Religion and Academia

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Theological Education in the Catholic Tradition

Book
Carey, Patrick W. and Earl C. Muller, S.J., eds.
1997
Crossroads, New York, NY
BX905.T43 1997
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
The aim of this book is both to raise questions about the contemporary theological enterprise and to suggest ways to improve theological education at the college, seminary, and graduate levels. With that in mind the editors have here gathered together important essays by leading theologians and prominent bishops that provide expert assessment of the present state of Catholic theological education and its future prospects, treating a full range of the ...
Additional Info:
The aim of this book is both to raise questions about the contemporary theological enterprise and to suggest ways to improve theological education at the college, seminary, and graduate levels. With that in mind the editors have here gathered together important essays by leading theologians and prominent bishops that provide expert assessment of the present state of Catholic theological education and its future prospects, treating a full range of the most pressing topics, from undergraduate and graduate programs to the role of bishops and the task of inculturation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
List of Abbreviations
Introduction (Patrick W. Carey)

ch. 1 Theological Education in the Catholic Tradition (Avery Dulles)
ch. 2 Catholic Higher Education as Historical Context for Theological Education (Philip Gleason)
ch. 3 Mission and Identity in Catholic Universities (Joseph A. Komonchak)
ch. 4 Catechesis Isn't Just for Children Anymore (Berard L. Marthaler)
ch. 5 Theological Education in the Undergraduate Core Curriculum (Monika K. Hellwig)
ch. 6 Introduction of Theology in the Catholic Tradition (Arthur L. Kennedy)
ch. 7 The Undergraduate Theology Major (Lawrence S. Cunningham)
ch. 8 Challenges for Catholic Graduate Theological Education (Matthew L. Lamb)
ch. 9 The Future of Graduate Education in Theology: A Clear Sky with the Possibility of a Late Afternoon Thunderstorm (William M. Shea)
ch. 10 Faculty Research and Catholic Identity (John C. Haughey)
ch. 11 Theological Education in Seminaries (Robert J. Wister)
ch. 12 Theological Faculty and Programs in Seminaries (Katarina Schuth)
ch. 13 Theology's Place in a Catholic University (James L. Heft)
ch. 14 Institutional Resources in the Seminary ((Thomas R. Kopfensteiner)
ch. 15 Bishops and Theologians (Francis E. George)
ch. 16 Theologians and Bishops (Robert P. Imbelli)
ch. 17 Faith: Normative for Bishops and Theologians (Oscar H. Lipscomb)
ch. 18 Theologians and Bishops: With Each Other (John J. Leibrecht)
ch. 19 Inculturation and Acculturation for an American Bishop and Theologian (Donald E. Pelotte)
ch. 20 Biblical Studies in University and Seminary Theology (Lawrence E. Boadt)
ch. 21 Historical Theology in the Curriculum (Joseph T. Lienhard)
ch. 22 Liturgy: The Integrative Center of the Theological Disciplines (Susan K. Wood)
ch. 23 The Divorce of Spirituality from Theology (Keith J. Egan)
ch. 24 The Integration of Theology and Spirituality: a View from the Seminary (Austin C. Doran)
ch. 25 Theological Education of African American Catholics (M. Shawn Copeland)
ch. 26 Catholic Theological Education and U.S. Hispanics (Roberto S. Goizueta)
Afterword (Earl C. Muller)

Selected Bibliography on Theological Education in American Catholic Higher Education, 1881-1995 (Pamela C. Young)
Contributors
Index
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Organizing a Christian Mind: A Theology of Higher Education

Book
Carmody, Denise Lardner
1996
Trinity Press, Valley Forge, PA
BT738.17.C38 1996
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
"The sadness I feel," writes Denise Carmody, "stems from watching the capitulation of good schools, both Christian and secular, to the pragmatism of recent times and their concomitant loss of a pervasive vision of their enterprise." Such capitulation has produced a serious crisis in American higher education, including also church-sponsored higher education, leading to a preoccupation with research and publication instead of teaching and to frequent inattention to ultimate human ...
Additional Info:
"The sadness I feel," writes Denise Carmody, "stems from watching the capitulation of good schools, both Christian and secular, to the pragmatism of recent times and their concomitant loss of a pervasive vision of their enterprise." Such capitulation has produced a serious crisis in American higher education, including also church-sponsored higher education, leading to a preoccupation with research and publication instead of teaching and to frequent inattention to ultimate human questions. Following an introductory discussion of teaching, research and publication, and "the difference that God makes," the book moves through such topics as human nature, physical nature, politics, divinity or ultimate reality, and education (including community services, academic freedom, and the arts and sciences). A concluding chapter focuses on vision in higher education, that is, gaining a clear sense of what a collegiate venture wants to do and the kind of curriculum and teaching that squares with what a college is trying to achieve. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 On Human Nature
ch. 2 On Physical Nature
ch. 3 On Politics
ch. 4 On Divinity
ch. 5 Education Revisited

Conclusion
Index
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Should God get tenure?

Book
Gill, David W., ed.
1997
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
LC383.S46 1997
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
During the twentieth century, theological and religious perspectives have been marginalized, if not utterly excluded, in many of our colleges and universities. The essays in this book argue in different ways for the critical, appreciative, inclusion of theological and religious perspectives in higher education. The contributors believe that even in our secular, religiously disestablished era, religion and God continue to occupy an important and dynamic role in personal and social ...
Additional Info:
During the twentieth century, theological and religious perspectives have been marginalized, if not utterly excluded, in many of our colleges and universities. The essays in this book argue in different ways for the critical, appreciative, inclusion of theological and religious perspectives in higher education. The contributors believe that even in our secular, religiously disestablished era, religion and God continue to occupy an important and dynamic role in personal and social life. If our colleges and universities are to fulfill their higher aspirations of educating whole persons for the real world in all of its diversity and challenge, we need to go bravely against the flow and "give God tenure." (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Contributors
Introduction: Should God Get Tenure? (David W. Gill)

ch. 1 On Being a Professor: The Case of Socrates (Bruce R. Reichenbach)
ch. 2 Academic Excellence: Cliche or Humanizing Vision? (Merold Westphal)
ch. 3 Religion, Science, and the Humanities in the Liberal Arts Curriculum (H. Newton Malony)
ch. 4 Tolstoy and Freud on Our Need for God (Robert C. Roberts)
ch. 5 Religious Toleration and Human rights (Paul A. Marshall)
ch. 6 Christianity, Higher Education, and Socially Marginalized Voices (Lauree Hersh Meyer)
ch. 7 Diversity, Christianity, and Higher Education (Robert G. Clouse)
ch. 8 Evangelical Civility and the Academic Calling (Richard J. Mouw)
ch. 9 Ethics With and Without God (David W. Gill)
ch. 10 C. S. Lewis on Eros as a Means of Grace (Corbin Scott Carnell)
ch. 11 Faith and Imagination (Jill Pelaez Baumgaertner)
ch. 12 Prayer and Higher Education (Carnegie Samuel Calian)
ch. 13 What We Can Learn About Higher Education from the Jesuit (W. Ward Gasque)
ch. 14 The Evangelical Mind in America (Mark A. Knoll)
ch. 15 The Brethren and Higher Education: Tension and Tradition (Donald F. Durnbaugh)

Postscript: J. Omar Good: The Man and His Legacy (Earl C. Kaylor, Jr)
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Religious Higher Education in the United States: A Source Book

Book
Hunt, Thomas C. and James C. Carper, eds.
1996
Garland Publishing, New York, NY
LC383.R47 1996
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Theological Education   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Higher education today suffers from lack of a clearly articulated purpose-a deficiency particularly challenging to religious-affiliated institutions. What is the relationship of secular learning to the faith that originally undergirded these institutions? This book offers the reader answers to this and other major questions currently facing denomination-affiliated institutions of higher education. Following a chapter on civil government's relationships to these institutions, 24 chapters survey the colleges, universities, and seminaries associated with ...
Additional Info:
Higher education today suffers from lack of a clearly articulated purpose-a deficiency particularly challenging to religious-affiliated institutions. What is the relationship of secular learning to the faith that originally undergirded these institutions? This book offers the reader answers to this and other major questions currently facing denomination-affiliated institutions of higher education. Following a chapter on civil government's relationships to these institutions, 24 chapters survey the colleges, universities, and seminaries associated with denominations. Each chapter begins with an historical essay followed by annotated bibliographic entries covering primary and secondary sources dating back to 1986 on various denomination-connected institutions. There are 614 bibliographic entries, an epilogue on critical issues covered throughout the book, as well as a subject and author index. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Thomas C. Hunt, and James C. Carper)

ch. 1 Government Aid to and Regulation of Religious colleges and universities (Ralph D. Mawdsley)
ch. 2 The educational system of the church of Jesus Christ of latter day saints (Robert L. Millett)
ch. 3 Quakers and higher education (William C. Kashatus)
ch. 4 Lutheran college education in the US (Richard W. Solberg)
ch. 5 Reformed colleges and seminaries (Peter P. DeBoer)
ch. 6 Higher Education among Churches of Christ (Robert E. Hooper)
ch. 7 Moravian colleges and universities (Daniel R. Gilbert)
ch. 8 United Church of Christ colleges, universities and seminaries (Lowell H. Zuck)
ch. 9 Disciples of Christ colleges, universities and seminaries (John M. Imbler)
ch. 10 Episcopal colleges and universities (Donald S. Armentrout)
ch. 11 Higher education institutions of the Church of the Brethren (Kenneth M. Shaffer)
ch. 12 Foursquare Gospel Church colleges (John C. Holmes)
ch. 13 Wesleyan Colleges and University (John C. Holmes)
ch. 14 Free Methodist Colleges (John C. Holmes)
ch. 15 Catholic Higher Education in the US (Gerald P. Fogarty, S. J., Mary A. Grant, Anna M. Donnelly)
ch. 16 Baptist Colleges and Universities (Jerry M. Self)
ch. 17 Seventh Day Adventist higher Education in the US (George R. Knight)
ch. 18 Jewish Seminaries and colleges (Harold S. Wechsler)
ch. 19 American Bible colleges (Virginia Lieson Brereton)
ch. 20 Higher education in the United Methodist Church (L. Glenn Tyndall)
ch. 21 Mennonite Institutions of higher education (Donovan D. Steiner, and Judy H. Mullet)
ch. 22 Independent Christian colleges and universities (William Vance Trollinger, Jr.)
ch. 23 Church of the Nazarene Universities, colleges and theological seminaries (Harold E. Raser)
ch. 24 Pentecostal colleges and seminaries
Epilogue (Edith L. Blumhofer)

Indexes
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Religious and Theological Studies in American Higher Education: A Pilot Study

Journal Issue
Hart, Ray
1999
Journal of the American Academy of Religion, No. 59 (Oxford University Press, Cary, NC)
BL41.H37 1991
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
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Religious Advocacy and American History

Book
Kuklick, Bruce and D.G. Hart, eds.
1997
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
E175.R45 1997
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Religious Advocacy and American History explores the general question of bias and objectivity in higher learning from the perspective of the role of religious convictions in the study of American history. The contributors to this book, many of whom are leading historians of American religion and culture, address primarily two related questions. First, how do personal religious convictions influence one's own research, writing, and teaching? And, second, what place should ...
Additional Info:
Religious Advocacy and American History explores the general question of bias and objectivity in higher learning from the perspective of the role of religious convictions in the study of American history. The contributors to this book, many of whom are leading historians of American religion and culture, address primarily two related questions. First, how do personal religious convictions influence one's own research, writing, and teaching? And, second, what place should personal beliefs have within American higher education? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction

ch. 1 Christian Advocacy and the Rules of the Academic Game (George M. Marsden)
ch. 2 Traditional Christianity and the Possibility of Historical Knowledge (Mark A. Noll)
ch. 3 On Critical History (Bruce Kuklick)
ch. 4 Advocacy and Academe (Murray G. Murphey)
Marxism, Christianity, and Bias in the Study of Southern Slave Society (Eugene D. Genovese)
ch. 5 Advocacy and the Writing of American Women's History (Elizabeth Fox. Genovese)
ch. 6 In Search of the Fourth "R": The Treatment of Religion in American History Textbooks and Survey Courses (Paul Boyer)
ch. 7 What's So Special about the University, Anyway? (D.G. Hart)
ch. 8 Understanding the Past, Using the Past: Reflections on Two Approaches to History (Grant Wacker)
ch. 9 A Transcendentalist's Aristotle: Non-evangelical Reflections on Conviction and the Writing of History (Catherine L. Albanese)
ch. 10 Seldon's Choice: Variations on a Theme by Asimov (Paul A. Carter)
ch. 11 One Historian's Sundays (Leslie Woodcock Tentler)

Afterword
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The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship

Book
Marsden, George M.
1997
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
BT738.17.M37 1997
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
At the end of his 1994 book, The Soul of the American University, George Marsden advanced a modest proposal for an enhanced role for religious faith in today's scholarship. This "unscientific postscript" helped spark a heated debate that spilled out of the pages of academic journals and The Chronicle of Higher Education into mainstream media such as The New York Times, and marked Marsden as one of the leading participants in ...
Additional Info:
At the end of his 1994 book, The Soul of the American University, George Marsden advanced a modest proposal for an enhanced role for religious faith in today's scholarship. This "unscientific postscript" helped spark a heated debate that spilled out of the pages of academic journals and The Chronicle of Higher Education into mainstream media such as The New York Times, and marked Marsden as one of the leading participants in the debates concerning religion and public life. Marsden now gives his proposal a fuller treatment in The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship, a thoughtful and thought-provoking book on the relationship of religious faith and intellectual scholarship. More than a response to Marsden's critics, The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship takes the next step towards demonstrating what the ancient relationship of faith and learning might mean for the academy today. Marsden argues forcefully that mainstream American higher education needs to be more open to explicit expressions of faith and to accept what faith means in an intellectual context. Contemporary university culture is hollow at its core, Marsden writes. Not only does it lack a spiritual center, but it is without any real alternative. He argues that a religiously diverse culture will be an intellectually richer one, and it is time for scholars and institutions to take the intellectual dimensions of their faith seriously and become active participants in the highest level of academic discourse. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Why Christian Perspectives Are Not Welcomed
ch. 2 The Arguments for Silence
ch. 3 Christian Scholarship and the Rules of the Academic Game
ch. 4 What Difference Could It Possibly Make?
ch. 5 The Positive Contributions of Theological Context
ch. 6 Building Academic Communities

Getting Specific: A Readable Appendix
Notes
Index
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The Secularization of the Academy

Book
Marsden, George M. and Bradley J. Longfield, eds.
1992
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
LC383.S43 1992
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
A searching exploration of a century and a half of higher education in American culture. This book will enliven, and inform, the wide-ranging discussion now taking place. Bringing together eleven new essays--most published here for the first time--on the secularization of American, British, and Canadian higher education, this text maps some of the major contours of a largely unexplored topic. It focuses on the histories of leading universities since the ...
Additional Info:
A searching exploration of a century and a half of higher education in American culture. This book will enliven, and inform, the wide-ranging discussion now taking place. Bringing together eleven new essays--most published here for the first time--on the secularization of American, British, and Canadian higher education, this text maps some of the major contours of a largely unexplored topic. It focuses on the histories of leading universities since the late nineteenth century, analyzing the transition from an era when organized Christianity and its ideals had a major role in leading institutions of higher education to an era when they have almost none. This book is an important resource for students of religion and the history of education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Introduction

ch. 1 The Soul of the American University: An Historical Overview (George M. Marsden )
ch. 2 From Evangelicalism to Liberalism: Public Midwestern Universities in Nineteenth-Century America (Bradley J. Longfield)
ch. 3 Secularization and Sacralization: Speculations on Some Religious Origins of the Secular Humanities Curriculum, 1850-1900 (James Turner )
ch. 4 Faith and Learning in the Age of the University: The Academic Ministry of Daniel Coit Gilman (D.G. Hart )
ch. 5 "For God, for Country, and for Yale": Yale, Religion, and Higher Education between the World Wars (Bradley J. Longfield )
ch. 6 "The Survival of Recognizably Protestant Colleges": Reflections on Old-Line Protestantism, 1950-1990 (Robert Wood Lynn )
ch. 7 American Learning and the Problem of Religious Studies (D.G. Hart )
ch. 8 American Catholic Higher Education, 1940-1990: The Ideological Context (Philip Gleason )
ch. 9 The Secularization of British Universities since the Mid-Nineteenth Century (David Bebbington )
ch. 10 Protestant Colleges in Canada: Past and Future (G.A. Rawlyk)
ch. 11 Christianity and the University in America: A Bibliographical Essay (D.G. Hart.)

Index
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Faith, Hype and Clarity: Teaching About Religion in American Schools and Colleges

Book
Nash, Robert J.
1999
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC111.N25 1999
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
In an effort to provide clarity about the highly charged issue of religion in US classrooms, Nash (College of Education and Social Services, Univ. of Vermont) describes and critiques four diverse religious positions, namely, fundamentalist, prophetic, alternative spiritualities, and post-theist. He uses a narrative approach, asking such questions as, is it workable? is it convincing? does it move people and provide a sense of purpose, community, moral action? and does ...
Additional Info:
In an effort to provide clarity about the highly charged issue of religion in US classrooms, Nash (College of Education and Social Services, Univ. of Vermont) describes and critiques four diverse religious positions, namely, fundamentalist, prophetic, alternative spiritualities, and post-theist. He uses a narrative approach, asking such questions as, is it workable? is it convincing? does it move people and provide a sense of purpose, community, moral action? and does it explain the unknown? Chapters cover the positive and negative aspects of the four religious positions Nash describes. They outline a methodology and curriculum of religious education, focusing on these four positions, which have gathered much strength throughout society and have created controversy in communities in the United States and around the world. Relevant readings are integrated into the text, which purports to help schools and colleges move toward "religious literacy." For a similar perspective, see Richard J. Bernstein's The New Constellation: The Ethical-Political Horizons of Modernity/Postmodernity (1992). Suitable for upper-division undergraduates and beyond; recommended especially for use by teachers and policy makers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Transcendental Narratives and Education
ch. 2 The Fundamentalist Narrative
ch. 3 The Failure of the Fundamentalist Narrative
ch. 4 The Prophetic Narrative
ch. 5 The Failure of the Prophetic Narrative
ch. 6 The Alternative Spiritualities Narrative
ch. 7 The Failure of the Alternative Spiritualities Narrative
ch. 8 The Post-Theist Narrative
ch. 9 The Failure of the Post-Theist Narrative

References
Index
About the Author
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The Making of the Modern University: Intellectual Transformation and the Marginalization of Morality

Book
Reuben, Julie A.
1996
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LA227.1.R48 1996
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
What is the purpose of higher education, and how should we pursue it? Debates over these issues raged in the late nineteenth century as reformers introduced a new kind of university - one dedicated to free inquiry and the advancement of knowledge. In the first major study of moral education in American universities. Julie Reuben examines the consequences of these debates for modern intellectual life. Based on extensive research at ...
Additional Info:
What is the purpose of higher education, and how should we pursue it? Debates over these issues raged in the late nineteenth century as reformers introduced a new kind of university - one dedicated to free inquiry and the advancement of knowledge. In the first major study of moral education in American universities. Julie Reuben examines the consequences of these debates for modern intellectual life. Based on extensive research at eight universities - Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Johns Hopkins, Chicago, Stanford, Michigan, and California at Berkeley - Reuben examines the aims of university reformers in the context of nineteenth-century ideas about truth. She argues that these educators tried to apply new scientific standards to moral education, but that their modernization efforts ultimately failed. By exploring the complex interaction between institutional and intellectual change, Reuben enhances our understanding of the modern university, the secularization of intellectual life, and the association of scientific objectivity with value-neutrality. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 The Unity of Truth
ch. 2 Science and Religion Reconceived
ch. 3 The Open University
ch. 4 The Reconstruction of Religion
ch. 5 Scientific Substitutes for Religion
ch. 6 Value-Free Science
ch. 7 From Truth to Beauty
ch. 8 Administrative Order

Conclusion
Notes
Index
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Beyond the Classics: Essays in Religious Studies and Liberal Education

Book
Reynolds, Frank E. and Sheryl L. Burkhalter, ed.
1990
Scholars Press, Atlanta, GA
BL41.B49 1990
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Taken ad seriatim, these essays present a wide range of differing theoretical positions and practical strategies for reform. It is our hope that, when read from this point of view, they will evoke the kind of very specific discussions, debates and actions that will be required if real change is to occur. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Taken ad seriatim, these essays present a wide range of differing theoretical positions and practical strategies for reform. It is our hope that, when read from this point of view, they will evoke the kind of very specific discussions, debates and actions that will be required if real change is to occur. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Reconstructing liberal education : a religious studies perspective (Frank E. Reynolds)
ch. 2 University, the liberal arts, and the teaching and study of religion (Charles H. Long)
ch. 3 "Seeking an end to the primary text" or "putting an end to the text as primary" (Lawrence E. Sullivan)
ch. 4 Rethinking the humanities for the 1990s : redressing the balance (George W. Pickering)
ch. 5 Confidence and criticism : religious studies and the public purposes of liberal education (Robin W. Lovin) -- Education and the intellectual virtues (Lee H. Yearly)
ch. 6 Legal status of religious studies programs in public higher education (W. Royce Clark)
ch. 7 Four modes of discourse : blurred genres in the study of religion (Sheryl L. Burkhalter)
ch. 8 Beyond ours and theirs : the global character of religious studies (James H. Foard)
ch. 9 Religious studies and exposure to multiple worlds in the liberal arts curriculum (Judith A. Berling)
ch. 10 Writing across the curriculum : a religious studies contribution ( James H. Foard)
ch. 11 Dearth in Venice (William R. Darrow)
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Curriculum, Religion, and Public Education: Conversations for an Enlarging Public Square

Book
Sears, James T., ed.
1998
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC111.C844 1998
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Along the fault line of public education and conservative religious beliefs, this break-through volume explores five curriculum arenas that have been "ground zero" in community debate—science and human evolution, textbook selection, sexuality instruction, character development, and outcome-based education. Curriculum, Religion, and Public Education will assist educators, parents, and community leaders in crossing boundaries to communicate with "the others," and in the process transform schools—and ourselves. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Along the fault line of public education and conservative religious beliefs, this break-through volume explores five curriculum arenas that have been "ground zero" in community debate—science and human evolution, textbook selection, sexuality instruction, character development, and outcome-based education. Curriculum, Religion, and Public Education will assist educators, parents, and community leaders in crossing boundaries to communicate with "the others," and in the process transform schools—and ourselves. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (James T. Sears)

Pt. I Foundations for Conversations
ch. 1 History, Religion, and Schooling: A Context for Conversation (James C. Carper)
ch. 2 Encounters in Law, Philosophy, Religion, and Education Commentary (Richard John Neuhaus, Martin E. Marty, Maxine Greens, George Marsden, and Michael W. McConnell)
ch. 3 Crossing Boundaries and Becoming the Other: Voices Across Borders (James T. Sears)
ch. 4 Dialogue, Religion, and Tolerance: How to Talk to People Who Are Wrong About (Almost) Everything (Kenneth A. Strike)

Pt. II Textbooks: Whose Stories are to be Told?
ch. 5 Religion and the Textbooks (Gilbert T. Sewall)
ch. 6 It's Not About the Books: Textbook Controversies and the Need for Uncertain Conversations (J. Dan Marshall)
Suggested Additional Readings on Textbooks (Elaine Lindsey, and James T. Sears)

Pt. III Values in the Public Schools: What and Whose Values Should be Taught?
ch. 7 Why a Functional Definition of Religion Is Necessary If Justice Is to Be Achieved in Public Education (Richard A. Baer, Jr.
ch. 8 Moral Education as a Form of Life (Nel Noddings)
Community Dialogue: Is There a Common Moral Framework That Schools Can Embrace? (Carolyn Murphy, James T. Sears, and Bob Shearer et al.)
Suggested Additional Readings on Values (Elaine Lindsey, and James T. Sears)

Pt. IV Sexuality Education: What Does Teaching Sexual Responsibility Mean?
ch. 9 Sex Education Should Exclusively Endorse Abstinence... (George A. Rekers, and Richard C. Hohn)
ch. 10 Teaching and Researching Sexualities in a Socially Responsible Manner (James T. Sears)
Community Dialogue: Sexual Behaviors and Sexual Cultures (Carolyn Murphy, Bob Shearer, Gary Burgess, et al.)
Suggested Additional Readings on Sexuality Education (Elaine Lindsey, and James T. Sears)

Pt. V Outcome-Based Education: Who Should Set the Standards?
ch. 11 The Fundamentalist Right, the "New Paradigm," and Outcome-Based Education (Dennis Carlson)
ch. 12 Outcome-Based Education: Can It Be Redeemed? (Charles L. Glenn)
Community Dialogue: A Matter of Fairness and Equity (Carolyn Murphy, James T. Sears, and Bob Shearer et al.)
Suggested Additional Readings on Outcome-Based Education (Elaine Lindsey, and James T. Sears)

Pt. VI Science: Who and What are we?
ch. 13 The Problem of Dogmatism in Science Education (Nancy W. Brickhouse, and William J. Letts, IV)
ch. 14 The Two Controversies over Evolution (Phillip E. Johnson)
Community Dialogue: From Six Days to 4.6 Billion Years (Carolyn Murphy, James T. Sears, Bob Shearer et al.)
Suggested Additional Readings on Science (Elaine Lindsey, and James T. Sears)

Pt. VII A Concluding Conversation Among Education Scholars (James T. Sears, Richard Baer, and Paul S. Brantley et al.)
Index

About the Editor and the Contributors
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Church-Affiliated Higher Education

Book
Stoltzfus, Victor
1992
Pinchpenny Press, Goshen, IN
LC428.S86 1992
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Stoltzfus shows us the pressures on religious colleges towards assimilation into the mainstream, but also shows us the surprising strength of those colleges and the unique ways in which each acts to pass on the living tradition of its faith. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Stoltzfus shows us the pressures on religious colleges towards assimilation into the mainstream, but also shows us the surprising strength of those colleges and the unique ways in which each acts to pass on the living tradition of its faith. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction, Purpose and Methods
ch. 2 A Review of the Literature
ch. 3 Presbyterian "PHI" College
ch. 4 Roman Catholic "BETA" College
ch. 5 Wesleyan "KAPPA" College
ch. 6 Findings
ch. 7 Future Possibilities in Church-Affiliated Higher Education

Appendix I. Author's Autobiographical Note
Appendix II. Governance in Mennonite Church Colleges
Appendix III. Research Instruments
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The Fragility of Knowledge: Theological Education in the Church and the University

Book
Farley, Edward
1988
Fortress Press, Minneapolis, MN
BV4020.F348 1988
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
In a sequel to his 1983 work, Theologia, Farley develops a conceptual apparatus for re-thinking the structure of theological education in church, seminary, and university which is unified by a hermeneutical approach. He defines this approach as acts of interpretation which yield understanding, and argues that it requires ordered learning and critical thinking. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
In a sequel to his 1983 work, Theologia, Farley develops a conceptual apparatus for re-thinking the structure of theological education in church, seminary, and university which is unified by a hermeneutical approach. He defines this approach as acts of interpretation which yield understanding, and argues that it requires ordered learning and critical thinking. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1 - Theology and University education
ch. 1 The Fragility of knowledge - hermeneutic paradigms in the enlightenment tradition
ch. 2 The Fragility of knowledge - The corruption and redemption of knowledge
ch. 3 The Fragmentation of Knowledge - Specialty fields and the university
ch. 4 The place of theology in the study of religion
Part 2 - The Study of Theology
ch. 5 Can Church education be theological education?
ch. 6 The structure of theological study - reformulating the problem
ch. 7 The structure of theological study - mapping the terrain
ch. 8 The structure of theological study - disciplines and curricula
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Faith and Knowledge: Mainline Protestantism and American Higher Education

Book
Sloan, Douglas
1994
Westminster John Knox, Louisville, KY
LC383.S56 1994
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Sloan explores the impact that the Protestant theological renaissance (1925-1960) had on American colleges and universities, focusing in particular on the church's most significant claim to have a continuing voice in higher education. He traces the role of the national ecumenical and denominational organizations, and studies the changing place of college chaplains. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Sloan explores the impact that the Protestant theological renaissance (1925-1960) had on American colleges and universities, focusing in particular on the church's most significant claim to have a continuing voice in higher education. He traces the role of the national ecumenical and denominational organizations, and studies the changing place of college chaplains. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Church, the University, and the Faith-Knowledge Issue: The Background
ch. 2 The Church and the Crisis in the University
ch. 3 The Church Engages Higher Education: The Campaign Is Launched
ch. 4 The Theologians and the Two-Realm Theory of Truth
ch. 5 The Campaign Collapses: The Student Movement
ch. 6 Collapse and Rout: The Faculty
ch. 7 Protestantism and Its Postmodern Prospects: Some Reflections on the Present and Future

Index
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Shifting Boundaries: Contextual Approaches to the Structure of Theological Education

Book
Wheeler, Barbara G. and Edward Farley eds.
1991
Westminster John Knox, Louisville, KY
BV4022.S45 1991
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
At a time of widespread perplexity about the social role of humanistic scholarship, few disciplines are as anxious about their nature and purposes as academic theology. In this important work, W. Clark Gilpin, dean of the University of Chicago Divinity School, proposes that American theological scholarship become responsible to a threefold public: the churches, the academic community, and civil society. Gilpin approaches this goal indirectly, by investigating the historic social ...
Additional Info:
At a time of widespread perplexity about the social role of humanistic scholarship, few disciplines are as anxious about their nature and purposes as academic theology. In this important work, W. Clark Gilpin, dean of the University of Chicago Divinity School, proposes that American theological scholarship become responsible to a threefold public: the churches, the academic community, and civil society. Gilpin approaches this goal indirectly, by investigating the historic social roles of Protestant theologians and the educational institutions in which they have pursued their scholarship and teaching. Ranging from analyses of the New England Puritan Cotton Mather to contemporary theologians as "public intellectuals," Gilpin proposes that we find out what theology "is by asking what theologians "do. By showing how particular cultural problems have always shaped the work of theologians, Gilpin's work profoundly illuminates the foundations of American academic theology, providing insights that will help guide its future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Reconceiving practice (Craig Dykstra)
ch. 2 Situating the structure (Rebecca S. Chopp)
ch. 3 The historical consciousness and the study of theology (Walter E. Wyman, Jr.)
ch. 4 Theological and religious studies (Francis Schèussler Fiorenza)
ch. 5 Beyond a mono-religious theological education (Paul F. Knitter)
ch. 6 Overcoming alienation in theological education (Peter J. Paris)
ch. 7 Christian social ethics as a theological discipline (Thomas W. Ogletree)
ch. 8 Theology against the disciplines (John B. Cobb, Jr.) Celebrating difference, resisting domination (Mark Kline Taylor)
ch. 9 Toward a fundamental and strategic practical theology (Don S. Browning)
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The Soul of the American University: From Protestant Establishment to Established Nonbelief

Book
Marsden, George M.
1994
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
LA226.M34 1994
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
In this bold reexamination of the role of religion in higher education, Marsden provides a fascinating look at the histories of many pacesetting universities, including Harvard, Yale, and the University of California at Berkeley. The author argues for a new place for traditional religious perspectives in American universities. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
In this bold reexamination of the role of religion in higher education, Marsden provides a fascinating look at the histories of many pacesetting universities, including Harvard, Yale, and the University of California at Berkeley. The author argues for a new place for traditional religious perspectives in American universities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Prologue (I): God and Buckley at Yale (1951)
Prologue (II): Henry Sloane Coffin's Yale (1897)
Prologue (III): A "Christian College"? The Yale of Noah Porter and William Graham Sumner (1879-1881

Pt. I The Establishment of Protestant Nonsectarianism
ch. 1 The Burden of Christendom: Seventeenth-Century Harvard
ch. 2 The New Queen of the Sciences and the New Republic
ch. 3 Two Kinds of Sectarianism
ch. 4 A Righteous Consensus, Whig Style

Pt. II Defining the American University in a Scientific Age
ch. 5 American Practicality and Germanic Ideals: Two Visions for Reform
ch. 6 The Christian Legacy in the Epoch of Science
ch. 7 Positive Christianity versus Positivism at Noah Porter's Yale
ch. 8 California: Revolution without Much Ideology
ch. 9 Methodological Secularization and Its Christian Rationale at Hopkins
ch. 10 Liberal Protestantism at Michigan: New England Intentions with Jeffersonian Results
ch. 11 Harvard and the Religion of Humanity
ch. 12 Holding the Line at Princeton
ch. 13 Making the World Safe from the Traditionalist Establishment
ch. 14 The Low-Church Idea of a University

Pt. III When the Tie No Longer Binds
ch. 15 The Trouble with the Old-Time Religion
ch. 16 The Elusive Ideal of Academic Freedom
ch. 17 The Fundamentalist Menace
ch. 18 The Obstacles to a Christian Presence
ch. 19 Outsiders
ch. 20 Searching for a Soul
ch. 21 A Church with the Soul of a Nation
ch. 22 Liberal Protestantism without Protestantism

Concluding Unscientific Postscript
Index
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Methodism and Education 1849-1902: J.H. Rigg, Romanism, and Wesleyan Schools

Book
Smith, John T.
1998
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
LC577.S65 1998
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This thorough history of the Wesleyan Methodist educational efforts in Victorian England discusses the influence of Dr. James Harrison Rigg, Principal of Westminster Training College, who dominated his church and who made friendships with senior politicians of the day. The book also Looks in depth at the influence of anti-Catholicism, which was rampant in the Methodist church of the era. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This thorough history of the Wesleyan Methodist educational efforts in Victorian England discusses the influence of Dr. James Harrison Rigg, Principal of Westminster Training College, who dominated his church and who made friendships with senior politicians of the day. The book also Looks in depth at the influence of anti-Catholicism, which was rampant in the Methodist church of the era. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Abbreviations

ch. 1 Introduction: Methodism and Education before 1859
ch. 2 The Ascendancy of Dr. J. H. Rigg
ch. 3 The Wesleyans and the 1870 Education Act
ch. 4 The Wesleyan Church in the School Board Era, 1871-1875
ch. 5 The Wesleyans and the Sandon Education Act, 1874-1876
ch. 6 The Wesleyan Educational Decline, 1877-1885
ch. 7 The Wesleyans and the Cross Commission, 1885-1891
ch. 8 The Free Education Issue, 1884-1891
ch. 9 Dr. Rigg's Last Years of Influence, 1892-1902
ch. 10 What Manner of Man was James Harrison Rigg?

App. A Number of Wesleyan Schools and Scholars
App. B Statistics of the Committee of Council on Education
App. C Rate of Annual Grant per Scholar in Average Attendance
App. D J. H. Rigg's Placements
App. E Presidents of the Methodist Conference

Bibliography
Index
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Between Church and State

Book
Fraser, James W.
1999
St. Martin's Griffin, New York, NY
LC111.F68 1999
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
At the end of the twentieth century, the ongoing battle between religion and public education is once again a burning issue in the United States. In this book, James Fraser shows that though these battles have been going on for as long as there have been public schools, there has never been any consensus about the proper relationship between religion and public education. Looking at the most difficult question of ...
Additional Info:
At the end of the twentieth century, the ongoing battle between religion and public education is once again a burning issue in the United States. In this book, James Fraser shows that though these battles have been going on for as long as there have been public schools, there has never been any consensus about the proper relationship between religion and public education. Looking at the most difficult question of how private issues of faith can be reconciled with the very public nature of schooling, James Fraser paints a picture of our multicultural society that takes our relationship with God into account. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 From Holy Commonwealth to the Strange Compromise of 1789
ch. 2 Creating an American Common School and a Common Faith: Horace Mann and the Protestant Public Schools, 1789-1860
ch. 3 Who Defines What Is Common? Roman Catholics and the Common School Movement, 1801-1892
ch. 4 Literacy in the African American Community: Church and School in Slave and Free Communities, 1802-1902
ch. 5 Native American Religion, Christian Missionaries, and Government Schools, 1819-1926
ch. 6 Protestant, Catholic, Jew: Immigration and Nativism from the Blaine Amendment to the Scopes Trial, 1875-1925
ch. 7 Prayer, Bible Reading, and Federal Money: The Expanding Role of Congress and the Supreme Court, 1925-1968
ch. 8 Culture Wars, Creationism, and the Reagan Revolution, 1968-1990
ch. 9 Changing School Boards, Curriculum, and the Constitution, 1990-
ch. 10 What's Next? Prayers, Vouchers, and Creationism: The Battle for the Schools of the Twenty-First Century

Notes
For Further Reading
Index
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Academic Freedom and Christian Scholarship

Book
Diekema, Anthony J.
2000
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
LC72.2.D54 2000
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
The dawning of the second millennium finds many Christian colleges and universities in a search for identity. Grappling with the often confused and misunderstood topic of academic freedom is essential to defining this identity. This new book by a widely respected practitioner offers the most articulate and informed discussion of academic freedom available. Anthony Diekema, who has spent the past forty years in higher education, provides a practical perspective on ...
Additional Info:
The dawning of the second millennium finds many Christian colleges and universities in a search for identity. Grappling with the often confused and misunderstood topic of academic freedom is essential to defining this identity. This new book by a widely respected practitioner offers the most articulate and informed discussion of academic freedom available. Anthony Diekema, who has spent the past forty years in higher education, provides a practical perspective on the much-maligned topic of academic freedom. The volume offers reflection on the extensive scholarly literature on academic freedom against the backdrop of personal experience. In the course of the book Diekema develops a sound working definition of the concept of academic freedom, assesses the threats it faces, acknowledges the significance of worldview in its implementation, explores the policy implications for its protection and promotion in Christian colleges, and provides some practical advice to those who are called to address the subject of academic freedom in their own institutions. As one might expect from a college president on a subject most often addressed by faculty—and among them usually by those who have been the “target” of actual academic freedom cases—this book is neither a totally sympathetic nor a thoroughly intellectual essay. Hoping to incite as well as to inform, Diekema, an unabashed defender of academic freedom, seeks to prescribe some movement in an academy that has lost its way toward an ethos of freedom. Critical yet constructive and hopeful, this volume is must reading for college administrators, faculty members, boards of trustees, students, and influential constituents of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 The Search for Definition
ch. 3 Threats to Academic Freedom
Ideological Imperialism and Dogmatism
Political Correctness and Intolerance of Religion
Prior Restraint and Censorship
The "Chilling Effect" and Self-Censorship
Governmental and Institutional Influence
Toward Vigilance Against the Threats
ch. 4 Academic Freedom in the Context of Worldview
Worldview and Enlightenment Objectivity
Academic Freedom and Christian Worldview
Academic Freedom: Means or End?
Academic Freedom as Christian Freedom
Personal and Corporate Academic Freedom
ch. 5 Policy Development in the Christian College: Modest Proposal
Definitions of Academic Freedom
Academic Freedom and Faculty Tenure
A Socratic Covenant
Academic Freedom and Christian Scholarship
Academic Freedom: College and Church
Academic Freedom and Freedom of Speech
Protection and Promotion of Academic Freedom
ch. 6 Reflections:Toward an Ethos of Freedom

Appendix
An Expanded Statement of the Mission of Calvin College
Bibliography and Selected Reading List
Index
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Education, Religion, and the Common Good: Advancing a Distinctly American Conversation about Religion's Role in Our Shared Life

Book
Marty, Martin E.
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC111.M32 2000
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
The preeminent authority on religion in America advances an important public dialogue on the proper role of religion in educating and forming the next generation within a pluralist society. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The preeminent authority on religion in America advances an important public dialogue on the proper role of religion in educating and forming the next generation within a pluralist society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Why Read This Book?

Just What Are We Talking About, Anyway?
Why This Civil Conversation Is Urgent.
A Historical Map of the Present Situation.
Religion and Education: The Pitfalls of Engaging a Complex Issue.
Why Religion Belongs in Publicly Funded Primary and Secondary Education
The Religious Schooling Response.
Public Universities and Graduate Education.
Religion and Higher Education: A Specific AgAnda for Advancing the Conversation.
After Listening, a Time to Act.

Resources.
Notes.
The Author
. About the Public Religion Project.
Index.
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The Catholic University as Promise and Project: Reflections in a Jesuit Idiom

Book
Buckley, Michael J., S.J.
1998
Georgetown University Press, Washington, DC
LC501.B627 1998
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
The remarkable development of the Catholic university in the United States has raised questions about its continued identity, its promise, and its academic constituents. Michael J. Buckley, S.J., explores these issues, especially as they have been experienced in the history and contemporary commitments of Jesuit higher education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The remarkable development of the Catholic university in the United States has raised questions about its continued identity, its promise, and its academic constituents. Michael J. Buckley, S.J., explores these issues, especially as they have been experienced in the history and contemporary commitments of Jesuit higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

Pt. 1 Crisis, Choice, and the Catholic University
ch. 1 The Catholic University and the Promise Inherent in its Identity
ch. 2 The Church and its Responsibility to Foster Knowledge
ch. 3 A Conversation with a Friend

Pt. 2 "The Universities of the Society"
ch. 4 Ignatius' Understanding of the Jesuit University
ch. 5 Humanism and Jesuit Theology

Pt. 3 Contemporary Signs of Contradiction
ch. 6 The Search for a New Humanism: The University and the Concern for Justice
ch. 7 The Catholic University as Pluralistic Forum

Pt. 4 Towards the Love of Wisdom
ch. 8 Philosophic Grammar and the Other Disciplines
ch. 9 Wisdom, Religion, and the Liberal Arts: Towards the Construction of Theology

Notes
Index
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Rituals, Ceremonies, and Cultural Meaning in Higher Education

Book
Manning, Kathleen
2000
Bergin & Garvey, Westport, CT
LC191.9.M26 2000
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
College students and graduates have fond memories of campus events such as commencement, founder's days, convocations, and baccalaureate. These events, defined as rites of passage, secular ceremonies, or cultural performances, create a special feel to a campus remembered for years to come. Borrowing from interpretive anthropology, the author spotlights the following ideas: culture is revealed and forms of life are expressed through the actions and words of community members; human ...
Additional Info:
College students and graduates have fond memories of campus events such as commencement, founder's days, convocations, and baccalaureate. These events, defined as rites of passage, secular ceremonies, or cultural performances, create a special feel to a campus remembered for years to come. Borrowing from interpretive anthropology, the author spotlights the following ideas: culture is revealed and forms of life are expressed through the actions and words of community members; human communities are dynamic, complex, and ever-changing environments revealed through analysis of cultural events; and commonplace rituals and ceremonies play a central role in the cultural work of human meaning. The purpose of the book is to explore campus culture as revealed through rituals and ceremonies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

The Rituals of Higher Education
Presidential Inauguration
Rites of Passage: Structuralism
Charter Day
Secular Ceremonies: Action, Order, and Evocation
Second Semester Convocation
Structure, Communitas, and Liminality
Baccalaureate
Cultural Performances: Rehearsals and Informality
Junior Show
Messages, Meanings, and Root Paradigms
Mary Lyon's Birthday Celebration
Old Traditions in New Places: The Oxymoron of "New" Rituals
Alumnae Parade and Laurel Chain
Constructivist Inquiry and Higher Education Rituals

References
Index
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The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education

Book
Hart, D.G.
1999
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
BL41.H38 1999
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
In The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education, historian D. G. Hart examines the rise of religion to its current place as one of the largest academic disciplines in contemporary higher education. Protestant ministers and faculty were especially influential in arguing for the importance of religion to a truly "liberal" education, staffing departments and designing curricula to reflect their own Protestant assumptions about the value of religion ...
Additional Info:
In The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education, historian D. G. Hart examines the rise of religion to its current place as one of the largest academic disciplines in contemporary higher education. Protestant ministers and faculty were especially influential in arguing for the importance of religion to a truly "liberal" education, staffing departments and designing curricula to reflect their own Protestant assumptions about the value of religion not just for higher education but for American culture in general. Though many educators originally found religion too sectarian and unscientific for colleges and universities, religious studies nevertheless emerged after World War II as a crucial element of a liberal education.

But the success of mainstream Protestantism in fostering the academic study of religion has become the field's greatest burden. Over the last twenty-five years, religion scholars have distanced themselves from traditional Protestant orientations while looking for topics better suited to America's cultural diversity. As a result, religion is in the awkward position of being one of the largest scholarly disciplines while simultaneously lacking a solid academic justification. It may be time, Hart argues, for academics to stop trying to secure a religion-friendly university.

The first sustained history of the academic study of religion at American universities, The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education is a timely book that explores the present-day implications of religious studies' Protestant past. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface and Acknowledgments
Introduction: Why Study Religion?

Part I: The Age of the University, 1870-1925
ch. 1 Enlightened Christianity and the Founding of the University
ch. 2 Protestant Divinity in the Shadow of the University
ch. 3 The Emergence of a Pattern

Part II: The Age of the Protestant Establishment, 1925-1965
ch. 4 Religious Studies and the Humanities
ch. 5 Finding a Place for Theology
ch. 6 The Good Book for Tough Times
ch. 7 Church History for the Nation

Part III: The Age of the American Academy of Religion, 1965-Present
ch. 8 Religious Studies and the Failure of the Christian Academy
ch. 9 Religious Studies in Post-Protestant America
ch. 10 Religious Studies, the Would-be Discipline

Conclusion: Whither Religion in the University?
Notes
Bibliographical Essay
Index
Article cover image

"Revitalizing Religion in the Academy"

Article
Mahoney, Kathleen A, John Schmalzbauer and James Youniss
Summary of the Evaluation of Lilly Endowment's Initiative on Religion & Higher Education, Chestnut Hill, MA
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This report provides an evaluation of the research and conversations on religion and higher education that the Lilly Endowment has sponsored. Chief among the report's findings is the emergence of a movement to revitalize religion in higher education that gathered momentum in the 1990s.
Additional Info:
This report provides an evaluation of the research and conversations on religion and higher education that the Lilly Endowment has sponsored. Chief among the report's findings is the emergence of a movement to revitalize religion in higher education that gathered momentum in the 1990s.
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The Sacred and The Secular University

Book
Roberts, Jon H. and James Turner
2000
Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ
LA636.7.R62 2000
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
American higher education was transformed between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of World War I. During this period, U.S. colleges underwent fundamental changes--changes that helped to create the modern university we know today. Most significantly, the study of the sciences and the humanities effectively dissolved the Protestant framework of learning by introducing a new secularized curriculum. This secularization has long been recognized as a decisive ...
Additional Info:
American higher education was transformed between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of World War I. During this period, U.S. colleges underwent fundamental changes--changes that helped to create the modern university we know today. Most significantly, the study of the sciences and the humanities effectively dissolved the Protestant framework of learning by introducing a new secularized curriculum. This secularization has long been recognized as a decisive turning point in the history of American education. Until now, however, there has been remarkably little attention paid to the details of how this transformation came about. Here, at last, Jon Roberts and James Turner identify the forces and explain the events that reformed the college curriculum during this era.

The first section of the book examines how the study of science became detached from theological considerations. Previously, one of the primary pursuits of "natural scientists" was to achieve an understanding of the workings of the divine in earthly events. During the late nineteenth century, however, scientists reduced the scope of their inquiries to subjects that could be isolated, measured, and studied objectively. In pursuit of "scientific truth," they were drawn away from the larger "truths" that they had once sought. On a related path, social scientists began to pursue the study of human society more scientifically, attempting to generalize principles of behavior from empirically observed events.

The second section describes the revolution that occurred in the humanities, beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, when the study of humanities was largely the study of Greek and Latin. By 1900, however, the humanities were much more broadly construed, including such previously unstudied subjects as literature, philosophy, history, and art history. The "triumph of the humanities" represented a significant change in attitudes about what constituted academic knowledge and, therefore, what should be a part of the college curriculum.

The Sacred and the Secular University rewrites the history of higher education in the United States. It will interest all readers who are concerned about American universities and about how the content of a "college education" has changed over the course of the last century. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreward
Acknowledgements
Introduction by John F. Wilson

Part One: The Sciences
ch. 1 Religion, Science, and Higher Education
ch. 2 The Emergence of the Human Sciences
ch. 3 Knowledge and Inquiry in the Ascendant

Part Two: The Humanities
ch. 4 The Triumph of the Humanities
ch. 5 The Boon and Bane of Specialization
ch. 6 Two Ideals of Knowledge
ch. 7 For and against Secularization
Notes
Index
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Models for Christian Higher Education: Strategies for Success in the Twenty-First Century

Book
Hughes, Richard T. and William B. Adrian
1997
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
LC427 .M63 1997
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This timely look at the state of Christian higher education in America contains descriptive, historical narratives that explore how fourteen Christian colleges and universities are successfully integrating faith and learning on their campuses despite the challenges posed by the increasingly pluralistic nature of modern culture. Written by respected representatives from seven major faith traditions - Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Reformed, Mennonite, Evangelical, Wesleyan/Holiness, and Baptist/Restorationist - these narratives are ...
Additional Info:
This timely look at the state of Christian higher education in America contains descriptive, historical narratives that explore how fourteen Christian colleges and universities are successfully integrating faith and learning on their campuses despite the challenges posed by the increasingly pluralistic nature of modern culture. Written by respected representatives from seven major faith traditions - Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Reformed, Mennonite, Evangelical, Wesleyan/Holiness, and Baptist/Restorationist - these narratives are also preceded by introductory essays that define the worldview and theological heritage of each given tradition and ask what that tradition can contribute to the task of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction
What Can the Roman Catholic Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Faith and Learning at the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University
The University of Portland: Center of Christian Humanism
What Can the Lutheran Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Religious Vision and Academic Quest at St. Olaf College
Faith and Learning at California Lutheran University
What Can the Reformed Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Piety and Progress: A History of Calvin College
Whitworth College: Evangelical in the Reformed Tradition
What Can the Mennonite Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Goshen College and Its Church Relations: History and Reflections
Religious Idealism and Academic Vocation at Fresno Pacific College
What Can the Evangelical/Interdenominational Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Faith and Learning at Wheaton College
Clarity through Ambiguity: Transforming Tensions at Seattle Pacific University
What Can the Wesleyan/Holiness Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
The History and Character of Messiah College, 1909-1995
Point Loma Nazarene College: Modernization in Christian Higher Education
What Can the Baptist Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Christian Identity and Academic Rigor: The Case of Samford University
What Can the Church of Christ Tradition Contribute to Christian Higher Education?
Faith and Learning at Pepperdine University
The Christian University: Maintaining Distinctions in a Pluralistic Culture
Notes on Contributors
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How Christian Faith Can Sustain the Life of the Mind

Book
Hughes, Richard T.
2001
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
LC383.H84 2001
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Can Christian Faith sustain the life of the mind? To many academics this question seems absurd. In their judgment, religion is fundamentally dogmatic, whereas the life of the mind requires openness, creativity, and imagination. This assumption about the nature of religion in general, and Christianity in particular, has contributed significantly over the past century to the divorce between faith and learning at countless colleges and universities in the United States.<...
Additional Info:
Can Christian Faith sustain the life of the mind? To many academics this question seems absurd. In their judgment, religion is fundamentally dogmatic, whereas the life of the mind requires openness, creativity, and imagination. This assumption about the nature of religion in general, and Christianity in particular, has contributed significantly over the past century to the divorce between faith and learning at countless colleges and universities in the United States.

In this powerful -- yet very personal -- reflection on faith and scholarship, Richard T. Hughes counters the widespread perception of Christians as steeped in narrowness and dogmatism, and provides a compelling argument that faith, properly pursued, in fact nourishes the openness and curiosity that make a life of the mind possible. Neither an assessment of contemporary church-related higher education nor a lamentation over the process of secularization, this book is instead a badly needed aid for academics in both private and public institutions who want to connect Christian faith with scholarship and teaching in meaningful and effective ways.

Defining the "life of the mind" in terms of disciplined search for truth, genuine conversation with diverse viewpoints, critical thinking and analysis, and intellectual creativity, Hughes shows that such life, far from being impeded by Christian faith, can actually be enhanced by it -- but only if Christians learn to think theologically and to break through the particularities of their own traditions.

Hughes first examines the way the deism of the Founding Fathers defines the values of the modern academy in the United States, and he asks how the Christian tradition might interact with these values in meaningful ways. He then looks at four different Christian traditions -- Catholic, Reformed, Anabaptist, and Lutheran -- and the different ways they sustain the life of the mind. When he turns to teaching, Hughes uses his own classroom work as an illustration of how a commitment to some of the great themes of Christian theology can undergird both the form and the content of the teaching task. Finally, in an especially poignant chapter, Hughes explores how good teaching and scholarship can be rooted in human suffering and tragedy.

After a spate of books and articles that merely mourn the decline of Christian intellectual life, here -- at last -- is a volume that offers a constructive assessment of how Christian faith can indeed sustain the life of the mind. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface and Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 The Religion of the Republic and the Life of the Mind
ch. 3 Christian Faith and the Life of the Mind
ch. 4 The Power of Christian Traditions
ch. 5 What Might It Mean to Teach from a Christian Perspective?
ch. 6 The Questions of Distinctiveness and Proclamation

Postscript: Tragedy, Christian Faith, and the Life of the Mind
Personal Reflections
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Journal of Beliefs and Values: Studies in Religion and Education, vol. 22, no. 1

Journal Issue
Campbell, William S., ed.
2001
Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education in the United Kingdom., Taylor & Francis Ltd., UK
BL41.J68 v.22 no.1 2001
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Some Patterns and Processes of Women's Faith Development (Nicola Slee)
ch. 2 On Understanding Worship in School Part Two: on worship and educating (M. C. Felderhof)
ch. 3 Secularism, Religion and Spiritual Development (David Smith)
ch. 4 From Transcendence to Ethics: shaping spirituality to schools (Jacqueline Watson)
ch.5 The Social and Communal Aspects of Urban Spirituality: See-Judge-Act and the urban context (Andrew Dawson)
ch. 6. Evaluative RE? A response to two articles by Andrew Wright on hermeneutics and religious understanding (Brenda Watson)
ch. 7 Dramatising the 'Health and Wealth Gospel': belief and practice of a neo-Pentecostal 'Faith' ministry (Stephen Hunt)
ch. 8 Religious Requirement: the case for Roman Catholic schools in the 1940s and Muslim schools in the 1990s (Jeremy Hurst)
ch. 9 Religiosity, Prosocial Values, and Adjustment among Students in Catholic High Schools in Canada (Eduard H. Schludermann, Shirin M. Schludermann, and Cam-Loi Huynh)
ch. 10 Teaching Theology to Undergraduates: are mature students easier to please? (Jeff Astley & Leslie J. Francis)
ch. 11 Dual Identity - A Real Possibility (Kathy Ehrensperger)
ch. 12 No Shame: the triumph of theology at the movies (Christopher Deacy)
ch. 13 Life After 'Life After Life': twenty-five years of near death studies (Mark Fox)
Cover image
Wabash tree

Religion, Scholarship, & Higher Education: Perspectives, Models, and Future Prospects

Book
Sterk, Andrea, ed.
2002
University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, IN
LC383.L49 2002
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Underneath its dry, scholarly title, this collection of essays is a lively read not only for scholars, institutional administrators and foundation officers, but for anyone interested in the evolving role of religion in American intellectual life over the last half century. The product of a three-year Lilly Foundation Seminar on Religion and Higher Education, this well-edited book is comprised of short, thought-provoking pieces from some of the country's leading lights ...
Additional Info:
Underneath its dry, scholarly title, this collection of essays is a lively read not only for scholars, institutional administrators and foundation officers, but for anyone interested in the evolving role of religion in American intellectual life over the last half century. The product of a three-year Lilly Foundation Seminar on Religion and Higher Education, this well-edited book is comprised of short, thought-provoking pieces from some of the country's leading lights in the humanities and social sciences. Divided into parts, the book addresses foundational issues, the theme of religion and scholarship, and teaching. Philosopher of religion Nicholas Wolterstorff opens the first essay with a question: What has moved the topic of religion and scholarship "from small pockets of inquiry out into the open public arena"? Postmodernism's interest in the "perspectival" has brought new prominence to old questions of religious thinkers and institutions. How do religious colleges retain and renew their identity in face of increasingly diverse student bodies and new opportunities for government funding, particularly in the natural sciences? Authors offer creative, religiously grounded possibilities for their disciplines: for example, a sacramental political theory and a vision of contemporary literary theory as a revival of Augustine's insights on language and finitude. In first-person reflections, this collection offers a vivid and informative account of religion and scholarship over the last few decades and poses constructive questions for its future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Preface

Pt. I Foundational Issues and Concerns
ch. 1 Scholarship Grounded in Religion (Nicholas Wolterstorff)
ch. 2 Does Religion Have Anything Worth Saying to Scholars? (James Turner)
ch. 3 The Potential for Pluralism: Religious Responses to the Triumph of Theory and Method in American Academic Culture (Alan Wolfe)
ch. 4 Enough Already: Universities Do Not Need More Christianity (David A. Hollinger)
ch. 5 Where Are the Universities of Tomorrow? (Mark R. Schwehn)

Pt. II Religion and Scholarship: Disciplinary Perspectives
ch. 6 Faith Histories (John McGreevy)
ch. 7 Sociology and the Study of Religion (Nancy T. Ammerman)
ch. 8 What We Make of a Diminished Thing: Religion and Literary Scholarship (Roger Lundin)
ch. 9 Historical Theology Today and Tomorrow (Brian E. Daley)
ch. 10 Institutions and Sacraments: The Catholic Tradition and Political Science (Clarke E. Cochran)
ch. 11 Selving Faith: Feminist Theory and Feminist Theology Rethink the Self (Seren Jones)
ch. 12 Religious Concerns in Scholarship: Engaged Fallibilism in Practice (Richard J. Bernstein)

Pt. III Religious Perspectives and Teaching: Reflections on Practice
ch. 13 Teaching History as a Christian (Mark A. Noll)
ch. 14 Questions of Teaching (Denis Donoghue)
ch. 15 Teaching and Religion in Sociology (Robert Wuthnow)
ch. 16 Does, or Should, Teaching Reflect the Religious Perspective of the Teacher? (Jean Bethke Elshtain)
ch. 17 "Stopping the Heart": The Spiritual Search of Students and the Challenge to a Professor in an Undergraduate Literature Class (Susan Handelman)

Concluding Reflections on the Lilly Seminar (Francis Oakley)
Epilogue (Nicholas Wolterstorff)
Members of the Lilly Seminar on Religion and Higher Education
Article cover image

"The Opening of the Evangelical Mind"

Article
Wolfe, Alan
2000
The Atlantic Monthly 286, no. 4 (2000): 55-76.
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Of all America's religious traditions, the author writes, evangelical Protestantism, at least in the twentieth-century conservative forms, has long ranked "dead last in intellectual stature." Now evangelical thinkers are trying to revitalize their tradition. Can they turn an intellectual backwater into an intellectual beacon?
Additional Info:
Of all America's religious traditions, the author writes, evangelical Protestantism, at least in the twentieth-century conservative forms, has long ranked "dead last in intellectual stature." Now evangelical thinkers are trying to revitalize their tradition. Can they turn an intellectual backwater into an intellectual beacon?
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The Idea of a Catholic University

Book
O'Brien, George Dennis
2002
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LC487.O23 2002
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
George Bernard Shaw thought that a Catholic university was a contradiction in terms--"university" represents intellectual freedom and "Catholic" represents dogmatic belief. Scholars, university administrators, and even the Vatican have staked out positions debating Shaw's observation. In this refreshing book, George Dennis O'Brien argues that contradiction arises both from the secular university's limited concept of academic freedom and the church's defective notion of dogma. Truth is a central concept for ...
Additional Info:
George Bernard Shaw thought that a Catholic university was a contradiction in terms--"university" represents intellectual freedom and "Catholic" represents dogmatic belief. Scholars, university administrators, and even the Vatican have staked out positions debating Shaw's observation. In this refreshing book, George Dennis O'Brien argues that contradiction arises both from the secular university's limited concept of academic freedom and the church's defective notion of dogma. Truth is a central concept for both university and church, and O'Brien's book is built on the idea that there are different areas of truth--scientific, artistic, and religious--each with its own proper warrant and "method." In this light, he argues that one can reverse Shaw's comparison and uncover academic dogma and Christian freedom, university "infallibility" and dogmatic "fallibility."

Drawing on theology and the history of philosophy, O'Brien shows how religious truth relates to the work of a Catholic university. He then turns to the current controversies over Pope John Paul II's recent statement, Ex Corde Ecclesiae, which seeks to make Catholic universities conform to the church's official teaching office. O'Brien rejects the conventional "institutional-juridical" model used by the Vatican as improper both to faith and academic freedom. He argues for a "sacramental" model, one that respects the different kinds of "truth"--thus preserving the integrity of both church and university while making their combination in a Catholic university not only possible but desirable. O'Brien concludes with a practical consideration of how the ideal Catholic university might be expressed in the actual life of the contemporary curriculum and extracurriculum.

For anyone concerned about the place of religion in higher education, The Idea of a Catholic University will be essential reading. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Biblical Foundations of the Modern University
ch. 2 Science: The Truth of Universities
ch. 3 Art: Signatured Truth
ch. 4 Religion: Truth of Presence
ch. 5 "I Am the Truth"
ch. 6 Academic Dogma and Catholic Freedom
ch. 7 Fallible Church and Infallible Academy or Infallible Church and Fallible Academy
ch. 8 A Thought Experiment: A Holocaust University
ch. 9 Ex Corde Ecclesiae
ch. 10 Lex Orandi, Lex Credendi
ch. 11 A Contrarian University
ch. 12 Practical/Praxis Postscript

Notes
Index
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Exiles from Eden: Religion and the Academic Vocation in America

Book
Schwehn, Mark R.
1993
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
LB1778.2.S38 1993
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Exiles From Eden sounds a call to the American academic community to begin seeking a solution to the many problems facing higher education today by rediscovering a proper sense of its vocation. Schwehn argues that the modern university has forgotten its spiritual foundations and that it needs to reappropriate those foundations before it can creatively and responsibly reform itself. The first part of the book offers a critical examination of ...
Additional Info:
Exiles From Eden sounds a call to the American academic community to begin seeking a solution to the many problems facing higher education today by rediscovering a proper sense of its vocation. Schwehn argues that the modern university has forgotten its spiritual foundations and that it needs to reappropriate those foundations before it can creatively and responsibly reform itself. The first part of the book offers a critical examination of the ethos of the modern academy, especially its understanding of knowledge, teaching, and learning. Schwehn then formulates a description of the "new cultural context" within which the world of higher learning is presently situated. Finally, he develops a view of knowledge and inquiry that is linked essentially to character, friendship, and community. In the process, he demonstrates that the practice of certain spiritual virtues is and always has been essential to the process of genuine learning - even within the secular academy. Schwehn critiques philosophies of higher education he sees as misguided, from Weber and Henry Adams to Derek Bok, Allan Bloom, and William G. Perry, Jr., drawing out valid insights, while always showing the theological underpinnings of the so-called secular thinkers. He emphasizes the importance of community, drawing on both the secular communitarian theory of Richard Rorty and that of the Christian theorist Parker Palmer. Finally, he outlines his own prescription for a classroom-centered spiritual community of scholars. Exiles From Eden examines the relationship between religion and higher learning in a way that is at once historical and philosophical and that is both critical and constructive. It calls for nothing less than a reunion of the intellectual, the moral, and the spiritual virtues within the world of higher education in America. It will engage all those concerned with higher education in America today: faculty, students, parents, alumni, administrators, trustees, and foundation officers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The Academic Vocation
ch. 2 Communities of Learning
ch. 3 Spirited Inquiry
ch. 4 Questions and Considerations
ch. 5 Adams's Education
ch. 6 Conclusion: Adam's Exile

Index
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Making Sense of the Institutional Mission: Student Cultures at an Evangelical University: A Dissertation

Book
Mayer, Lanney
1997
University of California Press, Los Angeles, CA
BV4030.B45.2 1997
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introducing the issues: seeking coherence in undergraduate education
ch. 2 The Biola university saga: as integrationist orientation
ch. 3 Biola since 1981: The University
ch. 4 Student cultures: enhancing the institutional mission
ch. 5 Student Cultures: Non- Conformists, Outsiders, and Rebels
ch. 6 Making Sense of the Institutional Mission
ch. 7 Epilogue

Appendices
Bibliography
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Teaching for Commitment: Liberal Education, Indoctrination, and Christian Nurture

Book
Thiessen, Elmer John
1993
McGill-Queen's University Press, Buffalo, NY
BV1464.T465 1993
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
This book covers the fields of religion, philosophy, epistemology, ethics, and education. The very practical nature of the problem examined, and Thiessen's straightforward and non-technical presentation, will be of interest to parochial and public school boards, teachers, and parents, as well as religious groups, educationalists, and philosophers of education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book covers the fields of religion, philosophy, epistemology, ethics, and education. The very practical nature of the problem examined, and Thiessen's straightforward and non-technical presentation, will be of interest to parochial and public school boards, teachers, and parents, as well as religious groups, educationalists, and philosophers of education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 The Charge of Religious Indoctrination
ch. 2 Liberal Education: The Context of the Charge of Indoctrination
ch. 3 Content of Indoctrination and the Scientific Ideal
ch. 4 Methods of Indoctrination and the Ideal of Rationality
ch. 5 Intentions of the Indoctrinator and the Ideal of Autonomy
ch. 6 Consequences of Indoctrination and the Ideal of Critical Openness
ch. 7 Institutional Indoctrination and the Democratic Ideal of Liberal Institution
ch. 8 Religious Indoctrination Vs. Liberal Education: Some Conclusions
ch. 9 Some Practical Suggestions

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Taking Religion to School: Christian Theology and Secular Education

Book
Webb, Stephen H.
2000
Brazos Press, Grand Rapids, MI
LC111.W43 2000
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
In the modern university, religion is often taken to school--primarily in the sense of being critiqued, disciplined, and domesticated. In this provocative book, Stephen Webb steps into the middle of current controversies about the place of religion in secular high schools and colleges. Speaking explicitly as a Christian theologian, but also as one who accepts the reality of religious pluralism, Webb argues that the teaching of religion is itself a ...
Additional Info:
In the modern university, religion is often taken to school--primarily in the sense of being critiqued, disciplined, and domesticated. In this provocative book, Stephen Webb steps into the middle of current controversies about the place of religion in secular high schools and colleges. Speaking explicitly as a Christian theologian, but also as one who accepts the reality of religious pluralism, Webb argues that the teaching of religion is itself a religious activity, that teachers of religion should not disguise their own faiths in the classroom, and that high schools and universities should allow more--not less--space for religious voices.

Taking Religion to School, rather than rehearse tired debates, bursts with creative insight and strategic reframings of the crucial questions about religion and pedagogy. Webb's penetrating analysis and vivid autobiographical reflections will benefit professors of religious studies, high school teachers of religion, students, seminary-and university-based theologians, and all others concerned with the many points of contention over religious education in our day. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Teaching Religion Religiously

ch. 1. Confessions of a Theologian: How I Learned Why I Teach
ch. 2. Religion Lost and Found in Public Education
ch. 3. The Theology of Teaching and the Teaching of Theology
ch. 4. Classroom Confessions: Redeeming a Theological Trope for Pedagogy
ch. 5. Religion Amid the Ruins of the Postmodern University
ch. 6. The Mystery of the Disappearing Chaplain: A Case Study of Wabash College
ch. 7. Teaching the Freedom to Believe: A Dialogue with William C. Placher
ch. 8. Theology and Religious Studies: How Every Religion Teacher is a Theologian Now

Notes
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Religion in Higher Education: The Politics of the Multifaith Campus

Book
Gilliat-Ray, Sophie
2000
Ashgate Publishing Company, Burlington, VT
BL625.9.C64G55 2000
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Examines how the higher education sector in Britain has responded to changes due to religious diversity. Takes particular account of the perspectives of chaplains in higher education, and also considers the perspectives of religious, student-run, and academic organizations concerned with religion in universities. Explores the role that religion plays in shaping a new generation of British Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs, and examines issues such as the staffing of chaplaincies, religious ...
Additional Info:
Examines how the higher education sector in Britain has responded to changes due to religious diversity. Takes particular account of the perspectives of chaplains in higher education, and also considers the perspectives of religious, student-run, and academic organizations concerned with religion in universities. Explores the role that religion plays in shaping a new generation of British Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs, and examines issues such as the staffing of chaplaincies, religious dietary needs, and equal opportunity policies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Religion in Higher Education in Britain Since 1945
ch. 3 University Faith Communities: Diversity, Identity and Rights
ch. 4 Chaplaincies: Organisation, Funding and Staffing
ch. 5 Meeting Student Needs
ch. 6 Religion and the Corporate Life of Universities: Equal Opportunities?
ch. 7 Student Voices
ch. 8 Religion in Higher Education and Public Life: Some Conclusions

Appendices
References
Index
Article cover image

"Introduction to Religious Studies, Theology, and the University: Conflicting Maps, Changing Terrain"

Article
Cady, Linell and Delwin Brown
Council of Societies for the Study of Religion Bulletin 31, no. 4 (2002): 96-101
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Religion and Public Education: The Bible in the Bible Belt"

Article
Hedrick, Charles W.
Council of Societies for the Study of Religion Bulletin 31, no. 4 (2002): 90-94
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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The Life of the Mind: A Christian Perspective

Book
Williams, Clifford
2002
Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI
BT50.W475 2002
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
From the Publisher
"Those who ponder these pages will be renewed to love God with all their minds, to pursue truth, and to live faithfully."--David S. Dockery, Union University

What purpose do purely intellectual pursuits have in the lives of Christians? Why should Christians study subjects that have little bearing on their future careers and ministry? In a style reminiscent of the work of Arthur Holmes ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher
"Those who ponder these pages will be renewed to love God with all their minds, to pursue truth, and to live faithfully."--David S. Dockery, Union University

What purpose do purely intellectual pursuits have in the lives of Christians? Why should Christians study subjects that have little bearing on their future careers and ministry? In a style reminiscent of the work of Arthur Holmes and Harry Blamires, veteran professor of philosophy Clifford Williams addresses these issues and more in this succinct and accessible examination of the life of the mind.

Christians cultivating the life of the mind actively pursue situations and discussions that require experimentation, reflection, and perseverance. They are interested in the acquisition of knowledge that is both unrelated and directly related to their faith. Williams answers common Christian objections to such activities, describes the virtues of the person who engages in the life of the mind, and asserts that the life of the mind is justifiably a Christian calling.

The Life of the Mind, the newest addition to the RenewedMinds imprint, is directed toward students contemplating the importance of college and intellectual activity in general, but it will be enjoyed by all committed to developing a Christian mind.


Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Why Do We Like to Think?
ch. 2 Is Thinking Good for Its Own Sake?
ch. 3 The Effects of Thinking
ch. 4 Tensions between the Life of the Mind and Christian Faith
ch. 5 Is the Life of the Mind at Odds with Culture?
ch. 6 The Crowd and the Community
ch. 7 The Hermit and the Explorer

Appendix
Questions for Reflection
Notes
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Professing in the Postmodern Academy: Faculty and the Future of Church-Related Colleges

Book
Haynes, Stephen R., ed.
2002
Baylor University Press, Waco, TX
LC427.P75 2002
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
This work examines the landscape of religiously affiliated higher education in America from the perspective of faculty members critically committed to the future of church-related institutions. The book includes articles on a variety of topics from members of the Rhodes Consultation on the Future of the Church-Related College, a project that has involved ninety church-related institutions since 1996. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This work examines the landscape of religiously affiliated higher education in America from the perspective of faculty members critically committed to the future of church-related institutions. The book includes articles on a variety of topics from members of the Rhodes Consultation on the Future of the Church-Related College, a project that has involved ninety church-related institutions since 1996. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Preface

Pt. 1 Introduction
A Review of Research on Church-Related Higher Education (Stephen R. Haynes)
Pt. 2 Postmodern Opportunity
The Habit of Empathy: Postmodernity and the Future of the Church-Related College (Paul Lakeland)
Prolegomena to Any Postmodern Hope for the Church-Related College (Margaret Falls-Corbitt)
A Sense of Place and the Place of Sense (William J. Cahoy)

Pt. 3 Academic Vocation
Conversation and Authority: A Tension in the Inheritance of the Church-Related College (Richard Kyte)
Beyond the Faith-Knowledge Dichotomy: Teaching As Vocation (Elizabeth Newman)
The Erotic Imagination and the Catholic Academy (John Neary)

Pt. 4 Pedagogy and Praxis
"Academic" vs. "Confessional" Study of the Bible in the Postmodern Classroom: A Response to Philip Davies and David Clines (Julia M. O'Brien)
Teaching the Conflicts, For the Bible Tells Me So (Timothy K. Beal)
A Pedagogy of Eucharistic Accompaniment (Dominic P. Scibilia)

Pt. 5 Mission and Curriculum
One-Armed Embrace of Postmodernity: International Education and Church-Related Colleges (Ketih Graber Miller)
Religion and the Curriculum at Church-Related Colleges (Marcia Bunge)
From the Ties that Bind to Way-Stations: The Dynamics of Religious Commitment among Students and Their Families (D. Jonathan Grieser, and Corrie E. Norman)
Afterword: A Typology of Church-Related Colleges and Universities (Stephen R. Haynes)

Notes
Bibliography
Contributors
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Teaching as An Act of Faith

Book
Migliazzo, Arlin C.
2002
Fordham University Press, New York, NY
BL60.T43 2002
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Interest in church-related higher education has increased greatly in recent years. Teaching as an Act of Faith is a practical guidebook on strategies to incarnate mission and epitomize theological and theoretical reflection in the classroom. In original essays, distinguished practitioners from fourteen liberal arts disciplines and Roman Catholic, Wesleyan, Anabaptist, Lutheran, and Reformed traditions demonstrate how they have been able link religious values more directly to their teaching. (From the ...
Additional Info:
Interest in church-related higher education has increased greatly in recent years. Teaching as an Act of Faith is a practical guidebook on strategies to incarnate mission and epitomize theological and theoretical reflection in the classroom. In original essays, distinguished practitioners from fourteen liberal arts disciplines and Roman Catholic, Wesleyan, Anabaptist, Lutheran, and Reformed traditions demonstrate how they have been able link religious values more directly to their teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction: An Odyssey of the Mind and Spirit

Pt. 1 The Social Sciences
ch. 1 Teaching Economics While Keeping the Faith
ch. 2 Scuttling the Schizophrenic Student Mind: On Teaching the Unity of Faith and Learning in Psychology
ch. 3 At the Lectern Between Jerusalem and Sarajevo: A Christian Approach to Teaching Political Science
ch. 4 Sociology and Faith: Inviting Students into the Conversation

Pt. 2 The Natural Sciences
ch. 5 Developing a Christian Perspective on the Nature of Mathematics
ch. 6 Christian Theism: Alive and Well in the Physics and Astronomy Classroom
ch. 7 A Careful Convergence: Integrating Biology and Faith in the Church-Related College

Pt. 3 The Fine Arts
ch. 8 "I Love to Tell the Story:" Teaching Theatre at a Church-Related College
ch. 9 Toward a Christian Pedagogy of Art
ch. 10 Music Pedagogy and the Christian Faith: A Twenty-Year Journey of Discovery

Pt. 4 The Humanities
ch. 11 An Ignatian Approach to Teaching Philosophy
ch. 12 Teaching Literature as Mediation: A Christian Practice
ch. 13 Faith, Learning, and the Teaching of History
ch. 14 Christian Faith and the Teaching of Speech Communication

Conclusion: A Prudent Synergy: Pedagogy for Mind and Spirit
App Christianity and Higher Education: A Selected Bibliography
App Ecumenical Christian Professional Associations
Notes on Contributors
Index
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Religion on Campus

Book
Cherry, Conrad, Betty A. DeBerg, and Amanda Porterfield
2003
University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, NC
BL625.9.C64 C44 2001
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
The first intensive, close-up investigation of the practice and teaching of religion at American colleges and universities, Religion on Campus is an indispensable resource for all who want to understand what religion really means to today's undergraduates.

To explore firsthand how college students understand, practice, and learn about religion, the authors visited four very different U.S. campuses: a Roman Catholic university in the East, a state university ...
Additional Info:
The first intensive, close-up investigation of the practice and teaching of religion at American colleges and universities, Religion on Campus is an indispensable resource for all who want to understand what religion really means to today's undergraduates.

To explore firsthand how college students understand, practice, and learn about religion, the authors visited four very different U.S. campuses: a Roman Catholic university in the East, a state university in the West, a historically black university in the South, and a Lutheran liberal arts college in the North. They interviewed students, faculty members, and administrators; attended classes; participated in worship services; observed prayer and Bible study groups; and surveyed the general ethos of each campus. The resulting study makes fascinating and important reading for anyone--including students, parents, teachers, administrators, clergy, and scholars--concerned with the future of young Americans.

Challenging theories of the secularization of higher education and the decline of religion on campus, this book reveals that both the practice and the study of religion are thriving, nourished by a campus culture of diversity, tolerance, and choice.(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 West University
ch. 3 South University
ch. 4 East University
ch. 5 North College
ch. 6 Conclusion

App. A Research Methods
App. B In-Class Questionnaire

Index
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Religious Studies, Theology, and the University: Conflicting Maps, Changing Terrain

Book
Cady, Linell E. and Delwin Brown, eds.
2002
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
BV4020.R38 2002
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
This collection explores the highly contested relationship of religious studies and theology and the place of each, if any, in secular institutions of higher education. The founding narrative of religious studies, with its sharp distinction between teaching religion and teaching about religion, grows less compelling in the face of globalization and the erosion of modernism. These essays take up the challenge of thinking through the identity and borders of religious ...
Additional Info:
This collection explores the highly contested relationship of religious studies and theology and the place of each, if any, in secular institutions of higher education. The founding narrative of religious studies, with its sharp distinction between teaching religion and teaching about religion, grows less compelling in the face of globalization and the erosion of modernism. These essays take up the challenge of thinking through the identity and borders of religious studies and theology for our time. Reflecting a broad range of positions, the authors explore the religious/secular conceptual landscape that has dominated the modern West, and in the process address the revision of the academic study of religion and theology now underway. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction (Linell E. Cady and Delwin Brown)
ch. 2 The Study of Religion as an Anthropology of Credibility (Russell T. McCutcheon)
ch. 3 Why "Theology" Won't Work (Ivan Strenski)
ch. 4 Our Subject "Over There?" Scrutinizing the Distance Between Religion and Its Study (Christopher Chesnek)
ch. 5 Other People's Theologies: The New Hubris of History of Religions (Richard C. Martin)
ch. 6 Embodied Theology (Sam Gill)
ch. 7 From Theology to theology: The Place of "God-Talk" in Religious Studies (William D. Hart)
ch. 8 Territorial Disputes: Religious Studies and Theology in Transition (Linell E. Cady)
ch. 9 Academic Theology in the University or Why an Ex-Queen's Heir Should Be Made a Subject (Delwin Brown)
ch. 10 Rethinking Theology and Religious Studies(Sheila Greeve Davaney)
ch. 11 Religious Studies and the Alienation of Theology (Darrell J. Fasching)
ch. 12 The Place of Academic Theology in the Study of Religion from the Perspective of Liberal Education (Paula M. Cooey)
ch. 13 The Epistemic Publicity of Academic Black Theology (Frederick L. Ware)
ch. 14 Theology and Cultural Contest in the University (Kathryn Tanner)

Bibliography
Contributors
Index
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Religion in Public Life: A Dilemma for Democracy

Book
Thiemann, Ronald F.
1996
Georgetown University Press, Washington, DC
BR115.P7T475 1996
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Prayer in public schools, abortion, gay and lesbian rights - these bitterly divisive issues dominate American politics today, revealing deep disagreements over basic moral values. In a highly readable account that draws on legal arguments, political theory, and philosophy, Ronald F. Thiemann explores the proper role of religious convictions in American public life. He proposes that religion can and should play an active, positive part in our society even as ...
Additional Info:
Prayer in public schools, abortion, gay and lesbian rights - these bitterly divisive issues dominate American politics today, revealing deep disagreements over basic moral values. In a highly readable account that draws on legal arguments, political theory, and philosophy, Ronald F. Thiemann explores the proper role of religious convictions in American public life. He proposes that religion can and should play an active, positive part in our society even as it maintains a fundamental commitment to pluralist, democratic values. Arguing that both increased secularism and growing religious diversity since the 1960s have fragmented commonly held values, Thiemann observes that there has been an historical ambivalence in American attitudes towards religion in public life. He proposes abandoning the idea of an absolute wall between church and state and all the conceptual framework built around that concept in interpreting the First Amendment. He returns instead to James Madison's views and the Constitutional principles of liberty, equality, and toleration. Refuting both political liberalism (as too secular) and communitarianism (as failing to meet the challenge of pluralism), Thiemann offers a new definition of liberalism that gives religions a voice in the public sphere as long as they heed the Constitutional principles of liberty, equality, and toleration or mutual respect. The American republic, Thiemann notes, is a constantly evolving experiment in constructing a pluralistic society from its many particular communities. Religion can act as a positive force in its moral renewal, by helping to shape common cultural values. All those interested in finding solutions to today's divisive political discord, in finding ways to disagree civilly in a democracy, and in exploring the extent to which religious convictions should shape the development of public policies will find that this book offers an important new direction for religion and the nation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
ch. 1 Religion in Public Life: An American Dilemma
ch. 2 Our Contemporary Dilemma In Historical Perspective: Religion, Values, and the Framing of the Constitution
ch. 3 The Constitutional Tradition: A Perplexing Legacy
ch. 4 Political Liberalism and Public Religion
ch. 5 Political Liberalism Revisioned
ch. 6 Public Religion in a Pluralistic Democracy: A Proposal
ch. 7 Beyond the Wall of Separation: Reconceiving American Public Life
Index
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The Idea of a University

Book
Newman, John Henry
1996
Yale University Press, New Haven, CT
LB2321.N54 1996
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Since its publication almost 150 years ago, John Henry Cardinal Newman's The Idea of a University has had extraordinary influence on the shaping and goals of higher education. This important and accessible edition includes new essays by five leading scholars who explore the background and present day relevance of Cardinal Newman's themes, a biographical sketch of his life, questions for discussion, expanded notes, and a glossary of names. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Since its publication almost 150 years ago, John Henry Cardinal Newman's The Idea of a University has had extraordinary influence on the shaping and goals of higher education. This important and accessible edition includes new essays by five leading scholars who explore the background and present day relevance of Cardinal Newman's themes, a biographical sketch of his life, questions for discussion, expanded notes, and a glossary of names. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
University Teaching considered in nine discourses
University subjects discussed in occasional lectures and essays - four selections
Notes
Glossary
Journal cover image

Teaching Religious Studies and Theology in Community Colleges

Journal Issue
Edwards, Kerry, and Kassam, Tazim R., eds.
2002
Spotlight on Teaching 17, no. 3 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2002-10oct.pdf 
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2002-10oct.pdf 

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching Religious Studies and Theology in Community Colleges (Kerry Edward, Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Teaching Weekend Religion Classes Part-time at Red Rocks Community College (Joy Lapp)
ch. 3 Developing the Religious Studies Program At Tulsa Community College (Cherie Hughes)
ch. 4 Teaching Biblical Languages and Biblical Archaeology in the Community College (M. Douglas Nelson)
ch. 5 Comparative Religion from On Ground to Online: Design to Implementation (Paula A. Drewek)
ch. 6 The Pragmatic Dimension of the Community College and Its Impact on Religious Studies (Peter D. Jauhiainen)
ch. 7 Teaching Religion in Community Colleges (Mary Karen Solomon)
ch. 8 Weekend Warrior: Adventures in the Teaching Trade (Jan Briel)
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Christian Higher Education Volume 2 Number 1

Book
2003
Taylor & Francis
LC368.C46v.2no.1
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

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Journal Issue
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Journal Issue

Table Of Content:
ch.1 CHALLENGES TO CHRISTIAN HIGHER EDUCATION IN ASIA
ch. 2 CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITIES IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
ch. 3 CHALLENGES TO CHRISTIAN HIGHER EDUCATION IN ASIA: PERSPECTIVES OF A UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT
ch. 4 RELIGIOUS STUDIES IN CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITIES IN CONTEMPORARY ASIA: ITS RELATIONSHIP TO CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY
ch. 5 AN APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY INTO THE SPIRITUAL VALUES OF CHRISTIAN HIGHER EDUCATION

BOOK REVIEWS
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Christian Higher Education Volume 2 Number 2

Journal Issue
2003
Taylor & Francis
LC368.C46v.2no.2
Topics: Religion and Academia

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Journal Issue.
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Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 PRELIMINARY CONSIDERATIONS ON THEOLOGICAL DOCTORAL PROGRAM DESIGN IN AN AFRICAN CONTEXT
ch 2. DEFINING AND ARTICULATING COMMUNITY: EXAMPLES FROM SELECTED INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL OF CHRISTIAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
ch 3. THE GRADUATE INSTITUTE FOR APPLIED LINGUISTICS (GIAL): PREPARING HEART AND MIND FOR CROSSCULTURAL SERVICE
ch 4. PERILS OF THE LIFE OF THE MIND: LESSONS FROM THE GERMAN UNIVERSITY
ch 5. EXPLANATORY STYLES AMONG UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS IN CHRISTIAN HIGHER EDUCATION.
PART 1: A SINGLE-INSTITUTION CASE STUDY
BOOK REVIEWS The Future of Religious Colleges
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John Henry Newman and His Idea of a University -- Christian Higher Education Volume 2 Number 3

Journal Issue
Adrian, William ed.
2003
Christian Higher Education Volume 2 Number 3
LC368.C46v.2no.3
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

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Journal Issue.
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Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
John Henry Newman and His Idea of a University

Guest Editor's Introduction (William Adrian)

Newman's Idea of a University Makes Sense Today (Jose Morales Marin)

Newman and Pattison: The Predicament of a Secularized University (Kazuhiko Funakawa)

Newman's Idea and Chung Chi's Practice (Peter Tze Ming Ng, and Pan-chiu Lai)

Newman's Challenge to the Contemporary Academy (Stephen M. Fields)

The Craft of Teaching: The Relevance of Newman for Theological Education (Frederick D. Aquino)

Newman: A Proposal for Lifelong Education (Rosario Athie)

Far from Home: Newman and the Contemporary Liberal Arts College (Thomas L. Benson)
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THE CHRISTIAN COLLEGE EXPERIENCE AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPIRITUALITY AMONG STUDENTS

Journal Issue
2003
Christian Higher Education Volume 2 Number 4
LC368.C46v.2no.4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

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Journal Issue.
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Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The Christian College Experience and the Development of Spirituality Among Students
ch. 2 Spiritual Integration as a Predictor of Persistence at a Christian Institution of Higher Education
ch. 3 Explanatory Styles Among Undergraduate Students in a Christian and a State-supported Institution of Higher Education Part 2: A Comparative Analysis
Book Reviews
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Navigating The Currents Of Certification: A Case Study Of Hispanic Baptist Theological School

Journal Issue
2004
Christian Higher Education Volume 3 Number 1
LC368.C46v.3no.1
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

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Journal Issue.
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Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 NAVIGATING THE CURRENTS OF CERTIFICATION: A CASE STUDY OF HISPANIC BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL

ch. 2 INSTITUTIONAL TYPES, ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURES, AND INNOVATION IN CHRISTIAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

ch. 3 DIAPERS, DISSERTATIONS, AND OTHER HOLY THINGS: THE EXPERIENCES OF MOTHERS WORKING IN CHRISTIAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

ch. 4 SPIRITUAL PERSPECTIVE AND NEEDS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF NURSING FACULTY IN A CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY AND A STATE UNIVERSITY

ch. 5 PERSONAL AND ACADEMIC BACKGROUNDS OF FEMALE CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICERS in EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
Article cover image

"Beyond the Faith-Knowledge Dichotomy: Teaching as Vocation"

Article
Newman, Elizabeth
2002
in Professing in the Postmodern Academy : Faculty and the Future of Church-related Colleges (Waco, TX : Baylor University Press, 2002), 131-148
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia   |   Theological Education

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The PRS-LTSN Journal 1, no. 1

Journal Issue
2001
The PRS-LTSN Journal 1, no. 1 (University of Leeds, UK 2001)
BV1474 vo. 1 no. 1 2001
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

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Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Thinking, believing and sharing: editorial
ch. 2 Welcome from the Director (George MacDonald Ross)
ch. 3 The LTSN and the PRS-LTSN
ch. 4 QAA Benchmarking Project
ch. 5 Workshops, Events and Networks
ch. 6 Teaching Pjilosophy and HPS to Science Students (Geoffrey Cantor)
ch. 7 The Vision of God and its Impact on the Educational Process (William S. Campbell)
ch. 8 The Special Educational Needs and Disability Act: the Implications for PRS (Gary Bunt)
ch. 9 Cultivating Transferable Skills in Philosophy Undergraduates (Christopher Cowley)
ch. 10 Double Marking versus Monitoring of Examinations (Roger White)
ch. 11 Report on a History of Science, Technology and Medicine Workshop, Leeds, 30-31 May 2001 (Graeme Gooday)
ch. 12 Report of a Workshop on Teaching South Asian Religious Traditions, Centre for Applied South Asian Studies, University of Manchester, 18 May 2001 (Suthren Hirst, Searle-Chatterjee, and Nesbitt)
ch. 13 About the Journal
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"Personal Self-Disclosure, Religious Studies Pedagogy, and the Skeptical Mission of the Public University"

Article
Jaffee, Martin S., Steven Leonard Jacobs, Catherine M. Roach, Theodore Louis Trost, Kurtis R. Schaeffer and Tim Murphy
Council of Societies for the Study of Religion Bulletin 33, no 2 (2004): 27-50
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

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Educating for Shalom: Essays on Christian Higher Education

Book
Wolterstorff, Nicholas
2004
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
BV1464.W66 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
In addition to his notable work as a premier Christian philosopher, Nicholas Wolterstorff has become a leading voice on faith-based higher education. This volume gathers the best of Wolterstorff's essays from the past twenty-five years dealing collectively with the purpose of Christian higher education and the nature of academic learning.

Integrated throughout by the biblical idea of shalom, these nineteen essays present a robust framework for thinking about ...
Additional Info:
In addition to his notable work as a premier Christian philosopher, Nicholas Wolterstorff has become a leading voice on faith-based higher education. This volume gathers the best of Wolterstorff's essays from the past twenty-five years dealing collectively with the purpose of Christian higher education and the nature of academic learning.

Integrated throughout by the biblical idea of shalom, these nineteen essays present a robust framework for thinking about education that combines a Reformed confessional perspective with a radical social conscience and an increasingly progressivist pedagogy. Wolterstorff develops his ideas in relation to an astonishing variety of thinkers ranging from Calvin, Kuyper, and Jellema to Augustine, Aquinas, and Kant to Weber, Habermas, and MacIntyre. In the process, he critiques various models of education, classic foundationalism, modernization theory, liberal arts, and academic freedom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

Rethinking Christian Higher Education
Teaching for Shalom: On the Goal of Christian Collegiate Education
The Mission of the Christian College at the End of the Twentieth Century
The Integration of Faith and Learning - The Very Idea
On the Idea of a Psychological Model of the Person That Is Biblically Faithful
The Point of Connection between Faith and Learning
The World for Which We Educate
A Case for Disinterested Learning
The Project of a Christian University in a Postmodern Culture
Teaching for Justice: On Shaping How Students Are Disposed to Act
Autobiography: The Story of Two Decades of Thinking about Christian Higher Education
Can Scholarship and Christian Conviction Mix? Another Look at the Integration of Faith and Learning
Abraham Kuyper on Christian Learning
Particularist Perspectives: Bias or Access?
Academic Freedom in Religiously Based Colleges and Universities
Christian Learning In and For a Pluralist Society
Should the Work of Our Hands Have Standing in the Christian College?
What Is the Reformed Perspective on Christian Higher Education?
Call to Boldness: A Response to Fides et Ratio

Afterword
Bibliography
Index
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Mentoring for Mission: Nurturing New Faculty at Church-related Colleges

Book
Simon, Caroline J.
2003
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
LB1731.4.M46554 2003
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

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Simon presents Roman Catholic and Protestant perspectives on ways to nurture new faculty at church-related educational institutions, for those involved in administering faculty development programs and for those seeking advice on designing and implementing such programs. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Simon presents Roman Catholic and Protestant perspectives on ways to nurture new faculty at church-related educational institutions, for those involved in administering faculty development programs and for those seeking advice on designing and implementing such programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Mentoring as an Exercise of Practical Wisdom

ch. 1 Mentoring and Christian Mission
ch. 2 All Mentoring Is Local: Thinking about How Your Program Fits Your Institution
ch. 3 All Mentoring Is Personal: Making Sure Your Program Fits Your Faculty
ch. 4 Getting There from Here
ch. 5 Facing Challenges and Achieving Lasting Success
ch. 6 The Bottom Line: Outcomes of Mentoring

App. 1 Reflection Questions for Mentoring Directors
App. 2 Reflection and Discussion Questions for Mentor Training
App. 3 Questions for Mentors and New Faculty to Reflect on Together

Selected Topical Bibliography
Contributors
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Conceiving the Christian College: A College President Shares His Vision of Christian Higher Education

Book
Liftin, Duane
2004
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
LC383.L58 2004
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This book is designed to help those who are interested in Christian higher education explore anew the unique features, opportunities, and contemporary challenges of one distinct type of educational institution - the Christian college. What distinguishes Conceiving the Christian College from the many other books on this subject is its incisive discussion of a set of crucial ideas widely misunderstood in the world of Christian higher education. Now serving in ...
Additional Info:
This book is designed to help those who are interested in Christian higher education explore anew the unique features, opportunities, and contemporary challenges of one distinct type of educational institution - the Christian college. What distinguishes Conceiving the Christian College from the many other books on this subject is its incisive discussion of a set of crucial ideas widely misunderstood in the world of Christian higher education. Now serving in his eleventh year as president of one of the nation's foremost Christian colleges, Duane Litfin is well placed to ask pressing questions regarding faith-based education. What is unique about Christian colleges? What is required to sustain them? How do they maintain their bearing in the tumultuous intellectual seas of the twenty-first century? Litfin's themes are large, but they are meant to refocus the conceptual challenges to Christian education in ways that will strengthen both the academic environment of today's Christian colleges and their impact on culture at large. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Two academic models
Challenge : to understand more clearly our own identity
ch. 3 The centerpiece
Challenge : to see more fully whom we serve
ch. 4 A centered education
Challenge : to keep the center at the center
ch. 5 It's all God's truth
Challenge : to strengthen the foundations of Christian thought
ch. 6 A balanced epistemology
Challenge : to preserve the idea of truth
ch. 7 Integrative thinking : prolegomena
Challenge : to understand the integrative mandate
ch. 8 Doing integration
Challenge : to sustain our commitment to the integrative task
ch. 9 Faith and learning
Challenge : to reinforce our commitment to revealed truth
ch. 10 The voluntary principle
Challenge : to reconcile institutional commitments with individual freedoms
ch. 11 Institutional breadth
Challenge : to appreciate our institutional uniqueness
ch. 12 Our place in the academy
Challenge : to engender a more congenial academic environment
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Spotlight on Teaching about Religion in the Schools: Multiculturalism and the Academic Study of Religion in the Schools

Journal Issue
Grelle, Bruce; Naylor, D. Keith; and Freund, Richard A., eds.
2002
Spotlight on Teaching 17, no. 2 March
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2002-02mar.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2002-02mar.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Spotlight on Teaching about Religion in the Schools: Multiculturalism and the Academic Study of Religion in the Schools (Bruce Grelle; D. Keith Naylor; and Richard A. Freund)
ch. 2 Guidelines on Religion in Public Schools: An Historic Moment (Marcia Beauchamp)
ch. 3 University Religion Departments and Teaching about the Bible in Public High Schools: A Report from Florida (David Levenson)
ch. 4 Interview: A Teacher’s Perspective (Martha Ball)
ch. 5 Weighty Matters and the Teenage Reader (Jenna Weissman Joselit)
ch. 6 The Program in Religion and Secondary Education at Harvard Divinity School (Diane L. Moore)
ch. 7 The Religion and Public Education Resource Center (Bruce Grelle)
ch. 8 God, gods, and Godot: Thoughts on Teaching about Religion in Secondary Education (Matthew Hicks)
ch. 9 Religion and Education (Michael D. Waggoner)
ch. 10 Moses Who? Literacy, Citizenship, and the Academic Study of Religion in the Schools (Bruce Grelle)
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Issues in Teaching Religion and Theology in Great Britain

Journal Issue
Pyper, Hugh, and Freund, Richard S., eds.
2001
Spotlight on Teaching 16, no. 3 Fall
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2001-03fall.pdf 
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2001-03fall.pdf 

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Issues in Teaching Religion and Theology in Great Britain (Hugh Pyper, Richard A. Freund)
ch. 2 An Introduction to the Philosophical and Religious Studies Learning and Teaching Support Network (PRS-LTSN) (Hugh Pyper)
ch. 3 Teaching Systematic Theology in Britain Today (David Fergusson)
ch. 4 Teaching South Asian Religions in Britain (Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad)
ch. 5 A British Higher Education Perspective on Widening Access to Religious Studies through the Application of Internet Resources (Gary Bunt)
ch. 6 The Mutual Influence of Religious Education in Schools and Religious Studies/Theology in Universities in the English Context (Denise Cush)
ch. 7 Teaching Biblical Studies to Non-Traditional Students in British Higher Education (Bill Campbell)
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"Prayerful Teaching in Higher Education: A Survey of Themes"

Article
Lynn, Monty L.
2004
Christian Higher Education 3, no. 3 (2004): 261-276
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Prayer is a primary spiritual discipline for Christians. Nonetheless, few contemporary scholarly discussions have ventured into exploring the role of prayer in college teaching. This paper extends the conversation by reviving three themes in writings about prayer and academics and making application of those themes to teaching and learning today. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Prayer is a primary spiritual discipline for Christians. Nonetheless, few contemporary scholarly discussions have ventured into exploring the role of prayer in college teaching. This paper extends the conversation by reviving three themes in writings about prayer and academics and making application of those themes to teaching and learning today. (From the Publisher)
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"Ex Corde Universitatis: From the Heart of the University"

Article
O'Brien, George Dennis
2004
Christian Higher Education 3, no. 3 (2004): 277-294
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
This paper explores the place of religion within the assumptions of the modern research university. The issue for Christianity is essentially epistemic: Given the criteria for truth or plausibility that prevail in advanced academic communities, what are the warrants for Christian belief? Are the prevailing criteria defined such that Christian claims can have no epistemic standing? The modern-day clash between Christianity and academic discourse go to the heart of the ...
Additional Info:
This paper explores the place of religion within the assumptions of the modern research university. The issue for Christianity is essentially epistemic: Given the criteria for truth or plausibility that prevail in advanced academic communities, what are the warrants for Christian belief? Are the prevailing criteria defined such that Christian claims can have no epistemic standing? The modern-day clash between Christianity and academic discourse go to the heart of the differing projects. For the academy, issues are admitted at arm's length, while Christianity moves beyond discussion to decision, to trust and to faith. This paper is not another screed against the modern university. Instead, the author regards the modern university as one of the great inventions of the human mind, and the university today can boast of its humanistic ideology. The author considers the sciences and arts as marvels of human ingenuity and emotional insight. The place of Christian belief within academic humanism is pondered. (From the Publisher)
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"Service-Learning in Christian Higher Education: Bringing Our Mission to Life"

Article
Schaffer, Regan H.
2004
Christian Higher Education 3, no. 2 (2004): 127-145
Topics: Service Learning   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to develop a working definition of service-learning, identify the best practices of service-learning in the context of Christian colleges and universities and, based upon that information, develop a model for replication. The study undertaken included: (a) examination of the findings of unpublished data from a survey on service-learning at 90 Christian colleges and universities and notes from a conference on service-learning ...
Additional Info:
The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to develop a working definition of service-learning, identify the best practices of service-learning in the context of Christian colleges and universities and, based upon that information, develop a model for replication. The study undertaken included: (a) examination of the findings of unpublished data from a survey on service-learning at 90 Christian colleges and universities and notes from a conference on service-learning at faith-based institutions; (b) a thorough review of the literature on service-learning and the mission and purpose of Christian higher education; and (c) interviews with practitioners from seven Christian colleges or universities that met prescribed criteria for best practices in service-learning, A content analysis resulted in a comprehensive definition of service-learning, key elements of best practices in service-learning, and a model which incorporates guidelines for Christian colleges and universities to use when developing service-learning programs. The comprehensive definition incorporates characteristics from previous definitions, but includes an added component of institutional support for service-learning. The best practices in service-learning in Christian higher education corroborate this finding and include key elements. The model for designing a service-learning program at a Christian college builds further upon the definition and best practices and includes eight guidelines. The model guidelines are meant to address the philosophical and practical implications in designing an effective service-learning course and program in Christian institutions of learning. The data from this study strongly suggest that Christian colleges and universities should implement service-learning as a means of furthering their faith-based missions through their curricula. (From the Publisher)
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"Spirituality and Pedagogy: Faith and Reason in the Age of Assessment"

Article
Houck, Anita
2002
Spiritus 2, no. 1 (2002): 50-63
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

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"Religion, Religious Studies and Higher Education: Into the 21st Century"

Article
Henking, Susan E.
2004
Religious Studies Review 30, no. 2 (2004):129-136
Topics: Religion and Academia

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Religion in the Academy

Journal Issue
2006
Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning March/April (Heldref Publications: Washington DC)
LB2300.C4 v 38 n 2
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue
Additional Info:
Journal Issue

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The Evangelical Mind Revisited
ch. 2 A delicate Balance
ch. 3 Crating Identity-Safe Spaces on College Campuses For Muslim Students
ch. 4 From Hermeneutic to Homiletic
ch. 5 The Rise of Conservatism
ch. 6 Promotion and Tenure and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
ch. 7 Integrating Technology in Schools, Colleges, and Departments of Education
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Christianity and the Soul of the University: Faith as a Foundation for Intellectual Community

Book
Henry, Douglas V. and Michael D. Beaty, eds.
2006
Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI
BV639.C6C47 2006
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Leading scholars explore the role of faith in the university setting. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Leading scholars explore the role of faith in the university setting. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Pt. 1 Basic issues
ch. 1 The palpable word as ground of Koinonia (Richard B. Hays)
ch. 2 To serve God wittily, in the tangle of one's mind (Jean Bethke Elshtain)br> ch. 3 Christian interdisciplinarity (John C. Polkinghorne)
ch. 4 The Christian scholar in an age of world Christianity (Joel A. Carpenter)
ch. 5 Faith, fortitude, and the future of Christian intellectual community (David Lyle Jeffrey)

Pt. 2 Vital Practices
ch. 6 Doubt and the hermeneutics of delight (Susan M. Felch)
ch. 7 Christian hospitality in the intellectual community (Aurelie A. Hagstrom)
ch. 8 Communal conflict in the postmodern Christian university (Steven R. Harmon)
ch. 9 Moral imagination at a Christian institution (Daniel Russ and Mark L. Sargent)
ch. 10 American Protestantism and vocation in higher education (Daniel H. Williams)
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"Understanding the Study of Religion in Undergraduate Programs of Religious Studies as Religious Education"

Article
Bowman, Lorna
2006
Religious Education 101, no. 2 (2006): 143-146
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

"Scientology and Catholicism Do Mix: A Note on Teaching New Religions in a Catholic Classroom"

TTR
Schmalz, Mathew N.
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 1 (2006): 29-36
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This note from the classroom explores teaching new or alternative religions within the context of a Roman Catholic Liberal Arts College. The essay will specifically focus on a section of a course entitled "Modern Religious Movements" in which students were asked to consider different methodological approaches to the teaching and study of Scientology and the Catholic cult of the Virgin Mary. This note from the classroom details how this rather ...
Additional Info:
This note from the classroom explores teaching new or alternative religions within the context of a Roman Catholic Liberal Arts College. The essay will specifically focus on a section of a course entitled "Modern Religious Movements" in which students were asked to consider different methodological approaches to the teaching and study of Scientology and the Catholic cult of the Virgin Mary. This note from the classroom details how this rather unexpected comparison prompted students to reconsider the category cult and argues that encouraging self-reflexivity in a largely Catholic classroom can become a crucial means for engaging a broader discussion of new religions, cult discourse, and the academic study of religion itself.
TTR cover image

"De-schooling the Theological Seminary: An Appropriate Paradigm for Effective Ministerial Formation"

TTR
Harkness, Allan G.
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 3 (2001): 141-154
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
The most common paradigm of contemporary Protestant theological education for ministerial formation is that of schooling, seen in the institution of the theological seminary/college. This article notes the limitations of the schooling paradigm for educational intervention in the range of domains inherent in effective ministerial formation; recognizes that teaching and learning take different but still legitimate shape when used to describe educational processes in this context; and argues for ...
Additional Info:
The most common paradigm of contemporary Protestant theological education for ministerial formation is that of schooling, seen in the institution of the theological seminary/college. This article notes the limitations of the schooling paradigm for educational intervention in the range of domains inherent in effective ministerial formation; recognizes that teaching and learning take different but still legitimate shape when used to describe educational processes in this context; and argues for an integrated, formational, and missional community paradigm modeled especially on the relationship of Jesus with his disciples as being both more consistent with biblical precedents and more effective educationally. The implications of this for the role of faculty of theological institutions are explored.
TTR cover image

"Critical Encounters with Rabbinic Doctrines of Creation: The Teacher as Source of Authority or as Partner in Dialogue"

TTR
Goshen-Gottstein, Alon
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 3 (2001): 155-165
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
This is a case study based upon my experience of teaching an introduction to rabbinic thought to a group of Orthodox Jewish students. The study of one particular midrashic pericope allowed for major tensions between academic and religious approaches to the text to surface. The tension revolved around the apparent contradiction between the rabbinic mythical perception of creation as proceeding from primary negative matter and later philosophical belief in creatio ...
Additional Info:
This is a case study based upon my experience of teaching an introduction to rabbinic thought to a group of Orthodox Jewish students. The study of one particular midrashic pericope allowed for major tensions between academic and religious approaches to the text to surface. The tension revolved around the apparent contradiction between the rabbinic mythical perception of creation as proceeding from primary negative matter and later philosophical belief in creatio ex nihilo. This contradiction touches upon issues of authority and of interpretation. The article explores various strategies dealing with issues of authority in general and of the meaning of the individual text in particular. Following a presentation of these strategies I offer my reflections upon my role as a teacher in this context. Dialogue emerges as an important element in the teaching process, creating a common ground between teachers and students and making them partners in a common quest for the truth of the text. Traditional dialogical modes of Jewish learning serve as the basis for the introduction of the academic agenda. This agenda is introduced as an extension of classical religious concerns rather than as an alternative to them.
TTR cover image

"Caring about More: An Integrative Capstone Course Connecting Religious Studies with General Education"

TTR
Carlson, Jeffrey
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 2 (2001): 81-88
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
This paper describes and analyzes an "Integrating Seminar" capstone course for undergraduate religious studies majors, which has the following goals for student learning: (1) to reflect on the cumulative achievement of their studies of religion; (2) to take stock of their learning in liberal studies coursework; and (3) to explore the connections between these specialized and general learning experiences. Readings provided by the instructor and the students and discussions around them lead toward ...
Additional Info:
This paper describes and analyzes an "Integrating Seminar" capstone course for undergraduate religious studies majors, which has the following goals for student learning: (1) to reflect on the cumulative achievement of their studies of religion; (2) to take stock of their learning in liberal studies coursework; and (3) to explore the connections between these specialized and general learning experiences. Readings provided by the instructor and the students and discussions around them lead toward a final paper on this question: "In the context of becoming an educated person, what is religion, how do you know, and why do you care?" The paper concludes with some reflections on ways to better prepare students for this kind of integrated thinking through advising and ongoing colloquia.
TTR cover image

"Teaching Buddhism in the Postmodern University: Understanding, Critique, Evaluation"

TTR
Reynolds, Frank E.
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 1 (2001): 9-14
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
A contemporary liberal education in the humanities and social sciences should introduce students to the serious exploration of various kinds of worlds that human beings articulate and within which they live. Teachers in Buddhist studies can make a significant contribution by offering courses that focus attention on distinctively Buddhist worlds that are directly relevant to postmodern interests and concerns. These courses should also be designed to empower students with the ...
Additional Info:
A contemporary liberal education in the humanities and social sciences should introduce students to the serious exploration of various kinds of worlds that human beings articulate and within which they live. Teachers in Buddhist studies can make a significant contribution by offering courses that focus attention on distinctively Buddhist worlds that are directly relevant to postmodern interests and concerns. These courses should also be designed to empower students with the kind of interpretive skills that are needed in a postmodern environment to generate viable modes of sympathetic understanding, convincing forms of critical analysis, and the capacity to formulate and defend responsible personal and social judgments. This article is a revised version of the keynote lecture given at a McGill University conference on "Teaching Buddhism: The State of the Art," October 8–10, 1999.
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"Immigration, Exodus, and Exile: Academic Theology and Higher Education"

TTR
Cooey, Paula A.
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 3 (2000): 125-132
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Recently scholars of religion have disputed whether theology properly belongs to the study of religion in institutions of higher education (McCutcheon 1997a, 1997b; Cady 1998; Brown and Cady forthcoming). At the same time, religious authorities have increasingly censored the work of theologians in seminaries and church-related schools; witness the loyalty oaths required of scholars in religious studies programs at some Protestant denominationally related colleges and the Catholic Church's recent stand expressed ...
Additional Info:
Recently scholars of religion have disputed whether theology properly belongs to the study of religion in institutions of higher education (McCutcheon 1997a, 1997b; Cady 1998; Brown and Cady forthcoming). At the same time, religious authorities have increasingly censored the work of theologians in seminaries and church-related schools; witness the loyalty oaths required of scholars in religious studies programs at some Protestant denominationally related colleges and the Catholic Church's recent stand expressed by Ex Cordae Ecclessiae. Both scholars who would exclude theology as a field from the study of religion and ecclesiastical authorities who would censor it fail to acknowledge the emergence of academic theology as a field that does not depend on institutional religious affiliation or personal confession of faith, a field that by its nature does depend for its continued existence on academic freedom. This article suggests a working definition of academic theology and then poses three questions: What might studying different kinds of theology academically teach us about religion? How, properly speaking, is theology as performed in a non-sectarian environment now a nomad wandering within the formal study of religion? What are the implications of this shift in status for how academic theologians teach? The article is a revision of the inaugural address, by the same title, given for the Margaret W. Harmon professorship in Christian Theology and Culture at Macalester College, Saint Paul, Minnesota, November 18, 1999.
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"Active Learning for the Kingdom of God"

TTR
Lambert, Lake
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 2 (2000): 71-80
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
At the same time that teachers in theology and religion have been encouraged to consider how their personal identities affect their teaching, there has also been increased interest in active learning strategies. This essay argues that these two initiatives may be in conflict if the communal commitments of the instructor do not mirror the democratic commitments inherent to most active learning pedagogies. As a teacher of theology and ethics who ...
Additional Info:
At the same time that teachers in theology and religion have been encouraged to consider how their personal identities affect their teaching, there has also been increased interest in active learning strategies. This essay argues that these two initiatives may be in conflict if the communal commitments of the instructor do not mirror the democratic commitments inherent to most active learning pedagogies. As a teacher of theology and ethics who is ultimately not committed to democracy but to the Kingdom of God, I have sought to develop learning strategies which avoid student passivity while focusing on the church as a foretaste to God's Kingdom. My consideration of this dilemma has drawn me to the educational philosophies of both John Dewey and Stanley Hauerwas, and in response to them I outline an active learning strategy which envisions the Christian church as a living tradition with students as dialogue partners and contributors to it.
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"Teaching Religion Religiously: A Dialogue"

TTR
Webb, Stephen H. and William C. Placher
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 2 (2000): 81-87
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
Two theologians teaching religion at the same college engage in a dialogue about differences in their understandings of teaching religion in order to explore serious pedagogical and theological issues. Their reflections on their teaching touch on issues of learning goals, institutional identity, student freedom, faculty self-revelation, and the liberal arts that most teachers of religion face. Along the way, they explore the relation of pedagogy to theological topics like grace ...
Additional Info:
Two theologians teaching religion at the same college engage in a dialogue about differences in their understandings of teaching religion in order to explore serious pedagogical and theological issues. Their reflections on their teaching touch on issues of learning goals, institutional identity, student freedom, faculty self-revelation, and the liberal arts that most teachers of religion face. Along the way, they explore the relation of pedagogy to theological topics like grace and ecclesiology. We invite readers to join the conversation begun in this article by engaging Webb, Placher, and one another through the public discussion list we've created for this article on the Wabash Center Discussion Forum at http://ntweb.wabash.edu/wcdiscus/.
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"Teaching Theology and Religious Studies Is There A Problem?"

TTR
Thrower, James
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 2 (1999): 89-95
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
This paper discusses a problem which is largely, though not exclusively, peculiar to the older universities in Great Britain where, in recent years, many long-established departments of Christian theology have expanded their area of responsibility to include religious studies. However, the author believes that what he has to say is not without relevance to universities and colleges outside of Great Britain which have inherited and continue to maintain a confessional ...
Additional Info:
This paper discusses a problem which is largely, though not exclusively, peculiar to the older universities in Great Britain where, in recent years, many long-established departments of Christian theology have expanded their area of responsibility to include religious studies. However, the author believes that what he has to say is not without relevance to universities and colleges outside of Great Britain which have inherited and continue to maintain a confessional bias in teaching theology and religion.
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"Theology and Religious Studies at the Turn of the Millenium: Reconceiving the Field"

TTR
Ford, David F.
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 1 (1998): 4-12
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
This article originated as a lecture at the celebration of 150 years of the Department of Theology and Religious Studies in King's College of the University of London. Professor Ford argues that our good practice as teachers has outstripped any available paradigm of the field, so it is necessary to reconceive it. He proposes four dimensions that unite theological and religious studies: how to study the phenomena of religions; how to ...
Additional Info:
This article originated as a lecture at the celebration of 150 years of the Department of Theology and Religious Studies in King's College of the University of London. Professor Ford argues that our good practice as teachers has outstripped any available paradigm of the field, so it is necessary to reconceive it. He proposes four dimensions that unite theological and religious studies: how to study the phenomena of religions; how to establish norms and responsibilities; how to cope with radical, self-involving particularity; and how to involve the divine in academic studies.
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"The Place of Religious Studies in the Liberal Arts Curriculum"

Article
Smith, Jonathan Z.
2004
Pedagogy and the Study of Religion, Occasional Papers 2, University of Chicago Divinity School (2004): 6-17
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Transforming Campus Life: Reflections on Spirituality & Religious Pluralism

Book
Miller, Vachel W. and Merle M. Ryan, eds.
2001
Peter Lang, New York, NY
BL625.9.C64T73 2001
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
How can campus life become more hospitable to the human spirit? This book invites everyone concerned with the quality and meaning of campus life to engage in new conversations about the spiritual and religious dimensions of diversity, leadership, student development, and learning. This book challenges conventions in higher education that neglect religious identity and spiritual exploration while perpetuating disconnection, competition, and separation from our natural and social environments. It offers ...
Additional Info:
How can campus life become more hospitable to the human spirit? This book invites everyone concerned with the quality and meaning of campus life to engage in new conversations about the spiritual and religious dimensions of diversity, leadership, student development, and learning. This book challenges conventions in higher education that neglect religious identity and spiritual exploration while perpetuating disconnection, competition, and separation from our natural and social environments. It offers innovative approaches for positive change, while addressing the complex legal, organizational, and cultural issues involved in this conversation. Grounded in original research and professional practice, this collection includes reflections from college presidents, campus leaders, student affairs staff members, and faculty. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part 1. Religious Pluralism and Spirituality in Campus Life: Issues and Approaches
ch. 1 "Losing Our Religion": Are Students Struggling in Silence? (Judy Raper)
ch. 2 Student Religious Organizations and the Public University (Jennifer L. Walters)
ch. 3 The Education as Transformation Project (Peter Laurence and Victor H. Kazanjian, Jr.)
ch. 4 Making and Maintaining a Religious Pluralism and Spirituality Group: A Case Study from a Jewish Sponsored Nonsectarian University(Ora Gladstone)
ch. 5 Religion, Spirituality, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Marie V. McDemond, Arthur R. Jackson and Jacqueline A. Curtis)
ch. 6 I Do and I Understand: The Self Knowledge Symposium Model for Spiritual (Mary Alice Scott, Georg Buehler and Kenny Felder))
ch. 7 Looking at Diversity through the Lens of Religion and Spirituality: The Manhattanville Experience (Margaret L. Causey and Richard A. Berman)
ch. 8 Dancing on the Edge (Leon Tilson Burrows)

Part 2. Spirituality and Leadership: Self and Organizational Transformation
ch. 9 Private Conversations about Public Spirituality (Sarah Stockton)
ch. 10 Learning to Connect: Spirituality and Leadership (Kathleen E. Allen and Gar Kellom)
ch. 11 The College Campus as a Web of Sociality (Gil Stafford)
ch. 12 Spirituality in Student Affairs: A Practitioner's Perspective (Margaret A. Jablonski)
ch. 13 Unpacking the Knapsack in Not a Picnic (Katja Hahn d'Errico)

Part 3. Integrating Spirituality into Learning and Life on Campus
ch. 14 Innate Mental Health: Tapping the Divine Gift for Learning and Well-being (Joel Grossman)
ch. 15 Creating a Learning Community and the Core Values of Spirituality (Fan Yihong)
ch. 16 Approaches to Conflict from Spiritual and Religious Perspectives: Lessons for Student Affairs (Patricia E. Martin)
ch. 17 Civility and Spirituality (Jane Fried)
ch. 18 Higher Education and Eco-Justice (Alberto Arenas)
ch. 19 Transforming Campus Life: Conclusions and Other Questions (Vachel W. Miller)

List of Contributors
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Religious Pluralism in the Academy: Opening the Dialogue

Book
Nash, Robert J.
2001
Peter Lang, New York, NY
BL85.N27 2001
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
This book argues that American colleges and universities need to enlarge their understanding of pluralism and multiculturalism by sponsoring open, challenging, spiritually and educationally revitalizing conversations among students about genuine religious difference. Although religious difference is a pivotal component of cultural pluralism, too often today it gets ignored, marginalized, or sugar-coated in higher education. Together administrators, faculty, and students must take the initiative to tranform the academy into an exciting ...
Additional Info:
This book argues that American colleges and universities need to enlarge their understanding of pluralism and multiculturalism by sponsoring open, challenging, spiritually and educationally revitalizing conversations among students about genuine religious difference. Although religious difference is a pivotal component of cultural pluralism, too often today it gets ignored, marginalized, or sugar-coated in higher education. Together administrators, faculty, and students must take the initiative to tranform the academy into an exciting space for robust and respectful religious dialogue throughout the campus. This book offers a number of concrete examples and strategies in each chapter for achieving this objective. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Cry for Meaning
Taking the World by the Throat
Taking the Plunge
Student Affairs Professionals: The "Hidden Educators"
Overcoming Fear
Three Objectives in Writing This Book
My Preliminary Credo
Organization of the Book
A Note on Use of Resources
Definitions of Several Key Terms

ch. 2 The Paradox of Religious Pluralism
The Reality of Religious Pluralism on College Campuses: Promise or Peril?
Is Conflict Among Religious Groups Inevitable?
The Paradox of Religious Pluralism
Bounded Versus Unbounded Discourse
When Should Intolerance Replace Tolerance?
Toward Unbounded Dialogue

ch. 3 Religions as Narratives (I): Three Mainstream Stories
The Indispensability of Stories
Narrative Construals of Reality
Six Types of Religious Stories That College Students Tell
Three Mainstream Stories
The Orthodoxy Narrative
The Wounded Belief Narrative
The Mainline Narrative

ch. 4 Religions as Narratives (II): Three Alternative Stories
Three Alternative Stories That Students Tell
The Activism Narrative
The Exploration Narrative
The Secular Humanism Narrative

ch. 5 The Role of Religion in Fostering Values on a Secular Campus
"I Am Comfortable Talking About Values...Not Religion"
Learning About Earning Is Not What College Is All About
It Is Neither Possible Nor Desirable to Decouple Religion and Values
An Example of Coupling Values and Religion in a Colloquium
We Are All Values Educators
The Nineteenth-Century Capstone Seminar
Is the American Professoriate Actually Religio-Phobic?
My Captone Seminar on Religion and Values
A Personal Memorandum to My Students on the Capstone

ch. 6 One Group, Many Truths: Constructing a Moral Conversation
"I'm Afraid to Open My Mouth in There for Fear of Getting Killed!"
Moral Conversation Versus Adversarial Discourse
Six Principles of Moral Conversation
Are College Students Developmentally Ready for Moral Conversation?
Establishing a Culture of Dialogue on College Campuses
The Widespread Yearning for Consoling Narratives of Meaning

Bibliography
Index
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The Significance of University Study of Religion for Church and Seminary

Journal Issue
1967
Theological Education 3, no. 3 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Scholarship in the Public Domain
(Paul M. Harrison)
The Posture of the Church in Relationship to the Increasing Study of Religion in College and University
(Wesley A. Hotchkiss)
Religion and Academia
(Robert Michaelsen)
Religious Studies in Roman Catholic Colleges and Universities
(Gerard S. Sloyan)
Church Education and the Teaching of Religion in the Public Domain
(C. Ellis Nelson)
Implication for Theological Education in Seminaries of the Study of Religion in the University
(E. Thomas Lawson)
In-Parish Pastoral Studies 1960–66
(Russell J. Becker)
A View from the Field: A Supervising Pastor’s Experience in the in-Parish Pastoral Studies Program
(Jervis S. Zimmerman)
Notes to:
Presidents (Ernest Cadman Colwell)
Trustees (Harold C. Skillrud)
Seminary Staff Officers (Donald J. Campbell)
Librarians (Kenneth G. Peterson)
Professors (Jesse H. Ziegler)
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Wabash tree

The Spirit of Service: Exploring Faith, Service, and Social Justice in Higher Education

Book
Johnson, Brian T. and Carolyn R. O'Grady, eds.
2006
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LC220.5.S635 2006
Topics: Service Learning   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Religion and Academia   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
In The Spirit of Service , the contributing authors explore the intersection of faith, service, and social justice in higher education. Reflecting upon the role that higher education plays in preparing future generations of citizens and leaders, this book asserts that spirituality and values necessarily involve one's person—and that educators must begin to connect student learning with the human experiences of faith, service, and commitment to social justice.
Each ...
Additional Info:
In The Spirit of Service , the contributing authors explore the intersection of faith, service, and social justice in higher education. Reflecting upon the role that higher education plays in preparing future generations of citizens and leaders, this book asserts that spirituality and values necessarily involve one's person—and that educators must begin to connect student learning with the human experiences of faith, service, and commitment to social justice.
Each of the authors describes a teaching experience in order to critically reflect upon the divide in academic culture between responsible, rigorous, intellectual competence and personal values. The authors' lessons in success and failure are meant to provide guidance for all institutions that are committed to preparing young students to lead lives of leadership and civic engagement. Divided into three parts, this book:
* Explores the meaning, practice, and implications of religions or spiritually motivated service
* Offers specific examples from faculty for integrating faith or spiritual perspectives with service, including what has worked and what dilemmas remain
* Focuses on specific dilemmas and implications for engaging in service for social justice
Containing a wealth of practical suggestions and strategies, The Spirit of Service represents a conversation in progress; it is an attempt to understand how to help undergraduates integrate service and spirituality for the purpose of social justice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Foreword
Acknowledgements

Part I: Analyzing the Landscape
ch. 1 Why We Started and Why It Matters (Carolyn R. O'Grady and Brian T. Johnson)
ch. 2 Opportunities and Issues: Talking About Faith at a Church-Related College (Florence Amamoto)
ch. 3 The Role of Institutional Narratives, Foundational Documents, and Program Collaboration (Brian T. Johnson and Noreen Buhmann)

Part II: Practicing What We Preach
ch. 4 Teaching Toward Social Justice: Notes From a religion Classroom (Mary M. Solberg)
ch. 5 Faith, Social Justice, and Service-Learning in Environmental Studies: The Struggle for Integration (Mark Bjelland)
ch. 6 Are There Mexicans in Minnesota? Comments on Service-Learning and Lutheran Liberal Arts Education (Gaston A. Alzate)
ch. 7 Faith, Peace, and Politics: Dwelling in Discomfort (Loramy Gerstbauer)
ch. 8 Just Food (Lisa Heldke and Peg O'Connor)
ch. 9 Ora et Labor: Prayer and Service in an International Study Abroad Program(Jenifer K. Ward)

Part III: Getting to the Heart of the Matter
ch. 10 Fear of Disclosure in the Academic Milieu (Leila Brammer)
ch. 11 Speaking Truth to Power (Nadarajan Sethuraju)
ch. 12 Service-Learning for Social Justice: Moving Faculty From Personal to Pedagogical Commitment Through Faculty Development (Elizabeth R. Baer)
ch. 13 Deep Learning and the Big Questions: Reflection in Service-Learning (Chris Johnson)
ch. 14 Student Perspectives (Callista Brown Isabelle and Lillian Zumberge)
ch. 15 Conclusion: What We Know So Far (Brian T. Johnson and Carolyn R. O'Grady)

Index
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The Passionate Intellect: Incarnational Humanism and the Future of University Education

Book
Klassen, Norman and Jens Zimmermann
2006
Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI
LC1011.K58 2006
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Chronicles the development of the intellectual culture of the Western university and proposes an approach to university education that keeps faith with central Christian doctrines. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Chronicles the development of the intellectual culture of the Western university and proposes an approach to university education that keeps faith with central Christian doctrines. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Can Christians think?
ch. 2 A holistic beginning : medieval humanism
ch. 3 Letter and spirit : literary humanism
ch. 4 Secular scientific humanism
ch. 5 Dare to think! Enlightenment humanism and dualism
ch. 6 The birth of the humanities : Giambattista Vico's critique of the enlightenment
ch. 7 Non-Christian criticism of enlightenment humanism
ch. 8 Postmodern humanism
ch. 9 Postmodern antihumanism and the university
ch. 10 Incarnational humanism
ch. 11 Incarnational humanism and common grace
ch. 12 Conclusion
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Gladly Learn, Gladly Teach: Living Out One's Calling in the 21st-Century Academy

Book
Dunaway, John Marson, ed.
2005
Mercer University Press, Macon, GA
BV1464.G53 2005
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
These essays come from scholars in a wide variety of fields: not just theology, but law, literature, political science, education, and philosophy. The essayists are teacher-scholars who genuinely seek to live out the sometimes-competing vocations of professor and believer. Though most of them teach in church-related institutions, they not only affirm the need for a clear theological vision on which to base institutional and pedagogical planning; they also stress the ...
Additional Info:
These essays come from scholars in a wide variety of fields: not just theology, but law, literature, political science, education, and philosophy. The essayists are teacher-scholars who genuinely seek to live out the sometimes-competing vocations of professor and believer. Though most of them teach in church-related institutions, they not only affirm the need for a clear theological vision on which to base institutional and pedagogical planning; they also stress the importance of diversity, pluralism, and true academic freedom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Editor's Introduction: John Marson Dunaway
“In Willingham Chapel," a poem by David Bottoms(M.U.1971)
Mercer Contributors
R. Kirby Godsey, "The Higher Calling of the Undergraduate Experience"
Gordon Johnston, "Poetry and Professing"
Charlotte Thomas, "Falling into Grace"
R. Alan Culpepper, "Full of Grace and Truth: A Theology of Teaching"
Jack L. Sammons, "Parables and Pedagogy"
Andrew Silver, "Pluralism at a Baptist University"
Extra mural Contributors
Richard T. Hughes (Pepperdine University), "What Makes Church-Related Education Christian?"
David Lyle Jeffery (Baylor University), "The Calling of the Teacher and the Place of the Community"
Jeanne Heffernan (Villanova University), "Integrating Heart, Mind, and Soul: The Vocation of the Christian Teacher"
William E. Hull (Samford University), "Where are the Baptists in the Higher Education Dialogue?"
Mary S. Poplin (Claremont Graduate University), "The Radical Call to Service"
Afterword: Jean Bethke Elshtain (University of Chicago)
Notes on Contributors
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Religious Education

Journal Issue
2006
Religious Education 101, no. 2 (Religious Education Association, Atlanta, GA 2006)
BV1460.R3V.101NO.2
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Understanding the Study of Religion in Undergraduate Programs of Religious Studies as Religious Education
Research in Religious Education: Content and Methods for the Postmodern and Global Era
Of Twirling Dervishes and Daring New Directions: Collaborative and Practitioner Research
The Research We Need in Religious Education: Four Facets
Research for a Movement
Research in Religious Education: Perspectives for the Future
Researching a Womanist Pedagogy to Heal
Research in Religious Education: Philosophical and Theological Perspectives
A Band of Sisters: The Impact of Long-term Small Group Participation: Forty Years in a Women's Prayer and Bible Study Group
Models for Adolescent Ministry: Exploring Eight Ecumenical Examples
How Shall We Study Religious School Culture?
Development of Religious Thinking
Outthinking the Media: Lessons from a Tennis Master
A Nonfoundationalist Approach to Education in Religion
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Spirituality in Higher Education

Book
Hoppe, Sherry L., and Bruce W. Speck, eds.
2005
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 104)
BL625.9.C64S67 2005
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Questions about meaning and purpose are as old as humans, and in the earliest days of higher education, the search for truth was the ultimate journey of the student. Over the decades, though, the academy has often shunned the spiritual aspect of a student's education. Whether that is to avoid controversy or to protect from acknowledging that all is not known, there is a predisposition to avoid talking about spirituality ...
Additional Info:
Questions about meaning and purpose are as old as humans, and in the earliest days of higher education, the search for truth was the ultimate journey of the student. Over the decades, though, the academy has often shunned the spiritual aspect of a student's education. Whether that is to avoid controversy or to protect from acknowledging that all is not known, there is a predisposition to avoid talking about spirituality in the academy. Regardless, the result is the creation of what T.S. Eliot called "hollow men" who live in this world but do not know why they are here and thus do not know how to live their lives. This book is one of many responding to a reawakening of desire to avoid such creatures. Its purpose, at least in a cursory way, is to look at spirituality in academe through a number of lenses. Composed of chapters from both faculty and administrators, this volume offers insight into the critical need for spirituality in educating the whole student while recognizing that how spirituality is viewed and taught (and experienced) is intensely personal. The goal is not to prescribe how spirituality should be integrated but to offer multiple options and perspectives. Not only will readers learn about the complex and vital role of spirituality, they will also be reminded that the quest for truth and meaning, not the destination, is what is vitally important in shaping discussions about spirituality.


Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 What is Spirituality? (Bruce W. Speck)
ch. 2 What Higher Education Law Says About Spirituality (John Wesley Lowery)
ch. 3 The Academy, Spirituality, and the Search for Truth (Christina Murphy)
ch. 4 Role of Spirituality and Spiritual Development in Student Life Outside the Classroom (Jennifer Capehart-Meningall)
ch. 5 Spirituality: The Physiological-Biological Foundation (Thomas J. Buttery)
ch. 6 Faculty Perspective on Spirituality, Teaching, and Learning on a Nonsectarian Campus: Gleanings from a Book Group (Miriam Rosalyn Diamond)
ch. 7 A Modular Curriculum for Integrating Spirituality and Health Care (Allen L. Pelletier and John W. McCall)
ch. 8 Issues Related to Spirituality and the Search for Truth in Sectarian Institutions of Higher Education (Harry Lee Poe)
ch. 9 Preparing Students for Spirituality in the Workplace (Gary D. Geroy)
ch. 10 Spirituality and Service Learning (John Sikula and Andrew Sikula, Sr.)
ch. 11 Spirituality and Leadership (Sherry L. Hoppe)
ch. 12 Whose Spirituality? Cautionary Notes About the Role of Spirituality in Higher Education (Daryl V. Gilley)

Index
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Encouraging Authenticity and Spirituality in Higher Education

Book
Chickering, Arthur W., Jon C. Dalton, and Liesa Stamm
2006
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2324.C49 2006
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Encouraging Authenticity and Spirituality in Higher Education is a comprehensive resource that explores the theory and research and examines the current initiatives on the topic of spirituality in higher education. The book provides an array of illustrative examples to guide interventions in curriculum, student affairs, community partnerships, assessment, and policy issues. The authors cover the social and historical background as well as the implications for practice. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Encouraging Authenticity and Spirituality in Higher Education is a comprehensive resource that explores the theory and research and examines the current initiatives on the topic of spirituality in higher education. The book provides an array of illustrative examples to guide interventions in curriculum, student affairs, community partnerships, assessment, and policy issues. The authors cover the social and historical background as well as the implications for practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

ch. 1 Our orientation
ch. 2 The dynamics of spirituality and the religious experience
ch. 3 The influence of religion and spirituality in shaping American higher education
ch. 4 Policy issues : legislative and institutional
ch. 5 Curricular content and powerful pedagogy
ch. 6 The place of spirituality in the mission and work of college student affairs
ch. 7 Integrating spirit and community in higher education
ch. 8 Planned change and professional development
ch. 9 Assessing ineffable outcomes
ch. 10 Leadership for recovering spirit
ch. 11 Principles and practices for strengthening moral and spiritual growth in college

App. A University of Missouri-Columbia policy statement
App. B Illustrative course syllabi
App. C Rutgers evaluation and dissemination plans
App. D Teacher formation evaluation results
App. E Inventory for assessing the moral and spiritual growth initiatives of colleges and universities
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"The Subtle Temptations of State Sponsored Theological Education: A New Zealand Perspective "

TTR
Meadowcroft, Tim
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 1 (2007): 25-33
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Over the past fifteen years in New Zealand, theology has come in from the tertiary educational cold in various ways. One of the results or reasons for this has been willingness on the part of the state to accredit and provide funding for theological education and research. This has taken place largely through a compliance system of accreditation and resource allocation. The result has been academic recognition and a precarious ...
Additional Info:
Over the past fifteen years in New Zealand, theology has come in from the tertiary educational cold in various ways. One of the results or reasons for this has been willingness on the part of the state to accredit and provide funding for theological education and research. This has taken place largely through a compliance system of accreditation and resource allocation. The result has been academic recognition and a precarious financial boon for theology and some theological institutions and their students. But little attention has been paid to the epistemological and pedagogical temptations of compliance. Drawing on the recent experience of the writer, this article seeks to identify a number of the subtle temptations posed by state sponsored theological education and research.
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"Renewing the Identity of Catholic Colleges: Implementing Lonergan's Method for Education"

TTR
Benders, Alison Mearns
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 4 (2007): 215-222
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
This article addresses the epistemological disarray and secularizing trends in American culture, while also suggesting a way for Catholic institutions to meet their responsibilities under Ex Corde Ecclesiae. It employs Bernard Lonergan's work to establish a theoretical foundation for education and outlines two specific liberal arts courses, Beginning with Knowing, in which students develop a methodological foundation for objective knowledge, and The Catholic Tradition, which transmits important Catholic perspectives and ...
Additional Info:
This article addresses the epistemological disarray and secularizing trends in American culture, while also suggesting a way for Catholic institutions to meet their responsibilities under Ex Corde Ecclesiae. It employs Bernard Lonergan's work to establish a theoretical foundation for education and outlines two specific liberal arts courses, Beginning with Knowing, in which students develop a methodological foundation for objective knowledge, and The Catholic Tradition, which transmits important Catholic perspectives and values.
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Confucian Tradition and Global Education

Book
de Bary, Wm. Theodore, ed.
2007
Columbia University Press, New York, NY
LC1090.D35 2007
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religion and Academia   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Drawn from a series of lectures that Wm. Theodore de Bary delivered in honor of the Chinese philosopher Tang Junyi, Confucian Tradition is a unique synthesis of essay and debate concerning the future of Chinese education and the potential political uses of Confucianism in the contemporary world. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Drawn from a series of lectures that Wm. Theodore de Bary delivered in honor of the Chinese philosopher Tang Junyi, Confucian Tradition is a unique synthesis of essay and debate concerning the future of Chinese education and the potential political uses of Confucianism in the contemporary world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Confucian education and the "point of democracy"
ch. 2 Asian classics and global education
ch. 3 Translating the classics
ch. 4 Tang Junyi and the philosophy of "general education" ( Cheung Chan-fai )
ch. 5 The over dominance of English in global education : a global response ( Kwan Tze-wan )

App. 1 Life chronology of Tang Junyi ( Lau Kwok-keung )
App. 2 The Chinese at Columbia : a personal testament
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Educations and Their Purposes: A Conversation among Cultures

Book
Ames, Roger T., and Peter D. Hershock, eds.
2008
University of Hawai'i Press, Honolulu
LB45.E15 2005
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religion and Academia   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Chapters included in Part One, Education, Relationality, and Diversity, examine the growing intellectual awareness of a pervasive interdependence amid diversity in all aspects of the human experience brought on by the unrelenting processes of globalization. One of the most distinguished voices in the philosophy of emotions offers a sustained reflection in the opening chapter to Part Two, Educating Emotions: The Phenomenology of Feelings. In Part Three, East Asian traditions of ...
Additional Info:
Chapters included in Part One, Education, Relationality, and Diversity, examine the growing intellectual awareness of a pervasive interdependence amid diversity in all aspects of the human experience brought on by the unrelenting processes of globalization. One of the most distinguished voices in the philosophy of emotions offers a sustained reflection in the opening chapter to Part Two, Educating Emotions: The Phenomenology of Feelings. In Part Three, East Asian traditions of thought that have never committed to the familiar mind-body dualism are appealed to as a resource for rethinking the body in education. The tension between personal authenticity and indoctrination in the role that education plays in preparing a person for a successful life is the subject of Part Four, Creativity and Habilitation, followed by chapters on the mutual accommodation of different approaches to education. The final essays discuss the role of aesthetic sensibilities in moral development with the theme of education and the aesthetics of moral cultivation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Roger T. Ames and Peter D. Hershock)

Part I Education, Relationality, and Diversity
ch. 1 Relating Freely: The Meaning of Educating for Equity and Diversity (Peter D. Hershock)
ch. 2 Philosophy and the Hybridization of Culture (Richard Rorty)
ch. 3 The Overdominance of English in Global Education: Is an Alternative Scenario Thinkable? (Tze-Wan Kwan)
ch. 4 Teaching Philosophy of Religion "Multiculturally": A Lokahi Approach? (Gwen Griffith-Dickson)
ch. 5 Democracy and Science in Education: Lacuna in China's Modernization (Sor-Hoon Tan)

Part II Education and Affectivity
ch. 6 Educating Emotions: The Phenomenology of Feelings (Robert C. Solomon)
ch. 7 Caring and Critical Thinking in Relational Ethics (Nel Noddings)
ch. 8 Cultivating the Mindful Heart: What We May Learn from the Japanese Philosophy of Kokoro (Thomas P. Kasulis)
ch. 9 The Dilemma of Skillful Means in Buddhist Pedagogy: Desire and Education in the Lotus Sutra (Tao Jiang)

Part III Education and Somaticity
ch. 10 With This Very Body: Or What Kukai Has to Teach Us about Ritual Pedagogy (Nikki Bado-Fralick)
ch. 11 The Confucian Body and Virtue Education: On the Balance between Inner Authenticity and Outer Expression (Seung-Hwan Lee)
ch. 12 Ethical Education as Bodily Training: Kitaro Nishida's Moral Phenomenology of "Acting-Intuition" (Joel W. Krueger)

Part IV Creativity and Habilitation
ch. 13 What's Wrong with Being "Creative"? (John Hope Mason)
ch. 14 Constructing Identities: The Shifting Role of Indoctrination in Chinese and American Education (Gay Garland Reed)
ch. 15 Initiating but not Proceeding to the end – a Confucian response to indoctrination (Geir Sigurdsson)
ch. 16 Either Self-realization or transmission of received wisdom in Confucian education? (Hoyt Cleveland Tillman)

Part V Education and Otherness
ch. 17 Oral traditions, African philosophical methods, and their contributions to education and our global knowledge (Workineh Kelbessa)
ch. 18 The ideas of “educating” and “learning” in Confucian thought (Chen Lai)
ch. 19 Spiritual transformation and transthetical life – thinking from advaita (John J. Thatamanil)
ch. 20 Education and responsiveness – On the agency of intersubjectivity (Brian J. Bruya)
ch. 21 Different encounter between teacher and student in Sankara’s Upadesa-Sahasri and in the teaching of Jiddu Krishnamurti (Daniel Raveh)

Part VI Education and Aesthetics of Moral Cultivation
ch. 22 Beautiful freedom – Schiller on the ‘Aesthetic Education’ of Humanity (Fred Dallmayr)
ch. 23 Musical Education for Peace (Kathleen Marie Higgins)
ch. 24 Fact and Value in the Analects – Education and Logic (Joel J. Kupperman)
ch. 25 Xunzi and the role of aesthetic experience in moral cultivation (Scott R. Stroud)
ch. 26 How is weakness of the will NOT possible? Cheng Yi’s Neo-confucian conception of moral knowledge (Yong Huang)

Contributors
Index
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Christian Higher Education Volume 3 Number 2

Journal Issue
2004
Taylor & Francis
LC368.C46v.3no.2
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
What Does It Profit A College To Add More Students? The Relationship Between Enrollment Growth And Financial Strength
Institutional Image: Secular And Marketing Influences On Christian Higher Education
Service-Learning In Christian Higher Education: Bringing Our Mission To Life
Evangelical Theological Higher Education: Past Commitments, Present Realities, And Future Considerations
Higher Education Doctoral Degrees Of Certain American Clergy: Ethics And Antics
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Christian Higher Education Volume 3 Number 3

Journal Issue
2004
Taylor & Francis
LC368.C46vo.3no.3
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Cosmogonies And Culture: Teaching Genesis And The Popol Vuh In An Interdisciplinary Course At A Christian University
African Students In Theological Doctoral Programs In Christian Institutions Of Higher Learning
Persistence Among American Indians And Alaska Natives At A Bible College: The Importance Of Family, Spirituality, And Validation
Intellectual Freedom And The Bible College Library
Prayerful Teaching In Higher Education: A Survey Of Themes
Ex Corde Universitatis: From The Heart Of The University
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Christian Higher Education Volume 3 Number 4

Journal Issue
2004
Taylor & Francis
LC368.C46vo.3no.4
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
A Non-Western Doctoral Program In Theology For Africans In Africa Free Access Free Access
Female Chief Academic Officers In Evangelical Christian Colleges And Universities: Part Ii: Reflections On Careers, Marriage, And Faith
Native American Christian Higher Education: Challenges And Opportunities For The 21st Century
Faith And Learning: Toward A Typology Of Faculty Views At Religious Research Universities
Changing Academic Cultures And Expanding Expectations: Motivational Factors Influencing Scholarship At Small Christian Colleges And Universities
Black Enrollments At The Nation's Christian Colleges Are On The Rise
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Journal of Beliefs and Values: Studies in Religion and Education, vol. 24, no. 1

Journal Issue
Campbell, William S., ed.
2003
Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education in the United Kingdom., Taylor & Francis Ltd., UK
BL41.J68 v.24 no.1 2003
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Black Religious Ethics and Higher Education: Rastafarian identity as a resource for inclusiveness (Jack Hill)
ch. 2 Spiritual, Moral and Heroic Virtue: Aristotelian character in the Arthurian and Grail narratives (David Carr)
ch. 3 A Dangerous Age? Secondary education and moral-religious training: the case history of Dutch Jewish secondary education 1880-1940 (Marjoke Rietveld-Van Wingerden)
ch. 4 The Work Values of Arab Teachers in Israel in a Multicultural Context (Ismael Abu-Saad)
ch. 5 Death and the Holocaust: the challenge to learners and the need for support (Deirdre Burke)
ch. 6 The Perceptions of some Australian Coptic Students of the Influences on their Religious Development (Marian De Souza, and Richard Rymarz)
ch. 7 Religious Organisations in the UK and Values Education Programmes for Schools (Eleanor Nesbitt, and Ann Henderson)
ch. 8 Christianity and Dogmatism among Undergraduate Students (Leslie J. Francis, and Mandy Robbins)
ch. 9 Reliability and Validity of a Dutch Translation of a Short Scale of Attitude toward Christianity (Christopher Alan Lewis, and Chris A.M. Hermans)
ch. 10 Christian Faith and Higher Education (Marius C. Felderhof)
ch. 11 Context, Competence and Cultural Diversity: religious education in a European setting (Andrew Wright)
ch. 12 The Secular Faith Controversy: religion in three dimensions (Edward Bailey)
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Journal of Beliefs and Values: Studies in Religion and Education, vol. 24, no. 2

Journal Issue
Campbell, William S., ed.
2003
Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education in the United Kingdom., Taylor & Francis Ltd., UK
BL41.J68 v.24 no.2 2003
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 William James' Varieties of Religious Experience and Jungian Varieties of Human Nature: the nature of the relationship between religious experience, belief and psychological type (C.C.H. Cook)

ch. 2 Belief as an Obstacle to Reading: the case of the Bible? (Mark A. Pike)

ch. 3 Effects of Mothers' and Schools' Religious Denomination on Preschool Children's God Concepts (Simone A. De Roos, Jurjen Iedema, and Siebren Miedema)

ch. 4 Church-going Farmers and Foot and Mouth Disease (Lewis Burton)

ch. 5 Renewal and Soul Survivor as Distinction and Subcultural Capital (Pete Ward)

ch. 6 Being a Christian school in the Netherlands: an analysis of 'identity' conceptions and their practical implications (Anneke J.C. De Wolff, Doret J. De Ruyter, and Siebren Miedema

ch. 7 Examining Mexico and US Values Education in a Global Context (Maria Teresa Tatto)

ch. 8 'Cleanliness is Next to Godliness': a further look (Christopher Alan Lewis)
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Journal of Beliefs and Values: Studies in Religion and Education, vol. 24, no. 3

Journal Issue
Campbell, William S., ed.
2003
Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education in the United Kingdom., Taylor & Francis Ltd., UK
BL41.J68 v.24 no.3 2003
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Transmitting religious values in adventist home education (Arniika Kuusisto)
ch. 2 A Jewish Jesus in the university classroom: from confusion to clarity (Gregory A. Barker)
ch. 3 Beyond the grave: dreams of Prabhupada and devotional life in the Hare Krishna movement (Graham Dwyer)
ch. 4 Moral horror (John Wilson, and Nicholas Wilson)
ch. 5 'Thus Says The Lord hellip': God's communication and children's understanding (Paul Burt)
ch. 6 Multiculturalism and religious education in the nursery: a Finnish approach (Arto J. Kallioniemi)
ch. 7 Who wants establishment? A comparison of clerical and lay opinion in the Church of England (Guy Smith, Leslie J. Francis, and Mandy Robbins)
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The Bible and the University, Volume 8

Book
Jeffrey, David Lyle, C. Stephen Evans and Craig G. Bartholomew, eds.
2007
Zondervan, Grand Rapids, MI
BS538.7.B575 2007
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
It is well known that the Western university gradually evolved from the monastic stadium via the cathedral schools of the twelfth century to become the remarkably vigorous and interdisciplinary European institutions of higher learning that transformed Christian intellectual culture in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. It is equally well known that subsequent disciplinary developments in higher education, including the founding and flourishing of many of the most prestigious of North ...
Additional Info:
It is well known that the Western university gradually evolved from the monastic stadium via the cathedral schools of the twelfth century to become the remarkably vigorous and interdisciplinary European institutions of higher learning that transformed Christian intellectual culture in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. It is equally well known that subsequent disciplinary developments in higher education, including the founding and flourishing of many of the most prestigious of North American universities, owe equally to the Protestant and perhaps particularly Calvinist influence. But that the secularized modern university that descended from these developments is now in something of an identity crisis is becoming widely and often awkwardly apparent.
The reason most often given for the crisis is our general failure to produce a morally or spiritually persuasive substitute for the authority that undergirded the intellectual culture of our predecessors. This is frequently also a reason for the discomfort many experience in trying to address the problem, for it requires an acknowledgement, at least, that the secularization hypothesis has proven inadequate as a basis for the sustaining of coherence and general intelligibility in the university curriculum. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the disciplines of biblical studies and theology, which once were the anchor or common point of reference for theological thought, but which are now both marginalized in the curriculum and internally divided as to meaning and purpose, even where the Church itself is concerned.
In this final volume of the Scripture and Hermeneutic Series, a group of distinguished scholars havesought to understand the role of the Bible in relation to the disciplines in a fresh way. Offered in a spirit of humility and experimentally, the essays here consider the historic role of the Bible in the university, the status of theological reflection regarding Scripture among the disciplines today, the special role of Scripture in the development of law, the humanities and social sciences, and finally, the way the Bible speaks to issues of academic freedom, intellectual tolerance, and religious liberty.

Contributors Include:
Dallas Willard
William Abraham
Al Wolters
Scott Hahn
Glenn Olsen
Robert C. Roberts
Byron Johnson
Robert Cochran, Jr.
David I. Smith
John Sullivan
Robert Lundin
C. Stephen Evans
David Lyle Jeffrey
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Contributors
Abbreviations
Introduction (David Lyle Jeffrey)
The Bible in Intellectual History
Authority and Wisdom
Authority and the Book
A Flourishing of the Disciplines
Ad Fontes Redivivus?
Postscript

ch. 1 The Bible, the University, and the God Who Hides (Dallas Willard)
Sources of Knowledge
The Bible as a Source of Knowledge
A Brief History of 'Knowledge'
Knowing vs. Not-Knowing
Knowledge of the God who Hides
The Task of the Christian Intellectual

ch. 2 The Place of Scripture in Christian Theology (William J. Abraham)
An Important Platitude
The Creation of Biblical Studies
The Unexpected Disaster
The Really Deep Problem
Retracing Our Steps
Back to the Crisis Again
Turning to the Future

ch. 3 No Longer Queen: The Theological Disciplines and Their Sisters (Al Wolters)
Foundational Assumptions in Biblical Scholarship
Bringing Scripture to Bear on Christian Scholarship

ch. 4 At the School of Truth: The Ecclesial Character of Theology and Exegesis in the Thought of Benedict XVI (Scott Hahn)
Truth, Freedom, and the Academy
The Critique of Academic Biblical Criticism
The Ecclesial Locus of Theology and Exegesis
Benedict's New Synthesis

ch. 5 The Spiritual Sense(s) Today (Glenn Olsen)
Recovering the Spiritual Sense(s)
Rethinking the 'Apostolic' Exegetical Tradition
Reconsidering Terminology: 'Allegory' and 'Typology'
Reclaiming the 'Historical' Sense
Restoring the Analogical Imagination

ch. 6 Situationism and the New Testament Psychology of the Heart (Robert C. Roberts)
Introduction
Situationism
Traits and Situations
The Psychology of the Heart
Application of the Psychology of the Heart to Situationism
Conclusion

ch. 7 The Bible, Positive Law, and the Legal Academy (Robert F. Cochran, Jr.)
The Bible and Positive Law
Jesus and the Positive Law
The Legal Academy

ch. 8 Biblical Imagery and Educational Imagination: Comenius and the Garden of Delight (David I. Smith)
Faith, Learning and Metaphor
The Garden of Delight as a School
The School as a Garden of Delight
The Garden of Delight Today
Coda: Of Math, Grammar and Reconciliation

ch. 9 Reading Habits, Scripture and the University (John Sullivan)
Scripture and Scholarship
Inhospitable Environments
Moving Forward in Hope

ch. 10 The Case for Empirical Assessment of Biblical Literacy in America (Byron Johnson)
Introduction
Are Christians and Non-Christians Different on Key Social Outcome Indicators?
Is America Becoming a Secular and Less Religious Society?
Data on Religion in America
Is Bible Literacy Low and Declining in America?
Conclusions

ch. 11 'As if God Were Dead': American Literature and the Question Of Scripture (Roger Lundin)
'As if God Were Dead': Emerson and Scriptural Authority
'The Secret of Our Paternity': Scripture in the School of Melville
'An Antique Volume': Dickinson and the Limits of Scripture
A Theological Response

ch. 12 Biblical Literacy, Academic Freedom, and Christian Liberty (David Lyle Jeffrey)
Eclipse of Biblical Narrative
Egotism and the Common Lot
The Bible and Academic Freedom
Afterword - The Bible and the Academy: Some Concluding Thoughts and Possible Future Directions (C. Stephen Evans)
University of Gloucestershire
The British and Foreign Bible Society
Baylor University
Redeemer University College

Scripture Index
Names Index
Subject Index
Journal cover image

"Religion and the Academy"

Journal Issue
2001
Academe: Bulletin of the American Association of University Professors 87, no. 1 (2001)
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
Theologians at Risk? Ex Corde and Catholic Colleges by Richard P. McBrien
Ivory Tower or Holy Mountain? Faith and Academic Freedom by Nicholas Wolterstorff
Literature and Tolerance at the University of St. Thomas by Michael Allen Mikolajcak
Uneasy Partners? Religion and Academics by Storm Bailey
Orthodox Judaism and the Liberal Arts by Shalom Carmy
Faithful and Free: A Call for Academic Freedom by Mary A. Burgan
Beyond the Course Pack: Putting Copyrighted Material Online by Cary Nelson
Faith and Faculty Autonomy at Calvin College by George N. Monsma, Jr.
Stolen Content: Avoiding Trouble on the Web by Jane C. Ginsburg
Article cover image

"Our "Special Promise" as Teachers: Scholars of Religion and the Politics of Tolerance"

Article
McCutcheon, Russell T.
2001
In Critics Not Caretakers: Redescribing the Public Study of Religion (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2001)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Methods and Theories in the Classroom: Teaching the Study of Myths and Rituals"

Article
McCutcheon, Russell T.
2001
In Critics Not Caretakers: Redescribing the Public Study of Religion (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2001)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Redescribing "Religion and ..." Film: Teaching the Insider/Outsider Problem"

Article
McCutcheon, Russell T.
2001
In Critics Not Caretakers: Redescribing the Public Study of Religion (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2001)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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The State of the University; Academic Knowledges and the Knowledge of God

Book
Hauerwas, Stanley
2007
Blackwell Publishing, Malden, MA
BT108.H38 2007
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
In this book, controversial and world-renowned theologian, Stanley Hauerwas, tackles the issue of theology being sidelined as a necessary discipline in the modern university. It is an attempt to reclaim the knowledge of God as just that – knowledge.

* Questions why theology is no longer considered a necessary subject in the modern university, and explores the role it should play in the development of our “knowledge”
* Considers how ...
Additional Info:
In this book, controversial and world-renowned theologian, Stanley Hauerwas, tackles the issue of theology being sidelined as a necessary discipline in the modern university. It is an attempt to reclaim the knowledge of God as just that – knowledge.

* Questions why theology is no longer considered a necessary subject in the modern university, and explores the role it should play in the development of our “knowledge”
* Considers how theology is often excluded from the knowledges of the modern university because these are constituted by an understanding of time necessary to make economic and state realities seem inevitable
* Argues that it is precisely this difference that makes Christian theology an essential resource for the university to achieve its task - that is, to form people who are able to imagine a different world through critical and disciplined reflection
* Challenges the domesticated character of much recent theology by suggesting how prayer and the love of the poor are essential practices that should shape the theological task
* Converses with figures as diverse as Luigi Giussani, David Burrell, Stanley Fish, Wendell Berry, Jeff Stout, Rowan Williams and Sheldon Wolin
* Published in the new and prestigious Illuminations series. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Theological Knowledge and the Knowledges of the University: Beginning Explorations
ch. 2 Leaving Ruins: The Gospel and Cultural Formations
ch. 3 How Risky is The Risk of Education: Random Reflections from the American Context
ch. 4 The End of "Religious Pluralism:" A Tribute to David Burrell, C.S.C.
ch. 5 The Pathos of the University: The Case of Stanley Fish
ch. 6 What Would a Christian University Look Like?: Some Tentative Answers Inspired by Wendell Berry
ch. 7 Pro Ecclesia, Pro Texana: Schooling the Heart in the Heart of Texas
ch. 8 Christians and the So-Called State (We Are In): A Meditation on Loyalty after September 11, 2001
ch. 9 Democratic Time: Lessons Learned from Yoder and Wolin
ch. 10 The State of the Secular: Theology, Prayer, and the University
ch. 11 To Love God, the Poor, and Learning: Lessons Learned from Saint Gregory of Nazianzus
ch. 12 Seminaries Are in Trouble: Chastened Reflections on the Centennial of Bethany Theological Seminary
ch. 13 Ordinary Time: A Tribute to Rowan Williams

Index
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A Buddhist in the Classroom

Book
Brown, Sid
2008
State University of New York Press
LB1027.22.B76 2008
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Sid Brown brings a Buddhist perspective into the classroom to explore the ethical quandaries, lived experiences and intimacy of teaching. Addressing such topics as attention, community, rage, wonder, consumerism, and kindness, Brown demonstrates how this centuries-old tradition can enrich and inform classroom life. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Sid Brown brings a Buddhist perspective into the classroom to explore the ethical quandaries, lived experiences and intimacy of teaching. Addressing such topics as attention, community, rage, wonder, consumerism, and kindness, Brown demonstrates how this centuries-old tradition can enrich and inform classroom life. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction In the Event of a Crash Landing

ch. 1 Lie Until It's True: Getting Students' Attention
ch. 2 Viewing Each Other With Kindly Eyes: Community in the Classroom
ch. 3 Stopping an Elephant Dead in Its Tracks: Irritation, Anger, and Rage
ch. 4 Do Not Cross Line: Wonder and Imaginative Engagement
ch. 5 Homicidal Tendencies: The Story of a Teacher and a Student
ch. 6 Letting Women into the Order: Learning from Students
ch. 7 Removing the Arrow: Authentic Teachers and Willing Students, Elements of Reciprocity
ch. 8 Trustful Confidence: Assessing Your Teaching
ch. 9 Conclusion: The Heart of Teaching

Appendix I Nifty assignments
Appendix II Handouts

Notes
Glossary
Bibliography
Index
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It's All About Jesus! Faith as an Oppositional Collegiate Subculture

Book
Peter Magolda and Kelsey Ebben Gross
2009
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC383.M324 2009
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
What it is like to be a collegian involved in a Christian organization on a public college campus? What roles do Christian organizations play in the lives of college students enrolled in a public college? What are evangelical student organizations’ political agendas, and how do they mobilize members to advance these agendas? What is the optimal equilibrium between the secular and the sacred within public higher education? What constitutes safe ...
Additional Info:
What it is like to be a collegian involved in a Christian organization on a public college campus? What roles do Christian organizations play in the lives of college students enrolled in a public college? What are evangelical student organizations’ political agendas, and how do they mobilize members to advance these agendas? What is the optimal equilibrium between the secular and the sacred within public higher education? What constitutes safe space for evangelical students, and who should provide this space?

This book presents a two-year ethnographic study of a collegiate evangelical student organization on a public university, authored by two “non-evangelicals.” The authors provide a glimpse into the lives of college students who join evangelical student organizations and who subscribe to an evangelical way of life during their college years. They offer empirically derived insights as to how students’ participation in a homogeneous evangelical student organization enhances their satisfaction of their collegiate experience and helps them develop important life lessons and skills. Ironically, while Christian students represent the religious majority on the campus under study, Christian organizations on this campus mobilize members by capitalizing on members’ shared sense of marginalization, and position themselves as cultural outsiders. This evangelical student organization serves as a safe space for students to express their faith within the larger secular university setting.

The narratives and interpretations aim not only to enrich understanding of a particular student organization but more importantly to spark intellectual discourse about the valueof faith-based organizations within public higher education. The role of religion in public higher education, student involvement in the co-curriculum, and peer education are three examples of critical issues in higher education for which this idiosyncratic case study offers broad understanding.

It’s All About Jesus! targets multiple audiences – both sacred and secular. For readers unfamiliar with evangelical collegiate organizations and the students they serve, the authors hope the narratives make the unfamiliar familiar and the dubious obvious. For evangelicals, the authors hope that the thickly described narratives not only make the familiar, familiar and the obvious, obvious, but also uncover the tacit meaning embedded in these familiar, but seldom examined subculture rituals.

The authors hope this book spurs discussion on topics such as campus power and politics, how organizations interact with the secular world around them, and how members can improve their organizations. Additionally, this text urges secular readers in student affairs to consider the many benefits, as well as liabilities, of “parachurches” as co-curricular learning sites on campus.

Lastly, given that the authors lay bare their methodology, their use of theory, and the tensions between their perspectives and those of the participants, this book will serve as a compelling case study for courses on qualitative research within religion studies, anthropology, sociology, and cultural studies fields. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword

ch. 1 Jesus and Higher Education Rituals of Faith
ch. 2 Research Processes Rituals of Inquiry
ch. 3 Researchers' Tales Rituals of Disclosure
ch. 4 Evolving Christians Precollege Evangelical Rituals
ch. 5 God's Squad Rituals of Recruitment
ch. 6 Praise Jesus Rituals of Difference
ch. 7 Getting To Really Know Jesus Teaching and Learning Rituals
ch. 8 Bridging the Gap between Evangelicals and Nonbelievers Outreach Rituals
ch. 9 Leading by Following Jesus Servant Leadership Rituals
ch. 10 From College Seniors to Real-World Evangelicals Transition Rituals
ch. 11 The Chosen Rituals of Vocation
ch. 12 SSC Revelations and Reconciliations Rituals of Understanding
ch. 13 Capstone Principles Exit Rituals
ch. 14 It's all about Jesus The Last Word

Notes
References
Index
Cover image

The American University in a Postsecular Age

Book
Douglas Jacobsen and Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen, eds.
2008
Oxford University Press, NY
BV1610.A4 2008
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
For much of the twentieth century, it was assumed that higher education was and ought to be a secular enterprise, but that approach no longer suffices. The culture has shifted, and contemporary college and university students are increasingly bringing religious and spiritual questions to campus. In response, college and university leaders are exploring anew the relationship between religion and higher education.

The American University in a Postsecular Age ...
Additional Info:
For much of the twentieth century, it was assumed that higher education was and ought to be a secular enterprise, but that approach no longer suffices. The culture has shifted, and contemporary college and university students are increasingly bringing religious and spiritual questions to campus. In response, college and university leaders are exploring anew the relationship between religion and higher education.

The American University in a Postsecular Age grapples with key questions:

—How religious or irreligious are faculty and students today? What level of religious literacy should be expected from students?
—Can religion be allowed into the classroom without being disruptive?
—Should colleges and universities help students reflect on their own faith?
—Is religion antithetical to critical inquiry?
—Can religion have a positive role to play in higher education?

This is a state-of-the-art introduction to the national discussion about religion and higher education. Leading scholars and top educators express a wide spectrum of opinions that reflect the best current thinking. Introductory and concluding essays by the editors describe the postsecular character of our age and propose a comprehensive framework intended to facilitate ongoing conversation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

I. Postsecular America (Douglas Jacbosen, Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen)

Part I Religion, Institutions, and Faculty Roles
ch. 2 The Religious Convictions of College and University Professors (Neil Gross, Solon Simmons)
ch. 3 Can Faith Be More Than a Sideshow in the Contemporary Academy? (Robert Wuthnow)
ch. 4 A Level Playing Field for Religion in Higher Education(John J. DiIulio, Jr.)
ch. 5 The Ideals and Diversity of Church-Related Higher Education (Douglas Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen)
ch. 6 Why Faculty Find It Difficult to Talk about Religion (Mark U. Edwards, Jr)
ch. 7 Faculty Priorities (R. Eugene Rice)

Part II Religion, the Curriculum, and Student Learning
ch. 8 The Religious and Spiritual Journeys of College Students (Larry A. Braskamp)
ch. 9 The Different Spiritualities of the Students We Teach (Robert J. Nash, DeMethra, LaSha Bradly)
ch. 10 Spirituality, Diversity, and Learner-Centered Teaching (Elizabeth J. Tisdell)
ch. 11 Taking Religion Seriously in Public Universities (Warren A. Nord)
ch. 12 Religious Pluralism, the Study of Religion, and "Postsecular" Culture (Amanda Poterfield)
ch. 13 Professing Understanding and Professing Faith (Lee S. Shulman)

Part III A Framework for Academic Conversation
ch. 14 Talking about Religion (Douglas Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen)

Notes
Index
Cover image

Where is Knowing Going? The Horizons of the Knowing Subject

Book
Haughey, John C., SJ
2009
Georgetown University Press, Washington, DC
LC501.H355 2009
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Catholic institutions of higher learning are at a crossroads: How can they remain true to their roots while recognizing that many of their administrations, faculties, and student bodies have little connection with the tradition? How can these institutions remain competitive while maintaining a relationship to the Church?

During the past several years, Catholic theologian John C. Haughey, SJ, has conducted groundbreaking research on these questions. He has done ...
Additional Info:
Catholic institutions of higher learning are at a crossroads: How can they remain true to their roots while recognizing that many of their administrations, faculties, and student bodies have little connection with the tradition? How can these institutions remain competitive while maintaining a relationship to the Church?

During the past several years, Catholic theologian John C. Haughey, SJ, has conducted groundbreaking research on these questions. He has done this in tandem with a team of Catholic scholars from around the United States. Haughey has also conducted numerous workshops with faculty at a dozen Catholic colleges and universities to learn firsthand about their research and teaching aspirations. Those relationships and conversations provide the foundation for this book's many insights.

In "Where Is Knowing Going?", Haughey explores what constitutes the Catholic identity of Catholic colleges and universities. Going beyond a doctrinal understanding of Catholic identity to one that engages and is engaged by the intellectual tradition of Catholicism, Haughey does not find that the issue of Catholic identity is adequately dealt with by marketing the distinctive identities of institutions in terms of their founding religious orders or saints. He provides a sure-handed process whereby the pursuits of individual faculty can be better aligned with the formal mission of the institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 What the Mission Looks Like from Below
ch. 2 A Further Beholding
ch. 3 Engaging Otherness
ch. 4 Catholicity: Its Scope and Contents
ch. 5 The Catholic Intellectual Tradition: Part I
ch. 6 The Catholic Intellectual Tradition: Part II
ch. 7 An Invitation
ch. 8 Where is Knowing Going?
ch. 9 Worship and the Catholic Identity of the Campus
ch. 10 Ex corde ecclesiae, Its Strengths and Limitations

Afterword
Appendixes

A. An Autobiographical Note on Prayer
B. The Categorical and the Transcendental
C. Catholic-Muslim Forum
D. A Contrasting Optic

Bibliography
Index
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

"The Ethics of Effective Teaching: Challenges from the Religious Right and Critical Pedagogy"

TTR
Trelstad, Marit
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 4 (2008): 191-202
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
This essay asks: What are the ethics of engaging self-identified "conservative" students in topics and processes of learning that may unravel their world-view and possibly their personal lives? We should take their concerns, fear, and distrust seriously and not simply dismiss them as ignorant. We should strive to be "trustworthy" educators, guiding students through the consequences of transformative education. This paper argues that conservative students are critically examining and reacting ...
Additional Info:
This essay asks: What are the ethics of engaging self-identified "conservative" students in topics and processes of learning that may unravel their world-view and possibly their personal lives? We should take their concerns, fear, and distrust seriously and not simply dismiss them as ignorant. We should strive to be "trustworthy" educators, guiding students through the consequences of transformative education. This paper argues that conservative students are critically examining and reacting to the liberal academy by leveling critiques similar to those found within feminist, post-colonial and post modern pedagogies. This essay reviews contemporary postmodern, postcolonial, and feminist pedagogies, which analyze bias and power in the classroom and have sought to represent marginalized voices in the classroom in order to challenge the way education often simply serves and protects the interests of the privileged. Pedagogies centered on subject or disciplinary method cannot secure a trustworthy pedagogy since method, thinking skills, and subjects are themselves bias-laden. But critical pedagogy offers insights to help us achieve the goal of becoming trustworthy educators for students coming from a wide spectrum of religious perspectives.
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Religion & Education Volume 36, no. 2

Journal Issue
2009
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC383.S65 2009
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface
Guest Editor's Introduction

ch. 1 Where Religion Faculty Meet Students' Worlds: Lessons from the GTU Preparing Future Faculty Project
ch. 2 Engaging the Institution: Mentoring Future Faculty, Big Questions of Vocation, and the Reality of Assessment
ch. 3 Reengineering the Teaching Machine: Big Questions from the Inside Out and the Outside In
ch. 4 The Stakes Involved in 'Going Spiritual': Mentoring Future Faculty toward Meaning and Value
ch. 5 Big Questions of Vocation, Professional Identity, and Classroom Practice: A Conversation Between Colleagues
ch. 6 Conflations and Confrontations: Spirituality, Religion, and Values in the Liberal Arts Classroom
ch. 7 The Spectre of Spirituality: On the (In) Utility of 'Spirituality' as an Analytical Category
ch. 8 Spirituality in Higher Education?
ch. 9 The Question is the Answer
ch. 10 Pedagogy of Reverence: A Narrative Account
ch. 11 Does Spirituality Have a Place in Higher Education?: A Response
ch. 12 Spirituality in Higher Education: Problem, Practices, and Programs: A Response
ch. 13 Spirituality in Higher Education: Toward a Holistic Approach to the Development of Future Faculty in Theology and Religion
ch. 14 Fuzzy But Not Warm: On the (Continuing) Descriptive and Analytical Inutility of 'Spirituality'
ch. 15 A Contemplative Response: The Part Is the Whole

Contributors
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Helping College Students Find Purpose: The Campus Guide to Meaning-Making

Book
Nash,Robert J. and Michele C. Murray
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LA227.4.N36 2010
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Praise for Helping College Students Find Purpose

A generous and inspiring book! In the spirit of 'convocation,' Nash and Murray call together both university faculty and student affairs professionals to provide them new means for helping more college students realize the highest purpose of higher education—that, in pursuing the means to make a living, one comes to make a meaning worth living for.

Educators ...
Additional Info:
Praise for Helping College Students Find Purpose

A generous and inspiring book! In the spirit of 'convocation,' Nash and Murray call together both university faculty and student affairs professionals to provide them new means for helping more college students realize the highest purpose of higher education—that, in pursuing the means to make a living, one comes to make a meaning worth living for.

Educators across campuses—faculty and administrators alike—will find in this book not only the importance of helping their students construct meaning upon which to base their academic and life ambitions, but also practical suggestions for doing so. Ultimately, those who will benefit most from this book are students whose education inside and outside the classroom is informed by the type of cross-campus, interdisciplinary approach to meaning-making put forth by the authors.

This comprehensive compendium is a must-read for any higher education professional interested in responding to students' ubiquitous concerns about existential issues concerning purpose and meaning. It brings together classical and contemporary thought, conceptual depth, and concrete suggestions for practice. This scholarship is enriched and enlivened by the authors' personal perspectives and experiences, and by student voices and vignettes. Buy it and keep it handy as a source of wisdom and good counsel.

A thoughtful, provocative, moving, yet practical guide for any teacher seeking to make the college classroom a space for inspiration and hope. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
About the Authors

Part I: Making Meaning in the Quarterlife
ch. 1 Is the Quarterlife Generation Ready for Meaning-Making?
ch. 2 Exploring the Meaning of Meaning: Existentialism and Postmodernism
ch. 3 Finding Meaning in Religion and Spirituality: Why Can’t My Faith Be Cool?

Part II: Putting Meaning-Making to Work: Tools of the Trade
ch. 4 A Pedagogy of Constructivism: Deep-Meaning Learning
ch. 5 Make Room for Meaning: Practical Advice
ch. 6 The Ethics of Meaning-Making
ch. 7 Meaning Maxims for Both Inside and Outside the Classroom

Part III: Our Own Attempts to Make Meaning
ch. 8 Two Personal Reflections for Our Readers

Resources for Meaning-Making Educators
Resource A: Four Therapeutic Approaches to Meaning-Making
Resource B: Crossover Pedagogy

References
Index
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Religion & Education Volume 28, no. 2

Journal Issue
2001
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2001 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Letters from the Council on Islamic Education

ch. 2 In Search of an Establishment Principle: The Original Understanding, Pre-Game Prayers, and Aid to Religious Schools

ch. 3 A "Perfect Standard?" Exploring Perceptions of Student Life and Culture at Wheaton College

ch. 4 Hecate Does Harvard: Notes on Academic Criticism of Wiccan Practice

ch. 5 An End to the Heckler's Veto: Good News Club v. Milford Central School

ch. 6 Thayer S. Warshaw - A Tribute

ch. 7 Does Why Religion Matters Really Matter?

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 28, no. 1

Journal Issue
2001
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2001 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Constructing a Spirituality of Teaching: A Personal Perspective

ch. 2 A Vision of Schools with Spirit

ch. 3 Building a Comfort Zone: Teacher Training and Standards-Based Education about Religion

ch. 4 Ex Corde Ecclesiae and American Catholic Higher Education: Dead on Arrival?

ch. 5 Spiritually Committed Public School Teachers: Their Beliefs and Practices Concerning Religious Expression in the Classroom

ch. 6 Cognitive Emotions and Emotional Cognitions

Field Notes

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 29, no. 1

Journal Issue
2002
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2002 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 How September 11, 2001 Transformed My Course on Religious Pluralism, Spirituality, and Education

ch. 2 The Peripatetic Class: Buddhist Traditions and Myths of Pedagogy

ch. 3 John Dewey and His Religious Critics

ch. 4 The Role of Religion in Korean Higher Education

ch. 5 How Do We Respond When All Our Ways of Knowing Converge on Subversive Truths?

ch. 6 Nord's Net: "Ways of Knowing" for the Science Classroom

ch. 7 Response to: A 'Perfect Standard'

ch. 8 Review of Whose Kids Are They Anyway?" Religion and Morality in America's Public Schools

Books Received

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 29, no. 2

Journal Issue
2002
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2002 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 The School Voucher Decision

ch. 2 School Vouchers and the Original Understanding of the Establishment Clause

ch. 3 Zelman vs. Simmons-Harris: Remarks from a National Press Club Panel

ch. 4 Our Public Schools: Inclusive Mission Brings Us All Together

ch. 5 Chuang Tzu as Teacher: Pedagogical Insights from the Chuang Tzu

ch. 6 Openly Addressing the Reality: Homosexuality and Catholic Seminary Policies

ch. 7 The Living Color of Student's Lives: Bringing Cajitas into the Classroom

ch. 8 Two Preachers, a Trial Lawyer, ad Aristotle

ch. 9 Maintaining a Christian Institutional Identity while Embracing Religious Diversity

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 30, no.1

Journal Issue
2003
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2003 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Inviting Atheists to the Table: A Modest Proposal for Higher Education

ch. 2 Teaching Spirituality in Public Higher Education

ch. 3 Spirituality and Religion: Through the Eyes of the "Hidden Educators"

ch. 4 Understanding Women's Spirituality in the Context of a Progressive Campus-Based Catholic Community

ch. 5 Faith and Public Education: Immigrants, Iowa, and the Biblical Mandate to Welcome the Stranger

ch. 6 'Moral Victories': Ronald Reagan and the Debate over School Prayer

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 30, no.2

Journal Issue
2003
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2003 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Religion and Public Schools: A Forty Year Retrospective

ch. 2 Defining Spirituality in Public Education: A Response to R. J. Nash from a Spirituality Engaged Atheist

ch. 3 Challenges To Discernment in Religious Education

ch. 4 The Austin TEA Party: Homeschooling Controversy in Texas, 1986-1994

ch. 5 The Sense of Spiritual Calling Among Teacher Education Program Students

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 31, no.1

Journal Issue
2004
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2004 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Taking the Tournament of Worldviews Seriously in Education: Why Teaching about Religion Is Not Enough

ch. 2 Fostering Spiritual Depth in a Trans-traditional Context: Communicating Across Differences

ch. 3 God's People and Fundamentalist Ideology in the Classroom: an Examination of Free Presbyterian Schooling in Northern Ireland

ch. 4 In the Matter of Race, Memory and Transformation: The Use of Sacred Sites to Teach Social Justice

ch. 5 Spirituality and School Leaders: The Value of Spirituality in the Lives of Aspiring School Leaders

ch. 6 Evangelical Students in Public Schools: They Don't Stand Out, But Don't Fit In

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 31, no.2

Journal Issue
2004
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2004 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Studying Religious Diversity in Public Education: An Interpretive Approach to Religious and Intercultural Understanding

ch. 2 The Complex and Rich Landscape of Student Spirituality: Findings from the Goucher College Spirituality Survey

ch. 3 Being Religious at Knox College: Attitudes Toward Religion, Christian Expression, and Conservative Values on Campus

ch. 4 Religious Autonomy and World Religious Education

ch. 5 Comparing the Influence of Religion on Education in the United States and Overseas: A Meta-Analysis

ch 6. The Religious Free Speech Rights of Public School Teachers: Wigg vx. Sioux Falls School District

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 32, no.2

Journal Issue
2005
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2005 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Evangelicals on Campus: An Exploration of Culture, Faith and College Life

ch. 2 The Big Chill: Are Campuses Turning a Cold Shoulder to Religious Students?

ch. 3 Jesus, the Enlightenment and Teaching World History: The Struggles of an Evangelical Scholar

ch. 4 Listening to Teacher Voices: Religion in Schools in the Rural South

ch. 5 In The World But Not of It? Voices and Experiences of Conservative Christian Students in Public Schools

Contributors

Coming in Future Issues

Books Received
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Religion & Education Volume 32, no.1

Journal Issue
2005
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2005 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

Special Focus Section


Rethinking Religion, Education, and Pluralism in Europe and the United States


ch. 1 Rethinking Religious Education and Plurality: Issues in Public Religious Education

ch. 2 Religion, Pluralism, and Public Education in America

ch. 3 Defining and Promoting the Study of Religion in British and American Schools

ch. 4 Engaging the Believer A Contribution to the Discussion of Robert Jackson's Rethinking Religious Education and Plurality

ch. 5 The Study of Religion in American Schools Response to Robert Jackson's Religious Education and Plurality

ch. 6 European and Danish Religious Education: Human Rights, the Secular State, and Rethinking Religious Education and Plurality

ch. 7 Recasting Agreements that Govern Teaching and Learning: An Intellectual and Spiritual Framework for Transformation

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 33, no.2

Journal Issue
2006
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2006 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

Special Issue Spirituality in Higher Education

ch. 1 Guest Editor's Preface

ch. 2 Learning With Heart And Mind: Embracing Wholeness in Learning Communities

ch. 3 Integrating Religion and Spirituality in Higher Education: Meeting the Global Challenges of the 21st Century

ch. 4 Equanimity and Spirituality

ch. 5 How Colleges Differ in their Efforts to Promote Moral and Ethical Development in College

ch. 6 Understanding the "Interior" Life of Faculty: How Important is Spirituality?

ch. 7 The Dynamics of Spirituality and the Religious Experience

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 33, no.3

Journal Issue
2006
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2006 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 God, Darwin, and the Courts: An Evolving Debate

ch. 2 Teaching the Contexts: Why Evolution Should Be Taught As An Argument and How it Might be Done

ch. 3 Problems in the Philosophical Bases of Intelligent Design

ch. 4 Challenging the Myth of Human Superiority

ch. 5 "This Evolution Bit is Straight from Satan": McLean v. Arkansas Board of Education and the Democratization of Southern Christianity

ch. 6 A Clash of Opposing Worldviews: How One Professor Teaches the Intelligent Design/Evolution Controversy

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 33, no.1

Journal Issue
2006
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2006 Winter
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
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Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Exploring Religious Pluralism in Higher Education: Non-Majority Religious Perspectives among Entering First-Year College Students

ch. 2 Teaching Adolescents about Religious Pluralism in a Post- 9/11 World

ch. 3 Diversity and Spirituality in Secular Higher Education: The Teaching Paradox

ch. 4 Evoke: Remembering an Institution's Mission Through Soulful Renewal

ch. 5 Social Studies Teacher Educators: A Survey of Attitudes Toward Religion in the Curriculum

Contributors

Coming in Future Issues
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 34, no.1

Journal Issue
2007
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2007 Winter
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 "Do You Believe in the Whole Idea of 'God the Father'?" How College Students Talk about Spiritual Transformation

ch. 2 Bible Bills, Bible Curricula, and Controversies of Biblical Proportions: Legislative Efforts to Promote Bible Courses in Public Schools

ch. 3 The Philosophy of Baha'i Education

ch. 4 Religion and High Academic Achievements in Puerto Rican High School Students

ch. 5 Government Involvement in Religious Education: Perspectives from Abraham Kuyper on School Choice

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 34, no.2

Journal Issue
2007
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2007 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Talking With Students About Faith in an Era of Religious Extremes

ch. 2 Exploring Religion and Christianity as Points of Diversity Within Counseling Training Programs

ch. 3 Addressing the Identity-Relevance Dilemma: Religious Particularity and Pluralism as Presbyterian Church-Related Colleges

ch. 4 Planning for Change in Christian Colleges: Learnings from Lilly's PTEV

ch. 5 Islamic and Liberal Visions of Citizenship Education: Religion and State in the National Curriculum of Pakistan

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 34, no.3

Journal Issue
2007
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2007 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Measuring Faculty Spirituality and its Relationship to Teaching Style

ch. 2 Learning to Teach about Religion in Public Schools: Perspectives and Experiences of Student Teachers in the Program for Religion and Secondary Education at Harvard Divinity School

ch. 3 Rain and Snow, Bless the Lord: Quaker Theology and Teacher Education Practice

ch. 4 Life on Campus after September 11th: Undergraduates' Attitudes Regarding War and Religious Discrimination

ch. 5 Review of the Bible in History and Literature

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 35, no.3

Journal Issue
2008
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2008 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Dueling Weltanschauungen: Contemporary Collegiate Worldviews Part 1

ch. 2 Between Secularism and Pluralism: Religious Clubs on the Queen's University Campus

ch. 3 John Haught and the New Atheists

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 35, no.2

Journal Issue
2008
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2008 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 The Developmental Pathways of Evangelical Christian Students

ch. 2 Talking with Students about Truth: Using Heidegger to Loosen the Grip of Literal Absolutes

ch. 3 Public Funding, Religious Education, and Multiculturalism in Canada

ch. 4 Latino/a Participation and Engagement in Community Events, in Church Settings, and in Educational Settings

ch. 5 The Servant and Teacher: "Poured Out Like Water" An Essay on Teaching and Living

ch. 6 Judical "hostility to all things religious in public life" or Healthy Separation of Religion and Public Education?

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 35, no.1

Journal Issue
2008
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2008 Winter
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 "Complete Victory is Our Objective": The National Council on Bible Curriculum in Public Schools

ch. 2 Community, Freedom, and Commitment: Student Discipline at Religiously- Affiliated Colleges and Universities

ch. 3 World Religions in Modesto: Findings from a Curricular Innovation

ch. 4 Teaching from the Edge

ch. 5 Wholeness and Creativity in Religious Studies Teaching

Contributors
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 36, no.1

Journal Issue
2009
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2009 Spring
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 Dueling Weltanschauungen: Contemporary Collegiate Worldviews Part II Toleration and Diversity as Defining Values?

ch. 2 Race Through Religious Eyes: Focusing Teacher Reflectivity on Race, Culture, and Spiritual Belief

ch. 3 Faith-Based Charter Schools: An Idea Whose Time is Unlikely to Come

ch. 4 Bible Electives in Public Schools: A Guide From the Society of Biblical Literature

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 36, no.3

Journal Issue
2009
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls
LC405.R45 2009 Fall
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

ch. 1 The Quest for Meaning: Teaching Spirituality in Communication, Social Work, Nursing, and Leadership

ch. 2 The 'Invisible Institution' and a Disappearing Achievement Gap

ch. 3 An Empirical Study on Factors Influencing Parents' School Choice

ch. 4 Religion Inside the Schoolhouse Gate: Gatekeeping Forces and Religion Coverage in Public High School Newspapers

ch. 5 Teaching and the Seasons of Time: The Final Days of an Art Class

Contributors
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Religious Ideas for Secular Universities

Book
Sommerville, C. John
2009
William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, MI
LC383.S67 2009
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
During the last century American students and scholars have found it increasingly difficult to discuss the relation of religion to the mission of self-consciously secular colleges and universities. Respected scholar C. John Sommerville here offers thought-provoking reflections on this subject in a conversational style. / Sommerville explores the crisis of the secular university, argues that religion and secular universities need each other, and examines how Christianity shows up on both sides ...
Additional Info:
During the last century American students and scholars have found it increasingly difficult to discuss the relation of religion to the mission of self-consciously secular colleges and universities. Respected scholar C. John Sommerville here offers thought-provoking reflections on this subject in a conversational style. / Sommerville explores the crisis of the secular university, argues that religion and secular universities need each other, and examines how Christianity shows up on both sides of our "culture wars." The astute reflections in Religious Ideas for Secular Universities point the way to a dialogue that would do justice both to religious insights and to truly neutral secular education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

I The Crisis of the Secular University
ch. 1 Secularist Education Becomes Problematic
ch. 2 Secularization Creates the Corporate University
ch. 3 Defining Religious and Secular Arguments
ch. 4 Why Christianity and Secularization Need Each Other
ch. 5 Scholars Recover the Human Difference

II Judging Religions, and Especially Christianity
ch. 6 How We Judge Religions
ch. 7 How Does Christianity Come Out?
ch. 8 Theocracy versus Christianity

III Scholars Assess the Western Bible
ch. 9 How the Bible Works: Narrative Theory
ch. 10 How the Bible Was Chosen and What Makes It One Book

IV The University and the Culture Wars
ch. 11 A Brief History of Our Culture Wars
ch. 12 The Child as Secular Icon
ch. 13 News as Culture Substitute
ch. 14 Spirituality and Decadence

Index
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Debating Moral Education: Rethinking the Role of the Modern University

Book
Kiss, Elizabeth and J. Peter Euben, eds.
2010
Duke University Press, Durham, NC
LC311.D43 2010
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
After decades of marginalization in the secularized twentieth-century academy, moral education has enjoyed a recent resurgence in American higher education, with the establishment of more than 100 ethics centers and programs on campuses across the country. Yet the idea that the university has a civic responsibility to teach its undergraduate students ethics and morality has been met with skepticism, suspicion, and even outright rejection from both inside and outside the academy. ...
Additional Info:
After decades of marginalization in the secularized twentieth-century academy, moral education has enjoyed a recent resurgence in American higher education, with the establishment of more than 100 ethics centers and programs on campuses across the country. Yet the idea that the university has a civic responsibility to teach its undergraduate students ethics and morality has been met with skepticism, suspicion, and even outright rejection from both inside and outside the academy. In this collection, renowned scholars of philosophy, politics, and religion debate the role of ethics in the university, investigating whether universities should proactively cultivate morality and ethics, what teaching ethics entails, and what moral education should accomplish. The essays quickly open up to broader questions regarding the very purpose of a university education in modern society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Noah Pickus)
Acknowledgments

I. Introduction: Why the Return to Ethics? Why Now?
ch. 1 Debating Moral Education: An Introduction (Elizabeth Kiss and J. Peter Euben)
ch. 2 The Changing Contours of Moral Education in American Colleges and Universities (Julie Reuben)

II. What Are Universities For?
ch. 3 Aim High: A Response to Stanley Fish (Elizabeth Kiss and J. Peter Euben)
ch. 4 I Know It When I See It: A Reply to Kiss and Euben (Stanley Fish)
ch. 5 The Pathos of the University: The Case of Stanley Fish (Stanley Hauerwas)
ch. 6 On the Distribution of Moral Badges: A Few Worries (Elizabeth V. Spelman)

III. The Politics and Ethics of Higher Education
ch. 7 Pluralism and the Education of the Spirit (Wilson Carey McWilliams and Susan McWilliams)
ch. 8 Multiculturalism and Moral Education (Lawrence Blum)
ch. 9 Against Civic Education (James Bernard Murphy)
ch. 10 Education, Independence, and Acknowledgment (Patchen Markell)
ch. 11 The Power of Morality (George Shulman)
ch. 12 Hunger, Ethics, and the University: A Radical Democratic Goad in Ten Pieces (Romand Coles)

IV. Which Virtues? Whose Character?
ch. 13 Is There an Ethicist in the House? How Can We Tell? (David A. Hoekema)
ch. 14 The Possibility of Moral Education in the University Today (J. Donald Moon)
ch. 15 Is a Humanistic Education Humanizing? (Ruth W. Grant)
ch. 16 Players and Spectators: Sports and Ethical Training in the American University (Michael Allen Gillespie)

Bibliography
Contributors
Index
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 37, no. 1

Journal Issue
2010
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 Spring 2010
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

Articles, Essays

ch. 1 How School Law Scholars Teach about Religion in Public Schools: An Analysis of Graduate and Undergraduate Textbooks (Suzanne E. Eckes)

ch. 2 Finding Congruence, Finding Meaning: Value Intersections and Transforming Relationships among Faculty and Staff at a Religious College (Alyssa N. Bryant, Christy Moran Craft)

ch. 3 Asking Sacred Questions: Understanding Religion's Impact on Teacher Belief and Action (Kimberly White)

ch. 4 The Evolving Place of Research on Religion in the American Educational Research Association (Jason Nelson)

Resource Reviews
ch. 5 A Buddhist in the Classroom

ch. 6 American Educational History: School, Society, and the Common Good

ch. 7 Education about Religions and Beliefs (ERB) Clearninghouse
Article cover image

"Spirituality in Higher Education: A National Study of Spirituality in Higher Education: Student's Search for Meaning and Purpose"

Article
Astin, Alexander W., Astin, Helen S., and Linholm, Jennifer A. Higher Education Research Institute Graduate School of Education & Information Studies University of California, Los Angeles
2003
Higher Education Research Institute (HERI), UCLA
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Key Findings from the First National Longitudinal Study of Undergraduates' Spiritual Growth, conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) at UCLA
www.spirtuality.ucla.edu
Additional Info:
Key Findings from the First National Longitudinal Study of Undergraduates' Spiritual Growth, conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) at UCLA
www.spirtuality.ucla.edu
TTR cover image

"On Qualifying Religious Literacy: Recent Debates on Higher Education and Religious Studies in Japan"

TTR
Fujiwara, Satoko
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 223-236
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
This article describes and analyzes controversies in Japan brought about by an intercollegiate educational project on religion. The project team, consisting of selected members of the Japanese Association for Religious Studies and the Japanese Association for the Study of Religion and Society, has been planning a new system for qualifying undergraduates as "specialists in religious cultures" (sh ky -bunkasi). It is anticipated that students with this qualification will be engaged ...
Additional Info:
This article describes and analyzes controversies in Japan brought about by an intercollegiate educational project on religion. The project team, consisting of selected members of the Japanese Association for Religious Studies and the Japanese Association for the Study of Religion and Society, has been planning a new system for qualifying undergraduates as "specialists in religious cultures" (sh ky -bunkasi). It is anticipated that students with this qualification will be engaged in various occupations that require knowledge of different cultures. The project reflects an increased awareness that the academic study of religion should play a social role and be recognized as worthwhile by the public. This article will focus upon the academic and pedagogical challenges that the project members faced in the process of planning a system to assess and qualify students' literacy in religious traditions. It will argue that religious literacy involves the dynamic ability to put knowledge into practice as well as to reflect continuously upon previously acquired knowledge.
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 37, no.2

Journal Issue
2010
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 August 2010
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

Articles, Essays

ch. 1 The Impact of Pedophile Priests on American Catholic Education: Reflections of a Cradle Catholic (Charles J. Russo)

ch. 2 University Student Affairs Staff and Their Spiritual Discussions with Students (Jill A. Burchell, Jenny J. Lee, Sara M. Olson )

ch. 3 "Anthropology-Lite": An Education Perspective on the Ideology of Religious Studies (Edward Dutton)

ch. 4 Exploring the Spiritual Needs of Adolescent Girls (Kaili Chen Zhang, Charlene Tan)

ch. 5 Yoga in the Public Schools: Diversity, Democracy and the Use of Critical Thinking in Educational Debates (Laura Douglass)

Resource Reviews

ch. 6 Religion in Education: A Contribution to Dialogue or a Factor of Conflict in Transforming Societies of European Countries

ch. 7 Materials Used to Teach about World Religions in Schools in England: A Summary
Article cover image

"Why Spirituality Deserves a Central Place in Liberal Education"

Article
Astin, Alexander W.
2004
Liberal Education 90, no. 2 (2004): 34-41
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
One of the most remarkable things about the human consciousness is that each of us has the capacity to observe our thoughts and feelings as they arise in our consciousness. Why shouldn?t cultivating this ability to observe one?s own mind in action,becoming more self aware or simply more "conscious" be one of the central purposes of education? Even a cursory look at our educational system makes it ...
Additional Info:
One of the most remarkable things about the human consciousness is that each of us has the capacity to observe our thoughts and feelings as they arise in our consciousness. Why shouldn?t cultivating this ability to observe one?s own mind in action,becoming more self aware or simply more "conscious" be one of the central purposes of education? Even a cursory look at our educational system makes it clear that the relative amount of attention that higher education devotes to the exterior and interior aspects of our lives has gotten way out of balance. Thus, while we are justifiably proud of our "outer" development in fields such as science, medicine, technology, and commerce, we have increasingly come to neglect our "inner" development the sphere of values and beliefs, emotional maturity, moral development, spirituality, and self understanding. This growing awareness of the importance of spirituality in higher education was recently underscored by the Templeton Foundation through its award of a $1.9 million grant to UCLA?s Higher Education Research Institute to support a large scale longitudinal study of spiritual development in college undergraduates. A pilot study of 3,700 students enrolled at forty-six colleges and universities was initiated in spring 2003, and a full-scale assessment of 90,000 students enrolling at 150 institutions will be initiated in fall 2004. Perhaps the most important thing to keep in mind about spirituality is that is touches directly on our sense of community. More than anything else, giving spirituality a central place in our institutions will serve to strengthen our sense of connectedness with each other, our students, and our institutions. This enrichment of our sense of community will not only go a long way toward overcoming the sense of fragmentation and alienation that so many of us now feel, but will also help our students to lead more meaningful lives as engaged citizens, loving partners and parents, and caring neighbors.
Article cover image

"The Spiritual Life of College Students: A National Study of College Students' Search for Meaning and Purpose"

Article
Astin, Alexander W., et al.
2005
Higher Education Research Institute Graduate School of Education & Information Studies University of California, Los Angeles
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Results of the second phase in an ongoing major study of the spiritual lives of college students was released in a report called "The Spiritual Life of College Students." The study was conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI), a research center of higher education based in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies (GSE&IS) at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). It is a groundbreaking attempt ...
Additional Info:
Results of the second phase in an ongoing major study of the spiritual lives of college students was released in a report called "The Spiritual Life of College Students." The study was conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI), a research center of higher education based in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies (GSE&IS) at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). It is a groundbreaking attempt to gain insight into the spiritual lives and concerns of students and improve how faculties and administrators at US colleges and universities address this part of their students' lives.
Article cover image

"Spirituality, Liberal Learning, and College Student Engagement"

Article
Kuh, George D., and Gonyea, Robert M.
2006
Liberal Education 92, no. 1 (2006): 40-47
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Explores the correlation between religion and liberal education in the U.S. Influence of spiritual or religious practices on student learning; Effect of spirituality on liberal learning; Ways in which religious practices affect learning. INSET: MEASURES OF STUDENT ENGAGEMENT.
Additional Info:
Explores the correlation between religion and liberal education in the U.S. Influence of spiritual or religious practices on student learning; Effect of spirituality on liberal learning; Ways in which religious practices affect learning. INSET: MEASURES OF STUDENT ENGAGEMENT.
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Christianity and Moral Identity in Higher Education

Book
Glanzer, Perry L., and Ream, Todd C.
2009
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LB2324.G53 2009
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Many scholarly visions of morality in higher education suggest that moral instruction should deal primarily with a person’s professional or political identity. In contrast, Glanzer and Ream argue that a more wholistic moral education takes place within a university committed to a tradition that can set forth a comprehensive ideal for the school and its students about human well-being. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Many scholarly visions of morality in higher education suggest that moral instruction should deal primarily with a person’s professional or political identity. In contrast, Glanzer and Ream argue that a more wholistic moral education takes place within a university committed to a tradition that can set forth a comprehensive ideal for the school and its students about human well-being. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: The Turn to Less than Human Moral Education: The Moral Reservations of Contemporary Universities

Part. I The Story of Moral Education in Higher Education
ch. 1 Love in the University: Moral Development and Moral Orientation
ch. 2 Searching for a Common, Tradition-Free Approach to Moral Education: The Failed Quest
ch. 3 The Rise of Less than Human Moral Education
ch. 4 The Quandary Facing Contemporary Higher Education: Moral Education in Postmodern Universities

Part II A More Human Education: Moral Identity and Moral Orientation
ch. 5 Who Are We? The Identities Universities Use To Provide Moral Orientation
ch. 6 Searching for a More Human Moral Education: Three Approaches
ch. 7 Moral Education in the Christian Tradition: Contemporary Exemplars
ch. 8 Moral Identity, Moral Autonomy, and Critical Thinking

Part III Strengthening the Moral Tradition of Christian Humanism
ch. 9 Christian Humanism and Christ-Centered Education: The Redemptive Development of Humans and Human Creations
ch. 10 A More Human Christian Education: Cultivating and Ordering the Great Identities

Conclusion: Transforming Human Animals into Saints
Notes
Select Bibliography
Index
Additional Info:
What is the appropriate role of religion in scholarship and teaching? Covering topics ranging from religious influences in faculty lives to questions of academic freedom, proselytization, and appropriate limits to religious expression within the Academy, this book seeks to promote faculty self-awareness and encourage dialogue with colleagues. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
What is the appropriate role of religion in scholarship and teaching? Covering topics ranging from religious influences in faculty lives to questions of academic freedom, proselytization, and appropriate limits to religious expression within the Academy, this book seeks to promote faculty self-awareness and encourage dialogue with colleagues. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part I: Cautions
ch. 1 Cautionary Tales
ch. 2 Encounters

Part II: Communities
ch. 3 Religious Formation
ch. 4 Disciplinary Formation
ch. 5 Institutional Settings

Part III: Individuals
ch. 6 Narrative Identity
ch. 7 Inclinations

Part IV: Implications
ch. 8 Community Warrant
ch. 9 Academic Freedom
ch. 10 Reticence
ch. 11 In the Classroom

Conclusion
Appendix 1: Advice for Seminar Leaders
Appendix 2: How and Why I Became an Academic
Notes
Index
TTR cover image

"Responses to the AAR-Teagle White Paper: “The Religious Studies Major in a Post-9/11 World”

TTR
Webster, Jane S., Buckley, James J., Jensen, Tim, Floyd-Thomas, Stacey M.,
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 1 (2011): 34-71
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
In October 2008 The American Academy of Religion published the findings of an eighteen month study (conducted with funding from the Teagle Foundation) on “The Religious Studies Major in a Post–9/11World: New Challenges, New Opportunities.” Re-published here, this AAR-Teagle White Paper provides the opportunity for four respondents to raise issues and questions about the teaching of religion in their own institutional contexts. First, Jane Webster describes how the White Paper's “...
Additional Info:
In October 2008 The American Academy of Religion published the findings of an eighteen month study (conducted with funding from the Teagle Foundation) on “The Religious Studies Major in a Post–9/11World: New Challenges, New Opportunities.” Re-published here, this AAR-Teagle White Paper provides the opportunity for four respondents to raise issues and questions about the teaching of religion in their own institutional contexts. First, Jane Webster describes how the White Paper's “five characteristics of the religion major” find expression in her biblical literature course. Then James Buckley suggests some of the general level teaching issues provoked by the study and analyzes how well the White Paper aligns with how the teaching of religion is conceived in his Catholic university context. Tim Jensen draws comparisons between the White Paper and the higher education structures and goals from his university context in Denmark, raising questions about what motivates students to major in religious studies, the “utility” of a religious studies major, and whether students' religious and spiritual concerns ought to enter the classroom. And finally Stacey Floyd-Thomas finds surprising similarities between the state of the religion major and the various crises facing contemporary North American theological education.
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Does God Make a Difference? Taking Religion Seriously in Our Schools and Universities

Book
Nord, Warren
2010
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
LB1027.2.N67 2010
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
In this provocative book Warren A. Nord argues that public schools and universities leave the vast majority of students religiously illiterate. Such education is not religiously neutral, a matter of constitutional importance; indeed, it borders on secular indoctrination when measured against the requirements of a good liberal education and the demands of critical thinking. Nord also argues that religious perspectives must be included in courses that address morality and those ...
Additional Info:
In this provocative book Warren A. Nord argues that public schools and universities leave the vast majority of students religiously illiterate. Such education is not religiously neutral, a matter of constitutional importance; indeed, it borders on secular indoctrination when measured against the requirements of a good liberal education and the demands of critical thinking. Nord also argues that religious perspectives must be included in courses that address morality and those Big Questions that a good education cannot ignore. He outlines a variety of civic reasons for studying religion, and argues that the Establishment Clause doesn't just permit, but requires, taking religion seriously. While acknowledging the difficulty of taking religion seriously in schools and universities, Nord makes a cogent case for requiring both high school and undergraduate students to take a year long course in religious studies, and for discussing religion in any course that deals with religiously controversial material. The final chapters address how religion might best be addressed in history, literature, economics, and (perhaps most controversially) science courses. He also discusses Bible courses, and the relevance of religion to moral education and ethics courses.

While his position will be taken by some as radical, he argues that he is advocating a "middle way" in our culture wars. Public schools and universities can neither promote religion nor ignore it. Does God Make a Difference? increases our understanding of a long and heated cultural conflict; it also proposes a solution to the problem that is philosophically sound and, in the long run, eminently practical. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

I. Problems
ch. 1 Does God Still Matter at the Beginning the Twenty-First Century?
ch. 2 Does God Measure Up to American Standards?
ch. 3 The Secularization of American Education
ch. 4 Problems

II. Solutions
ch. 5 Liberal Education
ch. 6 Moral, Existential, and Civic Arguments
ch. 7 Constitutional Considerations
ch. 8 Complications, Concerns, and Clarifications

III. Implications
ch. 9 The Basics
ch. 10 Taking Religion Seriously Across the Curriculum
ch. 11 Religion and Science Courses
ch. 12 Religion and Moral Education

Conclusions
TTR cover image

"Rethinking the Christian Studies Classroom: Reflections on the Dynamics of Teaching Religion in Southern Public Universities"

TTR
Gravett, Sandie; Hulsether, Mark; and Medine, Carolyn
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 2 (2011): 158-166
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
An extended set of conversations conducted by three religious studies faculty teaching at large public universities in the Southern United States spurred these reflections on how their institutional locations inflected issues such as the cultural expectations students bring to the classroom, how these expectations interact with the evolving priorities of religious studies departments, and how these factors affect the balance among the various subfields of religious studies and theology that ...
Additional Info:
An extended set of conversations conducted by three religious studies faculty teaching at large public universities in the Southern United States spurred these reflections on how their institutional locations inflected issues such as the cultural expectations students bring to the classroom, how these expectations interact with the evolving priorities of religious studies departments, and how these factors affect the balance among the various subfields of religious studies and theology that make up such departments.
TTR cover image

"Contemplative Pedagogy: Frequently Asked Questions"

TTR
Coburn, Tom; Grace, Fran; Klein, Anne Carolyn; Komjathy, Louis; Roth, Harold; and Simmer-Brown, Judith
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 2 (2011): 167-174
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Contemplative Pedagogy is a new and sometimes controversial pedagogical practice. Faculty often have basic questions about how to implement the pedagogy in their classrooms, in addition to questions that challenge the educational value and appropriateness of the practice. Assembled here are the most frequently asked questions about Contemplative Pedagogy, with responses from six contemplative professors, each from a different institutional and philosophical location. The respondents are founding members of the ...
Additional Info:
Contemplative Pedagogy is a new and sometimes controversial pedagogical practice. Faculty often have basic questions about how to implement the pedagogy in their classrooms, in addition to questions that challenge the educational value and appropriateness of the practice. Assembled here are the most frequently asked questions about Contemplative Pedagogy, with responses from six contemplative professors, each from a different institutional and philosophical location. The respondents are founding members of the Contemplative Studies Consultation of the American Academy of Religion. The diversity of views expressed by the respondents invites the reader to see that there is no single theory or praxis of contemplative pedagogy.
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Cultivating the Spirit: How College Can Enhance Students' Inner Lives

Book
Alexander W. Astin, Helen S. Astin, Jennifer A. Lindholm
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB3609.A78 2010
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Praise for Cultivating the Spirit

A groundbreaking study of the spiritual growth of college students.... The spiritual dimension of higher education has been explored from a variety of angles for the past twenty years, but not until now have we had a competent and comprehensive body of data organized around well-defined dimensions of this complex phenomenon. This is an essential book for anyone in academia who cares about ...
Additional Info:
Praise for Cultivating the Spirit

A groundbreaking study of the spiritual growth of college students.... The spiritual dimension of higher education has been explored from a variety of angles for the past twenty years, but not until now have we had a competent and comprehensive body of data organized around well-defined dimensions of this complex phenomenon. This is an essential book for anyone in academia who cares about the education of the whole person.

An extremely important book for layperson and professional alike. A stunning wake-up call for higher education—highly recommended!

Cultivating the Spirit makes a unique and important contribution to one of the least examined yet most fundamental questions about undergraduate education: how students acquire the values and convictions that help to give meaning and purpose to their lives.... The authors provide a wealth of valuable findings about this vital process and its effects on student achievement, well-being, and personal growth in college.

The fruit of a decade of elegantly designed and compelling research, Cultivating the Spirit provides timely and significant data for reorienting the conversation about the relationships among intellectual inquiry, traditional academic values, and the formation of the inner life. Informative, clearly written, essential, and evocative reading for today's faculty across all institutions—public and private, secular and religious. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Why Spirituality Matters
ch. 2 Assessing Spiritual and Religious Qualities
ch. 3 Spiritual Quest: The Search for Meaning and Purpose
ch. 4 Equanimity
ch. 5 Spirituality in Practice: Caring For and About Others
ch. 6 The Religious Life of College Students
ch. 7 Religious Struggle and Skepticism
ch. 8 How Spiritual Growth Affects Educational and Personal Development
ch. 9 Higher Education and the Life of the Spirit

Appendix: Study Methodology
Notes
References
Index
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 38, no.1

Journal Issue
2011
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 2011 Jan.-Apr.
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Special Issue on Warren A. Nord's
Does God Make a Difference? Taking Religion Seriously in Our Schools and Universities


Editor's Preface

Essays
ch. 1 Does God Make a Difference? Taking Religion Seriously in Our Schools and Universities: An Excerpt (Warren A. Nord)
ch. 2 Taking Warren Nord Seriously (Charles C. Haynes)
ch. 3 Even So, Keep Looking at That (MArtin E. Marty)
ch. 4 Teaching About Religion in Public Schools: Where Do We Go From Here? (Melissa Rogers)
ch. 5 Educational and Legal Perspectives: How Do They Differ? (Kent Greenawalt)
ch. 6 The Place of Religious Studies in Warren Nord's Does God Make a Difference (Bruce Grelle)
ch. 7 The Examined Life (Emile Lester)
ch. 8 Does Warren A. Nord Make a Difference? (Robert J. Nash)
ch. 9 Taking Religion Seriously: Another Approach (James C. Carper, Thomas C. Hunt)
Article cover image

"Advocacy in Academe: Academic versus Confessional Theology"

Article
Hindery, Roderick
2003
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 32, Number 1, November 2003
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Bibliographical Essay," from The University Gets Religion: Religious Studies in American Higher Education"

Article
Hart, Darryl G.
2003
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 32, Number 1, November 2003
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"The Religious Mission of the University and Academic Freedom: An Uneasy Relationship"

Article
Stancil, Wilburn T.
2001
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 30, Number 3, September 2001
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"So, What Are We Professing Here? Religion, the Liberal Arts, and Civic Life"

Article
Williams, Raymond B.
2000
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 29, Number 3, November 2000
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"WWJD?": Should Christian Scholars Bring Their Religion to Work?"

Article
Sullivan, Winnifred Fallers
1998
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 27, Number 3, September 1998
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Ascetic Self-discipline: George Marsden and The Outrageous Idea of Christian Scholarship Rejoinder"

Article
Dean, William, and Marsden, George
1998
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 27, Number 3, September 1998
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Spiritual Formation Goes to College: Class-Related "Soul Projects" in Christian Higher Education"

Article
Setran, David P.; Wilhoit, James C.; Ratcliff, Donald; Haase, Daniel T.; and Rosema, Linda
2010
Christian Education Journal, Series 3, Vol. 7, No. 2, pgs. 401-422
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Spiritual formation is both an opportunity and a challenge for educators in Christian colleges and seminaries. How can students be nurtured and guided in developing spiritually within the curriculum? Drawing on a number of educators, studies, and arguments, this article develops a rationale for engaging in spiritual formation and for the use of practical assignments or "soul projects." A selection of such projects is grouped into genres, followed by a ...
Additional Info:
Spiritual formation is both an opportunity and a challenge for educators in Christian colleges and seminaries. How can students be nurtured and guided in developing spiritually within the curriculum? Drawing on a number of educators, studies, and arguments, this article develops a rationale for engaging in spiritual formation and for the use of practical assignments or "soul projects." A selection of such projects is grouped into genres, followed by a brief exploration of best practices and an evaluation of such assignments.
Article cover image

"The Myth of Objectivity In Public Education: Toward the Intersubjective Teaching of Religion"

Article
Moore, Mary Elizabeth Mullino
1995
Religious Education Vol. 90, No. 2, Spring 1995, pgs. 207-225
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image
Wabash tree

Meditation and the Classroom: Contemplative Pedagogy for Religious Studies

Book
Simmer-Brown, Judith, and Grace, Fran
2011
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
BL627.M397 2011
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
A groundbreaking book on using meditation in education and how it can enhance teaching and learning.

Meditation and the Classroom inventively articulates how educators can use meditation to educate the whole student. Notably, a number of universities have initiated contemplative studies options and others have opened contemplative spaces. This represents an attempt to address the inner life. It is also a sign of a new era, one in ...
Additional Info:
A groundbreaking book on using meditation in education and how it can enhance teaching and learning.

Meditation and the Classroom inventively articulates how educators can use meditation to educate the whole student. Notably, a number of universities have initiated contemplative studies options and others have opened contemplative spaces. This represents an attempt to address the inner life. It is also a sign of a new era, one in which the United States is more spiritually diverse than ever before. Examples from university classrooms and statements by students indicate benefits include increased self-awareness, creativity, and compassion.

The religious studies scholars who have contributed to this book often teach about meditation, but here they include reflections on how meditation has affected them and their teaching. Until recently, though, even many religious studies professors would find sharing meditation experiences, let alone teaching meditation techniques, a breach of disciplinary and academic protocols. The value of teaching meditation and teaching about meditation is discussed. Ethical issues such as pluralism, respect, qualifications, power and coercion, and avoiding actual or perceived proselytization are also examined. While methods for religious studies are emphasized, the book provides valuable guidance for all those interested in this endeavor. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Editors’ Introduction

I. Why Contemplatives Pedagogy? The Religious Studies Dialogue
ch. 1 The Convergence of Liberal Education and Contemplative Education—Inevitable?
ch. 2 Meditation and Education: India, Tibet, and Modern America
ch. 3 Contemplative Studies: Can It Flourish in the Religious Studies Classrom?
ch. 4 Contemplative Studies and the Art of Persuasion: The Institutional Challenge

II. The Contemplative Professor
ch. 5 From Content, to Context, to Contemplation: One Professor’s Journey
ch. 6 The Collective Dynamics of Contemplative Practice
ch. 7 The Mindful Teacher as the Foundation of Contemplative Pedagogy
ch. 8 Compassion Beyond Fatigue: Contemplative Training for Educators and Other Helping Professionals
ch. 9 Field Notes from a Daoist Professor

III. Critical Issues In Contemplative Teaching
ch. 10 Training the Heart Responsibly: Ethical Considerations in Contemplative Teaching
ch. 11 Invitation and Coercion in Contemplative Pedagogy
ch. 12 Interiority and Higher Education: The Neurophenomenology of Contemplation

IV. Contemplative-Based Courses
ch. 13 Embodied Contemplative Learning: Aikido as a Case Study
ch. 14 Reflections on Theory and Practice: The Case of Modern Yoga
ch. 15 Sustaining Life: Contemplative Pedagogies in a Religion and Ecology Course
ch. 16 Adab: Courteous Behavior in the Classroom
ch. 17 Experiencing Medieval Christian Spirituality

V. Contemplative Exercises For The Classroom
ch. 18 Awareness Practices in an Undergraduate Buddhism Course
ch. 19 Contemplative Inquiry: Beyond the Disembodied Subject
ch. 20 Love of Wisdom Puts You on the Spot: The Warrior Exam
ch. 21 A Meeting of the Minds in Cyberspace: Eco-contemplative Methods for Online Teaching
ch. 22 Mindfulness in the History Classroom: Teaching as Interbeing
ch. 23 Two Contemplative Practices That Animate the Study of Religion
ch. 24 Mindfulness and Contemplative Practice in Art and Religion

VI. Conclusion: Does It Work? Evaluations From Our Students
ch. 25 Emotional Learning: Re-cognizing Emotion and Thought in a Buddhism Course
ch. 26 Meditation in the Classroom: What Do the Students Say They Learn?

Selected Bibliography List of Contributors Index
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 38, no. 2

Journal Issue
2011
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45.v38 no. 2
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Preface

Articles, Essays
ch. 1 Integrating Religious and Professional Identities: Christian Faculty at Public Institutions of Higher Education (Christy Moran Craft, John D. Foubert, Jessica Jelkin Lane)
ch. 2 Teaching: Tolerance in Public Education: Organizing the Exposure to Religious and Life-Stance Diversity (Ole Henrik Borchgrevink Hansen)
ch. 3 Measuring Faculty Spirituality and Its Relationship to Teaching Style (John J. Cecero, Tracy A. Prout)
ch. 4 Reinvention and Context: Freirean Approaches to Pedagogical Dialogue in Catholic, Jewish, and Public Schools (John L. Watzke, Maria Fernanda Montes Valencia)
ch. 5 Spirituality as a Pragmatic Science: Toward the Establishment of a Holistic Educational Rationale (Oren Ergas)

Resource Review
ch. 6 Neither Jew Nor Gentile: Exploring Issues of Racial Diversity on Protestant College Campuses
ch. 7 A Kindly Providence: An Alaskan Missionary's Story, 1926-2006 by Fr. Louis L. Renner, S. J.
TTR cover image

“Big Questions” in the Introductory Religion Classroom: Expanding the Integrative Approach"

TTR
Deffenbaugh, Daniel G.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 4 (2011): 307-322
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Recent research by Barbara Walvoord suggests a perceived disparity between faculty learning objectives and students' desire to engage “big questions” in the introductory religion classroom. Faculty opinions of such questions are varied, ranging from a refusal to employ any approach that diverts attention away from critical thinking, to a willingness to integrate personal questions of meaning and purpose into the introductory religion course. This essay argues that, in light of ...
Additional Info:
Recent research by Barbara Walvoord suggests a perceived disparity between faculty learning objectives and students' desire to engage “big questions” in the introductory religion classroom. Faculty opinions of such questions are varied, ranging from a refusal to employ any approach that diverts attention away from critical thinking, to a willingness to integrate personal questions of meaning and purpose into the introductory religion course. This essay argues that, in light of work currently being done by such developmental theorists as Sharon Daloz Parks and Marcia Baxter Magolda, the integrative approach has much to commend it. It concludes with suggestions for how religion faculty can expand this approach through learning covenants, service learning, and seeing the religion classroom as a gateway to various mentoring communities on campus.
TTR cover image

"Formation in the Classroom"

TTR
Glennon, Fred; Jacobsen, Douglas; Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt; Thatamanil, John J.; Porterfield, Amanda; and Moore, Mary Elizabeth
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 4 (2011): 357-381
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
What is the relationship between the academic knowledge of the guild and the formation of students in the classroom? This Forum gathers four essays originally presented at a Special Topics Session at the 2009 conference of the American Academy of Religion (Atlanta, Georgia), with a brief introductory essay by Fred Glennon explaining the genesis of the panel. Douglas Jacobsen and Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen clarify some of the issues at stake in ...
Additional Info:
What is the relationship between the academic knowledge of the guild and the formation of students in the classroom? This Forum gathers four essays originally presented at a Special Topics Session at the 2009 conference of the American Academy of Religion (Atlanta, Georgia), with a brief introductory essay by Fred Glennon explaining the genesis of the panel. Douglas Jacobsen and Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen clarify some of the issues at stake in undergraduate liberal arts classrooms by distinguishing between four dimensions of what they refer to as “the (in)formation teaching matrix: institutional context, course content, faculty roles, and student outcomes. John Thatamanil argues that all learning necessarily presupposes formation. Amanda Porterfield argues against using the word “formation” because it complicates and undermines her teaching goals to historicize religion and narratives about it through open-ended inquiry. And, finally, Mary Elizabeth Moore explores the interactive processes linking formation, information, reformation, and transformation.
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The Schooled Heart: Moral Formation in American Higher Education (Studies in Religion and Higher Education) (Studies in Religion & Higher Education)

Book
Henry, Douglas V., author, ed.; and Beaty, Michael R., ed.
2007
Baylor University Press, Waco, TX
LB2324.S356 2007
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
The Schooled Heart addresses a basic question about the nature of the university: should moral education figure among the university's purposes? This volume offers an affirmative response to that question. A central purpose of the university is the moral formation of students—what Beaty and Henry call the schooling of the heart. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The Schooled Heart addresses a basic question about the nature of the university: should moral education figure among the university's purposes? This volume offers an affirmative response to that question. A central purpose of the university is the moral formation of students—what Beaty and Henry call the schooling of the heart. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction Retrieving the Tradition, Remembering the End (Michael D. Beaty and Douglas V. Henry)
Part I-American Higher Education's Unschooled Heart

ch. 1 Liberal Education, Moral Education, and Religion (Warren A. Nord)
ch. 2 Free Love and Christian Higher Education: Reflections on a Passage from Plato's Theaetetus (Robert C. Roberts)
ch. 3 Returning Moral Philosophy to American Higher Education (Nicholas K. Meriwether)
ch. 4 Pro Ecclesia, Pro Texana: Schooling the Heart in the Heart of Texas (Stanley Hauerwas)

Part II-Christian Resources for Moral Formation in the Academy
ch. 5 Wisdom, Community, Freedom, Truth: Moral Education and the "Schooled Heart" (David Lyle Jeffrey)
ch. 6 Tracking the Toxins of Acedia: Re-envisioning Moral Education (Paul J. Wadell and Darin H. Davis)
ch. 7 Could Humility Be a Deliberative Virtue? (Shawn D. Floyd)
ch. 8 Cultivating Humility: Teaching Practices Rooted in Christian Anthropology (Stephen K. Moroney, Matthew P. Phelps and Scott T. Waalkes)
Notes
List of Contributors
Index
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Catholic Social Learning: Educating the Faith That Does Justice

Book
Bergman, Roger
2011
Fordham University Press, New York, NY
BX1795.S62 B47 2011
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
The canon for Catholic social teaching spreads to six hundred pages, yet fewer than two pages are devoted to Catholic social learning or pedagogy. In this long-needed book, Roger Bergman begins to correct that gross imbalance. He asks: How do we educate ("lead out") the faith that does justice? How is commitment to social justice provoked and sustained over a lifetime? To address these questions, Bergman weaves what he has ...
Additional Info:
The canon for Catholic social teaching spreads to six hundred pages, yet fewer than two pages are devoted to Catholic social learning or pedagogy. In this long-needed book, Roger Bergman begins to correct that gross imbalance. He asks: How do we educate ("lead out") the faith that does justice? How is commitment to social justice provoked and sustained over a lifetime? To address these questions, Bergman weaves what he has learned from thirty years as a faith-that-does-justice educator with the best of current scholarship and historical authorities. He reflects on personal experience; the experience of Church leaders, lay activists, and university students; and the few words the tradition itself has to say about a pedagogy for justice. Catholic Social Learning explores the foundations of this pedagogy, demonstrates its practical applications, and illuminates why and how it is fundamental to Catholic higher education. Part I identifies personal encounters with the poor and marginalized as key to stimulating a hunger and thirst for justice. Part II presents three applications of Catholic social learning: cross-cultural immersion as illustrated by Creighton University's Semestre Dominicano program; community-based service learning; and the teaching of moral exemplars such as Dorothy Day, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., and Archbishop Oscar Romero. Part III then elucidates how a pedagogy for justice applies to the traditional liberal educational mission of the Catholic university, and how it can be put into action.

Catholic Social Learning is both a valuable, practical resource for Christian educators and an important step forward in the development of a transformative pedagogy.

Roger Bergman is the founding director of the Justice and Peace Studies Program at Creighton University, where he is also Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements

Part I - Foundations
ch. 1 Personal Encounter: The Only Way
ch. 2 Ignatian Pedagogy and the Faith That Does Justice
ch. 3 Teaching Justice After MacIntyre: Toward a Catholic Philosophy of Moral Education

Part II - Applications
ch. 4 Immersion, Empathy, and Perspective Transformation: Semestre Dominicano, 1998
ch. 5 "We Made the Road by Stumbling": Aristotle, Service-Learning, and Justice
ch. 6 Meetings with Remarkable Men and Women: On Teaching Moral Exemplars

Part III - Institution and Program
ch. 7 Education for Justice and the Catholic University: Innovation or Development? An Argument from Tradition
ch. 8 Aristotle, Ignatius, and the Painful Path to Solidarity: A Pedagogy for Justice in Catholic Higher Education

Notes
References
Index
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In Search of the Whole: Twelve Essays on Faith and Academic Life

Book
Haughey, SJ, John C., ed.
2011
Georgetown University Press, Washington, DC
BX1795.I57.I52 2011
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
The contributors to this inspiring anthology meet the challenge that everyone faces: that of becoming a whole person in both their personal and professional lives. John C. Haughey, SJ, has gathered twelve professionals in higher education from a variety of disciplines—philosophy, theology, health care, business, and administration. What they have in common reflects the creative understanding of the meaning of "catholic" as Haughey has found it to operate in ...
Additional Info:
The contributors to this inspiring anthology meet the challenge that everyone faces: that of becoming a whole person in both their personal and professional lives. John C. Haughey, SJ, has gathered twelve professionals in higher education from a variety of disciplines—philosophy, theology, health care, business, and administration. What they have in common reflects the creative understanding of the meaning of "catholic" as Haughey has found it to operate in Catholic higher education.

Each essay in the first six chapters describes how its author has assembled a unique whole from within his or her particular area of academic competence. The last six chapters are more autobiographical, with each author describing what has become central to his or her identity. All twelve are "anticipating an entirety" with each contributing a coherence that is as surprising as it is delightful. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part One: Whole as Task
ch. 1. Wholeness Through Science, Justice, and Love (Patrick H. Byrne)
ch. 2 From Discovery to Risk (Cynthia Crysdale)
ch. 3 Professional Education as Transformation (Robert J. Deahl)
ch. 4 Learning to Love the Law of the Sea (William P. George)
ch. 5. Catholicity and Faculty Seminars (Rev. Msgr. Richard M. Liddy)
ch. 6 The "Real World" of Business (J. Michael Stebbins)

Part Two: Whole as Identity
ch. 7 Attaining Harmony as a Hindu-Christian (Michael Amaladoss)
ch. 8 Arriving at a Christocentric Universe (Ilia Delio)
ch. 9 Le Petit Philosophe (Patrick A. Heelan)
ch. 10 Towards a Catholic Christianity: A Personal Narrative (Michael McCarthy)
ch. 11 The Hunting and the Haunting (Peter Steele)
ch. 12 Attaining Harmony with the Earth (Cristina Vanin)

Epilogue
List of Contributors
Index
Article cover image

"Plasticity, Piety, and Polemics: Communicating a Faith Tradition in Higher Education"

Article
Sullivan, John
2011
Communicating Faith, ch. 12, pgs 185-198
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Thick and Thin: Personal and Communal Dimensions of Communicating Faith"

Article
Aquino, Fredrick, D.
2011
Communicating Faith, ch. 13, pgs 199-213
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Windows into Faith: Theology and Religious Studies at the University"

Article
D'Costa, Gavin
2011
Communicating Faith, ch. 14, pgs 214-228
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Communicating Faith and Online Learning"

Article
Stuart-Buttle, Ros
2011
Communicating Faith, ch. 21, pgs 328-342
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 38, no. 3

Journal Issue
2011
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Special Issue on the Quebec Ethics and Religious Culture Program

Preface
Articles, Essays

Perspectives from Quebec
ch. 1 Cultivating Reflection and Understanding: Foundations and Orientations of Quebec's Ethics and Religious Culture Program (Ronald W. Morris)
ch. 2 From Confessional to Cultural: Religious Education in the Schools of Quebec (Spencer Boudreau)
ch. 3 "Voluntary and Secret Choices of the Mind": The ERG and Liberal-Democratic Aims of Education (Kevin McDonough)
ch. 4 On the Front Lines: A Teacher's Experience with Quebec's Ethics and Religious Culture Program (Eric Van der Wee)
ch. 5 Enthusiasm and Ambivalence: Elementary School Teacher Perspectives on the Ethics and Religious Culture Program (Ronald W. Morris, Nancy Bouchard, Anne-Marie de Silva)

Perspectives from Europe, Asia, and the United States
ch. 6 On Ethics and Religious Culture in Quebec: Comments and Comparative Perspectives from a Norwegian and European Context (Bengt-Ove Andreassen)
ch. 7 Deconfessionalization Been Completed? Some Reflections upon Quebec's Ethics and Religious Culture (ERC) Program (Satoko Fujiwara)
ch. 8 Deweyan Democracy and Education About Religion (Emile Lester)
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Jesuit and Feminist Education: Intersections in Teaching and Learning in the Twenty-First Century

Book
Boryczka, Jocelyn M., and Petrino, Elizabeth A.
2012
Fordham University Press, New York, NY
LC493.J355 2012
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This book explores how the principles and practices of Ignatian pedagogy overlap and intersect with contemporary feminist theory in order to gain deeper insight into the complexities of today's multicultural educational contexts. Drawing on a method of inquiry that locates individual and collective standpoints in relation to social, political, and economic structures, this volume highlights points of convergence and divergence between Ignatian and feminist pedagogies to explore how educators might ...
Additional Info:
This book explores how the principles and practices of Ignatian pedagogy overlap and intersect with contemporary feminist theory in order to gain deeper insight into the complexities of today's multicultural educational contexts. Drawing on a method of inquiry that locates individual and collective standpoints in relation to social, political, and economic structures, this volume highlights points of convergence and divergence between Ignatian and feminist pedagogies to explore how educators might find strikingly similar methods that advocate common goals—including engaging with issues such as race, gender, diversity, and social justice. The contributors to this volume initiate a dynamic dialogue that will enliven our campuses for years to come. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward
Acknowledgements
Introduction: Educating for Transformation - Jesuit and Feminist Approaches in the Classroom and Beyond

Part I. Mapping The "Herstory" of Jesuit Education
ch. 1 "Do as I Do, Not as I Say": The Pedagogy of Action
ch. 2 Mary, the Hidden Catalyst: Reflections from an Ignatian Pilgrimage to Spain and Rome
ch. 3 Early Jesuit Pedagogy and the Subordination of Women: Resources from the Ratio Studiorum

Part II. Intersection I: Transformative Visions For Educating The Whole Person
ch. 4 "The Personal Is Political": At the Intersections of Feminist and Jesuit Education
ch. 5 Paideia and the Political Process: The Unexplored Coincidence of Jesuit and Feminist Pedagogical Visions
ch. 6 Feminist Pedagogy, the Ingnatian Paradigm, and Service-Learning: Distinctive Roots, Common Objectives, and Intriguing Challenges

Part III. Intersection II: The Power of Difference For Teaching Social Justice
ch. 7 The Intersection of Race, Class, and Gender in Jesuit and Feminist Education: Finding Transcendent Meaning in the Concrete
ch. 8 Teaching for Social Justice in the Engaged Classroom: The Intersection of Jesuit and Feminist Moral Philosophies
ch. 9 Transformative Education in a Broken World: Feminist and Jesuit Pedagogy on the Importance of Context
ch. 10 Consciousness-Raising as Discernment: Using Jesuit and Feminist Pedagogies in a Protestant Classroom

Part IV. The Fault Lines of Gender Sex, and Sexuality: Debates, Challenges, and Opportunities For The Future
ch. 11 De Certeau and "Making Do": The Case of Gay Men and Lesbians on a Jesuit Campus
ch. 12 Textual Deviance: Eve Ensler's The Vagina Monologues and Catholic Campuses
ch. 13 Tilling the Soil: Preparing Women for the Vocation of Ministry - A Challenge and Call
ch. 14 Women in Jesuit Higher Education: Ten Years Later

Afterword

Appendix
Decree 14: Jesuits and the Situation of Women in Church and Civil Society of Jesus

Notes
Bibliography
List of Contributors
Index
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 39, no.1

Journal Issue
2012
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 Jan/Feb 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial
Religion, Education, and Public Reason

An Exchange and Evaluating Religious Truth Claims in Public Schools
ch. 1 Epistemic Evaluation of Religious Claims in Public Schools: A Response to Suzanne Rosenblith (Emery J. Hyslop-Margison, Philip Peterson)
ch. 2 Beyond Belief: Epistemic Evaluation of Religious Experiences (Suzanne Rosenblith)
ch. 3 Epistemology or Self-Delusion? A Final Word on Evaluating Religious Truth Claims (Phillip Peterson, Emery J. Hyslop- Margison)

Articles, Essays
ch. 4 Spirituality and Academic Success: Perceptions of African American Males in the Community College (J. Luke Wood, Adriel A. Hilton)
ch. 5 Multi-Faith Religious Spaces on College and University Campuses (Karla Johnson, Peter Laurence)
ch. 6 Religious Affiliation and College Student Development: A Literature Review and Synthesis (Jenny L. Small, Nicholas A. Bowman)
ch. 7 Self-Knowledge Development as a Cognitive, Affective, Relational and Spiritual Journey (Terry Murray)
TTR cover image

"Creating a Public Space through Service-Learning"

TTR
Brigham, Erin
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 145-155
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Service Learning   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
In this paper, I suggest that community-based learning can act as a “public space” for the exchange of religious and non-religious identities. By providing a space for the collaboration between religiously-affiliated Universities and non-religiously affiliated community partners, community-based learning offers the opportunity for the negotiation of what civic engagement means in a pluralistic society. This exchange can inform the conversation on the public role of religion by offering an example ...
Additional Info:
In this paper, I suggest that community-based learning can act as a “public space” for the exchange of religious and non-religious identities. By providing a space for the collaboration between religiously-affiliated Universities and non-religiously affiliated community partners, community-based learning offers the opportunity for the negotiation of what civic engagement means in a pluralistic society. This exchange can inform the conversation on the public role of religion by offering an example of how religious and secular communities can discover a common language through the realization of shared interests.
Tactics cover image

"The Where and Who of Values"

Tactic
Marmon, Ellen L.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 156
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a free write exercise helps students reflect on and articulate their values.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a free write exercise helps students reflect on and articulate their values.
TTR cover image

Teaching World Religions without Teaching “World Religions”

TTR
Locklin, Reid B., Tiemeier, Tracy, and Vento,, Johann M.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 159-181
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of “religion” and “world religions” and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach world religions without teaching “world religions.” That is, we attempt to promote student engagement with the empirical study of a plurality ...
Additional Info:
Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of “religion” and “world religions” and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach world religions without teaching “world religions.” That is, we attempt to promote student engagement with the empirical study of a plurality of religious traditions without engaging in the rhetoric of pluralism or the reification of the category “religion.” The first two essays focus on topical courses taught at the undergraduate level in self-consciously Christian settings: the online course “Women and Religion” at Georgian Court University and the service-learning course “Interreligious Dialogue and Practice” at St. Michael's College, in the University of Toronto. The final essay discusses the integration of texts and traditions from diverse traditions into the graduate theology curriculum more broadly, in this case at Loyola Marymount University. Such confessional settings can, we suggest, offer particularly suitable – if somewhat counter-intuitive – contexts for bringing the otherwise covert agendas of the world religions discourse to light and subjecting them to a searching inquiry in the religion classroom.
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A Theology of Higher Education

Book
Higton, Mike
2012
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
BV1610.H54 2012
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
In this book, Mike Higton provides a constructive critique of Higher Education policy and practice in the UK, the US and beyond, from the standpoint of Christian theology. He focuses on the role universities can and should play in forming students and staff in intellectual virtue, in sustaining vibrant communities of inquiry, and in serving the public good. He argues both that modern secular universities can be a proper context ...
Additional Info:
In this book, Mike Higton provides a constructive critique of Higher Education policy and practice in the UK, the US and beyond, from the standpoint of Christian theology. He focuses on the role universities can and should play in forming students and staff in intellectual virtue, in sustaining vibrant communities of inquiry, and in serving the public good. He argues both that modern secular universities can be a proper context for Christians to pursue their calling as disciples to learn and to teach, and that Christians can contribute to the flourishing of such universities as institutions devoted to learning for the common good. In the process he sets out a vision of the good university as secular and religiously plural, as socially inclusive, and as deeply and productively entangled with the surrounding society. Along the way, he engages with a range of historical examples (the medieval University of Paris, the University of Berlin in the nineteenth century, and John Henry Newman's work in Oxford and Dublin) and with a range of contemporary writers on Higher Education from George Marsden to Stanley Hauerwas and from David Ford to Rowan Williams. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part I
ch. 1 Paris
ch. 2 Berlin
ch. 3 Oxford and Dublin
ch. 4 Contemporary Theological Voices

Part II
ch. 5 An Anglican Theology of Learning
ch. 6 The Virtuous University
ch. 7 The Social University
ch. 8 The Good University
ch. 9 The Negotiable University

Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
TTR cover image

Teaching Religion in Indonesia: A Report on Graduate Studies in Java

TTR
Lewis, Bret
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 3 (2012): 241-257
BL.T4 v.15 no. 3 2012
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Established in 2000–2001, the Center for Religious and Cross-cultural Studies (CRCS) is the only master's level religious studies program at a non-religiously affiliated university in Indonesia. In many respects, the program is experimental, operating within the dynamic political and religious environment of the Muslim world's youngest and largest democracy. Like other large democracies such as India or the United States, the Indonesian government and courts have their challenges and opportunities in ...
Additional Info:
Established in 2000–2001, the Center for Religious and Cross-cultural Studies (CRCS) is the only master's level religious studies program at a non-religiously affiliated university in Indonesia. In many respects, the program is experimental, operating within the dynamic political and religious environment of the Muslim world's youngest and largest democracy. Like other large democracies such as India or the United States, the Indonesian government and courts have their challenges and opportunities in navigating a multiplicity of religions. In Indonesia, this took on particular urgency in the context of religiously-charged conflict in the 1990's and early 2000's which helped lead to the establishment of the CRCS. This paper seeks to explore how students and key faculty relate to the program's mission and approach to the study of religion while tracing the development of religious studies as a discipline in Indonesia. Special attention is paid to the political and, at times, controversial aspects of approaching religion with secular and pluralistic frameworks and language. It was informed by interviews and surveys conducted between January and May of 2010.
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Wabash tree

No Longer Invisible: Religion in University Education

Book
Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt, and Jacobsen, Douglas
2012
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
LC383.J33 2012
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Drawing on conversations with hundreds of professors, co-curricular educators, administrators, and students from institutions spanning the entire spectrum of American colleges and universities, the Jacobsens illustrate how religion is constructively intertwined with the work of higher education in the twenty-first century. No Longer Invisible documents how, after decades when religion was marginalized, colleges and universities are re-engaging matters of faith-an educational development that is both positive and necessary.

...
Additional Info:
Drawing on conversations with hundreds of professors, co-curricular educators, administrators, and students from institutions spanning the entire spectrum of American colleges and universities, the Jacobsens illustrate how religion is constructively intertwined with the work of higher education in the twenty-first century. No Longer Invisible documents how, after decades when religion was marginalized, colleges and universities are re-engaging matters of faith-an educational development that is both positive and necessary.

Religion in contemporary American life is now incredibly complex, with religious pluralism on the rise and the categories of "religious" and "secular" often blending together in a dizzying array of lifestyles and beliefs. Using the categories of historic religion, public religion, and personal religion, No Longer Invisible offers a new framework for understanding this emerging religious terrain, a framework that can help colleges and universities-and the students who attend them-interact with religion more effectively. The stakes are high: Faced with escalating pressures to focus solely on job training, American higher education may find that paying more careful and nuanced attention to religion is a prerequisite for preserving American higher education's longstanding commitment to personal, social, and civic learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Religion within Higher Education

Part I: Context
ch. 1. Religion's ''Return''
ch. 2. The History of Religion in American Higher Education
ch. 3. Trail Markers in a Time of Transition
ch. 4. A Framework for Better Questions

Part II: Content
ch. 5. Religious Literacy
ch. 6. Interfaith Etiquette
ch. 7. Framing Knowledge
ch. 8. Civic Engagement
ch. 9. Convictions
ch. 10. Character and Vocation
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Pathways to Transformation: Learning in Relationship

Book
Boden McGill, Carrie J., and Kippers, Sola M., eds.
2012
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LC5225.L42 P35 2012
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Pathways to Transformation: Learning in Relationship is an edited collection that synthesizes current research on transformative learning and expands the current knowledge-base. This book is timely and significant as it provides a synthesis of some of the most exciting research in two fields: adult education and human services.

The objectives of this themed edited collection, Pathways to Transformation: Learning in Relationship, are threefold. First, this collection serves as ...
Additional Info:
Pathways to Transformation: Learning in Relationship is an edited collection that synthesizes current research on transformative learning and expands the current knowledge-base. This book is timely and significant as it provides a synthesis of some of the most exciting research in two fields: adult education and human services.

The objectives of this themed edited collection, Pathways to Transformation: Learning in Relationship, are threefold. First, this collection serves as a space to synthesize current research on transformative learning. Through an extensive literature review, the editors have discerned several important strands of research in the area of transformative learning and solicited chapters dealing with these topics. The second objective of the collection is to expand the current knowledge-base in the area of transformative learning by creating a space for dialog on the subject and bringing together diverse voices. The third objective of the collection is to transcend the field of adult education, with a specific goal to reach an audience in human services (psychology, counseling, social work, marriage and family therapy). (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Relationship With Self & Others
Part I: The Role of Communication and Dialogue in Transformative Learning
ch. 1 Meaningful Conversations: Coaching to Transform the Heart, Head, and Hands of Teaching and Learning (Angela Webster-Smith, Shelly Albritton, Patty Kohler-Evans)
ch. 2 Learning About Learning in Relationships: Novice Teacher Educators Give Transformative Dialogue a Try (Elizabeth Bondy, Lauren Tripp, D. Alvarez Caron)
ch. 3 Communication is the Relationship (Julien C. Mirivel)
ch. 4 Narrative Tools for Facilitating Research and Learning for Transformation (Leann M. R. Kaiser and Elizabeth A. Erichsen)

Part II: Learning in Relationship with Self and Others
ch. 5 Narrative, Somatic, and Social/Constructivist Approaches to Transformative Learning in Training Programs for the Helping Professions (Daniel Stroud, Julie Prindle, Stacy England)
ch. 6 In Hope of Transformation: Teaching and Learning Through Relational Practice in the Adult Learning Classroom (Teresa J. Carter.)
ch. 7 Spiritual Autobiography: A Transformative Journey for a Counselor in Training (Michelle Kelley Shuler and Katrina Cook.)
ch. 8 Developing Scholarship Through Mentoring and Reflection: A Transformative Process for Doctoral Studentsv(Brandé Flamez, Javier Cavazos Jr., Varunee Faii Sangganjanavanich, and Joshua C. Watson)
ch. 9 The Transformative Relationship Within Teaching Counseling Skills and Methods: Implications for Training and Practice (Laura J. Fazio-Griffith)
ch. 10 The Role of Faculty in Dispositional Development of Teacher Candidates: A Neglected Voice in Teacher Preparation J(anet Filer, Candice Dowd Barnes, and Mark Cooper)

Relationship With Culture, Context & Technology
Part I: Transformative Learning in Multicultural, Cross-Cultural, and Intercultural Contexts
ch. 11 Easing Teacher Candidates Toward Cultural Competence Through the Multicultural Step Out (Freddie A. Bowles and Nancy P. Gallavan)
ch. 12 The Transformative Path of Local, Cross-Cultural Relationships (Ellen L. Marmon)
ch. 13 In Black and White: Transformation Through Examined Selves (Gabriele Strohschen)
ch. 14 Developing Intercultural Effectiveness Competencies: The Journey of Transformative Learning and Cross-Cultural Learning for Foreign-Born Faculty in American Higher Education (Pi-Chi Han)
ch. 15 Transformational Learning Experience of Haitian Americans in Response to the Earthquake in Haiti (Emmanuel Jean Francois and William H. Young III)

Part II: Learning in Relationship with Culture, Context, and Technology
ch. 16 Rhythm, Rhyme, Reel, Resistance: Transformative Learning Using African American Popular Culture (Malik Saafir)
ch. 17 Transformative Learning Experiences of Black African International Students (Alex Kumi Yeboah and William H. Young III.)
ch. 18 Facilitating Transformative Learning Opportunities in Higher Education Contexts for Adult Learners in Online and Virtual Spaces (Kathleen P. King and Shelley Stewart.)
ch. 19 Video Technology: Transforming Reflective Practice, (Sejal Parikh and Christopher Janson)

Relationship With Education & Human Services Fields
ch. 20 Advancing Transformative Theory: Multifold and Cyclical Transformation (Fujuan Tan and Lee Nabb.)
ch. 21 The Self in Transformation: What Gets Transformed in Transformative Learning? (Ted Fleming)
ch. 22 Positive Life Changes in Response to Cancer: Perspective Transformation and Posttraumatic Growth (Allen C. Sherman, Avinash Thombre, and Stephanie Simonton)

About the Editors
About the Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 39, no.2

Journal Issue
2012
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 v. 39 no. 2
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Special Focus Section: Religion, Law and Higher Education
Special Section Guest Editor

Guest Edito's Preface

ch. 1 Religious Freedom in America Catholic Higher Education (Charles J. Russo, Paul E. McGreal)
ch. 2 Faculty Religious Speech in Class (Suzanne Eckes)
ch. 3 The Rights of Student Religious Organizations after Christian Legal Society v. Martenz (William E. Thro)
ch. 4 Transformational Multicultural Spiritual Framework for Educating Youth: Spiritual Development for Children and Adolescents (Alex S. Hall)
ch. 5 Theology, Law and the Australian Legal Academy (Paul Babie)
ch. 6 Freedom of Religion and Postsecondary Education in Canada: Resolving Competing Claims (Paul Clarke)

Article
Women Faculty at an Evangelical University: The Paradox of Religiously Driven Gender Inequalities and High Job Satisfaction (Brad Christerson, M. Elizabeth Lewis Hall, Shelly Cunningham)

Resource Review
Catholic Higher Schools: Facing the New Realities
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Thriving in Leadership: Strategies for Making a Difference in Christian Higher Education

Book
Longman, Karen A.
2012
Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, TX
LC383.T57 2012
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In this book, seventeen senior leaders from faith-based colleges and universities across North America--collectively bringing with them hundreds of years of leadership experience--share fresh insights into the theory and practice of Christian higher education leadership. These authors speak honestly about the successes, failures, and demands that have shaped their current leadership decisions and their visions for the future.In this book, seventeen senior leaders from faith-based colleges and universities across ...
Additional Info:
In this book, seventeen senior leaders from faith-based colleges and universities across North America--collectively bringing with them hundreds of years of leadership experience--share fresh insights into the theory and practice of Christian higher education leadership. These authors speak honestly about the successes, failures, and demands that have shaped their current leadership decisions and their visions for the future.In this book, seventeen senior leaders from faith-based colleges and universities across North America--collectively bringing with them hundreds of years of leadership experience--share fresh insights into the theory and practice of Christian higher education leadership. These authors speak honestly about the successes, failures, and demands that have shaped their current leadership decisions and their visions for the future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction

Part I: The Interior Life of Thriving Leaders
ch. 1 Thriving as a Leader: The Role of Resilience and Relationships
ch. 2 Leading from the Center: Body and Place
ch. 3 Honoring Giftedness: A Strengths Approach to Leadership

Part II: The Social Intelligence of Thriving Leaders
ch. 4 Tell Me a Story: Using as Old Tool to Sustain Culture, Embrace Change, and Envision a Bold Future
ch. 5 The Difference Trust Makes
ch. 6 Orchestrating a Life of Influence
ch. 7 Inside Faculty Culture
ch. 8 Building a Powerful Leadership Team
ch. 9 Mentoring for Leadership

Part III: How Leaders Can Shape a Thriving Organizational Culture
ch. 10 Metaphors Matter: Organizational Culture Shaped by Image
ch. 11 Beyond "Hospitality": Moving out of the Host-Guest Metaphor into an Intercultural "World House"
ch. 12 Toward a Distinctive, Christ-Honoring Campus Culture: Working the Vision
ch. 13 Leading a Turnaround and the Joy of a Third-Class Ticket
ch. 14 Leadership in the Fifth Dimension: Balancing Time with the Timeless

Epilogue
About the Author
About the Contributors
Bibliography
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Building a Culture of Faith: University-wide Partnerships for Spiritual Formation

Book
Balzar, Cary, and Reed, Rod
2012
Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, TX
LC427.B85 2012
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
A groundbreaking work on holistic spiritual formation in Christian higher education.

Contemporary Christian universities claim that students grow spiritually while enrolled, yet very little work has been done exploring the influences of various parts of the university on student spiritual formation, especially, but not limited to, the impact of faculty. Building a Culture of Faith addresses the unique role faculty and others play in student spiritual formation, including ...
Additional Info:
A groundbreaking work on holistic spiritual formation in Christian higher education.

Contemporary Christian universities claim that students grow spiritually while enrolled, yet very little work has been done exploring the influences of various parts of the university on student spiritual formation, especially, but not limited to, the impact of faculty. Building a Culture of Faith addresses the unique role faculty and others play in student spiritual formation, including historical and contemporary approaches; sets out a framework for understanding spiritual formation as it is practiced in the Christian university; and provides practical models for the roles the university plays in the spiritual formation of students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Section One - Institutional Influence on Spiritual Formation
ch. 1 Setting the Tone for Spiritual Formation on Campus: The President's Role
ch. 2 Mapping the Christian Higher Education Genome
ch. 3 Historical and Contemporary Approaches to Spiritual Formation in the University
ch. 4 Leaving a Mark: The Role of Faculty in University-Wide Spiritual Formation

Section Two - Exploring Spiritual Formation
ch. 5 A Theology of Christian Spiritual Formation
ch. 6 The Power of Context: Spiritual Formation in the Christian University
ch. 7 Who Are We to Form Students? The Importance of Remembering Who We Are
ch. 8 Invitation to an Academic Journey of Spiritual Formation

Section Three - Implementation, Praxis, and Models
ch. 9 "On the Lookout for What Would Be Revealed": Faculty and Spiritual Formation
ch. 10 Conversation Creates Culture: Student Development and Spiritual Formation in the Christian University
ch. 11 Strengthening a Christian College as a Faith-Mentoring Environment through Knowing--Being--Doing
ch. 12 Soul Projects: Class-Related Spiritual Practices in Higher Education
ch. 13 Tour Guides, Translators, and Traveling Companions: How Faculty Contribute to the Spiritual Formation of Students
ch. 14 In Partnership with Communities: Spiritual Formation and Cross-Cultural Immersion

Contributors
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Religion & Education Volume 39, no.3

Journal Issue
2012
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 v. 39 no. 3
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Religion, Education and Critical Thinking

Articles, Essays
ch. 1 Misinterpreting the Spirit and Heart: Religious and Paradigmatic Tension in Ethnographic Research (Peter Magolda, Kelsey Ebben Gross)
ch. 2 Moderate Ultra-Orthodoxy: Complexity and Nuance in American Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Moshe Krakowski)
ch. 3 The Impact of Religious Studies Courses: Measuring Change in College Students' Attitudes (Bret Lewis)
ch. 4 Freedom to Hold or Not to Hold Group Beliefs: The Case of Religious Beliefs in French and Polish Public School Textbooks(Sebastien Urbanski)
ch. 5 Integrating Client Religious Beliefs in Counseling: Evolving Theory, Research, Education, and Practice (Jennifer R. Curry, Leila F. Roach)

Resource Review
ch. 6 Religious Diversity and Children's Literature: Strategies and Resources (Shabana Mir)
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Courses and Canons in the Study of Religion (With Continual Reference to Jonathan Z. Smith)

Article
Levene, Nancy
2012
Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Vol. 80, No. 4, (December 2012): 998-1076
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
It is a commonplace that scholarship and teaching inform one another. Minimally, this means that the materials of research guide the formation of a syllabus. In courses that are introductory, however, teachers are called to reflect on the foundations of their scholarship. In this task, teaching serves to unsettle and provoke research, not only in the decision of what books to teach, but also in the course's argument. I propose ...
Additional Info:
It is a commonplace that scholarship and teaching inform one another. Minimally, this means that the materials of research guide the formation of a syllabus. In courses that are introductory, however, teachers are called to reflect on the foundations of their scholarship. In this task, teaching serves to unsettle and provoke research, not only in the decision of what books to teach, but also in the course's argument. I propose that this argument be directed not toward a field in some ideal shape but toward the more elementary concepts of course, canon, and introduction themselves, since teaching an introductory course is perforce to consider the very nature of introduction. The three concepts of introduction, canon, and course are integral to thinking across the arts and sciences, nowhere more so than in the study of religion, where the work of Jonathan Z. Smith has tunneled, if only partially, into their paradoxes.
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Teaching the Bible in the Liberal Arts Classroom

Book
Webster, Jane S., and Holland, Glenn S., eds.
2012
Sheffield Phoenix Press, England
BS601.T433 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Teaching biblical studies in the undergraduate liberal arts classroom poses many challenges. Do biblical studies deserve a place at a secular liberal arts college? In church-affiliated colleges, should courses in Bible toe the denominational line? Can we claim that biblical studies advance the goals of liberal education, whatever we might think they are?

On a more practical level, how can an instructor engage the attention of students who ...
Additional Info:
Teaching biblical studies in the undergraduate liberal arts classroom poses many challenges. Do biblical studies deserve a place at a secular liberal arts college? In church-affiliated colleges, should courses in Bible toe the denominational line? Can we claim that biblical studies advance the goals of liberal education, whatever we might think they are?

On a more practical level, how can an instructor engage the attention of students who are taking a course in biblical studies only to fulfill a requirement? How best to begin with students from non-religious backgrounds who begin a course with no real knowledge of the Bible at all? How best to deal with students who already think they know what the Bible is all about, and resist any ideas or approaches that might threaten their ideas?

This collection of pedagogical essays reflects the practical experience of instructors who have spent years teaching biblical studies successfully to undergraduates at liberal arts colleges. The essays address both methodological approaches and specific classroom strategies for teaching biblical studies effectively in a way that advances the skills of thinking and expression that are essential to a liberal arts education. The product of several years of conversation among working professors from an array of liberal arts colleges, these essays offer insights and inspiration for biblical studies instructors who work in a very specific and demanding academic environment. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part I: Biblical Studies In The Liberal Arts
ch. 1 A Forensic Rationale for Biblical Studies in American Liberal Education (Matthew C. Baldwin)
ch. 2 Occupy Academic Bible Teaching (Susanne Scholz)
ch. 3 Challenges to Teaching Biblical Literature as a General Education Requirement (Stan Harstine and Phillip Wisely)
ch. 4 ‘Not as the Scribes’: Teaching Biblical Studies in the Liberal Arts Curriculum (Glenn S. Holland)
ch. 5 What Do Athens and Jerusalem Have to Do with Sioux Falls? (Murray Joseph Haar and Anna Madesen)
ch. 6 Teaching the Bible in a Secular School (Christian Brady)
ch. 7 Engaging Diverse Students in a Required Biblical Studies Course (Margaret P. Cowan)
ch. 8 Arts Integration and Service-Learning in Introduction to Biblical Literature (Sharon Betsworth)
ch. 9 The Role of the Upper-Level Biblical Studies Seminar (Benjamin White)

Part II: Pedagogical Theory and Biblical Studies
ch. 10 Teaching the Material and Teaching the Students (Shane Kirkpatrick
ch. 11 Service-Learning in Undergraduate Biblical Studies Courses (Janet S. Everhart)
ch. 12 The Reality of Multiple Voices in Biblical Religion (J. Bradley Chance)
ch. 13 Collaborative Learning and the Pedagogy of the Bible (Alison Schofield)
ch. 14 Shifting Contexts and Goals for Introducing the Bible (Bryan D. Bibb)

Part III: Case Studies
ch. 15 Bible-Trek, Next Generation: Adapting a Bible Survey Course for a New Audience (Jonathan David Lawrence)
ch. 16 Dildos and Dismemberment: Reading Difficult Biblical Texts Classroom (Janet Everhart)
ch. 17 Reading Textual Violence as ‘Real’ Violence (Amy C. Cottrill)
ch. 18 Engaging Students Online: Using Wiki Technology (Carl Toney)
ch. 19 What’s the Harm in Harmonization? Using Jesus Films (Margaret E. Ramey)
ch. 20 Teaching with Meta-questions (Jane S. Webster)
ch. 21 Course Design and the Use of Meta-Questions (Russell Arnold)
ch. 22 Biblical Studies and Metacognitive Reading Skills (Rodney K. Duke)
ch. 23 Teaching Revelation to the Left Behind Generation (Susan E. Hylen)
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From Classroom to Controversy: Conflict in the Teaching of Religion

TTR
Neal, Lynn S.
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 1 (2013): 66-75
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 1
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
What happens when a class assignment becomes a source of controversy? How do we respond? What do we learn? By describing the controversy surrounding an assignment on religion and representation, this article examines conflict’s productive role in teaching about New Religious Movements (NRMs) and religion. It suggests that we consider how our personal and institutional dispositions toward conflict influence our pedagogies. Moreover, it urges us to consider how teaching ...
Additional Info:
What happens when a class assignment becomes a source of controversy? How do we respond? What do we learn? By describing the controversy surrounding an assignment on religion and representation, this article examines conflict’s productive role in teaching about New Religious Movements (NRMs) and religion. It suggests that we consider how our personal and institutional dispositions toward conflict influence our pedagogies. Moreover, it urges us to consider how teaching conflicts within and/or between disciplines can enhance our learning objectives and stimulate students’ ability to think critically.
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Religion & Education Volume 40, no.1

Journal Issue
2013
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 2013 Jan.-Apr.
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Special Issue on Religion in Education at the University of Warwick

Articles, Essays
ch. 1 Ethnography, Religious Education, and The Fifth Cup (Eleanor Nesbitt, Olga Schihalejev)
ch. 2 Religious Education Influencing Students' Attitudes: A Threat to Freedom? (Olga Schihalejev)
ch. 3 The Language of Interfaith Encounter Among Inner City Primary School Children (Julia Ipgrave)
ch. 4 Religious Extremism, Religious Education, and the Interpretive Approach (Joyce Miller)
ch. 5 Action Research and the Interpretive Approach to Religious Education (Kevin O'Grady)
ch. 6 "Very Sad, But It Works": One Pupil's Assessment Career in Religious Education (Nigel Fancourt)
ch. 7 The Interpretive Approach and Bridging the "Theory-Practice Gap": Action Research with Student Teachers of Religious Education (Judith Everington)
ch. 8 Comparative Studies in Religious Education: The Issue of Methodology (Oddrun M. H. Braten)
Additional Info:
A website for the seven-year study conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) at UCLA examining the role that college plays in facilitating the development of students' spiritual qualities.
Additional Info:
A website for the seven-year study conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) at UCLA examining the role that college plays in facilitating the development of students' spiritual qualities.
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"Teaching Inside-Out: On Teaching Islam"

Article
Hussain, Amir
2005
Method & Theory in The Study of Religion, 2005, Vol. 17, Issue 3, pgs 248-263
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Religious Diversity

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Offers a view on teaching Islam. Reason instructors do not look to Muslim scholarship; Role of the instructor in the modern university; Impact of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on teaching the religion.
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Offers a view on teaching Islam. Reason instructors do not look to Muslim scholarship; Role of the instructor in the modern university; Impact of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on teaching the religion.
Additional Info:
Report on a course that is part contemplative and part active. “There is a 'What' focus of the class and there is also a 'How' component.” In other words, students are encouraged to start thinking about big questions, and then apply those in real-life situations.
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Report on a course that is part contemplative and part active. “There is a 'What' focus of the class and there is also a 'How' component.” In other words, students are encouraged to start thinking about big questions, and then apply those in real-life situations.
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Contemplative Practices in Higher Education: Powerful Methods to Transform Teaching and Learning

Book
Barbezat, Daniel P.; and Bush, Mirabai
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.B357 2014
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Contemplative pedagogy is a way for instructors to:
- empower students to integrate their own experience into the theoretical material they are being taught in order to deepen their understanding;
- help students to develop sophisticated problem-solving skills;
- support students’ sense of connection to and compassion for others; and
- engender inquiries into students’ most profound questions.
<...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Contemplative pedagogy is a way for instructors to:
- empower students to integrate their own experience into the theoretical material they are being taught in order to deepen their understanding;
- help students to develop sophisticated problem-solving skills;
- support students’ sense of connection to and compassion for others; and
- engender inquiries into students’ most profound questions.

Contemplative practices are used in just about every discipline—from physics to economics to history—and are found in every type of institution. Each year more and more faculty, education reformers, and leaders of teaching and learning centers seek out best practices in contemplative teaching, and now can find them here, brought to you by two of the foremost leaders and innovators on the subject.

This book presents background information and ideas for the practical application of contemplative practices across the academic curriculum from the physical sciences to the humanities and arts. Examples of contemplative techniques included in the book are mindfulness, meditation, yoga, deep listening, contemplative reading and writing, and pilgrimage, including site visits and field trips. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by Parker J. Palmer
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Authors

Part One - Theoretical and Practical Background
ch. 1 Transformation and Renewal in Higher Education
ch. 2 Current Research on Contemplative Practice
ch. 3 Contemplative Pedagogy in Practice: Two Experiences
ch. 4 Teacher Preparation and Classroom Challenges

Part Two - A Guide to Contemplative Practices
Introduction to the Practices
ch. 5 Mindfulness
ch. 6 Contemplative Approaches to Reading and Writing
ch. 7 Contemplative Senses: Deep Listening and Beholding
ch. 8 Contemplative Movement
ch. 9 Compassion and Loving Kindness
ch. 10 Guest Speakers, Field Trips, and Retreats
ch. 11 Conclusion

Afterword by Arthur Zajonc
References
Index
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The Quest for Meaning and Wholeness: Spiritual and Religious Connections in the Lives of College Faculty

Book
Lindholm, Jennifer A.; Astin, Alexander W.; and Astin, Helen S.
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1775.L49 2014
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: If institutions are to create campus environments that provide welcoming and engaging contexts for personal and professional development of students, faculty, administrators, and staff, all members of campus communities must be willing to look closely not just at what they do (or do not do) on a daily basis, but also why. This book offers an analysis of how faculty perceive intersections between ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: If institutions are to create campus environments that provide welcoming and engaging contexts for personal and professional development of students, faculty, administrators, and staff, all members of campus communities must be willing to look closely not just at what they do (or do not do) on a daily basis, but also why. This book offers an analysis of how faculty perceive intersections between spirituality and higher education, and what implications their spiritual inclinations have, not only for undergraduate education, but also for faculty life within academic workplaces.

The Quest for Meaning and Wholeness draws on the 2012 Faculty Beliefs and Values Survey of just over 8,500 faculty employed at a range of institutions, and features faculty voices to answer the “So what?” question about why administration, faculty developers, and researchers should care about the spiritual and religious lives of faculty. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Spirituality and Higher Education
ch. 2 The Meaningfulness of Spirituality and Religion in Faculty Members’ Lives
ch. 3 Spiritual Quest
ch. 4 Ethic of Caring, Ecumenical Worldview, and Charitable Involvement
ch. 5 Religious Faith and Perspectives
ch. 6 Equanimity
ch. 7 Higher Education and the Life of the Faculty Spirit

Epilogue
Appendix: Study Methodology
References
Subject Index
Name Index
Additional Info:
Professional societies in religious studies negotiate academic practices and confessional commitments. Here, Lester narrates one episode in the Society of Biblical Literature's understanding of "critical" biblical studies.
Additional Info:
Professional societies in religious studies negotiate academic practices and confessional commitments. Here, Lester narrates one episode in the Society of Biblical Literature's understanding of "critical" biblical studies.
Additional Info:
Inside Higher Ed narrates the dismissal of venerable biblical scholar Bruce Waltke after his remarks concerning evolution, and discusses issues around academic freedom at confessional seminaries.
Additional Info:
Inside Higher Ed narrates the dismissal of venerable biblical scholar Bruce Waltke after his remarks concerning evolution, and discusses issues around academic freedom at confessional seminaries.
Additional Info:
Inside Higher Ed narrates the dismissal of biblical scholar Christopher Rollston after his HuffPo opinion piece about the marginalization of women in biblical texts. The article discusses the relationship of tenure and donor support at a confessional seminary.
Additional Info:
Inside Higher Ed narrates the dismissal of biblical scholar Christopher Rollston after his HuffPo opinion piece about the marginalization of women in biblical texts. The article discusses the relationship of tenure and donor support at a confessional seminary.
Additional Info:
The comeback of the religious studies major and the importance of religious studies in the studies of politics, history and other disciplines.
Additional Info:
The comeback of the religious studies major and the importance of religious studies in the studies of politics, history and other disciplines.
Additional Info:
Given postmodernist claims that all perspectives are biased, what should be the role of religion in today's university? Originally published in the Chrnoicle of Higher Education.
Additional Info:
Given postmodernist claims that all perspectives are biased, what should be the role of religion in today's university? Originally published in the Chrnoicle of Higher Education.
Additional Info:
Report assesses successes and failures of the multi-million dollars spent on grants in the 1990's to revitalized the role of religion on college and university campuses.
Additional Info:
Report assesses successes and failures of the multi-million dollars spent on grants in the 1990's to revitalized the role of religion on college and university campuses.
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Religion and Knowledge in the Post-Secular Academy

Web
Mahoney, Kathleen A.; Schmalzbauer, John; and Youniss, James
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

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The return of religious ways of knowing in the academy could be called a "post-secular revolution." "This paper is a guided tour of the movement to reconnect religion and knowledge, a group portrait of the individuals and organizations behind the growing prominence of religious scholarship." Extensive bibliography.
Additional Info:
The return of religious ways of knowing in the academy could be called a "post-secular revolution." "This paper is a guided tour of the movement to reconnect religion and knowledge, a group portrait of the individuals and organizations behind the growing prominence of religious scholarship." Extensive bibliography.
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The Religion in the Academy Project at Messiah College

Web
Jacobsen, Douglas; and Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
The Religion in the Academy (RITA) project focuses on the many ways that religion, spirituality, and big questions of human meaning and purpose can enhance learning at colleges and universities.
Additional Info:
The Religion in the Academy (RITA) project focuses on the many ways that religion, spirituality, and big questions of human meaning and purpose can enhance learning at colleges and universities.
Additional Info:
Brief overview of Catholicism's role in the American academy, bu Boston College's Office of Mission and Ministry
Additional Info:
Brief overview of Catholicism's role in the American academy, bu Boston College's Office of Mission and Ministry
Web cover image

Why Study Religion?

Web
Herling Brian
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Website dedicated to basic issue related to studying religion: why? What is religion? What are the mportant issues? Where to study?
Additional Info:
Website dedicated to basic issue related to studying religion: why? What is religion? What are the mportant issues? Where to study?
Additional Info:
Religious studies suffers from the outside threat of less and less funding like all the humanities and from the inside challenge that religious studies is simply an ideology. Schneider argues that the religious studies major "needs to grow up" and learn to articulate what it is good for. He articulates several of these goods.
Additional Info:
Religious studies suffers from the outside threat of less and less funding like all the humanities and from the inside challenge that religious studies is simply an ideology. Schneider argues that the religious studies major "needs to grow up" and learn to articulate what it is good for. He articulates several of these goods.
Additional Info:
Podcast interview of who should be teaching religious education (what in the US is called "religious studies") and what it should entail at the primary and secondary levels in Great Britain.
Additional Info:
Podcast interview of who should be teaching religious education (what in the US is called "religious studies") and what it should entail at the primary and secondary levels in Great Britain.
Additional Info:
Podcast discusses that there is a "socio-political strategy" behind the claim that religion is 'sui generis'
Additional Info:
Podcast discusses that there is a "socio-political strategy" behind the claim that religion is 'sui generis'
Additional Info:
In this excerpt from Kugel's controversial How to Read the Bible, the author argues—with rich citation and documentation—that academic biblical studies is rife with an "unmistakably apologetic tone" of which even its most self-avowedly "critical" practitioners are largely unaware. The implication is that academic biblical studies, practiced as it is overwhelmingly by people of faith, does not achieve the honesty about the texts' "strangeness" characteristic of other corpus-oriented ...
Additional Info:
In this excerpt from Kugel's controversial How to Read the Bible, the author argues—with rich citation and documentation—that academic biblical studies is rife with an "unmistakably apologetic tone" of which even its most self-avowedly "critical" practitioners are largely unaware. The implication is that academic biblical studies, practiced as it is overwhelmingly by people of faith, does not achieve the honesty about the texts' "strangeness" characteristic of other corpus-oriented disciplines.
Additional Info:
A useful teaching piece for students of faith adjusting to academic religious studies. In this blog post, Tabor addresses the objection, often raised by students or religious laypeople, that (biblical) historians "exclude the miraculous" in their investigations. Not "suppressing" claims of the supernatural (e.g., miracles), historians welcome all such claims as contributing to our understanding of times and events, but refrain from adjudicating such claims beyond what is accessible ...
Additional Info:
A useful teaching piece for students of faith adjusting to academic religious studies. In this blog post, Tabor addresses the objection, often raised by students or religious laypeople, that (biblical) historians "exclude the miraculous" in their investigations. Not "suppressing" claims of the supernatural (e.g., miracles), historians welcome all such claims as contributing to our understanding of times and events, but refrain from adjudicating such claims beyond what is accessible to historical means.
Additional Info:
Alluding to several then-recent episodes of professors being forced from posts at evangelical institutions of learning, Enns asks whether schools dedicated to defending propositions grounded in private revelation and confessional dogma can be "truly academic" (and truly just to their instructors and students).
Additional Info:
Alluding to several then-recent episodes of professors being forced from posts at evangelical institutions of learning, Enns asks whether schools dedicated to defending propositions grounded in private revelation and confessional dogma can be "truly academic" (and truly just to their instructors and students).
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Teaching and Christian Practices: Reshaping Faith and Learning

Book
Smith, David I.; and Smith, James K. A.
2011
William B Eerdmans Publishing Co., Grand Rapids, MI
BV1610.T43 2011
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Over the past twenty years there has been a ferment of reflection on the integration of faith and learning -- yet relatively little notice has been paid to the integration of faith and teaching in the Christian university. In Teaching and Christian Practices twelve university professors describe and reflect on their efforts to allow historic Christian practices to reshape and redirect their pedagogical strategies. Whether using spiritually formative reading to ...
Additional Info:
Over the past twenty years there has been a ferment of reflection on the integration of faith and learning -- yet relatively little notice has been paid to the integration of faith and teaching in the Christian university. In Teaching and Christian Practices twelve university professors describe and reflect on their efforts to allow historic Christian practices to reshape and redirect their pedagogical strategies. Whether using spiritually formative reading to enhance a literature course, table fellowship to reinforce concepts in a pre-nursing nutrition course, or Christian hermeneutics to interpret data in an economics course, the authors present a practice of teaching and learning rooted in the rich tradition of Christian practices -- one that reconceives classrooms and laboratories as vital arenas for faith and spiritual growth. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Criag Dykstra; and Dorothy C. Bass
Caknowledgments
Introduction: Practces, Faith, and Pedagogy (David I. Smith; and James K. A. Smith)

ch. 1 Pedagogical Rhythms: Practices and Reflections on Practice (Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung)
ch. 2 Reading Practices and Christian Pedagogy: Enacting Charity with Texts (David I. Smith)
ch. 3 The Rough Trail to Authentic Pedagogy: Incorporating Hospitality, Fellowship, and Testimony into the Classroom (Carolyne Call)
ch. 4 Eat This Class: Breaking Bread in the Undergraduate Classroom (Julie A. P. Walton; and Matthew Walters)
ch. 5 From Curiosity to Studiousness: Catechizing the Appetite for Learning (Paul J. Griffiths)
ch. 6 From Tourists to Pilgrims: Christian Practices and the First-Year Experience (Ashley Woodiwiss)
ch. 7 Keeping Time in the Social Sciences: An Experiment with Fixed-Hour Prayer and the Liturgical Calendar (James K. A. Smith)
ch. 8 How Christian Practices Help to Engage Students Morally and Spiritually: Testimony from a Western Civilization Course (Glenn E. Sanders)
ch. 9 Thrill Rides and Labyrinths: The Pedagogical Logic of Freedom and Constraint (Matthew Walhout
ch. 10 Christian Practices and Technical Courses: Making Integral Connections (Kurt C. Schaefer)
ch. 11 Recruiting Students’ Imaginations: Prospects and Pitfalls of Practices (David I. Smith)

Contributors
Additional Info:
The author recounts his experience, as a young observant Jew, of James Kugel's academic biblical studies course at Harvard. The piece focuses specifically on how Kugel reconciles his religious faith  with his academic understanding, and how Jewish biblical scholars disagree with one another on what is involved in such a reconciliation. May be of special value for Christian learners undergoing a similar disruption, located as it is "safely" in a ...
Additional Info:
The author recounts his experience, as a young observant Jew, of James Kugel's academic biblical studies course at Harvard. The piece focuses specifically on how Kugel reconciles his religious faith  with his academic understanding, and how Jewish biblical scholars disagree with one another on what is involved in such a reconciliation. May be of special value for Christian learners undergoing a similar disruption, located as it is "safely" in a non-Christian context.
Additional Info:
Podcast: Conversation ranges from the public perception of what Religious Studies does, what to do with a RS degree, to the financial practicalities of doing postgraduate research in the UK and US today.
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Podcast: Conversation ranges from the public perception of what Religious Studies does, what to do with a RS degree, to the financial practicalities of doing postgraduate research in the UK and US today.
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Wiebe argues that the relationship between theology and religious studies is more compicated and interrelated than most acknowledge.
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Wiebe argues that the relationship between theology and religious studies is more compicated and interrelated than most acknowledge.
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An early review of Barbara Walvoords’ study showing a "great divide" in the introductory religious-studies classroom, especially at schools with a religious affiliation: While instructors want to prioritize the development of critical thinking, students want discussion that will develop their own religious beliefs and their moral & ethical values. (This is less true at secular colleges, where students are more on board with putting critical thinking first.)
Additional Info:
An early review of Barbara Walvoords’ study showing a "great divide" in the introductory religious-studies classroom, especially at schools with a religious affiliation: While instructors want to prioritize the development of critical thinking, students want discussion that will develop their own religious beliefs and their moral & ethical values. (This is less true at secular colleges, where students are more on board with putting critical thinking first.)
Additional Info:
"How . . . do we represent religious experience, in all of its various forms from apostasy to rapture, in ways that remain faithful to the rules of careful historical scholarship, but without inadvertently denigrating the experience as such by making it seem subordinate to other goals?"
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"How . . . do we represent religious experience, in all of its various forms from apostasy to rapture, in ways that remain faithful to the rules of careful historical scholarship, but without inadvertently denigrating the experience as such by making it seem subordinate to other goals?"
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Sociological look at religious belief and practices among college students
Additional Info:
Sociological look at religious belief and practices among college students
Article cover image

Cultural Understandings of Religion: The Hermeneutical Context of Teaching Religious Studies in North America

Article
Murphy, Tim
2006
Method & Theory in the Study of Religion, Vol. 18, No. 3 (2006): 197-218
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
When students come into the classroom, they have a prefigured, albeit deeply implicit, notion of what "religion" is and what it is not. They see religion as private, inner, and personal, as distinct from "politics" and "economics." This prefigured conception of religion is, in this author's view, one of the principle obstacles to teaching Religious Studies in an empirical, cross-cultural, comparative manner. Given the overall structure of the cultural configuration ...
Additional Info:
When students come into the classroom, they have a prefigured, albeit deeply implicit, notion of what "religion" is and what it is not. They see religion as private, inner, and personal, as distinct from "politics" and "economics." This prefigured conception of religion is, in this author's view, one of the principle obstacles to teaching Religious Studies in an empirical, cross-cultural, comparative manner. Given the overall structure of the cultural configuration within which students think about and live out "religion," i.e., that it is private, utilitarian, and simply an obvious given to them, how can we introduce theory into the Religious Studies classroom? The answer given here is that if we use language-based theoretical models of culture such as structuralism and hermeneutics, we do better, in the main, in applying that theory to the communicative context of the classroom than trying to teach theory directly to our undergraduate students. This paper offers an analysis, using such language-based theories, of those cultural conditions which our students bring into the classroom and which shape their "native" understanding of the category "religion," as well as some suggestions as to how to cope with it in order to teach Religious Studies more effectively.
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Religion & Education Volume 41, no.2

Journal Issue
2014
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 May-Aug. 2014
Topics: Religion and Academia

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Journal Issue.
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Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial
Christian (Michael D. Waggoner)

Articles, Essays
ch. 1 Religious/Worldview Identification and College: Student Success (Nicholas Bowman, Vivienne Felix, and Liane Ortis)

ch. 2 Measuring the Impact of Religious-Oriented Courses on Spirituality/Religiosity-Related Outcomes in Higher Education (Kenneth Plummer and John Hilton, III)

ch. 3 Reaffirming the Importance of Faculty Rituals at Religious Colleges and Universities (Nathan F. Alleman)

ch. 4 Campus Climate for Diversity as Predictor of Spiritual Development at Christian Colleges (Kristin Paredes-Collins)

ch. 5 Conservative Protestant College Students and Their Peers: Similarities and Differences (Ted M. Brimeyer and William L. Smith)

ch. 6 Christian Liberal Arts Teacher Preparation for 21st Century Students (Jonathan Eckert)

ch. 7 Religious Skepticism: A Reservation Regarding the American Academy of Religion's Guidelines (Daniel F. Lim)
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The Question of Conscience: Higher Education and Personal Responsibility

Book
Watson, David
2014
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB2324.W38 2014
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

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Abstract: Most of the claims about the purposes and achievements of higher education are irreducibly individualistic: it will change your life, through conversion or confirmation of faith, by improving your character, by giving you marketable “abilities,” by making you a better member of the community, or by being simply “capable” of operating more effectively in the contemporary world. All of these qualities scale up, ...
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Abstract: Most of the claims about the purposes and achievements of higher education are irreducibly individualistic: it will change your life, through conversion or confirmation of faith, by improving your character, by giving you marketable “abilities,” by making you a better member of the community, or by being simply “capable” of operating more effectively in the contemporary world. All of these qualities scale up, of course, but in differing ways.

David Watson explores the question of what higher education sets out to do for students through a number of lenses, including the “evolutionary” stages of modern university history, the sense participants and observers try to make of them, and a collection of “purposes,” or intended personal transformations. The resulting combinations are clustered around major questions about the role of universities for their students, and in society at large. He concludes by testing claims about the role of higher education in developing varieties of personal responsibility. The Question of Conscience identifies and explores how varied these claims have been over the long history of the higher enterprise, but also how strong and determined they invariably are. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword--Theodore Zeldin
Frontispiece: What does the university do?
Preface: 'My trade' and why it matters

ch. 1 What does higher education do? An historical and philosophical overview
ch. 2 The question of conscience
ch. 3 The question of character
ch. 4 The questions of calling, craft, and competence
ch. 5 The question of Citizenship
ch. 6 The questions of conversation and capability
ch. 7 Higher Education membership: Terms and conditions
ch. 8 Higher Education and personal responsibility

References List of websites Index
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Contemplative Learning and Inquiry Across Disciplines

Book
Gunnlaugson, Olen; Sarath, Edward W.; Scott, Charles; and Bai, Heesoon, eds.
2014
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
LC268.C775.2014
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Teaching for Transformation

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Abstract: A wide-ranging consideration of the emerging field of contemplative education.

Contemplative approaches to higher education have been gaining in popularity and application across a wide range of disciplines. Spurring conferences, a growing body of literature, and several academic programs or centers, these approaches promise to contribute significantly to higher education in the years to come. This volume provides an overview of ...
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Abstract: A wide-ranging consideration of the emerging field of contemplative education.

Contemplative approaches to higher education have been gaining in popularity and application across a wide range of disciplines. Spurring conferences, a growing body of literature, and several academic programs or centers, these approaches promise to contribute significantly to higher education in the years to come. This volume provides an overview of the current landscape of contemplative instruction, pedagogy, philosophy, and curriculum from the perspectives of leading researchers and scholar-practitioners. Contributors come from a variety of disciplines, including education, management and leadership studies, humanities, social sciences, the arts, and information science. Drawing on diverse contexts, the essays reveal the applicability of contemplative studies as a watershed field, capable of informing, enriching, and sustaining the many disciplines and instructional contexts that comprise higher education. Chapters discuss the theoretical aspects of the field; the details, experiences, and challenges of contemplative approaches; and the hopes and concerns for the future of this field. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
An Introduction to Contemplative Learning and Inquiry Across Disciplines Olen Gunnlaugson, Edward W. Sarath, Charles Scott, and Heesoon Bai)

Part I. Contemplative Studies: A New Academic Descipline ch. 1 Contemplative Pedagogy in Higher Education: Toward a More Reflective Academy (Arthur Zajonic, Amherst University)
ch. 2 A Philosophical Framework for Contemplative Education (Deborah Orr, York University)
ch. 3 Kindred Spirits in Teaching Contemplative Practice: Distraction, Solitude, and Simplicity (Mara Adelman, Seattle University)
ch. 4 Contemplation: The Soul’s Way of Knowing (John (Jack) P. Miller, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto)
ch. 5 Fitting in Breath Hunting: Thai and U.S. Perspectives of Contemplative Pedagogy (David Lee Keiser, Monclair State University, and Saratid Sakulkoo, Burapha University)
ch. 6 A Pedagogy for the New Field of Contemplative Studies (Harold D. Roth, Brown University)

Part II. Domain Specific Perspectives
ch. 7 Learning about Obligation, Compassion, and Global Justice: The Place of Contemplative Pedagogy (David Khane, University of Alberta)
ch. 8 History as Dharma: A Contemplative Practice Model for Teaching the Middle East and Africa (Elise G. Young, Westfield State University)
ch. 9 Paying Attention: Introspection as a Ground of Learning (Daniel Barbezat, Amherst College)
ch. 10 Integrating Mindfulness Theory and Practice at Lesley University (Nancy W. Waring, Lesley University
ch. 11 Information and Contemplation: Exploring Contemplative Approaches to Information Technology (David M. Levy, University of Washington
ch. 12 Contemplative Pedagogy: Perspectives from Cognitive and Affective Science (Alfred W. Kaszniak, University of Arizona< )

Part III. Contemplating Change: Individual and Collective Transformation in Contemplative Education Environments
ch. 13 Transformative Pathways: Engaging the Heart in Contemplative Education (Diana Denton, University of Waterloo)
ch. 14 Contemplating Uncomfortable Emotions: Creating Transformative Spaces for Learning in Higher Education (John Eric Baugher, University of Southern Maine)
ch. 15 Contemplative Disciplines in Higher Education: Cutting through Academic Materialism (Daniel Vokey, University of British Columbia)
ch. 16 Transitions: Teaching from the Spaces Between (Richard C. Brown, Naropa University)
ch. 17 A Call for Wisdom in Higher Education: Contemplative Voices from the Dao-Field (Heeson Bai, Simon Fraser University; Avraham Cohen, City University; Tom Culham, Sean Park, Shahar Rabi, Charles Scott, and Saskia Tait, Simon Fraser University)

Part IV. New Frontiers of Contemplative Learning and Instruction
ch. 18 Considerations for Collective Leadership: A Threefold Contemplative Curriculum for Engaging the Intersubjective Field of Learning (Olen Gunnlaugson, Université Laval)
ch. 19 Buberian Dialogue as an Intersubjective Contemplative Praxis (Charles Scott, Simon Fraser University)
ch. 20 Contemplative Pedagogy and Compassionate Presence (Joanne Gozawa, California Institute of Integral Studies)
ch. 21 What Next?: Contemplating the Future of Contemplative Education (Edward W. Sarath, University of Michigan)
ch. 22 An Inquiry into the Field Dynamics of Collective Learning (Chris Bache, Youngstown State University in conversation with Olen Gunnlaugson, Université Laval)

Author Biographies
Index
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Becoming Beholders: Cultivating Sacramental Imagination and Actions in College Classrooms

Book
Eifler, Karen E.; and Landy, Thomas M., eds.
2014
Liturgical Press, Collegeville, MN
BX922.B43 2014
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Mentoring Students   |   Liberal Arts

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Abstract: Catholic colleges and universities have long engaged in conversation about how to fulfill their mission in creative ways across the curriculum. The "sacramental vision" of Catholic higher education posits that God is made manifest in the study of all disciplines.

Becoming Beholders is the first book to share pedagogical strategies about how to do that. Twenty faculty—from many religious backgrounds ...
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Abstract: Catholic colleges and universities have long engaged in conversation about how to fulfill their mission in creative ways across the curriculum. The "sacramental vision" of Catholic higher education posits that God is made manifest in the study of all disciplines.

Becoming Beholders is the first book to share pedagogical strategies about how to do that. Twenty faculty—from many religious backgrounds and teaching in fields as varied as chemistry, economics, English, history, mathematics, sociology, and theology—discuss ways that their teaching nourishes students' ability to find the transcendent in their studies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Karen E. Eifler and Thomas M. Landy)

Part I - The Sacramental Imagination as a Theological Perspective
ch. 1 Finding God in All Things: A Sacramental Worldview and Its Effects (Michael J. Himes)
ch. 2 Detectives of Grace in the Adventures of Scholarship (James Corkey, SJ)

Part II - A Long, Loving Look at the Real
ch. 3 Practice Makes Reception: The Role of Contemplative Ritual in Approaching Art (Joanne E. Ziegler)
ch. 4 Radical Transcendence: Teaching Environmental Literature at a Catholic University (Kimberly P. Bowers)
ch. 5 You Are Here: Engagement, Spirituality, and Slow Teaching (Anita Houck)
ch. 6 Pauses

Part III - Word and Sacrament
ch. 7 Rhetorics of Silence: A Pedagogy of Contemplation, Empathy, and Action (Melissa A. Godlthwaite)
ch. 8 Stumbling toward Grace: Meditations on Communion and Community in the Writing Classroom (Anne E. Green)Hello - Thanks for providing your street address.  The book will be mailed today.
ch. 9 Looking into the Bible (Michael Patella, OSB)

Part IV - In Places of Struggle and Challenge
ch. 10 Catholic Social Teaching, Community-Based Learning, and the Sacramental Imagination (Susan Crawford Sullivan)
ch. 11 Solidarity through “Poverty and Politics” (William Purcell and Rev. William Lies, CSC)
ch. 12 Exorcizing Taboos: Teaching End-of-Life Communication (Michael P. Pagano)
ch. 13 Who Decides? Encountering Karma and Catastrophe in the Catholic Liberal Arts (Michael Bathgate)
ch. 14 Beholding the Eschaton: Transforming Self and World through the Study of World History (Eric Cunningham)

Part V - Appreciating Where We Stand and What Other See
ch. 15 Shiver of Wonder: A Dialogue about Chemistry with Sister Angela Hoffman, OSB (Karen E. Eifler)
ch. 16 “Finding the Unfamiliar in the Familiar Places”: The Regis Community-Based Spanish/English Exchange Project: Journeys in Place (Obdulia Castro and Elizabeth Grassi)
ch. 17 Dialogues of Discernment: Science for Social Justice (Audrey A. Friedman)
ch. 18 Cultivating Empathy and Mindfulness: Religious Praxis (Angela Kim Harkins)
ch. 19 This I Believe: Linking the Mathematical Axiomatic Method with Personal Belief Systems (Stephanie Anne Salomone)
ch. 20 Mutual Benefice: Helping Students Find God in a Research Methods Course (Joanthan W. Bowman)

About the Authors
TTR cover image

Teaching Comparative Theology from an Institution's Mission

TTR
Bidlack, Bede Benjamin; Brecht, Mara; Krokus, Christian S.; Scheid, Daniel P.; and Locklin, Reid B.
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 4 (2014): 369-387
BL41.T4. v.17 no. 4 2014
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Learning Designs   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Although comparative theology is a continuously growing method in the study of religion, it is still relatively new and not widely accepted in either confessional or secular institutions. Scholars may face difficulty when seeking their institutions' acceptance for a comparative theology course. One way of generating interest and approval for such a course is by designing it from the center of the institution's mission. Professors can look to the institution's ...
Additional Info:
Although comparative theology is a continuously growing method in the study of religion, it is still relatively new and not widely accepted in either confessional or secular institutions. Scholars may face difficulty when seeking their institutions' acceptance for a comparative theology course. One way of generating interest and approval for such a course is by designing it from the center of the institution's mission. Professors can look to the institution's mission as a resource for teaching comparatively. We offer four examples from Catholic institutions of how this might be done. Reid Locklin offers further insights in his response to our explorations.
Journal cover image

Distinctive, Not Disposable: Religious Studies in American Public Higher Education in the Twenty-first Century

Journal Issue
Robinson, Joanne, (Guest Editor), Posman, Ellen, and Locklin, Reid B., (Editors)
2012
Spotlight on Teaching, May
BL41.S72
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Liberal Arts   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Distinctive, Not Disposable: Religious Studies in American Public Higher Education in the Twenty-first Century (Joanne Robinson, Guest Editor)
ch. 2 From Traditions to Topics to Themes, within an Era of Technological Change (Joel Gereboff)
ch. 3 Religious Studies in the Context of Liberal Education (Brian C. Wilson)
ch. 4 Teaching Religion, Teaching Disruption: Inculcating Independent Critical Thinking through the Study of Religion (Stephen C. Finley)
ch. 5 The Examined Life: Religious Studies and the Cultivation of Self-Reflection (Laura Ammon)
ch. 6 The Lively Classroom: A Fusion of Gen Ed and Religious Studies (Celia Brewer Sinclair)
ch. 7 Hybrid Vigor in Religious Studies Courses (Lora Hobbs)
ch. 8 Religious Studies in American Public Higher Education in the Twenty-first Century: Suggested Resources
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Building Catholic Higher Education: Unofficial Reflections from the University of Notre Dame

Book
Smith, Christian
2014
Cascade Books, Eugene, OR
LC501.S65 2014
Topics: Religion and Academia

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Abstract: American Catholic universities and colleges are wrestling today with how to develop in ways that faithfully serve their mission in Catholic higher education without either secularizing or becoming sectarian. Major challenges are faced when trying to simultaneously build and sustain excellence in undergraduate teaching, strengthen faculty research and publishing, and deepen the authentically Catholic character of education. This book uses the particular case ...
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Abstract: American Catholic universities and colleges are wrestling today with how to develop in ways that faithfully serve their mission in Catholic higher education without either secularizing or becoming sectarian. Major challenges are faced when trying to simultaneously build and sustain excellence in undergraduate teaching, strengthen faculty research and publishing, and deepen the authentically Catholic character of education. This book uses the particular case of the University of Notre Dame to raise larger issues, to make substantive proposals, and thus to contribute to a national conversation affecting all Catholic universities and colleges in the United States (and perhaps beyond) today. Its arguments focus particularly on challenging questions around the recruitment, hiring, and formation of faculty in Catholic universities and colleges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Lofty Visions
ch. 2 The Apparent Assumptions behind and Implications of Notre Dame's Catholic Mission for Its Faculty: An Interpretive Commentary in Ten Proposals
ch. 3 How Faculty Can Support the Catholic Mission (Even If They Are Not Catholic or Do Not Understand or Personally Endorse the Cathoilic Mission)
ch. 4 Social Science in Catholic Higher Education: What Difference Does Catholicism Make?
ch. 5 The Nearly Impossible Balancing Act: Achieving Undergraduate Excellence, Catholic Education, and Premier Research University Scholarship (Simultaneiously)

Conclusion
Appendix: The Role of Theology at a Catholic University or College
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 42, no.1

Journal Issue
2015
Taylor & Francis, Inc., Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 2015 Jan.-Apr.
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

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Journal Issue.
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Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial (Michael D. Waggoner)

Articles, Essays
ch. 1 Renewing Intellectual Discouse by Means of a New Philosophy of Knowledge for Nonnatural Sciences: Implications for the Role of Religion in the Research University(Mary Frances McKenna)
ch. 2 Religious Freedom in Education: A Fundamental Human Right (Charles J. Russo)
ch. 3 Religious Education, Critical Thinking, Rational Autonomy, and the Child's Right to an Open Future (Oduntan Jawaoniyi)
ch. 4 Teacher Prayfulness: Identifying Public School Teachers Who Connect Their Spiritual and Religious Lives With Their Professional Lives (James M. M. Hartwick)
ch. 5 The Religious Factor in Ontario's Educational Policy Creation: The Hall-Dennis Report, 1965-1968 (Kurt Clausen and Anthony Easton)
ch. 6 Human Fulfillment and Education: A Critique of Dewey's Philosophy of Education (Francis A. Samuel)

Resource Review
ch. 7 When Diversity Drops: Race, Religion, and Affirmative Action in Higher Education (Julie J. Park, Reviewed by Dwight C. Watson)
Additional Info:
White Paper and the Working Group Papers for a 2008 Teagle funded conference with participants from Bucknell University, Macalester College, Vassar College, and Williams College.
 Asking: how secular assumptions both enable and limit the questions of meaning and purpose that are central to liberal arts education. 
Additional Info:
White Paper and the Working Group Papers for a 2008 Teagle funded conference with participants from Bucknell University, Macalester College, Vassar College, and Williams College.
 Asking: how secular assumptions both enable and limit the questions of meaning and purpose that are central to liberal arts education. 
Article cover image

Contemplative Studies and the Liberal Arts

Article
Fort, Andrew O.
2013
Buddhist-Christian Studies, v33 n1: 23-32
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Contemplative Studies—meaning both standard “third-person” study of contemplative traditions in history and various cultures as well as actual “first-person” practice of contemplative exercises as part of coursework—is a new field in academia, and aspects have been controversial in some quarters, seen as not completely compatible with the rigorous “critical inquiry” of liberal arts study. While there are agendas within contemplative studies (CS) that go beyond the traditional questions ...
Additional Info:
Contemplative Studies—meaning both standard “third-person” study of contemplative traditions in history and various cultures as well as actual “first-person” practice of contemplative exercises as part of coursework—is a new field in academia, and aspects have been controversial in some quarters, seen as not completely compatible with the rigorous “critical inquiry” of liberal arts study. While there are agendas within contemplative studies (CS) that go beyond the traditional questions and issues of liberal education, I want to argue that CS has, for a number of reasons, a place right at the heart of such inquiry. CS can be approached from many disciplines, including psychology, medicine, and neuroscience, as well as literature and visual, fine, and performing arts, but here I will focus on its place in liberal arts generally, and in religious studies specifically.
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Religion & Education Volume 42, no.3

Journal Issue
2015
Taylor & Francis, Inc., Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 2015 Sept. - Dec.
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

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Journal Issue.
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Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Articles, Essays
ch. 1 (Mis) Understanding Islam in a Suburban Texas School District (Miriam D. Ezzani and Melanie C. Brooks)
ch. 2 Uncovered: Two Generations of African American Muslim Parents Speak Out About Education (Aisha El-Amin)
ch. 3 Religious Beliefs, Knowledge, and Teaching Actions: Elementary Teacher Candidates and World Religions (Derek Anderson, Holly Mathys and Tanya Cook)
ch. 4 When the Children Asked to Study God, What Did the Parents Say: Building Family Engagement Around Sensitive Topics (Mona M. Abo-Zena and Ben Mardell)
ch. 5 Exploratory Study of Professional and Personal Beliefs of Early Childhood Teachers in Public Schools: Their Perceptions of Religiousness and Teaching Efficacy (Shin Ji Kang)
ch. 6 Curricular Documents and the Positioning of Teachers and Students in Catholic Schools: The Cult of Personality (Kevin J. Burke)
ch. 7 Supporting Minority Belonging: Finnish Minority RE Teacher Perspectives on the Significance of RE (Harriet Zilliacus and Arto Kallioniemi)
ch. 8 “If It Feels Good…”: Research on School Selection Process Motives Among Parents of Young Children (Ina ter Avest, Gerdien Bertram-Troost and Siebren Miedema)
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The Pietist Vision of Christian Higher Education:Forming Whole and Holy Persons

Book
Gehrz, Christopher, ed.
2015
InterVarsity Press, Downers Grove, IL
BV1473.P54 2015
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

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Abstract: Pietism has long been ignored in evangelical scholarship. This is especially the case in the field of Christian higher education, which is dominated by thinkers in the Reformed tradition and complicated by the association of Pietism with anti-intellectualism. The irony is that Pietism from the beginning "was intimately bound up with education," according to Diarmaid MacCulloch. But until now there has not been ...
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Abstract: Pietism has long been ignored in evangelical scholarship. This is especially the case in the field of Christian higher education, which is dominated by thinkers in the Reformed tradition and complicated by the association of Pietism with anti-intellectualism. The irony is that Pietism from the beginning "was intimately bound up with education," according to Diarmaid MacCulloch. But until now there has not been a single work dedicated to exploring a distinctively Pietist vision for higher education.

In this groundbreaking volume edited by Christopher Gehrz, scholars associated with the Pietist tradition reflect on the Pietist approach to education. Key themes include holistic formation, humility and openmindedness, the love of neighbor, concern for the common good and spiritual maturity. Pietism sees the Christian college as a place that forms whole and holy persons. In a pluralistic and polarized society, such a vision is needed now more than ever. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Janel M. Curry)
Acknowledgments (Christopher Gehrz)
Introduction: Does Pietism Provide a "Usable Past" for Christian Colleges and Universities? (Christopher Gehrz)

Part I: Teaching, Scholarship and Community in the Pietist University
ch. 1 Pietism and Faith-Learning Integration in the Evangelical University (David C. Williams)
ch. 2 Calling for Pietistic Community: Pia Desideria in the Classroom (Katherine J. Nevins)
ch. 3 Love and Learning: A Model for Pietist Scholarship in the Disciplines (Jenell Paris)
ch. 4 The Quest for an Evangelical University: The Educational Visions of Carl F. H. Henry and Carl H. Lundquist (Phyllis E. Alsdurf)
ch. 5 Reconceiving the Christ-Centered College: Convertive Piety and Life Together (Roger E. Olson)

Part II: Changed People Changing the World: Pietists and Their Neighbors’ Good
ch. 6 The Common Priesthood Seeking the Common Good (Dale G. Durie)
ch. 7 Pietism and the Practice of Civil Discourse (Christian T. Collins Winn)
ch. 8 Love My (Religious) Neighbor: A Pietist Approach to Christian Responsibility in a Pluralistic World (Marion H. Larson and Sara L. H. Shady)

Part III: Responses: Views from the Natural and Health Sciences
ch. 9 Pietistic Values in Science and Science Education (Richard W. Peterson)
ch. 10 A Pietist Approach to Nursing Education in a Christian University (Nancy L. Olen)

Part IV: Problems and Proposals: Putting the Pietist Vision into Practice
ch. 11 Intellectual Virtue and the Adventurous Christ Follower (Raymond J. VanArragon)
ch. 12 The Pietist Ethos and Organizational Coherency (Joel S. Ward)
ch. 13 Curating the Usable Past for a Vital Future: An Anabaptist Vision for Pietism (Kent T. K. Gerber)
ch. 14 Neoliberal Challenges to the Pietist Vision of Christian Higher Education (Samuel Zalanga)

Conclusion
"Their Mission Is Innovation": The Pietist University in the Twenty-First Century(Christopher Gehrz)
List of Contributors
Name Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Teaching and Christian Imagination

Book
Smith, David I. and Felch, Susan M.
2016
William B Eerdmans Publishing Co., Grand Rapids, MI
BV4596.T43 S65 2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

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Abstract: This book offers an energizing Christian vision for the art of teaching. The authors - experienced teachers themselves - encourage teacher-readers to reanimate their work by imagining it differently. David Smith and Susan Felch, along with Barbara Carvill, Kurt Schaefer, Timothy Steele, and John Witvliet, creatively use three metaphors - journeys and pilgrimages, gardens and wilderness, buildings and walls - to illuminate a ...
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Abstract: This book offers an energizing Christian vision for the art of teaching. The authors - experienced teachers themselves - encourage teacher-readers to reanimate their work by imagining it differently. David Smith and Susan Felch, along with Barbara Carvill, Kurt Schaefer, Timothy Steele, and John Witvliet, creatively use three metaphors - journeys and pilgrimages, gardens and wilderness, buildings and walls - to illuminate a fresh vision of teaching and learning. Stretching beyond familiar clichés, they infuse these metaphors with rich biblical echoes and theological resonances that will inform and inspire Christian teachers everywhere. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One - Journeys and Pilgrimages
ch. 1 Setting Our Feet on the Road
ch. 2 Are We Tourists or Pilgrims?
ch. 3 Walking the Path
ch. 4 What Sustains the Journey

Part Two - Gardens and Wilderness
ch. 5 Clearing the Ground
ch. 6 Generous Beauty: Is Your Classroom a Royal Garden?
ch. 7 Shaping the Soul
ch. 8 The Just Community

Part Three - Buildings and Walls
ch. 9 Drawing the Blueprints
ch. 10 Laying the Foundations
ch. 11 Building the Walls
ch. 12 Climbing the Steps
ch. 13 Entering the Sanctuary
ch. 14 Setting Up House

ch. 15 An Ending, An Invitation

Notes
General Index
Scripture Index
Index of Reflection
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Teaching Civic Engagement (AAR Teaching Religious Studies) 1st Edition

Book
Clingerman, Forrest and Locklin, Reid B., eds.
2016
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
LC220.5.T38 2016
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Civic Engagement

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Abstract: Using a new model focused on four core capacities-intellectual complexity, social location, empathetic accountability, and motivated action--Teaching Civic Engagement explores the significance of religious studies in fostering a vibrant, just, and democratic civic order.

In the first section of the book, contributors detail this theoretical model and offer an initial application to the sources and methods that already define much teaching ...
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Abstract: Using a new model focused on four core capacities-intellectual complexity, social location, empathetic accountability, and motivated action--Teaching Civic Engagement explores the significance of religious studies in fostering a vibrant, just, and democratic civic order.

In the first section of the book, contributors detail this theoretical model and offer an initial application to the sources and methods that already define much teaching in the disciplines of religious studies and theology. A second section offers chapters focused on specific strategies for teaching civic engagement in religion classrooms, including traditional textual studies, reflective writing, community-based learning, field trips, media analysis, ethnographic methods, direct community engagement and a reflective practice of "ascetic withdrawal." The final section of the volume explores theoretical issues, including the delimitation of the "civic" as a category, connections between local and global in the civic project, the question of political advocacy in the classroom, and the role of normative commitments.

Collectively these chapters illustrate the real possibility of connecting the scholarly study of religion with the societies in which we, our students, and our institutions exist. The contributing authors model new ways of engaging questions of civic belonging and social activism in the religion classroom, belying the stereotype of the ivory tower intellectual. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Introduction

Section I: What are the Dimensions of Teaching Civic Engagement in the Religious Studies or Theology Classroom?
ch. 1 Discourse, Democracy, and the Many Faces of Civic Engagement: Four Guiding Objectives for the University Classroom (Reid B. Locklin, with Ellen Posman)
ch. 2 Sacred Sites and Staging Grounds: The Four Guiding Objectives of Civic Engagement in the Religion Classroom (Ellen Posman, with Reid B. Locklin)

Section II: What Practical Strategies and Questions Emerge from Teaching Civic Engagement in Religious Studies and Theology?
ch. 3 Teaching for Civic Engagement: Insights from a Two-Year Workshop (Melissa Stewart)
ch. 4 Giving and Receiving Hospitality during Community Engagement Courses (Marianne Delaporte)
ch. 5 Civic Engagement in the Heart of the City (Rebekka King)
ch. 6 Engaging Media and Messages in the Religion Classroom (Hans Wiersma)
ch. 7 Service and Community-Based Learning: A Pedagogy for Civic Engagement and Critical Thinking (Phil Wingeier-Rayo)
ch. 8 Religious Diversity, Civic Engagement and Community-Engaged Pedagogy: Forging Bonds of Solidarity through Interfaith Dialogue (Nicholas Rademacher)
ch. 9 Stopping the Zombie Apocalypse: Ascetic Withdrawal as a Form of Civic Learning (Elizabeth W. Corrie)

Section III: What are the Theoretical Issues and Challenges in Teaching Civic Engagement in Religious Studies and Theology?
ch. 10 Thinking about the 'Civic' in Civic Engagement and Its Deployment in the Religion Classroom (Carolyn M. Jones Medine)
ch. 11 More than Global Citizenship: How Religious Studies Expands Participation in Global Communities (Karen Derris and Erin Runions)
ch. 12 Political Involvement, the Advocacy of Process, and the Religion Classroom (Forrest Clingerman and Swasti Bhattacharyya)
ch. 13 The Difference between Religious Studies and Theology in the Teaching of Civic Engagement (Tom Pearson)
ch. 14 Dreams of Democracy (Tina Pippin)

Bibliography
Index
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Teaching the Bible in the Liberal Arts Classroom, Volume Two

Book
Webster, Jane S.; and Holland, Glenn S.
2015
Sheffield Phoenix Press, England
BS601.T434 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

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Abstract: Eugene V. Gallagher, Rosemary Park Professor of Religious Studies at Connecticut College, writes: ‘In a context where the general value of the Humanities has increasingly come under question by those who see a college education as necessarily being directly tied to the first job that students will have after they graduate, an ability to make a vigorous case about the contribution of studying ...
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Abstract: Eugene V. Gallagher, Rosemary Park Professor of Religious Studies at Connecticut College, writes: ‘In a context where the general value of the Humanities has increasingly come under question by those who see a college education as necessarily being directly tied to the first job that students will have after they graduate, an ability to make a vigorous case about the contribution of studying the Bible to any college student’s education is crucial for any teacher’.

This second collection of essays edited by Jane Webster and Glenn Holland seeks not only to promote the role of biblical studies in an undergraduate liberal arts education, but also to suggest strategies and approaches for teaching the Bible in a range of academic situations. Combining the theoretical and the practical, this volume will be another useful source of guidance and support for teachers of biblical studies at any point in their professional careers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward (Thomas Pearson)
Preface
Contributors
Introduction (Jane S. Webster and Glenn S. Holland)

PART I: TACTICS
ch. 1 Twitter in the Classroom (Anthony L. Abell)
ch. 2 What Has Wikipedia to Do with Judah? Using Modern Collaborative Technologies to Teach Pentateuchal Formation (Nicole L. Tilford)
ch. 3 Choose Your Own Adventure: Teaching, Participatory Hermeneutics, and the Book of Revelation (Robby Waddell)
ch. 4 Biblical Studies and Digital Storytelling (Anne W. Stewart and Nicole L. Tilford)
ch. 5 Drama in the Biblical Studies Classroom: Using Role-Plays to Understand History, Do Theology, and Teach Hermeneutics (Eric A. Seibert)
ch. 6 Holistic Learning: Charitable Giving as a Tool to Teach Empathy (Seth Heringer)

PART II: STRATEGIES
ch. 7 Creative Writing in Biblical Studies: Engaging Students through Biblical Narratives (Geoffrey David Miller)
ch. 8 ‘Framing’ the Book of Job: Teaching at the Intersection of Biblical Studies and Academic Writing (Benjamin J. Laugelli)
ch. 9 Fantasy: The ‘Renewed’ Genre for Making Necessary a Biblical Education for Understanding our Contemporary World (Sonya Shetty Cronin)
ch. 10 Teaching Foodways as a Fresh Entrée into the World of the Bible (Margaret Cohen)

PART III: PRINCIPLES
ch. 11 Reading Biblical Texts with an Ecological Lens (Janet Everhart)
ch. 12 Supersessionism as a ‘Narrative Problem’ for New Testament Introductory Courses (Lee A. Johnson)
ch. 13 When God Smites: Talking with Students about the Violence of God in the Hebrew Bible (Eric A. Seibert)

PART IV: BIBLICAL STUDIES IN THE LIBERAL ARTS CURRICULUM
ch. 14 Teaching Biblical Studies in an Ability-based Curriculum (Steven Dunn)
ch. 15 Creating Common Ground: Strategies for Teaching Undergraduate Students from Non-Religious Backgrounds (Katy E. Valentine)
ch. 16 In the Beginning: Some Preliminary Thoughts on the Problem of Teaching the Introductory Biblical Studies Course in the General Education Curriculum (Charles William Miller)

Bibliography
General Index
Index of Authors
TTR cover image

Teaching Students as Shapers of the Traditions that Shape Them

TTR
Kirkpatrick, Shane
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 2 (2016): 175-188
BL41.T4 v.19 no. 2
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
An undergraduate liberal arts education can help students be not simply shaped by tradition but also shapers of tradition. Specifically, undergraduate theological education, aimed at ministry preparation in a liberal arts setting, can seek to graduate students who are responsible shapers of the traditions that shape them, that is, who are tradents. The work of a tradent involves active engagement that requires skills and capacities well beyond simply passing on ...
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An undergraduate liberal arts education can help students be not simply shaped by tradition but also shapers of tradition. Specifically, undergraduate theological education, aimed at ministry preparation in a liberal arts setting, can seek to graduate students who are responsible shapers of the traditions that shape them, that is, who are tradents. The work of a tradent involves active engagement that requires skills and capacities well beyond simply passing on the past formulations of a tradition. The pedagogical question, then, is how to engage in undergraduate theological education if this image of the tradent is what we have in mind for our students. Three aspects of this image can serve as pervasive or recurrent themes across the structure of a major or program. One aspect is the interpretive nature of the tradent's work, a second is facility with traditions, and a third is the creative, constructive work of thinking theologically. Whatever particular traditions characterize a department's context, the image of students as tradents can help focus pedagogical reflection on the department's work: teaching students as shapers of the traditions that shape them.
TTR cover image

Engaging the Borders: Empathy, Religious Studies, and Pre-Professional Fields

TTR
Trothen, Tracy J.
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 3 (2016): 245-263
BL41.T4 v.19 no. 3 2016
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
This article proposes that religious studies instructors can gain pedagogical insights regarding the value and teaching of empathy from pre-professional health care and counseling fields. I present research findings from these fields to support claims that empathic skills are teachable. I then show that empathy has been established within the field of religious studies as important in order to understand the beliefs of the religious other. I conclude that religious ...
Additional Info:
This article proposes that religious studies instructors can gain pedagogical insights regarding the value and teaching of empathy from pre-professional health care and counseling fields. I present research findings from these fields to support claims that empathic skills are teachable. I then show that empathy has been established within the field of religious studies as important in order to understand the beliefs of the religious other. I conclude that religious studies educators should be concerned about how to teach empathy, and suggest that pre-professional research findings point us in the direction of how to do this. Experiential exercises such as role-playing and other simulation exercises seem to be most effective in teaching empathic skills. I present examples that demonstrate how listening exercises and the role-playing of cases can be used in the religious studies classroom and can assist in the development of empathy for the religious other.
TTR cover image

Teaching with Spiritual Impact: An Analysis of Student Comments Regarding High- and Low-Rated Spiritually Inspiring Religion Classes

TTR
Hilton, III, John; Sweat, Anthony; Griffin, Tyler; and Griffiths, Casey
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 4 (2016): 340-358
BL41.T4 v.19 no. 4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
We analyzed 2,621 written student comments to better understand themes which most contribute to religion classes being rated high or low in terms of the spiritual benefit students received from the class. From 2,448 religion classes taught from September of 2010 through April of 2014, comments from the top 61 (2.5 percent) and bottom 51 (2.1 percent) rated classes in terms of being “spiritually inspiring” were compared for emerging themes. The most frequent themes in higher-ranked spiritually inspiring ...
Additional Info:
We analyzed 2,621 written student comments to better understand themes which most contribute to religion classes being rated high or low in terms of the spiritual benefit students received from the class. From 2,448 religion classes taught from September of 2010 through April of 2014, comments from the top 61 (2.5 percent) and bottom 51 (2.1 percent) rated classes in terms of being “spiritually inspiring” were compared for emerging themes. The most frequent themes in higher-ranked spiritually inspiring courses were (1) intellectually enlightening and (2) applied religion to life. In lower-ranked spiritually inspiring courses the themes (1) class time was ineffective and (2) poor assessments were prevalent. We explore the practical implications from these and other findings.
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Conversation With Stephen Prothero

TTR
Prothero, Stephen; Gallagher Eugene V.; Pearson, Thomas; Robinson, Joanne; and Stortz, Martha E.
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 4 (2016): 389-407
BL41.T4 v.19 no. 4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
This interview was recorded and transcribed in November 2015. Stephen Prothero is a professor of religious studies at Boston University, where he has taught since 1996. His publications include several that directly address teaching about religion, most notably Religious Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know – and Doesn't, which made an argument regarding K-12 education. In this manuscript he pulls the conversation into his own undergraduate classrooms – providing a vivid glimpse of ...
Additional Info:
This interview was recorded and transcribed in November 2015. Stephen Prothero is a professor of religious studies at Boston University, where he has taught since 1996. His publications include several that directly address teaching about religion, most notably Religious Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know – and Doesn't, which made an argument regarding K-12 education. In this manuscript he pulls the conversation into his own undergraduate classrooms – providing a vivid glimpse of his teaching practices, including how he conducts large lecture classes and seminars, how he works with teaching assistants, and how he conducts discussions even in very large courses. He also shares his broader reflections on the nature and importance of religious literacy and its place in American education.
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Interfaith Leadership: A Primer

Book
Patel, Eboo
2016
Beacon Press, Boston, MA
BL65.L42 P38 2016
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Religious Diversity   |   Civic Engagement

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A guide for students, groups, and organizations seeking to foster interfaith dialogue and promote understanding across religious lines

In this book, renowned interfaith leader Eboo Patel offers a clear, detailed, and practical guide to interfaith leadership, illustrated with compelling examples. Patel explains what interfaith leadership is and explores the core competencies and skills of interfaith leadership, before turning to the issues interfaith ...
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A guide for students, groups, and organizations seeking to foster interfaith dialogue and promote understanding across religious lines

In this book, renowned interfaith leader Eboo Patel offers a clear, detailed, and practical guide to interfaith leadership, illustrated with compelling examples. Patel explains what interfaith leadership is and explores the core competencies and skills of interfaith leadership, before turning to the issues interfaith leaders face and how they can prepare to solve them. Interfaith leaders seek points of connection and commonality—in their neighborhoods, schools, college campuses, companies, organizations, hospitals, and other spaces where people of different faiths interact with one another. While it can be challenging to navigate the differences and disagreements that can arise from these interactions, skilled interfaith leaders are vital if we are to have a strong, religiously diverse democracy. This primer presents readers with the philosophical underpinnings of interfaith theory and outlines the skills necessary to practice interfaith leadership today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Identity
ch. 1 The Identity of an Interfaith Leader

Theory
ch. 2 The “Inter” in Interfaith
ch. 3 The “Faith” in Interfaith

Vision
ch. 4 The Vision of Interfaith Leadership

Knowledge Base
ch. 5 The Knowledge Base of Interfaith Leadership

Skill Set
ch. 6 The Skill Set of Interfaith Leadership

Qualities
ch. 7 The Qualities of Interfaith Leadership

Conclusion
Appendix: Summary of Frameworks
Acknowledgments
Notes
Works Cited
Index
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Well-Being and Higher Education: A Strategy for Change and the Realization of Education's Greater Purposes

Book
Harward, Donald W., ed.
2016
Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C.
LA229W44.2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia   |   Changes in Higher Education

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The newest release from Bringing Theory to Practice, Well-Being and Higher Education, explores the multiple connections of well-being to higher education and why those connections matter—for the individual lives of students and those who teach; for the institution; and for whether or not the unique promise of higher education to a democratic society can be advanced and realized.

The publication’s ...
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The newest release from Bringing Theory to Practice, Well-Being and Higher Education, explores the multiple connections of well-being to higher education and why those connections matter—for the individual lives of students and those who teach; for the institution; and for whether or not the unique promise of higher education to a democratic society can be advanced and realized.

The publication’s thirty-five original essays and provocations—by some of the most highly respected voices within and beyond the academy—address the theoretical underpinnings and practical expressions of these connections. Articles include “Higher Education, the Struggle for Democracy, and the Possibility of Classroom Grace”; “Why Well-Being is Fundamental to Liberal Learning”; “Honoring the Humanity of Our Students”; “Thriving: Expanding the Goal of Higher Education”; and “College Makes Me Feel Dangerous: On Well-Being and Nontraditional Students.”

Well-Being and Higher Education opens the discussion on learning’s connection to well-being; responds to current challenges against the state of higher education today; and brings to the forefront a conversation considering the greater purposes of higher education and the need to preserve and revive the institution’s role to look beyond itself to a greater good. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Preface
Foreword
Introduction

PART 1: Analysis and Meaning
Essays
ch. 1 Measuring and Improving the Effect of Higher Education on Subjective Well-Being (John Bronsteen)
ch. 2 Eudaimonic Well-being and Education: Probing the Connections (Carol D. Ryff)
ch. 3 Higher Education and Education in Virtue (Barry Schwartz)
ch. 4 Higher Education, the Struggle for Democracy, and the Possibility of Classroom Grace (Henry Giroux)

Provocations
ch. 5 Against the Culture of Acquiescence: Why Students Need Liberal Learning for their own Well-Being as well as the Well-Being of Society (William M. Sullivan)
ch. 6 Is Well-Being an Individual Matter? (Kazi Joshua)
ch. 7 Understanding the Complexities of Well-Being (Elizabeth Minnich)
ch. 8 The University as the Common Enemy of Opposing Views of Well-Being (Jerzy Axer)
ch. 9 Education for Well-Being (Todd Gitlin)
ch. 10 Why Well-being is Fundamental to Liberal Learning (Alexander Astin)

PART 2: Manifestation and Implementation
Essays
ch. 11 Why Flourishing? (Corey Keyes)
ch. 12 College Makes Me Feel Dangerous: On Well-Being and Nontraditional Students (David Scobey)
ch. 13 What Constitutes Indices of Well-Being Among College Students? (Sara E. Dahill-Brown & Eranda Jayawickreme)
ch. 14 Thriving: Expanding the Goal of Higher Education (Laurie Schreiner)
ch. 15 Well-Being and Student Persistence: Reframing Student Success (Tricia Seifert)
ch. 16 What Does Doing Good Mean? Well-Being and the Civic Purpose of Higher Education (Andrew Seligsohn)

Provocations
ch. 17 Student Well-Being as a Function of Identity Development (Elsa M. Núñez)
ch. 18 Student Narratives and Well-Being (Thia Wolf & Amalia Rodas)
ch. 19 Well-Being and Agency: Political Education in a Time of Crisis (Brian Murphy)
ch. 20 Spirit, Truth, and The Bright Colors of Books: Institutional Well-Being and Productive Disorder at a Black Women’s College (Mona Taylor Phillips)

PART 3: Facilitation: Curricular, Pedagogic and Across Boundaries
Essays
ch. 21 The Well-Being University (Nance Lucas & Paul Rogers)
ch. 22 Curricular Infusion of Well-Being and Science (Heidi G. Elmendorf & Joan B. Riley)
ch. 23 Bringing Together the Humanities and the Science of Well-Being to Advance Human Flourishing (James O. Pawelski)
ch. 24 Honoring the Humanity of Our Students (David Schoem)

Provocations
ch. 25 Well-Being and Being Safe: Do Guns Change Social Interactions? A Missouri Case Study (Jonathan M. Metzl)
ch. 26 Well-Being and the Community College Mission (Amanda Hyberger)
ch. 27 The Morehouse Mystique and the Collective Well-being Imperative (John Silvanus Wilson, Jr.)
ch. 28 Mobilizing Campus Communities for Well-Being (Theodore Long)
ch. 29 Why Institutional Commitment to Well-Being Bridges the Academic and Student Affairs Divide (Kevin Kruger & Stephanie A. Gordon)
ch. 30 Distilling Career Advice from the Happiness Literature (Robert H. Frank)

PART 4: The Logic of Change: Why, What, and How?
Essays
ch. 31 Institutional Transformation in the Service of Well-being: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (Eric Lister)
ch. 32 Reinventing Higher Education for the 21st Century (Peter Leyden)
ch. 33 Transforming Learning: The LEAP Challenge and the Well-Being of Students (Carol Schneider)

Provocations
ch. 34 Well-being, Disintegration and the Rebundling of Higher Education (Randy Bass)

Contributors
About Bringing Theory to Practice
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Religion and Higher Education in Europe and North America

Book
Aune, Kristin; Stevenson, Jacqueline, eds.
2017
Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, New York
LC383.R369 2017
Topics: Religion and Academia

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Religion and Higher Education in Europe and North America illuminates the experiences of staff and students in higher education as they negotiate the university environment. Religious extremism has been rising across Europe, whilst recent attacks have thrown public debate around the place of religion on campus, the role of universities in recognising and managing religious fundamentalism and freedom of speech on campus into sharper ...
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Religion and Higher Education in Europe and North America illuminates the experiences of staff and students in higher education as they negotiate the university environment. Religious extremism has been rising across Europe, whilst recent attacks have thrown public debate around the place of religion on campus, the role of universities in recognising and managing religious fundamentalism and freedom of speech on campus into sharper focus.

Despite these debates, research exploring religion on campus has been largely absent from discourse on higher education outside of America, with policy and practices designed to deal with religion on campus largely founded on supposition rather than evidence. This book speaks into that void, including results from recent studies in the field which form an empirically grounded base from a broad variety of perspectives on religion at universities. Aiming to offer a deeper perspective, more dialogue, and engagement on the experiences of students, Religion and Higher Education in Europe and North America presents us not only with an opportunity to counter growing trends of intolerance, but for people to connect with the humanity of others.

Focusing on what research reveals about staff and students’ experiences, it incorporates research from different academic disciplines including sociology, education, social policy, theology and religious studies, and across different faith and belief groups. This thought-provoking and challenging volume features chapters written by researchers involved in informing policy and practice relating to religion and belief in higher education in the UK, US, Canada, France and the Netherlands . Spanning the academic-practitioner divide, students and academics interested in the sociology of religion and of higher education, as well as those responsible for the practical management of campus life, will find this text of particular importance. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part One. Patterns and Trends: Insights from Survey Research
ch 1. Religion and Higher Education in the United States: Extending the Research
ch 2. How Religion or Belief frame Participation and Access in UK Higher Education
ch 3. Religiously Unaffiliated Students in the United States: Characteristics, Experiences, and Outcomes

Part Two: The Religious Student Experience: Learning From Qualitative Studies
ch 4. The Contested Campus: Christian Students in UK Universities
ch 5. Invisible Islam: Muslim Student Migrants' Everyday Practices in French Secular Universities
ch 6. "My Horns Come Out in My Attitude!" Negotiating Jewish Student Identity and the Politics of Identification in Canada Charlotte Schallié
ch 7. Samosas and Simran: University Sikh Societies in Britain
ch 8. Secularism, Free Speech and the Public University: Student Engagement with Israel-Palestine in a British Campus
ch 9. Navigating the Secular: Religious Students’ Experiences of Attending a Red-brick University

Part Three: The Place of Policies, Structures and Curricula
ch 10. Islamic Studies in UK Universities: Challenging Curricula
ch 11. From Cognitive Science to Personal Leadership: the Role of Religion and Personal Life Orientation in Curriculum Development Processes Within the Domain of Religious Studies
ch 12. Do Religion and Belief Have a Place in 'The Student Experience'?
ch 13. Developing Religious Literacy in Higher Education

List of Contributors
Index
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Echoes of Insight: Past Perspectives and the Future of Christian Higher Education

Book
Allen, Patrick; Badley, Kenneth
2017
Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, TX
BT738.17.A45 2017
Topics: Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Christian higher education needs something richer and deeper. Faith-based institutions yearn for more than business as usual, and Echoes of Insight invites you to listen again to older, forgotten, and perhaps even ignored voices. Designed to stimulate conversation among colleagues, Echoes of Insight offers brief summaries of several thought-provoking writers from the last century and encourages a new, vigorous conversation about Christian higher education. (...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Christian higher education needs something richer and deeper. Faith-based institutions yearn for more than business as usual, and Echoes of Insight invites you to listen again to older, forgotten, and perhaps even ignored voices. Designed to stimulate conversation among colleagues, Echoes of Insight offers brief summaries of several thought-provoking writers from the last century and encourages a new, vigorous conversation about Christian higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

Part 1: The Classroom and the Student: Instruction, Formation, and Vocation
ch 1. The Aims of Education (1929) (Alfred North Whitehead)
ch 2. The Lost Tools of Learning (1947) (Dorothy L. Sayers)
ch 3. The Banality of Evil (1963) (Hannah Arendt)
ch 4. A Good Man is Hard to Find (1955) (Flannery O'Conner)
ch 5. The Montessori Method (1912) (Maria Montessori)

Part 2: The Faculty and the Administration: Mission, Vision, and Values
ch 6. The Rise and Progress of Universities (1872) (John Henry Newman)
ch 7. The American College (1908) (Abraham Flexner)
ch 8. The Higher Learning in America (1918) (Thorstein Veblen)
ch 9. The Mission of the University (1930) (José Ortega y Gasset)
ch 10. The Higher Learning in America (1936) Robert Maynard Hutchins)
ch 11. The Idea of the University (1946) (Karl Jaspers)

Conclusion
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Wabash tree

"A Profound Unknowing: The Challenge of Religion in the Liberal Education of World Citizens"

Article
Gummer, Natalie
2005
Liberal Education, Vol. 91, No. 2, (Spring 2005)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Liberal Arts   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Discussions of world citizenship that elide the challenge of grappling with religious worldviews expose a covert intolerance at the very core of secularism, calling into question the “liberality” of liberal education. The ethical imperative of engaging with different worldviews not only demands that religions be taught, but also raises questions regarding how religious worldviews should be taught.
Additional Info:
Discussions of world citizenship that elide the challenge of grappling with religious worldviews expose a covert intolerance at the very core of secularism, calling into question the “liberality” of liberal education. The ethical imperative of engaging with different worldviews not only demands that religions be taught, but also raises questions regarding how religious worldviews should be taught.
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The Contemplative Mind in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Book
Owen Smith, Patricia
2017
Indiana University Press
LB2331.094 2018
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
In The Contemplative Mind in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Patricia Owen-Smith considers how contemplative practices may find a place in higher education. By creating a bridge between contemplative practices and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), Owen-Smith brings awareness of contemplative pedagogy to a larger audience of college instructors, while also offering classroom models and outlining the ongoing challenges of both defining these practices and assessing their ...
Additional Info:
In The Contemplative Mind in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Patricia Owen-Smith considers how contemplative practices may find a place in higher education. By creating a bridge between contemplative practices and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), Owen-Smith brings awareness of contemplative pedagogy to a larger audience of college instructors, while also offering classroom models and outlining the ongoing challenges of both defining these practices and assessing their impact in education. Ultimately, Owen-Smith asserts that such practices have the potential to deepen a student’s development and understanding of the self as a learner, knower, and citizen of the world.

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

Introduction

Ch 1. A Historical Review
Ch 2. Contemplative Practices in Higher Education
Ch 3. Challenges and Replies to Contemplative Methods
Ch 4. Contemplative Research
Ch 5. The Contemplative Mind: A Vision of Higher Education for the 21st Century

Coda

References

Index