. James E. Côté and Anton L. Allahar offer an insider's account of the university system, an accurate, alternative view to that overwhelmingly presented to the general public. Throughout, the authors argue that fewer and fewer students are experiencing their university education in ways expected by their parents and the public. The majority of students are hampered by insufficient preparation at the secondary school level, lack of personal motivation, and disillusionment. Contrary to popular opinion, there is no administrative or governmental procedure in place to maintain standards of education.

Ivory Tower Blues is an in-depth look at the crisis facing Canadian and American universities, the factors that are precipitating the situation, and the long-term impact this crisis will have on the quality of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Canada's World-Leading University System: Image versus Reality
Who Should Read This Book?

ch. 1 Troubles in Paradise
The Disengaged Student
Higher Expectations, Lower Effort
Credentialism and Grade Inflation
Credentialism and Academic Disengagement
Roots of Student Disengagement
The New Functions of Higher Education
Sorting, Weeding, and Cooling
The Obsession with High Grades: Grade Inflation Up Close
Conclusion

ch. 2 The Professor as Reluctant Gatekeeper
How the New Functions Have Affected the Interpersonal Dynamics of Teaching and Learning: Faculty Disengagement
The Growth of Education as a Business
Life in the Credential Mart
Deskilling of the Professoriate
The Cult of Self-esteem and Other Sources of the Sense of Entitlement
Learning to Live with Student Disengagement
Awareness of the Issues: Sliding Standards
Perceptions of Student Engagement: Institutionalized Indifference
The Downward Spiral: The New Normal
Job Satisfaction and Job Stress: Being Thick-Skinned
Student Evaluations: Necessary Evils?
Sharing the Blame
Conclusion: Higher Education as a Big Business

ch. 3 The Student as a Reluctant Intellectual
   The Hazardous Passage to Adulthood
The Millennial Generation
The Gamut of Student Engagement
Voices of Disengagement
Student Empowerment
The Retreat of Faculty
Grade Inflation and the Democratization of Education
Education as a Commodity
Standards and Criteria
Edubusiness: University as Corporation
Conclusion: System Failure of Students

ch. 4 Parents as Investors and Managers: The Bank of Mom and Dad (BMD)
Education as an Investment
Setting the Right Goals
Estimating Costs
Baby Boomer Parents and the Experiences of Their Children
The Mini-Me and the Helicopter Parent
In Defence of the Helicopter Parent
How Parents Influence and Support Their Children
Aspirations
Finances: The Bottom Line
Conclusion

ch. 5 Policy Implications: So What Is University Good For? What Is Added beyond Alternatives?
Credentialism Revisited: A Brief History
You Can Lead Them to Water, but...
Grade Inflation Revisited: Underlying Causes
The Science of Grade Inflation and the Route to Reform
The University Graduate Revisited: What Is Added beyond Other Trajectories to the Workplace and Adulthood?
Show Me the Numbers: What Science Says about the High End of Benefits of Higher Education
Monetary Rates of Return
Looking beyond Statistical Averages: What Science Says about the Low End of the Benefits of the University Education
Underemployment Revisited
The Accessibility Issue
The Relative Merits of Soft and Hard Sorting Systems: Dealing with Accessibility
Conclusion: The Idea of the University - Education versus Training

Appendix
Methodological Considerations
Defining and Measuring Grade Inflation
Notes
Index
Cover image

Internationalizing the University

Book
Yvonne Turner and Sue Robson
2008
Continuum, New York
LC1090.T87 2008
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Globalization is changing the face of Higher Education across the world. Academics and students today are increasingly internationally mobile and, as such, an unprecedented number of international exchanges and cross-border education projects are being developed. The implications for individual universities are significant: international students can bring much-needed revenue to boost university coffers and stimulate university classrooms but they also have high expectations and demands.

This book discusses the ...
Additional Info:
Globalization is changing the face of Higher Education across the world. Academics and students today are increasingly internationally mobile and, as such, an unprecedented number of international exchanges and cross-border education projects are being developed. The implications for individual universities are significant: international students can bring much-needed revenue to boost university coffers and stimulate university classrooms but they also have high expectations and demands.

This book discusses the implications for those involved in managing the organizational processes and those designing programmes and supporting the student experience. A key concern in the text is that of reciprocal internationalization - the importance for universities to develop within an internationally-integrated environment rather than as national universities which accommodate the needs of people from other countries into their pre-existing practices. The emphasis throughout the discussion is therefore on the development of intercultural competences for university staff supported by sustainable international management practices. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: the scope of the book

ch. 1 The globalization of higher education: concepts and context
ch. 2 An international institution
ch. 3 Internationalization: the challenges
ch. 4 International students
ch. 5 International curriculum, teaching and assessment
ch. 6 Supporting the learning process
ch. 7 Managing the process: strategic and management issues
ch. 8 Internationalization, university teachers and academic development

References and selected bibliography
Index
Cover image

The Consumer Experience of Higher Education: The Rise of Capsule Education

Book
Deirdre McArdle-Clinton
2008
Continuum International Publishing Group, New York
LA184.M43 2008
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This monograph examines the philosophy underpinning current higher education provision. Contemporary culture seems to encourage consumers to purchase products where the product is shaped by the provider and the input of the consumer is very limited. Research suggests that students, their perceptions shaped by the educational experience they have undergone, view education as a commodity and require that information be packaged for easy consumption. The purpose of this study is ...
Additional Info:
This monograph examines the philosophy underpinning current higher education provision. Contemporary culture seems to encourage consumers to purchase products where the product is shaped by the provider and the input of the consumer is very limited. Research suggests that students, their perceptions shaped by the educational experience they have undergone, view education as a commodity and require that information be packaged for easy consumption. The purpose of this study is to examine the current situation in education against the backdrop of an emerging trend that sees education as a product and students as consumers or customers. The literature provides a basis to argue that a qualification now is frequently a simulacrum while previously it represented knowledge and competency. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

Part I
ch. 1 Modernism, Postmodernism and Higher Education
ch. 2 The Packaging of Education - Education as Oppression
ch. 3 Education Systems - Education as an Industry
ch. 4 Naming the Industry's Products - Education Terminologies
ch. 5 Postmodern Consumer Culture - The Effect on Education
ch. 6 Measuring the Grade and Quality of Education
ch. 7 Education - Agent for Social Placement
ch. 8 From Masefield to Massification

Part II
ch. 9 Higher Education as a Consumer Experience
ch. 10 The Testimony of Teachers
ch. 11 The Testimony of Students

Part III
ch. 12 Reflections
ch. 13 An Alternative View
ch. 14 Exploring the Metaphor
ch. 15 A Compromise Proposal

References
Author Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Understanding Interdisciplinary Challenges and Opportunities in Higher Education

Book
Holley, Karri A.
2009
Wiley Periodicals, Inc., San Francisco
LB2361.5.H644 2009
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Interdisciplinary teaching, learning, and research are often heralded as necessary responses to the many pressures facing contemporary higher education. Defined as the integration of knowledge from two or more disciplines, interdisciplinary work requires a change in the boundaries and norms that have long defined the academy. Through examples from a range of disciplines and institutional types, this volume considers how successful interdisciplinary engagement necessitates a focus on the structure and ...
Additional Info:
Interdisciplinary teaching, learning, and research are often heralded as necessary responses to the many pressures facing contemporary higher education. Defined as the integration of knowledge from two or more disciplines, interdisciplinary work requires a change in the boundaries and norms that have long defined the academy. Through examples from a range of disciplines and institutional types, this volume considers how successful interdisciplinary engagement necessitates a focus on the structure and rewards of academic behavior. This change is an intensely social process, involving dialogue and interation among diverse ideas, individuals, learning environments, and bodies of knowledge. It is this diversity that enables the rich potential of interdisciplinary engagement but also presents the greatest challenges for institutions. This volume considers the obstacles and opportunities inherent in interdisciplinary initiatives.

Academic administrators, faculty, and graduate students interested in understanding the disciplinary norms of higher education and cultivating interdisciplinary engagement will benefit from this volume. The author provides theoretical perspectives and practical applications for advancing interdisciplinarity in the classroom, the research laboratory, across the university campus, and outside institutional boundaries. Such endeavors entail not only interaction between scholars and professionals from normally distinct disciplines but also articulation of shared problems or topics that underscore the integration of disciplinary bodies of knowledge.

This is the second issue in the 35th volume of the Jossey-Bass series ASHE Higher Education Report. Each monograph in the series is the definitive analysis of a tough higher education problem, based on thorough research of pertinent literature and institutional experiences. Topics are identified by a national survey. Noted practitioners and scholars are then commissioned to write the reports, with experts providing critical reviews of each manuscript before publication. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Executive Summary
Foreword

Overview
Defining Interdisciplinarity
The Disciplines, Interdisciplinary, and the University
Interdisciplinary, Learning, and Cognition
Interdisciplinary and the Practice of Research
Faculty and Institutional Structure: The Conflict of Interdisciplinary
Best Practices Related to Interdisciplinary Education
Implications for Practice and the Future of Interdisciplinarity

Defining Interdisciplinarity
Conceptualizing the Disciplines
Conceptualizing Interdisciplinary Knowledge
Conclusion

The Disciplines, Interdisciplinarity, and the University
The Historical Influence of the Disciplines on Teaching and Learning
Interdisciplinary Initiatives in Twentieth-Century American Higher Education
Conclusion

Interdisciplinarity, Learning, and Congition
The Disciplinary Basis of College Student Learning
Defining Interdisciplinary Curricula in Higher Education
Conclusion

Interdisciplinarity and the Practice of Research
Challenges to the Practice of Interdisciplinary Research
Facilitating Interdisciplinary Research in Higher Education
Conclusion

Faculty and Institutional Structure: The Conflict of Interdisciplinarity
Interdisciplinarity: Faculty, and Change in Higher Education
Achieving Institutional Goals and Interdisciplinary Faculty Engagement
Fostering Faculty Connections Across Institutional Boundaries
Modifying Activity Systems to Encourage Interdisciplinarity
Conclusion

Best Practices Related to Interdisciplinary Education
Dedicated Organizational and Physical Space
Student-Centered Pedagogy
Focus on Problem- or Theme-Based Learning
Curriculum Shaped Through a Variety of Interdisciplinary Learning Experiences
Culminating Capstone Project or Student Portfolio
Focus on Collaborative Learning Rather Than Mastery of a Particular Content
Use of Independent Study, Internships, and Experiential Learning
Goal of Preparing Students for a Complex, Modern Interdisciplinary Future

Conclusion
References
Name Index
Subject Index
About the Author
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Curriculum Development for Adult Learners in the Global Community, Volume 1, Strategic Approaches

Book
Victor C.X. Wang, ed.
2008
Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, FL
LC5219.C87 2008 v.1
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Adult and continuing education continues to evolve as both a strong discipline and a professional field of practice throughout the global community. Both adult educators and adult learners require a common and informed conceptual and theoretical framework to assist them in developing meaningful curricula for adult learners. This book, in a collective and unified manner, describes innovative strategies for developing curricula for adult learners in diverse social, cultural, and economic ...
Additional Info:
Adult and continuing education continues to evolve as both a strong discipline and a professional field of practice throughout the global community. Both adult educators and adult learners require a common and informed conceptual and theoretical framework to assist them in developing meaningful curricula for adult learners. This book, in a collective and unified manner, describes innovative strategies for developing curricula for adult learners in diverse social, cultural, and economic contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
The Editor
The Contributors
Introduction (Victor C. X. Wang)

ch. 1 Principles of Instructional Design and Adult Learners (Laura L. Bierema)
ch. 2 Andragogy: An Introduction and Implications for Curriculum and Instruction (Lisa M. Baumgartner)
ch. 3 Learner-Derived Curriculum Development (Vivian W. Mott)
ch. 4 Designing Meaningful Curriculum for Disadvantaged Learners (Claretha H. Banks and Fredrick M. Nafukho)
ch. 5 Sequencing Instruction in Global Learning Communities (Rene L. Cambiano)
ch. 6 Expanding Curriculum Development Models (Mary Ziegler)
ch. 7 Developing Curriculum for Policy Officers and Firefighters: Tips to Follow and Pitfalls to Avoid (Sandra R. Daffron, Gail M. Goulet, John L. Gray, and Jason X Viada)
ch. 8 A New Model for Effective Learning: Moving Beyond Analysis, Development, Design, Implementation and Evaluation (ADDIE) (Judith A. Cochran)

Appendix: Volume II Information
Index
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Curriculum Development for Adult Learners in the Global Community, Volume II, Teaching and Learning

Book
Victor C.X. Wang, ed.
2009
Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, FL
LC5219.C87 2008 v.2
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Adult and continuing education continues to evolve as both a strong discipline and a professional field of practice throughout the global community. Both adult educators and adult learners require a common and informed conceptual and theoretical framework to assist them in developing meaningful curricula for adult learners. This book, in a collective and unified manner, describes innovative strategies for developing curricula for adult learners in diverse social, cultural, and economic ...
Additional Info:
Adult and continuing education continues to evolve as both a strong discipline and a professional field of practice throughout the global community. Both adult educators and adult learners require a common and informed conceptual and theoretical framework to assist them in developing meaningful curricula for adult learners. This book, in a collective and unified manner, describes innovative strategies for developing curricula for adult learners in diverse social, cultural, and economic contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
The Editor
The Contributors
Introduction

Part I Curriculum Development in the Global Context
ch. 1 Culturally Relevant Curriculum Development for Teachers of Adults: The Importance of Identity, Positionality, and Classroom Dynamics (Talmadge C. Guy)
ch. 2 Transnational Identities and Instructional Designs in Adult Education (Mary V. Alfred)
ch. 3 Impact of English-Language Education of Adult Learners in China on Curriculum Development (Wei Zheng)

Part II Teaching and Learning in the Global Community
ch. 4 Teachers of Adults in the Global Community (Kathleen P. King)
ch. 5 Helping Adults Learn in the 21st Century with Information Literacy (Barbara P. Heuer)
ch. 6 Design, Implementation and Assessment of E-Learning Curriculum for Adults with Diverse Learning Needs (Fredrick M. Nafukho)
ch. 7 Implementing Andragogy in China (Victor C.X. Wang)

Appendix: Volume I Information
Index
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To Delight and Instruct: Celebrating Ten Years of Pedagogy

Journal Issue
Holberg, Jennifer L. and Taylor, Marcy, eds.
2010
Duke University Press, Durham
LB2331.T59 2009
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
This issue considers the sustainability of English studies and of the humanities as a whole in the context of shrinking budgets and job opportunities and of shifting resources. Exploring topics from academic freedom and globalization to digitization, diversity, and the value of a humanities-based education, “To Delight and Instruct” reexamines the work of the English professor and calls for a reassessment of the priorities and means that ...
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
This issue considers the sustainability of English studies and of the humanities as a whole in the context of shrinking budgets and job opportunities and of shifting resources. Exploring topics from academic freedom and globalization to digitization, diversity, and the value of a humanities-based education, “To Delight and Instruct” reexamines the work of the English professor and calls for a reassessment of the priorities and means that undergird it.

Contributors examine the faculty’s fundamental responsibilities to classroom teaching, the university, and the community. Attending to the relationship between changing technologies and literacy in a global environment, the issue not only argues for a reassertion and reimagining of the humanities in the contemporary university but, perhaps as important, helps articulate a way forward.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Introduction: "Our Work"

Articles

ch. 1 Returning to Community and Praxis: A Circuitous Journey through Pedagogy and Literacy Studies (Martin Bickman)
ch. 2 Disappearing Acts: The Problem of the Student in Composition Studies (Marlolina Rizzi Salvatori and Patricia Donahue)
ch. 3 The Demands of the Day (Colin Jager)
ch. 4 Globalism and Multimodality in the Digitized World: Computers and Composition Studies (Gail E. Hawisher, Cynthia L. Selfe, Gorjana Kisa, Shafinaz Ahmed)
ch. 5 Can We Teach a Transnational Queer Studies? (Donald E. Hall)
ch. 6 Lore, Practice, and Social Identity in Creative Writing Pedagogy: Speaking with a Yellow Voice? (Shirley Geok-lin Lim)
ch. 7 Threat Level (Michael Berube)
ch. 8 Contexts for Canons (Paul Lauter)
ch. 9 The Figure of Writing and the Future of English Studies (Marc Bousquet)
ch. 10 Bringing Our Brains to the Humanities: Increasing the Value of Our Classes while Supporting Our Futures (Sheila T.Cavanagh)
ch. 11 The Coming Apocalypse (Richard E. Miller)
ch. 12 Why Assessment? (Gerald Graff)
ch. 13 Performing Discussion: The Dream of a Common Language in the Literature Classroom (Harriet Kramer Linkin)
ch. 14 What's the Trouble with Knowing Students? Only Time Will Tell (Julie Lindquist)
ch. 15 Paradigms, Conversation, Prayer: Liberal Arts in Christian Colleges (Donald G. Marshall)
ch. 16 English Studies and Intellectual Property: Copyright, Creativity, and the Commons (Danielle Nicole DeVoss)
ch. 17 Teaching Narrative as Rhetoric: The Example of Time's Arrow (James Phelan)
ch. 18 The English Curriculum after the Fall (Robert Scholes)
ch. 19 Taking Stock: A Decade of From the Classroom (Elizabeth Brockman)
ch. 20 Who We Are, Why We Care (Mark C. Long)

Contributors
Cover image

Collaborative Working in Higher Education: The Social Academy

Book
Walsh, Lorraine; and Kahn, Peter
2010
Routledge, New York
LB2331.5.W35 2010
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Collaborative working is an increasingly vital part of Higher Education academic life. Traditionally, university culture supported individual research and scholarship. Today, the focus has shifted from the individual to the group or team. Collaborative Working in Higher Education takes the reader on a journey of examination, discussion, and reflection of emerging collaborative practices. The book offers suggestions for developing practice via a broad overview of the key aspects of collaboration ...
Additional Info:
Collaborative working is an increasingly vital part of Higher Education academic life. Traditionally, university culture supported individual research and scholarship. Today, the focus has shifted from the individual to the group or team. Collaborative Working in Higher Education takes the reader on a journey of examination, discussion, and reflection of emerging collaborative practices. The book offers suggestions for developing practice via a broad overview of the key aspects of collaboration and collaborative working, informed by focused case studies and the international perspectives of the contributing authors.

The book has three main parts:

Part I: Examines the social nature of collaborative working from a practical and critical perspective, focusing on four dimensions of collaborative working: academic practice, professional dialogues, personal and organizational engagement and social structures. It considers organizational models, varied approaches, potential challenges posed by collaborative working, and reflection on the management of collaboration at different stages.

Part II: Focuses on the different aspects of collaborative working, building on the dimensions introduced in Part I, and addressing the crossing of boundaries. It looks at different contexts for collaboration (e.g. discipline-based, departmental, institutional and international) using case studies as examples of collaborative strategies in action, providing learning points and recommendations for practical applications.

Part III: In addition to considering forms of collaboration for the future, this part of the book engages the reader with athough-provoking round-table discussion that itself embodies an act of collaboration.

Collaborative Working in Higher Education is a comprehensive analysis of how collaboration is reforming academic life. It examines the shifts in working practices and reflects on how that shift can be supported and developed to improve practice. Higher Education faculty, administrators, researchers, managers and anyone involved in collaborative working across their institution will find this book a highly useful guide as they embark on their own collaborations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Case Studies
List of Figures
List of Tables
Foreword by Ronald Barnett
Acknowledgements
List of Contributors

Part I
Collaborative Working in Higher Education
ch. 1 Opening Up Collaborative Working
ch. 2 Theoretical Perspectives: The Collaborative Cocktail
ch. 3 Establishing and Sustaining Collaborations

Part II
Case Studies in Collaboration
ch. 4 Brokers of Collaboration
ch. 5 Crossing Boundaries in Collaboration
ch. 6 Proximity and Virtuality in Collaborative Research
ch. 7 Challenging Patterns of Practice through Collaborative Working

Part III
Developing the Social Academy
ch. 8 Squaring the Circle: Round-Table Discussion on Collaborative Working
ch. 9 A Collaborative Future for the Academy

Index
Cover image

The Last Professors: The Corporate University and the Fate of the Humanities

Book
Donoghue, Frank
2008
Fordham University Press, New York
LB2331.72.D66 2008
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
What makes the modern university different from any other corporation?' asked Columbia's Andrew Delbanco recently in the New York Times. 'There is more and more reason to think: less and less,' he answered.In this provocative book, Frank Donoghue shows how this growing corporate culture of higher education threatens its most fundamental values by erasing one of its defining features: the tenured professor.Taking a clear-eyed look at ...
Additional Info:
What makes the modern university different from any other corporation?' asked Columbia's Andrew Delbanco recently in the New York Times. 'There is more and more reason to think: less and less,' he answered.In this provocative book, Frank Donoghue shows how this growing corporate culture of higher education threatens its most fundamental values by erasing one of its defining features: the tenured professor.Taking a clear-eyed look at American higher education over the last twenty years, Donoghue outlines a web of forces—social, political, and institutional—dismantling the professoriate. Today, fewer than 30 percent of college and university teachers are tenured or on tenure tracks, and signs point to a future where professors will disappear. Why? What will universities look like without professors? Who will teach? Why should it matter? The fate of the professor, Donoghue shows, has always been tied to that of the liberal arts —with thehumanities at its core. The rise to prominence of the American university has been defined by the strength of the humanities and by the central role of the autonomous, tenured professor who can be both scholar and teacher. Yet in today's market-driven, rank- and ratings-obsessed world of higher education, corporate logic prevails: faculties are to be managed for optimal efficiency, productivity, and competitive advantage; casual armies of adjuncts and graduate students now fill the demand for teachers.Bypassing the distractions of the culture wars and other 'crises,' Donoghue sheds light on the structural changes in higher education—the rise of community colleges and for-profit universities, the frenzied pursuit ofprestige everywhere, the brutally competitive realities facing new Ph.D.s —that threaten the survival of professors as we've known them. There are no quick fixes in The Last Professors; rather, Donoghue offers his fellow teachers and scholarsan essential field guide to making their way in a world that no longer has room for their dreams. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface

ch. 1 Rhetoric, History, and the Problems of the Humanities
ch. 2 Competing in Academia
ch. 3 The Erosion of Tenure
ch. 4 Professors of the Future
ch. 5 Prestige and Prestige Envy

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Understanding the International Student Experience

Book
Montgomery, Catherine
2010
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LB2375.M66 2010
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Presenting the human face of internationalization, this discursive text examines the social learning experience of international students against the background of current cultures in Higher Education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Presenting the human face of internationalization, this discursive text examines the social learning experience of international students against the background of current cultures in Higher Education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editors' Preface
Preface
Aims and background to the book
An outline of the research supporting the book
An overview of issues raised in the book

Acknowledgements

Part I The Context
ch. 1 Culture in Higher Education
The culture of internationalization in Higher Education
The discourse of 'marketization' in Higher Education
Culture and international students
Small cultures and communities of practice: Two helpful paradigms?

ch. 2 Research on the International Student Experience: A Cultural Landscape
Research spanning the years: Social relationships and international students in America
Large-scale research on international students: Examples from the UK and New Zealand
International students and approaches to learning
Language, identity and their influence on the context of learning
Summary

Part 2 The Research
ch. 3 Student Voices, Student Lives: International Students in Context
The importance of the methodology
The context for the study: A brief demographic background
Choice of network
The student profiles
Student experience in context
Summary

ch. 4 International Student Networks: A Community of Practice?
Social networks and international students
Social networks and modern technology
Social capital and international students
International students in a community of practice
Summary

ch. 5 International Students and Home Students: Worlds Apart?
The experience of young UK students: The Shipton study
Understanding home students' perception of international students
The friendships of international students
International students' friendships with home students
Relationships with home students: Worlds apart?

ch. 6 Preparing for Life in a Global Community?
Caveat: A complex picture
Language, identity and change
Development of a global community
Citizens of the international community?

ch. 7 Concluding Comments to the Research
The themes of the research
Summary

Part 3 Discussion
ch. 8 Paths towards an International Experience for All: the Criticality of Discourse, Context and Internationalization at Home
The influence of discourse
Ways of thinking about teaching and learning practices in an international context
The importance of context
Internationalization at home
Final comments

Postscript
Appendix 1 More Details of the Research study
Appendix 2 A Reflective Account of the Researcher
References
Index
Cover image

Educating Global Citizens in Colleges and Universities: Challenges and Opportunities

Book
Stearns, Peter N.
2009
Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, New York
LC1090.S74 2009
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This book provides distinctive analysis of the full range of expressions in global education at a crucial time, when international competition rises, tensions with American foreign policy both complicate and motivate new activity, and a variety of innovations are taking shape. Citing best practices at a variety of institutions, the book provides practical coverage and guidance in the major aspects of global education, including curriculum, study abroad, international students, collaborations ...
Additional Info:
This book provides distinctive analysis of the full range of expressions in global education at a crucial time, when international competition rises, tensions with American foreign policy both complicate and motivate new activity, and a variety of innovations are taking shape. Citing best practices at a variety of institutions, the book provides practical coverage and guidance in the major aspects of global education, including curriculum, study abroad, international students, collaborations and branch campuses, while dealing as well with management issues and options. The book is intended to guide academic administrators and students in higher education, at a point when international education issues increasingly impinge on all aspects of college or university operation. The book deals as well with core principles that must guide global educational endeavors, and with problems and issues in the field in general as well as in specific functional areas. Challenges of assessment also win attention. Higher education professionals will find that this book serves as a manageable and provocative guide, in one of the most challenging and exciting areas of American higher education today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Preface

ch. 1 Defining the Challenge
ch. 2 Goals: Where We Should Be Heading
ch. 3 Contexts for Global Education
ch. 4 Curriculum: The Foundations for Global Education
ch. 5 Education Abroad: Redefining a Staple
ch. 6 International Students and Global Education
ch. 7 Branch Campuses and Collaborations: A New Frontier
ch. 8 Leadership and Administration: Bureaucratic Innovation without Bureaucratization
ch. 9 Assessment
ch. 10 General Observations: Some Underlying Issues
ch. 11 Conclusion: The Global Mission

Notes
Further Reading
About the Author
Index
Cover image

Harnessing America's Wasted Talent: A New Ecology of Learning

Book
Smith, Peter
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB1028.3.S59 2010
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Praise for Harnessing America's Wasted Talent

President Obama offered America and the world renewed hope for a better tomorrow. With decades of experience in alternative forms of higher education, Peter Smith grabs that optimistic spirit and seizes the moment to reveal to us the exciting age of Web-based teaching and learning, which is opening access to untold numbers of learners while harnessing the previously wasted talents of millions ...
Additional Info:
Praise for Harnessing America's Wasted Talent

President Obama offered America and the world renewed hope for a better tomorrow. With decades of experience in alternative forms of higher education, Peter Smith grabs that optimistic spirit and seizes the moment to reveal to us the exciting age of Web-based teaching and learning, which is opening access to untold numbers of learners while harnessing the previously wasted talents of millions of people in America and billions around the world. Those seeking insights, a vision of the future, and a chance to join this educational revolution should look forward to Harnessing America's Wasted Talent.

Anyone who wants to understand where American higher education is headed should read Harnessing America's Wasted Talent. Peter Smith's vision of the future of higher education is based on several decades of experience—at the national, state, and international levels. He brings a rare perspective that will interest students, educators, politicians, and those American business leaders who are worried about the future of our workforce and the health of our democracy.

Harnessing America's Wasted Talent is a must-read for those of us concerned about the increasing economic and education gaps in our country. Peter Smith takes on an important American disconnect: the need for an educated workforce and the fact that most working Americans lack a college degree. Drawing upon his experience in higher education and politics, Smith dissects the problem and presents a contemporary, practical plan to enhance the learning capacity of our country. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

Part One: The Law of Thirds
ch. 1 Wasted Talent
ch. 2 Maxed Out: Why Colleges Can't Meet This Challenge
ch. 3 The Paradox of Personal Learning

Part Two: Dangerous Conceits
ch. 4 Different Strokes for Different Folks
ch. 5 Learning Is More Than “Strictly Academic”
ch. 6 You Can't Get There from Here

Part Three: From Access to Success: A New Ecology of Learning
ch. 7 The End of Scarcity: Education's Emerging Long Tail
ch. 8 Game Changers: New Media and the Open Education Resource Movement
ch. 9 Reaching the Middle Third: Talent-Friendly Colleges for the Twenty-First Century (C21Cs)

Conclusion: A New Ecology of Learning
Resources
References
Index
Cover image

Transforming Global Higher Education: A Feminist Perspective

Book
Miriam David
2009
Institute of Education London
LC197.D38 2009
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Has higher education been transformative over the last three decades? Miram David’s question is double-edged, based on her educational experience and her social research.

What influences have second wave feminists, drawing on feminism as the key social movement of the twentieth century had on the pedagogies and practices in global higher education? As aspiring academics, their aims were for gender and social justice through inclusive pedagogies in ...
Additional Info:
Has higher education been transformative over the last three decades? Miram David’s question is double-edged, based on her educational experience and her social research.

What influences have second wave feminists, drawing on feminism as the key social movement of the twentieth century had on the pedagogies and practices in global higher education? As aspiring academics, their aims were for gender and social justice through inclusive pedagogies in higher education or lifelong learning. Ideas about inclusive pedagogies have begun to percolate into forms of mass higher education in the 21st century, linked to widening access and participation in higher education. Yet the expansion of higher education and the knowledge economy has been more about transforming global labor markets than it has been about social or gender justice. Higher education has indeed expanded and afforded diverse opportunities for participation as students and as researchers or academics yet these transformations maintain systemic inequalities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Content
Diversity, gender and widening participation in global higher education: a feminist perspective
TTR cover image

"Relevant and Effective Theological Education in the Context of Twenty-First Century South Asia"

TTR
Raja, Joshva, and Rajkumar, Peniel Jesudason Rufus
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 193-207
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This essay considers Christian theological education in South Asia highlighting pertinent issues in pedagogical content, form, method, and praxis. Debunking the notion of students as "empty bottles" to be filled, and criticizing the top-down model of education, the paper argues that theological education is an ongoing and interactive process in which students and teachers are participants who share and reflect upon each other's faith and socio-cultural experiences. Participants reject, test, ...
Additional Info:
This essay considers Christian theological education in South Asia highlighting pertinent issues in pedagogical content, form, method, and praxis. Debunking the notion of students as "empty bottles" to be filled, and criticizing the top-down model of education, the paper argues that theological education is an ongoing and interactive process in which students and teachers are participants who share and reflect upon each other's faith and socio-cultural experiences. Participants reject, test, negotiate, and choose – while remaining open to the variety that is embodied in different human experiences. The paper stresses the relationship between the theological college and the church and calls for mutual responsibility, respect, and accountability. In an increasingly communal and fundamentalist atmosphere that poses a threat to multi-culturalism, the role of the laity in shaping theological education is highlighted and public debate is encouraged. The paper calls for interactive and dialogic learning. A version of this paper was published in Ministerial Formation 100 (2003): 5–16.
TTR cover image

"Responses to Hugh Heclo's On Thinking Institutionally"

TTR
Fennell, Robert C., Ascough, Richard S., Liew, Tat-siong Benny, McLain, Michael, and Westfield, Nancy Lynne
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 272-284
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Hugh Heclo's recent book On Thinking Institutionally (Paradigm Publishers, 2008) analyzes changes that have taken place in the past half century in how North Americans tend to think and act in institutions. The volume is receiving particular attention as it can be applied to higher education and to religious denominations, and so deserves consideration by those who teach in theology and religious studies. At an October 2009 conference, The Wabash Center hosted ...
Additional Info:
Hugh Heclo's recent book On Thinking Institutionally (Paradigm Publishers, 2008) analyzes changes that have taken place in the past half century in how North Americans tend to think and act in institutions. The volume is receiving particular attention as it can be applied to higher education and to religious denominations, and so deserves consideration by those who teach in theology and religious studies. At an October 2009 conference, The Wabash Center hosted a lively discussion of Heclo's volume among invited religion and theology scholars, which resulted in the present compilation of four short responses to the book. What was and is clear from these responses is that while Heclo has identified a crucial issue, his analysis and prescription leave important theoretical and practical questions untouched. Indeed part of the energy around the discussion of the book flowed from the ways in which his lack of attention to social class, gender, race, and age circumscribed his ability to robustly describe and diagnose the challenge that gave rise to his book. In order to orient readers to the volume and discussion of it, the "Conversation" begins with a descriptive review of the book.
Cover image

Understanding the Working College Student: New Research and Its Implications for Policy and Practice

Book
Perna, Laura W., ed.
2010
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
HD6276.52.U5 U64 2010
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
How appropriate for today and for the future are the policies and practices of higher education that largely assume a norm of traditional-age students with minimal on-campus, or no, work commitments?

Despite the fact that work is a fundamental part of life for nearly half of all undergraduate students – with a substantial number of “traditional” dependent undergraduates in employment, and working independent undergraduates averaging 34.5 hours per week – little ...
Additional Info:
How appropriate for today and for the future are the policies and practices of higher education that largely assume a norm of traditional-age students with minimal on-campus, or no, work commitments?

Despite the fact that work is a fundamental part of life for nearly half of all undergraduate students – with a substantial number of “traditional” dependent undergraduates in employment, and working independent undergraduates averaging 34.5 hours per week – little attention has been given to how working influences the integration and engagement experiences of students who work, especially those who work full-time, or how the benefits and costs of working differ between traditional age-students and adult students.

The high, and increasing, prevalence and intensity of working among both dependent and independent students raises a number of important questions for public policymakers, college administrators, faculty, academic advisors, student services and financial aid staff, and institutional and educational researchers, including: Why do so many college students work so many hours? What are the characteristics of undergraduates who work? What are the implications of working for students’ educational experiences and outcomes? And, how can public and institutional policymakers promote the educational success of undergraduate students who work?

This book offers the most complete and comprehensive conceptualization of the “working college student” available. It provides a multi-faceted picture of the characteristics, experiences, and challenges of working college students and a more complete understanding of the heterogeneity underlying the label “undergraduates who work” and the implications of working for undergraduate students’ educational experiences and outcomes.

The volume stresses the importance of recognizing the value and contribution of adult learners to higher education, and takes issue with the appropriateness of the term “non-traditional” itself, both because of the prevalence of this group, and because it allows higher education institutions to avoid considering changes that will meet the needs of this population, including changes in course offerings, course scheduling, financial aid, and pedagogy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction

Section 1 Work As a Form of Financial Aid
ch. 1 Student Work and the Financial Aid System (Sandy Baum)

Section 2 Work As a Component of Student Identity
ch. 2 Adult Workers as Undergraduate Students: Significant Challenges for Higher Education Policy and Practice (Carol Kasworm)
ch. 3 Overcoming Adversity: Community College Students and Work (John S. Levin, Virginia Montero Hernandez, Christine Cerven)
ch. 4 Mobile Working Students: A Delicate Balance of College, Family, and Work (Mary Ziskin, Vasti Torres, Don Hossler, Jacob P.K. Gross)
ch. 5 Academic Success for Working Adult Students (Heather T. Rowan-Kenyon, Amy K. Swan, Nancy L. Deutsch, Bruce Gansneder)

Section 3 Work As a Vehicle for Promoting Cognitive Development and Learning
ch. 6 Using Economics to Illuminate the Dynamic Higher Education Landscape (Doug Lynch, Michael Gottfried, Wendy Green, Chris Allen Thomas)
ch. 7 Of A Mind to Labor: Reconceptualizing Student Work and Higher Education
ch. 8 Job Fare: Workplace Experiences That Help Students Learn

Section 4 Work As a Vehicle for Improving Student Engagement
ch. 9 Working During College: Its Relationship to Student Engagement and Education Outcomes
ch. 10 Effects of Work On African American College Students' Engagement
ch. 11 Impact of Working On Undergraduate Students' Interactions With Faculty

Section 5 Work As a Vehicle for Improving Educational and Economic Attainment
ch. 12 Understanding The Relationship Between Working While In College and Future Salaries

Conclusions and Recommendations for Policy, Practice, and Future Research
About The Authors and Editor

Index
Cover image

Social Justice Education: Inviting Faculty to Transform Their Institutions

Book
Skubikowski, Kathleen; Wright, Catharine; Graf, Roman, and Alvarez, Julia, eds.
2009
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC192.2.S63 2009
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This book grew out of a project – involving deans and directors of teaching centers and diversity offices from six institutions – to instigate discussions among teachers and administrators about implementing socially just practices in their classrooms, departments, and offices. The purpose was to explore how best to foster such conversations across departments and functions within an institution, as well as between institutions. This book presents the theoretical framework used, and many ...
Additional Info:
This book grew out of a project – involving deans and directors of teaching centers and diversity offices from six institutions – to instigate discussions among teachers and administrators about implementing socially just practices in their classrooms, departments, and offices. The purpose was to explore how best to foster such conversations across departments and functions within an institution, as well as between institutions. This book presents the theoretical framework used, and many of the successful projects to which it gave rise.

Recognizing that many faculty have little preparation for teaching students whose backgrounds, culture, and educational socialization differ from theirs, the opening foundational section asks teachers to attend closely to their and their students’ relative power and positionality in the classroom, and to the impact of the materials, resources and pedagogical approaches employed. Further chapters offer analytical tools to promote inquiry and change.

The concluding sections of the book demonstrate how intra- and inter-institutional collaborations inspired teachers to rise to the challenge of their campuses’ commitments to diversity. Among the examples presented is an initiative involving the faculty development coordinator, and faculty from a wide range of domains at DePauw University, who built upon an existing ethics initiative to embed social justice across the curriculum. In another, professors of mathematics from three institutions describe how they collaborated to create socially just classrooms that both serve mathematical learning, and support service learning or community-based learning activities.

The final essay by a student from the Maldives, describing how she navigated the chasm between life in an American college and her family circumstances, will reinforce the reader’s commitment to establishing social justice in the academy.

This book provides individual faculty, faculty developers and diversity officers with the concepts, reflective tools, and collaborative models, as well as a wealth of examples, to confidently embark on the path to transforming educational practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part I: Theoretical Perspectives on Social Justice Education
ch. 1 A Social Justice Education Faculty Development Framework for a Post-Grutter (Maurianne Adams and Barbara J. Love)
ch. 2 Learning through Story Types about Race and Racism: Preparing Teachers for Social Justice (Lee Anne Bell)
ch. 3 Academic Activism and the Socially Just Academy (Glen David Kuecker)
ch. 4 From Scientific Imagination to Ethical Insight: The Necessity of Personal Experience in Moral Agency (Arthur Zajonc)
ch. 5 Change to Social Justice Education: A Higher Education Strategy (Karen L. St. Clair and James E. Groccia)

Part II: Collaborations
ch. 6 Beyond Diversity: Social Justice Education Across the Curriculum (Kathleen Skubikowski)
ch. 7 Civics Without Cynics: A Campus-wide, Ethics-based Approach to Social Justice Pedagogy (Meryl Altman, Neil Abraham, Terri Bonebright, and Jeannette Johnson-Licon)
ch. 8 On Commitment: If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything (Vijay Prashad)

Part III: Social Justice Pedagogy Across the Curriculum
ch. 9 Mathematics of, for, and as Social Justice (Priscilla Bremser, Chawne Kimber, Rob Root, and Sheila Weaver)
ch. 10 Valued Contingencies: Social Justice in Foreign Language Education (Roman Graf)
ch. 11 Shakespeare Meets Social Justice: Incorporating Literature in the Social Sciences (Carolyn Palmer)
ch. 12 Writing for Social Change: Building a Citizen-Scholar Discourse that Combines Narrative, Theory and Research (Catharine Wright)
ch. 13 Deliberative Dialogue as a Pedagogical Tool for Social Justice (Kamakshi Murti)

Afterword: Oblique I Am (Zaheena Rasheed)
Contributors Index
Cover image

Citizenship, Education and Social Conflict: Israeli Political Education in Global Perspective

Book
Alexander, Hanan A., Pinson, Halleli, and Yonah, Yossi, eds.
2011
Routledge, New York, NY
LC1091.C5238 2011
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This volume provides new perspectives into the challenges of citizenship education in the age of globalization and in the context of multicultural and conflict-ridden societies. It calls on us to rethink the accepted liberal and national discourses that have long dominated the conceptualization and practice of citizenship and citizenship education in light of social conflict, globalization, terrorism, and the spread of an extreme form of capitalism.

The contributors ...
Additional Info:
This volume provides new perspectives into the challenges of citizenship education in the age of globalization and in the context of multicultural and conflict-ridden societies. It calls on us to rethink the accepted liberal and national discourses that have long dominated the conceptualization and practice of citizenship and citizenship education in light of social conflict, globalization, terrorism, and the spread of an extreme form of capitalism.

The contributors of the volume identify the main challenges to the role of citizenship education in the context of globalization, conflicts and the changes to the institution of citizenship they entail and critically examine the ways in which schools and education systems currently address – and may be able to improve – the role of citizenship education in conflict-ridden and multicultural contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Preface
Introduction: Theories of Conflict in Citizenship Education

Part I: Conflict Theories in Citizenship Education
ch. 1 The Emergence of Citizenship as a Political Problem in an Era of Globalization (Seyla Benhabib)
ch. 2 Becoming a Critical Citizen: A Marxist-Humanist Critique (Juan Suoranta, Peter McLaren, Nathalia Jaramilo)
ch. 3 Education, Power and the State: Dilemmas of Citizenship in Multicultural Societies (Carlos Alberto Torres)
ch. 4 Addressing Gender Conflict, Sexuality and Violence: Feminist Perspectives on the Challenges Faced By Global Citizenship Education (Madeleine Arnot)
ch. 5 Teaching About Conflict Through Citizenship Education (Lynn Davies)
ch. 6 Tolerance, Education, and Parental Rights (Walter Feinberg)

Part II: Citizenship Education in a Democratic and Jewish State

ch. 7 Reconsidering Zionism: Open Society, Critical Theory, and the Education of Citizens (Hanan A. Alexander)
ch. 8 Democracy, Educational Autonomy, and Israeli Law: The Case of the Ultra-Orthodox Minority (Yossi Dahan, Yoav Hammer)
ch. 9 The Consolidation of Civic Identity in a Particularistic Religious Setting (Zehavit Gross)
ch. 10 Bargaining Over Citizenship: Pre-military Preparatory Activities in the Service of the Dominant Groups (Noa HArel, Edna Lomsky-Feder)
ch. 11 Adverse Aspects of Citizenship Education in the Global Era: The Israeli Case (Yossi Yonah)
ch. 12 Civic Education for the Palestinians in Israel: Dilemmas and Challenges (Ayman K. Agbaria)
ch. 13 One Civic Curriculum, Different Civic Visions (Halleli Pinson)

Conclusion: Transforming Social Conflict: The Burdens and Dilemmas of Citizenship Education in Israel

References
Contributors
Index
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Degrees of Inequality: Culture, Class, and Gender in American Higher Education

Book
Mullen, Ann L.
2010
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LC67.62.M58 2010
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Degrees of Inequality reveals the powerful patterns of social inequality in American higher education by analyzing how the social background of students shapes nearly every facet of the college experience.

Even as the most prestigious institutions claim to open their doors to students from diverse backgrounds, class disparities remain. Just two miles apart stand two institutions that represent the stark class contrast in American higher education. Yale, an ...
Additional Info:
Degrees of Inequality reveals the powerful patterns of social inequality in American higher education by analyzing how the social background of students shapes nearly every facet of the college experience.

Even as the most prestigious institutions claim to open their doors to students from diverse backgrounds, class disparities remain. Just two miles apart stand two institutions that represent the stark class contrast in American higher education. Yale, an elite Ivy League university, boasts accomplished alumni, including national and world leaders in business and politics. Southern Connecticut State University graduates mostly commuter students seeking credential degrees in fields with good job prospects.

Ann L. Mullen interviewed students from both universities and found that their college choices and experiences were strongly linked to social background and gender. Yale students, most having generations of family members with college degrees, are encouraged to approach their college years as an opportunity for intellectual and personal enrichment. Southern students, however, perceive a college degree as a path to a better career, and many work full— or part—time jobs to help fund their education.

Moving interviews with 100 students at the two institutions highlight how American higher education reinforces the same inequities it has been aiming to transcend. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Yale and Southern
ch. 2 The High School Years
ch. 3 Deciding to Go to College
ch. 4 Choosing Colleges
ch. 5 Going to College
ch. 6 Majors and Knowledge

Conclusion
Note on Methodology
Bibliography
Index
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Wabash tree

The Heart of Higher Education: A Call to Renewal

Book
Palmer, Parker J., Zajonc, Arthur, Scribner, Megan and Nepo, Mark
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2322.2.P35 2010
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Praise for The Heart of Higher Education

Palmer and Zajonc have issued a compelling call for change and renewal in higher education. They show us how colleges and universities can be transformed by taking a more integrated approach to teaching and learning that focuses on the inner lives of their students and faculty.

At a moment when many are dreaming of an integrative form of higher ...
Additional Info:
Praise for The Heart of Higher Education

Palmer and Zajonc have issued a compelling call for change and renewal in higher education. They show us how colleges and universities can be transformed by taking a more integrated approach to teaching and learning that focuses on the inner lives of their students and faculty.

At a moment when many are dreaming of an integrative form of higher education that unites intellectual rigor with compassion and love, Palmer and Zajonc invite us to engage in conversations designed to infuse the academy with meaning, purpose, and soul. For those who yearn to transform colleges and universities from sterile, vacuous spaces to places of hope, possibility, and respect for everything human, this is the book you have been waiting for.

Parker Palmer and Arthur Zajonc call for a renewal of our commitment to inspiring deeper thinking and educating the whole person. This book should and will inspire debate about our larger purpose, about how we can go beyond the traditional silos in which we work for the sake of individual and institutional transformation.

What should be at the center of our teaching and our students' learning? Palmer and Zajonc take up this simple but daunting question and provide the most solid ground yet on which to hold a conversation about the heart of our enterprise. They reimagine higher education in a way commensurate with the magnitude of our problems and offer us practical paths toward implementation. Integrative education is the most important reformation of higher learning since the rise of the modern university. This book can help us achieve it. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Gratitudes
The Authors
Introduction

ch. 1 Toward a Philosophy of Integrative Education
ch. 2 When Philosophy Is Put into Practice
ch. 3 Beyond the Divided Academic Life
ch. 4 Attending to Interconnection, Living the Lesson
ch. 5 Experience, Contemplation, and Transformation
ch. 6 Transformative Conversations on Campus

Afterword

About the Appendices: Experiments in Integrative Education
Appendix A In the Classroom
Appendix B Beyond the Classroom
Appendix C Administrative and Campuswide Initiatives

Notes
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses

Book
Arum, Richard, and Roksa, Josipa
2011
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LA227.4.A78 2011
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
In spite of soaring tuition costs, more and more students go to college every year. A bachelor’s degree is now required for entry into a growing number of professions. And some parents begin planning for the expense of sending their kids to college when they’re born. Almost everyone strives to go, but almost no one asks the fundamental question posed by Academically Adrift: are undergraduates really learning anything ...
Additional Info:
In spite of soaring tuition costs, more and more students go to college every year. A bachelor’s degree is now required for entry into a growing number of professions. And some parents begin planning for the expense of sending their kids to college when they’re born. Almost everyone strives to go, but almost no one asks the fundamental question posed by Academically Adrift: are undergraduates really learning anything once they get there?

For a large proportion of students, Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa’s answer to that question is a definitive no. Their extensive research draws on survey responses, transcript data, and, for the first time, the state-of-the-art Collegiate Learning Assessment, a standardized test administered to students in their first semester and then again at the end of their second year. According to their analysis of more than 2,300 undergraduates at twenty-four institutions, 45 percent of these students demonstrate no significant improvement in a range of skills—including critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing—during their first two years of college. As troubling as their findings are, Arum and Roksa argue that for many faculty and administrators they will come as no surprise—instead, they are the expected result of a student body distracted by socializing or working and an institutional culture that puts undergraduate learning close to the bottom of the priority list.

Academically Adrift holds sobering lessons for students, faculty, administrators, policy makers, and parents—all of whom are implicated in promoting or at least ignoring contemporary campus culture. Higher education faces crises on a number of fronts, but Arum and Roksa’s report that colleges are failing at their most basic mission will demand the attention of us all. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 College Cultures and Student Learning
ch. 2 Origins and Trajectories
ch. 3 Pathways through Colleges Adrift
ch. 4 Channeling Students' Energies toward Learning
ch. 5 A Mandate for Reform

Methodological Appendix
Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Pedagogy of Place: Seeing Space as Cultural Education

Book
Callejo-Perez, David M., Fain, Stephen M., Slater, Judith J., eds.
2003
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LC189.P39 2004
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
From the Pubisher

Pedagogy of Place focuses on the embodiment of purposefully created space resulting from the creation and enactment of its participants' cultural and social conditions. It is also about education, the purposeful creation of spaces that comprise learning environments, and the aesthetic dimensions of the created space called school. The essays present the concept of space - the place where learning happens and where the lives ...
Additional Info:
From the Pubisher

Pedagogy of Place focuses on the embodiment of purposefully created space resulting from the creation and enactment of its participants' cultural and social conditions. It is also about education, the purposeful creation of spaces that comprise learning environments, and the aesthetic dimensions of the created space called school. The essays present the concept of space - the place where learning happens and where the lives of student and teacher can thrive or wither - a place rich in human potential. In an attempt to address the diversity of what we define as space, Pedagogy of Place addresses issues around place and identity in three distinct strands: as social, as aesthetic, and as political and historical. As a collection, these essays are attempts to open conversations with persons interested in what counts as curriculum, teaching, and learning within the spaces and places that release human potential and nurture the human spirit.

Table Of Content:
Foreword: Reflections on the Place of Curriculum
Acknowledgements
Introduction: Understanding Place as a Social Aspect of Education

ch. 1 The Construction of Public Space (Stephen M. Fain)
ch. 2 The Erosion of the Public Space (Judith Slater)
ch. 3 The Fall of the Public Academic (Donna Adair)
ch. 4 Traces, Patterns, Texture: In Search of Aesthetic Teaching/Learning Encounters (Margaret Mcaintyre Latta)
ch. 5 An Environment for Developing Souls: The Ideas of Rudolph Steiner (Bruce Uhrmacher)
ch. 6 School as Parkland: The Re-invention of a "Story of School" (Cheryl Craig)
ch. 7 Away with All Teachers: The Cultural Politics of Home Schooling (Michael Apple)
ch. 8 Identity, Literature, Schools, and Race: Southern Writers and Literature as a Metaphor for Place (David M. Callejo)
ch. 9 Getting from Farmhouse to Schoolhouse: School Consolidation, Pupil Transportation, and the Limits of Educational Reform in Mississippi (Corey Lesseig)

Epilogue
List of Contributors
Cover image

Interdisciplinary Higher Education: Perspectives and Practicalities

Book
Davies, Martin, author, ed.; Devlin, Marica, ed.; and Tight, Malcolm, ed.
2010
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
LB2361.I56 2010 v.5
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In an age of pressing global issues such as climate change, the necessity for countries to work together to resolve problems affecting multiple nations has never been more important. Interdisciplinarity in higher education is a key to meeting these challenges. Universities need to produce graduates, and leaders, who understand issues from different perspectives, and who can communicate with others outside the confines of their own disciplines.

Drawing on ...
Additional Info:
In an age of pressing global issues such as climate change, the necessity for countries to work together to resolve problems affecting multiple nations has never been more important. Interdisciplinarity in higher education is a key to meeting these challenges. Universities need to produce graduates, and leaders, who understand issues from different perspectives, and who can communicate with others outside the confines of their own disciplines.

Drawing on contributions from 37 scholars from Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Malaysia, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, this volume examines issues inherent in providing interdisciplinary education within the structures of universities and proposes ways in which these issues might be best managed.

The book has a dual focus on perspectives and practicalities. Themes covered include: the need for graduates who can work within and across multi-disciplinary and multi-professional teams; interdisciplinary leadership; the critical importance of interdisciplinary thinking to meet global challenges; collaboration in interdisciplinary approaches to teaching and learning; the role of institutional and other systems to support interdisciplinary endeavours; the centrality of disciplines; balancing disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity; and the place of interdisciplinarity in graduate outcomes and attributes. Definitional aspects of interdisciplinary higher education and current interdisciplinary practice across a range of contexts are also examined.

Contributors represent a wide range of discipline areas, including accounting, academic development, agriculture, food and wine science, biotechnology, employment relations, environmental science, the health sciences, higher education, land and environment, languages and cultures, occupational therapy, science communication, social work and social policy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Contributors
Introduction

Part I: Theoretical Perspectives On Interdisciplinarity
ch. 1 Interdisciplinary Higher Education (Martin Davies, Marcia Devlin)
ch. 2 Complexity and Mastery in Shaping Interdisciplinarity (Philip MacKinnon, William D. Rifkin, Damian Hine, Ross Barnard)
ch. 3 Interdisciplinary Leadership and Learning (Paul Blackmore, Camille Kandiko)
ch. 4 Working Successfully in University Interdisciplinary Teams: Learning From Embedded Intergroup Relations Theory (Meaghan Botterill, Barbara de la Harpe)
ch. 5 What Kind of Interdisciplinary Space Is Academic Development? (Tai Peseta, Catherine Manathunga, Anna Jones)

Part II: Vignettes of Interdisciplinary Practice
Vignette 1 (Inter)disciplinary Dublin Descriptors? Implementation of the Bologna Process in a Dutch University (Ellen Jansen, Martin Goedhart)
Vignette 2 Facing the Realities of Implementing an Interdisciplinary Approach in Institutions of Higher Learning in Malaysia (Sarjit Kaur, Gurnam Kaur Sidhu)
Vignette 3 Interdisciplinary Survival: The Case of Murdoch University (Lorraine Marshall)
Vignette 4 Explicating Interdisciplinarity in a Postgraduate Materials Conversation Programme (Marcelle Scott)
Vignette 5 The Getting of Interdisciplinarity: The Everyday Practice of Environmental Curriculum Design (Ruth Beilin, Helena Bender)
Vignette 6 Pluridisciplinary Learning and Assessment: Reflections on Practice (Sandra Jones, Kim Watty)
Vignette 7 Many Disciplines - Common Approach: Experiences in the Development and Delivery of an Interprofessional Health Subject (Helen Cleak, Dianne Williamson, Glenys French)
Vignette 8 Revisiting Higher Eduction's Heartland: (Inter)Disciplinary Ways of Knowing and Doing For Sustainability Education (Kathryn Hegarty, Barbara de la Harpe )
Vignette 9 Interdisciplinary Scholarship For Novice Students (Charlotte Brack, Lisa Schmidt, Philip MacKinnon)
Vignette 10 The Role of Inter-Faculty Relationships in Special Project Collaborations: A Distinctly New Zealand Experience (Cath Fraser, Lin Ayo)
Vignette 11 Developing Students' Academic Skills: An Interdisciplinary Approach (Kate Chanock)
Vignette 12 Structuring Interdisciplinary Collaboration to Develop Research Students' Skills For Publishing Research Internationally: Lessons From Implementation (Margaret Cargill, Patrick O’Conno)
Vignette 13 Promoting Interdisciplinary Practices Through ePortolios (Juliana Chau)

References Contributors
Cover image

Culture Centers in Higher Education: Perspectives on Identity, Theory, and Practice

Book
Patton, Lori D., ed.
2010
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC3731.C845.2010
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Are cultural centers ethnic enclaves of segregation, or safe havens that provide minority students with social support that promotes persistence and retention?

Though Black cultural centers boast a 40-year history, there is much misinformation about them and the ethnic counterparts to which they gave rise. Moreover, little is known about their historical roots, current status, and future prospects. The literature has largely ignored the various culture center models, ...
Additional Info:
Are cultural centers ethnic enclaves of segregation, or safe havens that provide minority students with social support that promotes persistence and retention?

Though Black cultural centers boast a 40-year history, there is much misinformation about them and the ethnic counterparts to which they gave rise. Moreover, little is known about their historical roots, current status, and future prospects. The literature has largely ignored the various culture center models, and the role that such centers play in the experiences of college students.

This book fills a significant void in the research on ethnic minority cultural centers, offers the historic background to their establishment and development, considers the circumstances that led to their creation, examines the roles they play on campus, explores their impact on retention and campus climate, and provides guidelines for their management in the light of current issues and future directions.

In the first part of this volume, the contributors provide perspectives on culture centers from the point of view of various racial/ethnic identity groups, Latina/o, Asian, American Indian, and African American. Part II offers theoretical perspectives that frame the role of culture centers from the point of view of critical race theory, student development theory, and a social justice framework. Part III focuses specifically on administrative and practice-oriented themes, addressing such issues as the relative merits of full- and part-time staff, of race/ethnic specific as opposed to multicultural centers, relations with the outside community, and integration with academic and student affairs to support the mission of the institution.

For administrators and student affairs educators who are unfamiliar with these facilities, and want to support an increasingly diverse student body, this book situates such centers within the overall strategy of improving campus climate, and makes the case for sustaining them. Where none as yet exist, this book offers a rationale and blueprint for creating such centers. For leaders of culture centers this book constitutes a valuable tool for assessing their viability, improving their performance, and ensuring their future relevance – all considerations of increased importance when budgets and resources are strained. This book also provides a foundation for researchers interested in further investigating the role of these centers in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface: A Call to Action: Historical and Contemporary Reflections on the Relevance of Campus Culture Centers in Higher Education

Part I: Racial/Ethnic Group - Specific Culture
ch. 1 Latina/o Cultural Centers: Providing a Sense of Belonging and Promoting Student Success (Adele Lozano )
ch. 2 Asian American Student Involvement in Asian American Culture Centers (William Liu, Michael Cuyjet, and Sunny Lee )
ch. 3 Island of Sanctuary: The Role of an American Indian Cultural Center (Rosa Cintrón, Heather J. Shotton, and Star Yellowfish)
ch. 4 On Solid Ground: An Examination of Successful Strategies and Positive Student Outcomes Associated with Two Black Culture Centers (Lori Patton)

Part II: Theoretical Perspectives and Culture Centers
ch. 5 Counterspaces in a Hostile Place: A Critical Race Theory Analysis of Campus Culture Centers (Tara Yosso and Corina Benavides Lopez)
ch. 6 Critical Borders: Student Development Theoretical Perspectives Applied to Culture Centers (Mary Howard Hamilton, Kandace Hinton, and Robin Hughes)
ch. 7 Resituating Culture Centers within a Social Justice Framework: Is There Room for Examining Whiteness (Michael Benitez, Jr. )

Part III: Administrative and Practice-Oriented Issues For Culture Centers
ch. 8 Viewing Cultural Practice Through a Lens of Innovation and Intentionality: Strategies for Student Personnel Administrators in Culture Centers (Toby Jenkins)
ch. 9 Campus Culture Center Directors’ Perspectives on Advancement, Current Issues, and Future Directions (E. Michael Sutton and Phyllis McCluskey-Titus )
ch. 10 Promoting Student Engagement: Administrative Considerations for Current and Future Planning of Culture Center Programming and Outreach (Salvador Mena)

Appendix A: Transforming for the 21st Century: Best Practices for Examining and Evaluating Campus Culture Centers and Multicultural Affairs Offices (Lari D. Patton)
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Wabash tree

The American Academic Profession: Transformation in Contemporary Higher Education

Book
Hermanowicz, Joseph C., ed.
2011
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LA227.4.A446 2011
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The academic profession, like many others, is rapidly being transformed. This book explores the current challenges to the profession and their broad implications for American higher education.

Examining what professors do and how academia is changing, contributors to this volume assess current and potential threats to the profession. Leading scholars in sociology and higher education explore such topics as structural and cognitive change, socialization and deviance, career development, ...
Additional Info:
The academic profession, like many others, is rapidly being transformed. This book explores the current challenges to the profession and their broad implications for American higher education.

Examining what professors do and how academia is changing, contributors to this volume assess current and potential threats to the profession. Leading scholars in sociology and higher education explore such topics as structural and cognitive change, socialization and deviance, career development, and professional autonomy and regulation.

A comprehensive analysis of the significant questions facing this crucial profession, The American Academic Profession will be welcomed by students and scholars as well as by administrators and policy makers concerned with the future of the academy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

Part I - Structural and Cognitive Change
ch. 1 Optimizing Research and Teaching: The Bifurcation of Faculty Roles at Research Universities (Roger L. Geiger)
ch. 2 Focus on the Classroom: Movements to Reform College Teaching and Learning, 1980-2008 (Steven Brint)
ch. 3 Whose Educational Space? Negotiating Professional Jurisdiction in the High Tech Academy (Gary Rhoades)
ch. 4 American Academe and the Knowledge-Politics Problem (Neil Gross)

Part II - Socialization and Deviance
ch. 5 The Socialization of Future Faculty in a Changing Context: Traditions, Challenges, and Possibilities (Ann E. Austin)
ch. 6 Professionalism in Graduate Teaching and Mentoring (John M. Braxton, Eve Proper, Alan E. Bayer)

Part III - Experience of the Academic Career
ch. 7 Scholarly Learning and the Academic Profession in a Time of Change (Anna Neumann)
ch. 8 Anomie in the American Academic Profession (Joseph C. Hermanowicz)

Part IV - Autonomy and Regulation
ch. 9 Academic Freedom, Professional Autonomy, and the State (Sheila Slaughter)
ch. 10 Codes of Commerce: The Uses of Business Rhetoric in the American Academy, 1960-2000 (Daniel Lee Kleinman, Jacob Habinek, Steven P. Vallas)
ch. 11 The Meaning of Regulation in a Changing Academic Profession (Erin Leahey, Kathleen Montgomery)

Part V - Contemporary and Historical Views
ch. 12 Professional Control in the Complex University: Maintaining the Faculty Role (Teresa A. Sullivan)
ch. 13 All That Glittered Was Not Gold: Rethinking American Higher Education's Golden Age, 1945-1970 (John R. Thelin)

Contributors
Index
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Empowering Women in Higher Education and Student Affairs: Theory, Research, Narratives, and Practice From Feminist Perspectives

Book
Pasque, Penny A., and Nicholson, Shelley Errington, eds.
2011
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC1567.E47 2011
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
How do we interrupt the current paradigms of sexism in the academy? How do we construct a new and inclusive gender paradigm that resists the dominant values of the patriarchy? And why are these agendas important not just for women, but for higher education as a whole?

These are the questions that these extensive and rich analyses of the historical and contemporary roles of women in higher education— ...
Additional Info:
How do we interrupt the current paradigms of sexism in the academy? How do we construct a new and inclusive gender paradigm that resists the dominant values of the patriarchy? And why are these agendas important not just for women, but for higher education as a whole?

These are the questions that these extensive and rich analyses of the historical and contemporary roles of women in higher education— as administrators, faculty, students, and student affairs professionals—seek constructively to answer. In doing so they address the intersection of gender and women’s other social identities, such as of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, class, and ability.

This book addresses the experiences and position of women students, from application to college through graduate school, and the barriers they encounter; the continuing inequalities in the rates of promotion and progression of women and other marginalized groups to positions of authority, and the gap in earnings between men and women; and pays particular attention to how race and other social markers impact such disparities, contextualizing them across all institutional types.

Written collaboratively by an intergenerational group of women, men, and transgender people with different social identities, feminist perspectives, and professional identities— and who, in the process, built upon each other’s work—this volume constitutes a call to educators and scholars to work toward centering feminist and other marginalized perspectives in their practice and research in order to equitably address the evolving complexities of college and university life. Employing a wide range of theoretical lenses, examining a variety of models of practice, and giving voice to a diversity of personal experiences through narrative, this is a major contribution to the scholarship on women in higher education.

This is a book for all women in the academy who want to better understand their experience, and to dismantle the remaining barriers of sexism and oppression—for themselves, and future generations of students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

Section I: Setting the Context: A Contemporary (Re)Examination of Women in Higher Education and Student Affairs
ch. 1 An Introduction to Feminism and Feminist Perspectives in Higher Education (Shelley Errington Nicholson and Penny A. Pasque)
ch. 2 Reflections From "Professional Feminists" in Higher Education (Susan Marine)
ch. 3 "Each Generation of Women had to Start Anew" (Jennifer LeeHoffman)
ch. 4 The Powerful Collaborations Between Deans of Women and Directors of Physical Education (Thalia Mulvihill)

Section II: Considering Experiences of Women throughout the Academy: An Exploration of Undergraduates, Graduate Students and Administrators
ch. 5 Female Graduate Students Work-Life Balance and the Student Affairs Professional (Rachael L. Simpson and Kim L. Filer)
ch. 6 High Achieving Women (Monica Marcelis Fochtman)
ch. 7 Toward Self-Investment (Annemarie Vaccaro)
ch. 8 The Influence of Gender (Jennifer Sader)

Section III: Exploring Identity Contexts: The Intersections of Class, Gender, Race, and Sexual Orientation for Faculty, Administrators, and Students
ch. 9 How Race Matters: Race as an Instrument for Institutional Transformations, a Study of Tenured Black Female Faculty (Venice Thandi Sule)
ch. 10 Life Stories From the Daughter of First-Generation Italian Immigrants: Gender, Ethnicity, Culture, and Class Intertwine to Form an Italian American Feminist (Florence Guido DiBrito)
ch. 11 Economically Disadvantaged Women in Higher Education: Hearing Their Stories and Striving for Social Justice (Penny J. Rice)
ch. 12 Sister Circles: A Dialogue on the Intersections of Gender, Race, and Student Affairs (Mariama Boney; Linda Contreras Bullock; Cie Cochran; Irene Kao; and Amanda Suniti Niskode-Dossett)
ch. 13 Using Queer Theory to Explore Lesbian College Students’ Multiple Dimensions of Identity (Elisa Abes, and David Kasch)
ch. 14 Identity Development in College Women (Amy Stalzer Sengupta and Yvette Loury Upton)

Section IV: Advancing the Future: Strategies for Changing Dominant Paradigms
ch. 15 The Campus Women’s Center as Classroom: A Model for Thinking and Action (Jennifer R. Wies )
ch. 16 In (Re)Search of Women in Student Affairs Administration (Tamara Yakaboski and Saran Donahoo)
ch. 17 Campus-Based Sexual Assault Prevention: Perspectives and Recommendations From Program Facilitators (Lindsay M. Orchowski, Eric Zimak, Troy Robison, Justin Reeder, Ryan Rhoades, Christine A. Gidycz and Alan Berkowitz )
ch. 18 Learning and Leading Together: A Cohort-Based Model for Women’s Advancement (Lee S. Hawthorne Calizo)

Section V: Envisioning and Acting on a Feminist Future
ch. 19 Envisioning A New Future With Feminist Voices (Amanda Suniti Niskode-Dossett, Shelley Errington Nicholson, and Penny A. Pasque)

About the Contributors
Index
TTR cover image

"Metaphors We Teach By: The Language of “Learning Outcomes”

TTR
Batten, Alicia J.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 1 (2012): 16-28
BL41.T4 v.15 no. 1 2012
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Liberal Arts   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This article employs George Lakoff and Mark Johnson's work on metaphor (1980) to examine the current use of the term “learning outcomes” within higher education. It argues that “learning outcomes” is an ontological metaphor (education becomes focused on results that one can understand and measure) that resonates with contemporary academic capitalism. Yet because metaphors highlight some things and conceal others, thinking about teaching and disciplines using “learning outcomes” hides other dimensions ...
Additional Info:
This article employs George Lakoff and Mark Johnson's work on metaphor (1980) to examine the current use of the term “learning outcomes” within higher education. It argues that “learning outcomes” is an ontological metaphor (education becomes focused on results that one can understand and measure) that resonates with contemporary academic capitalism. Yet because metaphors highlight some things and conceal others, thinking about teaching and disciplines using “learning outcomes” hides other dimensions of academic capitalism and obscures unquantifiable and highly complex aspects of education. Finally, the article explores ways in which an emphasis upon outcomes has consequences for the field of Religious Studies.
Cover image

Creating Connections in Teaching and Learning

Book
Abawl, Lindy; Conway, Joan; Henderson, Robyn, eds.
2011
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB1060.C755 2011
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This book explores the wide range of contexts in which research into creating connections in learning and teaching may take place. Creating connections can encompass making links, crossing divides, forming relationships, building frameworks, and generating new knowledge. The cognitive, cultural, social, emotional and/or physical aspects of understanding, meaning-making, motivating, acting, researching, and evaluating are explored as constituent forms of creativity in relation to such connections.

From this ...
Additional Info:
This book explores the wide range of contexts in which research into creating connections in learning and teaching may take place. Creating connections can encompass making links, crossing divides, forming relationships, building frameworks, and generating new knowledge. The cognitive, cultural, social, emotional and/or physical aspects of understanding, meaning-making, motivating, acting, researching, and evaluating are explored as constituent forms of creativity in relation to such connections.

From this exploration the authors identify varied connective contexts and means which include the learner, the educator, the organisation, and the relevant community. The crossing of divides, forming learner-educator relationships, bringing together diverse groups of learners, establishing networks and partnerships among educators, and establishing links between organisations and communities are all considered as connections which can be created by and within the learning and teaching dynamic.

By examining the factors which help to facilitate and/or restrict the possibilities for creating connections in educational contexts, implications for and outcomes of learning and/or teaching arise from the connections created. The final chapter of this book will explicate the realisations that have emerged for educators and researchers working to create connections. These offer suggestions for future directions and enunciate what and how connections might contribute to both educational institutions and the broader society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Authors
Exposing Threads: Creating Connections in Teaching and Learning

Section I: Connecting Within School Contexts
ch. 1 Connecting Early Childhood Educators, Action Research, and Teaching for Social Justice (Karen Hawkins)
ch. 2 Inspire to Connect a Learning Desirec (Brad McLennan and Karen Peel)
ch. 3 Shared Values Connecting Parents, Teachers, and Students (J. Anne Casley)
ch. 4 Engaging Students Through Student Voice: Negotiating Pedagogy (Ian Fraser)
ch. 5 Relational Trust as a Core Resource for Building Capacity in Schools (Richard Scagliarini)
ch. 6 International Teachers Making Connections in Times of Change (Marie Davis)

Section II: Connecting Beyond School Contexts
ch. 7 Enhancing Relationships in Doctoral Student Supervision: Shibboleths, Signifiers, and Strategies (P. A. Danaher and Henriette van Rensburg)
ch. 8 Productive Partnerships: Cross-Departmental Connections in a Tertiary Context (Karen Noble and Robyn Henderson)
ch. 9 Addressing Offshore Disconnections Between Chinese and Western Business Academics and Students (Joe Peng Zhou and Cec Pedersen)
ch. 10 Curriculum Connections: Lessons from Post-Compulsory Vocational Education and Training (Lindsay Parry, R. E. (Bobby) Harreveld and P. A. Danaher)

Section III: Making Meaning From Lived Experiences
ch. 11 Look Who’s Listening: Using the Superaddressee for Understanding Connections in Dialogue (Warren Midgley)
ch. 12 Effective Cluster Collaborations: Transformation Through School and University Connections (Joan M. Conway and Lindy Abawi)
ch. 13 Linking Pedagogical Documentation to Phenomenological Research (Laurie Kocher)
ch. 14 Juggling Research with Teaching: Building Capacity in a University Research Team (Margaret Baguley and Helmut Geiblinger)
ch. 15 Sharing Japanese and Australian Culture: A Case Study in Second Language Learning (Junichi Hatai and Robert D. White)

Section IV: Making Virtual Connections
ch. 16 A New Zealand Tertiary Educator’s Online Journey (C. E. Haggerty)
ch. 17 Connecting Learners in Virtual Space: Forming Learning Communities (Lyn Brodie and Peter Gibbings)
ch. 18 Bridging a Discipline Divide Through the Lens of Community of Inquiry (Petrea Redmond and Christine McDonald)
ch. 19 Finding the Right Online Learning Connections: Comparing Models in Practice (Tina van Eyk)
ch. 20 Linking the Threads: Creating Clearer Connections (Lindy Abawi, Joan M. Conway, and Robyn Henderson)
Cover image

The Future of Theological Education (pdf)

Journal Issue
2011
Theological Education 46, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v. 46 no. 2 2011
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2011-theological-education-v46-n2.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2011-theological-education-v46-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Deconstructing the Gender Issue in the 2010 Standards of Accreditation (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Adaptive Leadership: Planning in a Time of Transition (Nick Carter)
MDiv: Still the "Gold Standard" Degree? (Randy MacFarland)
Adaptive Leadership: Planning in a Time of Transition (Linda Cannell)
Does a Secular Age Need the Seminary? Considerations on Alternative Forms of Ministerial Preparation (Glenn T. Miller)
Waiting for a Divine Bailout: Theological Education for Today and Tomorrow (Alice Hunt)
The Future has Arrived: Changing Theological Education in a Changed World (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Dancing a Cosmic Prayer: Creativity, Collaboration, and Spiritlinking in a Women's Leadership (Sharon Henderson Callahan)
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Dimensions of Expertise: A Conceptual Exploration of Vocational Knowledge

Book
Winch, Christopher
2012
Continuum International Publishing Group, New York
LC1042.W55 2012
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Adult Learners   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
A detailed philosophical debate on the nature of expertise is long overdue and Dimensions of Expertise opens up that debate. Christopher Winch firstly explores an account of know-how, derived primarily from the pioneering work of Gilbert Ryle, and moves on to relate this epistemological debate to discussions concerning the nature of expertise in vocational and professional education, including attempts to provide a theory of expertise. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A detailed philosophical debate on the nature of expertise is long overdue and Dimensions of Expertise opens up that debate. Christopher Winch firstly explores an account of know-how, derived primarily from the pioneering work of Gilbert Ryle, and moves on to relate this epistemological debate to discussions concerning the nature of expertise in vocational and professional education, including attempts to provide a theory of expertise. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1. The Two Faces of Expertise 
ch. 2. Current Philosophical Debates about Knowing How
ch. 3.  Skills and Their Discontents
ch. 4.  Beyond Skill: The Complexities of Competence
ch. 5. To Follow a Rule…: The Normative Basis of Practical Knowledge
ch. 6. Theory, Underpinning Knowledge and Practice
ch. 7. Tacit Knowledge
ch. 8. Can There be a Theory of Expertise? 
ch. 9. Novice, Journeyman, Expert
ch. 10.  Vocational Education and the Development of Expertise

Bibliography
Index
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General Education Essentials: A Guide for College Faculty

Book
Hanstedt, Paul, and Rhodes, Terrel
2012
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco
LB2361.5.H36 2012
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Every year, hundreds of small colleges, state schools, and large, research-oriented universities across the United States (and, increasingly, across Europe and Asia) are revisiting their core and general education curricula, often moving toward more integrative models. And every year, faculty members who are highly skilled and regularly rewarded for their work in narrowly defined fields are raising their hands at department meetings, at divisional gatherings, and at faculty senate sessions ...
Additional Info:
Every year, hundreds of small colleges, state schools, and large, research-oriented universities across the United States (and, increasingly, across Europe and Asia) are revisiting their core and general education curricula, often moving toward more integrative models. And every year, faculty members who are highly skilled and regularly rewarded for their work in narrowly defined fields are raising their hands at department meetings, at divisional gatherings, and at faculty senate sessions and asking two simple questions: “Why?” and “How is this going to impact me?” This guide seeks to answer these and other questions by providing an overview of and a rationale for the recent shift in general education curricular design, a sense of how this shift can affect a faculty member’s teaching, and a sense of how all of this might impact course and student assessment. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
About the Author
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One: The Big Picture
ch. 1 Structuring General Education
ch. 2 Some Examples of Integrative Curricular Models

Part Two: General Education at the Course Level

ch. 3 Designing Effective General Education Courses
ch. 4 How the Purposes of General Education Can Reshape a Course: Case Studies

Part Three: General Education at the Assignment and Assessment Level
ch. 5 Designing Appropriate Assignments for General Education
ch. 6 The Chapter You May Want to Skip: Institutional Assessment and General Education

Conclusion
Appendix A: Syllabus for Artistic and Literary Responses to Science and Technology
Appendix B: Syllabus for The Way Things Work: Sky Diving and Deep Sea Diving
Appendix C: Syllabus for Traveling Without Leaving: Global Sociology
Appendix D: Syllabus for Elite Deviance: Crime in the Suites
Appendix E: Syllabus for Does Gun Control Save Lives?
Appendix F: Syllabus for Statistics and Botany

References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Fostering Global Citizenship: Through Faculty-Led International Programs

Book
Mullens, Jo Beth, and Cuper, Pru
2012
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB2375.M85 2012
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
With awareness of both the opportunities and challenges presented by globalization, there is a growing trend among colleges and universities across the country to commit goals and resources to the concept of internationalizing their campuses. This can occur in a number of different ways but a common thread involves exploring the concept of global citizenship and finding ways to embed this concept in undergraduate curricula. For faculty, this may call ...
Additional Info:
With awareness of both the opportunities and challenges presented by globalization, there is a growing trend among colleges and universities across the country to commit goals and resources to the concept of internationalizing their campuses. This can occur in a number of different ways but a common thread involves exploring the concept of global citizenship and finding ways to embed this concept in undergraduate curricula. For faculty, this may call for moving out of a presumed comfort zone in the traditional classroom and determining new approaches to teaching a generation of students who will live and work in a more global context. A method for accomplishing this work that is growing in popularity involves offering short-term, faculty-led field courses to international settings. In fact, today more college students are participating in such short-term study abroad opportunities than the more traditional semester and/or yearlong programs.

Faculty and administrators who want to capitalize on short-term, study abroad programs as a means for internationalizing their campuses need practical resources to help them realize this challenging but important goal. They not only need support in developing the course curricula and logistics, but also in constructing authentic means for assessing the multi-faceted learning that occurs. Short-term international programs, when carefully planned and executed, engage the participants (both students and faculty) in unique learning experiences that can involve service, research, and critical analysis of what it truly means to be a global citizen. Such work helps define the somewhat nebulous but worthy goals of internationalizing campuses and fostering global citizenship.

The authors of this text are professional educators with deep experience in global education and curriculum development. They offer a valuable resource for the development, execution and assessment of faculty-led international field courses that is at once theoretical, practical and motivational. Whether readers are considering offering an international field program for the first time and need guidance; are veteran field course leaders who would like to take their work to the next level; or are administrators attempting to encourage and provide needed support for faculty-led international programs, this book will prove invaluable. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction.

Part I: Faculty-Led International Programs: Examining The Value
ch. 1 Trends That Drive The Need For Change
ch. 2 Experiential Learning And Student Engagement
ch. 3 Sense Of Self And Reflective Growth
ch. 4 Promoting Global Citizenship
ch. 5 Personal And Professional Faculty Development

Part II: International Program Organization: Undertaking The Tasks
ch. 6 The World Is Your Classroom: Selecting The Country And The Setting
ch. 7 Designing And Planning The Essentials
ch. 8 Passports, Liability And Dealing With The Unexpected
ch. 9 Filling The Roster

Part III: The Learning Realizing The Potential of Faculty-Led International Programs
ch. 10 Learning Objectives And Assessment: You Can’t Have One Without The Other
ch. 11 Predeparture Preparation: Setting The Stage For International Learning
ch. 12 Learning During The Journey
ch. 13 Reentry And Beyond: Sustaining And Forwarding What Has Been Gained

Conclusion
References
Additional Info:
Inquiry-driven learners anticipate, embrace, and adapt to disruptive change. Clifton Conrad and Laura Dunek advance a transformative purpose of a college education. They invite stakeholders from across higher education to engage in vigorous dialogue about the aims of a college education—and how to realize those aims.

Increasingly influenced by market forces, many universities employ a default purpose of a college education: preparing students for entry into the ...
Additional Info:
Inquiry-driven learners anticipate, embrace, and adapt to disruptive change. Clifton Conrad and Laura Dunek advance a transformative purpose of a college education. They invite stakeholders from across higher education to engage in vigorous dialogue about the aims of a college education—and how to realize those aims.

Increasingly influenced by market forces, many universities employ a default purpose of a college education: preparing students for entry into the workforce. As a result, students remain unprepared for a world in which much of the knowledge they acquire will have a shelf life of only a few years.

Cultivating Inquiry-Driven Learners charts a new way forward. It proposes that a college education prepare students to be innovative and adaptable by developing four signature capabilities: core qualities of mind, critical thinking skills, expertise in divergent modes of inquiry, and the capacity to express and communicate ideas. In concert, these capabilities empower students to explore and foster ideas that will prepare them to successfully navigate constant change, capitalize on career opportunities, enrich their personal lives, and thoughtfully engage in public life.

This innovative book also explores a wide range of initiatives and practices for educating inquiry-driven learners. Examples illustrate possibilities for developing inquiry-driven learners across the curriculum and are drawn from institutions with remarkably different missions and identities—from research universities to liberal arts colleges.

"This book revitalizes the notion of a 'well-rounded' education by describing how inquiry-driven learning is critically important for these times. It is the sort of foundational text that invites discussion and debate and describes with clarity and economy of prose the pressures facing colleges and universities and how they ought to respond."—Matthew Hartley, University of Pennsylvania. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part I - What Is The Purpose of A College Education?
ch. 1 Contemporary Discourse on the Purpose of a College Education
The Dominate Discourse: Eclipse of the Legacy of Liberal Education
Contemporary Ideas on the Purpose of a College Education
The Absence of a Fundamental Purpose of a College Education

Part II - Approaching Obsolete: Higher Learning In The Twenty-First Century
ch. 2 A Rapidly Changing World and the Need for a Response
The Rapidly Shifting U.S. Economy: From Industrial Production to Knowledge and Innovation
Four Trends Affecting Higher Education, All Driven by Monetary Incentives
Lessons from Other Sectors of Society, All Reshaped by the Same Market Forces Buffeting Higher Education
Proactively Directing External Forces and Preparing Students for a New World

ch. 3 Hurtling toward Obsolescence: The Default Purpose of a College Education
Shortcomings of the Default Purpose: Knowledge-Inundated, Workplace Commodities
The Need for a Fundamental Purpose of a College Education

Part III - Becoming An Inquiry-Driven Learner
ch. 4 Portrayal of an Inquiry-Driven Learner
Definition of an Inquiry-Driven Learner
Core Qualities of Mind
Critical Thinking Skills
Expertise in Divergent Models of Inquiry
The Capacity to Express and Communicate Ideas
Building upon a Legacy of Ideas

Part IV - Developing Inquiry-Driven Learners
ch. 5 Ideas for Developing Inquiry-Driven Learners
Initiatives at Eight Institutions
Institutional Practices for Educating Inquiry-Driven Learners
A Concluding Note

Notes
References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology Out of Your College Classroom Will Improve Student Learning

Book
Bowen, Jose Antonio
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB1028.3.B69 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Introducing a new way to think about higher education, learning, and technology that prioritizes the benefits of the human dimension. José Bowen recognizes that technology is profoundly changing education and that if students are going to continue to pay enormous sums for campus classes, colleges will need to provide more than what can be found online and maximize “naked” face-to-face contact with faculty. Here, he illustrates how technology is most ...
Additional Info:
Introducing a new way to think about higher education, learning, and technology that prioritizes the benefits of the human dimension. José Bowen recognizes that technology is profoundly changing education and that if students are going to continue to pay enormous sums for campus classes, colleges will need to provide more than what can be found online and maximize “naked” face-to-face contact with faculty. Here, he illustrates how technology is most powerfully used outside the classroom, and, when used effectively, how it can ensure that students arrive to class more prepared for meaningful interaction with faculty. Bowen offers practical advice for faculty and administrators on how to engage students with new technology while restructuring classes into more active learning environments. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Author

Part I: The New Digital Landscape
ch. 1. The Flat Classroom and Global Competition
ch. 2. Social Proximity and the Virtual Classroom
ch. 3. Games, Customization, and Learning

Part II: Designing 21st-Century Courses
ch. 4. Designing College More Like a Video Game
ch. 5. Technology for Information Delivery
ch. 6. Technology for Engagement
ch. 7. Technology for Assessment
ch. 8. The Naked Classroom

Part III: Strategies for Universities of the Future
ch. 9. The Educational Product in the Internet Age
ch. 10. The Naked Curriculum
ch. 11. The Naked Campus

Bibliography
Index
Cover image

The Fall of the Faculty: The Rise of the All-Administrative University and Why It Matters

Book
Ginsberg , Benjamin
2011
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
LB2341.G496 2011
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Until very recently, American universities were led mainly by their faculties, which viewed intellectual production and pedagogy as the core missions of higher education. Today, as Benjamin Ginsberg warns in this eye-opening, controversial book, "deanlets"--administrators and staffers often without serious academic backgrounds or experience--are setting the educational agenda.

The Fall of the Faculty examines the fallout of rampant administrative blight that now plagues the nation's universities. In ...
Additional Info:
Until very recently, American universities were led mainly by their faculties, which viewed intellectual production and pedagogy as the core missions of higher education. Today, as Benjamin Ginsberg warns in this eye-opening, controversial book, "deanlets"--administrators and staffers often without serious academic backgrounds or experience--are setting the educational agenda.

The Fall of the Faculty examines the fallout of rampant administrative blight that now plagues the nation's universities. In the past decade, universities have added layers of administrators and staffers to their payrolls every year even while laying off full-time faculty in increasing numbers--ostensibly because of budget cuts. In a further irony, many of the newly minted--and non-academic--administrators are career managers who downplay the importance of teaching and research, as evidenced by their tireless advocacy for a banal "life skills" curriculum. Consequently, students are denied a more enriching educational experience--one defined by intellectual rigor. Ginsberg also reveals how the legitimate grievances of minority groups and liberal activists, which were traditionally championed by faculty members, have, in the hands of administrators, been reduced to chess pieces in a game of power politics. By embracing initiatives such as affirmative action, the administration gained favor with these groups and legitimized a thinly cloaked gambit to bolster their power over the faculty.

As troubling as this trend has become, there are ways to reverse it. The Fall of the Faculty outlines how we can revamp the system so that real educators can regain their voice in curriculum policy.

Features

• Powerful and stinging critique of one of the most powerful trends in academia: the shift in power to non-academic administrators
• Exceptionally well written polemic that will stir controversy at universities across the country
• The author is well known throughout academia, and has coauthored one of the bestselling textbooks on American government in recent history
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 The Growth of Administration
ch. 2 What Administrators Do
ch. 3 Management Pathologies
ch. 4 The Realpolitik of Race and Gender
ch. 5 There Is No Such Thing As Academic Freedom (For Professors)
ch. 6 Research and Teaching at the All-Administrative University
ch. 7 What is to be Done
Cover image

Social Media for Academics: A Practical Guide

Book
Diane Rasmussen Neal, ed.
2012
Chandos Publishing, Oxford
HM742.S63 2012
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
No other book exists that assists academics in learning how to use social media to benefit their teaching and research.
 - the editor has an extensive background in social media teaching, consulting, research, and everyday use
 - all the contributors come to the book with a common goal, from various expertise areas and perspectives

This book provides an overview of social media technologies in the context ...
Additional Info:
No other book exists that assists academics in learning how to use social media to benefit their teaching and research.
 - the editor has an extensive background in social media teaching, consulting, research, and everyday use
 - all the contributors come to the book with a common goal, from various expertise areas and perspectives

This book provides an overview of social media technologies in the context of practical implementation for academics, guided by applied research findings, current best practices, and the author’s successful experiences with using social media in academic settings. It also provides academics with sensible and easy strategies for implementing a wide spectrum of social media and related technologies - such as blogs, wikis, Facebook, and various Google tools for professional, teaching, and research endeavours.

Readership: Academics and academic librarians with professional, teaching and research responsibilities in all fields who are interested in learning more about using social media in the context of their careers, will find this book invaluable. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures and tables
Acknowledgements
About the editor
About the contributors
Introduction (Diane Rasmussen Neal)

Part 1 - The Nuts and Bolts of Social Media for Academics
ch. 1 Blogging your academic self: the what, the why and the how long? (Carolyn Hank)
 - Introduction
 - Scholars in the blogosphere
 - Motivations and benefits
 - Blog publishing: getting started … or getting more
 - Your blog today? Tomorrow?
 - Conclusions
 - Notes
 - References

ch. 2 Non-academic and academic social networking sites for online scholarly communities (Anatolly Gruzd)
 - Introduction
 - General public platforms for online scholarly communities
 - Academic sites for online scholarly communities
 - Conclusions
 - Acknowledgements
 - References

ch. 3 Research and teaching in real time: 24/7 collaborative networks (Anabel Quan-Haase)
 - Real-time technologies for academics
 - The concept of real time
 - Real-time technologies and research
 - Real-time technologies and teaching
 - Choosing a real-time technology
 - Conclusions
 - Acknowledgements
 - Notes
 - References

ch. 4 Locating scholarly papers of interest online
 - Introduction (Maureen Henninger)
 - Overview of online scholarly search services
 - Scholarly communication and social media
 - Use and purpose of scholarly search services
 - Impact of the Open Access movement
 - Search engine functionality
 - Social media and public scholarly search
 - Conclusions
 - Notes
 - References
 - Appendix: features of web-based public scholarly search services

ch. 5 Tracking references with social media tools: organizing what you’ve read or want to read (Jackie Krause)
 - Introduction
 - Why use online social bibliographic tools?
 - A look at top social bibliographic tools: Zotero, Mendeley, CiteULike and Connotea
 - How these tools can improve your research, writing and collaboration
 - How to choose the right tool for your needs
 - Conclusions
 - References

ch. 6 Pragmatics of Twitter use for academics: tweeting in and out of the classroom (Lynne Y. Williams, and Jackie Krause)
 - What is Twitter? An introduction
 - How can Twitter be used by academics?
 - How to get started
 - Research
 - Teaching
 - Professional branding
 - ‘In the field’: academics using Twitter
 - Using Twitter to encourage professional engagement, connection and collaboration
 - Is tweeting for you?
 - References

ch. 7 The academy goes mobile: an overview of mobile applications in higher education (Adam Craig)
 - Introduction
 - Leveraging the backchannel and immediate collaboration
 - QR codes: creating linkages to online content in physical space
 - Treading lightly in uncharted territory
 - References

Part 2 - Putting Social Media Into Practice
ch. 8 Incorporating web-based engagement and participatory interaction into your courses (Jaruee Henninger, and Diane Rasmussen Neal)
 - Online engagement and interaction: what does it mean?
 - Choose the right tools for the job
 - Social networking services in the classroom: a case study
 - Wikis in the classroom
 - Tools for virtual conferences: a case study
 - Conclusions
 - Notes
 - References

ch. 9 When good research goes viral! Getting your work noticed online (Diane Rasmussem Neal)
 - Introduction
 - Social networking: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, and so on
 - Google, you and ‘the filter bubble’
 - Official university pages: viral is not always better
 - Conclusions
 - References

ch. 10 Who is the ‘virtual’ you and do you know who’s watching you? (Lynne Y. Williams)
 - Awareness of data privacy, digital footprints, maintaining separate work and personal online identities, and other types of identity concerns
 - What is an online identity?
 - What is privacy?
 - Data privacy and the ‘virtual’ you
 - Tracking your digital footprints
 - Keeping your work ‘you’ and your personal ‘you’ apart
 - What should you know in order to adequately protect all of your ‘you’s?
 - References

ch. 11 Social media for academic libraries
 - Introduction (David J. Flander)
 - Overview of social media types and sites
 - Creating a Facebook page
 - Promoting and managing the library’s Facebook page
 - Social media policies and procedures
 - Community acceptable behaviour policies
 - Monitoring and interacting with your users
 - Users must have persistent identifiers
 - Identifying and stopping bad behaviour
 - Conclusions
 - Note
 - References

ch. 12 Learning social media: student and instructor perspectives (Robert Foster, and Diane Rasmussen Neal)
 - Introduction
 - Designing and delivering a class in social media
 - The students’ motivations and expectations for the course
 - The instructor’s expectations
 - Students’ views about the course
 - Students’ take-aways from the course
 - The instructor’s take-aways from the course
 - Conclusions from the student
 - Conclusions from the instructor
 - References

Index
Cover image

Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age

Book
Starkey, Louise
2012
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1028.3.S737 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age is for all those interested in considering the impact of emerging digital technologies on teaching and learning. It explores the concept of a digital age and perspectives of knowledge, pedagogy and practice within a digital context.

By examining teaching with digital technologies through new learning theories cognisant of the digital age, it aims to both advance thinking and offer strategies for ...
Additional Info:
Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age is for all those interested in considering the impact of emerging digital technologies on teaching and learning. It explores the concept of a digital age and perspectives of knowledge, pedagogy and practice within a digital context.

By examining teaching with digital technologies through new learning theories cognisant of the digital age, it aims to both advance thinking and offer strategies for teaching technology-savvy students that will enable meaningful learning experiences.

Illustrated throughout with case studies from across the subjects and the age range, key issues considered include:

• how young people create and share knowledge both in and beyond the classroom and how current and new pedagogies can support this level of achievement
• the use of complexity theory as a framework to explore teaching in the digital age
• the way learning occurs – one way exchanges, online and face-to-face interactions, learning within a framework of constructivism, and in communities
• what we mean by critical thinking, why it is important in a digital age, and how this can occur in the context of learning
• how students can create knowledge through a variety of teaching and learning activities, and how the knowledge being created can be shared, critiqued and evaluated.

With an emphasis throughout on what it means for practice, this book aims to improve understanding of how learning theories currently work and can evolve in the future to promote truly effective learning in the digital age. It is essential reading for all teachers, student teachers, school leaders, those engaged in Masters’ Level work, as well as students on Education Studies courses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures and tables
Introduction
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 The complexity of schools
ch. 2 The digital age
ch. 3 Knowledge and connectivism
ch. 4 Connections and relationships
ch. 5 Creating Knowledge
ch. 6 Critical thinking
ch. 7 Learning in the digital age
ch. 8 Teaching in the digital age
ch. 9 The start of the digital age

Notes
References
Index
Cover image

The Global University: Past, Present, and Future Perspectives

Book
Nelson, Adam R., and Wei, Ian P., eds.
2012
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LB2322.2.G548 2012
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Engages a topic of pressing concern for government, business, and education leaders around the world: the race to establish 'world-class' universities. Some herald the globalization of higher education as the key to a dynamic and productive 'knowledge society.' Others worry that modern universities have come to resemble multinational corporations. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Engages a topic of pressing concern for government, business, and education leaders around the world: the race to establish 'world-class' universities. Some herald the globalization of higher education as the key to a dynamic and productive 'knowledge society.' Others worry that modern universities have come to resemble multinational corporations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Foreword Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I: Regionalism(s) and Global Higher Education Reform
ch. 1 Global Aspirations and Strategizing for World-Class Status: New Modes of Higher-education governance and the Emergence of Regulatory Regionalism in East Asia (Ka Ho Mok)
ch. 2 Contributing to the Southeast Asian Knowledge Economy? Australian Offshore Campuses in Malaysia and Vietnam (Anthony R. Welch)

Part II: The Changing Dimensions of University Governance
ch. 3 Collegiality and Hierarchy: Coordinating principles in higher education (Ivar Bleiklie)
ch. 4 The Twenty-First Century University: Dilemmas of Leadership and Organizational Futures (Rosemary Deem)

Part III: Academic Roles and the Purposes of the University
ch. 5 Medieval Universities and Aspirations to Universal Significance (Ian P. Wei)
ch. 6 The Changing Role of the Academic: Historical and Comparative Perspectives (Xu Xiaozhou, Xue Shan)

Part IV: Shifting Patterns in Graduate and Undergraduate Education
ch. 7 Toward General Education in the Global University: The Chinese Model (Chen Honjie, Shen Wenqin, Cai Leiluo)
ch. 8 Doctoral Education and the Global University: Student Mobility, Hierarchy, and Canadian Government Policy (Glen A. Jones, Bryan Gopaul)

Part V: Universities and External Funding
ch. 9 What Can Modern Universities Learn from the Past? English Universities Working with Industry, 1870-1914 (John Taylor)
ch. 10 Universities and the Effects of External Funding: Sub-Saharan Africa and the Nordic Countries (Peter Maassen)

Conclusion: Lessons from the Past, Considerations for the Future
Notes on Contributors
Cover image

We're Losing Our Minds: Rethinking American Higher Education

Book
Keeling, Richard P., and Hersh, Richard H.
2012
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LA227.4.K435 2011
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
America is being held back by the quality and quantity of learning in college. This is a true educational emergency! Many college graduates cannot think critically, write effectively, solve problems, understand complex issues, or meet employers' expectations. We are losing our minds—and endangering our social, economic, and scientific leadership. Critics say higher education costs too much and should be more efficient. But the real problem is value, not cost; ...
Additional Info:
America is being held back by the quality and quantity of learning in college. This is a true educational emergency! Many college graduates cannot think critically, write effectively, solve problems, understand complex issues, or meet employers' expectations. We are losing our minds—and endangering our social, economic, and scientific leadership. Critics say higher education costs too much and should be more efficient. But the real problem is value, not cost; financial 'solutions' alone won't work. In this book, Keeling and Hersh argue that the only solution - making learning the highest priority in college - demands fundamental change throughout higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements

ch.1 Higher Education Without Higher Learning
ch. 2 Judging College Quality
ch. 3 The Developmental Basis of Higher Learning
ch. 4 The Neuroscience of Learning
ch. 5 Assessment for Higher Learning
ch. 6 More is Not Better, Better is More: A Framework for Rethinking American Higher Education
ch. 7 Talk of Change is Not Change: Rethinking American Higher Education

Notes
Index
Additional Info:
Argues that the time is ripe for an institutional reform movement to focus on holistic learning: What does research say about the relationship among the intellectual, social, and emotional elements of student learning? What can individual faculty, student affairs professionals, and institutions more generally do to enhance holistic learning?
Additional Info:
Argues that the time is ripe for an institutional reform movement to focus on holistic learning: What does research say about the relationship among the intellectual, social, and emotional elements of student learning? What can individual faculty, student affairs professionals, and institutions more generally do to enhance holistic learning?
Additional Info:
Web site providing the full text of the American Association of University Professors’ bimonthly publication, with the mission to advance academic freedom and shared governance, to define fundamental professional values and standards for higher education, and to ensure higher education's contribution to the common good.
Additional Info:
Web site providing the full text of the American Association of University Professors’ bimonthly publication, with the mission to advance academic freedom and shared governance, to define fundamental professional values and standards for higher education, and to ensure higher education's contribution to the common good.
Additional Info:
A report from the Social Science Research Council (SSRS) that extends findings reported in the 2010 book "Academically Adrift" to document practices associated with improved student performance, as well as differences across individuals and institutions in the level of learning.
Additional Info:
A report from the Social Science Research Council (SSRS) that extends findings reported in the 2010 book "Academically Adrift" to document practices associated with improved student performance, as well as differences across individuals and institutions in the level of learning.
Additional Info:
An engaging and accessible rumination on the purposes of liberal arts education and how they have been undermined in the past 50 years.
Additional Info:
An engaging and accessible rumination on the purposes of liberal arts education and how they have been undermined in the past 50 years.
Additional Info:
AASHE is helping to create a brighter future of opportunity for all by advancing sustainability in higher education. By creating a diverse community engaged in sharing ideas and promising practices, AASHE provides administrators, faculty, staff and students, as well as the business that serve them, with: thought leadership and essential knowledge resources; outstanding opportunities for professional development; and a unique framework for demonstrating the value and competitive edge created by ...
Additional Info:
AASHE is helping to create a brighter future of opportunity for all by advancing sustainability in higher education. By creating a diverse community engaged in sharing ideas and promising practices, AASHE provides administrators, faculty, staff and students, as well as the business that serve them, with: thought leadership and essential knowledge resources; outstanding opportunities for professional development; and a unique framework for demonstrating the value and competitive edge created by sustainability initiatives.
Additional Info:
A report from the AAC&U's National Task Force on Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement and a call to action to reclaim higher education’s civic mission by pushing back against a prevailing national dialogue that limits the mission of higher education to workforce preparation and training while marginalizing disciplines basic to democracy.
Additional Info:
A report from the AAC&U's National Task Force on Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement and a call to action to reclaim higher education’s civic mission by pushing back against a prevailing national dialogue that limits the mission of higher education to workforce preparation and training while marginalizing disciplines basic to democracy.
Cover image

Sustainability in Higher Education: Stories and Strategies for Transformation

Book
Bartlett, Peggy F.; and Chase, Geoffrey W., eds.
2013
MIT Press, Cambridge, MA
LB3223.3.S88 2013
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In colleges and universities across the United States, students, faculty, and staff are forging new paths to sustainability. From private liberal arts colleges to major research institutions to community colleges, sustainability concerns are being integrated into curricula, policies, and programs. New divisions, degree programs, and courses of study cross traditional disciplinary boundaries; Sustainability Councils become part of campus governance; and new sustainability issues ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In colleges and universities across the United States, students, faculty, and staff are forging new paths to sustainability. From private liberal arts colleges to major research institutions to community colleges, sustainability concerns are being integrated into curricula, policies, and programs. New divisions, degree programs, and courses of study cross traditional disciplinary boundaries; Sustainability Councils become part of campus governance; and new sustainability issues link to historic social and educational missions. In this book, leaders from twenty-four colleges and universities offer their stories of institutional and personal transformation.

These stories document both the power of leadership—whether by college presidents, faculty, staff, or student activists—and the potential for institutions to redefine themselves. Chapters recount, among other things, how inclusive campus governance helped mobilize students at the University of South Carolina; how a course at the Menominee Nation’s tribal college linked sustainability and traditional knowledge; how the president of Furman University convinced a conservative campus community to make sustainability a strategic priority; how students at San Diego State University built sustainability into future governance while financing a LEED platinum-certified student center; and how sustainability transformed pedagogy in a lecture class at Penn State. As this book makes clear, there are many paths to sustainability in higher education. These stories offer a snapshot of what has been accomplished and a roadmap to what is possible. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Page
Dedication
Preface and Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I – Leadership and Commitment
ch. 1 Drury University: A Story of Personal and Institutional Transformation (Wendy B. Anderson)
ch. 2 Building a Decentralized, Grassroots, Campus Sustainability Organization and Community: The Transformational Impact of Green Values (David Whiteman)
ch. 3 Science and Technology Leaders for a Sustainable Future (Richard D. Schulterbrandt Gragg, III, LaRae Donnellan, Ryan Mitchell, Clayton J. Clark, II, and Viniece Jennings)
ch. 4 Bowling Gutter Balls: My First Year as the Energy Conservation Committee Chair (Julie Snow)

Part II – Curricular Transformation
ch. 5 Curriculum for the Bioregion: Putting Communities and Ideas in Place (Jean MacGregor)
ch. 6 From Environmental Advocates to Sustainability Entrepreneurs: Rethinking a Sustainability-Focused General Education Program (William Throopo)
ch. 7 From Soybeans and Silos to the Prairie Project: The Journey to Restorative Global Sustainability Education at Central College (Jim Zaffiro)
ch. 8 Take-Home Messages that Transform Individuals and Institutions: The Student Leaders on Global Environmental Issues Program (John Cusick)
ch. 9 Learning Sustainability in a Tribal College Context (William Van Lopik)

Part III – Defining the Paradigm for Change
ch. 10 Driving Transformative Change by Empowering Student Sustainability Leaders at the University of Michigan (Mike Shriberg, Andrew J. Horning, Katherine Lund, John Callewaert, and Donald Scavia)
ch. 11 Metabolism and Resiliency: Key Concepts for Catalyzing Transformational Change (E. Chrstian Wells)
ch. 12 Reimagining Professional Development: Collaborative Circles for Creative Change (Krista Hiser)

Part IV – Institutional Mission and the Culture of Sustainability
ch. 13 The Journey to Green: Becoming Sustainable Spelman (Beverly Daniel Tatum)
ch. 14 Weaving a Culture of Sustainability: Santa Clara University’s Evolving Story (Sherry Booth, Lindsey Cromwell Kalbrenner, Leslie Gray, and Amy Shachter)
ch. 15 Sustainability as Leadership Ethos (Margo Flood)
ch. 16 Sustainability as Turnaround: The Case of Unity College (Mitchell Thomashow)
ch. 17 Transformational Leadership at Furman University: Tradeoffs and Transitions (Angela C. Halfacre)

Part V – Accountability
ch. 18 Sustainability Strategic Planning: Establishing Accountability in a World of Distractions (Julie Newman)
ch. 19 Transforming the Silos: Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability (Charles L. Redman)
ch. 20 Fair Trade, Social Justice, and Campus Sustainability at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh (James W. Feldman, and David Barnhill)
ch. 21 Creating and Sustaining a Student Movement at San Diego State University (Grant A. Mack)

Part VI – Professional and Personal Transformation
ch. 22 Living the Questions: Contemplative and Reflective Practices in Sustainability Education (Marie Eaton, Kate Davies, Michael Gillespie, Karen Harding, and Sharon Daloz Parks)
ch. 23 Cultivating Pedagogies of Resilience: Practicing Place, Expanding Perspectives, Sustaining Life (Bobbie Patterson)
ch. 24 Awakening to the Hero’s Journey in Teaching and Learning (Christopher Uhl, and Greg Lankenau)

About the Contributors
Index
Series List
Additional Info:
High Impact Educational Practices are defined as “an investment of time and energy over an extended period that has unusually positive effects on student engagement in educationally purposeful behavior.” Studies indicate that students who participate more frequently in educationally purposeful activities are more satisfied with their college experience.
Additional Info:
High Impact Educational Practices are defined as “an investment of time and energy over an extended period that has unusually positive effects on student engagement in educationally purposeful behavior.” Studies indicate that students who participate more frequently in educationally purposeful activities are more satisfied with their college experience.
Additional Info:
Podcasting is a digital technology that allows listeners to download course audio and video files, including both instructor-created and student-created content, through the RSS-based subscription mode and listen to them anywhere, anytime.
Additional Info:
Podcasting is a digital technology that allows listeners to download course audio and video files, including both instructor-created and student-created content, through the RSS-based subscription mode and listen to them anywhere, anytime.
Additional Info:
Incorporating Wikipedia into the curriculum as a collaborative environment or primary source affords students with the opportunity to develop their media literacy, improve their writing skills, and learn appropriate ways to use Wikipedia as an academic resource.
Additional Info:
Incorporating Wikipedia into the curriculum as a collaborative environment or primary source affords students with the opportunity to develop their media literacy, improve their writing skills, and learn appropriate ways to use Wikipedia as an academic resource.
Web cover image

MOOC Case Study

Web
McFarland, Daniel
Topics: Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This website provides a case analysis of a Massive, Open, Online Course (MOOC) taught at Stanford University. The professor wanted to provide high quality course content, engage students, offer free and discounted readings, enable peer evaluation of term papers and study the course to improve it.
Additional Info:
This website provides a case analysis of a Massive, Open, Online Course (MOOC) taught at Stanford University. The professor wanted to provide high quality course content, engage students, offer free and discounted readings, enable peer evaluation of term papers and study the course to improve it.
Additional Info:
There has been a lot of buzz in higher education lately about the flipped classroom model for teaching and learning. It's not as easy as it appears, and it's not as new as others would have us believe.
Additional Info:
There has been a lot of buzz in higher education lately about the flipped classroom model for teaching and learning. It's not as easy as it appears, and it's not as new as others would have us believe.
Additional Info:
The backlash against MOOCs and online learning in higher education has begun.
Additional Info:
The backlash against MOOCs and online learning in higher education has begun.
Additional Info:
The Coalition on the Academic Workforce seeks to "address issues associated with deteriorating faculty working conditions and their effect on college and university students in the United States." This URL links to a large-scale survey of part-time and "contingent" faculty members, conducted in 2010 and published in 2012.
Additional Info:
The Coalition on the Academic Workforce seeks to "address issues associated with deteriorating faculty working conditions and their effect on college and university students in the United States." This URL links to a large-scale survey of part-time and "contingent" faculty members, conducted in 2010 and published in 2012.
Additional Info:
The MLA recommendations for departments concerning the treatment of non-tenure-track faculty members. The URL includes a link to a PDF entitled "PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES FOR NON-TENURE-TRACK FACULTY MEMBERS: RECOMMENDATIONS AND EVALUATIVE QUESTIONS".
Additional Info:
The MLA recommendations for departments concerning the treatment of non-tenure-track faculty members. The URL includes a link to a PDF entitled "PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES FOR NON-TENURE-TRACK FACULTY MEMBERS: RECOMMENDATIONS AND EVALUATIVE QUESTIONS".
Additional Info:
Infographic, with supporting citations, concerning the adjunctification of higher ed and the living/working conditions of contingent faculty members.
Additional Info:
Infographic, with supporting citations, concerning the adjunctification of higher ed and the living/working conditions of contingent faculty members.
Web cover image

Adjunct versus Full-Time Faculty: Comparison of Student Outcomes in the Online Classroom

Web
Mueller, Brian; Mandernach, B. Jean; and Sanderson, Kelly
Topics: Online Learning   |   Adjuncts   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The Journal of Online Teaching and Learning (JoLT) publishes the detailed results of a study. Briefly: student outcomes are better across the board when taught by FT faculty over adjunct faculty.
Additional Info:
The Journal of Online Teaching and Learning (JoLT) publishes the detailed results of a study. Briefly: student outcomes are better across the board when taught by FT faculty over adjunct faculty.
Additional Info:
Adjunctification as an "education problem." Addresses the fact that academia and the media continue to promote the myth of "an academy that doesn't exist," in which tenure-track is still the norm. Looks at steps schools ought to take to help adjunct instructors accomplish their teaching.
Additional Info:
Adjunctification as an "education problem." Addresses the fact that academia and the media continue to promote the myth of "an academy that doesn't exist," in which tenure-track is still the norm. Looks at steps schools ought to take to help adjunct instructors accomplish their teaching.
Additional Info:
This in an "info" piece on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and its provisions regarding part-time college instructors, including not only health insurance matters, but those relating to workload definitions.
Additional Info:
This in an "info" piece on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and its provisions regarding part-time college instructors, including not only health insurance matters, but those relating to workload definitions.
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Ed offers a time line, with links, of the controversial resignation and reinstatement of University of Virginia's president Teresa Sullivan. At the heart of the controversy is disagreement between the school's Board of Visitors and President Sullivan regarding the pace and manner of adopting online learning.
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Ed offers a time line, with links, of the controversial resignation and reinstatement of University of Virginia's president Teresa Sullivan. At the heart of the controversy is disagreement between the school's Board of Visitors and President Sullivan regarding the pace and manner of adopting online learning.
Additional Info:
Identifies key changes in values and behaviors that are changing higher education. Discusses technological changes, the ways in which people engage each other and technology; and the implications of these changes for higher education.
Additional Info:
Identifies key changes in values and behaviors that are changing higher education. Discusses technological changes, the ways in which people engage each other and technology; and the implications of these changes for higher education.
Additional Info:
Nel examines the factors contributing to overwork on the part of faculty members in higher education: habit, economics, a culture of busy-ness, the blurred line between work and "fun," technological connectedness, etc.
Additional Info:
Nel examines the factors contributing to overwork on the part of faculty members in higher education: habit, economics, a culture of busy-ness, the blurred line between work and "fun," technological connectedness, etc.
Additional Info:
Based on "preliminary findings of an ongoing study at Boise State University," the author reports that faculty work 61 hours/week, increasingly at administrative tasks, and "largely alone." Only a vanishingly small percentage of time is spent on research and writing. The article is especially relevant in contrast with periodic pieces purporting to show that instructors in higher ed are protected from economic realities and underworked.
Additional Info:
Based on "preliminary findings of an ongoing study at Boise State University," the author reports that faculty work 61 hours/week, increasingly at administrative tasks, and "largely alone." Only a vanishingly small percentage of time is spent on research and writing. The article is especially relevant in contrast with periodic pieces purporting to show that instructors in higher ed are protected from economic realities and underworked.
Additional Info:
In this Prezi (without voice-over), Thompson explains "open access" to educators and scholars. Includes attention to Open Educational Resources (OER), the relation of Creative Commons to "public domain" and traditional copyright, the difference between "open access" and "open source," different axes of "openness," and the economic crisis in academic publishing. Includes link to Google Doc capturing all URLs cited in the Prezi.
Additional Info:
In this Prezi (without voice-over), Thompson explains "open access" to educators and scholars. Includes attention to Open Educational Resources (OER), the relation of Creative Commons to "public domain" and traditional copyright, the difference between "open access" and "open source," different axes of "openness," and the economic crisis in academic publishing. Includes link to Google Doc capturing all URLs cited in the Prezi.
Additional Info:
This pdf is an entire 200 page book published by Parlor Press, Anderson, South Carolina 2014). It contains twenty-three chapters, by different authors, exploring the benefits and disadvantages of the recent educational phenomenon known as Massive Open Online Courses (acronym, MOOC). 
Additional Info:
This pdf is an entire 200 page book published by Parlor Press, Anderson, South Carolina 2014). It contains twenty-three chapters, by different authors, exploring the benefits and disadvantages of the recent educational phenomenon known as Massive Open Online Courses (acronym, MOOC). 

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Building on the Tradition of CCK08 (Charles Lowe)

ch. 1 MOOCology 1.0 (Glenna L. Decker)
ch. 2 Framing Questions about MOOCs and Writing Courses (James E. Porter)
ch. 3 A MOOC or Not a MOOC: ds106 - Questions the Form (Alan Levine)
ch. 4 Why We Are Thinking About MOOCs (Jeffrey T. Grabill)
ch. 5 The Hidden Costs of MOOCs (Karen Head)
ch. 6 Coursera: Fifty Ways to Fix the Software (with apologies to Paul Simon) (Laura Gibbs)
ch. 7 Being Present in a University Writing Course: A Case Against MOOCs (Bob Samuels)
ch. 8 Another Colonialist Tool? (Aaron Barlow)
ch. 9 MOOCversations: Commonplaces as Argument (Jeff Rice)
ch. 10 MOOC Feedback: Pleasing All the People? (Jeremy Knox, Jen Ross, Christine Sinclair, Hamish Macleod, and Siân Bayne)
ch. 11 More Questions than Answers: Scratching at the Surface of MOOCs in Higher Education (Jacqueline Kauza) ch. 12 Those Moot MOOCs: My MOOC Experience (Melissa Syapin)
ch. 13 MOOC Assigned (Steven D. Krause)
ch. 14 Learning How to Teach ... Differently: Extracts from a MOOC Instructor’s Journal (Denise K. Comer)
ch. 15 MOOC as Threat and Promise (Edward M. White)
ch. 16 A MOOC With a View: How MOOCs Encourage Us to Reexamine Pedagogical Doxa (Kay Halasek, Ben McCorkle, Cynthia L. Selfe, Scott Lloyd DeWitt, Susan Delagrange, Jennifer Michaels, and Kaitlin Clinnin)
ch. 17 Putting the U in MOOCs: The Importance of Usability in Course Design (Heather Noel Young)
ch. 18 “I open at the close”: A Post-MOOC Meta-Happening Reflection and What I’m Going to Do About That (Elizabeth D. Woodworth)
ch. 19 Here a MOOC, There a MOOC (Nick Carbone)
ch. 20 Writing and Learning with Feedback Machines (Alexander Reid)
ch. 21 Learning Many-to-Many: The Best Case for Writing in Digital Environments (Bill Hart-Davidson)
ch. 22 After the Invasion: What’s Next for MOOCs? (Steven D. Krause)

Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
Podcast: Conversation ranges from the public perception of what Religious Studies does, what to do with a RS degree, to the financial practicalities of doing postgraduate research in the UK and US today.
Additional Info:
Podcast: Conversation ranges from the public perception of what Religious Studies does, what to do with a RS degree, to the financial practicalities of doing postgraduate research in the UK and US today.
Additional Info:
Wiebe argues that the relationship between theology and religious studies is more compicated and interrelated than most acknowledge.
Additional Info:
Wiebe argues that the relationship between theology and religious studies is more compicated and interrelated than most acknowledge.
Additional Info:
An early You Tube mix of submissions for "The Visions of Students Today," a project by cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch. Learners express apathy and discouragement concerning their education, but also strong desire for empowering experiences of learning as creating, exploring, risking.
Additional Info:
An early You Tube mix of submissions for "The Visions of Students Today," a project by cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch. Learners express apathy and discouragement concerning their education, but also strong desire for empowering experiences of learning as creating, exploring, risking.
Additional Info:
Video. A lengthy You Tube video (1 hour), and dated 2008, but still relevant. Cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch discusses "media literacy" as a site of ongoing struggle and professional development for an instructor in higher education. If our students come to us unprepared for school, does that mean they are unprepared for learning? Is the problem with them, or with school? Have we taught learners the wrong things about learning?
Additional Info:
Video. A lengthy You Tube video (1 hour), and dated 2008, but still relevant. Cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch discusses "media literacy" as a site of ongoing struggle and professional development for an instructor in higher education. If our students come to us unprepared for school, does that mean they are unprepared for learning? Is the problem with them, or with school? Have we taught learners the wrong things about learning?
Additional Info:
Article addresses: what are some of the drawbacks to taking a human rights approach to information rights?
Additional Info:
Article addresses: what are some of the drawbacks to taking a human rights approach to information rights?
Additional Info:
Perhaps the most dramatic shift in library services is the transition from a purely physical to a physical/virtual environment. This article examines how 21stC online librarians deliver reference services to students and faculty, and explores the ramifications future librarians’ education, including areas of technology, instruction, interpersonal skills, intellectual property.
Additional Info:
Perhaps the most dramatic shift in library services is the transition from a purely physical to a physical/virtual environment. This article examines how 21stC online librarians deliver reference services to students and faculty, and explores the ramifications future librarians’ education, including areas of technology, instruction, interpersonal skills, intellectual property.
Cover image

Rethinking Knowledge within Higher Education: Adorno and Social Justice

Book
McArthur, Jan
2013
Bloomsbury Academic, New York, NY
LB2322.2.M325 2013
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Rethinking Knowledge within Higher Education argues for a higher education that is neither a romantic idyll of learning for its own sake nor an instrumental institution designed to train a willing workforce for the prevailing economic system. Instead, using analysis informed by critical theorist Theodor Adorno, this book argues that higher education should have social and economic roles at its heart, and that ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Rethinking Knowledge within Higher Education argues for a higher education that is neither a romantic idyll of learning for its own sake nor an instrumental institution designed to train a willing workforce for the prevailing economic system. Instead, using analysis informed by critical theorist Theodor Adorno, this book argues that higher education should have social and economic roles at its heart, and that these should encompass the needs of all society. The key to achieving this purpose without privilege lies in the ways in which knowledge is understood and engaged with in higher education. Higher education has a special role in society as a place in which complex, contested and dynamic knowledge is engaged with, challenged and created. The realization of this purpose challenges traditional dichotomies between economic and social purposes, liberal and vocational education, and theory and practice. Jan McArthur shows that by interpreting and adapting some of Adorno's most complex ideas, the nature of knowledge and the pursuit of social justice within higher education is feasible and aspirational. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Adorno and Higher Education

ch. 1 Knowledge and Social Justice in Higher Education
ch. 2 Approaches to Critical Theory and Critical Pedagogy
ch. 3 The Importance of Knowledge Being Not Easily Known
ch. 4 Beyond Standardized Engagement with Knowledge
ch. 5 The Social Implications of Engaging with Knowledge in Higher Education
ch. 6 Challenging the Theory–Practice Dichotomy
ch. 7 Towards a Higher Education Transcending Both the Elite and the Mainstream

References
Index
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The Pursuit of Wisdom and Happiness in Education: Historical Sources and Contemplative Practices

Book
Steel, Sean
2014
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
LB14.7.S7299 2014
Topics: Faith in the Classroom   |   Changes in Higher Education

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Abstract: Explores the nature and role of wisdom in education.

Modern scholarship has struggled to come to terms with the meaning of wisdom and its significance in the field of education. This book examines the importance of pursuing wisdom in schools by turning to ancient and medieval sources for clarification concerning the nature of wisdom. Sean Steel argues that our current emphasis ...
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Abstract: Explores the nature and role of wisdom in education.

Modern scholarship has struggled to come to terms with the meaning of wisdom and its significance in the field of education. This book examines the importance of pursuing wisdom in schools by turning to ancient and medieval sources for clarification concerning the nature of wisdom. Sean Steel argues that our current emphasis on the development of rigorous critical-analytic thinking skills, on assessment, and on accountability in education has negatively impacted the ability of schools to foster an environment in which both students and teachers might pursue wisdom. Although in recent times efforts have been made to incorporate the pursuit of wisdom into schools through Philosophy for Children (P4C) and contemplative education programming, such initiatives have missed their mark. Steel therefore recommends not more accountability in education for the purpose of ensuring global competitiveness, but rather the institutional promotion of periods of leisure or schole in the school day.

Drawing upon his own experiences as a teacher who has tried to encourage students to search for wisdom, the author discusses some of the challenges and pitfalls of wisdom seeking. He also offers examples of various wisdom-seeking activities that might bear fruit in the classroom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Stating the Problem: The Loss of Wisdom in the Modern World
ch. 2 Aristotle’s Understanding of Wisdom and Wisdom’s Pursuit
ch. 3 Boethius: The Relevance of Philosophy and the Need for a Wisdom Atmosphere in Education
ch. 4 Moses Maimonides’s Warnings against the Pursuit of Wisdom in Schoolsv ch. 5 Thomas Aquinas and the Gift of Wisdom
ch. 6 “Forget about Wisdom! Let’s Innovate!” A Critique of Current Trends in Education Reform
ch. 7 The Same Old Story: A History Lesson with St. Augustine about Education Reform
ch. 8 The Problem of Introducing Schole into Schools Today
ch. 9 Gareth Matthews’s Defense of Philosophizing with Childrenv ch. 10 Matthew Lipman and the P4C Movement
ch. 11 What Philosophy Is Not
ch. 12 A Brief Statement on the Unity between the Philosophic and Contemplative Traditions
ch. 13 Technological Education and the Need for Contemplation
ch. 14 The Challenge of Contemplative Education Programming in Schools
ch. 15 Examples of Contemplative Education in Schools
ch. 16 A Proposal for “Metaxic” Education, or an Education of the In-Between

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Through Toil and Tribulation: Financing Theological Education, 2001-2011

Journal Issue
Ruger, Anthony; and Meinzer, Chris A.
2014
Auburn Studies No. 18 (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY 2014)
BV4070.A8 A1 2014 no. 18
Topics: Theological Education   |   Adult Learners   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Revenues and expenditures of schools are analyzed for this ten year period. Enrollment trends, including extension sights and distance education, are reviewed. Qualitative factors that contribute to financial stability are examined, including findings from six schools whose financial performance was remarkably consistent and solid for this decade. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Revenues and expenditures of schools are analyzed for this ten year period. Enrollment trends, including extension sights and distance education, are reviewed. Qualitative factors that contribute to financial stability are examined, including findings from six schools whose financial performance was remarkably consistent and solid for this decade. (From the Publisher)
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The Other Side of Pedagogy: Lacan's Four Discourses and the Development of the Student Writer

Book
Johnson, T. R.
2014
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
PE1404.J647 2014
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching

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Abstract: Delineates Lacan’s theory of the four discourses as a practical framework through which faculty can reflect on where their students are, developmentally, and where they might go.

University classrooms are increasingly in crisis—though popular demands for accountability grow more insistent, no one seems to know what our teaching should seek to achieve. This book traces how we arrived at ...
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Abstract: Delineates Lacan’s theory of the four discourses as a practical framework through which faculty can reflect on where their students are, developmentally, and where they might go.

University classrooms are increasingly in crisis—though popular demands for accountability grow more insistent, no one seems to know what our teaching should seek to achieve. This book traces how we arrived at our current impasse, and it uses Lacan’s theory of the four discourses to chart a path forward via an analysis of the freshman writing class. How did we forfeit a meaningful set of goals for our teaching? T. R. Johnson suggests that, by the 1960s, the work of Bergson and Piaget had led us to see student growth as a journey into more and more abstract thought, a journey that will happen naturally if the teacher knows how to stay out of the way. Since the 1960s, we’ve come to see development, in turn, only as a vague initiation into the academic community. This book, however, offers an alternative tradition, one rooted in Vygotsky and the feminist movement, that defines the developing student writer in terms of a complex, intersubjective ecology, and then, through these precedents, proposes a fully psychoanalytic model of student development. To illustrate his practical use of the four discourses, Johnson draws on a wide array of concepts and a colorful set of examples, including Franz Kafka, Keith Richards, David Foster Wallace, Hannah Arendt, and many others.

“Graceful, provocative, thoughtful, and well researched, The Other Side of Pedagogy connects theory and teaching in compelling ways. This is a groundbreaking book that scholars of writing will want to read, reread, and teach.” — Joseph Harris, author of A Teaching Subject: Composition Since 1966 (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Recovering the Unconscious: Pedagogy’s Other Side

ch. 1 The Crisis: Forfeiting Our Most Valuable Asset
ch. 2 Contemporary Composition Studies: Development Means Joining Our Community, and That’s All There Is to Know
ch. 3 Why the “Growth” Movement Didn’t Grow—And an Alternative
ch. 4 Psychoanalysis and Pedagogy: Some Historical Context and Key Terms for Doing the Impossible
ch. 5 A Perfect Ignorance and Paralysis: The Discourse of the Master
ch. 6 Only Following Directions: The Discourse of the University
ch. 7 “Songs…dripping off my fingers”: The Discourse of Hysteric
ch. 8 Playing by Ear: The Discourse of the Analyst

Works Cited
Index
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Academic Freedom at American Universities: Constitutional Rights, Professional Norms, and Contractual Duties

Book
Lee, Philip
2015
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
KF4242.L44 2015
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

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Abstract: This book details the legal and historical development of institutional and professorial academic freedoms to better understand the relationship between these concepts. While some judges and scholars have focused on the divergence of these protections, this book articulates an aligned theory that brings both the professorial and institutional theories together. It argues that while constitutionally based academic freedom does its job in protecting ...
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Abstract: This book details the legal and historical development of institutional and professorial academic freedoms to better understand the relationship between these concepts. While some judges and scholars have focused on the divergence of these protections, this book articulates an aligned theory that brings both the professorial and institutional theories together. It argues that while constitutionally based academic freedom does its job in protecting both public and private universities from excessive state interference, or at the very least it asks the right questions, it is inadequate because it fails to protect many individual professors in the same way. This solution entails using contract law to fill in the gaps that constitutional law leaves open in regard to protecting individual professors.

Contract law is an effective alternative to constitutional law for three reasons. First, unlike constitutional law, it covers professors at both public and private universities. Second, it allows for the consideration of the custom and usage of the academic community as either express or implied contract terms in resolving disputes between universities and professors. Third, contract law enables courts to structure remedies that take into account the specific campus contexts that give rise to various disputes instead of crafting broad remedies that may ill fit certain campus environments.

The proposed reconceptualization of academic freedom merges constitutional protection for institutions and contractual protection for individual professors. This combined approach would provide a more comprehensive framework than is currently available under the predominantly constitutional paradigm of academic freedom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Crisis of Academic Freedom in the Modern University and the Founding of the AAUP
ch. 2 The AAUP’s First Policy Declaration in 1915 and its Early Struggle to Defend Academic Freedom
ch. 3 The AAUP’s Seminal 1940 Statement and Judicially Defined Academic Freedom During the McCarthy Era
ch. 4 Modern Constitutional Conceptions of Academic Freedom
ch. 5 The Limitations of Constitutionally Based Professorial Freedom
ch. 6 Contract Law as an Alternative Foundation for Professorial Freedom

Conclusion
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Democratizing Higher Education: International Comparative Perspectives

Book
Blessinger, Patrick; and Anchan, John P., eds.
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
LC213.D45 2015
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Higher education systems around the world are undergoing fundamental change and reform due to external pressures—including internationalization of higher education, increased international competition for students, less reliance on public funding, and calls to create greater access opportunities for citizens. How are higher education systems evolving structurally as a result of these and other pressures? In light of these changes, how can higher education be a positive force for democratizing ...
Additional Info:
Higher education systems around the world are undergoing fundamental change and reform due to external pressures—including internationalization of higher education, increased international competition for students, less reliance on public funding, and calls to create greater access opportunities for citizens. How are higher education systems evolving structurally as a result of these and other pressures? In light of these changes, how can higher education be a positive force for democratizing societies?

This book examines the emerging trends taking place in higher education systems around the world, focusing on the most salient political and social forces that underlie these trends. Each chapter provides a case study of a country, exploring its cultural and political history, the political and social developments that have affected its higher education system, and the result of these changes on the higher education system. In a fast-changing, knowledge-intensive, democratic society, Democratizing Higher Education explores how higher education systems can be developed to provide access, affordability, participation, and quality life-long learning for all. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Nel Noddings)
Preface (Patrick Blessinger and John P. Anchan)

ch. 1 An Introduction to Democratizing Higher Education (John P. Anchan)
ch. 2 Democratizing Higher Education in the United States: A Legacy of Democratic Learning (Linda Watts)
ch. 3 Democratizing Higher Education in Canada: Quality and Educational Development (Arshad Ahmad and Lori Goff)
ch. 4 Democratization in European Higher Education: The Past, Present, and Future of the Bologna Process (María Luisa Pérez Cañado)
ch. 5 South Europe Higher Education: Portugal and Its Peripheral Regions (Luísa Soares and Catarina Faria)
ch. 6 Democratizing Higher Education in the United Kingdom: A Case Study (Craig Mahoney and Helena Lim)
ch. 7 Higher Education in Scandinavia: A Case Study (Jorgen Lerche Nielsen and Lars Birch Andreasen)
ch. 8 Higher Education in New Zealand: A Case Study of the Land of the Long White Cloud (Lorraine Stefani)
ch. 9 Higher Education in South Africa: A Case Study (Mandla S. Makhanya and Jeanette C. Botha)
ch. 10 Modernization of Russian Higher Education: Progress and Opportunities (Natalia Moscvina and Olga Kovbasyuk)
ch. 11 Democratizing Higher Education in China’s Hong Kong: Between Rhetoric and Reality (Hei-hang Hayes Tang)
ch. 12 Democratization of Higher Education in India: A Case Study (Arputharaj Devaraj)
ch. 13 Malaysian Higher Education: A Case Study (Enakshi Sengupta)
ch. 14 The Future of Higher Education: Towards A Democratic Theory of Higher Education (Patrick Blessinger)
ch. 15 Democratizing Higher Education: Concluding Thoughts (Patrick Blessinger)

About the Contributors
Index
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Part-Time on the Tenure Track, AEHE Volume 40 Number 5

Book
Herbers, Joan M., ed.
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2300.A81 H47 2014
Topics: Adjuncts   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Changes in Higher Education

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Abstract: The case for a flexible work schedule for faculty has been repeatedly made, with one policy recommendation being part-time positions for tenure-track/tenured faculty (PTTT). Despite some of the benefits of this approach for both faculty and institutions, the PTTT concept is the least implemented policy for faculty flexibility and is poorly understood. This report offers the first comprehensive treatment of PTTT, suggesting ...
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Abstract: The case for a flexible work schedule for faculty has been repeatedly made, with one policy recommendation being part-time positions for tenure-track/tenured faculty (PTTT). Despite some of the benefits of this approach for both faculty and institutions, the PTTT concept is the least implemented policy for faculty flexibility and is poorly understood. This report offers the first comprehensive treatment of PTTT, suggesting that this mode of flexibility enhances recruitment, retention, and engagement of faculty, while offering value-added productivity, planning potential, and faculty loyalty for the institution.

Herbers provides data that explore how a PTTT policy can lead to faculty success and satisfaction across the lifespan of a career, and likewise offers analogies and examples of well-established practices that administrators across institution types can adapt to create their own policies. Administrators and faculty will find the author’s policy recommendations, best practices, and solutions to common challenges to be a roadmap for stimulating change in their institutions.

This is the 5th issue of the 40th volume of the Jossey-Bass series ASHE Higher Education Report. Each monograph is the definitive analysis of a tough higher education issue, based on thorough research of pertinent literature and institutional experiences. Topics are identified by a national survey. Noted practitioners and scholars are then commissioned to write the reports, with experts providing critical reviews of each manuscript before publication. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Executive Summary
Foreword
Acknowledgments

Prologue 1
Part-Time Tenure Track in Higher Education
Precis

Faculty Flexibility and the Part-Time Option
The Need for Faculty Flexibility
The Imperative of Faculty Retention
The Faculty Life Course
PTTT and the Flexibility Agenda
Policy and Practice

Profile I: PTTT at Three Institutions
Who Are They?
Sources of Data on PTTT
IPEDS Data
NSOPF Data

Profile II
Patterns of Use by PTTT Faculty
Early Career and Family Constraints
Mid-Career Motivations
Late Career: Phasing Into Retirement
Conclusion

Profile III: Transitional Retirement at Colorado State University (CSU)
Lessons From Academic Medical Centers
Academic Medicine Must Adapt to a Changing Workforce
Faculty Retention
PTTT in Academic Medicine
Department Culture
Differences Among Specialty Areas
The Life Course Model in Academic Medicine

Profile IV
Analogs to Part-Time Tenure Track
Analogs Within Academia
Analogs in Other Work Sectors: The Path to Partner
Conclusion

Profile V
The Structure of PTTT Positions
Policies on PTTT
Parameters of PTTT Appointments
Conclusion

Profile VI
Benefits and Challenges
The View From Administration
The View From the Faculty
Conclusion

Profile VII
External Forces
Laws About Fair Hiring and Conflicts of Interest
Faculty Contracts for Collective Bargaining
State Retirement Systems
Funding Agencies
Accreditation Bodies
Insurance Companies
Special Faculty Units
Conclusion

Profile VIII
A Pathway Forward
The Faculty Life Course
Challenging the Ideal Worker
Best Practices for PTTT
The New Ideal

Notes
Appendix 1: Individuals Who Have Held PTTT Positions in Early Career, and Their Current Status
Appendix 2: Snapshots of Institutional Policies and Usage of PTTT Positions, Excluding Phased Retirement Policies
References
Name Index
Subject Index
About the Author
Cover image

The Higher Education Scene in America: Some Observations

Book
Gitlow, Abrham; and Gitlow, Howard
2014
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LC173.G58 2014
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

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Abstract: Based on the authors’ experiences in academe over seventy-five years, The Higher Education Scene in America: Some Observations discusses a number of issues that confront America’s higher education scene today. Those issue embrace such problems as: (1) the missions(s) of our colleges and universities and the development of critical thinking and/or employability; (2) the role of for-profit academic institutions; (3) the impact of ...
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Abstract: Based on the authors’ experiences in academe over seventy-five years, The Higher Education Scene in America: Some Observations discusses a number of issues that confront America’s higher education scene today. Those issue embrace such problems as: (1) the missions(s) of our colleges and universities and the development of critical thinking and/or employability; (2) the role of for-profit academic institutions; (3) the impact of online technology; (4) diffusion of power and achievement of consensus between administrators and faculty; (5) the importance of financial matters, embracing budgets, fundraising, and endowments; (6) the insidious problem of conflicts of interest; (7) the scandalous impact of big-time, big-money Division 1 sports on academe; (8) the growth of non-academic functions; and (9) the importance of leadership in consensual institutions and how leaders are chosen. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Higher Education in a Free Society
ch. 2 Formal Authority and Diffusion of Power
ch. 3 The Academic Pecking Order and Unionization of the Academic Staff
ch. 4 The Budgetary Challenge and Fiscal Responsibility
ch. 5 The Fundraising Challenge
ch. 6 Other Aspects of Fundraising
ch. 7 Conflicts of Interest and Division I Sports
ch. 8 Service Functions: A Secondary Source of Threats to the Academic Mission
ch. 9 The University President: The Leader’s Job is Critical

Conclusion
Sources
Index
About the Authors
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Best Practices in Online Program Development: Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Book
King, Elliot; and Alperstein, Neil
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2395.7.K56 2015
Topics: Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education

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Abstract: Best Practices in Online Program Development is a practical, hands-on guide that provides the concrete strategies that academic and administrative departments within institutions of higher learning need to develop in order to create and maintain coherent and effective online educational programs. Unlike individual courses, an online education program requires a comprehensive, inter-departmental effort to be integrated into the ongoing educational project of a ...
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Abstract: Best Practices in Online Program Development is a practical, hands-on guide that provides the concrete strategies that academic and administrative departments within institutions of higher learning need to develop in order to create and maintain coherent and effective online educational programs. Unlike individual courses, an online education program requires a comprehensive, inter-departmental effort to be integrated into the ongoing educational project of a college or university. This book focuses on the:

Integration of online education into the institutional mission
Complex faculty-related issues including recruiting, training, and teaching
Multifaceted support required for student retention and success
Need for multilayered assessment at the course, program, technical, and institutional levels
Challenges posed to governance and by the need to garner resources across the institution
Model to insure ongoing, comprehensive development of online educational programs

Best Practices in Online Program Development covers the above topics and more, giving all the stakeholders in online educational programs the building blocks to foster successful programs while encouraging them to determine what role online education should play in their academic offerings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Series Editor Introduction

ch. 1 The Online Challenge in Higher Education
ch. 2 The First Step Now
ch. 3 Issues and Challenges Facing Faculty
ch. 4 Issues and Challenges Facing Students
ch. 5 Institutional Issues and Challenges
ch. 6 The Generational Model for Online Program Development

Index
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Deconstructing Derrida: Tasks for the New Humanities

Book
Trifonas, Peter Pericles and Peters, Michael A., eds.
2005
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
B2430.D484 D38 2005
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Responding to Jacques Derrida's vision for what a 'new' humanities should strive toward, Peter Trifonas and Michael Peters gather together in a single volume original essays by major scholars in the humanities today. Using Derrida's seven programmatic theses as a springboard, the contributors aim to reimagine, as Derrida did, the tasks for the new humanities in such areas as history of literature, history of democracy, history of profession, idea of ...
Additional Info:
Responding to Jacques Derrida's vision for what a 'new' humanities should strive toward, Peter Trifonas and Michael Peters gather together in a single volume original essays by major scholars in the humanities today. Using Derrida's seven programmatic theses as a springboard, the contributors aim to reimagine, as Derrida did, the tasks for the new humanities in such areas as history of literature, history of democracy, history of profession, idea of sovereignty, and history of man. Deconstructing Derrida engages Jacques Derrida's polemic on the future of the humanities to come and expands on the notion of what us proper to the humanities in the current age of globalism and change. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction - The Humanities in Deconstruction (Michael A. Peters and Peter Pericles Trifonas)

ch. 1 The Future of the Profession or the Unconditional University (Thanks to the ‘Humanities’, What Could Take Place Tomorrow) (J.Derrida)
ch. 2 Sovereignty Death Literature Unconditionality Democracy University (J.Hillis Miller)
ch. 3 Right to Humanities: Of Faith and Responsibility (D.Egéa-Kuehne)
ch. 4 Higher Education and Democracy's Promise: Jacques Derrida's Pedagogy of Uncertainty (H.A.Giroux)
ch. 5 War, Crimes Against Humanity, and the New Humanities: Derrida and the Promise of Europe (M.A.Peters)
ch. 6 Higher Education and Everyday Life (S.Aronowitz)
ch. 7 Altering the Material Conditions of Access to the Humanities (J.Willinsky)
ch. 8 The Grammatology of the Future (G.Ulmer)
ch. 9 Moving Devi (G.Chakravorty Spivak)
ch. 10 Ourselves as Another: Cosmopolitical Humanities (P.Pericles Trifonas)

Index
Cover image

Higher Education Reconsidered: Executing Change to Drive Collective Impact

Book
Lane, Jason E., ed.
2015
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
LA227.4.H54 2015
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

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Abstract: Focuses on the opportunities and challenges of using the science of change to improve the academic enterprise.

This is not another book about why higher education needs to change. This volume is about how to facilitate change. What could higher education achieve if varied stakeholders decided to work together to accomplish a shared vision by using data and scaling up evidence-based interventions? ...
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Abstract: Focuses on the opportunities and challenges of using the science of change to improve the academic enterprise.

This is not another book about why higher education needs to change. This volume is about how to facilitate change. What could higher education achieve if varied stakeholders decided to work together to accomplish a shared vision by using data and scaling up evidence-based interventions? The contributors offer examples and instructions to help execute change in order to drive collective impact. When we understand large-scale change in other sectors, such as healthcare, business, and the social sector, it can help inform us of what collective impact looks like and how to get there. A deeper investigation into the science of change will enable us to work towards increasing access, overcoming racial disparities, reducing the need for remediation, and improving learning outcomes. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Illustrations
Foreword: Bringing Collective Impact to Higher Education (Nancy L. Zimpher)
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Jason E. Lane)

ch. 1 Collective Leadership in Higher Education: Moving from Competition to Collaboration to Impact (Jason E. Lane, B. Alex Finsel, and Taya L. Owens)
ch. 2 The Inconvenient Truth about Change Management: Why It Isn’t Working and What to Do about It (Scott Keller and Carolyn Aiken)
ch. 3 From Perpetuation to Innovation: Breaking through Barriers to Change in Higher Education (Jonathan S. Gagliardi)
ch. 4 The Rise of Collective Impact (Jeff Edmondson and Nancy L. Zimpher)
ch. 5 Using Design Thinking to Drive Collective Impact in Higher Education (David J. Weerts, Christopher J. Rasmussen, and Virajita Singh)
ch. 6 The Albany Promise Story: How a Community Came Together to Go All-in on Education Reform (Juliette Price)
ch. 7 What Large-scale Change Looks Like and How to Get There: Theories of Action A conversation (Jeff Edmondson, Jason Helgerson, Danette Howard, James Kvaal, Becky Kanis Margiotta, and Joe McCannon Moderated by David Leonhardt)

Contributors
Index
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Alternative Solutions to Higher Education’s Challenges: An Appreciative Approach to Reform

Book
Harrison, Laura M.; and Mather, Peter C.
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2322.2.H37 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

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Abstract: Moving beyond critique, Alternative Solutions to Higher Education’s Challenges uses an appreciative approach to highlight what is working in colleges and universities and offers an examination of how institutions can improve practice. Drawing on examples and cases from real higher education institutions, this book offers a solution-focused framework that challenges the negative assumptions that have plagued higher education. Chapters explore how current ...
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Abstract: Moving beyond critique, Alternative Solutions to Higher Education’s Challenges uses an appreciative approach to highlight what is working in colleges and universities and offers an examination of how institutions can improve practice. Drawing on examples and cases from real higher education institutions, this book offers a solution-focused framework that challenges the negative assumptions that have plagued higher education. Chapters explore how current narratives have perpetuated and maintained systematic flaws in our education system and have hindered reform. This invaluable resource breaks from the substantial literature that only highlights the many problems facing higher education today, and instead provides alternative strategies and essential recommendations for moving higher education institutions forward. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Developing a Toolbox for Appreciative Approaches to Change
ch. 2 Cultivating Organizational Strengths Through Democratic Leadership
ch. 3 Fostering an Enriching Community Life and Effective Public Service
ch. 4 Centering Institutional Practices Around Meaningful Student Learning
ch. 5 Leveraging Liberal Education to Promote Equal Opportunity
ch. 6 Embracing the Heart in the Head(y) World of Higher Education
ch. 7 Reclaiming Teaching in Person
ch. 8 Moving Forward

References
Index
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Internationalizing Higher Education: Critical Collaborations across the Curriculum

Book
Williams, Rhiannon D.; and Lee, Amy, eds.
2015
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LC1090.I65 2015
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: Higher education is facing unprecedented change as today’s graduates need particular skills, awareness, and knowledge to successfully navigate a complex and interconnected world. Higher education institutions and practitioners are under pressure to be attentive to internationalization initiatives that support increasingly diverse student populations and foster the development of global citizenship competencies which include, “problem-defining and solving perspectives that cross disciplinary and cultural ...
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Abstract: Higher education is facing unprecedented change as today’s graduates need particular skills, awareness, and knowledge to successfully navigate a complex and interconnected world. Higher education institutions and practitioners are under pressure to be attentive to internationalization initiatives that support increasingly diverse student populations and foster the development of global citizenship competencies which include, “problem-defining and solving perspectives that cross disciplinary and cultural boundaries” (Hudzik, 2004, p. 1 as cited in Leask & Bridge, 2013).

Internationalizing Higher Education: Critical Collaborations across the Curriculum is for current and future faculty, student affairs staff, and administrators from diverse disciplinary, institutional, and geographic contexts. This edited volume invites readers to investigate, better understand, and inform intercultural pedagogy that supports the development of mindful global citizenship. This edited volume features reflective practitioners exploring the dynamic and evolving nature of intercultural learning as well as the tensions and complexities. Contributors include institutional researchers, directors and key implementers of EU/Bologna process in Poland (one of the newest members and one that is facing unprecedented change in the diversity of its students), international partners in learning abroad programs, and scholars and instructors across a range of humanities, STEM, and social sciences. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Internationalizing Higher Education: Critical Collaborations across the Curriculum (Rhiannon D. Williams and Amy Lee)

Section 1: Mindful Global Citizenship: Critical Concepts and Current Contexts
ch. 1 On the Hologram of International Education: With Raya Hegerman-Davis, Amy Lee, Nue Lor, & Rhiannon Williiams (Josef A. Mestenhauser)
ch. 2 Promoting Holistic Global Citizenship in College: Implications for Education Practitioners (Elena Galinova)
ch. 3 The Challenges and Implications of Globalization for Undergraduate Pedagogy (Marta A. Shaw)
ch. 4 Institutional and Instructional Techniques to Promote Undergraduates’ Intercultural Development: Evidence from a Multi-Institutional Student Survey (Krista M. Soria)

Section 2: Developing Intercultural Programs and Practitioners
ch. 5 Internationalizing Teaching and Learning: Transforming Teachers, Transforming Students (Gayle Woodruff, Kate Martin and Mary Katherine O’Brien)
ch. 6 Strategies for the Development of an Intercultural Environment (Jill E. Blondin)
ch. 7 Global Citizenship: Surfacing the Gap between Rhetoric and Reality in Internationalization of Management Curricula (Diana Rajendra, Janet Bryant, Patricia Buckley and Ryan Jopp)
ch. 8 Social Competencies in the European and Polish Qualifications Framework: A Tool for Designing Intercultural Environments (Ewa Chmielecka and Izabela Buchowicz)

Section 3: Critical Reflections from across the Curriculum
ch. 9 Internationalizing Teaching and Learning in a Graduate Doctor of Nursing Program Curriculum (Mary Benbenek)
ch. 10 Internationalizing College Algebra (Susan Staats)
ch. 11 Illuminating a Course Transformation Journey (Catherine Solheim, Mary Katherine O’Brien and Scott Spicer)
ch. 12 Social Media & Intercultural Competence: Using Each to Explore the Other (Barbara Gibson, Meredith Hyde and Troy Gordon)
ch. 13 Developing Diversity-Related Competences in Creativity Workshop for Teachers (Adam Jagiello-Rusilowski)
ch. 14 On Becoming a Global Citizen: Critical Pedagogy and Crossing Borders in and out of the University Classroom (Sahtiya Hosoda Hammell, Rose Cle, Lauren Start, Chrissie Monaghan and Carol Anne Spreen)
ch. 15 “Unpacking” International Experience through Blended Intercultural Praxis (Jane Jackson)

Notes on Contributors
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Critical Approaches to the Study of Higher Education: A Practical Introduction

Book
Martínez-Alemán, Ana M.; Pusser, Brian, and Bensimon, Estela Mara, eds.
2015
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2326.3.C74 2015
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Critical theory has much to teach us about higher education. By linking critical models, methods, and research tools with an advocacy-driven vision of the central challenges facing postsecondary researchers and staff, Critical Approaches to the Study of Higher Education makes a significant—and long overdue—contribution to the development of the field.

The contributors argue that, far from being overly abstract, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Critical theory has much to teach us about higher education. By linking critical models, methods, and research tools with an advocacy-driven vision of the central challenges facing postsecondary researchers and staff, Critical Approaches to the Study of Higher Education makes a significant—and long overdue—contribution to the development of the field.

The contributors argue that, far from being overly abstract, critical tools and methods are central to contemporary scholarship and can have practical policy implications when brought to the study of higher education. They argue that critical research design and critical theories help scholars see beyond the normative models and frameworks that have long limited our understanding of students, faculty, institutions, the organization and governance of higher education, and the policies that shape the postsecondary arena.

A rigorous and invaluable guide for researchers seeking innovative approaches to higher education and the morass of traditionally functionalist, rational, and neoliberal thinking that mars the field, this book is also essential for instructors who wish to incorporate the lessons of critical scholarship into their course development, curriculum, and pedagogy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Critical discourse analysis in higher education policy research (Ana M. Martinez-Aleman)
ch. 2 Sense and sensibility: considering the dynamic between scholarship and lived experiences (Mitchell J. Chang)
ch. 3 A critical approach to power in higher education (Brian Pusser)
ch. 4 A critical reframing of human capital theory in US higher education (Sheila Slaughter, Barrett J. Taylor, and Kelly O. Rosinger)
ch. 5 The ideas and craft of the critical historian of education (Derrick P. Alridge)
ch. 6 The state and contest in higher education in the globalized era: critical perspectives (Imanol Ordorika and Marion Lloyd)
ch. 7 Critical policy analysis, the craft of qualitative research, and analysis of data on the Texas top 10% law (Anna Neumann and Aaron M. Pallas)
ch. 8 Critical action research on race and equity in higher education (Alicia C. Dowd, and Robin M. Bishop, Estela Mara Bensimon)
ch. 9 Using critical race theory to (re) interpret widely-studied topics related to students in U.S Higher education (Lori Patton Davis, Shaun R. Harper, and Jessica Harris)
ch. 10 Whose structure, whose function? (feminist) post-structural approaches in higher education Policy research (Amy Scott Metcalfe)
ch. 11 A critical examination of the college completion agenda: advancing equity in higher education (Robert T. Teranishi and Annie W. Bezbatchenko)
ch. 12 The new stratification: differentiating opportunity by race and class at community colleges in the U.S. (Gregory M. Anderson, Ryan P. Barone, Jeffrey C. Sun, and Nicholas Bowlby)
ch. 13 The transformative paradigm: principles and challenges (Sylvia Hurtado)

Afterword
Contributors
Index
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Discerning Critical Hope in Educational Practices

Book
Bozalek, Vivienne; Leibowtiz, Brenda; Carolissen, Ronelle; and Boler, Megan, eds.
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LC196.5.S6 D57 2014
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: How can discerning critical hope enable us to develop innovative forms of teaching, learning and social practices that begin to address issues of marginalization, privilege and access across different contexts?

At this millennial point in history, questions of cynicism, despair and hope arise at every turn, especially within areas of research into social justice and the struggle for transformation in education. ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: How can discerning critical hope enable us to develop innovative forms of teaching, learning and social practices that begin to address issues of marginalization, privilege and access across different contexts?

At this millennial point in history, questions of cynicism, despair and hope arise at every turn, especially within areas of research into social justice and the struggle for transformation in education. While a sense of fatalism and despair is easily recognizable, establishing compelling bases for hope is more difficult. This book addresses the absence of sustained analyses of hope that simultaneously recognize the hard edges of why we despair.

The volume posits the notion of critical hope not only as conceptual and theoretical, but also as an action-oriented response to despair. Our notion of critical hope is used in two ways: it is used firstly as a unitary concept which cannot be disaggregated into either hopefulness or criticality, and secondly, as an analytical concept, where critical hope is engaged and diversely theorized in ways that recognize aspects of individual and collective directions of critical hope. The book is divided into four sub-sections:

- Critical Hope in Education
- Critical Hope and a Critique of Neoliberalism
- Critical Race Theory/Postcolonial Perspectives on Critical Hope
- Philosophical Overviews of Critical Hope.

Education can be a purveyor of critical hope, but it also requires critical hope so that it, as a sector itself, can be transformative. With contributions from international experts in the field, the book will be of value to all academics and practitioners working in the field of education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Vivienne Bozalek, Ronelle Carolissen, Brenda Leibowitz and Megan Boler)

Part 1: Critical Hope in Education
ch. 1 Affective, Political and Ethical Sensibilities in Pedagogies of Critical Hope: Exploring the Notion of ‘Critical Emotional Praxis’ (Michalinos Zembylas)
ch. 2 Teaching for Hope: The Ethics of Shattering World Views (Megan Boler)
ch. 3 A Pedagogy of Hope in South African Higher Education (Vivienne Bozalek, Ronelle Carolissen and Brenda Leibowitz)

Part 2: Critical Hope and a Critique of Neoliberalism
ch. 4 ”That’s Scary. But it’s not Hopeless": Critical Pedagogy and Redemptive Narratives of Hope (Gustavo Fischman and Eric Haas)
ch. 5 Plasticity, Critical Hope and the Regeneration of Human Rights Education (Andre Keet)
ch. 6 Critical Hope: Deconstructing of the Politics of HOPE at a South African University (Henk van Rinsum)

Part 3: Critical Race Theory/Postcolonial Perspectives on Critical Hope
ch 7 Critical Hope and Struggles for Justice: An Antidote to Despair for Antiracism Educators (Ronald Glass)
ch. 8 Agents of Critical Hope: Black British Narratives (Paul Warmington)
ch. 9 Decolonizing Education: Discovering Critical Hope in Marginal Spaces (Merlyne Cruz)

Part 4: Philosophical Overviews of Critical Hope
ch 10 Hope: An Emancipatory Resource Across the Ages (John Horton)

Afterword: Critical Hopes – Gratitude and the Magic of Encounter (Mary Zournazi)
Index
Additional Info:
Workplace is a refereed, open access journal published by the Institute for Critical Education Studies (ICES) and a collective of scholars in critical university studies, or critical higher education, promoting dignity and integrity in academic work. Contributions are aimed at higher education workplace scholar-activism and dialogue on all issues of academic labor.
Additional Info:
Workplace is a refereed, open access journal published by the Institute for Critical Education Studies (ICES) and a collective of scholars in critical university studies, or critical higher education, promoting dignity and integrity in academic work. Contributions are aimed at higher education workplace scholar-activism and dialogue on all issues of academic labor.
Cover image
Wabash tree

Multiversities, Ideas, and Democracy

Book
Fallis, George
2007
University of Toronto Press, Toronto
LB2322.2.F35 2007
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Multiversities are sprawling conglomerates that provide liberal undergraduate, graduate, and professional education. As well-springs of innovation and ideas, these universities represent the core of society's research enterprise. Multiversities, Ideas, and Democracy forcibly argues that, in the contemporary world, multiversities need to be conceptualized in a new way, that is, not just as places of teaching and research, but also as fundamental institutions of democracy.

Building upon the history ...
Additional Info:
Multiversities are sprawling conglomerates that provide liberal undergraduate, graduate, and professional education. As well-springs of innovation and ideas, these universities represent the core of society's research enterprise. Multiversities, Ideas, and Democracy forcibly argues that, in the contemporary world, multiversities need to be conceptualized in a new way, that is, not just as places of teaching and research, but also as fundamental institutions of democracy.

Building upon the history of universities, George Fallis discusses how the multiversity is a distinctive product of the later twentieth century and has become an institution of centrality and power. He examines five characteristics of our age - the constrained welfare state, the information technology revolution, postmodern thought, commercialization, and globalization - and in each case explains how the dynamic of multiversity research alters societal circumstances, leading to the alteration of the institution itself and creating challenges to its own survival. The character of our age demands reappraisal of the multiversity, Fallis argues, in order to safeguard them from so-called 'mission drift.' Writing from a multi-national perspective, this study establishes how similar ideas are shaping multiversities across the Anglo-American world.

Ultimately, Multiversities, Ideas, and Democracy seeks to uncover the ethos of the multiversity and to hold such institutions accountable for their contribution to democratic life. It will appeal to anyone interested in the role of education in society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One: The Emergence of the Multiversity
ch. 1 The Idea of a University
ch. 2 The Uses of the Multiversity in Postindustrial Society
ch. 3 The Multiversity and the Welfare State
ch. 4 A Social Contract: Tasks, Autonomy, and Academic Freedom

Part Two: The Character of Our Age
ch. 5 The Constrained Welfare State
ch. 6 The Information Technology Revolution
ch. 7 Postmodern Thought
ch. 8 Commercialization
ch. 9 Globalization

Part Three: Renewing the Social Contract
ch. 10 The Multiversity and Liberal Democracy
ch. 11 A Liberal Education for Our Age

Notes
References
Index
Article cover image

"Portable, Stackable Credentials A New Education Model for Industry-Specific Career Pathways" (pdf)

Article
Austin, James T.; Mellow, Gail O.; Rosin, Mitch; and Seltzer, Marlene
2012
McGraw-Hill Research Foundation, November 28,
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Argues for a new system of credentials in place of university degree programs, focused on education for job skill acquisition and professional development.
Additional Info:
Argues for a new system of credentials in place of university degree programs, focused on education for job skill acquisition and professional development.
Cover image

Designing Transformative Multicultural Initiatives: Theoretical Foundations, Practical Applications, and Facilitator Considerations

Book
Watt, Sherry K.
2015
LB2322.2.D47 2015
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
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Abstract: Higher education is facing a perfect storm as it contends with changing demographics, shrinking budgets and concerns about access and cost, while underrepresented groups – both in faculty ranks and students – are voicing dissatisfaction with campus climate and demanding changes to structural inequities.

This book argues that, to address the inexorable changes ahead, colleges and universities need both to centralize the value ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Higher education is facing a perfect storm as it contends with changing demographics, shrinking budgets and concerns about access and cost, while underrepresented groups – both in faculty ranks and students – are voicing dissatisfaction with campus climate and demanding changes to structural inequities.

This book argues that, to address the inexorable changes ahead, colleges and universities need both to centralize the value of diversity and inclusion and employ a set of strategies that are enacted at all levels of their institutions. It argues that individual and institutional change efforts can only be achieved by implementing “diversity as a value” – that is embracing social change efforts as central and additive rather than episodic and required – and provides the research and theoretical frameworks to support this approach, as well as tools and examples of practice that accomplish change.

The contributors to this book identify the elements that drive successful multicultural initiatives and that strengthen the effectiveness of campus efforts to dismantle systemic oppression, as well as the individual and organization skills needed to manage difference effectively. Among these is developing the capacity of administrators, faculty and student affairs professionals as conscious scholar practitioners to sensitively manage conflicts on campus, deconstruct challenging structures and reconstruct the environment intentionally to include in respectful ways experiences of historically marginalized groups and non-dominant ways of being in the world.

The books’ focus on developing capacities for multicultural competence aligns with higher education’s increasing emphasis on civic engagement and institutional goals promote skills to interact in meaningful and responsible ways around difference, whether of people, ideas or identities.

Designing Transformative Multicultural Initiatives provides guiding principles and practical strategies to successfully transform higher education to become fully inclusive and advance the success of all constituents and stakeholders. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part One: Guiding Principles for Transformative Multicultural Initiatives (What are some useful guiding principles that help conscious scholar practitioners design transformative multicultural initiatives?)
ch. 1 Multicultural Initiatives as a Practice of Freedom (Sherry K. Watt)
ch. 2 Authentic, Action-Oriented Framing for Environmental Shifts (AAFES) Method (Sherry K. Watt)
ch. 3 Privilege Identity Exploration (PIE) Model Revisited: Strengthening Skills for Engaging Difference (Sherry K. Watt)

Part Two: Designing Multicultural Initiatives: A How to Manual (What techniques do conscious scholar practitioners use to develop a multicultural initiative that will lead to a successful outcome?)
ch. 4 Multicultural Initiatives as Bridges: Structures Necessary for Successful Facilitation (Cindy Ann Kilgo and Richard Barajas)
ch. 5 In Pursuit of a Strong, Clear Vision: Initiating and Sustaining Multicultural Change in Higher Education Organizations (Lacretia Johnson Flash)
ch. 6 Sharing Power and Privilege through the Scholarly Practice of Assessment (Wayne Jacobson)

Part Three: Scholarly Examples of Multicultural Initiatives in Teaching, Higher Education Administration, and Student Affairs Practice (What are examples of the varying types of multicultural initiatives in higher education and student affairs?)
ch. 7 Teaching Contemporary Leadership: Advancing Students’ Capacities to Engage
With Difference (John P. Dugan and Daviree Velázquez)
ch. 8 Aligning Actions With Core Values: Reflections of a Chief Diversity Officer and National Science Foundation ADVANCE Director on Advancing Faculty Diversity (Paulette Granberry Russell and Melissa McDaniels)
ch. 9 Creating Inclusive Organizations: One Student Affairs Division’s Efforts to Create Sustainable, Systemic Change (Kathy Obear and Shelly Kerr)
ch. 10 Dialogue Matters: Applying Critical Race Theory to Conversations About Race (Sherri Edvalson Erkel)
ch. 11 Confronting Systems of Privilege and Power Through Classroom Discussion: Uses of Power (Bridget Turner Kelly and Joy Gaston Gayles)
ch. 12 The Transformational Potential of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs Partnerships for Enacting Multicultural Initiatives (Lucy A. LePeau)

Part Four: Conscious Scholar Practitioners' Reflections on Identity, Power, and Privilege
(How do conscious scholar practitioners face the challenges within the convergence of identity, power, and privilege that are inherent to multicultural initiatives and campus organizational change?)
ch. 13 Politics of Intersecting Identities (John A. Mueller and Craig S. Pickett)
ch. 14 Toxic Environments: Perseverance in the Face of Resistance (Mary F. Howard)
ch. 15 Facing the Proverbial Lion of Racism (Jodi L. Linley and Sherry K. Watt)
ch. 16 The Art of Reflective Teaching (Ellen E. Fairchild)
ch. 17 Daring Greatly: A Reflective Critique of the Authentic, Action-Oriented Framing for Environmental Shifts (AAFES) Method (Tracy Robinson-Wood and Sherry K. Watt)

About the Editor and Contributors
Index
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Why Does College Cost So Much?

Book
Archibald, Robert B.; and Feldman, David H.
2011
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
LB2342.A685 2011
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Much of what is written about colleges and universities ties rapidly rising tuition to dysfunctional behavior in the academy. Common targets of dysfunction include prestige games among universities, gold plated amenities, and bloated administration. This book offers a different view. To explain rising college cost, the authors place the higher education industry firmly within the larger economic history of the United States. The trajectory of college cost is similar to ...
Additional Info:
Much of what is written about colleges and universities ties rapidly rising tuition to dysfunctional behavior in the academy. Common targets of dysfunction include prestige games among universities, gold plated amenities, and bloated administration. This book offers a different view. To explain rising college cost, the authors place the higher education industry firmly within the larger economic history of the United States. The trajectory of college cost is similar to cost behavior in many other industries, and this is no coincidence. Higher education is a personal service that relies on highly educated labor. A technological trio of broad economic forces has come together in the last thirty years to cause higher education costs, and costs in many other industries, to rise much more rapidly than the inflation rate. The main culprit is economic growth itself.

This finding does not mean that all is well in American higher education. A college education has become less reachable to a broad swathe of the American public at the same time that the market demand for highly educated people has soared. This affordability problem has deep roots. The authors explore how cost pressure, the changing wage structure of the US economy, and the complexity of financial aid policy combine to reduce access to higher education below what we need in the 21st century labor market.

This book is a call to calm the rhetoric of blame and to instead find policies that will increase access to higher education while preserving the quality of our colleges and universities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1 - Introduction
ch. 1 The Landscape of the College Cost Debate
ch. 2 Is Higher Education All That Unusual?

Part 2 - Costs
ch. 3 Higher Education is a Service
ch. 4 The Costs of Employing Highly Educated Workers
ch. 5 Cost and Quality in Higher Education
ch. 6 The Bottom Line: Why Does College Cost So Much?
ch. 7 Is Higher Education Increasingly Dysfunctional?
ch. 8 Productivity Growth in Higher Education

Part 3 - Tuition and Fees
ch. 9 Subsidies and Tuition Setting
ch. 10 List-Price Tuition and Institutional Grants
ch. 11 Outside Financial Aid
ch. 12 The College Affordability Crisis

Part 4 - Policy
ch. 13 Federal Policy and College Tuition
ch. 14 Financial Aid Policy
ch. 15 Rewriting the Relationship between States and Their Public Universities
ch. 16 A Few Final Observations

Appendix 1: Data on Costs and Prices
Appendix 2: Granger Causality Tests of the Bennett Hypothesis
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The Graduate School Mess: What Caused It and How We Can Fix It

Book
Cassuto, Leonard
2015
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2371.4.C27 2015
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: It is no secret that American graduate education is in disarray. Graduate students take too long to complete their studies and face a dismal academic job market if they succeed. The Graduate School Mess gets to the root of these problems and offers concrete solutions for revitalizing graduate education in the humanities. Leonard Cassuto, professor and graduate education columnist for The Chronicle of ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: It is no secret that American graduate education is in disarray. Graduate students take too long to complete their studies and face a dismal academic job market if they succeed. The Graduate School Mess gets to the root of these problems and offers concrete solutions for revitalizing graduate education in the humanities. Leonard Cassuto, professor and graduate education columnist for The Chronicle of Higher Education, argues that universities’ heavy emphasis on research comes at the expense of teaching. But teaching is where reforming graduate school must begin.

Cassuto says that graduate education must recover its mission of public service. Professors should revamp the graduate curriculum and broaden its narrow definition of success to allow students to create more fulfilling lives for themselves both inside and outside the academy. Cassuto frames the current situation foremost as a teaching problem: professors rarely prepare graduate students for the demands of the working worlds they will actually join. He gives practical advice about how faculty can teach and advise graduate students by committing to a student-centered approach.

In chapters that follow the career of the graduate student from admissions to the dissertation and placement, Cassuto considers how each stage of graduate education is shaped by unexamined assumptions and ancient prejudices that need to be critically confronted. Written with verve and infused with history, The Graduate School Mess returns our national conversation about graduate study in the humanities to first principles. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: In Search of a Useable Future

ch. 1 Admissions
ch. 2 Classwork: The Graduate Seminar and Beyond
ch. 3 The Comprehensive Exam: Capstone or Cornerstone?
ch. 4 Advising
ch. 5 Degrees
ch. 6 Professionalization
ch. 7 The Job Market Reconceived

Conclusion: In Search of an Ethic
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
Article cover image

"Making the Case for Reforming the U.S. Credentialing System" (pdf)

Article
Lumina Foundation
2015
Lumina Foundation, Indianapolis, IN
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The Lumina Foundation has been at the forefront of increasing the number of adults in higher education fro the past few years. This report discusses the merits and drawbacks of credentialing systems. 
Additional Info:
The Lumina Foundation has been at the forefront of increasing the number of adults in higher education fro the past few years. This report discusses the merits and drawbacks of credentialing systems. 
Web cover image

Competency-Based Education Publications

Web
CAEL
2016
The Council for Adult & Experiential Learning
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
CAEL is a nonprofit that works at all levels within the higher education, public, and private sectors to make it easier for people to get the education and training they need. Competency-Based Education suggests various alternative enrollment, assessment, and credentialing processes. 
Additional Info:
CAEL is a nonprofit that works at all levels within the higher education, public, and private sectors to make it easier for people to get the education and training they need. Competency-Based Education suggests various alternative enrollment, assessment, and credentialing processes. 
Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

The Lives of Campus Custodians Insights into Corporatization and Civic Disengagement in the Academy

Book
Magolda, Peter M.
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB3235.M25 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
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This unique study uncovers the lives and working conditions of a group of individuals who are usually rendered invisible on college campuses--the custodians who daily clean the offices, residence halls, bathrooms and public spaces. In doing so it also reveals universities’ equally invisible practices that frequently contradict their espoused values of inclusion and equity, and their profession that those on the margins are important ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
This unique study uncovers the lives and working conditions of a group of individuals who are usually rendered invisible on college campuses--the custodians who daily clean the offices, residence halls, bathrooms and public spaces. In doing so it also reveals universities’ equally invisible practices that frequently contradict their espoused values of inclusion and equity, and their profession that those on the margins are important members of the campus community.

This vivid ethnography is the fruit of the year’s fieldwork that Peter Magolda’s undertook at two universities. His purpose was to shine a light on a subculture that neither decision-makers nor campus community members know very much about, let alone understand the motivations and aspirations of those who perform this work; and to pose fundamental questions about the moral implications of the corporatization of higher education and its impact on its lowest paid and most vulnerable employees.

Working alongside and learning about the lives of over thirty janitorial staff, Peter Magolda becomes privy to acts of courage, resilience, and inspiration, as well as witness to their work ethic, and to instances of intolerance, inequity, and injustices. We learn the stories of remarkable people, and about their daily concerns, their fears and contributions.

Peter Magolda raises such questions as: Does the academy still believe wisdom is exclusive to particular professions or classes of people? Are universities really inclusive? Is addressing service workers’ concerns part of the mission of higher education? If universities profess to value education, why make it difficult for those on the margins, such as custodians, to “get educated.”

The book concludes with the research participants’ and the author’s reflections about ways that colleges can improve the lives of those whose underpaid and unremarked labor is so essential to the smooth running of their campuses.

Appendices provide information about the research methodology and methods, as well as a discussion of the influence of corporate managerialism on ethnographic research. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Foreword
Preface: “I See You”

Part I: The Research Study, Research Sites and Researcher
ch. 1 You Must Have Done Something Wrong
The Right Kind Of Wrong
What’s Wrong?
Writing Wrongs

ch. 2 Research Sites Insights
Cleaning Insights
Research Sites
Historical And Political Insights
Insights Unseen

ch. 3 Coming Clean—Ethnographic Origins and Milieus
The Subjective “I” And “Eye”
Lessons Learned

Part II: The Custodial Life: Family and Fear
ch. 4 Pathways To A Cleaner [’s] Life
Career Immobility
Upward Mobility
Downward Mobility
The Allure Of Custodial Work On College Campuses
Left Behind And Losing Ground

ch. 5 The Custodian Life
Grime Scenes

ch. 6 The Supervising Life
The Clean Team
The Buffer
Worker-Manager Strife

ch. 7 Fear the Worst
Primal Fear
Fear Factors
Caste-Away Fears

ch. 8 Family Matters
Family Feuds
The Compton University Family
The Harrison University Family
Family Therapy

Part III: Corporate Managerialism and Civic Disengagement
ch. 9 The Corporate Creep
Business As [Un] Usual
How’s Business? Not So Good
Getting Down To Business
A Corporate Managerialism Business Model
Going Out Of Business

ch. 10 Soiled Educational Aspirations and Civic Disengagement
Doing More Harm Than Good
The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly
Too Bad

Part IV Education and Possibilities
ch. 11 The Courage to Be [In Trouble]
Urine Trouble
Trouble Makers
Trouble In Paradise

ch. 12 A Dog’s Life
Having A Dog’s Chance
Teaching Old Dogs New Tricks
Dog-Ma

Epilogue

Compton University Staff Updates
Harrison University Updates
Miami University Updates

Appendix A: Research Methodologies And Methods
Philosophical Foundations
Fieldwork Methods Influences
Writing
Goodness Criteria

Appendix B: Unsanitized Tales From The Field
Omissions Accomplished
Fools Rush In Where Angels Fear to Tread

Conclusion
References
Index
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Reimagining the Academic Library

Book
Lewis, David W.
2016
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
Z675.U5 L42 2016
Topics: Librarians as Teachers   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Academic libraries are in the midst of significant disruption. Academic librarians and university administrators know they need to change, but are not sure how. Bits and pieces of what needs to happen are clear, but the whole picture is hard to grasp.

Reimagining the Academic Library paints a simple straightforward picture of the changes affecting academic libraries and what academic librarians ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Academic libraries are in the midst of significant disruption. Academic librarians and university administrators know they need to change, but are not sure how. Bits and pieces of what needs to happen are clear, but the whole picture is hard to grasp.

Reimagining the Academic Library paints a simple straightforward picture of the changes affecting academic libraries and what academic librarians need to do to respond to the changes would help to guide future library practice. The aim is to explain where academic libraries need to go and how to get there in a book that can be read in a weekend.

David Lewis provides a readable survey of the current state of academic library practice and proposes where academic libraries need to go in the future to provide value to their campuses. His primary focus is on collections as this is the area with the greatest opportunity for change and is the driver of most library cost. Lewis provides an accessible framework for thinking about how library practice needs to adjust in the digital environment.

The book will be useful not only to academic librarians, but also for librarians to share with presidents and provosts who a concise source for understanding where and how to focus their expenditures on libraries. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction: There is a Road

Part One: The Forces We Face
ch. 1 Force One: Disruption
ch. 2 Force Two: Digital Documents
ch. 3 Force Three: The Book is Changing
ch. 4 Force Four: The New Scholarly Record
ch. 5 Force Five: The Economics of Information
ch. 6 Force Six: Demographics
Interlude: A Conjecture on the Nature of Digital Information

Part Two: Steps Down the Road
ch. 7 Step One: Defining the Job
ch. 8 Step Two: Creating the Library as Place
ch. 9 Step Three: Retiring the Legacy Print Collection
ch. 10 Step Four: Preserving Digital Content
ch. 11 Step Five: Making the Money Work
ch. 12 Step Six: Working with the Smart Machine

Conclusion: Ten Things to Do Now
Bibliography
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Organizing Academic Work in Higher Education Teaching, learning and identities

Book
Leišytė, Liudvika; and Wilkesmann, Uwe, eds.
2016
LB2341.O835 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Organizing Academic Work in Higher Education explores how managers influence teaching, learning and academic identities and how new initiatives in teaching and learning change the organizational structure of universities. By building on organizational studies and higher education studies literatures, Organizing Academic Work in Higher Education offers a unique perspective, presenting empirical evidence from different parts of the world. This edited collection provides a conceptual ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Organizing Academic Work in Higher Education explores how managers influence teaching, learning and academic identities and how new initiatives in teaching and learning change the organizational structure of universities. By building on organizational studies and higher education studies literatures, Organizing Academic Work in Higher Education offers a unique perspective, presenting empirical evidence from different parts of the world. This edited collection provides a conceptual frame of organizational change in universities in the context of New Public Management reforms and links it to the core activities of teaching and learning.

Split into four main sections:

- University from the organizational perspective,
- Organizing teaching,
- Organizing learning and
- Organizing identities,

this book uses a strong international perspective to provide insights from three continents regarding the major differences in the relationships between the university as an organization and academics.

It contains highly pertinent, scientifically driven case studies on the role and boundaries of managerial behaviour in universities. It supplies evidence-based knowledge on the effectiveness of management behaviour and tools to university managers and higher education policy-makers worldwide. Academics who aspire to institutionalize their successful academic practices in certain university structures will find this book of particular value.

Organizing Academic Work in Higher Education will be a vital companion for academic interest in higher education management, transformation of universities, teaching, learning, academic work and identities. Bringing together the study of the organizational transformation in higher education with the study of teaching, learning and academic identity, Organizing Academic Work in Higher Education presents a unique cross-national and cross-regional comparative perspective. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Contributors
Series editors’ instruction (David Palfreyman, Ted Tapper, and Scott L. Thomas)
Organizing academic work in higher education: teaching, learning, and identities - an introduction (Liudvika Leisyte and Uwe Wilkesmann)

Part 1 - University From the Organizational Perspective
ch. 1 Universities, teaching, and learning (Jay R. Dee)
ch. 2 Teaching matters, too: Different ways of governing a disregarded institution(Uwe Wilkesmann)
ch. 3 Bridging the duality between universities and the academic profession: A tale of protected spaces, strategic gaming and institutional entrepreneurs (Liudvika Leisyte)
ch. 4 Organizing and managing university education (Hamish Coates and Emmaline Bexley)

Part 2 - Organizing Teaching
ch. 5 Toward a conceptualization of faculty decision-making about curricular and instructional change (Lisa R. Lattice and Jennifer R. Pollard)
ch. 6 Institutional (teaching) entrepreneurs wanted! - Considerations on the professoriate’s potency to enhance academic teaching in Germany (Christian J. Schmid and Sabine Lauer)
ch. 7 Organizing teaching in Chinese universities (Shuangye Chen)

Part 3 - Organizing learning
ch. 8 Learners and Organizations: competing patterns of risk, trust and responsibility (Ray Land)
ch. 9 Organizing teaching in project teacher teams across established disciplines using wearable technology – Digital Didactical Designing a new form of practice (Isa Jahnke, Eva Marell-Olsson and Thomas Mejtoff)
ch. 10 Changing organizational structure and culture to enhance teaching and learning: Cases in a university in Hong Kong (Samuel K. W. Chu and Sanny S. W. Mok)

Part 4. Organizing identities
ch. 11 Multiversities and academic identities: change, continuities and complexities (Mary Henkel)
ch. 12 Boundary crossing and maintenance among UK and Dutch bioscientists: Toward hybrid identities of academic entrepreneurs (Liudvika Leisyte and Bengu Hosch-Dayican)
ch. 13 University academic promotion system and academic identity: An institutional logics perspective (Yuzhuo Cai and Gaoming Zheng)

Conclusion (Rosemary Deem)
Index
Cover image

The Power of Integrated Learning: Higher Education for Success in Life, Work, and Society

Book
Sullivan, William
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2331.5.S85 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

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Students and their parents wonder if college is worth the investment. Employers want graduates with the skills they need. The public wonders if higher education is preparing future generations for an era of dynamic change.

In his latest book, William Sullivan offers a model of higher education that answers all these questions in the affirmative, through the power of integrated learning. Drawing ...
Additional Info:
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Students and their parents wonder if college is worth the investment. Employers want graduates with the skills they need. The public wonders if higher education is preparing future generations for an era of dynamic change.

In his latest book, William Sullivan offers a model of higher education that answers all these questions in the affirmative, through the power of integrated learning. Drawing on examples from the 25 members of the New American Colleges & Universities (NAC&U) consortium, the book makes the case for an approach that combines the strengths of the liberal arts, professional studies, and civic responsibility in order to give students the combination of skills and experience that will prepare them for success in all aspects of life after graduation.

NAC&U campuses place emphasis upon enabling their students to know themselves and their abilities, as well as providing them with opportunities to develop a sophisticated understanding of the world. To achieve these goals, the academic programs focus on developing students’ intellectual and practical skills, such as analytical ability, problem solving, facility in written and spoken communication, and an appreciation for human diversity and creativity. These have traditionally been identified as the goals of a liberal arts education, and are the same ones identified in a national employer survey as giving job-seekers an edge.

These institutions also invest a great deal of effort to provide their students with state-of-the-art preparation for professional life and occupational success in diverse fields. These range from the technical – science and technology fields, with disciplines such as engineering and computer science – through business, and across the human service fields, such as education, nursing, pre-medicine, and pre-law, to architecture, and the performing and visual arts. In these courses of study, students begin to shape their future careers.

The important third value of a NAC&U education is fostering civic responsibility among students. In programs of study abroad and a range of internship and service opportunities, these colleges support their students in shaping for themselves unique and effective ways to contribute to the larger life of their world.

Parents and prospective students may appreciate the chance to learn more about these schools and what they have to offer, while those working in higher education will appreciate the chance to learn more about a model that their own institutions may be motivated to emulate. All readers will take away a picture of a truly vital part of the higher education landscape in this country. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The New American Colleges and Universities Experience: Integrating Liberal Arts, Professional Studies, and Civic Responsibility
ch. 2 Only Connect
ch. 3 Finding Yourself
ch. 4 Becoming a Citizen and Engaging the World
ch. 5 After the Bachelor’s Degree: Graduate Programs and Civic Professionalism

Conclusion
Appendix A: Campus Profiles
Appendix B: Graduate Programs Offered by New American Colleges and Universities Members
Bibliography
About the Author
Index
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Making Sense of Teaching in Difficult Times

Book
Burke, Penny Jane and Shay, Suellen, eds.
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2331.M35 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

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Abstract:Thinking about teaching in educational terms has become increasingly difficult because of the conceptions of higher education that predominate in both policy and public debate. Framing the benefits of higher education simply as an economic good poses particular difficulties for making educational sense of teaching. Moreover, the assumptions about social mobility, usefulness, and the economic advantages of higher education, upon which these conceptions ...
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Abstract:Thinking about teaching in educational terms has become increasingly difficult because of the conceptions of higher education that predominate in both policy and public debate. Framing the benefits of higher education simply as an economic good poses particular difficulties for making educational sense of teaching. Moreover, the assumptions about social mobility, usefulness, and the economic advantages of higher education, upon which these conceptions are based, can no longer be taken for granted.

The chapters in this book all wrestle with understandings of education and teaching experiences in changing global, national, and institutional contexts. They explore questions of difference and privilege, the social transformation of teaching through transforming teachers, contestations of global citizenship and interculturality, learning and sensibilities of self-in-the-world, the relationship between programme content and student decision-making, divergent conceptions of learning in international education, and subject-centred approaches to embodied teaching. The book considers the value of disciplinary tools of analysis in addressing contextual challenges in developing societies, connections between pedagogies, autonomy and intercultural classrooms, and ways of countering the marketization of higher education through online teaching communities. This book was originally published as a special issue of Teaching in Higher Education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Citation Information
Notes on Contributors

ch. 1 Difficult times for college students of color: teaching white students about White Privilege provides hope for change (Su L. Boatright-Horowitz, Savannah Frazier, Yvette Harps-Logan and Nathanial Crockett)
ch. 2 Teacher as learner: a personal reflection on a short course for South African university educators (Lindsay Clowes)
ch. 3 Global citizenship, sojourning students and campus communities (David Killick)
ch. 4 Strategies for critiquing global citizenry: undergraduate research as a possible vehicle (Juliet Henderson)
ch. 5 Interdisciplinary content, contestations of knowledge and informational transparency in engineering curriculum (Sarah Barnard, Tarek Hassan, Andrew Dainty and Barbara Bagilhole)
ch. 6 Chinese students making sense of problem-based learning and Western teaching – pitfalls and coping strategies (Malene Gram, Kirsten Jæger, Junyang Liu, Li Qing and Xiangying Wu)
ch. 7 Reframing teaching relationships: from student-centred to subject-centred learning (Julia Hobson and Angus Morrison-Saunders)
ch. 8 A heuristic for analysing and teaching literature dealing with the challenges of social justice (Priya Narismulu)
ch. 9 The influence of internationalisation and national identity on teaching and assessments in higher education (Jane Vinther and Gordon Slethaug)
ch. 10 Online teaching communities within sociology: a counter trend to the marketization of higher education (Nathan Palmer and April M. Schueths)

Index
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Multiculturalism on Campus: Theory, Models, and Practices for Understanding Diversity and Creating Inclusion, 2nd Edition

Book
Cuyjet, Michael J.; Linder, Chris; Howard-Hamilton, Mary F.; and Cooper, Diane L.
2016
LC1099.3.M87 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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The first edition of this book constituted a comprehensive resource for students of higher education, faculty, higher education administrators and student affairs leaders engaging with multiculturalism and diverse populations on college campuses. It was one of the first texts to gather in a single volume the related theories, assessment methods, and environmental and application issues pertinent to the study and practice of multiculturalism, while ...
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The first edition of this book constituted a comprehensive resource for students of higher education, faculty, higher education administrators and student affairs leaders engaging with multiculturalism and diverse populations on college campuses. It was one of the first texts to gather in a single volume the related theories, assessment methods, and environmental and application issues pertinent to the study and practice of multiculturalism, while also offering approaches to enhancing multicultural programming and culturally diverse campus environments.

This second edition retains the structure and vision of the first, introducing readers to the key theories and models for understanding the complexity of the students they serve, and for reflecting on their own values and motivations. It provides an array of case studies, discussion questions, examples of best practice, and recommendations about resources for use in the classroom.

This edition includes a new chapter on intersectionality; updates several chapters, presents a number of new cultural frameworks and updated best practices for creating an inclusive environment for marginalized groups, and expands the third section of the book on cultural competent practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Michael J. Cuyjet)

Part One: Awareness of Cultural Issues
ch. 1 Understanding Multiculturalism and Multicultural Competence Among College Students (Mary F. Howard-Hamilton, Michael J. Cuyjet, and Diane L. Cooper)
ch. 2 Oppression and Its Effect on College Student Identity Development (Mary F. Howard-Hamilton and Kandace G. Hinton)
ch. 3 Environmental Influences on College Culture (Michael J. Cuyjet and Jason L. Meriwether)
ch. 4 An Intersectional Approach to Supporting College Students (Chris Linder)

Part Two: Information on Cultural Populations
ch. 5 Latinx College Students (Susana Hernández and Anna M. Ortiz)
ch. 6 Asian American and Pacific Islander Students (Julie J. Park and OiYan A. Poon)
ch. 7 African American College Students (Bettina C. Shuford and Lamont A. Flowers)
ch. 8 Native America College Students (LeManuel Bitsóí (Navajo)
ch. 9 Biracial and Multiracial College Students (Kristen A. Renn and Marc P. Johnston-Guerrero)
ch. 10 Working With White College Students to Understand and Navigate White Racial Identities (Chris Linder)
ch. 11 International College Students (Sevan G. Terzian and Leigh Ann Osborne)
ch. 12 Men and Women College Students (Merrily Dunn and Philip D. Badaszewski)
ch. 13 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender College Students (Dena R. Kniess, Tony W. Cawthon, and Kristin M. Walker)
ch. 14 Adult College Students- (Fiona J. D. MacKinnon and Rosiline D. Floyd)
ch. 15 College Students With Disabilities (Martha E. Wisbey and Karen S. Kalivoda)
ch. 16 Religious and Spiritual Diversity Among College Students (Laura A. Dean and Darris R. Means)

Part Three: Critical Consciousness of Cultural Competence
ch. 17 From Cultural Competence to Critical Consciousness: Creating Inclusive Campus Environments (Chris Linder and Diane L. Cooper)

Contributors
Index
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Transforming Understandings of Diversity in Higher Education: Demography, Democracy, and Discourse

Book
Pasque, Penny A.; Ortega, Noe; Burkhardt, John C.; Ting, and Marie P., eds.
2016
LC1099.3.T725 2016
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: This exciting new text examines one of the most important and yet elusive terms in higher education and society: What do we mean when we talk in a serious way about “diversity”?

A distinguished group of diversity scholars explore the latest discourse on diversity and how it is reflected in research and practice. The chapters trace how the discourse on diversity ...
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Abstract: This exciting new text examines one of the most important and yet elusive terms in higher education and society: What do we mean when we talk in a serious way about “diversity”?

A distinguished group of diversity scholars explore the latest discourse on diversity and how it is reflected in research and practice. The chapters trace how the discourse on diversity is newly shaped after many of the 20th century concepts of race, ethnicity, gender and class have lost authority. In the academic disciplines and in public discourse, perspectives about diversity have been rapidly shifting in recent years. This is especially true in the United States where demographic changes and political attitudes have prompted new observations - some which will clash with traditional frameworks.

This text brings together scholars whose research has opened up new ways to understand the complexities of diversity in higher education. Because the essential topic under consideration is changing so quickly, the editors of this volume also have asked the contributors to reflect on the paths their own scholarship has taken in their careers, and to see how they would relate their current conceptualization of diversity to one or more of three identified themes (demography, democracy and discourse). Each chapter ends with a candid graduate student interview of the author that provides an engaged picture of how the authors wrestle with one of the most complicated topics shaping them (and all of us) as individuals and as scholars. Of interest to anyone who is following the debates about diversity issues on our campuses, the book also offers a wonderful introduction to graduate students entering a discipline where critically important ideas are still very much alive for discussion. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Phillip J. Bowman)
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Transforming Understandings of Diversity in Higher Education: History and Context (John C. Burkhardt, Christina Morton, Marie P. Ting, Penny A. Pasque, and Noe Ortega)

ch. 1 Color-Blind Ideology and the Disconnected Power-Analysis Frame Considerations for Historically Black Colleges and Universities’ Diversification (Uma M. Jayakumar and Annie S. Adamian)
ch. 2 An Interview With Uma M. Jayakumar: Social Agency and the Power of Resistance (Diane M. Back)
ch. 3 A Theory of Equity: A Social and Legal Analysis of College Access for Low-Income Students (Jarrett T. Gupton and Karen Miksch)
ch. 4 An Interview With Jarrett T. Gupton: The Value of Uncertainty and the Need for Nuance (Sheela Linstrum)
ch. 5 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Students on Campus: Fostering Inclusion Through Research, Policy, and Practice (Michael R. Woodford, Jessica Joslin, and Kristen A. Renn)
ch. 6 An Interview With Michael R. Woodford: Bringing Invisible Communities to Light: Disciplinary Norms, Collaboration and the Quest for Legitimacy (Timothy Hickey-LeClair)
ch. 7 Racially and Socioeconomically Diverse Students’ Pathways to College: An Exploration of Latin@ Students (Angela M. Locks, Dawn Person, Michelle Cuellar, Jeanette Maduena, and Melba Schneider Castro)
ch. 8 An Interview With Angela M. Locks: Understanding the Complexities of the College-Going Process (James M. Ellis)
ch. 9 Architecture of Diversity: Using the Lens and Language of Space to Examine Racialized Experiences of Students of Color on College Campuses (Michelle Samura)
ch. 10 An Interview With Michelle Samura: How the “Blue Wall” Changes Our Discourses on Race in Higher Education: Stepping Out of the Comfort Zone and Seeing Things in a Different Light (Jimin Kwon)
ch. 11 Including Disability in the Discourse: Extending and Advancing the Defi nition of Diversity in Higher Education (Allison Lombardi and Adam Lalor)
ch. 12 An Interview With Allison Lombardi: Including Disability in the Discourse (Lloyd Edward Shelton)
ch. 13 The Impact of Media Imagery on Academic Identity Development for Black Male Student Athletes (LaVar J. Charleston and Jerlando F. L. Jackson)
ch. 14 An Interview With Jerlando F. L. Jackson: An Instrumental Diversity Researcher (Carly Wegner)
ch. 15 Racialized and Gendered Experiences of African American Female Faculty at Public Community Colleges (Tamara Nichele Stevenson and Eboni M. Zamani-Gallaher)
ch. 16 An Interview With Tamara Nichele Stevenson, Surviving Racial Battle Fatigue: Cultivating Safe Spaces in Radicalized Environments (Tonya Kneff)
ch. 17 Unpacking the Mandate Rhetoric of Historically Black Colleges and Universities’ Diversity Discourses (Courtney Carter)
ch. 18 An Interview With Courtney Carter: Unpacking the Mandate Rhetoric of Historically Black Colleges and Universities’ Diversity Discourses (Demar F. Lewis IV)
ch. 19 Transforming Demography, Democracy, and Discourse Through Diversity in Education and Society (John C. Burkhardt and Marie P. Ting)

Contributors
Index
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Well-Being and Higher Education: A Strategy for Change and the Realization of Education's Greater Purposes

Book
Harward, Donald W., ed.
2016
Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C.
LA229W44.2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia   |   Changes in Higher Education

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The newest release from Bringing Theory to Practice, Well-Being and Higher Education, explores the multiple connections of well-being to higher education and why those connections matter—for the individual lives of students and those who teach; for the institution; and for whether or not the unique promise of higher education to a democratic society can be advanced and realized.

The publication’s ...
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The newest release from Bringing Theory to Practice, Well-Being and Higher Education, explores the multiple connections of well-being to higher education and why those connections matter—for the individual lives of students and those who teach; for the institution; and for whether or not the unique promise of higher education to a democratic society can be advanced and realized.

The publication’s thirty-five original essays and provocations—by some of the most highly respected voices within and beyond the academy—address the theoretical underpinnings and practical expressions of these connections. Articles include “Higher Education, the Struggle for Democracy, and the Possibility of Classroom Grace”; “Why Well-Being is Fundamental to Liberal Learning”; “Honoring the Humanity of Our Students”; “Thriving: Expanding the Goal of Higher Education”; and “College Makes Me Feel Dangerous: On Well-Being and Nontraditional Students.”

Well-Being and Higher Education opens the discussion on learning’s connection to well-being; responds to current challenges against the state of higher education today; and brings to the forefront a conversation considering the greater purposes of higher education and the need to preserve and revive the institution’s role to look beyond itself to a greater good. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Preface
Foreword
Introduction

PART 1: Analysis and Meaning
Essays
ch. 1 Measuring and Improving the Effect of Higher Education on Subjective Well-Being (John Bronsteen)
ch. 2 Eudaimonic Well-being and Education: Probing the Connections (Carol D. Ryff)
ch. 3 Higher Education and Education in Virtue (Barry Schwartz)
ch. 4 Higher Education, the Struggle for Democracy, and the Possibility of Classroom Grace (Henry Giroux)

Provocations
ch. 5 Against the Culture of Acquiescence: Why Students Need Liberal Learning for their own Well-Being as well as the Well-Being of Society (William M. Sullivan)
ch. 6 Is Well-Being an Individual Matter? (Kazi Joshua)
ch. 7 Understanding the Complexities of Well-Being (Elizabeth Minnich)
ch. 8 The University as the Common Enemy of Opposing Views of Well-Being (Jerzy Axer)
ch. 9 Education for Well-Being (Todd Gitlin)
ch. 10 Why Well-being is Fundamental to Liberal Learning (Alexander Astin)

PART 2: Manifestation and Implementation
Essays
ch. 11 Why Flourishing? (Corey Keyes)
ch. 12 College Makes Me Feel Dangerous: On Well-Being and Nontraditional Students (David Scobey)
ch. 13 What Constitutes Indices of Well-Being Among College Students? (Sara E. Dahill-Brown & Eranda Jayawickreme)
ch. 14 Thriving: Expanding the Goal of Higher Education (Laurie Schreiner)
ch. 15 Well-Being and Student Persistence: Reframing Student Success (Tricia Seifert)
ch. 16 What Does Doing Good Mean? Well-Being and the Civic Purpose of Higher Education (Andrew Seligsohn)

Provocations
ch. 17 Student Well-Being as a Function of Identity Development (Elsa M. Núñez)
ch. 18 Student Narratives and Well-Being (Thia Wolf & Amalia Rodas)
ch. 19 Well-Being and Agency: Political Education in a Time of Crisis (Brian Murphy)
ch. 20 Spirit, Truth, and The Bright Colors of Books: Institutional Well-Being and Productive Disorder at a Black Women’s College (Mona Taylor Phillips)

PART 3: Facilitation: Curricular, Pedagogic and Across Boundaries
Essays
ch. 21 The Well-Being University (Nance Lucas & Paul Rogers)
ch. 22 Curricular Infusion of Well-Being and Science (Heidi G. Elmendorf & Joan B. Riley)
ch. 23 Bringing Together the Humanities and the Science of Well-Being to Advance Human Flourishing (James O. Pawelski)
ch. 24 Honoring the Humanity of Our Students (David Schoem)

Provocations
ch. 25 Well-Being and Being Safe: Do Guns Change Social Interactions? A Missouri Case Study (Jonathan M. Metzl)
ch. 26 Well-Being and the Community College Mission (Amanda Hyberger)
ch. 27 The Morehouse Mystique and the Collective Well-being Imperative (John Silvanus Wilson, Jr.)
ch. 28 Mobilizing Campus Communities for Well-Being (Theodore Long)
ch. 29 Why Institutional Commitment to Well-Being Bridges the Academic and Student Affairs Divide (Kevin Kruger & Stephanie A. Gordon)
ch. 30 Distilling Career Advice from the Happiness Literature (Robert H. Frank)

PART 4: The Logic of Change: Why, What, and How?
Essays
ch. 31 Institutional Transformation in the Service of Well-being: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (Eric Lister)
ch. 32 Reinventing Higher Education for the 21st Century (Peter Leyden)
ch. 33 Transforming Learning: The LEAP Challenge and the Well-Being of Students (Carol Schneider)

Provocations
ch. 34 Well-being, Disintegration and the Rebundling of Higher Education (Randy Bass)

Contributors
About Bringing Theory to Practice
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Diversity's Promise for Higher Education: Making It Work, 2nd Edition

Book
Smith, Daryl G.
2015
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LC3727.S65 2015
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Daryl G. Smith has devoted her career to studying and fostering diversity in higher education. She has witnessed and encouraged the evolution of diversity from an issue addressed sporadically on college campuses to a reality of the modern university experience. In Diversity’s Promise for Higher Education, Smith brings together scholarly and field research relevant to the next generation of diversity work. The book argues that achieving excellence in a ...
Additional Info:
Daryl G. Smith has devoted her career to studying and fostering diversity in higher education. She has witnessed and encouraged the evolution of diversity from an issue addressed sporadically on college campuses to a reality of the modern university experience. In Diversity’s Promise for Higher Education, Smith brings together scholarly and field research relevant to the next generation of diversity work. The book argues that achieving excellence in a diverse society requires increasing the institutional capacity for diversity while simultaneously working to understand how diversity is tied to better leadership, positive change, research in virtually every field, student success, accountability, and more equitable hiring practices.

To become more relevant to society, the nation, and the world while remaining true to their core missions, colleges and universities must continue to see diversity—like technology—as central, not parallel, to their work. In Diversity’s Promise for Higher Education, Smith proposes a set of clear and realistic practices that will help colleges and universities locate diversity as a strategic imperative and pursue diversity efforts that are inclusive of the varied—and growing—issues apparent on campuses without losing focus on the critical unfinished business of the past.

In this edition, which is aimed at administrators, faculty, researchers, and students of higher education, Smith emphasizes a transdisciplinary approach to the topic of diversity, drawing on an updated list of sources from a wealth of literatures and fields. The tables have been refreshed to include data on faculty diversity over a twenty-year period and the book includes new information about gender identity, stereotype threat, student success, the growing role of chief diversity officers, the international emergence of diversity issues, faculty hiring, and implicit bias. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I The Diversity Imperative
ch. 1 The National and Global Context for Diversity in Higher Education
ch. 2 The Role of Identity in Diversity

Part II Reframing Diversity
ch. 3 A Diversity Framework for Higher Education
ch. 4 The Past Fifty Years

Part III Building Capacity by Interrupting the Usual
ch. 5 Identifying and Retaining Talent
ch. 6 Working with and across Differences
ch. 7 Student Learning and Success

Part IV What Will It Take?
ch. 8 Monitoring Progress on Diversity
ch. 9 Making Diversity Work

References
Index
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Start Talking: A Handbook for Engaging Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education

Book
Landis, Kay; Jenkins, Patricia; and Roderick, Libby
2008
University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK
LB2331.S73 2008
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

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The University of Alaska Anchorage and Alaska Pacific University created Start Talking: A Handbook for Engaging Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education, a field manual for professors who wish to engage their students more effectively in conversations about the most important issues of our time. The book addresses themes of academic freedom; classroom safety; rhetoric and debate; race, class and culture; science and religion; and ...
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The University of Alaska Anchorage and Alaska Pacific University created Start Talking: A Handbook for Engaging Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education, a field manual for professors who wish to engage their students more effectively in conversations about the most important issues of our time. The book addresses themes of academic freedom; classroom safety; rhetoric and debate; race, class and culture; science and religion; and business, politics and social justice. For information about the project, including faculty intensives on difficult dialogues and indigenous ways of teaching and learning, see UAA Initiatives. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Who We Are

ch. 1 Ground Rules
ch. 2 Rhetoric, Debate
ch. 3 Race, Class, Culture
ch. 4 Science, Religion
ch. 5 Business, Politics, Social Justice
ch. 6 Outcomes
ch. 7 Keep Talking

References
Index of Contributors Index of Techniques
Cover image

Stop Talking: Indigenous Ways of Teaching and Learning and Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education

Book
Merculieff, Ilarion and Roderick, Libby
2013
University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK
LB2331.M47 2013
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

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For 10,000 years, Alaska’s Native peoples have survived and thrived in some of the harshest conditions in the world. During that time, they perfected teaching and learning practices that ensured the survival of their communities and the wellbeing of their natural environments. Those ancient practices offer fresh insights for educators who care about the state of our world and seek ways to make education ...
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For 10,000 years, Alaska’s Native peoples have survived and thrived in some of the harshest conditions in the world. During that time, they perfected teaching and learning practices that ensured the survival of their communities and the wellbeing of their natural environments. Those ancient practices offer fresh insights for educators who care about the state of our world and seek ways to make education more relevant and engaging.

This book describes a unique higher education project that broke some difficult silences between academic and Native communities by introducing a small group of non-Native faculty members to traditional Alaska Native ways of teaching and learning. It presents a model for a Native-designed and run faculty development intensive, strategies for applying indigenous pedagogies in western learning environments, reflection on education by Alaska Native Elders, and reports from participants on what they learned and what they tried in their classrooms. It is intended to stimulate discussion and reflection about best practices in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Foreword
Who we are

ch. 1 Ground Rules
ch. 2 Indigenizing Education
ch. 3 Difficult Dialogues
ch. 4 One Day with Elders on the Land
ch. 5 Into Our Classrooms
ch. 6 Assessment
ch. 7 Pausing for Reflection

References and Recommended Reading
TTR cover image

Sexual Violence in and around the Classroom

TTR
Raybill, Rhiannon; Minister, Meredith; and Lawrence, Beatrice
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 1 (2017): 70-88
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 1
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Sexual violence on campus is a major issue facing students, faculty, and administrators, and institutions of higher education are struggling to respond. This forum brings together three responses to the problem, with a focus on the religious studies classroom. The responses move from the institution to the faculty to the classroom, exploring three separate but linked spaces for responding to sexual violence. The first contribution (Graybill) critiques common institutional responses ...
Additional Info:
Sexual violence on campus is a major issue facing students, faculty, and administrators, and institutions of higher education are struggling to respond. This forum brings together three responses to the problem, with a focus on the religious studies classroom. The responses move from the institution to the faculty to the classroom, exploring three separate but linked spaces for responding to sexual violence. The first contribution (Graybill) critiques common institutional responses to sexual violence. The second contribution (Minister) advocates for long-term, classroom-based responses to sexual violence and describes a faculty/staff workshop response. The third contribution (Lawrence) emphasizes the classroom, examining the issues that arise when perpetrators of sexual assault are part of the student body. Read together, the pieces offer a comprehensive view of the complicated intersections of sexual violence, the university, and pedagogical issues in religious studies.
Cover image

Contemplative Studies in Higher Education

Book
Sanders, Linda A., ed.
2013
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 134)
LB2361.C59 2013
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The complexities of 21st-century life- personal, social, cultural, and environmental - demand thoughtful responses, responses fostered and enhanced through contemplative experience. Contemplative education includes studies of the history, psychology, and socialcultural context of such experience, as well as the development of experiential knowledge through one or more personal practices.

Contemplative education has recently emerged in the academy. Although there has been significant published discussion of postsecondary courses and ...
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The complexities of 21st-century life- personal, social, cultural, and environmental - demand thoughtful responses, responses fostered and enhanced through contemplative experience. Contemplative education includes studies of the history, psychology, and socialcultural context of such experience, as well as the development of experiential knowledge through one or more personal practices.

Contemplative education has recently emerged in the academy. Although there has been significant published discussion of postsecondary courses and programs that incorporate contemplative views and practices, there have been few studies of relevant curricula and pedagogy. This volume integrates research, theory, and practice through a fusion of perspectives and approaches, giving readers the opportunity to review contemplative educational concepts and applications in academic, social, and institutional domains.

This is the 134th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. New Directions for Teaching and Learning offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Linda A. Sanders)

ch. 1 Peak Oil, Peak Water, Peak Education (Thomas B. Coburn)
This chapter introduces contemplative education as a way of teaching and learning that is meaningful, relevant, and critical to the evolution of the 21st century academy. The essay also offers guidelines for contemplative practice in face-to-face and online class environments.

ch. 2 Contemplative Science: An Insider Prospectus (Willoughby B. Britton, Anne-Catharine Brown, Christopher T. Kaplan, Roberta E. Goldman, Marie DeLuca, Rahil Rojiani, Harry Reis, Mandy Xi, Jonathan C. Chou, Faye McKenna, Peter Hitchcock, Tomas A. Rocha, Josh Himmelfarb, David M. Margolis, Halsey F. Niles, Allison M. Eckert, Tana Frank)
Seventeen members of the Contemplative Studies Research Lab from Brown University envision a new kind of science that includes collaborative research and the integration of contemplative studies into scientific training. The chapter includes comprehensive discussion about the long-term consequences of contemplative pedagogies for the fields of science and medicine.

ch. 3 Contemplative Practices and the Renewal of Legal Education (Rhonda V. Magee)
This chapter discusses the contemplative law movement and its influence on the development of new courses and cocurricular sessions at the University of San Francisco School of Law and other law school programs. The contemplative approach to law is also presented as transformative and inclusive epistemology and methodology in response to multiple critiques that call for change in legal education.

ch. 4 Birthing Internal Images: Employing the Cajita Project as a Contemplative Activity in a College Classroom (Vijay Kanagala, Laura I. Rendón)
This chapter provides a step-by-step description of planning and implementing the cajita project, a contemplative exercise, designed to facilitate self-refl exivity, as well as personal and social responsibility in graduate students majoring in higher education leadership and student affairs at the University of Texas–San Antonio. The chapter also explains the cultural and pedagogical origins of the cajita project.

ch. 5 Integrating Contemplative Education and Contemporary Performance (Linda A. Sanders)
In this chapter, faculty and students characterize contemplative education, and students disclose their perspectives of how contemplative view and practice affect their personal and professional development in a graduate, interdisciplinary performing arts community. At Naropa University, traditional contemplative education is integrated with conservatory-level, contemporary performance training in its Master of Fine Arts in Theater: Contemporary Performance program.

ch. 6 The Formation and Development of the Mindful Campus (Margaret A. DuFon, Jennifer Christian)
This chapter recounts the efforts of faculty and students to cultivate contemplative pedagogies and mindfulness through curricular initiatives and extracurricular programs at California State University– Chico. The authors describe their campuswide programmatic and promotional work that captures the attention, support, and involvement of the greater Chico community.

ch. 7 Koru: Teaching Mindfulness to Emerging Adults(Holly B. Rogers)
This chapter reviews the developmental features of emerging adulthood and explores the ways in which mindfulness is a useful developmental aid for this age group. The specifi c strategies employed in Koru, a program designed at Duke University to make mindfulness accessible to college students, are described. Student responses to Koru are also briefly discussed.

ch. 8 Contemplative Pedagogy: A Quiet Revolution in Higher Education (Arthur Zajonc)
A contemplative pedagogy movement is quietly emerging around the world. This chapter offers a brief history of the movement, which has occurred during the last fi fteen years throughout postsecondary campuses, and describes the contemplative practices of mindfulness, concentration, open awareness, and sustaining contradictions. The author also voices such larger hopes for higher education as the cessation of ignorance and an “epistemology of love” and suggests that contemplative pedagogy can cultivate and form the capacities that are required for integrative, transformative teaching and learning in the 21st century academy.

Index
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Envisioning the Faculty for the Twenty-First Century: Moving to a Mission-Oriented and Learner-Centered Model

Book
Kezar, Andrianna; Masey, Daniel; eds.
2016
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
LB2335.7.E68 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

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The institution of tenure—once a cornerstone of American colleges and universities—is rapidly eroding. Today, the majority of faculty positions are part-time or limited-term appointments, a radical change that has resulted more from circumstance than from thoughtful planning. As colleges and universities evolve to meet the changing demands of society, how might their leaders design viable alternative faculty models for the future?
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The institution of tenure—once a cornerstone of American colleges and universities—is rapidly eroding. Today, the majority of faculty positions are part-time or limited-term appointments, a radical change that has resulted more from circumstance than from thoughtful planning. As colleges and universities evolve to meet the changing demands of society, how might their leaders design viable alternative faculty models for the future?

Envisioning the Faculty for the Twenty-First Century weighs the concerns of university administrators, professors, adjuncts, and students in order to critically assess emerging faculty models and offer informed policy recommendations. Cognizant of the financial pressures that have led many universities to favor short-term faculty contracts, higher education experts Adrianna Kezar and Daniel Maxey assemble a top-notch roster of contributors to investigate whether there are ways to modify the existing system or promote new faculty models. They suggest how colleges and universities might rethink their procedures for faculty development, hiring, scheduling, and evaluation in order to maintain a campus environment that still fosters faculty service and student-centered learning.

Even as it asks urgent questions about how to retain the best elements of American higher education, Envisioning the Faculty for the Twenty-First Century also examines the opportunities that systemic changes might create. Ultimately, it provides some starting points for how colleges and universities might best respond to the rapidly evolving needs of an increasingly global society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I - The Context for a New Faculty Model
ch. 1 The Current Context for Faculty Work in Higher Education: Understanding the Forces Affecting Higher Education and the Changing Faculty (Daniel Maxey and Adrianna Kezar)
ch. 2 Recognizing the Need for a New Faculty Model (Adrianna Kezar and Daniel Maxey)

Part II - Ideas for a New Faculty
ch. 3 An Emerging Consensus about New Faculty Roles: Results of a National Study of Higher Education Stakeholders (Adrianna Kezar, Elizabeth Holcombe, and Daniel Maxey)
ch. 4 Core Principles for Faculty Models and the Importance of Community (Ann E. Austin and Andrea G. Trice)
ch. 5 The Anatomy and Physiology of Medical School Faculty Career Models (William T. Mallon)
ch. 6 Students Speak About Faculty: What Students Need, What They Want, and What Helps Them Succeed (Arleen Arnsparger and Joanna Drivalas)
ch. 7 Faculty as Learners: The New Faculty Role through the Lens of Faculty Development (Malcolm Brown)
ch. 8 More Than a Zero-Sum Game: Shared Work Agreements (KerryAnn O’Meara and Lauren DeCrosta)
ch. 9 New Paradigm for Faculty Work and Evaluation (Richard Alan Gillman, Nancy Hensel, and David A. Salomon)
ch. 10 Internationalization and Faculty Work (William Plater)
ch. 11 The Future of Faculty Work: Academic Freedom and Democratic Engagement (R. Eugene Rice)
ch. 12 Distinctive Aspirations and Inclinations among Emerging and Early Career Faculty: Seeing the Possibilities (Leslie Gonzalez and Aimee LaPointe Terosky)
ch. 13 Resonant Themes for a Professoriate Reconsidered: Consensus Points to Organize Efforts toward Change (Adrianna Kezar and Daniel Maxey)

About the Contributors
Index
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Transforming the Academy: Faculty Perspectives on Diversity and Pedagogy

Book
Willie-LeBreton, Sarah, ed.
2016
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
LB2331.T727 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

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In recent decades, American universities have begun to tout the “diversity” of their faculty and student bodies. But what kinds of diversity are being championed in their admissions and hiring practices, and what kinds are being neglected? Is diversity enough to solve the structural inequalities that plague our universities? And how might we articulate the value of diversity in the first place?

...
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In recent decades, American universities have begun to tout the “diversity” of their faculty and student bodies. But what kinds of diversity are being championed in their admissions and hiring practices, and what kinds are being neglected? Is diversity enough to solve the structural inequalities that plague our universities? And how might we articulate the value of diversity in the first place?

Transforming the Academy begins to answer these questions by bringing together a mix of faculty—male and female, cisgender and queer, immigrant and native-born, tenured and contingent, white, black, multiracial, and other—from public and private universities across the United States. Whether describing contentious power dynamics within their classrooms or recounting protests that occurred on their campuses, the book’s contributors offer bracingly honest inside accounts of both the conflicts and the learning experiences that can emerge from being a representative of diversity.

The collection’s authors are united by their commitment to an ideal of the American university as an inclusive and transformative space, one where students from all backgrounds can simultaneously feel intellectually challenged and personally supported. Yet Transforming the Academy also offers a wide range of perspectives on how to best achieve these goals, a diversity of opinion that is sure to inspire lively debate. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

Introduction - Full Steps Forward, Half Steps Back - The Diversity Challenge of Pedagogy (Sarah Willie-LeBreton)
Part I: Challenging Classrooms
ch. 1 Decentering Whiteness: Teaching Anti-racism on a Predominantly White Campus (Michael D. Smith and Eve Tuck)
ch. 2 Is there a Silver Lining? The Experiences of a Black female Teaching Assistant (Dela Kusi-Appouh)
ch. 3 Radical Leftist or Objective Practitioner? Perceptions of a Black Male Professor (H. Mark Ellis)
ch. 4 Teaching Difference in Multiple Ways: Through Content and Presence (Cheryl Jones-Walker)
ch. 5 What You May Not See: The Oscillating Critique (Pato Hebert)
ch. 6 The Professor, Her Colleague, and Her Student: Two Race-Related Stories (Sarah Willie-LeBreton)
ch. 7 Challenging Oppression in Moderation? Student Feedback in Diversity Courses (Anita Chikkatur)

Part II: Witnessing Protest
ch. 8 The (S)paces of Academic Work: Disability, Access, and Higher Education (Kristin Lindgren)
ch. 9 Queer Affects/Queer Access (Anna Ward)
ch. 10 Geographies of Difference: From Unity to Solidarity (Betty Sasaki)
ch. 11 La Promesa: Working with Latina/o Students in an Elite Liberal Arts College (Aurora Camacho de Schmidt)
ch. 12 Passing Strange: Embodying and Negotiating Difference in Academia (Daphne Lamothe)
ch. 13 A Dean’s Week: “Trap Doors and Glass Ceilings” (Theresa Tensuan)

Conclusion - Theorizing the Transformation of the 21st Century Campus (Sarah Willie-LeBreton)
Bibliography
About the Contributors
End Notes
Index
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Spanning the Divide Latinos/as in Theological Education

Book
Hernández, Edwin I.; Peña, Milagros; Turner, Caroline Sotelo Viernes; and Salazar, Ariana Monque
2016
AETH, Orlando, FL
BV4030.H47 2016
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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This book provides a detailed look at the current state of Latino/a theological education in the United States. This includes consideration of the career development and opinions of Latinos/as in seminary education, as well attention to other important modes of Latino/a theological education, like non-degree programs and Hispanic-serving organizations like the HTI and HSP. Another goal of this project was to ...
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This book provides a detailed look at the current state of Latino/a theological education in the United States. This includes consideration of the career development and opinions of Latinos/as in seminary education, as well attention to other important modes of Latino/a theological education, like non-degree programs and Hispanic-serving organizations like the HTI and HSP. Another goal of this project was to make recommendations for ways in which schools of theology can do a better job preparing the next generation of Latino/a religious leaders to serve as bridge builders for the future. Thus, we paid special attention to how hospitable theological educational institus are to Hispanics.

This book also offers recommendations on improving Latino/a recruitment, revamping the curriculum and Hispanic ministry education, tending better to the sense of community on campuses, and so much more. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part One - Overview
Introduction
ch. 1 Lifting the Veil: A Look Inside Theological Educational Institutions

Part Two - Latino/a Seminary Students
ch. 2 Taking Roll: What Are Latino/a Seminary Students
ch. 3 Hearing the Call: Latinto/a Seminarians Vocational Motivations and Views about the Church’s Role in Society
ch. 4 Finding the Right Fit: How Latino/a Seminarians Choose Their Schools
ch. 5 Bringing Their Gifts: Experience and Education of Latino/a Seminarians
ch. 6 Facing the Gap: How Latino/a Seminarians Evaluate Their Institution’s Quality and Commitment to Diversity
ch. 7 Serving Their Own: What Seminaries Can Do to Help Latinos/as Prepare for Ministry to the Hispanic Community

Part Three - The World of Latino/a Faculty in Theological Education
ch. 8 Latino/a Theological Faculty: A Close Look
ch. 9 Latino/a Theological Faculty: A Cross-Racial Comparison
ch. 10 Faculty Diversity in Theological Education: The Continuous Challenge of Inclusion with Justice

Part Four - Alternative Pathways and Best Practices in Latino/a Theological Education
ch. 11 Making Progress: How One Institution is Successfully Improving Its Approach to Training Latino/a Religious Leaders
ch. 12 Empowering Hispanic Ministry in Greater Grand Rapids: A Case Study
ch. 13 The Alternative Path and Latino/a Concerns: The AETH Study of Bible Institutes
ch. 14 Caring For Their Own: Latino/a Theological Education As Done By HTI/HTIC and HSP

Conclusion - Spanning The Divide
Bibliography
The Authors
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The Balancing Act: International Higher Education in the 21st Century

Book
Saudelli, Mary Gene
2015
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LC1090.S28 2015
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

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Why is it important to learn about higher education in international contexts? Why learn about curriculum, teaching, and learning at Dubai Women’s College of the Higher Colleges of Technology? Global education systems have remarkable contributions to make to understandings of 21st century curriculum, teaching, and learning.

Adult educators across the globe are exploring how to make learning meaningful in a world that is experiencing change, global migration, ...
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Why is it important to learn about higher education in international contexts? Why learn about curriculum, teaching, and learning at Dubai Women’s College of the Higher Colleges of Technology? Global education systems have remarkable contributions to make to understandings of 21st century curriculum, teaching, and learning.

Adult educators across the globe are exploring how to make learning meaningful in a world that is experiencing change, global migration, rapid development, cross-cultural communication demands, and systems with mandates for accountability and international standardized measures of quality. Dubai is an Emirate in the United Arab Emirates that has experienced these issues, which have had a profound impact on higher education for Emirati women.

The international educators who contributed to this book reveal how they designed and implemented a curriculum that represented a complex balancing act replete with recognition of local, global, religious, cultural, and societal implications. There is no other book like The Balancing Act: International Higher Education in the 21st Century. It reveals the nature of a highly devoted team of international educators who designed a contextually and globally relevant transdisciplinary, 21st century curriculum.

“Dr. Mary Gene Saudelli has tremendous knowledge and experience with delivering world class education in the Middle East. She has a deep commitment to progressive education and an understanding of global mindedness. It is wonderful that she shares her research on a wide range of topics in educational curriculum and global issues. In The Balancing Act: International Higher Education in the 21st Century, Dr. Saudelli opens the dialogue of reciprocity in learning from higher education in diverse contexts. This book honours Emirati women’s backgrounds and differences, yet cherishes the uniqueness of the international educators involved in this study.” – Kim Critchley, Dean and CEO, University of Calgary in Qatar (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Jennifer Rowsell)

Module 1: Exploring the Context and the Theories
ch. 1 Setting the Stage: Introducing Dubai Women’s College and the United Arab Emirates
ch. 2 Constructive Learning Theory and Contemporary Debates
ch. 3 Adult Learners, Sociology of Education and Change Theories

Module 2: Presenting the Educators, Learners and Curriculum
ch. 4 Introducing the International Educators
ch. 5 Introducing 21st Century Teaching & Learning and the Emirati Learners
ch. 6 Making Learning Meaningful: Trans-Disciplinary 21st Century Curriculum

Module 3: Delving into the Learning Context, Religion, Culture, Society and Language
ch. 7 Encountering Islam in the Classroom: Faith and 21st Century Curriculum
ch. 8 Balancing Issues and Exploring Boundaries: Emirati Culture and 21st Century Curriculum
ch. 9 Globalization on Steroids: 21st Century Curriculum and Societal Change in Dubai
ch. 10 English - A Global Language

Conclusion
ch. 11 Capturing 21st Century Curriculum Design in Practice: What Can Be Learned from Higher Education at DWC?

Appendix A: Current Issues Forum: Booth Allocations
Appendix B: Reading Assessments Texts
References
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(Not) Being There - Online Distance Theological Education

Journal Issue
Miller, Sharon L. and Scharen, Christian
2017
Auburn Studies, No. 23 (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY Fall 2017)
BV4070.A8A1 2017 no.23
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

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This Auburn Studies report highlights the changing features of online distance education (ODE) within theological schools. Distance education is not a new phenomenon, particularly within the broader field of higher education, and yet the “disruptive innovation” of the internet, as Clayton Christensen and others have argued, has only recently begun to change theological education.[i] While in some respects the impact of the internet is dramatic and new, many faith ...
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This Auburn Studies report highlights the changing features of online distance education (ODE) within theological schools. Distance education is not a new phenomenon, particularly within the broader field of higher education, and yet the “disruptive innovation” of the internet, as Clayton Christensen and others have argued, has only recently begun to change theological education.[i] While in some respects the impact of the internet is dramatic and new, many faith traditions have deep experience with the sort of mediated presence distinctive of ODE.

For many world religions, the embodied presence of their founders—Moses, Jesus, Mohammad, Buddha, and others—was brief. For most of the histories of these great traditions, “not being there” has been normative. Take, for example, the story of Jesus’ post-resurrection appearance to the disciples in the Gospel of John. All the disciples were there, save Thomas, who would not believe Jesus was truly alive without “being there” to see and touch Jesus. Lucky for him, a week later Jesus appeared to Thomas as well. But note what Jesus said: “Have you believed because you have seen me? Blessed are those who have not seen and have come to believe.” This is the case for millions of believers today, whose experience of the holy is through a mediating presence, holy objects, or rituals, and perhaps, most profoundly, through scriptures understood as God’s presence, voice, or word.

It is then not an unfamiliar world at all for people of faith to teach and learn at a distance, using mediated relationships to do so—even when the technology affording the connection is indeed new. While this report outlines our research findings, we also hope to offer resources for thinking in creative and hopeful ways in a time of change. The report takes stock of a generation of change in theological education driven by what is often called the “digital revolution.” We highlight three key findings:

First, ODE is growing rapidly, pushing the boundaries of who typically attends theological school. Over the past decade, enrollment at member schools of The Association of Theological Schools (ATS) dropped by 11%; in the same period, online enrollment rose almost 200%. Broader cultural patterns regarding spirituality are surely at play as we see the democratizing force of the internet opening theological exploration to a much wider—and, it turns out, quite interested—audience. Given the success of ODE, many schools suddenly find themselves with too large and expensive a physical plant for the educational needs.

Second, ODE student outcomes are equal to or better than those of traditional residential classes. Many critics—even now—harbor doubts that anything but students and a professor in a room together can achieve the desired educational outcomes. Yet the evidence shows this is not true. ODE provokes pedagogical innovation, shifting the focus from teacher to learner, and the power of the contexts in which the student learns. For both faculty and students, it is powerful to take seriously the “real world” context where student learning and daily work dynamically interrogate one another. Ironically, we found, while ODE takes more time and effort, remarkably few resources are currently dedicated to training and supporting faculty as they learn this new medium.

Third, the integrated reality of digital life is quickly making the old divide between “traditional” and “online” classes—and hybrid courses or programs, which toggle between the two—obsolete. ODE creates an identity crisis for many schools that value highly the formative power of “being there” in classroom, chapel, and community life. Yet the question the disruption of the internet raises is “where” does education actually happen? It is clearly wherever the student lives, works, and learns, including in virtual spaces and through digitally mediated access to human and material resources.

Table Of Content:
Executive Summary

I. Introduction
II. Overview of Literature
----Case Study: Bethel Seminary
III. Whats, Whys, and Hows of Online Distance Education
----Case Study: Luther Seminary
IV. Why Say Yes to ODE?
----Case Study: Central Baptist Theological Seminary
V. Challenges for ODE
----Case Study: Columbia Theological Seminary
VI. How to Jumpstart ODE
VII. Conclusions
Sage Advice: How to Do it Well
Data Sources

About the Authors, Funding and Support
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The Idea of the PhD: The Doctorate in the Twenty-First-Century Imagination

Book
Kelly, Frances Jennifer
2017
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2386.K46 2017
Topics: Changes in Higher Education

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The Idea of the PhD: The doctorate in the twenty-first-century imagination analyses the PhD as it is articulated in diverse areas of contemporary discourse at a time in which the degree is undergoing growth, change and scrutiny worldwide. It considers not just institutional ideas of the PhD, but those of the broader cultural and social domain as well as asking whether, and to what ...
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The Idea of the PhD: The doctorate in the twenty-first-century imagination analyses the PhD as it is articulated in diverse areas of contemporary discourse at a time in which the degree is undergoing growth, change and scrutiny worldwide. It considers not just institutional ideas of the PhD, but those of the broader cultural and social domain as well as asking whether, and to what extent, the idea of the Doctor of Philosophy, the highest achievable university award, is being reimagined in the twenty-first century.

In a world where the PhD is undergoing significant radical change, and where inside universities, doctoral enrolments are continually climbing, as the demand for more graduates with high-level research skills increases, this book asks the following questions:

How do we understand how the PhD is currently imagined and conceptualised in the wider domain?

Where will we find ideas about the PhD, from its purpose, to the nature of research work undertaken and the kinds of pedagogies engaged, to the researchers who undertake it and are shaped by it?

International in scope, this is a text that explores the culturally inflected representation of the doctorate and its graduates in the imagination, literature and media. The Idea of the PhD contributes to the research literature in the field of doctoral education and higher education. As such, this will be a fascinating text for researchers, postgraduates and academics interested in the idea of the university. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: The Doctor of Philosophy in the Twenty-First-Century Imagination

Ch 1. The nature of doctoral research
Ch 2. The idea of the PhD researcher
Ch 3. The idea of PhD pedagogy
Ch 4. The spaces of doctoral research

Concluding remarks: Future Imaginings