Teaching Diverse Students

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Promoting Diversity in College Classrooms: Innovative Responses for the Curriculum, Faculty and Institutions

Book
Adams, Maurianne ed.
1992
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC1099.3.P76 1992
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. This journal presents a collection a essays that offer several new perspectives on teaching practice; give descriptive and narrative accounts of curricular and teaching innovations; and discusses a range of shared learnings obtained from public university, community college, and private college multicultural change processes. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. This journal presents a collection a essays that offer several new perspectives on teaching practice; give descriptive and narrative accounts of curricular and teaching innovations; and discusses a range of shared learnings obtained from public university, community college, and private college multicultural change processes. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes
ch. 1 Dynamics of Diversity in the Teaching-Learning Process: A Faculty Development Model for Analysis and Action (Linda S. Marchesani, Maurianne Adams)
ch. 2 Racial Identity Development: Understanding Racial Dynamics in College Classrooms and on Campus (Rita Hardiman, Bailey W. Jackson)
ch. 3 Bias Issues in the Classroom: Encounters with the Teaching Self (Gerald Weinstein, Kathy Obear )
ch. 4 International and Multicultural Education: Unrelated Adversaries or Successful Partners? (June Noronha)
ch. 5 Cultural Pluralism and Core Curricula (Betty Schmitz)
ch. 6 Diversity in Required Writing Courses (Marcia S. Curtis, Anne J. Herrington)
ch. 7 Curricular Innovations: Social Diversity as Course Content (Maurianne Adams, Linda S. Marchesani)
ch. 8 Monoculturalism to Multiculturalism: Lessons from Three Public Universities (John A. Hunt ... [et al.] )
ch. 9 Community College Contexts for Diversity: Miami-Dade Community College and Joliet Junior College (Mardee S. Jenrette, J.Q. Adams)
ch. 10 Institutional Transformation for Multicultural Education: Bloomfield College and St. Norbert College (Martha J. LaBare, Stuart G. Lang)
Index
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The Misteaching of Academic Discourses: The Politics of Language in the Classroom

Book
Bartolome, Lilia I.
1998
Westview Press, Boulder, CO
LB1033.5.B37 1998
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Bartolome explores issues in teaching working-class minority students the mainstream academic ways of speaking necessary for success in school. Drawing from her own experience as a white teacher of Mexican- American students, she reveals the veiled antagonism between students and teacher, emphasizes the political dimensions of language, and critiques the dominant deficit ideology that underlies the cultural difference explanation of academic underachievement among linguistic minority students. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Bartolome explores issues in teaching working-class minority students the mainstream academic ways of speaking necessary for success in school. Drawing from her own experience as a white teacher of Mexican- American students, she reveals the veiled antagonism between students and teacher, emphasizes the political dimensions of language, and critiques the dominant deficit ideology that underlies the cultural difference explanation of academic underachievement among linguistic minority students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

ch. 1 Understanding Academic Discourses
ch. 2 Language and Ideology: The (Il)literacy of Linguistic-Minority Students
ch. 3 A Potentially Ideal Classroom
ch. 4 The Misteaching of Academic Discourses: Three Discourse Events
ch. 5 Student Language Performance on Language Tasks
ch. 6 Rethinking Academic Discourses: Some Pedagogical Comments

Notes
Index
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Wabash tree

Women's Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice and Mind

Book
Belenky, Mary, Blythe Clinchy, Nancy Goldberger, and Jill Tarule
1986
Basic Books, New York, NY
HQ1206.W88 1986
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Despite the progress of the women's movement, many women still feel silenced in their families and schools. Based on in-depth interviews with 135 women, this moving and important book explains why. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Despite the progress of the women's movement, many women still feel silenced in their families and schools. Based on in-depth interviews with 135 women, this moving and important book explains why. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction:: To the Other Side of Silence
Part I The Ways of Knowing
ch. 1 Silence
ch. 2 Received Knowledge: Listening to the Voices of Others
ch. 3 Subjective Knowledge: The Inner Voice
ch. 4 Subjective Knowledge: The Quest for Self
ch. 5 Procedural Knowledge: The Voice of Reason
ch. 6 Procedural Knowledge: Separate and Connected Knowing
ch. 7 Constructed Knowledge: Integrating the Voices
Part II: Development in Context: Families and Schools
ch. 8 Family Life and The Politics of Talk
ch. 9 Toward an Education for Women
ch. 10 Connected Teaching
Appendix A: Interview Schedule
Appendix B: Educational Dialectics
References
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Wabash tree

Teaching for Diversity

Book
Border, Laura L. B., and Nancy Van Note Chism, eds.
1992
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 49)
LB2331.T43 1992
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
In the charged atmosphere of the debate on multicultural issues, higher education professionals must take action, even in the face of incomplete information and complicated arguments and counter arguments, and are often expected to set standards when many assumptions are made in deep-rooted, taken-for-granted institutional practices. This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning speaks in a practical way to administrators, instructors, faculty/TA developers, and support staff who ...
Additional Info:
In the charged atmosphere of the debate on multicultural issues, higher education professionals must take action, even in the face of incomplete information and complicated arguments and counter arguments, and are often expected to set standards when many assumptions are made in deep-rooted, taken-for-granted institutional practices. This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning speaks in a practical way to administrators, instructors, faculty/TA developers, and support staff who work in the multicultural classroom and offers valuable information that will serve as a basis for recognizing and solving issues in diversity. This is the 49th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. For more information on the series, please see the Journals and Periodicals page. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Cultural Inclusion in the American College Classroom (Robert M. Diamond)
ch. 2 Acknowledging the Learning Styles of Diverse Student Populations: Implications for Instructional Design(Mary Sorcinelli)
ch. 3 Stirring It Up: The Inclusive Classroom (Delivee L. Wright)
ch. 4 Ensuring Equitable Participation in College Classes (L. Dee Fink)
ch. 5 Inside Feminist Classrooms: An Ethnographic Approach(L. Dee Fink)
ch. 6 Creating Multicultural Classrooms: An Experience-Derived Faculty Development Program (Karron G. Lewis)
ch. 7 Improving the Climate: Eight Universities Meet the Challenges of Diversity(LuAnn Wilkerson and Karron G. Lewis)
ch. 8 The Future Is Now: A Call for Action and List of Resources (Nancy A. Diamond)

Index
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Confronting Diversity Issues on Campus

Book
Bowser, Benjamin, Gale Auletta, Terry Jones
1993
Sage Publications, Newbury Park, CA
LC1099.3.B69 1993
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Controversies about affirmative action hires, admission policies, intercultural relations in the classroom, the role of ethnic studies departments, and changes in course curriculum all seem to swirl around the changing ethnic composition of the campus. How do we all get along? Tackling this question are authors Bowser, Auletta, and Jones, who suggest some practical strategies for dealing with questions of racism, diversity, and intercultural communication. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Controversies about affirmative action hires, admission policies, intercultural relations in the classroom, the role of ethnic studies departments, and changes in course curriculum all seem to swirl around the changing ethnic composition of the campus. How do we all get along? Tackling this question are authors Bowser, Auletta, and Jones, who suggest some practical strategies for dealing with questions of racism, diversity, and intercultural communication. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 The Unwritten Organization
The Unwritten Rules
The Power of Networks
People of Color as Perceived Threats
What Can Be Done?
Ideas for Improving Treatment of Students of Color
Ideas for Improving Treatment of Faculty of Color

ch. 2 What Did You Say You Were? Am I a Racist?
Racism and Self-Identity for Whites
Racism and Self-Identity for People of Color
The Myths and Realities of Racism
What Can Be Done?

ch. 3 Communication, Communication, Communication!
Communication: Racial Dividers and Connectors
Why Race and Power Matter

ch. 4 Dealing With Conflict and Diversity in the Academic Community
The Purpose of Education
Issues of Access and Affirmative Action
Freedom of Speech: Fighting Words
Ethnic Studies and Multicultural Education
Summary

ch. 5 Toward New Racial and Cultural Boundaries in the Academy
Communities of Interest Defined
Redefining Communities of Interests
Models of Success
Selected References and Suggested Readings
About the Authors
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Gender on Campus: Issues for College Women

Book
Gmelch, Sharon Bohn
1998
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
LC1757.G65 1998
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Where adolescents and young adults are looking for a solid, wide-ranging introduction to gender issues, Gmelch's survey may be a useful acquisition. Although its focus is the college campus, cultural anthropologist Gmelch, head of the women's studies program at Union College, takes a straightforward, practical approach that may be helpful in other contexts as well. Gmelch incorporates discussions of race, class, disability, sexual identity, body image, violence, and substance abuse ...
Additional Info:
Where adolescents and young adults are looking for a solid, wide-ranging introduction to gender issues, Gmelch's survey may be a useful acquisition. Although its focus is the college campus, cultural anthropologist Gmelch, head of the women's studies program at Union College, takes a straightforward, practical approach that may be helpful in other contexts as well. Gmelch incorporates discussions of race, class, disability, sexual identity, body image, violence, and substance abuse in brief but focused chapters on gender issues; and she includes material on language and gender, opportunities for women in sports, and treatment of women in the media, the workplace in general, and politics. Each chapter closes with bullet-pointed "Did You Know?" and "What You Can Do" lists and annotated comments on videos and organizations; most include one or two apropos cartoons (sources include Nicole Hollander, Garry Trudeau, and the New Yorker). Mary Carroll (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Gender Issues on Campus
ch. 1 What Is Feminism?
ch. 2 Sexism in the Genderless Classroom
ch. 3 Language and Gender
ch. 4 Women and Sports
Dealing With Diversity
ch. 5 Sexual Identity and Homophobia
ch. 6 Racism in the Colorblind Academy
ch. 7 Beyond the Coed
ch. 8 Women and Disability
Sexuality and the Body
ch. 9 Eating and Body Image
ch. 10 Women, Drinking, and Drugs
ch. 11 Sexuality and Reproductive Issues
ch. 12 Rape and Sexual Assault
College and Beyond
ch. 13 Women in the Media
ch. 14 Women and Work
ch. 15 Women and Politics
Appendix Safety on Campus
Notes
Index
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Unauthorized Methods: Strategies for Critical Teaching

Book
Kincheloe, Joe L. and Shirley R. Steinberg, eds.
1998
Routledge, New York, NY
LC196. U53 1998
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Unauthorized Methods makes accessible some of the best theoretical innovations in critical pedagogy of the last decade. The contributors consider how an integration of popular culture and cultural studies into the lesson plan can enrich and reinvigorate the learning experience. These essays, ranging widely in topic and educational level, are grounded in theory but intended for practical application. By focusing on classroom methods, the contributors provide educators with techniques, strategies, ...
Additional Info:
Unauthorized Methods makes accessible some of the best theoretical innovations in critical pedagogy of the last decade. The contributors consider how an integration of popular culture and cultural studies into the lesson plan can enrich and reinvigorate the learning experience. These essays, ranging widely in topic and educational level, are grounded in theory but intended for practical application. By focusing on classroom methods, the contributors provide educators with techniques, strategies, and examples designed to transform the classroom into a truly multicultural and democratic space. Unauthorized Methods will be an indispensable resource for teachers, students, and policy makers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editor's Foreword

ch. 1 Lesson Plans from the Outer Limits: Unauthorized Methods (Joe L. Kincheloe and Shirley R. Steinberg)
ch. 2 Towards an Alternative Pedagogy (Ivor F. Goodson)
ch. 3 Nurturing the Imagination of Resistance: Young Adults as Creators of Knowledge (Kathleen S. Berry)
ch. 4 Gorillas ... Oops: Guerrillas in our Midst - (RE)dux: Kitchen Knowledge (Karen Anijar, Joshuea Anijar, Ronald Gonzales, and Lana Krievis)
ch. 5 The Critical Transformation of a Special Education Classroom: A Beginning Teacher Puts Theory into Practice (Nina Zaragoza and Marge Scardina)
ch. 6 A Textbook for Everyone: Balancing Canons and Culture in English Textbooks (Timothy A. Dohrer)
ch. 7 Deep Viewing: A Critical Look at Visual Texts (Ann Watts Pailliotet)
ch. 8 Still Crazy After All of These Years: Teaching Critical Media Literacy (Ladi Semali)
ch. 9 Bilingual Education in America: In Search of Equity and Social Justice (Lourdes Diaz Soto)
ch. 10 Innovative Pedagogy in Art Education (Dennis E. Fehr)
ch. 11 Teacher Says, Simon Says: Dualism in Science Learning (David B. Pushkin)
ch. 12 Teaching/Learning Mathematics in School (Peter M. Appelbaum)
ch. 13 Surfing and Getting Wired in a Fifth Grade Classroom: Critical Pedagogical Methods and Techno-Culture (John A. Weaver and Karen Grindall)
ch. 14 Teachers and Administrators: A Vision of Prophetic Practice (Patrick Slattery and Rebecca McElfresh Spehler)

Notes on Editors and Contributors
Index
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Students With Disabilities: Building a Partnership in Equal Access to Learning

Book
Conrardy, Joellen
1998
Ave Maria Press, Notre Dame, IN
LC4813.S78 1995
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Cover title.
"A resource for faculty and staff at the University of Notre Dame"--Cover.
Additional Info:
Cover title.
"A resource for faculty and staff at the University of Notre Dame"--Cover.

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Section 1 - Overview
ch. 1 The University of Notre Dame's Office for Students with disabilities
ch. 2 The Qualified Student
ch. 3 Thoughts about the Classroom Environment
ch. 4 Test Adaptation and Administration
ch. 5 Faculty Dilemmas and Challenges - Personal Experiences

Section 2 - Resources
ch. 6 Assistive Technology
ch. 7 Visual Impairments
ch. 8 Mobility and Dexterity
ch. 9 Students with Attention Deficit Disorder and Learning Disabilities
ch. 10 Hearing Impairments
ch. 11 Speech Impairments
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Dialogues for Diversity: Community and Ethnicity on Campus

Book
Kramer, Martin and Stephen Weiner
1994
Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LC3727.D53 1994
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Provides organized materials intended to help groups of individuals on campus toward focused discussions of the role of ethnic diversity in the daily life of colleges and universities. The (welcome) aim is to help such groups find their own common ground, not to tell them what that common ground should be. Produced by the Project on Campus Community and Diversity of the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of ...
Additional Info:
Provides organized materials intended to help groups of individuals on campus toward focused discussions of the role of ethnic diversity in the daily life of colleges and universities. The (welcome) aim is to help such groups find their own common ground, not to tell them what that common ground should be. Produced by the Project on Campus Community and Diversity of the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Participants in the Development of Dialogues for Diversity
A Note to Users

Topic One: Mission and Diversity
Topic Two: The Social Context
Topic Three: Diversity and Quality
Topic Four: Community and Campus Climate
Topic Five: Student Development and Ethnic Identity
Topic Six: The Faculty Role
Topic Seven: Leadership for Diversity
Topic Eight: Planning and Conducting

Discussions of Ethnic Diversity
Index
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Multicultural Teaching in the University

Book
Schoem, David, Linda Frankel, Ximena Zuniga
1993
Praeger, Westport, CT
LC1099.3.M86 1993
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This important book includes more than twenty essays by faculty from different disciplines, each articulating the multiple dimensions and components of multicultural teaching. Teachers discuss their own teaching methods and classes in terms of course content, process and discourse, and diversity among faculty and students in the classroom. This volume integrates new scholarship that reflects a more expansive notion of knowledge, and suggests new ways to communicate with diverse populations ...
Additional Info:
This important book includes more than twenty essays by faculty from different disciplines, each articulating the multiple dimensions and components of multicultural teaching. Teachers discuss their own teaching methods and classes in terms of course content, process and discourse, and diversity among faculty and students in the classroom. This volume integrates new scholarship that reflects a more expansive notion of knowledge, and suggests new ways to communicate with diverse populations of students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

Part 1 The Meaning of Multicultural Teaching: An Introduction

Part 2 Courses on Intergroup Relations
ch. 1 Teaching About Ethnic Identity and Intergroup Relations
ch. 2 Continuing the Legacy: On the Importance of Praxis in the Education of Social Work Students and Teachers
ch. 3 Teaching With and About Conflict in the Classroom
ch. 4 Latinos in the United States: A Framework for Teaching
ch. 5 Reflections on the Teaching of Multicultural Courses

Part 3 Courses on Racism, Sexism, and Diversity
ch. 6 Anti-Racism and Multiculturalism in a Law School Class
ch. 7 Our Lives, Our Histories
ch. 8 "A Circle of Learners": Teaching About Gender, Race, and Class ch. 9 Multicultural Teaching in Public Health: A Course on Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Health
ch. 10 The Latina: A Teaching Experience
ch. 11 Lesbian Studies and Multicultural Teaching: A Challenge in Diversity
ch. 12 The 1988 Presidential Campaign and Multicultural Education

Part 4 General Courses Giving Attention to Diversity
ch. 13 Seeing the Whole of the Moon
ch. 14 How I Teach Mathematics to Minorities
ch. 15 Racial Bias in Science Education
ch. 16 Waking Up to the World: A Multicultural Approach to Writing
ch. 17 Should and Can a White, Heterosexual, Middle-Class Man Teach Students About Social Inequality and Oppression? One Person's Experience and Reflections
ch. 18 On Engaging Students in a Multicultural Course on a Global Scale: Risks, Costs, and Rewards
ch. 19 Social Psychology

Part 5 Teacher Training and Nonformal Education
ch. 20 Dialogue Groups: An Innovative Approach to Multicultural Learning
ch. 21 Combating Homophobia Through Education
ch. 22 FAIRteach: Faculty Development on Issues of Racism and Diversity
ch. 23 Constructing a Teaching Assistant Training Program with a Multicultural Emphasis

Part 6 Roundtable Discussion: The Insiders' Critique of Multicultural Teaching

Part 7 Questions and Responses on Multicultural Teaching and Conflict in the Classroom

Part 8 Classroom and Workshop Exercises

Selected Bibliography
Index
About the Contributors
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Approaches to Teaching Non-Native English Speakers Across the Curriculum

Book
Sigsbee, David L., Bruce Speck and Bruce Maylath, eds.
1997
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 70)
LB2365.L38A77 1997
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning makes the knowledge and skills of academic specialists available to subject-area faculty who deal with the writing and oral communication styles of non-native users of English in their classrooms. The chapters offer information and much-needed advice in nontechnical language about ways to help these students improve their writing and speaking skills in content-area courses. The volume also considers the points of ...
Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning makes the knowledge and skills of academic specialists available to subject-area faculty who deal with the writing and oral communication styles of non-native users of English in their classrooms. The chapters offer information and much-needed advice in nontechnical language about ways to help these students improve their writing and speaking skills in content-area courses. The volume also considers the points of view of the students themselves and discusses their differing levels of intent about becoming proficient in English writing and speaking. The authors are specialists from institutions of higher education across the United States, and their academic fields included English as a Second Language, composition theory, editing, technical editing, interpersonal communication, oral communication, and linguistics. Faculty, especially those involved in writing-across-the-curriculum programs, will find this an invaluable help in dealing with the writing aspects of their courses, and those in charge of faculty development activities will particularly welcome this volume for use in their seminars. This is the 70th issues of the journals New Directions for Teaching and Learning. For more information on the series, please see the Journals and Periodicals page. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1. My Language, My Culture: International Variations in Standards for English (James C. Stalker)
ch. 2. Which Non-Native Speaker? (Joy M. Reid)
ch. 3. Why Do They Get It When I Say "Gingivitis" But Not When I Say "Gum Swelling"? (Bruce Maylath)
ch. 4. Respect for Religious Differences: The Case of Muslim Students (Bruce W. Speck)
ch. 5. Cultural Norms Affect Oral Communication in the Classroom (Ellen Johnson)
ch. 6. Using the "Writing Process" with Non-Native Users of English (Kimberly Koffolt, Sheryl L. Holt)
ch. 7. Building Editing Skills: Putting Students at the Center of the Editing Process (Robin Murie)
ch. 8. Responding to Grammar Errors (Sheryl L. Holt)
ch. 9. How Cultural Differences Affect Written and Oral Communication: The Case of Peer Response Groups (Gayle L. Nelson)
ch. 10. Please Speak Up: Asian Immigrant Students in American College Classrooms (Barbara D. Hodne)
ch. 11. What Teachers Can Do to Relieve Problems Identified by International Students (Debra S. Lee)
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Learning Environments for Women's Adult Development: Bridges Toward Change

Book
Taylor, Kathleen, and Catherine Marienau, eds.
1995
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC1663.L42 1995
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education explores emerging theory and practice in adult development, adult learning, and feminist pedagogy for learning environments designed to meet women's needs. Adult women learners face special challenges as they enter or reenter higher education. Research and experience suggest that historical and current education approaches may not serve men and women equally. The central aim of this book is to help ...
Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education explores emerging theory and practice in adult development, adult learning, and feminist pedagogy for learning environments designed to meet women's needs. Adult women learners face special challenges as they enter or reenter higher education. Research and experience suggest that historical and current education approaches may not serve men and women equally. The central aim of this book is to help make learning environments more supportive of reentry women in their ongoing development. Many of the practices showcased in this sourcebook emerged from programs of alternative higher education as they endeavored to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse population of learners. The different pedagogical approaches described herein help a woman learner shape the narrative of her evolving self in multiple life contexts. Ultimately, the kinds of educational practices described in this volume will prove effective in promoting lifelong learning and development for both women and men. This is the 65th issue in the journal series New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes (Catherine Marienau, and Kathleen Taylor)

ch. 1 Bridging Practice and Theory for Women's Adult Development (Kathleen Taylor, and Catherine Marienau)
ch. 2 Journal Writing: A Tool for Women Developing as Knowers (Phyllis Walden)
ch. 3 Sitting Beside Herself: Self-Assessment and Women's Adult Development ( Kathleen Taylor)
ch. 4 Prior Learning Assessment, Critical Self-Reflection, and Reentry Women's Development (Jan Droegkamp, and Kathleen Taylor)
ch. 5 In Their Own Voices: Women Learning About Their Own Development (Catherine Marienau)
ch. 6 Teaching to the Development Needs of Nonmainstream Learners (Linda Gajdusek, Helen Gillotte)
ch. 7 A Developmental Core Curriculum for Adult Women Learners (Rosemarie Carfagna)
ch. 8 Multiple Roles of the Mentor Supporting Women's Adult Development (Mayra Bloom)
ch. 9 Linking Learning, Teaching, and Development (Morris Fiddler, and Catherine Marienau)
ch. 10 Speaking Her Mind: Adult Learning and Women's Adult Development (Kathleen Taylor)
Conclusion
Index
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Taking Women Seriously: Lessons and Legacies for Educating the Majority

Book
Tidball, M. Elizabeth, Daryl G. Smith, Charles S. Tidball, Lisa E. Wolf-Wendel
1999
Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LC1756.T26 1999
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Over the past 25 years, research findings have continued to underscore the direct and positive impact of women's colleges--institutions where the academic aspirations of women are the focus of the entire educational community. This book identifies the distinctive characteristics that make these colleges preeminent contributors of achieving women to the wider society. The authors also explain how the lessons and legacies of these institutions have the potential to enhance the education ...
Additional Info:
Over the past 25 years, research findings have continued to underscore the direct and positive impact of women's colleges--institutions where the academic aspirations of women are the focus of the entire educational community. This book identifies the distinctive characteristics that make these colleges preeminent contributors of achieving women to the wider society. The authors also explain how the lessons and legacies of these institutions have the potential to enhance the education environment at all colleges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
List of Tables
Foreword
Acknowledgments
About the Authors
Introduction Writing History Differently
Pt. 1 Women's Colleges within the Context of American Higher Education
Pt. 2 Three Major Ways of Knowing Provide Lessons from Women's Colleges
Pt. 3 Legacies from Women's Colleges Serve As Institutional Models
Pt. 4 Women's Colleges and the Meaning of Taking Women Seriously
Additional Resources
Supplement to Ch. 1 Connecting with Global Issues
Supplement to Ch. 2 Tracking Frames of Reference
Supplement to Ch. 3 From Baccalaureate Origins to Institutional Productivity
Supplement to Ch. 4 Social Science Approaches to Studying College Impact
Supplement to Ch. 5 A Look Inside "A Look Inside"
References
Index
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Wabash tree

Educating Citizens in a Multicultural Society

Book
Banks, James A.
1997
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC1099.3.B364 1997
Topics: Liberal Arts   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The thousands of immigrants who enter the United States each year, the increasing number of children who speak a first language other than English in the schools, and the ever-widening gap between rich and poor are some of the realities that educators face today. Given these conditions, it is increasingly difficult to prepare students for democratic citizenship. Bringing together years of work as an expert on multicultural education, James Banks ...
Additional Info:
The thousands of immigrants who enter the United States each year, the increasing number of children who speak a first language other than English in the schools, and the ever-widening gap between rich and poor are some of the realities that educators face today. Given these conditions, it is increasingly difficult to prepare students for democratic citizenship. Bringing together years of work as an expert on multicultural education, James Banks shows how we can prepare students to effectively participate in a society that reflects ethnic, cultural, and class diversity at the same time that we promote national unity and the public good. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword
Preface

Part I Citizenship Education and Diversity
ch. 1 Reconstructing Citizenship Education
ch. 2 Citizenship Education in a Multicultural Society
ch. 3 Teaching Social Studies for Decision-Making and Citizen Action

Pt. II Citizenship Education and Epistemological Issues
ch. 4 Ethnicity, Social Science Research, and Education
ch. 5 The Persistence of Ethnicity: Research and Teaching Implications
Pt. III Citizenship Education and the Dimensions of Multicultural Education
ch. 6 Multicultural Education and Curriculum Transformation
ch. 7 Equity Pedagogy and Multicultural Education
ch. 8 Citizenship Education and the Development of Democratic Racial Attitudes
Pt. IV Educating Teachers, Leaders, and Citizens
ch. 9 Teaching Multicultural Literacy to Teachers
ch. 10 Multicultural Education: Goals for the Twenty-First Century
ch. 11 Cultural Democracy and Citizenship Education

References
Index
About the Author
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Responsive Teaching: An Ecological Approach to Classroom Patterns of Culture, Language and Thought

Book
Bowers, C.A. and Flinders, David J.
1990
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LB3013.B645 1990
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Responsive Teaching: An Ecological Approach to Classroom Patterns of Language, Culture, and Thought, the fourth title in this series, provides a conceptual basis for recognizing the classroom as an ecology of lingistic and cultural patterns that should be taken into account as part of the teacher's professional decision making. It argues that the orchestration of classroom behavior cannot be separated from the students primary culture. Chapters discuss the metaphorical nature ...
Additional Info:
Responsive Teaching: An Ecological Approach to Classroom Patterns of Language, Culture, and Thought, the fourth title in this series, provides a conceptual basis for recognizing the classroom as an ecology of lingistic and cultural patterns that should be taken into account as part of the teacher's professional decision making. It argues that the orchestration of classroom behavior cannot be separated from the students primary culture. Chapters discuss the metaphorical nature of language and thought, primary socialization, non-verbal communication, framing and social control, the classroom as an ecology of power, culturally responsive supervision, and educating teachers for the 21st century - all from a cultural and linguistic point of view.

The authors challenge the Cartesian tradition of viewing the student as a culture-free individual, and the classroom as a problem in management. They draw on Gregory Bateson's ideas help to illuminate student behavior as a form of communication about social relationships - one that relies heavily on culturally embedded patterns - and to reveal the classroom as a mental ecology where thought processes of others are encoded in the metaphorical language used to introduce new concepts. The book emphasizes that responsive teaching involves being sensitive to how the ecology of patterns (behavior and thought) reflects cultural differences and may be a source of miscommunication and alienation. (From the Publisher)
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Gendered Subjects: The Dynamics of Feminist Teaching

Book
Cully, Margo and Catherine Portuges
1985
Routledge, Boston, MA
LC1756.G46 1985
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Two decades after the first Women's Studies courses appeared on campuses in the US, feminist research and teaching are now thriving around the world. The editors of this book provide a rich sample of theoretical and practical reflections on classroom experience by teachers of Women's Studies over the past ten years, raising provocative questions which apply broadly to many areas of progressive teaching. The collection features new, unpublished and original ...
Additional Info:
Two decades after the first Women's Studies courses appeared on campuses in the US, feminist research and teaching are now thriving around the world. The editors of this book provide a rich sample of theoretical and practical reflections on classroom experience by teachers of Women's Studies over the past ten years, raising provocative questions which apply broadly to many areas of progressive teaching. The collection features new, unpublished and original work as well as a selection of the best articles to have appeared in recent years. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Part one - Frameworks and definitions
ch. 1 The politics of nurturance
ch. 2 Taking women students seriously
ch. 3 Classroom pedagogy and the new scholarship on women
ch. 4 Women's studies - a knowledge of one's own
ch. 5 The educational process of Women's Studies in Argentina - reflections on theory and technique
Part two - Transforming the disciplines
ch. 6 Feminist pedagogy as subversive activity
ch. 7 Teaching mediation - a feminist perspective on the study of law
ch. 8 Staging the feminist classroom - a theoretical model
Part three - Teaching as other
ch. 9 Pink elephants - confessions of a black feminist in an all white, mostly male English department...
ch. 10 Is there room for me in the closet, or my life as the only lesbian professor
ch. 11 A male feminist in a women's college classroom
Part four - Experience as text
ch. 12 Breaking silences - life in the feminist classroom
ch. 13 Black-eyed blues connections - teaching black women
Part five - Theory as text
ch. 14 Suspicious pleasures - on teaching feminist theory
ch. 15 The spectacle of gender - cinema and psyche
ch. 16 Mastery, identity and the politics of work - a feminist teacher in the graduate classroom
Part six - Authority and affect
ch. 17 Authority in the feminist classroom - a contradiction in terms?
ch. 18 Anger and authority in the introductory Women's Studies classroom
Part seven - Communication across differences
ch. 19 How racial differences helped us discover our common ground
ch. 20 Toward a pedagogy of Everywoman's Studies
ch. 21 Combating the marginalization of black women in the classroom
ch. 22 Teaching the feminist minority
Pedagogy of the oppressors?
Bibliography
Index
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Black Teachers On Teaching

Book
Foster, Michele
1997
New Press, New York, NY
LA2311.F67 1997
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Black Teachers on Teaching is a riveting and honest portrait of the politics and philosophies of the education of black children over the last fifty years. Foster, a leading expert on black educators and the history of black education, has interviewed pioneering teachers from across the country. In presenting their experiences, black teachers go on the record about mixed-race classrooms, the losses and gains accompanying desegregation, repeated cycles of attempted ...
Additional Info:
Black Teachers on Teaching is a riveting and honest portrait of the politics and philosophies of the education of black children over the last fifty years. Foster, a leading expert on black educators and the history of black education, has interviewed pioneering teachers from across the country. In presenting their experiences, black teachers go on the record about mixed-race classrooms, the losses and gains accompanying desegregation, repeated cycles of attempted and abandoned reform efforts, and the differing attitudes toward and perceptions of black students among black and white teachers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I The Elders
ch. 1 Everett Dawson
ch. 2 Ora Benson
ch. 3 Ruby Middleton Forsythe
ch. 4 Madge Scott
ch. 5 Leroy Lovelace
ch. 6 Bernadine B. Morris

Part II The Veterans
ch. 7 Cheryl Thigpen
ch. 8 Ethel Tanner
ch. 9 Etta Joan Marks
ch. 10 Lorraine Lawrence
ch. 11 Edouard Plummer
ch. 12 Millicent Byard Gray
ch. 13 Pamela Otis Ogonu
ch. 14 Lerone Swift
ch. 15 Joelle Vanderall
ch. 16 Louise Mason
ch. 17 Bobbie Duvon
ch. 18 Mabel Bettie Moss

Part III The Novices
ch. 19 Leonard Collins
ch. 20 Ashallah Williams
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Postmodernism, Feminism, and Cultural Politics: Redrawing Educational Boundaries

Book
Giroux, Henry A., ed.
1991
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LC191.4.P67 1991
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction Modernism, Postmodernism, and Feminism: Rethinking the Boundaries of Educational Discourse (Henry A. Giroux)

ch. 1 Reading Images Critically: Toward a Postmodern Pedagogy (Douglas Kellner)
ch. 2 An Ethic of Solidarity and Difference (Sharon Welch)
ch. 3 Presence of Mind in the Absence of Body (Linda Brodkey and Michelle Fine)
ch. 4 Raging Hormones and Powerful Cars: The Construction of Men's Sexuality in School Sex Education and Popular Adolescent Films (Mariamne H. Whatley)
ch. 5 Schooling the Postmodern Body: Critical Pedagogy and the Politics of Enfleshment (Peter L. McLaren)
ch. 6 Women Dancing Back: Disruption and the Politics of Pleasure (Leslie Gotfrit)
ch. 7 The Making of the Boy: Meditations on What Grammar School Did With, To, and For My Body (Philip R. D. Corrigan)
ch. 8 Postmodernism as Border Pedagogy: Redefining the Boundaries of Race and Ethnicity (Henry A. Giroux)

Notes and References
Index
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Multicultural Education, Critical Pedagogy and the Politics of Difference

Book
Sleeter, Christine and Peter L. McLaren, eds.
1995
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LC1099.3.M16 1995
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Here is a comprehensive view of leading theories and practices of multicultural education from scholars of various racial and ethnic groups. The perspectives of those often left out of scholarly debate are well represented in this book. Those perspectives offer significant insights into the ways in which dominant ideologies and classroom practices have functioned to serve only one segment of the American population. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Here is a comprehensive view of leading theories and practices of multicultural education from scholars of various racial and ethnic groups. The perspectives of those often left out of scholarly debate are well represented in this book. Those perspectives offer significant insights into the ways in which dominant ideologies and classroom practices have functioned to serve only one segment of the American population. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction: Exploring Connections to Build a Critical Multiculturalism
ch. 1 White Terror and Oppositional Agency: Towards a Critical Multiculturalism (Peter L. McLaren)
ch. 2 Literacy for Stupidification: The Pedagogy of the Big Lies (Donaldo Macedo)
ch. 3 White Culture and the Politics of Racial Difference: Implications for Multiculturalism (Stephen Haymes)
ch. 4 Critical Multiculturalism and Democratic Schooling: An Interview with Peter L. McLaren and Joe Kincheloe (Shirley R. Steinberg)
ch. 5 Mirror Images on Common Issues: Parallels between Multicultural Education and Critical Pedagogy (Geneva Gay)
ch. 6 From Brown Heroes and Holidays to Assimilationist Agendas: Reconsidering the Critiques of Multicultural Education (Sonia Nieto)
ch. 7 Multicultural, Critical, Feminine, and Constructive Pedagogies Seen through the Lives of Youth: A Call for the Revisioning of These and Beyond: Toward a Pedagogy for the Next Century (John Rivera and Mary Poplin)
ch. 8 The Problem with Origins: Race and the Contrapuntal Nature of the Educational Experience (Cameron McCarthy)
ch. 9 Postmodernism, the "Politically Correct," and Liberatory Pedagogy (Carl Allsup)
ch. 10 Culture as an Ongoing Dialog: Implications for Multicultural Teacher Education (Carmen Montecinos)
ch. 11 Whose Voice Is It Anyway?: Vocalizing Multicultural Analysis (Mary Ritchie)
ch. 12 Buscando America: The Contributions of Critical Latino Educators to the Academic Development and Empowerment of Latino Students in the U.S. (Antonio Darder)
ch. 13 An African-centered Pedagogy in Dialog with Liberatory Multiculturalism (Khaula Murtadha)
ch. 14 Multicultural Education beyond the Classroom (Evelyn Newman Phillips)
ch. 15 Cultural Diversity in Higher Education: An American Indian Perspective (Janine Pease-Windy Boy)
ch. 16 Reflections on My Use of Multicultural and Critical Pedagogy When Students Are White (Christine Sleeter)
Afterword
Notes on Contributors
Index
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Diversity and Motivation: Culturally Responsive Teaching

Book
Wlodkowski, Raymond J. and Margery B. Ginsberg
1995
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC1099.3.W56 1995
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book provides teachers and trainers with sensitive and practical help in working effectively with groups of culturally diverse learners. Raymond J. Wlodkowski and Margery B. Ginsberg combine their respective expertise in motivation and multiculturalism to go beyond the usual rhetoric on promoting diversity, offering real-world guidance and suggestions for successful teaching in today's changing classroom environment. Using a motivational framework for culturally responsive teaching complete with extensive examples and ...
Additional Info:
This book provides teachers and trainers with sensitive and practical help in working effectively with groups of culturally diverse learners. Raymond J. Wlodkowski and Margery B. Ginsberg combine their respective expertise in motivation and multiculturalism to go beyond the usual rhetoric on promoting diversity, offering real-world guidance and suggestions for successful teaching in today's changing classroom environment. Using a motivational framework for culturally responsive teaching complete with extensive examples and illustrations, the authors describe the values, learning strategies, and structures necessary to establish inclusion, develop attitude, enhance meaning, and engender competence. By considering a set of eight guidelines, teachers and trainers can learn how to revise syllabus and assessment formats, form cooperative collegial groups, and create action plans for implementing a culturally responsive pedagogy. Diversity and Motivation shows all postsecondary faculty, instructors, trainers, and administrators how to create safe and respectful learning environments with teaching practices that cross disciplines and cultures to engage the motivation and honor the integrity of all learners. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Authors

ch. 1 Understanding Relationships Between Culture and Motivation to Learn
ch. 2 Establishing Inclusion
ch. 3 Developing Attitude
ch. 4 Enhancing Meaning
ch. 5 Engendering Competence
ch. 6 Implementing a Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

Resource: A. Facilitating Equitable Discussions Within the Multicultural Classroom
Resource: A. Effective Lecturing Within the Multicultural Classroom
Resource: B. Cooperative Lesson Worksheet
Resource: C. Evaluator Assessment
Resource: D. Evaluative Descriptors for Narrative Assessment

References
Name Index
Subject Index
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"Impediments to Teaching a Culturally Diverse Undergraduate Population"

Article
Solomon, Barbara
1990
Teaching Excellence 2, no. 4 (1990)
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

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"Academic Culture: The Hidden Curriculum"

Article
Adams, Maurianne
1991
Teaching Excellence 3, no. 6 (1991)
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Tales Told Out of School: Women's Reflections on Their Undergraduate Experience"

Article
Clinchy, Blythe
1991
Teaching Excellence 3, no. 4 (1991)
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

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Additional Info:
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"Issues of Gender in Teaching and Learning"

Article
Clinchy, Blythe McVicker
1990
Journal on Excellence in College Teaching 1 (1990): 52-67
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
When I ask myself-Does gender matter in college teaching and learning?-I come up with two mutually contradictory answers. One is, I don't know. The other is yes. Because it's hard to frame an argument around two contradictory propositions, I shall tell you a story instead of presenting an argument. In stories, conflicts and contradictions are allowable and even desirable. The story I'd like to tell is about the ways ...
Additional Info:
When I ask myself-Does gender matter in college teaching and learning?-I come up with two mutually contradictory answers. One is, I don't know. The other is yes. Because it's hard to frame an argument around two contradictory propositions, I shall tell you a story instead of presenting an argument. In stories, conflicts and contradictions are allowable and even desirable. The story I'd like to tell is about the ways in which my thinking about gender and teaching and learning has evolved over the years.
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"Reaching African-American Students in the Classroom"

Article
Collett, Jonathan
1990
To Improve the Academy 9 (1990): 177-188
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Acknowledging the Learning Styles of Diverse Student Populations"

Article
Anderson, James A., and Maurianne Adams
1992
in Teaching for Diversity (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1992), 19-33
Topics: Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
In instructional design for higher education, it is important to the success of all students to take into account the differences in individual learning styles. Research indicates that different student populations have characteristically different approaches to learning and that teachers can use patterns of effective practice to foster success across cognitive styles. (Author/MSE)
Additional Info:
In instructional design for higher education, it is important to the success of all students to take into account the differences in individual learning styles. Research indicates that different student populations have characteristically different approaches to learning and that teachers can use patterns of effective practice to foster success across cognitive styles. (Author/MSE)
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"Facilitator's guide for race in the classroom: the multiplicity of experience"

Article
Derek Bok Center
1992
Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 1992)
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Tips for Teachers: Encouraging Students in a Racially Diverse Classroom"

Article
Derek Bok Center
1992
Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 1992)
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Fostering Positive Race, Class, and Gender Dynamics in the Classroom"

Article
Cannon, Lynn Weber
1990
Women's Studies Quarterly 18, no. 1 & 2 (1990): 126-134
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Diversity and Community: Right Objectives and Wrong Arguments"

Article
Wong, Frank F.
1991
Change July/Aug (1991): 48-54
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Discusses the conflicting arguments among cultural diversity advocates with respect to community. Allegorical tale; Arguments among cultural diversity advocates; Relativism and separatism; Highest vs. lowest common denominator; Three ways in which the sense of community can be claimed by the cause of cultural diversity.
Additional Info:
Discusses the conflicting arguments among cultural diversity advocates with respect to community. Allegorical tale; Arguments among cultural diversity advocates; Relativism and separatism; Highest vs. lowest common denominator; Three ways in which the sense of community can be claimed by the cause of cultural diversity.
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The Feminist Teacher Anthology: Pedagogies and Classroom Strategies

Book
Cohee, Gail E., Elisabeth Daumer, Theresa D. Kemp, Paula M. Krebs, Sue Lafky, and Sandra Runzo, eds.
1998
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC197.F478 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Learning Designs   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Each selected essay is introduced by its original author who updates the chapter topic. Drawing on examples from their own experiences, the authors provide practical classroom strategies such as readings and resources, writing assignments, classroom exercises, and guidance for using journals, multimedia workshops, and new technologies. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Each selected essay is introduced by its original author who updates the chapter topic. Drawing on examples from their own experiences, the authors provide practical classroom strategies such as readings and resources, writing assignments, classroom exercises, and guidance for using journals, multimedia workshops, and new technologies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Collectively Speaking

Part I - Encountering the Classroom: Developing Feminist Strategies
ch. 1 The Radicalization of a Teacher (Carla Golden)
ch. 2 My Introduction to "Introduction to Women's Studies:" The Role of the Teacher's Authority in the Feminist Classroom (Frances A. Maher)
ch. 3 Warming Up the Classroom Climate for Women (Sue V. Rosser)
ch. 4 Rewriting the Future: The Feminist Challenge to the Malestream Curriculum (Karen J. Warren)
ch. 5 Resistance to Generalizations in the Classroom (Susanne Bohmer)
ch. 6 The Power of No (Martha E. Thompson)
ch. 7 Reflections on Teaching: "Gender, Race, and Class" (Joy James)
ch. 8 Reshaping the Introductory Women's Studies Course: Dealing Up Front with Anger, Resistance, and Reality (Ardeth Deay, and Judith Stitzel)
ch. 9 Enhancing Feminist Pedagogy. Multimedia Workshops on Women's Experience with the Newspaper and Home (Berenice Fisher)
ch. 10 This Class Meets in Cyberspace: Women's Studies via Distance Education (Ellen Cronan Rose)

Part II - Bringing The World Into The Feminist Classroom
ch. 11 Integrating the Study of Race, Gender, and Class: Some Preliminary Observations (Paula Rothenberg)
ch. 12 Homophobia and Sexism as Popular Values (David Bleich)
ch. 13 Breaking the Silence: Sexual Preference in the Composition Classroom (Allison Berg, Jean Kowaleski, Caroline Le Guin, Ellen Weinauer, and Eric A. Wolfe)
ch. 14 A Discourse on the Care and Handling of Feminist Administrators (Lynette Carpenter)
ch. 15 The Hand and the Hammer: A Brief Critique of the Overhead Projector (Eloise Knowlton)
ch. 16 Lesbian Instructor Comes Out: The Personal Is Pedagogy (Janet Wright)
ch. 17 Would You Rather Be a Goddess or a Cyborg? (Suzanne K. Damarin)
ch. 18 Educating the Living, Remembering the Dead: The Montreal Massacre as Metaphor (Jennifer Scanlon)
ch. 19 Gender, Race, and Radicalism: Teaching the Autobiographies of Native and African American Women Activists (Joy James)

Index
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Wabash tree

Women as Learners: The Significance of Gender in Adult Learning

Book
Hayes, Elisabeth, Daniele D. Flannery, Ann K. Brooks, Elizabeth J. Tisdell, and Jane M. Hugo
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5225.L42H39 2000
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Here, at last, is a volume that explores and analyzes learning as a distinctive experience for women. The authors are all established adult education professionals and recognized authorities on women as adult learners. Together, they examine and compare theimportance of such factors as sense of identity, self-esteem, social world, and power in what and how women learn. Drawing from extensive research and scholarship, as well as from personal stories, they ...
Additional Info:
Here, at last, is a volume that explores and analyzes learning as a distinctive experience for women. The authors are all established adult education professionals and recognized authorities on women as adult learners. Together, they examine and compare theimportance of such factors as sense of identity, self-esteem, social world, and power in what and how women learn. Drawing from extensive research and scholarship, as well as from personal stories, they reveal the numerous ways in which women experience the learning process. They explain, for example, how women often become personally connected to the object and process of learning. They also analyze these different experiences to show education and training professionals how to better design and conduct programs for women. Women as Learners offers specific recommendations to improve all types of formal and informal adult educational programs, including literacy education, counseling and support groups, workplace training, and professional development activities. Concise yet comprehensive, this long-awaited book provides the most current principles for practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Women's Learning: A Kaleidoscope
ch. 2 Contexts of Women's Learning
ch. 3 Women's Self and Learning
ch. 4 Talk, Identity, & Power: Voice and Silence in Women's Learning
ch. 5 Women's Knowing and Learning
ch. 6 Transformative Learning in the Lives of Women, Ann Brooks
ch. 7 Feminist Pedagogy in Three Movements: Stories from the Field, Elizabeth J. Tisdell
ch. 8 Re-Searching for Women's Learning
ch. 9 Re-Vision Learning Opportunities for Women, Jane M. Hugo
ch. 10 Creating Knowledge about Women Learners
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Teaching Asian America: Diversity and the Problem of Community

Book
Hirabayashi, Lane Ryo, ed.
1998
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
E184.06T43 1998
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This innovative volume offers the first sustained examination of the myriad ways Asian American Studies is taught at the university level. Through this lens, this volume illuminates key debates in U.S. society about pedagogy, multiculturalism, diversity, racial and ethnic identities, and communities formed on these bases. Asian American Studies shares critical concerns with other innovative fields that query representation, positionality, voice, and authority in the classroom as well as ...
Additional Info:
This innovative volume offers the first sustained examination of the myriad ways Asian American Studies is taught at the university level. Through this lens, this volume illuminates key debates in U.S. society about pedagogy, multiculturalism, diversity, racial and ethnic identities, and communities formed on these bases. Asian American Studies shares critical concerns with other innovative fields that query representation, positionality, voice, and authority in the classroom as well as in the larger society. Acknowledging these issues, twenty-one distinguished contributors illustrate how disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to Asian American Studies can be utilized to make teaching and learning about diversity more effective. "Teaching Asian America" thus offers new and exciting insights about the state of ethnic studies and about the challenges of pluralism that face us as we move into the twenty-first century. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction (Lane Ryo Hirabayashi)
ch. 2 Queer/Asian American/Canons (David L. Eng)
ch. 3 Teaching Asian American History (Gary Y. Okihiro)
ch. 4 "Just What Do I Think I'm Doing?" Enactments of Identity and Authority in the Asian American Literature Classroom (Patricia A. Sakurai)
ch. 5 The Case for Class: Introduction to the Political Economy of Asian American Communities in the San Francisco Bay Area (Ben Kobashigawa)
ch. 6 Critical Pedagogy in Asian American Studies: Reflections on an Experiment in Teaching (Keith Osajima)
ch. 7 Unity of Theory and Practice: Integrating Feminist Pedagogy Into Asian American Studies (Diane C. Fujino)
ch. 8 Contemporary Asian American Men's Issues (Jachinson W. Chan)
ch. 9 Teaching Against the Grain: Thoughts on Asian American Studies and "Nontraditional" Students (Ji-Song Ku)
ch. 10 Reflections on Diversity and Inclusion: South Asians and Asian American Studies (Madhulika S. Khandelwal)
ch. 11 A Contending Pedagogy: Asian American Studies as Extracurricular Praxis (Laura Hyun Yi Kang)
ch. 12 Reflections on Teaching about Asian American Communities (Timothy P. Fong)
ch. 13 Psychology and the Teaching of Asian American Studies (Ramsay Liem)
ch. 14 Beyond the Missionary Position: Reflections on Teaching Student Activism from the Bottom Up (Eric C. Wat)
ch. 15 Vietnamese American Studies: Notes toward a New Paradigm (Chung Hoang Chuong)
ch. 16 Empowering the Bayanihan Spirit: Teaching Filipina/o American Studies (Emily Porcincula Lawsin)
ch. 17 Building Community Spirit: A Writing Course on the Indian American Experience (Rosane Rocher)
ch. 18 Teaching the Asian American Experience through Film (Jun Xing)
ch. 19 Teaching Asian American Studies in Community Colleges (Susie Ling)
ch. 20 The Politics of Teaching Asian American Literature Amidst Middle-Class, Caucasian Students "East of California" (Sheng-mei Ma)

App.: Resources for Innovation/Excellence in Teaching: A Select, Annotated Bibliography (Malcolm Collier and Lane Ryo Hirabayashi)
Index
About the Contributors
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The Multicultural Campus: Strategies for Transforming Higher Education

Book
Valverde, Leonard A. and Louis A. Castenell Jr., eds.
1998
AltaMira Press, Walnut Creek, CA
LC3727.M83 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The Multicultural Campus brings together administrators, faculty, and students to offer strategies that will alter the academic environment of the future. Hispanic, African, and Asian American educational leaders examine the obstacles they have faced, as minorities, climbing up the predominantly white career ladder in American universities. Firsthand accounts show how change on governance, executive, faculty, and curricula levels will help us better educate all students in our nation's growing pluralistic ...
Additional Info:
The Multicultural Campus brings together administrators, faculty, and students to offer strategies that will alter the academic environment of the future. Hispanic, African, and Asian American educational leaders examine the obstacles they have faced, as minorities, climbing up the predominantly white career ladder in American universities. Firsthand accounts show how change on governance, executive, faculty, and curricula levels will help us better educate all students in our nation's growing pluralistic society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

Part I Introduction and Overview
Introduction: Presenting the Context
ch. 1 Future Strategies and Actions: Creating Multicultural Higher Education Campuses (Leonard A. Valverde)

Part II Administrators' Perspectives
ch. 2 Challenges and Opportunities for Leaders of Color (Chang-Lin Tien)
ch. 3 External Agents Fostering Multiculturalism (Howard L. Simmons)
ch. 4 Race and Ethnicity in Academia (Enrique (Henry) T. Trueba)
ch. 5 Campus Climate and Students of Color (Myrtis H. Powell)

Part III Faculty Perspectives
ch. 6 Career Patterns of People of Color in Academia (Flora Ida Ortiz)
ch. 7 Leading from the Margins in the Ivory Tower (A. Reynaldo Conteras
ch. 8 African American Women Faculty and Administrators: Surviving the Multiple Barriers of Discrimination (Vanessa Allen-Brown

Part IV Student Perspective
ch. 9 An African Student's View of Educational Leadership (Abayomi Adejokun)

About the Authors
Index
Article cover image

"Teaching Theology Students Who Don't Know Aristotle from Aquinas"

Article
McMurtrie, Beth
2000
The Chronicle of Higher Education, Vol 46, Issue 31, April 7, 2000
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Reports on the challenges of United States accredited schools of Christian theology in teaching master's-level students with little or no preparation, either academically or personally. Theological ignorance of many incoming students; Poor undergraduate training; Remediation efforts done by seminaries.
Additional Info:
Reports on the challenges of United States accredited schools of Christian theology in teaching master's-level students with little or no preparation, either academically or personally. Theological ignorance of many incoming students; Poor undergraduate training; Remediation efforts done by seminaries.
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Special Theme Issue: Education and Race

Journal Issue
Teachers College Record
1999
Teachers College Record 100, no. 4, Summer
LC191.2.E3 1999
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 A Movement Against and Beyond Boundaries: Politically Relevant Teaching Among African American Teachers (Tamara Beauboeuf-Lafontant)
ch. 2 How White Teachers Perceive the Problem of Racism in Their Schools: A Case Study in "Liberal" Lakeview (Julie Kailin)
ch. 3 Theorizing Race in the Context of Learning to Teach (Luann M. Duesterberg)
ch. 4 Shifting Identities in Private Education: Reconstructing Race at/in the Cultural Center (Amir Proweller)
ch. 5 Teaching in Tensions: Latino Immigrant Youth, Their Teachers, and the Structures of Schooling (Susan Roberta Katz)
ch. 6 "You Can't Oppress Yourself": Negotiating the Meaning of Opportunity in Post-Apartheid South Africa (Janine Bempechat, and Salie Abrahams)

Essay Review ch. 7 What Is "Racism" in Antiracist Education? (Lawrence Blum)
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"A Model for Student Success: Critical Thinking and 'At Risk' Students" (pdf)

Article
Osborne, Randall E.
2000
The Journal of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 1, no. 1 (2000): 1-7
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
There appears to be a significant gap between faculty expectations for incoming college students and these same students perceptions of their abilities. Incoming college students are not very confident of their critical thinking abilities, yet faculty expect students to enter college already being able to critically evaluate information and to reach conclusions based on a critical analysis of the data. The current study challenges the preconception that critical thinking cannot ...
Additional Info:
There appears to be a significant gap between faculty expectations for incoming college students and these same students perceptions of their abilities. Incoming college students are not very confident of their critical thinking abilities, yet faculty expect students to enter college already being able to critically evaluate information and to reach conclusions based on a critical analysis of the data. The current study challenges the preconception that critical thinking cannot be taught and delineates a model for critical thinking that can be employed regardless of one’s discipline. Outcome data strongly suggests critical thinking can lead to both proximal and distal increases in student success.
Additional Info:
Adult educators are increasingly faced with the task of creating and facilitating learning activities for participants from diverse backgrounds. They need to take into account the needs of both male and female learners, learners of different ethnic and racial groups, and learners from different social backgrounds in creating an inclusive adult learning environment. The developing body of literature on multicultural concerns in adult education, on feminist theory and on critical ...
Additional Info:
Adult educators are increasingly faced with the task of creating and facilitating learning activities for participants from diverse backgrounds. They need to take into account the needs of both male and female learners, learners of different ethnic and racial groups, and learners from different social backgrounds in creating an inclusive adult learning environment. The developing body of literature on multicultural concerns in adult education, on feminist theory and on critical and feminist pedagogies offer some insights in this regard. This publication aims to: (1) synthesise some of the work related to inclusivity and diversity that has already been done in the field of adult education; and (2) examine aspects of the wider literature base on multicultural education and feminist theory and pedagogy that can offer insights specifically for creating inclusive adult learning environments. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Tables
Foreword
Introduction

Part 1 Planning and implementing an inclusive curriculum
Part 2 Pedagogy: Facilitating inclusivity in the learning environment

Epilogue: Implications for practice, summary and conclusions
ReferencesEnvironments: Insights from
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Race, Class, and Gender in the United States

Book
Rothenberg, Paula S.
2001
Worth Publishers, New York, NY
HT1521.R335 2001
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Like its preceding editions, this fourth edition of Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study undertakes a study of race, gender, and sexuality within the context of class. With 28 new readings and 5 revised readings, this edition also contains an entirely new section entitled "'Us' and 'Them': Becoming an American." This section examines the ways in which the concept of "citizen" has been constructed in the United ...
Additional Info:
Like its preceding editions, this fourth edition of Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study undertakes a study of race, gender, and sexuality within the context of class. With 28 new readings and 5 revised readings, this edition also contains an entirely new section entitled "'Us' and 'Them': Becoming an American." This section examines the ways in which the concept of "citizen" has been constructed in the United States over time and studies the role that issues of race, class, and gender have played in determining who is included inand excluded from - this category. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Pt. I The Social Construction of Difference: Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality
Pt. II "Us" and "Them": Becoming an American
Pt. III Understanding Racism, Sexism, and Class Privilege
Pt. IV The Economics of Race, Class, and Gender in the United States
Pt. V Many Voices, Many Lives: Some Consequences of Racial, Gender, and Class Inequality
Pt. VI How it Happened: Race and Gender Issues in U.S. Law
Pt. VII Creating and Maintaining Hierarchies: Stereotypes, Ideology, Language, Violence, and Social Control
Pt. VIII Revisioning the Future

Index
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Knowledge, Difference, and Power: Essays Inspired by Women's Ways of Knowing

Book
Goldberger, Nancy, Jill Tarule, Blythe Clinchy, and Mary Belenky, eds.
1996
Basic Books, New York, NY
Not catalogued
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Ten years ago, Mary Belenky, Blythe Clinchy, Nancy Goldberger, and Jill Tarule wrote Women's Ways of Knowing, a book The New York Times Book Review called "a framework for future research on women, knowledge, and identity." In the decade that followed, their theory of women's psychology, development, and ways of knowing has been applied in several fields, from the social sciences to the humanities, women's studies, education, psychology, and law. ...
Additional Info:
Ten years ago, Mary Belenky, Blythe Clinchy, Nancy Goldberger, and Jill Tarule wrote Women's Ways of Knowing, a book The New York Times Book Review called "a framework for future research on women, knowledge, and identity." In the decade that followed, their theory of women's psychology, development, and ways of knowing has been applied in several fields, from the social sciences to the humanities, women's studies, education, psychology, and law. But even as it was embraced by readers, Women's Ways of Knowing also became the center of a fierce debate within academic circles. Now, in 14 illuminating new essays, the original authors and invited contributors explore how the theory introduced in Women's Ways of Knowing has developed and shifted over the years and how it has been received, applied, used, and abused. The authors, and others, respond to critics of the original theory. The essays also expand the original argument beyond gender and knowing to address the complicating factors of race, class, and culture. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: The Beginning of the Story: Collaboration and Separation
Introduction: Looking Backward, Looking Forward

ch. 1 Reconfiguring Teaching and Knowing in the College Classroom (Ann Stanton)
ch. 2 Women's Ways of "Knowing" Law: Feminist Legal Epistemology, Pedagogy, and Jurisprudence (Carrie Menkel-Meadow)
ch. 3 Embodying Knowledge, Knowing Desire: Authority and Split Subjectivities in Girls' Epistemological Development (Elizabeth Debold, Deborah Tolman, and Lyn Mikel Brown)
ch. 4 Connected Knowing in Constructive Psychotherapy (Michael J. Mahoney)
ch. 5 Women's Ways of Knowing in Women's Studies, Feminist Pedagogies, and Feminist Theory (A. Maher with Mary Kay Tetreault)
ch. 6 Unknown Women and Unknowing Research: Consequences of Color and Class in Feminist Psychology (Vanessa M. Bing and Paela Trotman Reid)
ch. 7 Connected and Separate Knowing: Toward a Marriage of Two Minds (Blythe McVicker Clinchy)
ch. 8 Reason's "Femininity": A Case for Connected Knowing (Sara Ruddick)
ch. 9 Voices in Dialogue: Collaborative Ways of Knowing (Jill Mattuck Tarule)
ch. 10 Speech Is Silver, Silence Is Gold: The Asymmetrical Intersubjectivity of Communicative Action (Patrocinio P. Schweickart)
ch. 11 Cultural Imperatives and Diversity in Ways of Knowing (Nancy Rule Goldberger)
ch. 12 Strategic Suspensions: Feminists of Color Theorize the Production of Knowledge (Ada Hurtado)
ch. 13 Public Homeplaces: Nurturing the Development of People, Families, and Communities (Mary Field Belenky)
ch. 14 Gendered Ways of Knowing and the "Epistemological Crisis" of the West (Sandra Harding)

Contributors
Index
Article cover image

"Social Class and Student Learning"

Article
Rhem, James
1998
The National Teaching and Learning Forum 7, no. 5 (1998): 1-4
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Blue Collar, Crimson Blazer: Recollections of Class on Campus"

Article
Mar, M. Elaine
1995
Harvard Magazine 98, no. 2 (1995): 47-51
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Class in the Classroom"

Article
Warren, Lee
1998
National Teaching & Learning FORUM 7, no. 5 (1998): 1-4
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Outbursts in Academe: Multiculturalism and Other Sources of Conflict

Book
Dixon, Kathleen, ed.
1998
Boynton/Cook Publishers, Portsmouth, NH
LC1099.3.O88 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Outbursts in Academe advances a new theoretical notion in the composition classroom: the concept of "outburst" as a single, researchable moment in the lives of teachers and students. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Outbursts in Academe advances a new theoretical notion in the composition classroom: the concept of "outburst" as a single, researchable moment in the lives of teachers and students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Outbursts: The Theory and a Guide to Reading (K. Dixon & W. Archibald)

ch. 1 Immodest Proposals Cyborg Bodies: Race, Class, Gender, and Communications Technology (C. Winkelmann)
ch. 2 Macho in the Killing Zone or How to Survive Multicultural Reality (B. Davis)
ch. 3 Responses: Whose Icon? (J. Degan)
ch. 4 Beyond Stereotypes: Las Latinas Caught Between Linguas y Culturas (A. Perez)
ch. 5 Inter-view One: Reading Conflict in English Studies (K. Dixon)
ch. 6 Classroom Conflicts
ch. 7 Revisiting White Feminist Authority or Gang Life in the University Classroom (K. Dixon)
ch. 8 Essays That Never Were: Deaf Identity and Resistance in the Mainstream Classroom (J. Anderson)
ch. 9 A Captivity Narrative: Indians, Mixedbloods, and the "White" Academy (S. Lyons)
ch. 10 Responses: "Mixedblood" Rhetorics and the Concept of "Outbursts"(P. Bizzell)
ch. 11 Beyond Liberal and Cultural Approaches to Social Justice (E. Flynn)
ch. 12 Formations of "Multicultural" Selves and Institutions
ch. 13 Inter-view Two: Lost Outbursts (K. Dixon)
ch. 14 Super-Mammy or Super-Sellout? Young, Black, and Female in the Academy (D. Paul)
ch. 15 "Lost and Melted in the Pot": Multicultural Literacy in Predominantly White Classrooms (D. Starke-Meyerring)
ch. 16 Response: Dangerous Critique: Academic Freedom and Institutional Constraint (S. Dilks)
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching from a Multicultural Perspective

Book
Roberts, Helen, Juan C. Gonzales, Olita D. Harris, Delores J. Huff, Ann M. Johns, Ray Lou, Otis L. Scott
1994
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA
LC1099.3.T435 1994
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The authors of this volume, all experienced teachers and administrators, outline how to teach in a multicultural environment. They suggest classroom strategies, curriculum reforms and assessment tools that work for all students. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The authors of this volume, all experienced teachers and administrators, outline how to teach in a multicultural environment. They suggest classroom strategies, curriculum reforms and assessment tools that work for all students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Once You Accept, Then You Can Teach (Juan C. Gonzalez)
ch. 2 Diversity and Change on Campus (Helen R. Roberts)
ch. 3 Teaching All Students Equally (Ray Lou)
ch. 4 Including Multicultural Content and Perspectives in Your Courses (Otis Scott)
ch. 5 Languages and Cultures in the Classroom (Ann Johns)
ch. 6 Equity in Classroom Assessment (Olita Harris)
ch. 7 On Becoming a Mensch or a Mentor (Delores Huff)

Appendix: A Student Profile Questionnaire
About the Authors
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Providing Culturally Relevant Adult Education: A Challenge for the Twenty-First Century

Book
Guy, Talmadge C., ed.
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5219.P75 1999
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education offers an examination of theoretical and practical issues in providing adult education services to socially, politically, and culturally marginalized groups in the United States, with a particular focus on learner culture from the perspective of authors who share that cultural background." "Culturally relevant adult education focuses on popular culture, that is, learner culture and the cultural context of adult education ...
Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education offers an examination of theoretical and practical issues in providing adult education services to socially, politically, and culturally marginalized groups in the United States, with a particular focus on learner culture from the perspective of authors who share that cultural background." "Culturally relevant adult education focuses on popular culture, that is, learner culture and the cultural context of adult education programs. The contributors to this volume present and discuss various issues, models, and practices that marginalized learners can use to take control of their learning and their lives. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes

ch. 1 Culture as Context for Education: The Need for Culturally Relevant Adult Education (Talmadge C. Guy)
ch. 2 Adult Learning: Moving Toward More Inclusive Theories and Practices (Donna D. Amstutz)
ch. 3 Giving Voice: Inclusion of African American Students' Polyrhythmic Realities in Adult Basic Education (Vanessa Sheared)
ch. 4 The Quest for Visibility in adult Education: The Hispanic Experience (Jorge Jeria)
ch. 5 Navajo Language and Culture in Adult Education (Louise Lockard)
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The Close: A Young Woman's First Year at Seminary

Book
Breyer, Chloe
2000
Basic Books, New York, NY
BV4070.G48B74 2000
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
An intimate and inspiring chronicle of a young woman entering a vocation that for centuries has been the exclusive dominion of menSet in the context of the Church Year, The Close is an enthralling account of one young woman's spiritual journey. It is both a personal meditation on faith, in the spirit of Kathleen Norris's Cloister Walk, and a fascinating behind-the-scenes story of a graduate student's first year, in the ...
Additional Info:
An intimate and inspiring chronicle of a young woman entering a vocation that for centuries has been the exclusive dominion of menSet in the context of the Church Year, The Close is an enthralling account of one young woman's spiritual journey. It is both a personal meditation on faith, in the spirit of Kathleen Norris's Cloister Walk, and a fascinating behind-the-scenes story of a graduate student's first year, in the mode of Scott Turow's One L. Raised in a liberal, interfaith home, Breyer, responding to an inner call to a spiritual vocation, began her training at New York's General Theological Seminary in 1997. She describes her intense immersion in daily prayer, the rigors and rewards of the academic program, and the challenging tension between secular and spiritual that marks her training, including working as a chaplain at Bellevue Hospital. She probes the day-to-day meanings of such profound issues as exaltation, enlightenment, and redemption, illuminating the unique experience of a young person of faith preparing to live and hoping to thrive in a secular modern world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Coming into the Kingdom

ch. 1 Advent
ch. 2 Christmas
ch. 3 Epiphany
ch. 4 Lent
ch. 5 Easter
ch. 6 Pentecost

Acknowledgments
Book cover image

Shattering the Silence

Book
Nelson, Stanley and Gail Pellett
1997
California Newsreel, San Francisco
VIDEO LB2331.72 .S5 1997 [VHS]
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Teacher Thinking in Cultural Contexts

Book
Rios, Francisco A., ed.
1996
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LB1033.T26 1996
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Francisco Rio's book sheds light on current scholarship around teacher thinking in cultural contexts and identifies promising practices that take into account context specific influences. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Francisco Rio's book sheds light on current scholarship around teacher thinking in cultural contexts and identifies promising practices that take into account context specific influences. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Teacher Thinking in Urban Schools: The Need for a Contextualized Research Agenda (Alfredo J. Artiles)
ch. 2 Teachers', Administrators', and Staff's Implicit Thinking about "At-Risk" Urban High School Latino Students (Martha Montero-Sieburth)
ch. 3 Teacher Thinking and Perceptions of African-American Male Achievement in the Classroom (Clara A. New)
ch. 4 Resistance and Rethinking: White Student Teachers in Predominately African-American Schools (Maureen D. Gillette)
ch. 5 Teachers' Principles of Practice for Teaching in Multicultural Classrooms (Francisco A. Ríos)
ch. 6 Teaching Writing in a Multicultural Classroom: Students and Teacher as Storytellers (Dawn Abt-Perkins)
ch. 7 Tacit Messages: Teachers' Cultural Models of the Classroom (Mary Lynn Hamilton)
ch. 8 Teachers' Choices for Infusing Multicultural Content: Assimilating Multicultural Practices into Schemata for Instruction in the Content Area (Carmen Montecinos, and Deborah L. Tidwell)
ch. 9 Teaching Concerns Revisited: The Multicultural Dimension (Patricia L. Marshall)
ch. 10 Using a Constructivist Approach to Challenge Preservice Teachers' Thinking about Diversity in Education (Teresita E. Aguilar Cathy A. Pohan)
ch. 11 Learning to Teach in Cross-Cultural Settings: The Significance of Trusting Relations (Linda Valli)
ch. 12 Coalition Building as a Means for Changing Teachers' Cultural Knowledge about Multicultural Education (Marilynne Boyle-Baise Judith Washburn)

Conclusion: New Directions in Teacher Thinking: Linking Theory to Practice
Notes
References
Index
Article cover image

"Common Instructional Problems in the Multicultural Classroom"

Article
Jenkins, Carol A., and Deborah L. Bainer
1991
Journal on Excellence in College Teaching 2 (1991): 77-88
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Since the arrival of significant numbers of diverse minority students at predominantly Anglo institutions of higher learning, educators have been concerned about the academic performance of these students. We recognize that equitable treatment of all students is our responsibility, but we may not know which attitudes, behaviors expectations, or teaching strategies might be misunderstood by minority students and have a negative effect on learning
Additional Info:
Since the arrival of significant numbers of diverse minority students at predominantly Anglo institutions of higher learning, educators have been concerned about the academic performance of these students. We recognize that equitable treatment of all students is our responsibility, but we may not know which attitudes, behaviors expectations, or teaching strategies might be misunderstood by minority students and have a negative effect on learning
Cover image

Multicultural Education: Issues and Perspectives

Book
Banks, James A. and Cherry A. Mcgee Banks, eds.
1989
Allyn & Bacon, Boston, MA
LC1099.3.M85 1989
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This handy reference is designed to help present and future educators acquire the concepts, paradigms, and explanations needed to become effective practitioners in culturally, racially, and language diverse classrooms and schools. The Fourth Edition reflects current and emerging research, concepts, and debates about the education of students from both genders and from different cultural, racial, ethnic, and language groups. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This handy reference is designed to help present and future educators acquire the concepts, paradigms, and explanations needed to become effective practitioners in culturally, racially, and language diverse classrooms and schools. The Fourth Edition reflects current and emerging research, concepts, and debates about the education of students from both genders and from different cultural, racial, ethnic, and language groups. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Issues and Concepts
ch. 1 Multicultural Education: Characteristics and Goals / James A. Banks)
The Nature of Multicultural Education
Multicultural Education: An International Reform Movement
The Historical Development of Multicultural Education
How Multicultural Education Developed
Multicultural Education and Tension among Diverse Groups
The Nature of Culture in the United States
The Social Construction of Categories
The Dimensions of Multicultural Education

ch. 2 Culture in Society and in Educational Practices (Frederick Erickson)
Culture: An Overview
Alternative Definitions and Conceptions of Culture
Cultural Issues in Education and Society
Teaching and Learning Multiculturally
Conclusion: On Diversity of Tongues and Their Educational Potential

ch. 3 Race, Class, Gender, and Disability in the Classroom (Carl A. Grant, Christine E. Sleeter)
Race, Class, Gender, Language, Disability, and Classroom Life
Approaches to Multicultural Education
Ms. Julie Wilson and Her Approach To Teaching
Social Class and Religion

ch. 4 Inner Cities, Affluent Suburbs, and Unequal Educational Opportunity (Jean Anyon)
Differences between Affluent Suburban and Inner-City-Schooling
Consequences of These Differences
What Teachers Can Do
To Make a Difference

ch. 5 Religious Diversity and Education (James K. Uphoff)
Definitions of Religion
Religious Diversity in the United States
Educational Implications
Gender
Gender Bias: From Colonial America to Today's Classrooms (David Sadker, Myra Sadker)
Article cover image

"Cognitive Styles and Multicultural Populations"

Article
Anderson, James A.
1988
Journal of Teacher Education 39, no. 1 (1988): 2-9.
Topics: Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Social scientists generally agree that different cultures have different cognitive styles. New educational models which operate within a multicultural framework are necessary. As a result, traditional approaches to training educators must be adjusted if minority groups are to enter teacher education programs.
Additional Info:
Social scientists generally agree that different cultures have different cognitive styles. New educational models which operate within a multicultural framework are necessary. As a result, traditional approaches to training educators must be adjusted if minority groups are to enter teacher education programs.
Article cover image

"The Chilly Climate: Subtle Ways in Which Women are Often Treated Differently at Work and in Classrooms"

Article
Sandler, Bernice R.
1999
About Women on Campus 8, no 3 (1999)
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

"Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?" And Other Conversations About Race

Book
Tatum, Beverly Daniel
1997
Basic Books, New York, NY
E185.625.T38 1999
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
In 'Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?' And Other Conversations About Race, Dr. Tatum provides us with a new way of thinking and talking about race through the lens of racial identity. She explains that all of us have a racial identity and must strive to affirm it. For people of color, the development of a constructive racial identity requires being able to recognize ...
Additional Info:
In 'Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?' And Other Conversations About Race, Dr. Tatum provides us with a new way of thinking and talking about race through the lens of racial identity. She explains that all of us have a racial identity and must strive to affirm it. For people of color, the development of a constructive racial identity requires being able to recognize and reject the bombardment of negative stereotypes and to embrace a history of resistance and empowerment rather than passive victimization. For Whites, the challenge is to engage in a process of racial identity development which leads to an awareness of White privilege and a determination to actively work against injustice - and this requires the strength to reject a system that rewards them, and to reclaim the legacy of White allies. For many, this is uncharted territory. This book provides a road map for those who want to make the journey and better understand the racial dynamics of their daily lives. Tatum extends her ideas about racial identity development beyond the usual Black-White paradigm to embrace the unique circumstances of Latinos, American Indians, Asians, as well as biracial youth. Also included is a list of resources for further reading as well as a list of books for parents and teachers to recommend to children of all ages. Using real-life examples and the latest research, Tatum presents strong evidence that straight talk about our racial identities - whatever they may be - is essential if we are serious about facilitating communication across racial and ethnic divides. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Defining Racism
ch. 2 The Complexity of Identity
ch. 3 The Early Years
ch. 4 Identity Development in Adolescence
ch. 5 Racial Identity in Adulthood
ch. 6 The Development of White Identity
ch. 7 White Identity and Affirmative Action
ch. 8 Critical Issues in Latino, American Indian, and Asian Pacific American Identity Development
ch. 9 Identity Development in Multiracial Families
ch. 10 Embracing a Cross-Racial Dialogue 193 App.: Getting Started: A Resource Guide

Notes
Bibliography
Acknowledgments
Index
Cover image

The Third Shift: Women Learning Online

Book
Kramarae, Cheris
2001
AAUW Educational Foundation, Washington, DC
LC5805.K715 2001
Topics: Online Learning   |   Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
A report by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) Educational Foundation has found that distance — or online — learning is on the rise and women make up the majority of students. Sixty percent of these nontraditional online learners are over 25 years of age and female.
Working mothers interested in furthering their education are doing so online and adding a difficult "third shift" to their responsibilities as mothers and employees, ...
Additional Info:
A report by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) Educational Foundation has found that distance — or online — learning is on the rise and women make up the majority of students. Sixty percent of these nontraditional online learners are over 25 years of age and female.
Working mothers interested in furthering their education are doing so online and adding a difficult "third shift" to their responsibilities as mothers and employees, according to the study, by Cheris Kramarae, the AAUW Educational Foundation's 1999-2000 Scholar-in-Residence.
The report examines the benefits as well as discouraging factors women experience with online learning and concludes with several recommendations to help women with their third shift. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

Part 1: Introduction
Part 2: Why Do Women Go Online? Educational Plans, Preferences
Part 3: The Digital Divide: Gaps and Bridges
Part 4: Look Who’s Talking: Gender Identity and Culture Online
Part 5: Conclusions and Recommendations

Appendices
Methodology
About the Researcher
Bibliography
Article cover image

"Resource Notebook on Culturally Relevant and Responsive Learning Styles/Pedagogy"

Article
Compiled by Joan Martin and Barbara Weaver for the 2002 African American Workshop
Handout.
Topics: Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Teaching Working Class

Book
Linkon, Sherry Lee, ed.
1999
University of Massachusetts Press, Amherst, MA
LC5051.L494 1999
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Since the 1970s, working-class individuals have made up an increasing proportion of students enrolled in institutions of higher education. At the same time, working-class studies has emerged as a new academic discipline, updating a long tradition of scholarship on labor history and proletarian literature to include discussions of working-class culture, intersections of class with race and ethnicity, and studies of the representation of the working class in popular culture. These ...
Additional Info:
Since the 1970s, working-class individuals have made up an increasing proportion of students enrolled in institutions of higher education. At the same time, working-class studies has emerged as a new academic discipline, updating a long tradition of scholarship on labor history and proletarian literature to include discussions of working-class culture, intersections of class with race and ethnicity, and studies of the representation of the working class in popular culture. These developments have generated new ideas about teaching that incorporate both a sensitivity to the working-class roots of many students and the inclusion of course content informed by an awareness of class culture. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Teaching Working Class(Sherry Lee Linkon )
Writing the Personal: Narrative, Social Class, and Feminist Pedagogy (Ann E. Green )
Border Crossings: Working-Class Encounters in Higher Education (Richard A. Greenwald, and Elizabeth A. Grant)
Reversals of Fortune: Downward Mobility and the Writing of Nontraditional Students (Anne Aronson)
The (Dis)location of Culture: On the Way to Literacy (Joanna Brooks, Fern Cayetano)
Between Dirty Dishes and Polished Discourse: How Working-Class Moms Construct Student Identities (Eileen Ferretti)
The Shape of the form: Working-Class Students and the Academic Essay (Linda Adler-Kassner)
What Kinds of Tools? Teaching Critical Analysis and Writing to Working-Class Students (Joseph Heathcott )
"Just American"? Reversing Ethnic and Class Assimilation in the Academy (Caroline Pari)
To Know, to Remember, to Realize: Illinois Labor Works - A History Workers Can Use (Robert Bruno, and Lisa Jordan)
Striking Close to Home: Students Confront the 1985 Hormel Strike (Colette Hyman)
Critical Literacy and the Organizing Model of Unionism: Reading and Writing History at a Steelworkers' Union Hall (Kelly Belanger, Linda Strom, John Russo)
Telling Toil: Issues in Teaching Labor Literature (Laura Hapke)
Films of and for a Working-Class World (Tom Zaniello)
Teaching Working-Class Literature to Mixed Audiences (Renny Christopher)
Class, Race, and Culture: Teaching Intercultural Communication (Anthony Esposito )
Immigrant Fiction, Working-and Middle-Class White Students, and Multicultural Empathy: A Pedagogical Balancing Act (Charles Johanningsmeier0
Teaching the Convergence of Race and Class in Introductory Asian American Studies (John Streamas )
Difficult Dialogues: Working-Class Studies in a Multicultural Literature Classroom (Terry Easton, Jennifer Lutzenberger)
Notes
Contributors
Index
Cover image

Educating Culturally Responsive Teachers

Book
Villegas, Ana Maria and Tamara Lucas
2002
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LC1099.3.V55 2002
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Offering a conceptual framework and practical strategies for teacher preparation in schools with increasingly diverse racial and ethnic student populations, this book presents a coherent approach to educating culturally responsive teachers. The authors focus on the importance of recruiting and preparing a diverse teaching force, as they propose a vision for restructuring the teacher education curriculum, reconceiving the pedagogy used to prepare prospective teachers, and transforming the institutional context in ...
Additional Info:
Offering a conceptual framework and practical strategies for teacher preparation in schools with increasingly diverse racial and ethnic student populations, this book presents a coherent approach to educating culturally responsive teachers. The authors focus on the importance of recruiting and preparing a diverse teaching force, as they propose a vision for restructuring the teacher education curriculum, reconceiving the pedagogy used to prepare prospective teachers, and transforming the institutional context in order to support the curricular and pedagogical changes they recommend. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 The Shifting Demographic Landscape
ch. 2 Developing Fundamental Orientations for Teaching a Changing Student Population
ch. 3 Fostering Culturally Responsive Teaching
ch. 4 Modeling the Practice of Culturally Responsive Teaching
ch. 5 The Institutional Context Needed to Educate Culturally Resposive

Teachers
Conclusion
Notes
References
Index
Cover image

How Minority Students Experience College: Implications for Planning and Policy

Book
Watson, Lemuel W.
2002
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC3727.H66 2002
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Have three decades of integration and multicultural initiatives in higher education delivered a better education to all students? Are majority and minority students reaping similar benefits, specifically in predominantly white colleges? Do we know what a multicultural campus should look like, and how to design one that is welcoming to all students and promotes a learning environment?

Through a unique qualitative study involving seven colleges and universities considered ...
Additional Info:
Have three decades of integration and multicultural initiatives in higher education delivered a better education to all students? Are majority and minority students reaping similar benefits, specifically in predominantly white colleges? Do we know what a multicultural campus should look like, and how to design one that is welcoming to all students and promotes a learning environment?

Through a unique qualitative study involving seven colleges and universities considered national models of commitment to diversity, this book presents the views and voices of minority students on what has been achieved and what remains to be done.

The direct quotations that form the core of this book give voice to Black, Hispanic, Asian, Native American and bi-racial students. They offer in their own words their perceptions of their campus cultures and practices, the tensions they encounter and what works for them.

Rather than elaborating or recommending specific models or solutions, this book aims to provide insights that will enable the reader better to understand and articulate the issues that need to be addressed to achieve a well-adapted multicultural campus.

Presidents, academic affairs professionals, student affairs personnel and faculty concerned with equity and diversity will find this book helpful and enlightening. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Authors
Introduction

ch. 1 Defining Multiculturalism
ch. 2 Institutional Characteristics and Profiles
ch. 3 Research Methods and Procedures for Inquiry
ch. 4 Reality of Campus Culture
ch. 5 The Lack of Multiculturalism and How It Affects Students
ch. 6 Coping: Involvement, Identity, and Educational Outcomes
ch. 7 Discussions, Conclusions, and Suggestions

App. A General Assurances
App. B Consent Form
App. C Demographic Form
App. D Facilitator Form
App. E Interview Protocol
App. F Content Areas

References
Index
Cover image

Critical Minds and Discerning Hearts: A Spirituality of Multicultural Teaching

Book
Talvacchia, Kathleen
2003
Chalice Press, St. Louis, MO
LC1099.T35 2003
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book goes beyond the "how-to's" of teaching to offer a pedagogy founded in spirituality, providing teachers with the elements necessary to create a truly multicultural classroom. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book goes beyond the "how-to's" of teaching to offer a pedagogy founded in spirituality, providing teachers with the elements necessary to create a truly multicultural classroom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Teaching in a Diverse World

ch. 1 Perceptive Attentiveness: Forming Critical Minds and Discerning Hearts
ch. 2 Listening and Understanding
ch. 3 Seeing Clearly
ch. 4 Acting Differently
ch. 5 Staying Faithful

Conclusion: Critical Minds, Discerning Hearts, and the Hospitable Classroom Notes
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Teaching Cross-Culturally: An Incarnation Model for Learning and Teaching

Book
Lingenfelter, Judith E.
2003
Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI
LB45.L53 2003
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
How can Christian educators teach effectively in different cultures? Here are winning principles drawn from educational theory and personal experience. How can Christian educators teach effectively within a culture not their own? In what sense is teaching part of the Great Commission? These questions are being asked more and more often in our increasingly global community. In the opening chapter of Teaching Cross-Culturally, Judith Lingenfelter recounts two contrasting teaching experiences ...
Additional Info:
How can Christian educators teach effectively in different cultures? Here are winning principles drawn from educational theory and personal experience. How can Christian educators teach effectively within a culture not their own? In what sense is teaching part of the Great Commission? These questions are being asked more and more often in our increasingly global community. In the opening chapter of Teaching Cross-Culturally, Judith Lingenfelter recounts two contrasting teaching experiences she had early in her career.

First, she taught junior high students in a rough urban setting near Pittsburgh. Next, she taught elementary students at a school on the small island of Yap in the western Pacific. Both experiences, she discovered, were examples of cross-cultural teaching. Teaching Cross-Culturally is designed to complement Sherwood Lingenfelter's highly successful Ministering Cross-Culturally. It takes similar insights and applies them specifically to an educational setting. It also guides readers with little understanding of cross-cultural challenges in ministry and helps them see how cultural sensitivity and effective teaching are inseparably linked. Chapters include discussions about how to uncover cultural biases, how to address intelligence and learning styles, and teaching for biblical transformation. Teaching Cross-Culturally is ideal for the western-trained educator who plans to work in a non-western setting. Missionaries, "tentmakers, " and those who teach in an increasingly multicultural North America will find this book helpful. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Teaching Cross-Culturally
The Hidden Curriculum
Understanding Traditional Learning Strategies
Formal Schooling and Traditional Learning
Intelligence and Learning Styles
The Role of the Teacher
Teaching for Change
False Expectations
Learning to Teach Cross-Culturally
References
Index
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Beyond Affirmative Action: Reframing the Context of Higher Education

Book
Ibarra, Robert A.
2001
University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, WI
LC191.9.I23 2001
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
A century ago, universities were primarily in the business of molding upper-class young men for the professions. The world has changed, and universities have been forced to keep pace by experimenting with affirmative action, curriculum overhauls, part-time degree programs, and the like. But at the core of the modern university establishment is an ingrained academic culture that has operated in the same ways for centuries, contends Robert Ibarra, and in ...
Additional Info:
A century ago, universities were primarily in the business of molding upper-class young men for the professions. The world has changed, and universities have been forced to keep pace by experimenting with affirmative action, curriculum overhauls, part-time degree programs, and the like. But at the core of the modern university establishment is an ingrained academic culture that has operated in the same ways for centuries, contends Robert Ibarra, and in Beyond Affirmative Action, he calls for a complete paradigm shift.

Why does academic culture, he asks, emphasize individual achievement over teamwork? Why do so many exams test discrete bits of knowledge rather than understanding of the big picture? Why is tenure awarded for scholarly publications rather than for sharing knowledge in diverse ways with students and a wider community? Why do undergraduates drop out? And why do so many bright graduate students and junior faculty—including many minorities, women, and some majority males—become disenchanted with academia or fail to be accepted and rewarded by the tenured faculty?

Ibarra introduces a theory of "multicontextuality," which proposes that many people learn better when teachers emphasize whole systems of knowledge and that education can create its greatest successes by offering and accepting many approaches to teaching and learning. This revolutionary paradigm also addresses why current thinking about academic systems and organizational culture, affirmative action, and diversity must be revised. Ibarra bases his groundbreaking proposals upon his own synthesis of findings from anthropological, educational, and psychological studies of how people from variouscultures learn, as well as findings from extended interviews he conducted with Latinos and Latinas who pursued graduate degrees and then either became university faculty or chose other careers. From his perspectives as a practicing anthropologist, teacher, researcher, and administrator, Ibarra provides a blueprint for change that will interest:
* Administrators developing campus strategic plans
* Boards, commissions, and agencies making policy for educational institutions
* Students and faculty struggling to find ways that academia can serve multiple constituencies
* Academic and career advisors to students
* Researchers in cognitive psychology, sociology, anthropology, education, and ethnic studies
* Businesses rethinking their organizational cultures and strategies
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Tables
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Pt. I Reframing the Context of Higher Education
ch. 1 Critical Junctures for Change
ch. 2 The Latino Study: Reconceptualizing Culture and Changing the Dynamics of Ethnicity
ch. 3 Multicontextuality: A Hidden Dimension in Higher Education
Pt. II Latinas and Latinos in Graduate Education and Beyond
ch. 4 The Graduate School Experience: Ethnicity in Transformation
ch. 5 "They Really Forget Who They Are": Latinos and Academic Organizational Culture
ch. 6 Latinos and Latinas Encountering the Professoriate
Pt. III The Engagement of Cultural in Academia
ch. 7 Teaching, Testing, and Measuring Intelligence: Uncovering the Evidence That Cultural Context Is Important
ch. 8 Reframing the Cultural Context of the Academy: A New Infrastructure for Teaching, Learning, and Institutional Change
App. 1 Institutions Attended by Interviewees
App. 2 Graduate Enrollment, 1986-1996
App. 3 Latino Faculty Issues
Notes
References
Index
Article cover image

"Approaching Diversity: Some Classroom Strategies for Learning Communities"

Article
Koolsbergen, William
2013
Peer Review Vol. 4, No. 1, Summer/Fall
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Using the example of LaGuardia Community College in Long Island, New York, discusses how to use learning communities to promote inclusion and reflective examination on a range of diversity issues. Offers ground rules for class discussion of diversity and other classroom activities for fostering meaningful dialogue.
Additional Info:
Using the example of LaGuardia Community College in Long Island, New York, discusses how to use learning communities to promote inclusion and reflective examination on a range of diversity issues. Offers ground rules for class discussion of diversity and other classroom activities for fostering meaningful dialogue.
Article cover image

"Center to Margin: Dynamics in a Global Classroom"

Article
De Danaan, Llyn
1990
Women's Studies Quarterly 18, no. 1 & 2 (1990): 135-144
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Perceptions of Faculty Behavior by Students of Color" (pdf)

Article
Chesler, Mark A.
1997
CRLT Occasional Papers No. 7, The Center for Research on Learning and Teaching, University of Michigan (1997): 1-8
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Provides the results of 15 focus groups of students of color on student perceptions of faculty. Gives suggestions for addressing student concerns: Broaden course content; “manage” diversity; “manage” selves; and deal with institutional context surrounding the classroom
Additional Info:
Provides the results of 15 focus groups of students of color on student perceptions of faculty. Gives suggestions for addressing student concerns: Broaden course content; “manage” diversity; “manage” selves; and deal with institutional context surrounding the classroom
Additional Info:
An overview of the research on “universal design,” which aims to design instruction to maximize the learning of students from a wide variety of ethnic and racial backgrounds, English language skills, learning styles, and disabilities.
Additional Info:
An overview of the research on “universal design,” which aims to design instruction to maximize the learning of students from a wide variety of ethnic and racial backgrounds, English language skills, learning styles, and disabilities.
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Making a Difference: University Students of Color Speak Out

Book
Lesage, Julia, Abby L. Ferber, Debbie Storrs, Donna Wong, eds.
2002
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LC3727.M35 2002
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
In Making a Difference, students of color relate their first-hand experiences with educational systems and campus living conditions. Their narratives provide an insider perspective useful to anyone working on diversity issues who is trying to improve institutional culture and policy. The contextualizing essays following the student narratives are written by academics and student affairs professionals who draw links between issues of institutional access, recruitment and retention of students and faculty ...
Additional Info:
In Making a Difference, students of color relate their first-hand experiences with educational systems and campus living conditions. Their narratives provide an insider perspective useful to anyone working on diversity issues who is trying to improve institutional culture and policy. The contextualizing essays following the student narratives are written by academics and student affairs professionals who draw links between issues of institutional access, recruitment and retention of students and faculty of color, curriculum changes, teaching strategies--especially for teaching whiteness and racial identity formation, campus climate, and the relation between an individual institution's history of dealing with race to developments in public policy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: Genesis of This Project (Julia Lesage)
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Conceptualizing Diversity (Julia Lesage)

Part I University Students of Color in Their Own Voices
ch. 1 School, Language, and Identity
ch. 2 Hopes and Coalitions and the Realities of Campus Life
ch. 3 Reframing the Educational Process and the Community as a Whole

Part II Race and Ethnic Relations in Higher Education
ch. 4 The Tellers, the Tales, and the Audience: Narratives by Students of Color (Debbie Storrs and Julia Lesage)
ch. 5 Diversity in Higher Education Nationwide (Donna Wong)
ch. 6 A Historical Look at Students of Color at the University of Oregon (Donna Wong)
ch. 7 Hate Crimes, White Backlash, and Teaching about Whiteness (Abby L. Ferber)

Conclusion: This Is Only the Beginning (Abby L. Ferber and Donna Wang)
App A Checklist Method of Evaluating Diversity in Your Institution
Resources
About the Authors
Index
Article cover image

"African American Men and the Academy"

Article
Green, Paul
2000
in Brothers of the Academy: Up and Coming Black Scholars Earning Our Way in Higher Education (Sterling VA: Stylus Publishing, 2000), 1-20
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"The Miseducation of the Negro Revisited: African American Racial Identity, Historically Black Institutions, and Historically White Institutions"

Article
Marks, Bryant T.
2000
in Brothers of the Academy: Up and Coming Black Scholars Earning Our Way in Higher Education (Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing, 2000), 53-69
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"What A Course Will Look Like After Multicultural Change"

Article
Kitano, Margie K.
in Multicultural Course ransformation in Higher Education: A Broader Truth (Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon, 1997), 18-34
Topics: Course Design   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Diversity Challenged: Evidence on the Impact of Affirmative Action

Book
Orfield, Gary, ed.
2001
Harvard Education Pub. Group, Cambridge, MA
LC3727.D54
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
In the courts and in referenda campaigns, affirmative action in college admissions is under full-scale attack. Though it was designed to help resolve a variety of serious racial problems, affirmative action's survival may turn on just one question--whether or not the educational value of diversity is sufficiently compelling to justify consideration of race as a factor in deciding whom to admit to colleges and universities. Diversity Challenged is designed to ...
Additional Info:
In the courts and in referenda campaigns, affirmative action in college admissions is under full-scale attack. Though it was designed to help resolve a variety of serious racial problems, affirmative action's survival may turn on just one question--whether or not the educational value of diversity is sufficiently compelling to justify consideration of race as a factor in deciding whom to admit to colleges and universities. Diversity Challenged is designed to address that question.

This book explores what is known about how increasing minority enrollment changes and enriches the educational process. In chapter after chapter, researchers and policymakers discuss substantial developing evidence showing that diversity of students can and usually does produce a broader educational experience, both in traditional learning and in preparing for jobs, professions, and effective citizenship in a multiracial democracy. The evidence also suggests that such benefits can be significantly increased by appropriate leadership and support on campus. Diversity may be challenged on college campuses today, but the research and evidence in this book shows how diversity works. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Student Diversity and Higher Learning (Neil L. Rudenstine)
ch. 2 A Policy Framework for Reconceptualizing the Legal Debate Concerning Affirmative Action in Higher Education (Scott R. Palmer)
ch. 3 Diversity and Affirmative Action: Evolving Principles and Continuing Legal Battles (Scott R. Palmer)
ch. 4 Maximizing the Benefits of Student Diversity: Lessons from School Desegregation Research (Janet Ward Schofield)
ch. 5 Is Diversity a Compelling Educational Interest?: Evidence from Louisville (Michal Kurlaender and John T. Yun)
ch. 6 Diversity and Legal Education: Student Experiences in Leading Law Schools (Gary Orfield and Dean Whitla)
ch. 7 The Positive Educational Effects of Racial Diversity on Campus (Mitchell J. Chang)
ch. 8 Linking Diversity and Educational Purpose: How Diversity Affects the Classroom Environment and Student Development (Sylvia Hurtado)
ch. 9 The Impact of Affirmative Action on Medical Education and the Nation's Health (Timothy Ready)
ch. 10 Racial Differences in the Effects of College Quality and Student Body Diversity on Wages (Kermit Daniel, Dan A. Black, and Jeffrey Smith)
ch. 11 Increasing Diversity Benefits: How Campus Climate and Teaching Methods Affect Student Outcomes (Jeffrey F. Milem)
ch. 12 Faculty Experience with Diversity: A Case Study of Macalester College (Roxane Harvey Gudeman)
ch. 13 Reflections on Affirmative Action: Its Origins, Virtues, Enemies, Champions, and Prospects (Paul M. Gaston)
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Getting Ready for Benjamin: Preparing Teachers for Sexual Diversity in the Classroom

Book
Kissen, Rita ed.
2002
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LC192.6 .G48 2002
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This text grew out of a symposium sponsored by the Lesbian and Gay Studies Special Interest Group at the American Educational Research Association conference in 1999, titled "Over the Rainbow and Under the Multicultural Umbrella." Twenty-eight educational scholars, theorists, and practitioners—most from the U.S.—contribute 19 chapters on the preparation of future teachers in such issues as the interrelationships of prejudice, sexual differences, teaching tolerance, discussing diversity, and deconstructing gender ...
Additional Info:
This text grew out of a symposium sponsored by the Lesbian and Gay Studies Special Interest Group at the American Educational Research Association conference in 1999, titled "Over the Rainbow and Under the Multicultural Umbrella." Twenty-eight educational scholars, theorists, and practitioners—most from the U.S.—contribute 19 chapters on the preparation of future teachers in such issues as the interrelationships of prejudice, sexual differences, teaching tolerance, discussing diversity, and deconstructing gender and sexual identities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I Surveying the Landscape
ch. 1 The Challenges of Gay Topics in Teacher Education: Politics, Content, and Pedagogy (Arthur Lipkin)
ch. 2 "But No One in the Class Is Gay": Countering Invisibility and Creating Allies in Teacher Education Programs (Diana Straut, and Mara Sapon-Shevin)
ch. 3 What Do We Do in Physical Education? (Michael Gard)
ch. 4 "Pedophiles and Deviants": Exploring Issues of Sexuality, Masculinity, and Normalization in the Lives of Male Teacher Candidates (Deborah P. Berrill, and Wayne Martino)
ch. 5 Homophobia in the Schools: Student Teachers' Perceptions and Preparation to Respond (Jane A. Page, and Delores D. Liston)
ch. 6 Education by Association: The Shortcomings of Discourses of Privacy and Civility in Anti-Homophobia Education (Cris Mayo)
ch. 7 The Gay Ghetto in the Geography of Education Textbooks (Allison J. Young, and Michae J. Middleton)

Part II "Add Lgbt and Stir": Multiculturalism and Sexual Diversity
ch. 8 "Talking about Inclusion Like It's for Everyone": Sexual Diversity and the Inclusive Schooling Movement (Paula Kluth, and Kevin P. Colleary)
ch. 9 Revisioning Multiculturalism in Teacher Education: Isn't It Queer? (Will Letts)
ch. 10 Queer Developments in Teacher Education: Addressing Sexual Diversity, Homophobia, and Heterosexism (Tim Bedford)
ch. 11 Getting to the Heart of Teaching for Diversity (Genet Simone)

Pt. III Telling Our Stories
ch. 12 How My Teacher Education Program Failed ("Starr")
ch. 13 Visibility, Invisibility, and "The Thickness of Nondiversity": What I Learned from Karen (Rita M. Kissen, and Karen Phillips)
ch. 14 Heteronormativity and Common Sense in Science (Teacher) Education (Steve Fifield and Howard (Lee) Swain)
ch. 15 "I Was Afraid He Would Label Me Gay if I Stood Up for Gays": The Experience of Lesbian and Gay Elementary Education Credential Candidates at a Rural State University (Eric Rofes)
ch. 16 Teacher Educators and the Multicultural Closet: The Impact of Gay and Lesbian Content on an Undergraduate Teacher Education Seminar (James R. King, and Roger Brindley)
ch. 17 Can of Worms: A Queer TA in Teacher Ed (Karleen Pendleton Jiménez)
ch. 18 I'm Every Woman: Multiple Identities at Part of the Diversity Curriculum (Karen Glasgow)
ch. 19 Campus Dyke Meets Teacher Education: A Marriage Made in Social Justice Heaven (Ronni Sanlo)

Afterword: A Word about Getting Ready for Benjamin from His Mommies
Index
About the Contributors
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Minding Women: Reshaping the Educational Realm

Book
Woyshner, Christine A. and Holly S. Gelfond, eds.
1998
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LC197 .M55 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Research on women and girls has exploded during the past twenty years. Since 1977, when the Harvard Educational Review published Carol Gilligan's now-classic article "In a Different Voice," in which she argued so persuasively that women and girls must be understood on their own terms, researchers have been discovering, uncovering, and recovering women's ways of knowing, being, thinking, teaching, and learning. Minding Women charts the wealth of thought and writing related ...
Additional Info:
Research on women and girls has exploded during the past twenty years. Since 1977, when the Harvard Educational Review published Carol Gilligan's now-classic article "In a Different Voice," in which she argued so persuasively that women and girls must be understood on their own terms, researchers have been discovering, uncovering, and recovering women's ways of knowing, being, thinking, teaching, and learning. Minding Women charts the wealth of thought and writing related to women and girls and education that this process of discovery has produced.
Minding Women begins with a "Classics" section--articles that call attention to the lack of research on girls and women and describe the effect this has had on knowledge and society. The contributors then discuss feminist pedagogy, and how it has changed and been refined over time. Girls and young women are the focus of the next section. Too often their voices and viewpoints are excluded from these discussions, so some of their own writings are included here. The book then explores women's educational history, showcasing some of the rich work in this area over the past twenty years. Identity issues are addressed in the final section, acknowledging that substantial differences exist among groups of women and girls on how they experience the world and their roles, prospects, and lives. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 In a different voice : women's conceptions of self and morality (Carol Gilligan)
ch. 2 Woman's place in man's life cycle (Carol Gilligan )
ch. 3 Excluding women from the educational realm (Jane Roland Martin )
ch. 4 Placing women in the liberal arts (Marilyn R. Schuster and Susan Van Dyne )
ch. 5 Mujeres unidas en acción: a popular education process (Eva Young and Mariwilda Padilla )
ch. 6 Freire and a feminist pedagogy of difference (Kathleen Weiler )
ch. 7 Chronicles (Kari Larsen ... [et al.] )
ch. 8 Sexuality, schooling, and adolescent females (Michelle Fine )
ch. 9 Voice, play, and a practice of ordinary courage in girls' and women's lives (Annie G. Rogers )
ch. 10 Sexual harassment in school (Nan Stein )
ch. 11 We who believe in freedom cannot rest until it's done (William Ayers )
ch. 12 ch. 1 Reconsidering a classic (Linda Eisenmann )
ch. 13 African American female elite (Linda M. Perkins )
ch. 14 Hidden Half : a history of Native American women's education (Deirdre A. Almeida-- ch. 15 Reflections on writing a history of women teachers (Kathleen Weiler )
ch. 16 How we find ourselves (Alex Wilson )
ch. 17 Colonizer/colonized Chicana ethnographer (Sofia Villenas )
ch. 18 Learning in the dark (Frances A. Maher and Mary Kay Thompson Tetreault)
ch. 19 Road to college (Stacey J. Lee )
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Electronic Literacies: Language, Culture, and Power in Online Education

Book
Warschauer, Mark
1999
Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ
LC149.5.W37 1999
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Electronic Literacies is an insightful study of the challenges and contradictions that arise as culturally and linguistically diverse learners engage in new language and literacy practices in online environments. The role of the Internet in changing literacy and education has been a topic of much speculation, but very little concrete research has been done in the area. This book is one of the first attempts to document the role of ...
Additional Info:
Electronic Literacies is an insightful study of the challenges and contradictions that arise as culturally and linguistically diverse learners engage in new language and literacy practices in online environments. The role of the Internet in changing literacy and education has been a topic of much speculation, but very little concrete research has been done in the area. This book is one of the first attempts to document the role of the Internet and other new digital technologies in the development of language and literacy. Warschauer looks at how the nature of reading and writing is changing, and how those changes are being addressed in the classroom. His focus is on the experiences of culturally and linguistically diverse learners who are at special risk of being marginalized from the information society. Literacies is highly relevant for those interested or involved in ESL, bilingual, and multicultural education; composition and literacy education; technology-based school reform; the social context of schooling, critical pedagogy, and cultural studies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction: Surveying the Terrain of Literacy
ch. 2 Computers, Composition, & Christianity
ch. 3 Networking into Academic Discourse
ch. 4 Computer-Assisted Language Revitalization
ch. 5 Cyber Service Learning
ch. 6 Conclusion: Striving Toward Multiliteracies

Epilogue
App Researching the Online Classroom
References
Author Index
Subject Index
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Writing in Multicultural Settings

Book
Severino, Carol, Juan C. Guerra, and Johnnella E. Butler, eds.
1997
Modern Language Association, New York, NY
PE1405.U6W75 1997
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The twenty essays and four responses ("cross-talks") in this volume, the fifth in the Research and Scholarship in Composition series, confront the challenges presented by the racial, ethnic, class, gender, religious, age, and physical-ability differences among today's writing students. The contributors, who teach in classrooms and writing centers at a variety of private and public institutions, discuss their immersion in students' discourses and cultures and balance descriptions of their teaching ...
Additional Info:
The twenty essays and four responses ("cross-talks") in this volume, the fifth in the Research and Scholarship in Composition series, confront the challenges presented by the racial, ethnic, class, gender, religious, age, and physical-ability differences among today's writing students. The contributors, who teach in classrooms and writing centers at a variety of private and public institutions, discuss their immersion in students' discourses and cultures and balance descriptions of their teaching experiences with careful and critical reflection.

The volume begins and ends with sections examining the tensions and conflicts in the classroom; the two sections in between focus more specifically on texts and curricula and on teaching English as a second language. The cross-talks that conclude each section synthesize and critique the essays.

Writing in Multicultural Settings is essential, thought-provoking reading for college administrators, writing teachers, and scholars and students in composition studies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface to the Series
Acknowledgments
Introduction
ch. 1 Embracing a Multicultural Rhetoric (Bonnie Lisle and Sandra Mano)
ch. 2 Whose Voice Is It Anyway? Marked Features in the Writing of Black English Speakers (Denise Troutman)
ch. 3 Teaching American Indian Students: Interpreting the Rhetorics of Silence (Michelle Grijalva)
ch. 4 Exploring Bias in Essay Tests (Liz Hamp-Lyons)
ch. 5 "Real Niggaz's Don't Die": African American Students Speaking Themselves into Their Writing (Kermit E. Campbell)
ch. 6 Negotiating Authority through One-to-One Collaboration in the Multicultural Writing Center (Susan Blalock)
ch. 7 Cross-Talk: Talking Cross-Difference (Gail Y. Okawa)
ch. 8 Two Approaches to "Cultural Text": Toward Multicultural Literacy (Carol Severino)
ch. 9 Decolonizing the Classroom: Freshman Composition in a Multicultural Setting (Esha Niyogi De and Donna Uthus Gregory)
ch. 10 Writing Identities: The Essence of Difference in Multicultural Classrooms (Wendy S. Hesford)
ch. 11 Composition Readers and the Construction of Identity (Sandra Jamieson)
ch. 12 "But Isn't This the Land of the Free?": Resistance and Discovery in Student Responses to Farewell to Manzanar (Virginia A. Chappell)
ch. 13 Cross-Talk: Teachers, Texts, Readers, and Writers (Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés)
ch. 14 Contrastive Rhetoric: Implications for Teachers of Writing in Multicultural Classrooms (Ulla Connor)
ch. 15 Differences in ESL and Native-English-Speaker Writing: The Research and Its Implications (Tony Silva)
ch. 16 Cultural Conflicts in the Writing Center: Expectations and Assumptions of ESL Students (Muriel Harris)
ch. 17 Cross-Talk: ESL Issues and Contrastive Rhetoric (Ilona Leki)
ch. 18 The Place of Intercultural Literacy in the Writing Classroom (Juan C. Guerra)
ch. 19 The Politics of Difference: Toward a Pedagogy of Reciprocity (Mary Soliday)
ch. 20 An Afrocentric Multicultural Writing Project (Henry L. Evans)
ch. 21 "Better Than What People Told Me I Was": What Students of Color Tell Us about the Multicultural Composition Classroom (Carol A. Miller)
ch. 22 Students on the Border (Kate Mangelsdorf )
ch. 23 When the Writing Test Fails: Assessing Assessment at an Urban College (Barbara Gleason)
ch. 24 Cross-Talk: Toward Transcultural Writing Classrooms
Notes on Contributors (Keith Gilyard)
Works Cited
Index
Cover image

Graduate Theological Education and the Human Experience of Disability

Book
Anderson, Robert C., ed.
2003
Haworth Press, Binghampton, NY
BV4020.G73 2003
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Graduate Theological Education and the Human Experience of Disability examines graduate schools of theology and their limited familiarity with the study of disability -- and the presence of people with disabilities in particular -- on their campuses. Dubbed a "missing note" by one theologian, this text offers critical research and illuminates new pathways for theologia and practice in the community of faith. Reviews of previous literature, theology, and practices illuminate ...
Additional Info:
Graduate Theological Education and the Human Experience of Disability examines graduate schools of theology and their limited familiarity with the study of disability -- and the presence of people with disabilities in particular -- on their campuses. Dubbed a "missing note" by one theologian, this text offers critical research and illuminates new pathways for theologia and practice in the community of faith. Reviews of previous literature, theology, and practices illuminate how people with disabilities have historically been marginalized by the religious community. Theologians, people with disabilities and researchers offer suggestions for incorporating disability studies into theological education and religious life. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: A Look Down the Road (Robert C. Anderson)
Access to Professional Education (Harold H. Wilke)
Integrating Welcome into the Seminary Curriculum (Bruce C. Birch)
In Search of the Disabled Human Body in Theological Education: Critical Perspectives on the Construction of Normalcy - An Overview (Robert C. Anderson)
Toward a Theology That Includes the Human Experience of Disability (Deborah Creamer)
Christian Theology and Human Disability: A Literature Review (W. Daniel Blair)
Healing and Hospitality in Jesus' Ministry (Bruce G. Epperly)
Inclusiveness as Hospitality in Worship Settings (Laurence Hull Stookey)
Each Made in God's Image, Each a Unit of God's Grace (Lu Leone with Ginny Thornburgh)
Index
Article cover image

"Dynamics of Diversity in the Teaching-Learning Process: A Faculty Development Model for Analysis and Action"

Article
Marchesani, Linda S., and Marianne Adams
1992
in Promoting Diversity in College Classrooms: Innovative Responses for the Curriculum, Faculty, and Institutions (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1992), 9-19
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Four primary factors are relevant to social and cultural diversity in the college classroom: students, teachers, course content, and teaching methods. Faculty can use understanding of these factors and their interrelationships to facilitate learning in an increasingly multicultural environment.
Additional Info:
Four primary factors are relevant to social and cultural diversity in the college classroom: students, teachers, course content, and teaching methods. Faculty can use understanding of these factors and their interrelationships to facilitate learning in an increasingly multicultural environment.
Article cover image

"The Predicament of Nepantla: Chicana/o Religions into the 21st Century"

Article
Busto, Rudy
1998
Perspectivas: Hispanic Theological Institute Occasional Papers Series 1 (Fall 1998): 7-21
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Yellow: Race in America Beyond Black and White

Book
Wu, Frank H.
2002
Basic Books, New York, NY
E184.06W84 2003
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This explosive book examines the current state of civil rights in the U.S. through the unique experiences of Asian Americans. In the tradition of W.E.B. Du Bois, Cornel West, and other public intellectuals who have confronted the "color line" of the twentieth century, journalist, scholar, and activist Frank H. Wu offers a unique perspective on how changing ideas of racial identity will affect race relations in the ...
Additional Info:
This explosive book examines the current state of civil rights in the U.S. through the unique experiences of Asian Americans. In the tradition of W.E.B. Du Bois, Cornel West, and other public intellectuals who have confronted the "color line" of the twentieth century, journalist, scholar, and activist Frank H. Wu offers a unique perspective on how changing ideas of racial identity will affect race relations in the new century.

Often provocative and always thoughtful, this book addresses some of the most controversial contemporary issues: discrimination, immigration, diversity, globalization, and the mixed race movement, introducing the example of Asian Americans to shed new light on the current debates. Mixing personal anecdotes, social science research, legal cases, history, and original journalistic reporting, Wu tackles Asian American stereotypes like "the model minority" and "the perpetual foreigner," and shows how these seemingly innocuous concepts have harmed individuals and damaged relations between communities. By offering new ways of thinking about race in American society, Wu's work challenges us to make good on our great democratic experiment. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 East Is East, East Is West: Asians as Americans
ch. 2 The Model Minority: Asian American "Success" as a Race Relations Failure
ch. 3 The Perpetual Foreigner: Yellow Peril in the Pacific Century
ch. 4 Neither Black Nor White: Affirmative Action and Asian Americans
ch. 5 True But Wrong: New Arguments Against New Discrimination
ch. 6 The Best "Chink" Food: Dog-Eating and the Dilemma of Diversity
ch. 7 The Changing Face of America: Intermarriage and the Mixed Race Movement
ch. 8 The Power of Coalitions: Why I Teach at Howard

Epilogue: Deep Springs
References
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
About the Author
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Perspectivas: Occasional Papers Winter 1999

Journal Issue
Perspectivas
1999
Hispanic Theological Initiative, Atlanta, GA
BR563.H57P47 1999
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue
Additional Info:
Journal Issue

Table Of Content:
Forward
Race Matters in More than Black and White (Harold J. Recinos)
U.S. Hispanics/Latinos and the Field of Graduate Theological Education (Manuel Jesus Mejido)
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Race and Higher Education: Rethinking Pedagogy in Diverse College Classrooms

Book
Howell, Annie and Frank Tuitt, eds.
2003
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LC3727.C64 2003
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
U.S. colleges and universities are witnessing increased diversity in their student bodies, yet many faculty members continue to use outdated modes of instruction, creating potentially harmful learning environments. This timely book addresses this problem, guiding educators toward a better understanding of how changes in the student population require new approaches to classroom learning. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
U.S. colleges and universities are witnessing increased diversity in their student bodies, yet many faculty members continue to use outdated modes of instruction, creating potentially harmful learning environments. This timely book addresses this problem, guiding educators toward a better understanding of how changes in the student population require new approaches to classroom learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
ch. 1 Diversity and Higher Education: Theory and Impact on Educational Outcomes (Patricia Gurin ... [et al.] )
ch. 2 Against Repetition: Addressing Resistance to Anti-Oppressive Change in the Practices of Learning, Teaching, Supervising, and Researching (Kevin K. Kumashiro)
ch. 3 Learning in the Dark: How Assumptions of Whiteness Shape Classroom Knowledge (Frances A. Maher and Mary Kay Thompson Tetreault)
ch. 4 Blind Vision: Unlearning Racism in Teacher Education (Marilyn Cochran-Smith)
ch. 5 Moving beyond Polite Correctness: Practicing Mindfulness in the Diverse Classroom (Barbara Vacarr)
ch. 6 Talking about Race, Learning about Racism: The Application of Racial Identity Development Theory in the Classroom (Beverly Daniel Tatum)
ch. 7 Teaching and Practice (Sondra Perl)
ch. 8 A Dialogue: Culture, Language, and Race (Paulo Freire and Donaldo P. Macedo)
ch. 9 Freire and a Feminist Pedagogy of Difference (Kathleen Weiler)

Afterword: Realizing a More Inclusive Pedagogy (Frank Tuitt)
About the Contributors
Article cover image

"A Contending Pedagogy: Asian American Studies as Extracurricular Praxis"

Article
Hyun Yi Kang, Laura
1998
in Teaching Asian America: Diversity and the Problem of Community (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1998),123-141
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Connecting to Learn: Educational and Assistive Technology for People with Disabilities

Book
Scherer, Marcia J.
2004
American Psychological Association, Washington, DC
LC4812.S34 2004
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Connecting to Learn: Educational and Assistive Technology for People With Disabilities presents a comprehensive approach to matching the right assistive technology with students with disabilities, especially visual and auditory disabilities. Dr. Scherer explores the way disabilities, especially those involving the senses, can lead to isolation and a lack of "connectedness," and how this leads to educational difficulties. She then provides a step-by-step model for assessing and evaluating the needs of ...
Additional Info:
Connecting to Learn: Educational and Assistive Technology for People With Disabilities presents a comprehensive approach to matching the right assistive technology with students with disabilities, especially visual and auditory disabilities. Dr. Scherer explores the way disabilities, especially those involving the senses, can lead to isolation and a lack of "connectedness," and how this leads to educational difficulties. She then provides a step-by-step model for assessing and evaluating the needs of individual students and finding the right assistive technology to help each student. This practical book features data on prevalence of vision and hearing loss as well as quotations from students and teachers about the various technologies they use in their schools and in daily life. School psychologists, educators, and rehabilitation psychologists will find this book indispensable in their efforts to help those with disabilities learn, live, and connect with others. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

I Introduction
ch. 1 The Fundamental Sense of Connectedness

II Learner Characteristics and Preferences
ch. 2 The Effects of Loss of Hearing or Vision on the Learner and Learning
ch. 3 The Personal Meaning of Hearing or Vision Loss

III Environments for Learning
ch. 4 The Move From Separate to Inclusive Education
ch. 5 Contrasting Inclusive With Exclusive Education
ch. 6 Technology Made Inclusive Education Possible

IV Technologies for Access to Information and for Instructional Delivery
ch. 7 Computers: Mixing Assistive, Information, and Access Technologies
ch. 8 Desirable and Less Desirable Effects of Educational Technologies
ch. 9 Getting Going on Learning

V Matching Learners With the Most Appropriate Technologies and Strategies for Their Use
ch. 10 Individual Learner Preferences and Needs
ch. 11 The Matching Person and Technology Model

VI Connecting to Learn
ch. 12 Bringing It All Together for the Individual User

App. A Matching Person and Technology Process and Samples of the Assessment Forms
App. B: Copy of Statement of Need Form
App. C Checklists for Educational Technology Evaluation and Selection
App. D Finding and Funding Assistive Technologies
App. E: Resources

Glossary
References
Author Index
Subject Index
About the Author
Article cover image

"Critical Race Theory, Latino Critical Theory, and Critical Raced-Gendered Epistemologies: Recognizing Students of Color as Holders and Creators of Knowledge"

Article
Bernal, Dolores Delgado
2002
Qualitative Inquiry 8, no. 1 (2002): 105-126
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
For too long, the histories, experiences, cultures, and languages of students of color have been devalued, misinterpreted, or omitted within formal educational settings. In this article, the author uses critical race theory (CRT) and Latina/Latino critical theory (LatCrit) to demonstrate how critical raced-gendered epistemologies recognize students of color as holders and creators of knowledge. In doing so, she discusses how CRT and LatCrit provide an appropriate lens for qualitative ...
Additional Info:
For too long, the histories, experiences, cultures, and languages of students of color have been devalued, misinterpreted, or omitted within formal educational settings. In this article, the author uses critical race theory (CRT) and Latina/Latino critical theory (LatCrit) to demonstrate how critical raced-gendered epistemologies recognize students of color as holders and creators of knowledge. In doing so, she discusses how CRT and LatCrit provide an appropriate lens for qualitative research in the field of education. She then compares and contrasts the experiences of Chicana/Chicano students through a Eurocentric and a critical raced-gendered epistemological perspective and demonstrates that each perspective holds vastly different views of what counts as knowledge, specifically regarding language, culture, and commitment to communities. She then offers implications of critical raced-gendered epistemologies for both research and practice and concludes by discussing some of the critiques of the use of these epistemologies in educational research.
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Crossing the Digital Divide: Race, Writing, and Technology in the Classroom

Book
Monrie, Barbara
2004
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
PE1405.U6M66 2004
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Online Learning   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
As poor, non-white communities on "the other side" of the digital divide become immersed in electronic media, how can we evaluate their experiences to transform the teaching of writing and literature and improve student learning? This important book offers a balanced view of instructional technology and critical multiculturalism as experienced in today’s public schools. With valuable insights to help English educators at all levels working in all types of ...
Additional Info:
As poor, non-white communities on "the other side" of the digital divide become immersed in electronic media, how can we evaluate their experiences to transform the teaching of writing and literature and improve student learning? This important book offers a balanced view of instructional technology and critical multiculturalism as experienced in today’s public schools. With valuable insights to help English educators at all levels working in all types of schools, this accessible volume features:

* Case studies of high-poverty secondary schools as they come online, offering an examination of the literacy practices of some of the country’s most underserved students on Indian reservations and in central cities.
* A unique approach to teaching writing and literature at both high school and middle school levels, including practical suggestions for classroom practice.
* A compelling analysis and critique of the contrasting rhetoric of American adolescent minority groups, differences in their early language socialization, and the impact of those differences on academic performance.
* A fresh angle on the public policy debate on access to technology, arguing that high-poverty schools do not have student access and, when they do, computers are used to "reform," rather than "transform" schooling. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Reconsidering the terms of the debate
ch. 2 Putting one's business on Front Street
ch. 3 Crucible for critical literacy
ch. 4 Storytime on the reservation
ch. 5 Revisiting the access issue

Notes
References
Index
About the author
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The Quality and Quantity of Contact: African Americans and Whites on College Campuses

Book
Moore, Robert M. III, ed.
2002
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LC191.94.Q35 2002
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The authors present to the reader, meaningfully and responsibly, the quality and quantity of contact between African Americans and whites on predominantly white campuses across our nation. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The authors present to the reader, meaningfully and responsibly, the quality and quantity of contact between African Americans and whites on predominantly white campuses across our nation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Article 1. Teaching Region, Learning Humility (Larry Griffin)
Article 2. Black and White Friendship (Sharon A. Lewis and Sara D. Jonsberg)
Article 3. Balancing Academic and Athletic Success: A Chronicle of African American Male Athletes Involvement in Higher Education (Eddie Comeaux and C. Keith Harrison)
Article 4. "It's Not About Race:" Making Whiteness Visible in the Interpretation of Rap Music (Natalie Fasnacht)
Article 5. Revisiting African American University Students' Interpersonal Style on Predominantly White Campuses (Wanda Collins, Robbie J. Steward and Douglas Neil)
Article 6. Don't Stand Too Close to me: Social Distance and College Students at a Northern New Jersey University (Gabe Wang and Kathleen Korgen)
Article 7. The History of the Black Student Union at a Professional Institution (Joeseph Ruane)
Article 8. Black and Gay Identity Selection on College Campuses: Master and Subordinate Status Strain and Conflict (Tim Baylor)
Article 9. "Did you hear what that white woman said?" Speaking for Change in Memphis, Tennessee / Wanda Rushing
Article 10. Exploring Racial Policy Views of College-Age White Americans: Implications for Campus Climate / Eboni M. Zamani
Article 11. African American Male Students at Predominantly White Female Institutions of Higher Education / Amitra Hodge
Article 12. Interaction Patterns Between Black and White College Students: For Better or Worse? / Jas M. Sullivan, Ashraf M. Esmail and Raymond S. Soh
Article 13. Black Professor/White Students: The Unique Problems Minority Professors Face when Teaching Race/Ethnicity to Majority Group Students / George Yancey
Article 14. Would but Don't: Reconciling Expressed Willingness to Intergroup Marriage with National Trends / Charles A. Gallagher
Article 15. Do Undergraduate College Students Self-Segregate? / Bette J. Dickerson, Kianda Bell and Kathryn Lasso / [et al.]
Article 16. Student Multicultural Tolerance Levels in Relation to Student Rank / Elliot Anderson
Article 17. Understanding the Margins: Marginality and Social Segregation in Predominantly White Institutions / Will Tyson
Article 18. Race, Gender and Intimacy on a College Campus / Robert M. Moore III
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Stony the Road We Trod: African American Biblical Interpretation

Book
Felder, Cain Hope, ed.
Fortress Press, Minneapolis, MN
not catalogued
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
A hallmark of American black religion is its distinctive use of the Bible in creating community, resisting oppression, and fomenting social change. What can critical biblical studies learn from the African American experience with the Bible, and vice versa?
This singular volume marks the emergence of a critical mass of black biblical scholars. Combining sophisticated exegesis with special sensitivity to issues of race, class, and gender, the authors of ...
Additional Info:
A hallmark of American black religion is its distinctive use of the Bible in creating community, resisting oppression, and fomenting social change. What can critical biblical studies learn from the African American experience with the Bible, and vice versa?
This singular volume marks the emergence of a critical mass of black biblical scholars. Combining sophisticated exegesis with special sensitivity to issues of race, class, and gender, the authors of this scholarly collection examine the nettling questions of biblical authority, blacks and African in biblical narratives, and the liberating aspects of Scripture. Together they are reshaping and redefining the questions, concerns, and scholarship that determine how the Bible is appropriated by church, academy, and the larger society today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Map
Introduction

Part I: The Relevance of Biblical Scholarship and the Authority of the Bible
ch. 1 Interpreting Biblical Scholarship for the Black Church Tradition (Thomas Hoyt, Jr.)
ch. 2 The Hermeneutical Dilemma of the African American Biblical Student (Renita J. Weems)
ch. 3 Reading Her Way through the Struggle: African American Women and the Bible (Renita J. Weems)

Part II: African American Sources For Enhancing Biblical Interpretation
ch. 4 The Bible and African Americans: An Outline of an Interpretative History (Vincent L. Wimbush)
ch. 5 "An Ante-bellum Sermon": A Resource for an African American Hermeneutic (David T. Shannon)

Part III: Race and Ancient Black Africa in the Bible
ch. 6 Race, Racism, and the Biblical Narratives (Cain Hope Felder)
ch. 7 The Black Presence in the Old Testament (Charles B. Copher)
ch. 8 Beyond Identification: The Use of Africans in Old Testament Poetry and Narratives (Randall C. Bailey)

Part IV: Reinterpreting Biblical Texts
ch. 9 Who Was Hagar? (John W. Waters)
ch. 10 The Haustafeln (Household Codes) in African American Biblical Interpretation: "Free Slaves" and " Subordinate Women"(Clarice J. Martin)
ch. 11 An African American Appraisal of the Philemon-Paul-Onesimus Triangle (Lloyd A. Lewis)

Index of Ancient Sources
Index of Topics and Names
Contributors
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Challenging & Supporting The First-Year Student: A Handbook for Improving The First Year of College

Book
Upcraft, M. Lee, John N. Gardner, Betsy O. Barefoot & Associates, eds.
2005
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2343.3.U63 2004
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
An authoritative, comprehensive guide to the first year of college, Challenging and Supporting the First-Year Student includes the most current information about the policies, strategies, programs, and services designed to help first-year students make a successful transition to college and fulfill their educational and personal goals. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
An authoritative, comprehensive guide to the first year of college, Challenging and Supporting the First-Year Student includes the most current information about the policies, strategies, programs, and services designed to help first-year students make a successful transition to college and fulfill their educational and personal goals. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface and Acknowledgments
Authors and Contributors
Introduction: The First Year of College Revisited

Part 1 What We Know about Today's First-Year Students and Institutional Efforts to Help Them Succeed
ch. 1 Today's First-Year Students (Jennifer L. Crissman Ishler)
ch. 2 The Keys to First-Year Student Persistence (Jennifer L. Crissman Ishler and M. Lee Upcraft)
ch. 3 Current Institutional Practice in the First College Year (Betsy O. Barefoot)

Part 2 Recruiting and Challenging First-Year Students
ch. 4 The Enrollment Management Process (Don Hossler and Douglas K. Anderson)
ch. 5 Student Engagement in the First Year of College (George D. Kuh)
ch. 6 Expectations and Performance (Karen Maitland Schilling and Karl L. Schilling)

Part 3 Creating Campus Cultures for First-Year Student Success
ch. 7 Fostering First-Year Success of Underrepresented Minorities (Freeman A. Hrabowski III)
ch. 8 The Realities of Diversity and the Campus Climate for First-Year Students (W. Terrell Jones)
ch. 9 Building the Foundation for First-Year Student Success in Public, Urban Universities: A Case Study (Diana S. Natalicio and Maggy Smith)
ch. 10 Inviting First-Year Student Success: A President's Perspective (Betty L. Siegel)
ch. 11 Advocating for First-Year Students (Jay Chaskes and Ralph G. Anttonen)
ch. 12 Collaborative Partnerships Between Academic and Student Affairs (Charles C. Schroeder)
ch. 13 Technology and Today's First-Year Students (Reynol Junco)

Part 4 Challenging and Supporting First-Year Students in the Classroom
ch. 14 Inside the First-Year Classroom: Challenges and Constraints (Bette LaSere Erickson and Diane W. Strommer)
ch. 15 Faculty Development and the First Year (Scott E. Evenbeck)
ch. 16 First-Year Seminars (Mary Stuart Hunter and Carrie W. Linder)
ch. 17 Developmental Education (Jeanne L. Higbee)
ch. 18 Supplemental Instruction (Deanna C. Martin and Maureen Hurley)
ch. 19 Academic Advising (Margaret C. King and Thomas J. Kerr)
ch. 20 The Place of the Library Versus the Library as Place (Margit Misangy Watts)
ch. 21 Service-Learning and the First-Year Student (Edward Zlotkowski)
ch. 22 Learning Communities (Jodi Levine Laufgraben)

Part 5 Challenging and Supporting First-Year Students Outside the Classroom
ch. 23 Designing Orientation Programs (Richard H. Mullendore and Leslie A Banahan)
ch. 24 First-Year Student Living Environments (William J. Zeller)
ch. 25 Student Support Services (John H. Schuh)
ch. 26 The First-Year Experience and Alcohol Use (Philip W. Meilman and Cheryl A. Presley)

Part 6 Assessing the First College Year
ch. 27 Assessing the First Year of College (M. Lee Upcraft)
ch. 28 A Beginner's Guide for Assessing the First College Year(M. Lee Upcraft, Jennifer L. Crissman Ishler and Randy L. Swing)
ch. 29 Choosing and Using Assessment Instruments (Randy L. Swing and M. Lee Upcraft)

Conclusion: Principles of Good Practice for the First College Year and Summary of Recommendations
References (John N. Gardner, M. Lee Upcraft and Betsy O. Barefoot)
Name Index
Subject Index
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Degrees of Choice: Social Class, Race and Gender in Higher Education

Book
Reay, Diane, Miriam E. David, and Stephen Ball
2005
Trentham Books, Sterling, VA
LC191.98.G7R43 2005
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
"Degrees of Choice provides a sophisticated account of the overlapping effects of social class, ethnicity and gender in the process of choosing which university to attend. The shift from an elite to a mass system has been accompanied by much political rhetoric about widening access, achievement-for-all and meritocratic equalisation." This book gives a full and different picture, drawing on qualitative and quantitative data to show how the welcome expansion of ...
Additional Info:
"Degrees of Choice provides a sophisticated account of the overlapping effects of social class, ethnicity and gender in the process of choosing which university to attend. The shift from an elite to a mass system has been accompanied by much political rhetoric about widening access, achievement-for-all and meritocratic equalisation." This book gives a full and different picture, drawing on qualitative and quantitative data to show how the welcome expansion of higher education has also deepened social stratification, generating new and different inequalities. While gender inequalities have reduced, those of social class remain and are now reinforced by racial inequalities in access. Employing perspectives from the sociology of education and particularly Bourdieu's work on distinction and judgement, the book links school (institutional habitus) and family (class habitus) with individual choice making in a socially informed dynamic. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Setting the scene
ch. 2 Conceptualising choice of higher education
ch. 3 Making a difference : institutional habituses
ch. 4 Parents and higher education choice
ch. 5 Working class students
ch. 6 Culture, community and choice : ethnic minority students
ch. 7 Illuminating the field? : information, marketing and higher education decision making
ch. 8 Conclusion
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching Inclusively: Resources for Course, Department & Institutional Change in Higher Education

Book
Ouellett, Mathew L., ed.
2005
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LC1099.3.T436 2005
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Teaching Inclusively brings together a broad array of current "best practices" in the design, implementation, and assessment of multicultural change initiatives on college and university campuses. Readers will find that this volume advocates for more transparent connections between change initiatives at individual, departmental, and college-wide levels by highlighting the ways in which such practices and change goals can relate to and support each other, thus addressing a noticeable absence in ...
Additional Info:
Teaching Inclusively brings together a broad array of current "best practices" in the design, implementation, and assessment of multicultural change initiatives on college and university campuses. Readers will find that this volume advocates for more transparent connections between change initiatives at individual, departmental, and college-wide levels by highlighting the ways in which such practices and change goals can relate to and support each other, thus addressing a noticeable absence in the current available literature.

The contributors to this volume present readers with a balance between theoretical models and demonstration projects that address change processes at three levels: individual courses, programs and departments, and across schools and institutions. In addition, there are descriptions of current, multi-year or multi-phase efforts at both departmental and organizational levels. Whenever possible, the contributors include their perspectives on important lessons learned from their efforts. Finally, we offer resource materials that promise concrete support for applications.

Part I addresses models and perspectives that help to conceptualize, implement and assess diversity-related instructional and faculty development programs at the systemic level. Contributors offer models and descriptions of practices aimed at making transparent the values, beliefs, and goals that shape institutional and classroom climates. Note that in the context of this volume, "diversity" is deliberately defined broadly to encourage a more systemic approach to the analyses of and response to diversity-related issues. For many readers, this may offer new dimensions and greater texture to their current conceptualization of diversity. This section reflects the contributors’ interests in analytical tools and organizational frameworks useful in addressing individual, departmental, and institutional changes. Whenever appropriate, authors in this section identify a range of practical applications, such as course-based efforts in the major to courses that fulfill general education requirements.

In Part II, contributors describe change initiatives that use departments (or programs) as the unit of analysis for diversity-related change efforts. In this section, readers will benefit from the descriptions and assessments of programs designed specifically to bring faculty and academic administrators together in cohorts to address diversity and teaching development goals within the disciplines in a sustained dialogue on diversity. Assessment of current efforts indicate that such initiatives illuminate the content, skills, and values necessary for sustained change and that such experiences can become important models for broader institutional change efforts.

In Part III, the contributors discuss multicultural change efforts at the college or institutional level directed at creating and sustaining more inclusive teaching and learning communities. Additionally, contributors describe programs and practices useful in addressing diversity issues across the disciplines as well as within discipline-specific contexts. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding how can systematic multicultural organization change initiatives can support a departmental or campus-wide emphasis on teaching inclusively. These chapters offer rich descriptions of efforts at institutions learning how to address diversity-related initiatives in a sustainable, comprehensive manner. Such efforts can help others determine how best to assess their organization’s needs and strengths, and to determine what is needed in the larger environment to initiate and sustain successful pro-equity organizational change and innovations.

Finally, Part IV pays particular attention to resources and program models particularly useful for faculty developers and centers. Contributors to this section provide a rich set of tools for self and course assessment, planning for new or revised programs, and suggesting well-proven strategies for approaches to diversity-related teaching development and organizational change initiatives. These include descriptions of specific, "hands on" consultation practices, workshop exercises, resource materials, and design elements (e.g., use of writing prompts) proven effective across the disciplines in engaging faculty in reflection, analysis, dialogue and innovation related to diversity-related teaching development goals. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
About the Editor

I. Theoretical Frameworks and Useful Models
ch. 1 The Theory and Practice of Multicultural Organization Development in Education (Bailey W. Jackson)
ch. 2 Letting the Hydra Roam: Attending to Diverse Forms of Diversity in Liberal Arts Education (Sammy Basu)
ch. 3 It Takes a Campus: Situating Professional Development Efforts Within a Campus Diversity Program (Nancy Chism , and Karen Whitney)
ch. 4 Defining the Shape of Diversity Pedagogy (Lynn Leonard, Sue Akersten, Stephen Adkison, and Edward Nuhfer)
ch. 5 Transcultural Issues in Teaching and Learning (Bland Tomkinson)
ch. 6 Building Multiculturalism into Teaching Development Programs (Constance Ewing Cook, and Mary Deane Sorcinelli)
ch. 7 Warming Up the Chill: Teaching Against Structures (Audrey Kleinsasser, and Jane Nelson)
ch. 8 Enhancing the Climate for Diversity in the Classroom: An Experiment in Campus Transformation (Richard C. Turner, Gina Sanchez Gibau, Monica M. Medina, and Sherree A. Wilson)
ch. 9 Positionality and Authority in Curriculum Transformation: Faculty/Student Collaboration in Course Design (Betty Schmitz, and Anupama Taranath)
ch. 10 Teaching and Diversity: Collaborative Lessons Learned (Pamela Ashmore, Kathleen Sullivan Brown, G. O. Akura, and Carole Murphy)
ch. 11 Teaching Inclusively: The Whole Is Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts (Christine Martin)
ch. 12 Renewing Diversity Initiatives Within an English Department (Anne J. Herrington)
ch. 13 Teaching Diversity and Fostering Inclusivity at the University: A Collaborative Approach (Abby L. Ferber, and Andrea O'Reilly Herrera)
ch. 14 Speaking a New Language: An Innovative Program Promotes Discussions in Diversity With Foreign Language Learners (Lisa Calvin)
ch. 15 Transforming Teacher Preparation: Changing Cultures Through Constructivism and Reflective Practices (Miguel Licona)

II. Departmental or Program-Based Change Initiatives
ch. 16 Teaching Together: Interracial Teams (Mathew L. Ouellett, and Edith C. Fraser)
ch. 17 Confronting Issues of Oppression in the University: Creating a Space for Faculty Dialogue, Reflection, and Action (Peter T. Wilson)
ch. 18 Breaking the Silence: Innovative Approaches for Promoting Dialogue About Diversity Issues Within a Communication Disorders Department (Maria Diana Gonzales and Jane A. Baran)
ch. 19 Transforming Higher Education Institutions Using Multicultural Organizational Development: A Case Study of a Large Northeastern University (Linda S. Marchesani and Bailey W. Jackson)
ch. 20 Institutional Transformation to Support Inclusive Teaching Initiatives (Murali Krishnamurthi)
ch. 21 Cultivating Global Understanding Through Campus-Wide Learning Communities (Bonnie B. Mullinix, Rekha Datta and Morris Saldov)

III. Systemic Change Initiatives
ch. 22 Moving the Mountain: Social Justice Education at the University (Julie Andrzejewski and John Alessio)
ch. 23 Multicultural Transformation at Macalester College (Roxane Harvey Gudeman)
ch. 24 Making the Campus Community a Safe and Affirming Space for All (Robert S. Haynor, and Susan A Holton)
ch. 25 Critical Moments: A Case-Based Diversity Project That Engages and Enlivens Campus-Wide Efforts to Teach and Work Inclusively (Diane Gillespie, Gillies Malnarich, and Tina Young)
ch. 26 From Reading Group to Faculty Change Team: The Hamline University Lido Group (James Francisco Bonilla)
ch. 27 But How Can I Talk With Faculty About That? Approaches to Consulting Around Multicultural Issues (Matthew Kaplan, and Beth Glover Reed)
ch. 28 Mainstreaming Feminist Perspectives (Carol Lauer and Lynda M. Glennon)
ch. 29 Faculty Development and Students With Disabilities: Accommodations and Universal Design (Sheryl Burgstahler)
ch. 30 A Catwalk for Kitano: Highlighting Kitano's Paradigm for Multicultural Course Transformation in Consultations With Individual Faculty (Natasha Flowers)
ch. 31 Proving Diversity Classes Make a Difference: Effective Assessment of Students' Learning (Sherwood Smith)
ch. 32 A Framework for Inclusive Teaching in STEM Disciplines (Lois A. Reddick, Wayne Jacobson Angela Linse, and Darryl Yong)
ch. 33 The Multicultural Lab: Diversity Issues in STEM Classes (A.T. Miller)
ch. 34 Science in the Interest of Social Justice: Untangling the Biological Realities of Race and Gender (Leslie S. Jones)
ch. 35 Faculty Development and Organizational Change: Moving From "Minority Relevant" to Intersectionality and Social Justice (Beth Glover Reed, and Melissa R. Peet)
ch. 36 Interactive Theater as a Multicultural Change Agent in Faculty Development (Diana Kardia, A.T. Miller, and Jeffrey Steiger)
ch. 37 Dissemination of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) and Formation of a National Network: Embracing a Common Pedagogy (Pratibha Varma-Nelson, and David Gosser)
ch. 38 Service Learning, Study Circles, and Problem-Based Learning: Student-Initiated Efforts to Confront the Concept of Race (Larry E. Greeson)

IV. Best Practices and Methods
ch. 39 Developing Diversity Management Skills in a University Context: A Direct or Indirect Approach? (Philip Frame, and Jennifer O’Connor)
ch. 40 Creating Inclusive Classrooms: A View Through the Student Lens (James Greenberg and Andre Perry)
ch. 41 Multicultural Course Transformation (Christine A. Stanley, Shari Saunders, and Jamie M. Hart)
ch 42 Teaching With a Social Justice Perspective: A Model for Faculty Seminars Across Academic Disciplines (Maurianne Adams, and Barbara J. Love)
ch. 43 Strategic Action in Hot Moments (Lee Warren)
ch. 44 Inclusive Teaching for Our Queer Students: A Workshop (Michele DiPietro)
ch. 45 Key Resources on Diversity for Faculty Developers: An Idiosyncratic Annotated Bibliography (Stephanie Nickerson)
ch. 46 Multicultural Online Resources: What Are They, Where Are They, and Are They Bias-Free? (Denise C. Camin)
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Embracing Disability in Teaching Religion

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2005
Spotlight on Teaching 20, no. 3 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/spotlight-2005-05may.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/spotlight-2005-05may.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Embracing Disability in Teaching Religion (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Integrating Disability in Religious Studies and Theological Education (Nancy L. Eiesland)
ch. 3 Disability Law and the Classroom (F. Rachel Magdalene)
ch. 4 Accommodating Disability in the Classroom (Kerry Wynn)
ch. 5 A Student’s Perspective on the Accessible Classroom (Kirk VanGilder)
ch. 6 New Bodies of Knowledge: Disability Studies and Teaching Biblical Studies (Hector Avalos)
ch. 7 Disability and the Tasks of Social Justice (Roger S. Gottlieb)
ch. 8 Teaching Students Who Are Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Impaired (Jane Hurst)
ch. 9 Students with Learning Disabilities (Kent A. Eaton)
ch. 10 He Who Has Ears to Hear (Rebecca Raphael)
ch. 11 An Academic’s Encounter with Chronic Illness: Teaching, Collegiality and Scholarship, and Students with Chronic Conditions (Mary Jo Iozzio)
ch. 12 The Future of Disability in the Teaching of Religion: Views from the Next Generation (Deborah Creamer)
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"African Students in Theological Doctoral Programs in Christian Institutions of Higher Education"

Article
Starcher, Richard L.
2004
Article: Christian Higher Education 3, no. 3 (2004): 207-222
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Over the years, thousands of students have left Africa to pursue theological doctorates in Christian institutions of higher learning around the world. The study reported in this paper endeavored to understand their experiences and articulate their needs and aspirations. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with 23 African students and were analyzed using grounded theory procedures. The emerging profile revealed African students in pursuit of theological doctorates to be mature in ...
Additional Info:
Over the years, thousands of students have left Africa to pursue theological doctorates in Christian institutions of higher learning around the world. The study reported in this paper endeavored to understand their experiences and articulate their needs and aspirations. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with 23 African students and were analyzed using grounded theory procedures. The emerging profile revealed African students in pursuit of theological doctorates to be mature in age and experience with rich and variegated backgrounds. While a desire for increased competence, access to employment opportunities, and a greater voice in church and society were motivating factors in their educational quests, the dominant motivation expressed by research participants was a passion to help Africa and the African church. Students viewed increased competence and access as enhancing usefulness. Consequently, students preferred doctoral programs perceived as Africa-relevant and internationally credible. Nevertheless, they demonstrated a readiness to compromise the ideal in favor of the achievable, particularly in terms of program affordability. (From the Publisher)
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"Realities, Visions, and Promises of a Multicultural Future"

Article
Moore, Mary Elizabeth, Boyung Lee, Katherine Turpin, Ralph Casas, Lynn Bridgers and Veronica Miles
2004
Religious Education 99, no. 3 (2004): 287-315
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Communities of Difference: Culture, Language, Technology

Book
Trifonas, Peter P., ed.
2005
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
HM 1271.C65 2005
Topics: Online Learning   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Communities of Difference looks at the implications of educational practices in communities that are differentiated by issues of language, culture, and technology. Trifonas and contributors argue that a "community" is at once a gathering of like-minded individuals in solidarity of purpose and conviction, and also a gathering that excludes others. The chapters in this collection reveal this tension between theory and practice in order to engage the models of community ...
Additional Info:
Communities of Difference looks at the implications of educational practices in communities that are differentiated by issues of language, culture, and technology. Trifonas and contributors argue that a "community" is at once a gathering of like-minded individuals in solidarity of purpose and conviction, and also a gathering that excludes others. The chapters in this collection reveal this tension between theory and practice in order to engage the models of community and the theories of difference that support them as a way to teach, to learn, and to know. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Communities of difference : a preface to a knowledge of ourselves as another

ch. 1 The war against children and the shredding of the social contract (Henry A. Giroux)
ch. 2 Tackling difference in the conservative heartland of Canada (Darren E. Lund)
ch. 3 Our political state in an age of globalization (John Willinsky)
ch. 4 Culture, postmodernity, and education (Blaine R. Després)
ch. 5 Critical pedagogy in the age of neoliberal globalization (Peter McLaren)
ch. 6 The letter of the law/the silence of letters : poetic ruminations on love and school (Carl Leggo)
ch. 7 A metanarrative of emancipation (Trevor Norris)
ch. 8 Freirean literacy : difference that makes a difference (Carlo Ricci)
ch. 9 Crossing the postmodern conditions that divide : theorizing difference and the cultural politics of emancipation in critical pedagogy (Peter Pericles Trifonas and Effie Balomenos)
ch. 10 The technology of difference : ASCII, hegemony, and the Internet (Jason Nolan)
ch. 11 The phoneur : mobile commerce and the digital pedagogies of the wireless Web (Robert Luke)
ch. 12 Difference and the Internet : when ethnic community goes on-line (Joel Weiss, Jason Nolan and Vera Nincic)
ch. 13 Learning the real, theorizing the virtual I : toward a postmodern techno-epistemology (Peter Pericles Trifonas and Paulo Ghiraldelli Jr.)
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Wabash tree

Making Diversity Work on Campus: A Research-Based Perspective

Book
Milem, Jeffrey F., Mitchell J. Chang, and Anthony Lising Antonio
2005
Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C.
LC1099.3.M544 2005
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The authors discuss recent empirical evidence, gathered on behalf of the University of Michigan Supreme Court defense, demonstrating the educational benefits of diverse learning environments. These are environments that must be intentionally planned and nurtured, where diversity is conceived of as a process toward better learning and not merely an outcome that one can check off a list. Included are numerous suggestions for how to engage diversity in the service ...
Additional Info:
The authors discuss recent empirical evidence, gathered on behalf of the University of Michigan Supreme Court defense, demonstrating the educational benefits of diverse learning environments. These are environments that must be intentionally planned and nurtured, where diversity is conceived of as a process toward better learning and not merely an outcome that one can check off a list. Included are numerous suggestions for how to engage diversity in the service of learning, ranging from recruiting a compositionally diverse student body, faculty, and staff to transforming curriculum, co-curriculum, and pedagogy to reflect and support goals for inclusion and excellence. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction to the series
Making Diversity Work on Campus: A Research Based Perspectives
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Defining Diversity as Engagement
ch. 3 Research Synthesis
ch. 4 Concluding Thoughts about the Research on Divinity
ch. 5 Understanding the Campus Racial Climate
ch. 6 Engaging Diversity on Campus
ch. 7 The diveristy Agenda: The Time is Now
References
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Higher Education and the Color Line: College Access, Racial Equity, and Social Change

Book
Orfield, Gary, Patricia Marin, and Catherine L. Horn, eds.
2005
Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, MA
LC3727.C65 2005
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This timely and comprehensive book outlines the agenda for achieving racial justice in higher education in the next generation. It focuses on the racial transformation of higher education and the structural barriers that perpetuate racial stratification in colleges and universities--and beyond. Taking on topical issues such as shifting patterns of financial aid, the growing importance of community colleges, and identifying model programs for retaining and supporting minority students, it lays ...
Additional Info:
This timely and comprehensive book outlines the agenda for achieving racial justice in higher education in the next generation. It focuses on the racial transformation of higher education and the structural barriers that perpetuate racial stratification in colleges and universities--and beyond. Taking on topical issues such as shifting patterns of financial aid, the growing importance of community colleges, and identifying model programs for retaining and supporting minority students, it lays the foundation for realizing the U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's goal of eliminating the need for affirmative action within 25 years. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Gary Orfield)

ch. 1 The racial transformation of higher education (Michal Kurlaender and Stella M. Flores)
ch. 2 Necessary but not sufficient : higher education as a strategy of social mobility (David Karen and Kevin J. Dougherty)
ch. 3 Equity in educational attainment : racial, ethnic, and gender inequality in the 50 states (Derek V. Price and Jill K. Wohlford)
ch. 4 Can minority students afford college in an era of skyrocketing tuition? (Donald E. Heller)
ch. 5 Illusions of opportunity? : from college access to job access at two-year colleges (Regina Deil Amen, James E. Rosenbaum, and Ann E. Person)
ch. 6 Diversity on campus : exemplary programs for retaining and supporting students of color (Dean K. Whitla, Carolyn Howard, Frank Tuitt, Richard J. Reddick, and Elizabeth Flanagan)
ch. 7 Potential or peril : the evolving relationship between large-scale standardized assessment and higher education (Catherine L. Horn)
ch. 8 After Grutter and Gratz : higher education, race, and the law (Angelo N. Ancheta)
ch. 9 From strict scrutiny to educational scrutiny : a new vision for higher education policy and research (Patricia Marin and John T. Yun)

About the Contributors
Index
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"ATS Folio: Diversity in Theological Education" (pdf)

Journal Issue
Seymour, Jack L.; Speller, Julia M.; Liew, Tat-siong Benny; and Aleshire, Daniel, eds.
2003
ATS Folio (Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh 2003)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Five perspectives on diversity are provided here for reflection and discussion in your institution. Jack Seymour and Julia Speller offer observations drawn from discussions at the March 2002 ATS Workshop on Diversity. Two fictional cases explore negotiating cultural differences from a faculty member's and a dean's perspectives. Daniel Aleshire's column on "Good Work" is reprinted from the ATS newsletter, Colloquy (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Five perspectives on diversity are provided here for reflection and discussion in your institution. Jack Seymour and Julia Speller offer observations drawn from discussions at the March 2002 ATS Workshop on Diversity. Two fictional cases explore negotiating cultural differences from a faculty member's and a dean's perspectives. Daniel Aleshire's column on "Good Work" is reprinted from the ATS newsletter, Colloquy (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Using The Folio - Suggests ways in which the various contents of this folio might be used in a range of institutional settings.
ch. 2 Perspectives on Diversity - Presents, in a newsletter format, several short essays on diversity in theology education.
ch. 3 Faculty Member Profiles - Provide specific, personal locations for entry into issues of diversity within theological institutions: Asian Faculty Member Profile, African American Faculty Member Profile, Hispanic Faculty Member Profile
ch. 4 Statistics on Race and Ethnicity - Provides data on racial/ethnic diversity within ATS schools and within the general populace.
ch. 5 Issue - Sheets are designed to be short, provocative entry points into discussion of issues related to tenure, hospitality, isolation, hiring, and curriculum revision.
ch. 6 Seven Cases - Illustrate ways in which institutions have come to work through issues of diversity.
ch. 7 The Do's and Don'ts - Sheet identified a number of concerns regarding diversity and institutional change.
TTR cover image

"Teaching Effectively in Racially and Culturally Diverse Classrooms"

TTR
Ramsay, Nancy J.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 1 (2005): 18-23
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Issues of racial and cultural diversity and racism pose particular challenges for effective teaching and learning in diverse theological classrooms. In this essay the author outlines specific strategies to confront racism and engage racially and culturally diverse students. Through the use of a model for understanding multicultural dynamics of teaching and learning, the author helps readers consider four epistemological categories: knowing our students, knowing ourselves as instructors, knowing how we ...
Additional Info:
Issues of racial and cultural diversity and racism pose particular challenges for effective teaching and learning in diverse theological classrooms. In this essay the author outlines specific strategies to confront racism and engage racially and culturally diverse students. Through the use of a model for understanding multicultural dynamics of teaching and learning, the author helps readers consider four epistemological categories: knowing our students, knowing ourselves as instructors, knowing how we teach, and knowing what we teach.
TTR cover image

"Theological Education with Hispanic Persons: Teaching Distinctiveness"

TTR
Pazmiño, Robert W.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 138-145
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The article explores the distinctiveness of Hispanic or Latino/a persons and implications for teaching practice in theological education. It reports on findings from a workshop for non-Hispanic faculty that was conducted at the Hispanic Summer Program in 1901. The content is broadly defined, and the context and persons of theological education are considered in addressing the particular learning characteristics that can typify Hispanic persons. The work draws upon the pioneering ...
Additional Info:
The article explores the distinctiveness of Hispanic or Latino/a persons and implications for teaching practice in theological education. It reports on findings from a workshop for non-Hispanic faculty that was conducted at the Hispanic Summer Program in 1901. The content is broadly defined, and the context and persons of theological education are considered in addressing the particular learning characteristics that can typify Hispanic persons. The work draws upon the pioneering work of Dr. Eldin Villafañe (The Liberating Spirit) who identifies cultural distinctiveness among Hispanic persons in the United States. Suggestions related to each of those characteristics are proposed for teaching practice with the expectation that transformation in practice can foster greater inclusion of Hispanic persons in theological education.
TTR cover image

"Facilitating the Academic Success of International Students"

TTR
Spencer, Amy
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 164-168
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
International seminarians seeking an education at academic institutions located in the United States often face a host of learning challenges. Seminary faculty that teach in these institutions are often confronted with a need to adjust their teaching methods to facilitate learning by international students. This essay outlines specific strategies to facilitate academic success of international seminarians by offering specific teaching methods for faculty and learning strategies for international students. Topics ...
Additional Info:
International seminarians seeking an education at academic institutions located in the United States often face a host of learning challenges. Seminary faculty that teach in these institutions are often confronted with a need to adjust their teaching methods to facilitate learning by international students. This essay outlines specific strategies to facilitate academic success of international seminarians by offering specific teaching methods for faculty and learning strategies for international students. Topics include training faculty in how to respond to diverse learning styles, expanding learning environments beyond the classroom, methods for enhancing student participation, and development of assignments. Strategies for student success include developing skills in how to improve note taking, critical reading, and writing.
TTR cover image

"Two-Way Bridge: The Cross Cultural Colloquy at Virginia Seminary"

TTR
Hadler, Jacques B. and Richard J. Jones
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 2 (2001): 102-107
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Six years of the Cross-cultural Colloquy at Virginia Theological Seminary, located in metropolitan Washington, D.C., have alerted the two participating American teachers to some peculiarities of their own American culture, some peculiarities of the home cultures of foreign students, and the importance of the work which foreign Christian leaders must do to select and translate from their new learnings when they begin to turn their minds towards resuming responsibilities ...
Additional Info:
Six years of the Cross-cultural Colloquy at Virginia Theological Seminary, located in metropolitan Washington, D.C., have alerted the two participating American teachers to some peculiarities of their own American culture, some peculiarities of the home cultures of foreign students, and the importance of the work which foreign Christian leaders must do to select and translate from their new learnings when they begin to turn their minds towards resuming responsibilities at home. We observe that this Colloquy also meets characteristic needs of non-Americans studying theology in the USA: it offers them conceptual tools and an oral forum for explaining to themselves odd aspects of American culture, emotional support during that time of adjustment, and inducements to begin formulating ways to take both curricular and extracurricular learnings and begin to apply them in the settings to which they will be returning. We commend this model for consideration by schools where foreign or minority-culture students' place in the curriculum and in the community of teachers and learners is ill-defined or remains less than satisfactory.
Additional Info:
One of the difficulties in teaching religious studies in Asia is that many religious theories and case studies are closely related to Western countries and therefore the knowledge and teaching material have a strong Western cultural bias. The cultural differences make teaching rather difficult and, most importantly, lower students' motivation to learn. To deal with the problem, this researcher attempted to introduce material on indigenous religions in various subjects in ...
Additional Info:
One of the difficulties in teaching religious studies in Asia is that many religious theories and case studies are closely related to Western countries and therefore the knowledge and teaching material have a strong Western cultural bias. The cultural differences make teaching rather difficult and, most importantly, lower students' motivation to learn. To deal with the problem, this researcher attempted to introduce material on indigenous religions in various subjects in order to test whether such material would enhance student motivation. The material included newspaper articles, articles in books and journals, television programs, and documentary films. This paper is the result of an experiment in education and personal reflection on the use of indigenous religious materials in teaching religious studies in the Asian context.
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"Ask and You Shall Find Out: Some Multicultural Dynamics in Catholic Theological Education"

TTR
Gillman, Florence Morgan
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 3 (2000): 152-156
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The theological classroom is a place where dynamics of diversity and multiculturalism enter not only the understanding and interpretation of the course material, but also the very processes of teaching and learning. But how is one to learn and assess what students and professors are experiencing as cultural differences, and how is one to sort out the personal characteristics from the cultural? This essay, underscoring the importance of asking students ...
Additional Info:
The theological classroom is a place where dynamics of diversity and multiculturalism enter not only the understanding and interpretation of the course material, but also the very processes of teaching and learning. But how is one to learn and assess what students and professors are experiencing as cultural differences, and how is one to sort out the personal characteristics from the cultural? This essay, underscoring the importance of asking students about cultural issues, discusses a few such issues via some anecdotal data.
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"The Bible in African American Perspectives"

TTR
Bellis, Alice Ogden
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 3 (1998): 161-165
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This modified "note from the classroom" is a dialogue between two scholars about African American study of the Bible. Bellis introduces the subject by advocating the primacy of social location and the African American student's religious experience in the method that she uses in her classes. (Her sample bibliography, syllabus and course outline for teaching about the Bible in African American perspectives can be found on the Wabash Center web ...
Additional Info:
This modified "note from the classroom" is a dialogue between two scholars about African American study of the Bible. Bellis introduces the subject by advocating the primacy of social location and the African American student's religious experience in the method that she uses in her classes. (Her sample bibliography, syllabus and course outline for teaching about the Bible in African American perspectives can be found on the Wabash Center web page: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu.) Brown's response takes a different stance with regard to the relative importance for exegesis of historical-critical method and the reader's social location. While Bellis and Brown agree on the appeal that the King James Version holds for many African Americans (but for different reasons), their differing assessments of translations, the distinctiveness of African American interpretations, and the ethnicity of Biblical characters models a lively discussion of issues in teaching and learning.
TTR cover image

"Are We Missing a Truly Multicultural Moment? Comments on "The Bible in African American Perspectives""

TTR
Brown, Michael Joseph
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 3 (1998): 165-168
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This modified "note from the classroom" is a dialogue between two scholars about African American study of the Bible. Bellis introduces the subject by advocating the primacy of social location and the African American student's religious experience in the method that she uses in her classes. (Her sample bibliography, syllabus and course outline for teaching about the Bible in African American perspectives can be found on the Wabash Center web ...
Additional Info:
This modified "note from the classroom" is a dialogue between two scholars about African American study of the Bible. Bellis introduces the subject by advocating the primacy of social location and the African American student's religious experience in the method that she uses in her classes. (Her sample bibliography, syllabus and course outline for teaching about the Bible in African American perspectives can be found on the Wabash Center web page: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu.) Brown's response takes a different stance with regard to the relative importance for exegesis of historical-critical method and the reader's social location. While Bellis and Brown agree on the appeal that the King James Version holds for many African Americans (but for different reasons), their differing assessments of translations, the distinctiveness of African American interpretations, and the ethnicity of Biblical characters models a lively discussion of issues in teaching and learning.
TTR cover image

"Response to Michael Brown's Comments"

TTR
Bellis, Alice Ogden
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 3 (1998): 168-170
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Journal cover image

Women in Theological Education: An Issue Reexamined

Journal Issue
1975
Theological Education 11, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
The Seminary Quarter for Women at Grailville: Toward a Feminist Approach to Theological Education (Murphy Davis)
Women Theologizing: Naming and Claiming our Style (Susan Ross Clewell, Anita Herrick, Susan Haverstadt, Susan Vogel, and Susan Thorton)
A Survey of Interests and Agendas of Women in U.S. Church Denominations (Linda J. Hanson)
Women in the Seminary: A Roman Catholic Perspective (Joseph P. Brennan)
Association of Theological Schools Affirmative Action Plan (Arabella Meadows-Rogers)
A Modest Proposal (Fay Hollingshead Ellison)
Men in Conversation About Men (James W. Bergland, Tom F. Driver, Marvin Ellison, Bruce Robbins, Sidney D. Skirvin, and Arabella Meadows-Rogers)
Doctoral Placement Service for Women in Religion
Journal cover image

Black Pastors/White Professors: An Experiment in Dialogic Education

Journal Issue
Wilmore, Gayraud S., ed.
1980
Theological Education 16, no. 1, spec. issue (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Gayraud S. Wilmore)
Collaboration and Challenge: Analysis of the Process (Abstract) (James B. Ashbrook, and Louis Charles Harvey)
Our Reflection on the Lilly Project (Paul Garlington, et al.)
Commentary on the Process (Gayraud S. Wilmore)
The Project and Biblical Studies (Werner E. Lemke)
The Project and Historical Studies (Richard M. Spielmann)
The Project and Theological Studies (Kenneth Cauthen)
The Final Interviews with the Pastors (Thomas H. Troeger)
Concluding Commentary (Gayraud S. Wilmore)
Appendix—Biographical Sketches of the Participants
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Speaking The Lower Frequencies: Students and Media Literacy

Book
Jacobs, Walter R.
2005
State University of New York Press, Albany
P96.M42U585 2005
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Speaking the Lower Frequencies demonstrates how students can be critical consumers of media while retaining the pleasure they derive from it. In Walter R. Jacobs's classes on media and society, students use the instructor's experiences as a model for investigating their own histories. By creating new social contexts and meanings, the students learn to "speak the lower frequencies. Jacobs looks at the students' reception and critique of pop culture texts ...
Additional Info:
Speaking the Lower Frequencies demonstrates how students can be critical consumers of media while retaining the pleasure they derive from it. In Walter R. Jacobs's classes on media and society, students use the instructor's experiences as a model for investigating their own histories. By creating new social contexts and meanings, the students learn to "speak the lower frequencies. Jacobs looks at the students' reception and critique of pop culture texts like the movie I Like It Like That and the television show The XFiles to provide evidence for the effects of alternative pedagogy on critical literacy. He shows that when students are encouraged to be more than just passive receptors of the media they learn to develop active, critical voices that they use both inside and outside the classroom. Jacobs also explains how students can become more aware and active in attempts to create democratic possibilities for themselves and others. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Entering the Pensieve
ch. 2 Autoethnography of teachers, texts, and space
ch. 3 Fragments of the sociological imagination
ch. 4 Strange texts in postmodern space
ch. 5 Breaking and making frames as context
ch. 6 Conjuring the future
ch. 7 Evoking the lower frequencies
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Teaching Around the 4MAT Cycle: Designing Instruction for Diverse Learners with Diverse Learning Styles

Book
McCarthy, Bernice and Dennis McCarthy
2006
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1029.A13M34 2006
Topics: Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
From the Publisher
Learning styles are linked to preferences in the ways people perceive and process experience. Bernice McCarthy's unique 4MAT cycle is a brain-based teaching method that emphasizes diverse learning styles, honors learner individuality, teaches concepts as well as facts, and improves student thinking and performance on traditional as well as high-stakes assessments.
With 25+ years of field testing and field use supporting its effectiveness, the 4MAT method ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher
Learning styles are linked to preferences in the ways people perceive and process experience. Bernice McCarthy's unique 4MAT cycle is a brain-based teaching method that emphasizes diverse learning styles, honors learner individuality, teaches concepts as well as facts, and improves student thinking and performance on traditional as well as high-stakes assessments.
With 25+ years of field testing and field use supporting its effectiveness, the 4MAT method uses a 4-quadrant cycle of learning that begins by engaging learners through direct experience, moving them toward: Reflective observation, Abstract conceptualizing, Active experimentation and problem-solving, Integration of new knowledge and skills.
Learning happens as we unite our experiences and their meaning with actions that test those meanings in the world. This exciting new resource offers schools a powerful tool to enhance teaching and learning for students with all learning styles, backgrounds, and preferences.

Table Of Content:
Foreword

ch. 1 Learning styles
ch. 2 A cycle of learning
ch. 3 Teaching around the cycle
ch. 4 The brain-mind learning system
ch. 5 Overlaying right- and left-mode to complete the 4MAT cycle
ch. 6 Teaching from concepts
ch. 7 The 4MAT design overlay (lesson planning)
Article cover image

"Educating Chinese Seminarians in North America: A Cross Cultural Understanding of Teaching and Learning"

Article
Lai, Alan Ka Lun
1999
Consensus 25, no. 1 (1999): 69-92
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"The Syllabus as Passport into a Common Culture of Teaching and Learning: Developing and Assessing Strategies for Dealing with Diversity"

TTR
Green, Barbara and Martha Stortz
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 4 (2006): 221-228
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Finding themselves teaching to increasingly diverse student populations, two mid-career faculty from different disciplines embarked on a common voyage to make their foundational courses more sensitive to student learning styles. Adrift in the seas of multiple intelligences and multiculturalism, the researchers quickly abandoned any hope of developing distinctive teaching portfolios for individual learning profiles. Instead, they structured the syllabus to be the passport into a common culture of teaching and ...
Additional Info:
Finding themselves teaching to increasingly diverse student populations, two mid-career faculty from different disciplines embarked on a common voyage to make their foundational courses more sensitive to student learning styles. Adrift in the seas of multiple intelligences and multiculturalism, the researchers quickly abandoned any hope of developing distinctive teaching portfolios for individual learning profiles. Instead, they structured the syllabus to be the passport into a common culture of teaching and learning in the classroom. Syllabus design and on-going "spot" assessments proved trusty guides in re-centering learning on the students' needs. In the process of outlining these two strategies for creating a common culture of teaching and learning, the article offers testimony that old dogs can learn new tricks! Additional materials, including syllabi used in these courses and in class assessment tools, can be found on the Web page of the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu/journal/greenstortz.html
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"Why Do Students Keep Writing Me Sermons? Teaching Biblical Studies Cross-Culturally in New Zealand "

TTR
Wall, Lynne
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 1 (2007): 34-41
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Students from different cultural backgrounds respond in a variety of ways to my teaching of biblical studies. Some sermonize or plagiarize quite unselfconsciously in their written assignments, while others consistently hand in work late or are silent members of the class. As I struggled with what these behaviors were saying about my teaching, I came to realize that limited ability in spoken and written English was not the only barrier. ...
Additional Info:
Students from different cultural backgrounds respond in a variety of ways to my teaching of biblical studies. Some sermonize or plagiarize quite unselfconsciously in their written assignments, while others consistently hand in work late or are silent members of the class. As I struggled with what these behaviors were saying about my teaching, I came to realize that limited ability in spoken and written English was not the only barrier. Deeper issues were at stake here about the nature of cross-cultural communication, teaching, and learning. In this note I analyze the issues of faith, authority, and styles of teaching and learning which underlie the "clash of educational cultures" (Ballard and Clanchy 1997, viii) occurring in the cross-cultural classroom. Then I suggest a number of strategies that I have developed to build bridges of understanding between the various educational cultures, to encourage deeper participation and to develop critical thinking.
TTR cover image

"Transforming to Teach: Teaching Religion to Today's Black College Student"

TTR
Coleman, Monica A.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 2 (2007): 95-100
BL41.T4
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Emerging from the particular experiences of the marginalized, postmodern pedagogies (bell hooks, Paolo Freire, feminist pedagogies) argue that education is more than conveying information from teacher to student. Rather education should encompass the transformative process of shaping character, values, and politics through the dynamic interaction among the teacher, the students' experiences, and the content of the instructional material. These perspectives argue that educators should reject "the banking model" of education, ...
Additional Info:
Emerging from the particular experiences of the marginalized, postmodern pedagogies (bell hooks, Paolo Freire, feminist pedagogies) argue that education is more than conveying information from teacher to student. Rather education should encompass the transformative process of shaping character, values, and politics through the dynamic interaction among the teacher, the students' experiences, and the content of the instructional material. These perspectives argue that educators should reject "the banking model" of education, and teach to transform. However, religious studies with today's black college student tests the mettle of these approaches. On the one hand, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have long practiced transformative education through a commitment to shaping both the minds and characters of their students. On the other hand, many of today's black college students are less receptive to transformation, particularly in the academic study of religion. This resistance to transformation is a reflection of (1) the socio-economic reality of the current student, and (2) a new black religiosity that portrays the world in binary terms. These economic and religious realities present a teaching context for which few religious scholars are prepared. This essay discusses the particularities of teaching religion to today's black college student by sharing the challenges, failures, successes, and joys of teaching religion at a small church-related, historically black women's college in the south. I will discuss the techniques that fail, and the way in which this unique context causes me to transform the way I teach religion. In the midst of a commitment to postmodern pedagogies, I feel a need to return to the banking model's establishment of authority and emphasis on content. As I negotiate with this method, I find ways to stealthily infuse transformative pedagogical techniques. I also discuss the way such a dramatic shift in pedagogy has transformed me, the teacher.
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"Rethinking Classroom Diversity: Three Student Cultures in a Mainline Seminary"

TTR
Evans, Christopher H.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 4 (2007): 223-230
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Discussions on teaching and learning within theological seminaries often center on the question of student diversity, focused primarily upon issues of race, gender, and ethnicity. At the same time that seminaries are challenged to deal with a multitude of pedagogical suppositions emerging from increasingly diverse learning goals, seminaries must also pay attention to the ways their students challenge an institution's core mission to train ministers for service in churches and ...
Additional Info:
Discussions on teaching and learning within theological seminaries often center on the question of student diversity, focused primarily upon issues of race, gender, and ethnicity. At the same time that seminaries are challenged to deal with a multitude of pedagogical suppositions emerging from increasingly diverse learning goals, seminaries must also pay attention to the ways their students challenge an institution's core mission to train ministers for service in churches and denominations. Based upon the author's experience teaching in a mainline Protestant seminary, the essay discusses three student cultures that often overlap among today's seminarians. These three student cultures, referred to here as "church seminarian," "new paradigm seminarian," and "vocational seminarian," carry very different understandings of the seminary's role to prepare students for ministry. A critical discernment of these cultures might challenge seminary faculty to reevaluate their educational and missional suppositions amidst divergent student career objectives.
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African American Men in College

Book
Cuyjet, Michael J., and Associates, ed.
2006
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC2781.A39 2006
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
African American Men in College is a much-needed resource that includes examples of real-world programs and activities to enhance academic success in the college environment for African American men. The examples are collected from a variety of institutions across the country.With contributions from leading practitioners and scholars in the field, African American Men in College explores the factors that promote a climate of academic success. The book shows how ...
Additional Info:
African American Men in College is a much-needed resource that includes examples of real-world programs and activities to enhance academic success in the college environment for African American men. The examples are collected from a variety of institutions across the country.With contributions from leading practitioners and scholars in the field, African American Men in College explores the factors that promote a climate of academic success. The book shows how participation in extracurricular activities can create a positive social climate and examines the advantages of developing communication and leadership skills. It shows how fostering relationships with administrators and community leaders can promote academic success. The book also describes a proven mentoring program and examines the role spirituality and religion can play in bolstering successful college experiences. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 African American college men : twenty-first-century issues and concerns (Michael J. Cuyjet)
ch. 2 Enhancing the academic climate for African American men (Fred A. Bonner II and Kevin W. Bailey)
ch. 3 The impact of campus activities on African American college men (Charles Brown)
ch. 4 Enhancing African American male student outcomes through leadership and active involvement (Shaun R. Harper)
ch. 5 Developmental mentoring of African American college men (E. Michael Sutton)
ch. 6 The role of spirituality and religion in the experiences of African American male college students (Lemuel W. Watson)
ch. 7 The role of black fraternities in the African American male undergraduate experience (Shaun R. Harper and Frank Harris III)
ch. 8 African American male college athletes (Kenya LeNoir Messer)
ch. 9 African American gay men : another challenge for the academy (Jamie Washington and Vernon A. Wall)
ch. 10 African American men at historically black colleges and universities : different environments, similar challenges (Walter M. Kimbrough and Shaun R. Harper)
ch. 11 Meeting the challenges to African American men at community colleges (Myron L. Pope)
ch. 12 Helping African American men matriculate : ideas and suggestions (Michael J. Cuyjet)
ch. 13 Student African American brotherhood (Tyrone Bledsoe and Kevin D. Rome, Sr.)
ch. 14 Meyerhoff scholarship program : University of Maryland, Baltimore County (Earnestine Baker)
ch. 15 The Black Man On Campus (BMOC) project : Bowling Green State University, Ohio (Kevin W. Bailey)
ch. 16 Black men's collective : Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey (Christopher C. Catching)
ch. 17 Black male rap session : University of Louisville (Edward Laster)
ch. 18 African American men of Arizona State University (AAMASU) (Alonzo Jones and Lasana O. Hotep)
ch. 19 Sons of Alkebulan and the black man think tank : University of North Texas (Pamela Safisha Nzingha Hill)
ch. 20 It's easier than you think : Central State University, Wilberforce, Ohio (Tobias Q. Brown and Amanda A. Farabee)
ch. 21 The Collegiate 100 : an affiliate organization of the 100 Black Men of America, Inc. (Christian A. Mattingly and Carl Humphrey)
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Latino Change Agents in Higher Education: Shaping a System that Works for All

Book
Valverde, Leonard A., and Associates
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LC2670.6.L40 2008
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book offers college and university teachers a practical guide for meeting the challenges of educating the burgeoning population of Latino students. The contributors, a stellar group of experienced leaders in higher education, clearly show that the changes to higher education needed to ensure Latino student success will benefit all students.
In this book, the authors call for systemic change across the entire K-16 spectrum but put the focus ...
Additional Info:
This book offers college and university teachers a practical guide for meeting the challenges of educating the burgeoning population of Latino students. The contributors, a stellar group of experienced leaders in higher education, clearly show that the changes to higher education needed to ensure Latino student success will benefit all students.
In this book, the authors call for systemic change across the entire K-16 spectrum but put the focus on the challenges for higher education. The book outlines strategies for increasing access and retention, explores the role of professional associations in advocating change, and explains the importance of the contributions of Latino college graduates to the U.S economy. Latino Change Agents in Higher Education is a much-needed guide for higher education leaders no matter what type of campus or institution they represent. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by Ricardo R. Fernandez
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Contributors

Part I The Past Cannot Be the Future
ch. 1 Why the United States Can No Longer Wait to Educate Its Latino Population
ch. 2 Pathways to a Better Future: Reconfiguring the Educational Context for Change
ch. 3 Making an All-in-One K-16 System Work

Part II Systemic Change, Si; Special Add-On Programs, No
ch. 4 From Minority to Majority: New Education Strategies
ch. 5 Recent Strategies to Increase Access and Retention
ch. 6 Latino Professional Associations: Advocacy for Liberation
ch. 7 Establishing Institutions of Higher Education That Serve Latinos

Part III A Bright Future Necesita Un Grito Fuerte
ch. 8 The Stakes Keep Going Up: Sustaining Latino Communities
ch. 9 Old Promises, Contemporary Goals, and Future Dreams: Time for a Bold Plan
ch. 10 Where Latinos Go to College Matters

Part IV Beginning the Work of Reshaping Higher Education
ch. 11 Leadership Always Makes a Difference
ch. 12 Changing Paradigms: As Society Transforms So Must Higher Education

References
Index
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Making a Real Difference with Diversity: A Guide to Institutional Change

Book
Clayton-Pedersen, Alma R.; Parker, Sharon; Smith, Daryl G.; Moreno, Jose F.; and Teraguchi, Daniel Hiroyuki
2007
Association of American Colleges and Universities
LC1099.4.C2M34 2007
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Making a Real Difference with Diversity provides readers with a step-by-step guide for implementing, evaluating, and sustaining comprehensive diversity work on campus. Drawn from a six-year diversity initiative involving twenty-eight independent California colleges and universities, the monograph offers a set of promising practices and selected quantitative and qualitative findings pertaining to efforts to enhance college access and success for underrepresented students, increase the presence of underrepresented minority faculty, and strengthen ...
Additional Info:
Making a Real Difference with Diversity provides readers with a step-by-step guide for implementing, evaluating, and sustaining comprehensive diversity work on campus. Drawn from a six-year diversity initiative involving twenty-eight independent California colleges and universities, the monograph offers a set of promising practices and selected quantitative and qualitative findings pertaining to efforts to enhance college access and success for underrepresented students, increase the presence of underrepresented minority faculty, and strengthen overall institutional functioning regarding diversity. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Journey from "Project-itis" to Coordinated Action
ch. 2 Quantitative Findings
ch. 3 Qualitative Findings
ch. 4 Promising Practices
ch. 5 A Guide to Comprehensive Diversity Work

Conclusion
References
Appendices
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The Gender Gap in College: Maximizing the Developmental Potential of Women and Men

Book
Linda J. Sax
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LC212.92.S29 2008
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Drawing on data from a sample of approximately 17,000 male and female students that represent 200 institutions, The Gender Gap in College examines the impact of college experiences, peer groups, and faculty on a comprehensive array of student outcomes. Author Linda Sax’s approach is unique because she directly examines the interaction between gender and a variety of college experiences, a major inquiry which addresses the fundamental “individualization” question: do women and ...
Additional Info:
Drawing on data from a sample of approximately 17,000 male and female students that represent 200 institutions, The Gender Gap in College examines the impact of college experiences, peer groups, and faculty on a comprehensive array of student outcomes. Author Linda Sax’s approach is unique because she directly examines the interaction between gender and a variety of college experiences, a major inquiry which addresses the fundamental “individualization” question: do women and men respond differently to a given educational experience? The areas covered in the book include academic achievement, self-concept, life goals, career development, physical and emotional health, political and social attitudes, and satisfaction with college. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Foreword
Preface
About the Author
Introduction

Gender Differences Among Entering College Students, Emily Arms and Casey Eznekier
Gender and College Student Development, Alyssa N. Bryant
Approaches to Studying Gender and College Impact
Personality and Identity
Political and Social Values
Academic Outcomes
Where Should We Go from Here? Implications of the Gender Gap for Campus Practice and Future Research
Review Prior of Research on Separate-Gender College Effects
Analytical Approach Used for Separate-Gender Regressions
Changes in the Gender Gap during College
Squared Multiple Correlations, by Gender

References
Index
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Diversified Theological Education: Equipping All God's People

Book
Kinsler, Ross, ed.
2008
William Carey International University Press, Pasadena, CA
BV4020.D58 2008
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The central concern of Diversified Theological Education, which includes Theological Education by Extension, is access. TEE and DTE models have made enormous progress in the urgent task of equipping all God's people for ministry. Ross Kinsler has compiled in this anthology important case studies of the diverse means of contemporary theological education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The central concern of Diversified Theological Education, which includes Theological Education by Extension, is access. TEE and DTE models have made enormous progress in the urgent task of equipping all God's people for ministry. Ross Kinsler has compiled in this anthology important case studies of the diverse means of contemporary theological education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Desmond Tutu)
Preface
Diversified Theological Education
ch. 1 Equipping all God's people for God's mission (Ross Kinsler)
Africa
ch. 2 Theological education by extension in Zambia (Kangwa Mabuluki)
ch. 3 TEE College of Southern Africa (Tony Moodie)
ch. 4 TEE among African Instituted Churches (Helena Hooper)

Asia and Australia
ch. 5 The extension programme of the senate of Serampore College, Roger Gaikwad
ch. 6 The Institute for TEE in Nepal (Peter Bisset)
ch. 7 St. Mark's National Theological Centre, Australia (Stephen Pickard)

Latin America
ch. 8 Latin American Biblical University (José Duque)
ch. 9 International faculty of theological education, Argentina, (Norberto Saracco)
ch. 10 Central American Center for Pastoral Studies, Guatemala, (Judith Castañeda, et al)
ch. 11 Latin American doctoral program (Charles Van Engen)

North America and Europe
ch. 12 TEE in First Nations communities (John A. (Ian) MacKenzie)
ch. 13 Master of Arts in Global Leadership, Fuller Theological Seminary (Robert Freeman)
ch. 14 The Open Russian Theological Academy (Michael Huggins)
Additional Info:
As societal expectations about attending college have grown, professors report increasing numbers of students who are unprepared for the rigors of postsecondary education—not just more students with learning disabilities (whose numbers have more than tripled, but students (with and without special admission status who are academically at-risk because of inadequate reading, writing and study skills.
This book provides professors and their graduate teaching assistants—those at the front ...
Additional Info:
As societal expectations about attending college have grown, professors report increasing numbers of students who are unprepared for the rigors of postsecondary education—not just more students with learning disabilities (whose numbers have more than tripled, but students (with and without special admission status who are academically at-risk because of inadequate reading, writing and study skills.
This book provides professors and their graduate teaching assistants—those at the front line of interactions with students—with techniques and approaches they can use in class to help at-risk students raise their skills so that they can successfully complete their studies.
The author shares proven practices that will not only engage all students in a class, but also create the conditions—while maintaining high standards and high expectations—to enable at-risk and under-prepared students to develop academically, and graduate with good grades. The author also explains how to work effectively with academic support units on campus.
Within the framework of identifying those students who need help, establishing a rapport with them, adopting inclusive teaching strategies, and offering appropriate guidance, the book presents the theory teachers will need, and effective classroom strategies.
The author covers teaching philosophy and goals
issues of discipline and behavior
motivation and making expectations explicit
classroom climate and learning styles
developing time management and study skills
as well as the application of "universal design" strategies.
The ideas presented here—that the author has successfully employedover many years—can be easily integrated into any class. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword

ch. 1 Unprepared and At-Risk College Students: Myth or Reality?
ch. 2 Philosophical Foundations: Yes, They Can!
ch. 3 The First Week of Class: Sharing a Mission for Success
ch. 4 Begin with Consistent Contact: Attendance That Matters
ch. 5 Learning Styles and the Science of Learning: Tapping Brain Power
ch. 6 Embracing Learner-Centered Education: Engaging Students
ch. 7 Interweaving Assessment and Teaching: Any Questions?
ch. 8 Techniques for Promoting Academic Integrity and Discouraging Cheating: Playing by the Rules

Epilogue: Final Thoughts: Promoting A Richer Campus Environment

Appendix A: Checklist for Possible Course Syllabi Items
Appendix B: Performance Prognosis Inventory for Analytical Chemistry
Appendix C: Preparing for Three Different Groupings
Appendix D: Vocabulary Strategy Steps

References
Index
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Most College Students Are Women: Implications for Teaching, Learning, and Policy

Book
Allen, Jeanie K., Diane R. Dean, and Susan J. Bracken, eds.
2008
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC1756.M67 2008
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
* Reveals continuing barriers to success for women students
* Offers remedies that will benefit all students
What are the realities behind recent press reports suggesting that women students have taken over higher education, both outnumbering males and academically outperforming them? Does women's development during college diverge from the commonly accepted model of cognitive growth? Does pedagogy in higher education take into account their different ways of knowing? Are there ...
Additional Info:
* Reveals continuing barriers to success for women students
* Offers remedies that will benefit all students
What are the realities behind recent press reports suggesting that women students have taken over higher education, both outnumbering males and academically outperforming them? Does women's development during college diverge from the commonly accepted model of cognitive growth? Does pedagogy in higher education take into account their different ways of knowing? Are there still barriers to women's educational achievement?
In answering these questions, this book's overarching message is that the application of research on women's college experiences has enriched teaching and learning for all students. It describes the broad benefits of new pedagogical models, and how feminist education aligns with the new call for civic education for all students.
The book also examines conditions and disciplines that remain barriers for women's educational success, particularly in quantitative and scientific fields. It explores problems that arise at the intersection of race and gender and offers some transformative approaches. It considers the impact of the campus environment—such as the rise of binge drinking, sexual assault, and homophobic behaviors—on women students' progress, and suggests means for improving the peer culture for all students. It concludes with an auto-narrative analysis of teaching women's studies to undergraduates that offers insights into the practicalities and joys of teaching.
At a time when women constitute the majority of students on most campuses, this book offers insights for all teachers, male and female, into how tohelp them to excel; and at the same time how to engage all their students, in all their diversity, through the application of feminist pedagogy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Women Learners on Campus: What Do We Know and What Have We Done?

ch. 1 Feminist and Civic Education: Bridging Parallel Approaches to Teaching and Learning (Becky Ropers-Huilman, Betsy Palmer)
ch. 2 Learning Partnerships: A Gender-Inclusive Model for Undergraduate Teaching (Baxter Magolda)
ch. 3 Effective Practices in Fostering Developmental Growth In Women Learners: A View from Neurophysiology (Kathleen Taylor, Catherine Marienau)
ch. 4 Women in Technology Careers (Teri Sosa)
ch. 5 Helping Women Improve Statistics Learning Online Through Authentic Learning And Emotional Intelligence (Marilyn K. Simon)
ch. 6 Examining The Baggage: First Steps Toward Transforming Habits of Mind Around Race in Higher Education (Crystal Gafford Muhammad, Adrienne Dixson)
ch. 7 Is Mona Lisa Still Smiling?: Women and the Out-of-Class Experience (Jeanie K. Allen)
ch. 8 Submerged Feminism(s)?: Perceptions of Adult Education Student Experiences With Women's Studies Scholarship (Susan J. Bracken)
Conclusion: Back(lash) To The Future (Jeanie K. Allen, Diane R. Dean, Susan J. Bracken)

Index
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Black Boys Can Make It: How They Overcome the Obstacles to University in the UK and USA

Book
Byfield, Cheron
2008
Trentham Books, Sterling, VA
LC2806.G7B94 2008
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book dispels the myth that Black boys are synonymous with underachievement.
It demonstrates how many progress into higher education, albeit against the odds, and offers solutions for policy and practice. There is a plethora of research focusing on the underachievement of Black boys. But little attention has been given to their positive achievement until this author's research on both sides of the Atlantic.
The book follows black ...
Additional Info:
This book dispels the myth that Black boys are synonymous with underachievement.
It demonstrates how many progress into higher education, albeit against the odds, and offers solutions for policy and practice. There is a plethora of research focusing on the underachievement of Black boys. But little attention has been given to their positive achievement until this author's research on both sides of the Atlantic.
The book follows black male students in the USA and UK who have successfully accessed higher education— at both elite universities (Harvard and Oxford) and less selective institutions. It sets out to establish the extent to which they have been exposed to the factors known to correlate with the underachievement of Black male youths, and to identify the factors that have led to their educational success and influenced their access to, and choice of universities.
Part One sets the educational scene in each country. Part Two looks at the obstacles the students encountered, covering social class; parental social capital; racism and racial identity; and addressing the boys' own negative attitudes and behavior. Part Three unravels the factors leading to success, devoting attention to parental roles; positive encounters with schools, teachers and community; the influence of church; and the students' personal qualities and navigational smarts. Part Four reviews the boys' processes of choice and application to university and concludes with implications for educational policy and practice.
Here is a book that can be used both as guide to policy development, and as a practical tool for use by parents, teachers and Black boys themselves to help gainaccess to higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Foreword
Preface

Part 1 Setting the Scene
ch. 1 Introduction

Part 2 Obstacles Overcome
ch. 2 The lens of social class
ch. 3 The parents' involvement
ch. 4 Racism and racial identity
ch. 5 Boys with attitude

Part 3 Unravelling the Factors That Generate Success
ch. 6 How parents steer their sons towards educational success
ch. 7 Teachers in schools and community projects
ch. 8 Religion and its effect
ch. 9 Personal qualities and navigational smarts

Part 4 Progressing Into Higher Education
ch. 10 Going to university

Part 5 Conclusion
ch. Implications for policy and practice

Appendix Interview Schedule
Bibliography
Index
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Learning From Experience: Minority Identities, Multicultural Struggles

Book
Paula M. L. Moya
2002
University of California Press, Berkley
PS 153.M4.M69 2002
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Inclusion and Diversity: Meeting the Needs of All Students

Book
Grace, Sue and Phil Gravestock
2009
Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, New York
LB2331.G665 2009
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
How should you prepare for the first day of class? How can you encourage all students to participate in discussions? How do you ensure disabled students can take part in field work? Increasingly, universities are drawing from a less traditional group of students – international students, disabled students, part time students, and mature students. This book offers specific, practical advice on the issues that teachers encounter when teaching in a diverse ...
Additional Info:
How should you prepare for the first day of class? How can you encourage all students to participate in discussions? How do you ensure disabled students can take part in field work? Increasingly, universities are drawing from a less traditional group of students – international students, disabled students, part time students, and mature students. This book offers specific, practical advice on the issues that teachers encounter when teaching in a diverse classroom. Inclusion and Diversity highlights good practice for all students, and provides a helpful structure around the day-to-day experiences of staff and students as they make contact with each other. With reference to the international literature, and discussing some of the educational principles that underpin an inclusive curriculum, this book covers a wide range of useful topics so that teachers will have quick access to guidelines on different aspects of teaching and learning:

o small and large group teaching

o e-learning

o work placements

o students’ lives out of the classroom

o personal tutoring

o skills agenda

o assessment

o employability and further study

Addressing a range of themes, including student age, ethnicity, disability, sexuality and gender, this book aids all practitioners in higher education today – particularly those new lecturers meeting their students for the first time – to develop a better understanding of the issues involved in teaching a diverse range of students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Starting Off – Preparing to Meet Your Students
ch. 2 Working With Students in Large Groups
ch. 3 Teaching Students in Small Groups
ch. 4 Using Learning Technologies
ch. 5 Your Students and Their Lives/Experience out of the Classroom – Academic
ch. 6 Your Students and Their Lives/Experience out of the Classroom – Welfare
ch. 7 Your Students and Their Lives/Experience out of the Classroom – Skills
ch. 8 Assessment Time – How do I Attempt to Ensure Fairness for All?
ch. 9 After the Ball is Over… How do I Help My Student Prepare for Life After the Course has Ended?
ch. 10 Conclusions

Bibliography
Index
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The Sage Handbook of African American Education

Book
Linda C. Tillman, ed.
2009
Sage Publications, Inc. Thousand Oaks, CA
LC2717.S34 2009
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The SAGE Handbook of African American Education is a unique, comprehensive collection of theoretical and empirical scholarship in six important areas: historical perspectives, teaching and learning, PK-12 school leadership, higher education, current issues, and education policy. The purpose of the Handbook is to articulate perspectives on issues affecting the participation and leadership of African Americans in PK-12 and postsecondary education. This volume also addresses historical and current issues affecting the ...
Additional Info:
The SAGE Handbook of African American Education is a unique, comprehensive collection of theoretical and empirical scholarship in six important areas: historical perspectives, teaching and learning, PK-12 school leadership, higher education, current issues, and education policy. The purpose of the Handbook is to articulate perspectives on issues affecting the participation and leadership of African Americans in PK-12 and postsecondary education. This volume also addresses historical and current issues affecting the education of African Americans and discusses current and future school reform efforts that directly affect this group.

Key Features

* Promotes inquiry and development of questions, ideas, and dialogue about critical practice, theory, and research on African Americans in the United States educational system

* Makes significant contributions to the scholarship on African Americans in the broad context of U.S. education and society

* Addresses the central question-in what ways do African Americans in corporate, private, and public positions influence and shape educational policy that affects African Americans? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction (Gloria J. Ladson-Billings)
Acknowledgments

Section I: The Education of Black Folk: Historical Perspectives
Introduction (Derrick P. Alridge and V.P. Franklin)
ch. 1. To Gain and to Lose: The Loving School and the African American Struggle for Education in Columbus, Ohio, 1831-1882 (Adah Ward Randolph)
ch. 2. African American Educators and the Black Intellectual Tradition (Derrick P. Alridge)
ch. 3. "They Rose or Fell Together": African American Educators and Community Leadership, 1795-1954 (V. P. Franklin)
ch. 4. The History of Black Women Graduate Students, 1921-1948 (Linda M. Perkins)
ch. 5. Caught Between a Rock and a Hard Place: The Dissolution of Black State Teachers Associations, 1954-1970 (Michael Fultz)

Section II: The Landscape of Teaching and Learning for African Americans in U.S. Schooling
Introduction (Jacquline Jordan Irvine)
ch. 6. Identity, Agency, and Culture: Black Achievement and Educational Attainment (Peter C. Murrell, Jr.)
ch. 7. Cultural Community Practices as Urban Classroom Resources (Yolanda J. Majors and Sana Ansari)
ch. 8. Preparing Teachers of African American Students in Urban Schools (H. Richard Milner IV)
ch. 9. African American Teachers' Caring Behaviors: The Difference Makes a Difference (Mari Ann Roberts and Jacquline Jordan Irvine)
ch. 10. After "It Takes A Village": Mapping the Terrain of Black Parental Involvement in the Post-Brown Era (Cheryl Fields-Smith)

Section III: African American Leaders in PK-12 Educational Leadership
Introduction (Linda C. Tillman)
ch. 11. African American Principals and the Legacy of Brown (Linda C. Tillman)
ch. 12. Leadership Challenges in K-12 Urban Education: Prospective African American Administrators' Views on Educating African American Students and Closing the Achievement (Will J. Jordan)
ch. 13. The Confluence of Race, Gender, and Generation in the Lives of African American Women Principals (Tondra L. Loder-Jackson)
ch. 14. Race, Law, and Leadership: Exploring the Interest-Convergence Dilemma (Mark A. Gooden)
ch. 15. African American Superintendents in Public School Districts (Kay Lovelace Taylor and Linda C. Tillman)

Section IV: African Americans in Higher Education
Introduction (Kofi Lomotey)
ch. 16. Exclusions and Illusions: Rethinking the Mysterious UC Admissions Process that Disadvantages Deserving African American Students (Eddie Comeaux and Walter R. Allen)
ch. 17. Hip Hop: A Source of Empowerment for African American Male College Students (Jon A. Yasin)
ch. 18. Campuswide Climate: Implications for African American Students (William A. Smith)
ch. 19. Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Catalysts to Liberation? (Kofi Lomotey and Sessi S. F. Aboh)
ch. 20. The Power of Pathways: Strategies for the Preparation of African American Faculty (Lynette L. Danley, Roderic R. Land, and Kofi Lomotey)

Section V: Current Issues: Theory and Research on the Participation of African Americans in U.S. Education
Introduction (Gwendolyn Carledge)
ch. 21. Critical Race Studies in Education and the "Endarkened" (Marvin Lynn and Thurman L. Bridges III)
ch. 22. Educating and Counseling African American Students: Recommendations for Teachers and School Counselors (James L. Moore III and Delila Owens)
ch. 23. The Education of African American Students in Charter Schools: Four Case Studies (Carol E. Malloy and Richard Noble III)
ch. 24. Disproportionality of African American Children in Special Education: Definition and Dimensions (Gwendolyn Cartledge and Charles Dukes)
ch. 25. Toward Understanding African American Males and K-12 Education (James Earl Davis)

Section VI: African Americans Shaping Educational Policy?
Introduction (Jennifer Beaumont)
ch. 26. Creating Opportunities for Educational Success: Oral Histories of Four African Americans Shaping Education Policy (Jennifer Beaumont)
ch. 27. Realities and Responsibilities in the Education Village (Eric J. Cooper)
ch. 28. Creating a New Model of Education for African-American Children: Mobilizing Stakeholder Partners in Service to Sustained Academic Success (Sabrina Hope King and Nancy M. Cardwell)
ch. 29. Beyond Segregation: The Continuing Struggle for Educational Equity 50 Years After Brown v. Board of Education (Sheilah D. Vance)
ch. 30. Educating Black Youth for Economic Empowerment: Democratic Economic Participation and School Reform Practices and Policies (Jessica Gordon Nembhard)

Epilogue: Black Education Post-Katrina: And All Us We Are Not Saved (Joyce Elaine King)
Appendix: Graduate School Programs to Prepare Future Faculty of Color (Lynette L. Danley, Roderic R. Land, and Kofi Lomotey)
Author Index
Subject Index
About the Editor
About the Section Editors
About the Contributors
Cover image

It's All About Jesus! Faith as an Oppositional Collegiate Subculture

Book
Peter Magolda and Kelsey Ebben Gross
2009
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC383.M324 2009
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
What it is like to be a collegian involved in a Christian organization on a public college campus? What roles do Christian organizations play in the lives of college students enrolled in a public college? What are evangelical student organizations’ political agendas, and how do they mobilize members to advance these agendas? What is the optimal equilibrium between the secular and the sacred within public higher education? What constitutes safe ...
Additional Info:
What it is like to be a collegian involved in a Christian organization on a public college campus? What roles do Christian organizations play in the lives of college students enrolled in a public college? What are evangelical student organizations’ political agendas, and how do they mobilize members to advance these agendas? What is the optimal equilibrium between the secular and the sacred within public higher education? What constitutes safe space for evangelical students, and who should provide this space?

This book presents a two-year ethnographic study of a collegiate evangelical student organization on a public university, authored by two “non-evangelicals.” The authors provide a glimpse into the lives of college students who join evangelical student organizations and who subscribe to an evangelical way of life during their college years. They offer empirically derived insights as to how students’ participation in a homogeneous evangelical student organization enhances their satisfaction of their collegiate experience and helps them develop important life lessons and skills. Ironically, while Christian students represent the religious majority on the campus under study, Christian organizations on this campus mobilize members by capitalizing on members’ shared sense of marginalization, and position themselves as cultural outsiders. This evangelical student organization serves as a safe space for students to express their faith within the larger secular university setting.

The narratives and interpretations aim not only to enrich understanding of a particular student organization but more importantly to spark intellectual discourse about the valueof faith-based organizations within public higher education. The role of religion in public higher education, student involvement in the co-curriculum, and peer education are three examples of critical issues in higher education for which this idiosyncratic case study offers broad understanding.

It’s All About Jesus! targets multiple audiences – both sacred and secular. For readers unfamiliar with evangelical collegiate organizations and the students they serve, the authors hope the narratives make the unfamiliar familiar and the dubious obvious. For evangelicals, the authors hope that the thickly described narratives not only make the familiar, familiar and the obvious, obvious, but also uncover the tacit meaning embedded in these familiar, but seldom examined subculture rituals.

The authors hope this book spurs discussion on topics such as campus power and politics, how organizations interact with the secular world around them, and how members can improve their organizations. Additionally, this text urges secular readers in student affairs to consider the many benefits, as well as liabilities, of “parachurches” as co-curricular learning sites on campus.

Lastly, given that the authors lay bare their methodology, their use of theory, and the tensions between their perspectives and those of the participants, this book will serve as a compelling case study for courses on qualitative research within religion studies, anthropology, sociology, and cultural studies fields. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword

ch. 1 Jesus and Higher Education Rituals of Faith
ch. 2 Research Processes Rituals of Inquiry
ch. 3 Researchers' Tales Rituals of Disclosure
ch. 4 Evolving Christians Precollege Evangelical Rituals
ch. 5 God's Squad Rituals of Recruitment
ch. 6 Praise Jesus Rituals of Difference
ch. 7 Getting To Really Know Jesus Teaching and Learning Rituals
ch. 8 Bridging the Gap between Evangelicals and Nonbelievers Outreach Rituals
ch. 9 Leading by Following Jesus Servant Leadership Rituals
ch. 10 From College Seniors to Real-World Evangelicals Transition Rituals
ch. 11 The Chosen Rituals of Vocation
ch. 12 SSC Revelations and Reconciliations Rituals of Understanding
ch. 13 Capstone Principles Exit Rituals
ch. 14 It's all about Jesus The Last Word

Notes
References
Index
Cover image

African Americans and Community Engagement in Higher Education: Community Service, Service-Learning, and Community-Based Research

Book
Evans, Stephanie Y.; Taylor, Collette M.; Dunlap, Michelle R.; and Miller, DeMond S, eds.
2009
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
LC220.5.A48 2009
Topics: Service Learning   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book discusses race and its roles in university-community partnerships. The contributors take a collaborative, interdisciplinary, and multiregional approach that allows students, agency staff, community constituents, faculty, and campus administrators an opportunity to reflect on and redefine what impact African American identity-in the academy and in the community-has on various forms of community engagement. From historic concepts of "race uplift" to contemporary debates about racialized perceptions of need, they argue ...
Additional Info:
This book discusses race and its roles in university-community partnerships. The contributors take a collaborative, interdisciplinary, and multiregional approach that allows students, agency staff, community constituents, faculty, and campus administrators an opportunity to reflect on and redefine what impact African American identity-in the academy and in the community-has on various forms of community engagement. From historic concepts of "race uplift" to contemporary debates about racialized perceptions of need, they argue that African American identity plays a significant role. In representing best practices, recommendations, personal insight, and informed warnings about building sustainable and mutually beneficial relationships, the contributors provide a cogent platform from which to encourage the difficult and much-needed inclusion of race in dialogues of national service and community engagement.

"This book validates the African proverb 'it takes a village to raise a child.' The topics are right on the mark and highlight the benefits of service-learning as an instrument of individual and community involvement and empowerment." - Festus E. Obiakor, coeditor of Culturally Responsive Literacy Instruction (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables
Preface: Using History, Experience, and Theory to Balance Relationships in Community Engagement
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Characteristics of Engagement: Communicated Experiences of Race, Universities, and Communities

Part 1 Community Service, Volunteerism, and Engagement
ch. 1 The Community Folk Art Center: A University and Community Creative Collaboration (Kheli R. Willetts)
ch. 2 An African American Health Care Experience: An Academic Medical Center and Its Interdisciplinary Practice (Kendall M. Campbell)
ch. 3 African American College Students and Volunteerism: Attitudes toward Mentoring at a Title I School (Joi Nathan)
ch. 4 Prejudice, Pitfalls, and Promise: Experiences in Community Service in a Historically Black University (Jeff Brooks)

Part 2 Community Service-Learning
ch. 5 Can the Village Educate the Prospective Teacher? Reflections on Multicultural Service-Learning in African American Communities (Lucy Mule)
ch. 6 Sowing Seeds of Success: Gardening as a Method of Increasing Academic Self-Efficacy and Retention among African American Students (August Hoffman, Julie Wallach, Eduardo Sanchez, Richard Carifo)
ch. 7 A Service or a Commitment? A Black Man Teaching Service-Learning at a Predominantly White Institution (Troy Harden)
ch. 8 Racial Identity and the Ethics of Service-Learning as Pedagogy (Annemarie Vaccaro)
ch. 9 "We'll Understand It Better By and By": A Three-Dimensional Approach to Teaching Race through Community Engagement (Meta Mendel-Reyes, Dwayne A. Mack)

Part 3 Community-Based Research
ch. 10 Black Like Me: Navigating Race, Gender, Research, and Community (Fleda Mask Jackson)
ch. 11 A Partnership with the African American Church: IMPACT and S.P.I.C.E.S. For Life (Micah McCreary, Monica Jones, Raymond Tademy, John Fife)
ch. 12 "I Have Three Strikes Against Me": Narratives of Plight and Efficacy among Older African American Homeless Women and Their Implications for Engaged Inquiry (Olivia G. M. Washington, David P. Moxley)
ch. 13 A Culturally Competent Community-Based Research Approach with African American Neighborhoods: Critical Components and Examples (Richard Briscoe, Harold R. Keller, Gwen McClain, Evangeline R. Best, Jessica Mazza)
ch. 14 Community Engagement and Collaboration in Community-Based Research: The Road to Project Butterfly (GiShawn Mance, Bernadette Sanchez, Niambi Jaha-Echols)

Final Word: African Americans and Community Engagement: The Challenge and Opportunity for Higher Education
List of Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
In Teaching Critical Thinking, renowned cultural critic and progressive educator bell hooks addresses some of the most compelling issues facing teaching issues facing teachers in and out of the classroom today.

In a series of short, accessible, and enlightening essays, hooks explores of the confounding and sometimes controversial topics that teachers and students have urged her to address since the publication of the previous best-selling volums in her ...
Additional Info:
In Teaching Critical Thinking, renowned cultural critic and progressive educator bell hooks addresses some of the most compelling issues facing teaching issues facing teachers in and out of the classroom today.

In a series of short, accessible, and enlightening essays, hooks explores of the confounding and sometimes controversial topics that teachers and students have urged her to address since the publication of the previous best-selling volums in her Teaching series, Teaching to Transgress and Teaching Community. The issues are varied and broad, from whether meaningful teaching can take place in a large classroom setting to confronting issues of self-esteem. One professor, for example, asked how black female professors can maintain positive authority in a classroom without being seen through the lens of negative racist, sexist stereotypes. One teacher asked how to handle tears in the classroom. while another wanted to know how to use humor as a tool for learning.

Addressing questions of race, gender, and class in this work, hooks discusses the complex balance that allows us to teach, value, and learn from works written by racist and sexist authors. Highlighting the importance of reading, she insists on the primacy of free speech, a democratic education of literacy. Throughout these essays, she celebrates the transformative power of critical thinking. This is provocative, powerful, and joyful intellectual work. It is a must read for anyone who is at all interested in education today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Critical Thinking
ch. 2 Democratic Education
ch. 3 Engaged Pedaeos
ch. 4 Decolonization
ch. 5 Inteerit
ch. 6 Purpose
ch. 7 Collaboration
ch. 8 Conversation
ch. 9 Telling the Story
ch. 10 Sharing the story
ch. 11 Imagination
ch. 12 To Lecture or Not
ch. 13 Humor in the Classroom
ch. 14 Crying Time
ch. 15 Conflict
ch. 16 Feminist Revolution
ch. 17 Black, Female, and Academic
ch. 18 Learning Past the Hate
ch. 19 Honoring Teachers
ch. 20 Teachers against Teaching
ch. 21 Self-Esteem
ch. 22 The Joy of Reading
ch. 23 Intellectual Life
ch. 24 Writing Books for Children
ch. 25 Spirituality
ch. 26 Touch
ch. 27 To Love Again
ch. 28 Feminist Change
ch. 29 Moving Past Race and Gender
ch. 30 Talking Sex
ch. 31 Teaching as Prophetic Vocation
ch. 32 Practical Wisdom

Index
Cover image

The Way Literacy Lives: Rhetorical Dexterity and Basic Writing Instruction

Book
Carter, Shannon
2008
State University of New York Press, Albany
LB1576.C31793 2008
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Challenges an autonomous model of literacy instruction in favor of one that recognizes and builds on students' facility in navigating other rhetorical contexts. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Challenges an autonomous model of literacy instruction in favor of one that recognizes and builds on students' facility in navigating other rhetorical contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Way Literacy Tests
ch. 2 The Way Literacy Oppresses
ch. 3 The Way Literacy Liberates
ch. 4 The Way Literacy Stratifies
ch. 5 The Way Literacy (Re)produces
ch. 6 The Way Literacy Lives

Conclusion

Appendix A
Appendix B
Appendix C (Sample Writing Assignments)
Appendix D

Note
Works Cited
Index
Article cover image

"Making-Face, Making-Heart: The Spiritual Foundations of an Indigenous Pedagogy"

Article
Casas, Ralph
2001
Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Theological Education of African American Catholics"

Article
Copeland, M. Shawn
1997
Crossroad Publishing Company
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Universal Design in Higher Education: From Principles to Practice

Book
Sheryl E. Burgstahler and Rebecca C. Cory, eds.
2008
Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, MA
LC4818.38.U55 2008
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Universal Design in Higher Education is a comprehensive guide for researchers and practitioners on creating fully accessible college and university programs. It is founded upon, and contributes to, theories of universal design in education that have been gaining increasingly wide attention in recent years. As greater numbers of students with disabilities attend postsecondary educational institutions, administrators have expressed increased interest in making their programs accessible to all students. This book ...
Additional Info:
Universal Design in Higher Education is a comprehensive guide for researchers and practitioners on creating fully accessible college and university programs. It is founded upon, and contributes to, theories of universal design in education that have been gaining increasingly wide attention in recent years. As greater numbers of students with disabilities attend postsecondary educational institutions, administrators have expressed increased interest in making their programs accessible to all students. This book provides both theoretical and practical guidance for schools as they work to turn this admirable goal into a reality. It addresses a comprehensive range of topics on universal design for higher education institutions, thus making a crucial contribution to the growing body of literature on special education and universal design. This book will be of unique value to university and college administrators, and to special education researchers, practitioners, and activists.

Universal Design in Higher Education looks at the design of physical and technological environments at institutions of higher education; at issues pertaining to curriculum and instruction; and at the full array of student services. It concludes with a thorough consideration of how to institutionalize universal design at higher education institutions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

Part I Introduction
ch. 1 Universal Design in Higher Education (Sheryl E. Burgstahler)

Part 2 Universal Design of Instruction in Higher Education
ch. 2 Universal Design of Instruction: From Principles to Practice (Sheryl E. Burgstahier)
ch. 3 Universal Design for Learning in Postsecondary Education: Reflections on Principles and Their Application (David H. Rose, Wendy S. Harbour, Catherine Sam Johnston, Samantha G. Daley)
ch. 4 The Faculty Perspective: Implementation of Universal Design in a First-Year Classroom (Jeanne L. Higbee)
ch. 5 Universal Design of Assessment (Martha L. Thurlow, Christopher J. Johnstone, Leanne R. Ketterlin-Geller) )
ch. 6 Universal Design of Instruction: Reflections of Students (Imke Durre, Michael Richardson, Carson Smith, Jessie Amelia Shulman, Sarah Steele)
ch. 7 The Benefits of Universal Design for Students with Psychiatric Disabilities (Al Souma, Deb Casey)
ch. 8 The Contribution of Universal Design to Learning and Teaching Excellence (Adele Darr, Richard Jones)
ch. 9 Universal Course Design: A Model for Professional Development< (Kristen Behling, Debra Hart) br> ch. 10 Small Victories: Faculty Development and Universal Design (Susan Yager)
ch. 11 A Case Study Approach to Promote Practical Application of Universal Design for Instruction (Sally S. Scott)
ch. 12 Engaging Higher Education Faculty in Universal Design: Addressing Needs of Students with Invisible Disabilities (Andrea M. Spencer, Olga Romero)
ch. 13 Incorporating Universal Design into Administration Courses: A Case Study (Karen A. Meyers)

Part 3 Universal Design of Student Services, Physical Spaces, and Technological Environments in Higher Education
ch. 14 Universal Design of Student Services: From Principles to Practice (Sheryl E. Burgstahler)
ch. 15 Applications of Universal Design to Student Services: Experiences in the Field (Alice Anderson, Rebecca C. Cory, Pam Griffin, Patricia J. Richter, Scott Ferguson, Eric Patterson, Lacey Reed)
ch. 16 Universal Design of Physical Spaces: From Principles to Practice (Sheryl E. Burgstahler)
ch. 17 Applications of Universal Design to Higher Education Facilities (Elisabeth Goldstein)
ch. 18 Universal Design of Technological Environments: From Principles to Practice (Sheryl E. Burgstahler)
ch. 19 Problems and Solutions for Making Multimedia Web-Based Lectures Accessible: A Case Study (Alice Anderson, Mie Litzkow)
ch. 20 Universal Design of Computing Labs (Terry Thompson)

Part 4 Institutionalization of Universal Design in Higher Education
ch. 21 Indicators of Institutional Change (Sheryl E. Burgstahler, Rebecca C. Cory)
ch. 22 A Change Process for Creating a Universally Designed Campus (Cathy Jenner)
ch. 23 Implementing Universal Design: Collaborations Across Campus (Donald E. Finn, Elizabeth Evans Getzel, Susan B. Asselin, Virginia Reilly)
ch. 24 Promoters and Inhibitors of Universal Design in Higher Education (Sheryl E. Burgstahler)

Appendix: Project Teams and Resources
About the Authors
Index
Cover image

Diversity & Motivation: Culturally Responsive Teaching in College, Second Edition

Book
Margery B. Ginsberg & Raymond J. Wlodkowski
2009
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2331.G57 2009
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Praise for the Second Edition of Diversity and Motivation

"Since the first publication of Diversity and Motivation in 1995, we have consistently used this text and its philosophy in our faculty development at Valencia Community College. I am delighted to see that this new edition focuses on college teaching. Ginsberg and Wlodkowski's approach to the diverse challenges of student motivation is authentic and transforming, and faculty respond!"

—...
Additional Info:
Praise for the Second Edition of Diversity and Motivation

"Since the first publication of Diversity and Motivation in 1995, we have consistently used this text and its philosophy in our faculty development at Valencia Community College. I am delighted to see that this new edition focuses on college teaching. Ginsberg and Wlodkowski's approach to the diverse challenges of student motivation is authentic and transforming, and faculty respond!"

—Ann E. Puyana, assistant vice president for academic affairs, Valencia Community College

"There is a great need for deeper understanding and conceptualization of student motivation across diverse groups to change the consciousness of educators and, ultimately, society. For those of us who teach, and face that need daily, this work illuminates and inspires."

—Ed Taylor, vice provost and dean, Undergraduate Academic Affairs, University of Washington?

"No one knows more about creating intrinsically motivating classroom environments in diverse settings than Margery Ginsberg and Raymond Wlodkowski. Every educator who wants to engage students fully for success should read this book!"

—Beverly Daniel Tatum, president, Spelman College
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Authors

ch. 1 Understanding Relationships Between Culture and Motivation to Learn
ch. 2 Establishing Inclusion
ch. 3 Developing Attitude
ch. 4 Enhancing Meaning
ch. 5 Engendering Competence
ch. 6 Implementing a Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

Resources
Resource A: Charting Insights from Lesson Study
Resource B: Working with a Faculty Team to Introduce the Motivational Framework
Resource C: The Motivational Framework
Resource D: The Motivational Framework Lesson Plan
Resource E: Facilitating Equitable Discussions Within a Multicultural Classroom
Resource F: Effective Lecturing Within a Multicultural Classroom
Resource G: Providing Written Feedback to Students in a Multicultural Classroom
Resource H: Cooperative Lesson Worksheet
Resource I: Inclusion, Attitude, Meaning, and Competence Rubrics
Resource J: Peer Coaching Rubrics
Resource K: Evaluating the Motivational Conditions of a Class

References
Name Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Conducting Research on Asian Americans in Higher Education

Book
Samuel D. Museus, ed.
2009
Wiley Periodicals, Inc., San Francisco
LC2633.6.C654 2009
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
From the Editor

This volume of New Directions for Institutional Research moves beyond pervasive oversimplified and preconceived notions about Asian Americans in higher education and offers new directions in studying this population. The authors highlight the complexities inherent in the realities of Asian Americans in higher education. In addition to deconstructing common misconceptions that lead to the invisibility of Asian Americans in higher education research, they discuss methodological ...
Additional Info:
From the Editor

This volume of New Directions for Institutional Research moves beyond pervasive oversimplified and preconceived notions about Asian Americans in higher education and offers new directions in studying this population. The authors highlight the complexities inherent in the realities of Asian Americans in higher education. In addition to deconstructing common misconceptions that lead to the invisibility of Asian Americans in higher education research, they discuss methodological issues related to disaggregating data, assessing programmatic interventions, conducting campus climate research, engaging Asian American undergraduates in the research process, and using critical perspectives related to Asian Americans. They also discuss key challenges and future directions in research on this population.

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes

ch. 1 Deconstructing the Model Minority Myth and How It Contributes to the Invisible Minority Reality in Higher Education Research (Samuel D. Museus and Peter N. Kiang)
ch. 2 Disaggregating Qualitative Data fro Asian American College Students in Campus Racial Climate Research and Assessment (Samuel D. Museus and Kimberly A. Truong)
ch. 3 Administering and Assessing Culture-Specific Interventions to Address Culture-Bound Issues Among Asian American (Josephine M. Kim)
ch. 4 Challenging the Model Minority Myth: Engaging Asian American Students in Research on Asian American College Student Experiences (Karen L. Suyemoto, Grace S. Kim, Miwa Tanabe, John Tawa, and Stephanie C. Day)
ch. 5 Critical Race Theory and Research on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Higher Education (Robert T. Teranishi, Laurie B. Behringer, Emily A. Grey and Tara L. Parker)
ch. 6 Contextualizing Asian American Education Through Critical Race Theory: An Example of U.S. Pilipino College Student Experiences (Tracy Lachica Buenavista, Uma M. Jayakumar, and Kimberly Misa-Escalante)
ch. 7 Using Culturally Sensitive Frameworks to Study Asian American Leaders in Higher Education (Patricia A. Neilson and Karen L. Suyemoto)
ch. 8 Rising to Challenge of Conducting Research on Asian Americans in Higher Education (Samuel D. Museus and Mitchell J. Chang)

Index
Additional Info:
With the general practice of online teaching still in relative infancy, nuanced approaches for teaching target populations such as black students are especially scarce. This article submits a theoretical framework for approaching the activity of teaching black students online using a transformative, postmodern pedagogy that is sensitive to black learning styles. It also offers practical suggestions for course design and deployment in online religion courses. In the interest of providing ...
Additional Info:
With the general practice of online teaching still in relative infancy, nuanced approaches for teaching target populations such as black students are especially scarce. This article submits a theoretical framework for approaching the activity of teaching black students online using a transformative, postmodern pedagogy that is sensitive to black learning styles. It also offers practical suggestions for course design and deployment in online religion courses. In the interest of providing an optimal learning experience for every student, all instructors are encouraged to consider the race and culture variable in their online teaching, whether their roster contains one black student or many.
Cover image

Race and Ethnicity (pdf)

Journal Issue
2009
Theological Education 45, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v. 45 no. 1 2009
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2009-theological-education-v45-n1.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2009-theological-education-v45-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Gifts Differing: The Educational Value of Race and Ethnicity (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Engaging Borders: Lifting Up Difference and Unmasking Division (Gary Riebe-Estrella)
Latino/a Theological Education: Defining the Table (David Maldonado)
Case Study: Hood Theological Seminary (Christopher R. Hutson)
What Do We Do with the Diversity that We Already Are? The Asian and Asian North American in Accredited Graduate Theological Education (Lester Edwin J. Ruiz and Eleazar S. Fernandez)
Online Theological Education: Perspectives from First-Generation Asian American Students (Roger S. Nam)
CORE: An Evolving Initiative (Janice Edwards-Armstrong)
Cover image

Understanding the International Student Experience

Book
Montgomery, Catherine
2010
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LB2375.M66 2010
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Presenting the human face of internationalization, this discursive text examines the social learning experience of international students against the background of current cultures in Higher Education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Presenting the human face of internationalization, this discursive text examines the social learning experience of international students against the background of current cultures in Higher Education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editors' Preface
Preface
Aims and background to the book
An outline of the research supporting the book
An overview of issues raised in the book

Acknowledgements

Part I The Context
ch. 1 Culture in Higher Education
The culture of internationalization in Higher Education
The discourse of 'marketization' in Higher Education
Culture and international students
Small cultures and communities of practice: Two helpful paradigms?

ch. 2 Research on the International Student Experience: A Cultural Landscape
Research spanning the years: Social relationships and international students in America
Large-scale research on international students: Examples from the UK and New Zealand
International students and approaches to learning
Language, identity and their influence on the context of learning
Summary

Part 2 The Research
ch. 3 Student Voices, Student Lives: International Students in Context
The importance of the methodology
The context for the study: A brief demographic background
Choice of network
The student profiles
Student experience in context
Summary

ch. 4 International Student Networks: A Community of Practice?
Social networks and international students
Social networks and modern technology
Social capital and international students
International students in a community of practice
Summary

ch. 5 International Students and Home Students: Worlds Apart?
The experience of young UK students: The Shipton study
Understanding home students' perception of international students
The friendships of international students
International students' friendships with home students
Relationships with home students: Worlds apart?

ch. 6 Preparing for Life in a Global Community?
Caveat: A complex picture
Language, identity and change
Development of a global community
Citizens of the international community?

ch. 7 Concluding Comments to the Research
The themes of the research
Summary

Part 3 Discussion
ch. 8 Paths towards an International Experience for All: the Criticality of Discourse, Context and Internationalization at Home
The influence of discourse
Ways of thinking about teaching and learning practices in an international context
The importance of context
Internationalization at home
Final comments

Postscript
Appendix 1 More Details of the Research study
Appendix 2 A Reflective Account of the Researcher
References
Index
Cover image

Adult and Higher Education in Queer Contexts: Power, Politics, and Pedagogy

Book
Hill, Robert J., Andre P. Grace & Associates
2009
Discovery Association Publishing House, Chicago
LC192.6.A38 2009
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
From the “Forward” by Stephen D. Brookfield, Distinguished University Professor, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis St. Paul, Minnesota

“These days it is fashionable to lament the passing of adult education’s transgressive spirit. The historical myth that exercises considerable influence on the field is that adult education used to be a radical expression of the democratic spirit, but it has been tamed, moved to the dark side, become ...
Additional Info:
From the “Forward” by Stephen D. Brookfield, Distinguished University Professor, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis St. Paul, Minnesota

“These days it is fashionable to lament the passing of adult education’s transgressive spirit. The historical myth that exercises considerable influence on the field is that adult education used to be a radical expression of the democratic spirit, but it has been tamed, moved to the dark side, become the lapdog of workplace learning, sold its soul to the devil of professionalism in a misguided attempt to be taken seriously by more powerful branches of education. This myth is just that – a myth. I have never believed it. The radical, transgressive spirit of adult education has endured and constantly reconfigured itself, doing its best to escape and outwit those who would contain and neutralize its energy and surfacing in ways that constantly take adult e ducators by surprise. The colleagues I work with in adult and higher education and the learners I serve and study with are neither tamed nor ideologically hoodwinked. This volume of spirited commitment — defiantly hopeful, seriously playful, and placing matt ers of desire and resistance at its center — is an apt representation of the enduring radical spirit of the best of adult education.”

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Section I. General Queer Discourse
ch. 1 Positioning Queer in Adult Education: Intervening in Politics and Praxis in North America
ch. 2 Que(e)rying Intimacy: Challenges to Lifelong Learning
ch. 3 Art as Anti-Oppression Adult Eduction: Creating a Pedagogy of Presence and Place

Section II. Higher Education
ch. 4 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Campus Climate Assessments: Current Trends and Future Considerations
ch. 5 LGBTQ Allies on Campus: Do They Have a Role?
ch. 6 Where is Our Citizenship in Academia? Experiences of Gay Men of Color in Higher Education
ch. 7 Successfully Queering the Business Curriculum: A Proposal Agenda for Process as well as Content

Section III. Adult Learning
ch. 8 Crossroads for Creating My Space in the Workforce: Transformative Learning Helps Understand LGBTQ Sexual Identity Development among Adults
ch. 9 LGBTQ Lessons from Midlife: An Unpicked Harvest
ch. 10 Sobears: Gay Bears, Sobriety, and Community
ch. 11 Transsexuality: Challenging the Institutionalized Sex/Gender Binary

Section IV. Community
ch. 12 When the Down-Low Becomes the New High: Integrating Queer Politics and Pedagogies through Critical Community Education in Kosovo
ch. 13 Positive Prevention for Gay Men: Dismounting Missionary Positions
ch. 14 Just City Life: Creating a Safe Space for the GLBTQ Community in Urban Adult Education
ch. 15 No End to History: Demanding Civil Quarter for Sexual Minorities in Heteronormative Space

About the Editors
About the Contributors
Cover image

Women and Gaming: The Sims and 21st Century Learning

Book
Gee, James Paul and Elisabeth R. Hayes
2010
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LB1029.S53G44 2010
Topics: Online Learning   |   Cognitive Development   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Video games have become both big business and a technological focal point for new forms of learning. Today games are not just played; players engage in game design, write fan fiction, and organize themselves into collaborative learning communities. In these communities players acquire 21st century skills in technology, but, in the best of these communities, they hone these technical skills and strengthen emotional and social intelligence. The authors argue that ...
Additional Info:
Video games have become both big business and a technological focal point for new forms of learning. Today games are not just played; players engage in game design, write fan fiction, and organize themselves into collaborative learning communities. In these communities players acquire 21st century skills in technology, but, in the best of these communities, they hone these technical skills and strengthen emotional and social intelligence. The authors argue that women gamers—too often ignored as gamers—are in many respects leading the way in this trend towards design, cultural production, new learning communities, and the combination of technical proficiency with emotional and social intelligence. We draw on case studies about women who “play” the Sims, the best selling game in history, to argue a new general theory of learning for the 21st Century. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction: Gaming Goes Beyond Gaming
ch. 2 Video Games and 21st Century Skills: Why the Sudden Worldwide Interest in Video Games and Learning?
ch. 3 The Nickel and Dimed Challenge: Designing New Forms of Socially Conscious Play
ch. 4 A Young Girl Becomes a Designer and Goes Global: Succeeding at 21st Century Skills but Not at School
ch. 5 How Passion Grows: A Retired Shut-In Goes from Making a Purple Potty to Gaining Millions of Fans
ch. 6 Passionate Affinity Groups: A New Form of Community that Works to Make People Smarter
ch. 7 A Young Girl and Her Vampire Stories: How a Teenager Competes with a Best Selling Author
ch. 8 From The Sims to Second Life: A Young Woman Transforms Her Real Life
ch. 9 What Does it All Mean: What Women and The Sims Have to Teach Us About What Education and Learning Will Look Like in the 21st Century

Notes
References
Index
Cover image

Diversity's Promise for Higher Education: Making It Work

Book
Smith, Daryl G.
2009
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Daryl G. Smith's career has been devoted to studying and fostering diversity in higher education. She has witnessed and encouraged the evolution of diversity from an issue addressed sporadically on college campuses to an imperative if institutions want to succeed. In Diversity's Promise for Higher Education, she analyzes how diversity is practiced today and offers new recommendations for effecting lasting and meaningful change.

Smith argues that in the ...
Additional Info:
Daryl G. Smith's career has been devoted to studying and fostering diversity in higher education. She has witnessed and encouraged the evolution of diversity from an issue addressed sporadically on college campuses to an imperative if institutions want to succeed. In Diversity's Promise for Higher Education, she analyzes how diversity is practiced today and offers new recommendations for effecting lasting and meaningful change.

Smith argues that in the next generation of work on diversity, student population mix and performance will no longer be acceptable indicators of an institution's diversity effectiveness. To become more relevant to society, the nation, and the world while remaining true to their core mission, institutions must begin to see diversity, like technology, as central to teaching and research. She proposes a set of practices that will help colleges and universities embrace diversity as a tool for institutional success.

This thoughtful volume draws on 40 years of diversity studies. It offers both researchers and administrators an innovative approach to developing and instituting effective and sustainable diversity strategies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part I The Diversity Imperative

ch. 1 The National and Global Context for Diversity in Higher Education

ch. 2 The Role of Identity in Diversity

Part II Reframing Diversity

ch. 3 Diversity Framework for Higher Education: Inclusive and Differentiated

ch. 4 The Past Forty Years

Part III Building Capacity By Interrupting The Usual

ch. 5 Identifying Talent: The Faculty

ch. 6 Working With and Across Differences: Intergroup Relations and Identity

ch. 7 Student Learning and Success

Part IV What Will It Take?

ch. 8 Monitoring Progress on Diversity

ch. 9 Making Diversity Work: Recommendations and Conclusions

References

Index
Additional Info:
More first-generation students are attending college than ever before, and policy makers agree that increasing their participation in higher education is a matter of priority.

Despite this, there is no agreed definition about the term, few institutions can quantify how many first-generation students are enrolled, or mistakenly conflate them with low-income students, and many important dimensions to the first-generation student experience remain poorly documented. Few institutions have in ...
Additional Info:
More first-generation students are attending college than ever before, and policy makers agree that increasing their participation in higher education is a matter of priority.

Despite this, there is no agreed definition about the term, few institutions can quantify how many first-generation students are enrolled, or mistakenly conflate them with low-income students, and many important dimensions to the first-generation student experience remain poorly documented. Few institutions have in place a clear, well-articulated practice for assisting first-generation students to succeed.

Given that first-generation students comprise over 40% of incoming freshmen, increasing their retention and graduation rates can dramatically increase an institution’s overall retention and graduation rates, and enhance its image and desirability.

It is clearly in every institution’s self-interest to ensure its first-generation students succeed, to identify and count them, and understand how to support them. This book provides high-level administrators with a plan of action for deans to create the awareness necessary for meaningful long-term change, sets out a campus acclimation process, and provides guidelines for the necessary support structures.

At the heart of the book are 14 first-person narratives – by first-generation students spanning freshman to graduate years – that help the reader get to grips with the variety of ethnic and economic categories to which they belong. The book concludes by defining 14 key issues that institutions need to address, and offers a course of action for addressing them.

This book is intended for everyone who serves these students – faculty, academic advisors, counselors, student affairs professionals, admissions officers, and administrators – and offers a set of best practices for how two- and four-year institutions can improve the success of their first-generation student populations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 How many First-Generation College Students Are There?
ch. 2 The Observable Behaviors of First-Generation College Students
ch. 3 The Internal Psychology of First-Generation College Students
ch. 4 In Their Own Words
ch. 5 Narrative Analysis
ch. 6 Recommendations

Conclusion
References
About the Author
Index
Cover image

Understanding the Working College Student: New Research and Its Implications for Policy and Practice

Book
Perna, Laura W., ed.
2010
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
HD6276.52.U5 U64 2010
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
How appropriate for today and for the future are the policies and practices of higher education that largely assume a norm of traditional-age students with minimal on-campus, or no, work commitments?

Despite the fact that work is a fundamental part of life for nearly half of all undergraduate students – with a substantial number of “traditional” dependent undergraduates in employment, and working independent undergraduates averaging 34.5 hours per week – little ...
Additional Info:
How appropriate for today and for the future are the policies and practices of higher education that largely assume a norm of traditional-age students with minimal on-campus, or no, work commitments?

Despite the fact that work is a fundamental part of life for nearly half of all undergraduate students – with a substantial number of “traditional” dependent undergraduates in employment, and working independent undergraduates averaging 34.5 hours per week – little attention has been given to how working influences the integration and engagement experiences of students who work, especially those who work full-time, or how the benefits and costs of working differ between traditional age-students and adult students.

The high, and increasing, prevalence and intensity of working among both dependent and independent students raises a number of important questions for public policymakers, college administrators, faculty, academic advisors, student services and financial aid staff, and institutional and educational researchers, including: Why do so many college students work so many hours? What are the characteristics of undergraduates who work? What are the implications of working for students’ educational experiences and outcomes? And, how can public and institutional policymakers promote the educational success of undergraduate students who work?

This book offers the most complete and comprehensive conceptualization of the “working college student” available. It provides a multi-faceted picture of the characteristics, experiences, and challenges of working college students and a more complete understanding of the heterogeneity underlying the label “undergraduates who work” and the implications of working for undergraduate students’ educational experiences and outcomes.

The volume stresses the importance of recognizing the value and contribution of adult learners to higher education, and takes issue with the appropriateness of the term “non-traditional” itself, both because of the prevalence of this group, and because it allows higher education institutions to avoid considering changes that will meet the needs of this population, including changes in course offerings, course scheduling, financial aid, and pedagogy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction

Section 1 Work As a Form of Financial Aid
ch. 1 Student Work and the Financial Aid System (Sandy Baum)

Section 2 Work As a Component of Student Identity
ch. 2 Adult Workers as Undergraduate Students: Significant Challenges for Higher Education Policy and Practice (Carol Kasworm)
ch. 3 Overcoming Adversity: Community College Students and Work (John S. Levin, Virginia Montero Hernandez, Christine Cerven)
ch. 4 Mobile Working Students: A Delicate Balance of College, Family, and Work (Mary Ziskin, Vasti Torres, Don Hossler, Jacob P.K. Gross)
ch. 5 Academic Success for Working Adult Students (Heather T. Rowan-Kenyon, Amy K. Swan, Nancy L. Deutsch, Bruce Gansneder)

Section 3 Work As a Vehicle for Promoting Cognitive Development and Learning
ch. 6 Using Economics to Illuminate the Dynamic Higher Education Landscape (Doug Lynch, Michael Gottfried, Wendy Green, Chris Allen Thomas)
ch. 7 Of A Mind to Labor: Reconceptualizing Student Work and Higher Education
ch. 8 Job Fare: Workplace Experiences That Help Students Learn

Section 4 Work As a Vehicle for Improving Student Engagement
ch. 9 Working During College: Its Relationship to Student Engagement and Education Outcomes
ch. 10 Effects of Work On African American College Students' Engagement
ch. 11 Impact of Working On Undergraduate Students' Interactions With Faculty

Section 5 Work As a Vehicle for Improving Educational and Economic Attainment
ch. 12 Understanding The Relationship Between Working While In College and Future Salaries

Conclusions and Recommendations for Policy, Practice, and Future Research
About The Authors and Editor

Index
Cover image

Classroom in Conflict: Teaching Controversial Subjects in a Diverse Society

Book
Williams, John A.
1994
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LB2331.W47 1994
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book transcends recent debates about political correctness to address the underlying problems of teaching controversial subjects in the college and university history classroom. The author criticizes both sides of the debate, rejecting, on the one hand, calls for a uniform, chronological history curriculum and, on the other hand, claims that only ethnic or racial "insiders" are qualified to teach about their communities. In chapters on colonial, comparative, and African ...
Additional Info:
This book transcends recent debates about political correctness to address the underlying problems of teaching controversial subjects in the college and university history classroom. The author criticizes both sides of the debate, rejecting, on the one hand, calls for a uniform, chronological history curriculum and, on the other hand, claims that only ethnic or racial "insiders" are qualified to teach about their communities. In chapters on colonial, comparative, and African history, Williams applies the concept of "Gandhian truth" to historical subjects, moving through tentative and flexible perspectives to achieve a complex picture of historical episodes. And in chapters on imperialism, nationalism, racism, and the problem of "the other," he discusses the difficult and contingent nature of conceptual language. In the second half of the book, he addresses framing rules of discussion by which sensitive issues can be discussed with diverse audiences, the relationship of American pluralism to a world perspective, and what can be accomplished through an education in pluralism. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 One Classroom: An Introduction
ch. 2 Conflicting Views of the Classroom Revolution
ch. 3 The Teacher's Pitch and the Student Audience
ch. 4 Insiders and Outsiders
ch. 5 The Colonizer and the Colonized
ch. 6 The Uses of Comparative History
ch. 7 Teaching a Racially Sensitive Subject
ch. 8 On Understanding the South African Freedom Struggle
ch. 9 Imperialism
ch. 10 Nationalism and Racism: The Keywords
ch. 11 Structures of Argument in African History
ch. 12 The Other: The Problem of Authenticity
ch. 13 The World Context of American Pluralism
ch. 14 Learning in the Pluralist Classroom
ch. 15 The Rules of Discussion
ch. 16 In Pursuit of Pluralism

Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Degrees of Inequality: Culture, Class, and Gender in American Higher Education

Book
Mullen, Ann L.
2010
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LC67.62.M58 2010
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Degrees of Inequality reveals the powerful patterns of social inequality in American higher education by analyzing how the social background of students shapes nearly every facet of the college experience.

Even as the most prestigious institutions claim to open their doors to students from diverse backgrounds, class disparities remain. Just two miles apart stand two institutions that represent the stark class contrast in American higher education. Yale, an ...
Additional Info:
Degrees of Inequality reveals the powerful patterns of social inequality in American higher education by analyzing how the social background of students shapes nearly every facet of the college experience.

Even as the most prestigious institutions claim to open their doors to students from diverse backgrounds, class disparities remain. Just two miles apart stand two institutions that represent the stark class contrast in American higher education. Yale, an elite Ivy League university, boasts accomplished alumni, including national and world leaders in business and politics. Southern Connecticut State University graduates mostly commuter students seeking credential degrees in fields with good job prospects.

Ann L. Mullen interviewed students from both universities and found that their college choices and experiences were strongly linked to social background and gender. Yale students, most having generations of family members with college degrees, are encouraged to approach their college years as an opportunity for intellectual and personal enrichment. Southern students, however, perceive a college degree as a path to a better career, and many work full— or part—time jobs to help fund their education.

Moving interviews with 100 students at the two institutions highlight how American higher education reinforces the same inequities it has been aiming to transcend. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Yale and Southern
ch. 2 The High School Years
ch. 3 Deciding to Go to College
ch. 4 Choosing Colleges
ch. 5 Going to College
ch. 6 Majors and Knowledge

Conclusion
Note on Methodology
Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Learning and Teaching Across Cultures in Higher Education

Book
Palfreyman, David, and McBride, Dawn, eds.
2007
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LC1099.L419 2007
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Learning and Teaching Across Cultures in Higher Education contains theoretical rationale, resources and examples to help readers understand and deal with situations involving contact between learners or educators from different cultural backgrounds, as well as giving insights into the new global context of higher education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Learning and Teaching Across Cultures in Higher Education contains theoretical rationale, resources and examples to help readers understand and deal with situations involving contact between learners or educators from different cultural backgrounds, as well as giving insights into the new global context of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures

List of Tables

Notes on the Editors and Contributors

A Note on Terminology

Transcription Conventions

Introduction: Learning and Teaching Across Cultures in Higher Education

Issues

ch. 1 Issues in Multicultural Tertiary Education (D. Palfreyman)

ch. 2 Cross-cultural Differences in Learning and Education: Stereotypes, Myths and Realities (G.Apfelthaler, K. Hansen, S. Keuchel, C. Mueller, M. Neubauer, S. Heng Ong, N. Tapachai)

ch. 3 Teaching Business Studies to Far East Students in the UK

ch. 4 Cultural Learning in the Absence of Culture? A Study of How Students Learn Foreign Language and Culture in a Tertiary Classroom (N.Y.Collings)

ch. 5 Perception of 'Self and 'Other': Social Boundaries that Influence Teaching and Learning in Increasingly Diverse US Classrooms (S. Ituarte, G. Davies)

ch. 6 Intercultural Postgraduate Supervision: Ethnographic Journeys of Identity and Power (C.Manathunga)

ch. 7 Mobile Students, Flexible Identities and Liquid Modernity: Disrupting Western Teachers' Assumptions of 'The Asian Learner' (C. Doherty, P. Singh)

ch. 8 Cross-cultural Engagement in Higher Education Classrooms: a Critical View of Dialogue(A.Jones, K.Jenkins)

Practice

ch. 9 Practice in the Multicultural Tertiary Classroom (D.L.Mcbride)

ch. 10 One Size Fits All? Faculty Professional Development Workshops in a Multicultural Context (L.Smith)

ch. 11 Intercultural Competence: Examples of Internationalizing the Curriculum through Students' Interactions (S.Eisenchlas & S.Trevaskes)

ch. 12 Afrikaners and Arabs: Negotiating Course Delivery in a Blended Learning Context ( J.C.Cronjé)

ch. 13 Assessing Intercultural Dialogue: the German 'Wald' and the Canadian 'Forest' (U.Schuetze)

ch. 14 Virtual Internships for International Cooperation: Experiences of Learning, Teaching and Networking (R.Kristensen, E.Källström & J.A.Svenkerud)

ch. 15 Teaching Bioinformatics: LIsing Storytelling to Negotiate Cultural Divisions in the Sciences (N.Palfreyman)

References

Index
Additional Info:
Higher Education and First-Generation Students offers readers a rich understanding of the experience of students who are first in their family to attend college. This book contends that first-generation students are isolated and marginalized on many large college campuses and considers learning communities and critical multicultural pedagogies as vehicles to cultivate community, voice, and place for this new majority of students. This book is a theoretically informed study of the ...
Additional Info:
Higher Education and First-Generation Students offers readers a rich understanding of the experience of students who are first in their family to attend college. This book contends that first-generation students are isolated and marginalized on many large college campuses and considers learning communities and critical multicultural pedagogies as vehicles to cultivate community, voice, and place for this new majority of students. This book is a theoretically informed study of the lived experience of FG students and draws on their voices to demonstrate how their insights interface with what we, as educators, think we know about them. What can we learn from these students? How might their insights inform and shape the learning spaces we create for them? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I Getting There: First-Generation Students and the Road to College
ch. 1 A Long Way from Home: Deepening Our Understanding of First-Generation Students
ch. 2 Strangers without Codebooks: Isolation and Marginalization

Part II Being Here: Surviving the Transition to College
ch. 3 Reimagining the University: Theoretical Approaches to Serving First-Generation College Students
ch. 4 Toward Community, Connectedness, and Care

Part III Getting Through: Lessons from First-Generation Students
ch. 5 Rationale and Design for the Multicultural Learning Community
ch. 6 Belonging and Finding Place
ch. 7 Claiming Self: Identity and Academic Voice
ch. 8 On Critiques and Possibilities

References
Index
Cover image

Teaching Inclusively in Higher Education

Book
Fallon, Moira A., and Brown, Susan C., eds.
2010
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB2322.2.T424 2010
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book is designed for higher education instructors. The focus of the book is to assist all faculty instructors in higher education to better meet the needs of their student populations. It addresses the major issue of higher education teaching today: the need to reach all higher education students using active learning strategies. Higher education today is rapidly changing and faculty members are being presented with new types of students; ...
Additional Info:
This book is designed for higher education instructors. The focus of the book is to assist all faculty instructors in higher education to better meet the needs of their student populations. It addresses the major issue of higher education teaching today: the need to reach all higher education students using active learning strategies. Higher education today is rapidly changing and faculty members are being presented with new types of students; ones who often have clear goals for bettering themselves, but at the same time lack what might have been considered to be basic skills necessary for success in a college or university setting. Instructors today must reach and bring all students into the college or university setting in an inclusive manner. The emphasis of this book is on student-focused strategies for teaching inclusively. This book will provide valuable strategies and practical techniques for instructors to develop inclusive college classrooms that promote the learning of all students.

The audience targeted will be all instructors who work with higher education students, including students in community colleges and vocational institutions. The book is designed to be mainly practical instructional strategies with limited theoretical text and references. At the same time, major theories will be included to demonstrate why specific approaches are recommended. Although the authors and editors are from the field of education, the book is particularly valuable for all college instructors without a background in the discipline of education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part I Students As Diverse Individuals and Members of Inclusive Groups

ch. 1 A Student-Centered Approaches to College Classrooms (Moira A. FAllon and Susan C. Brown)
ch. 2 Students as Cultural Beings (Susan C. Brown)
ch. 3 When Reading in College s a Problem: What Really Matters? (Alexander B. Casareno)

Part II Inclusive Instructors As Strategic Leaders and Co-Leaners

ch. 4 Changing Instructional Strategies and Methods to Meet the Needs of All Learners (Moira A. Fallon)
ch. 5 The Changing Role of Instructors as Both Leaders and Learners (Paul T. Parkinson)
ch. 6 Using Language Successfully in the College Classroom < (Ellyn L. Arwood and Joanna R. Kaakinen) br>
Part III Technological Classroom Climates As Inclusive Learning Communities

ch. 7 Technology Connecting Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment (Mark C. Geary)
ch. 8 Reaching Students through a Virtual Community (Shelley B. Harris, Jennifer C. Wilson, and Jacqueline M. Fergeson)
ch. 9 The Technological Age of Teaching
ch. 10 Applications to Inclusive College Classrooms (Moira A. Fallon, Susan C. Brown, Alexander B. Casareno)

Authors' Biographies: In the Order They Appear in the Book
Additional Info:
Our goal in writing this book was to validate teachers for strong efforts in their life's work. We often observe teachers' frustrations with what they perceive to be a multitude of different hot topics in education that they must attend to now, but which they expect to come and go, like the last hot topics. So, we wanted to help readers see similarities between many of these hot topics-differentiation, multiple ...
Additional Info:
Our goal in writing this book was to validate teachers for strong efforts in their life's work. We often observe teachers' frustrations with what they perceive to be a multitude of different hot topics in education that they must attend to now, but which they expect to come and go, like the last hot topics. So, we wanted to help readers see similarities between many of these hot topics-differentiation, multiple intelligences, culturally responsive teaching, brain-friendly strategies, authentic assessment, and ethical classroom management which we feel are not flashes in the pan. And we trust that serious practitioners will not oversimplify the findings of neuroscientists and their application to education. Reading studies and books by scientists, a number of which are user-friendly, can help ensure that teachers separate the hype from credible information. We have seen this professionally judicious approach in the work of graduate students (Kolinski, 2007) in adopting brain-friendly strategies.

We have intentionally packed both theoretical/research-based and practical information in this book because professional educators want to know why they should use certain approaches, models, and strategies. In turn, as professionals, we should be able to explain why we teach the way we do-not to justify, but to educate others about our knowledge-based, reflective, decision-making processes and the impact on student learning. Thus, it is important to read Chapter 1 because it lays a foundation.

Each succeeding chapter (2-6) has unique and compelling twists and turns-chock full of ideas to use or to adapt. It is possible to gain lots of ideas, processes, and strategies from reading and implementing (or adapting) even one of the unit chapters, or a part of it. While some of the units are explicitly about literacy, others focus on content using reading, writing, speaking, and listening as critical in the learning process. Thus, literacy skills are reinforced and strengthened. Additionally, some of our colleagues and public school partners have given us feedback that they wanted to implement some of the units and activities themselves. So, feel free to use this book for self-exploration and professional development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Foreword
Preface

ch. 1 A Case for Differentiation and Much More
ch. 2 The Fabric of My Life: Using Poetry, Prose, and Graphic Novels to Help Students Reflect Upon Their Identities
ch. 3 Choices That Change Our Lives: Using Realistic Fiction and Nonfiction to Help Students Reflect on Difficult Decisions
ch. 4 Community and Culture: Understanding Ourselves and Others in the Global Community
ch. 5 A Journey from Innocence to Experience: A Course in Young Adult Literature for Future Teachers
ch. 6 Convince Me: A Syllabus for a Freshman Composition Course Focused on Writing Arguments

About the Authors
Index
Article cover image

"Learning Styles and Culturally Diverse Students: A Literature Review"

Article
Irvine, Jacqueline Jordan, York, Darlene Eleanor
1995
Handbook of Research On Multicultural Education, Chapter 27, 484-497
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The concept of learning styles is based on the theory that an individual responds to educational experiences with consistent behavior and performance patterns. The complexity of the construct, the psychometric problems related to its measurement, and the enigmatic relationship between culture and the teaching and learning process means that the body of research on learning styles must be interpreted and applied carefully. Analyses presented in this paper suggest that the ...
Additional Info:
The concept of learning styles is based on the theory that an individual responds to educational experiences with consistent behavior and performance patterns. The complexity of the construct, the psychometric problems related to its measurement, and the enigmatic relationship between culture and the teaching and learning process means that the body of research on learning styles must be interpreted and applied carefully. Analyses presented in this paper suggest that the widespread conclusions in the literature that African American, Hispanic American, and Indian students are field-dependent learners who prosper academically when taught with field-dependent teaching strategies are premature and conjectural. Research does not support the supposition that members of a particular ethnic group have the same learning style. The body of research does have implications for enhancing the academic achievement of culturally diverse students by reminding teachers to be alert to individual students' learning styles as well as their own actions and methods in reference to their students' cultural experiences and preferred learning environments.
Article cover image

"Cognitive Style of Selected International and Domestic Graduate Students at Marshall University"

Article
Gordon, Howard R.D., Wyant, Laura J.
1994
ERIC Education Resources Information Center
Topics: Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

An Integrative Analysis Approach to Diversity in the College Classroom

Book
Quellett, Matthew, ed.
2011
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 125)
LC1099.I58 2011
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
College and university instructors continue to seek models that help students to better understand today's complex social relationships. Feminist, Queer, and Ethnic Studies scholars put forward compelling arguments for more integrative understandings of race, class, gender, and sexuality and for centering the experiences of women, people of color, and others traditionally relegated to the margins. Intersectionality is one such approach.

In nine chapters, the contributors to this volume ...
Additional Info:
College and university instructors continue to seek models that help students to better understand today's complex social relationships. Feminist, Queer, and Ethnic Studies scholars put forward compelling arguments for more integrative understandings of race, class, gender, and sexuality and for centering the experiences of women, people of color, and others traditionally relegated to the margins. Intersectionality is one such approach.

In nine chapters, the contributors to this volume offer an overview of key tenets of intersectionality and explore applications of this model in faculty and instructional development in higher education. Gathered from across the disciplines, they draw upon a range of approaches to social identity formation, different theoretical models, and a complement of lived experiences. When read together, these chapters offer a systemic approach to change in higher education by addressing innovations at course, department, and institutional levels.

Intersectionality does not advocate for a flattening of differences. Instead, it argues for another layer of critical analyses that acknowledge the powerful interplay of the many aspects of social identity to address the rapidly shifting ways in which we talk about and describe identities in society and the complexity of classroom dynamics in the academy today. By illuminating the interconnected nature of systems of oppression, we shine a light on the potential for disrupting the status quo and create stronger alliances for social justice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes

Section One: Intersectionality and the Disciplines
ch. 1 The Promises and Challenges of Teaching from an Intersectional Perspective: Core Components and Applied Strategies (Susan R. Jones, Charmaine L. Wijeyesinghe)
ch. 2 The Trouble with Disciplining Disciplines (C. Shaun Longstreet)

Section Two: Collaborating Teaching
ch. 3 The Writers and the Detectives: Cultural Difference, Identify, and Pedagogical Disciplines in an Integrated Classroom (Jennifer DiGrazia, Elizabeth Stassinos)
ch. 4 Using an Intersectional Approach to Deepen Collaborative Teaching (Susan M. Pliner, Jonathan Iuzzini, Cerri A. Banks)

Section Three: Points of Interface
ch. 5 The Intersectional Potential of Queer Theory: An Example from a General Education Course in English (Deborah Carlin)
ch. 6 Teaching "Trans Issues" An Intersectional and Systems-Based Approach (Michel J. Boucher)
ch. 7 Refugees, Veterans, and Continuing Pedagogies of PTSD in Asian American Studies (Shirley Suet-ling Tang, Peter Nien-chu Kiang)

Section Four: Institutional Change
ch. 8 From Difficult Dialogues to Critical Conversations: Intersectionality in Our Teaching and Professional Lives (AnnJanette Alejano-Steele, Maurice Hamington, Lunden MacDonald, Mark Potter, Shaun Schafer, Arlene Sgoutas, Tara Tull)
ch. 9 Re-Seeing Race in a Post-Obama Age: Asian American Studies, Comparative Ethnic Studies, and Intersectional Pedagogies (Cathy J. Schlund-Vials)

Index
Cover image

Asians in the Ivory Tower: Dilemmas of Racial Inequality in American Higher Education

Book
Teranishi, Robert T.
2010
Teachers College Press, New York
LC2633.6.T47 2010
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This timely and compelling examination of the experience of Asian Americans in higher education explores why and how Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are important to our nation's higher education priorities and places the study of AAPI college participation within a broad set of conditions through which all students must navigate as they pursue higher education. Teranishi captures the intersections of individual agency, social conditions, and organizational structures as ...
Additional Info:
This timely and compelling examination of the experience of Asian Americans in higher education explores why and how Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are important to our nation's higher education priorities and places the study of AAPI college participation within a broad set of conditions through which all students must navigate as they pursue higher education. Teranishi captures the intersections of individual agency, social conditions, and organizational structures as synergetic forces that result in a range of postsecondary outcomes for subpopulations within the larger body of AAPIs.

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

What's Wrong With a Positive Stereotype?
Purpose of the Book
Organization of the Book
Data Sources and Methodology

ch. 1 Transcending Conceptual Blockages
AAPIs and America's Equity Agenda
Race in Comparative Research
Destabilizing Conceptual Blockages

ch. 2 Students, Families, and the Pursuit of College
The Demography of the AAPI Population
Perceptions of Opportunities and Challenges

ch. 3 The Community Context
Portraits of AAPI Communities
Segregated or Integrated?
Hmong and The "Outside World"
"For Chinese, It's Subliminal: It's All About College"

ch. 4 Secondary Schools and Postsecondary Opportunities
Race, Class, and School Inequality
Access to Quality Schooling for AAPI Students
Wilson High School, San Francisco
Hoovet High School, Vallejo
Hancock High School, Sacramento

ch. 5 Predictors of College Participation
Trends in AAPI College Enrollment
Beyond a Single Story: AAPI Precollege Postsecondary Preparation
AAPI College Enrollment Disaggregated

ch. 6 AAPI Degree Attainment and Field Representation
Degree Attainment Among AAPIs
"We're Not All Science Majors"
AAPIs in the Education Sector
Strategies to Improve the AAPI Education Pipeline
Conclusion: Beyond a Single Story
Transcending Categories and Boundaries
The Need for More and Better Research
An Essential Missing Link

Appendix A Data Sources and Methodology
Appendix B Data Instruments: Individual and Group Interview Protocol
Appendix C Languages Spoken in Asian Countries

Notes
References
Index
About the Author
Article cover image

"Native Americans and Higher Education"

Article
James, Philip
1992
College Student Affairs Journal, 12, no. 1, Fall (1992): 56-62
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Reviews research on Native Americans in higher education and discusses its implications for Native Americans' experiences in colleges and universities. Discusses current research, current programs and practices, and learning styles of Native Americans. Identifies cultural barriers that prevent Native Americans from obtaining equal access to higher education.
Additional Info:
Reviews research on Native Americans in higher education and discusses its implications for Native Americans' experiences in colleges and universities. Discusses current research, current programs and practices, and learning styles of Native Americans. Identifies cultural barriers that prevent Native Americans from obtaining equal access to higher education.
Cover image

Culture Centers in Higher Education: Perspectives on Identity, Theory, and Practice

Book
Patton, Lori D., ed.
2010
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC3731.C845.2010
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Are cultural centers ethnic enclaves of segregation, or safe havens that provide minority students with social support that promotes persistence and retention?

Though Black cultural centers boast a 40-year history, there is much misinformation about them and the ethnic counterparts to which they gave rise. Moreover, little is known about their historical roots, current status, and future prospects. The literature has largely ignored the various culture center models, ...
Additional Info:
Are cultural centers ethnic enclaves of segregation, or safe havens that provide minority students with social support that promotes persistence and retention?

Though Black cultural centers boast a 40-year history, there is much misinformation about them and the ethnic counterparts to which they gave rise. Moreover, little is known about their historical roots, current status, and future prospects. The literature has largely ignored the various culture center models, and the role that such centers play in the experiences of college students.

This book fills a significant void in the research on ethnic minority cultural centers, offers the historic background to their establishment and development, considers the circumstances that led to their creation, examines the roles they play on campus, explores their impact on retention and campus climate, and provides guidelines for their management in the light of current issues and future directions.

In the first part of this volume, the contributors provide perspectives on culture centers from the point of view of various racial/ethnic identity groups, Latina/o, Asian, American Indian, and African American. Part II offers theoretical perspectives that frame the role of culture centers from the point of view of critical race theory, student development theory, and a social justice framework. Part III focuses specifically on administrative and practice-oriented themes, addressing such issues as the relative merits of full- and part-time staff, of race/ethnic specific as opposed to multicultural centers, relations with the outside community, and integration with academic and student affairs to support the mission of the institution.

For administrators and student affairs educators who are unfamiliar with these facilities, and want to support an increasingly diverse student body, this book situates such centers within the overall strategy of improving campus climate, and makes the case for sustaining them. Where none as yet exist, this book offers a rationale and blueprint for creating such centers. For leaders of culture centers this book constitutes a valuable tool for assessing their viability, improving their performance, and ensuring their future relevance – all considerations of increased importance when budgets and resources are strained. This book also provides a foundation for researchers interested in further investigating the role of these centers in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface: A Call to Action: Historical and Contemporary Reflections on the Relevance of Campus Culture Centers in Higher Education

Part I: Racial/Ethnic Group - Specific Culture
ch. 1 Latina/o Cultural Centers: Providing a Sense of Belonging and Promoting Student Success (Adele Lozano )
ch. 2 Asian American Student Involvement in Asian American Culture Centers (William Liu, Michael Cuyjet, and Sunny Lee )
ch. 3 Island of Sanctuary: The Role of an American Indian Cultural Center (Rosa Cintrón, Heather J. Shotton, and Star Yellowfish)
ch. 4 On Solid Ground: An Examination of Successful Strategies and Positive Student Outcomes Associated with Two Black Culture Centers (Lori Patton)

Part II: Theoretical Perspectives and Culture Centers
ch. 5 Counterspaces in a Hostile Place: A Critical Race Theory Analysis of Campus Culture Centers (Tara Yosso and Corina Benavides Lopez)
ch. 6 Critical Borders: Student Development Theoretical Perspectives Applied to Culture Centers (Mary Howard Hamilton, Kandace Hinton, and Robin Hughes)
ch. 7 Resituating Culture Centers within a Social Justice Framework: Is There Room for Examining Whiteness (Michael Benitez, Jr. )

Part III: Administrative and Practice-Oriented Issues For Culture Centers
ch. 8 Viewing Cultural Practice Through a Lens of Innovation and Intentionality: Strategies for Student Personnel Administrators in Culture Centers (Toby Jenkins)
ch. 9 Campus Culture Center Directors’ Perspectives on Advancement, Current Issues, and Future Directions (E. Michael Sutton and Phyllis McCluskey-Titus )
ch. 10 Promoting Student Engagement: Administrative Considerations for Current and Future Planning of Culture Center Programming and Outreach (Salvador Mena)

Appendix A: Transforming for the 21st Century: Best Practices for Examining and Evaluating Campus Culture Centers and Multicultural Affairs Offices (Lari D. Patton)
Article cover image

"I am Yellow and Beautiful: Reflection on Queer Asian Spirituality and Gay Male Cyberculture" (pdf)

Article
Cheng, Patrick S.
2011
Journal of Technology, Theology, and Religion, Vol. 2, Issue 3, pgs. 1-21, June,
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
This article builds upon the theological insights of feminist and womanist theologians with respect to the sin of self-hate, and explores the ways in which gay male cyberculture inhibits the spiritual development of gay Asian men. 
Additional Info:
This article builds upon the theological insights of feminist and womanist theologians with respect to the sin of self-hate, and explores the ways in which gay male cyberculture inhibits the spiritual development of gay Asian men. 
Cover image

Transforming Classroom Culture: Inclusive Pedagogical Practices

Book
Dallalfar, Arlene; Kingston-Mann, Esther; and Sieber, Tim, eds.
2011
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LB2331.T725 2011
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Transforming Classroom Culture is an anthology of original work authored by diverse faculty who work in a variety of New England college and university settings--private and public, racially homogeneous and diverse. The authors focus on institutional contexts that promote innovation in teaching practice, faculty identity as a resource for effective pedagogy, and dilemmas and outcomes of student-faculty engagement in the classroom. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Transforming Classroom Culture is an anthology of original work authored by diverse faculty who work in a variety of New England college and university settings--private and public, racially homogeneous and diverse. The authors focus on institutional contexts that promote innovation in teaching practice, faculty identity as a resource for effective pedagogy, and dilemmas and outcomes of student-faculty engagement in the classroom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Microcosms of Hope: A Foreword
Acknowledgments
Faculty Collaboration and Inclusive Pedagogical Practice: An Introduction

Part I - The Institutional Contexts of Innovation and Change
ch. 1 Academic Integrity and Academic Inclusion: The Mission of the "Outsider Within" (Esther Kington-Mann)
ch. 2 A History Lived and Lessons Learned: Collaboration, Change, and Teaching Transformation (Tim Sieber)
ch. 3 Pedagogy for the Professoriate: The Personal Meets the Political (Denise Patmon)

Part II - Faculty Identity as a Resource for Effective Teaching
ch. 4 Imaging the Spaced Between Arts and Inclusive Pedagogy (Vivian Poey)
ch. 5 Inexplicable Desire, Pedagogical Compulsion: Teaching the Literatures of the Middle East (Rajini Srikanth)
ch. 6 Teaching Women's Lives: Feminist Pedagogy and the Sociological Imagination (Arlene Dallalfar)
ch. 7 Teaching Art History at an Art School: Making Sense from the Margin (Sunanda K. Sanyal)

Part III - Engaging Students in Learning
ch. 8 The Whole Person in Front of Me: Toward a Pedagogy of Empathy and Compassion (Robin A. Robinson)
ch. 9 Teaching Ethics through Multicultural Lenses (Janel Lucas)
ch. 10 Hearing Students' Silence: Issues of Identity, Performance, and Recognition in College Classrooms (Carolyn P. Panofsky, and Lesley Bogad)
ch. 11 Exploring/Exploding the Boundaries of Inclusive Teaching: Social Class Confronts Race and Gender (Phyllis Charlotte Brown)
ch. 12 Building Agency through Writing (Marjorie Jones)
ch. 13 Words Matter: Vocabulary in a Diverse Precollege-Level Writing Class (Richard Pepp)

References
Contributors
Index
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CLASH! Superheroic Yet Sensible Strategies for Teaching the New Literacies Despite the Status Quo

Book
Vavra, Sandra, and Spencer, Sharon L., eds.
2011
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB1028.3.C6 2011
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book offers ideas that secondary teachers, university content faculty, and teacher educators can use to challenge traditional literacy practices and demonstrate creative, innovative ways of incorporating new literacies into the classroom, all within a strong theoretical framework. Teachers are trying to catch up to the new challenges of the twenty-first century. It is a superheroic feat that must be achieved if education is to stay relevant and viable. There ...
Additional Info:
This book offers ideas that secondary teachers, university content faculty, and teacher educators can use to challenge traditional literacy practices and demonstrate creative, innovative ways of incorporating new literacies into the classroom, all within a strong theoretical framework. Teachers are trying to catch up to the new challenges of the twenty-first century. It is a superheroic feat that must be achieved if education is to stay relevant and viable. There is a lot of zip, bam, whap, and wow in the fast-paced, social networking, technological world, but not so much in the often laboriously slow-paced educational world. Where is the balance? How do teachers and students learn together, since one group has seasoned wisdom with limited technological know-how and the other uses all the cool new tools, but not in the service of learning? These are some important issues to consider in finding the balance in an unstable, fast-moving, ever-changing world.

This book is practical and useful to literacy teachers, teacher educators, and university faculty by bringing together the expertise of composition/rhetoric researchers and writers, literacy specialists, technology specialists, and teachers who are on the cutting edge of new literacies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

Part I: Batman Begins, Simply
ch. 1 The Cold, Hard Cash of Truth about Literacy in the 21st Century (Sandra A. Vavra and Sharon L. Spencer)
ch. 2 “And Now... A Word From Our Students”: Creating Better Writers and Thinkers by Having Students Study, Write and Film TV Commercials (Tom Scheft)
ch. 3 Superheroic Resourcefulness: Expanding Literacy and Engagement through YouTube (Sarah Wynn)

PPart II: The Force Is With Reluctant New Media Adopters
ch. 4 Popular Culture as a Sponsor of Literacy: Confronting the CLASH! BOOM! POW! in the Basic Writing Classroom (Tabetha Adkins)
ch. 5 Making Messes and Meaning with Wikis and Blogs (Collie Fulford)
ch. 6 “Are You Now or Have You Ever Been?”: Teaching “Writerly” Confidence, Media Literacy, and Historical, Civic, and Cultural Awareness with This I Believe (Rachelle S. Gold.)

PART III: BRINGING AN X-MENTALITY TO THE EVERYDAY CLASSROOM
ch. 7 Teaching Poetry in a Freestyle World: A Pedagogy for the Unimpressed (Lisa Carl)
ch. 8 Capitalizing on Digital Literacy: Visual Rhetoric, the Graphic Novel and Academic Identity (Sara Littlejohn and Hephzibah Roskelly)
ch. 9 Unraveling the Riddler: New Media, Technology, and Literacies in Exploring Heroes and Superheroes (Sarah M. Henchey and Sharon L. Spencer)
ch. 10 Changing the World–One Zip Code At a Time (Stefanie Frigo)
ch. 11 New Media as Instructional Supports in Inclusive Classrooms (Doris K. Tyler)

Part IV: From Indiana Jones To Buzz Lightyear: Moving Literacy From The Temple of Memory To Infinity and Beyond
ch. 12 Taking Risks and (Re)defining Expertise: Facilitating the Move from Consumption to Production in the Use of Digital Media (Colleen Reilly)
ch. 13 Composing Digitally and Learning Languages: Using Linguistic Models of Competency to Teach Multimedia Assignments (Mark Pepper)
ch. 14 Remembering: The Past and the Future, (George Pullman) Grappling with the Infonauts: Archival Literacy and the Fight for Memory (Tom Sura)

About the Authors
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Knowing and Reasoning in College: Gender-Related Patterns in Students' Intellectual Development

Book
Magolda, Marcia B. Baxter
1992
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1060.B4 1992
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
From the Publisher
Understanding college students' intellectual development is at the heart of effective educational practice. How do college students learn? How can educators maximize intellectual development in the college environment for both sexes—both in and out of the classroom? In this book Marcia B. Baxter Magolda demonstrates how educators can use a deeper understanding of the way students learn to teach more effectively. Drawing on a unique ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher
Understanding college students' intellectual development is at the heart of effective educational practice. How do college students learn? How can educators maximize intellectual development in the college environment for both sexes—both in and out of the classroom? In this book Marcia B. Baxter Magolda demonstrates how educators can use a deeper understanding of the way students learn to teach more effectively. Drawing on a unique longitudinal study of more than one hundred college students, both male and female—and presenting information not available in single-gender studies—the author explains surprising gender-related patterns that affect the way students develop. Baxter Magolda uses data gathered from in-depth interviews over a five-year period to reveal four distinct "ways of knowing."

The book provides useful real-life examples of how instructional approaches, class expectations, peer interaction, evaluation methods, and other factors affect intellectual development in the classroom. Similarly, the author demonstrates how peer relationships, student organizations, educational advising, internships, employment, and international and cultural exchange can support and develop complex learning beyond the classroom. "Knowing and Reasoning in College" provides practical recommendations on how to respond to each of the four ways of knowing. It shows how, by designing instruction and interaction to reach students at every level, educators can maximize learning, promote skill acquisition and development of complex reasoning, and enrich students' overall college experience. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author

Part One: Understanding Gender-Related Patterns in Knowing
ch. 1 Studying Ways of Knowing
ch. 2 Gender-Related Patterns in Knowing
ch. 3 Absolute Knowing: Receiving and Mastering Knowledge
ch. 4 Transitional Knowing: Interpersonal and Impersonal Patterns
ch. 5 Independent Knowing: Embracing and Subordinating Others' Ideas
ch. 6 Contextual Knowing: Integrating One's Own and Others' Ideas
ch. 7 Relating the Patterns to Diverse Student Populations

Part Two: Implications for Academic and Student Affairs
ch. 8 Teaching Responsively to Different Ways of Knowing
ch. 9 Developing Students in the Classroom
ch. 10 Supporting Patterns of Knowing in the Cocurriculum
ch. 11 Promoting Cocurricular Learning
ch. 12 Becoming Responsive to Ways of Knowing in Higher Education

Resources:
A. Context of the Study: Miami University
B. Design and Methods Used in the Study
C. Study Interview and Questionnaire

References
Index
Cover image

Diverse Millennial Students in College: Implications for Faculty and Student Affairs

Book
Bonner, II, Fred A.; Marbley, Aretha F.; Hamilton, Mary F. Howard, eds.
2011
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
Z665.2.U6 D58 2011
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
While many institutions have developed policies to address the myriad needs of Millennial college students and their parents, inherent in many of these initiatives is the underlying assumption that this student population is a homogeneous group. This book is significant because it addresses and explores the characteristics and experiences of Millennials from an array of perspectives, taking into account not only racial and ethnic identity but also cultural background, sexual ...
Additional Info:
While many institutions have developed policies to address the myriad needs of Millennial college students and their parents, inherent in many of these initiatives is the underlying assumption that this student population is a homogeneous group. This book is significant because it addresses and explores the characteristics and experiences of Millennials from an array of perspectives, taking into account not only racial and ethnic identity but also cultural background, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status differences—all factors contributing to how these students interface with academe.

In providing a “voice” to “voiceless” populations of African American, Asian American, Bi/Multi-Racial, Latino, Native American, and LGBT millennial college students, this book engages with such questions as: Does the term “Millennial” apply to these under-represented students? What role does technology, pop culture, sexual orientation, and race politics play in the identity development for these populations? Do our current minority development theories apply to these groups? And, ultimately, are higher education institutions prepared to meet both the cultural and developmental needs of diverse minority groups of Millennial college students?”

This book is addressed primarily to college and university administrators and faculty members who seek greater depth and understanding of the issues associated with diverse Millennial college student populations. This book informs readers about the ways in which this cohort differs from their majority counterparts to open a dialogue about how faculty members and administrators can meet their needs effectively both inside and outside the classroom. It will also be of value to student affairs personnel, students enrolled in graduate level courses in higher education and other social science courses that explore issues of college student development and diversity, particularly students planning to work with diverse Millennial college students in both clinical or practical work settings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One: Diverse Millennials In College- A National Perspective
ch. 1 A National Perspective - Testing Our Assumptions About Generational Cohorts (Gwendolyn Jordan Dungy)

Part Two: African American Millennials In College
ch. 2 African American Millennials In College (Terrell L. Strayhorn)
ch. 3 The Person, Environment, and Generational Interaction - An African American Rural Millennial Story (Corey Guyton and Mary F. Howard-Hamilton)

Part Three: Asian American Millennials In College
ch. 4 Asian American and Pacific Islander Millennial Students At A Tipping Point (Mitchell James Chang)
ch. 5 Asian American Millennial College Students In Context - Living at the Intersection of Diversification, Digitization, and Globalization (Samuel D. Museus)

Part Four: Latina/o Millennials In College
ch. 6 La Nueva Generacio’ N - Latina/o Millennial College Students at Four-Year Institutions (Victor B. Saenz, Manuel Gonzalez, and Sylvia Hurtado)
ch. 7 Millennial Characteristics and Latino/a Students (Anna M. Ortiz and Dorali Pichardo-Diaz)

Part Five: Native American Millennials in College
ch. 8 Indigenous Millennial Students in Higher Education (Bryan McKinley Jones Brayboy and Angelina E. Castagno)
ch. 9 Native American Millennial College Students (Stephanie J. Waterman)

Part Six: LGBTO Millennials in College
ch. 10 LGBTQ Millennials in College (Lori D. Patton, Carrie Kortegast, and Gabriel Javier)
ch. 11 Identity Makeover Millennial Edition - Using Contemporary Theoretical Frameworks to Explore Identity Intersections Among LGBTQ Millennial Populations (Lori D. Patton and Stephanie Chang)

Part Seven: Bi and Multiracial Millennials in College
ch. 12 Multiracialization, “Mixing” and Media Pedagogy (Nana Osei-Kofi)
ch. 13 Mixed Race Millennials in College - Multiracial Students in the Age of Obama (Kristen A. Renn)

Part Eight: Voices of Millennials in College - A Diversity of Perspectives
ch. 14 Moving Up and Out - Students of Color Transitioning From College to the Workforce (Lonnie Booker, Jr., Tonya Turner-Driver, Tammie Preston- Cunningham, Theresa Survillion, and Mattyna L. Stephens )
ch. 15 Curriculum Design For Millennial Students of Color (Rosa Maria Banda, Alonzo M. Flowers, III, Petra Robinson, Genyne Royal, Rose Anna Santos, and Nicholas Zuniga)

Conclusion: From One Generation To Another Generation - New Realities, New Possibilities, and a Reason for Hope (Aretha F. Marbley)
About The Contributor
Index
Cover image

Transcultural Blended Learning and Teaching in Postsecondary Education

Book
Francois, Emmanuel Jean, author, ed.
2013
IGI Global, Hershey, PA
LB1028.5.T625 2013
Topics: Online Learning   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Schedule constraints and other complicating factors can make face-to-face educational methods inadequate to the needs of learners. Thus, blended learning has emerged as a compromise that reconciles the need for high-tech and high-touch learning and teaching interactions. 

Transcultural Blended Learning and Teaching in Postsecondary Education educates readers across nations and cultures and strengthens their understanding of theories, models, research, applications, best practices, and emerging issues related to blended ...
Additional Info:
Schedule constraints and other complicating factors can make face-to-face educational methods inadequate to the needs of learners. Thus, blended learning has emerged as a compromise that reconciles the need for high-tech and high-touch learning and teaching interactions. 

Transcultural Blended Learning and Teaching in Postsecondary Education educates readers across nations and cultures and strengthens their understanding of theories, models, research, applications, best practices, and emerging issues related to blended learning and teaching through a holistic and transcultural perspective. This research volume serves as a valued resource for faculty, administrators, and leaders in postsecondary institutions to plan, develop, implement, and evaluate blended learning programs and courses. It also provides researchers with the latest research in transcultural blended learning and teaching theories, findings, best practices, and emerging trends. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgment

Section I
ch. 1 Transculturality (Emmanuel Jean Francois)
ch. 2 A Traditional African Perspective of Blended Learning (Mejai B. M. Avoseh, Olugbenga Abimbola Fayomi, Bolanie Clara Simeon-Fayomi)
ch. 3 How Cultural and Learning Style Differences Impact Students’ Learning Preferences in Blended Learning (Dirk Tempelaar, Bart Rienties, Bas Giesbers, Sybrand Schim van der Loeff)
ch. 4 Exploring Hofstede’s Cultural Dimension Using Hollins’ Structured Dialogue to Attain a Conduit for Effective Intercultural Experiences (Angela Owusu- Ansah)
ch. 5 Cyborg in the Village: Culturally Embedded Resistances to Blended Teaching and Learning (G'han Ruth Singh)
ch. 6 Not Just in Theory: Theoretical Aspects of Transcultural Blended Learning and Teaching Curriculum Design (Orly Sela)
ch. 7 Blended Learning Design and Teaching Strategies: Case of the Program Planning Course (Peggy Hui-Chaun Wei, Huang Chin- Yun)
ch. 8 Transformative Learning and Educational Technology Integration in a Post-Totalitarian Context: Professional Development among School Teachers in Rural Siberia, Russia (Wendy Griswold)
ch. 9 A Critical Perspective on the Challenges for Blended Learning and Teaching in Africa’s Higher Education (Alfred T. Kisubi)
ch. 10 Educational Technology and Instructional Design in Synchronous Blended Learning Environments (Sandra Y. Okita)
ch. 11 Facilitating Learning with Adult Students in the Transcultural Classroom (Gerald E. Thomas)
ch. 12 Crossing into the Dreamtime: Evaluating the Benefits of Weblogs as a Blended Learning Tool for University Students to Teach Elementary School Students about Australian Culture (Courtney Bauder, John K. Thompson)
ch. 13 Innovative Approaches in Project Management Blended Education: A Case Study on Introducing Agent-Based Simulation in a Master Degree Program (Constanta Nicoleta Bodea, Karen Pollack, Ike Shibley, Vicki S. Williams, Wu Shao-Wei, Ching Yu-Hui)
ch. 14 The Blended Learning Initiative: A University-Wide Program to Develop, Deliver, and Assess Blended Courses (Suzanne Weinstein, Karen Pollack, Ike Shibley, Vicki S. Williams, Wu Shao-Wei, Ching Yu-Hui)
ch. 15 Blended Learning: The Road to Inclusive and Global Education (Natasha Boskic, Sharon Hu)
ch. 16 Blended Learning in the Campus-Based University: A Case Study Exploring the Student Experience of Technology for Enhancing Learning (Amanda Jefferies)
ch. 17 Quality Matters in Transcultural Blended Learning and Teaching in Postsecondary Education: A Conceptual Framework (Emmanuel Jean Francois)
ch. 18 Intercultural Issues in Graduate Blended Learning Environments (L. Hyatt, Laurie Shcroeder, Adonay A. Montes)
ch. 19 Current and Emerging Trends in Transcultural Blended Learning and Teaching (Emmanuel Jean Francois)
Cover image

Understanding and Engaging Under-Resourced College Students

Book
Becker, Karen A.; Krodel, Karla M.; Tucker, Bethanie H.; Shenk, Dan; and Contrad, Jesse
2009
aha! Process, Inc
LC4069.6.B43 2009
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The degree to which your post-secondary school understands and supports students from poverty makes all the difference in meeting your recruitment, retention, and graduation goals. Understanding your students starts with better information about their personal experience of poverty, and about the skills and strengths they bring with them to college. Supporting your students involves creating opportunities to access a variety of resources, remedial education relevant to their lives, and fully ...
Additional Info:
The degree to which your post-secondary school understands and supports students from poverty makes all the difference in meeting your recruitment, retention, and graduation goals. Understanding your students starts with better information about their personal experience of poverty, and about the skills and strengths they bring with them to college. Supporting your students involves creating opportunities to access a variety of resources, remedial education relevant to their lives, and fully engaged relationships inside of school and out.

You'll learn to:
Recognize the impact of economic class on student preparedness and educational success

Build on students' existing resources, experiences, and abilities

Encourage student success through curriculum design and programming

Partner with communities and businesses to support academic progress

Help students look beyond the classroom through service learning and civic engagement (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

Section I - What Is Poverty?
ch. 1 Colleges, Resources, and Economic Class
ch. 2 What Are the Causes of Poverty?
ch. 3 Internal Resources
ch. 4 External Resources

Section II - The Why and the How of Addressing Low Resources
ch. 5 In Action—the Why and the How of Learning Strategies
ch. 6 In Action—the Why and the How of Instructional Design

Section III - How to Shift to the Additive Model
ch. 7 Paradigm Shifts in Higher Education
ch. 8 In Action—Facilitating the Getting Ahead, College Edition Curriculum

Section IV - How to Shift Institutions and Communities
ch. 9 Building Synergy Among Stakeholders
ch. 10 Resources and the College Campus
ch. 11 Developing Human and Social Capital on the Campus and in the Community
ch. 12 Beyond the Classroom—Fostering Student Engagement with Sociopolitical and Economic Structures
ch. 13 Developing Community Partnerships

Appendices
References
Index
Cover image

Cases on Cultural Implications and Considerations in Online Learning

Book
Edmundson, Andrea, author, ed.
2013
IGI Global, Hershey PA
LB1044.87.C368 2013
Topics: Online Learning   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Expectations – of life, work, education, and so forth – are rooted in cultural values. As a result, access to an engagement with online learning is a culture-bound experience.

Cases on Cultural Implications and Considerations in Online Learning illustrates ways in which to reach and engage learners across cultures by using online learning that accommodates cultural differences and preferences. This casebook helps online educators understand what cultural expectations their students ...
Additional Info:
Expectations – of life, work, education, and so forth – are rooted in cultural values. As a result, access to an engagement with online learning is a culture-bound experience.

Cases on Cultural Implications and Considerations in Online Learning illustrates ways in which to reach and engage learners across cultures by using online learning that accommodates cultural differences and preferences. This casebook helps online educators understand what cultural expectations their students have before they create online programs and tailor their instructional designs for multicultural and international learners. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Section 1 - Cultural Expectations
ch. 1 Designing Culturally Appropriate E-Learning for Learners from an Arabic Background: A Study in the Sultanate of Oman (Andrea Hall)
ch. 2 Collabor8: Online and Blended Cross-Cultural Studios (Ian McArthur)
ch. 3 Chinese Postgraduate Students Learning Online in New Zealand: Perceptions of Cultural Impact (Yan Cong, and Kerry Earl)
ch. 4 Incorporating "World View" into the LMS or CMS is Best (Katherine Watson)

Section 2 - Cultural Accessibility
ch. 5 Cultural Implications of E-Learning Access (and Divides): Teaching an Intercultural Communication Course Online (Pauline Hope Cheong, and Judith N. Martin)
ch. 6 Blended Learning Internationalization from the Commonwealth: An Australian and Canadian Collaboration Case Study (Shelley Kinash, and Susan Crichton)
ch. 7 Developing an E-Learning Course for a Global Legal Firm (Gemma Baltazar)
ch. 8 Integrating Culture with E-Learning Management System Design (Ray Archee, and Myra Gurney)

Section 3 - Content Globalization
ch. 9 Developing a Grassroots Cross-Cultural Partnership to Enhance Student Experiences (Iryna Pentina, and Veronique Guilloux)
ch. 10 Cultural Adaptation of E-Learning Courseware: An Ethics & Compliance Example (Randall Stieghorst, and Andrea Edmundson)
ch. 11 Culturally Significant Signs, Symbols, and Philosophical Belief Systems within E-Learning Environments (Caroline M. Crawford, and Ruth Gannon Cook)

Section 4 - Instructional Globalization
ch. 12 Collaborative Reflection in Globally Distributed Inter-Cultural Course Teams (Nicholas Bowskill, and David McConnell)
ch. 13 A Multidisciplinary Project Integrating Marketing Research, Art and Spanish Langauge for Social Sciences (Manuel Cuadrado-Garcia, Maria-Eugenia Ruiz-Molina, and Lourdes Hernández-Martin)
ch. 14 ORIENT: The Intercultural Empathy through Virtual Role-Play (Sibylle Enz, Carsten Zoll, Natalie Vannini, Mei Yii Lim, Wolfgan Schneider, Lynne Hall, Ana Paiva, Ruth Aylett)
ch. 15 Learning in Cross-Cultural Online MBA Courses: Perceptions of Chinese Students (Xiaojing Liu, and Richard J. Magjuka)
ch. 16 Integrated Cross-Cultural Virtual Classroom Exchange Program: How Adaptable Public Schools are in Korea and the USA? (Eunhee Jung O'Neill)
ch. 17 International Collaboration in Distance Education in Sub-Saharan Africa: Trends, Trials and Tomorrow's Thrusts (Gbolagade Adekanmbi, and Bopelo Boitschwarelo)

Compilation of References
About the Contributors
Index
Cover image

Teaching, Learning and Intersecting Identities in Higher Education

Book
Pliner, Susan M.; and Banks, Cerri A., eds.
2012
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LC191.94.T43 2012
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book utilizes the theory of intersectionality to focus on the divergent identities and experiences of marginalized groups and to analyze the ways these experiences infiltrate the classroom. It examines teaching and learning as integrated and synergistic practices and highlights the personal and institutional power dynamics existing between scholars and students.

Starting with the premise that institutions of higher education must pay attention to the ways intersecting identities ...
Additional Info:
This book utilizes the theory of intersectionality to focus on the divergent identities and experiences of marginalized groups and to analyze the ways these experiences infiltrate the classroom. It examines teaching and learning as integrated and synergistic practices and highlights the personal and institutional power dynamics existing between scholars and students.

Starting with the premise that institutions of higher education must pay attention to the ways intersecting identities and structures of privilege and disadvantage enter all educational settings, the contributors to this text represent a range of academic disciplines and they are both scholars and students. This approach demonstrates that ideas related to teaching and learning should not follow models that separate teachers, students, and disciplines, but rather that significant learning occurs in the areas where they overlap. Each chapter provides pedagogical strategies and methods for classroom practice that facilitate student learning, equitable classroom environments, and a social justice agenda. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Integrating Intersectionality, Transforming Learning (Kim A. Case, angela R. Miller, Sharpie Bambacigno Jackson)
ch. 2 "We Talk about Race Too Much in This Class!" Complicating the Essentialized Woman through Intersectional Pedagogy (Leah Wing)
ch. 3 Conflict Resolution Education and Intersectionality (Anna Creadick, Jalisa Whitley, Patrice Thomas, Amber Jackson, Katy Wolfe, Martin Quigley, Reina Apraez)
ch. 4 "Check Your Head" (Linda McCarthy/Laura M. Larson)
ch. 5 Using a Pedagogy of Intersectionality in the Community College Classroom (Neeta Bhasin)
ch. 6 The Rhetorical Nature of Intersecting Identities: Actualizing Intersectionality in the Classroom (Lesley Bogad/Ibilolia Holder/Juanita Montes de Oca/Andres Ramirez/Chris Susi)
ch. 7 A.L.L.I.E.D. Across Our Differences: Blogging and the (Un)Reconciled Politics of Intersectionality
ch. 8 Oprah and Obama Made It, Why Can’t Everyone Else? Utilizing Intersectional Pedagogy to Challenge Post-racial Ideologies within the Higher Education Classroom (Susan M. Pliner/Cerri A. Banks/Ashley M. Tapscot)
ch. 9 Intersectional Pedagogy and Transformative Learning (Jennifer Bowen)
ch. 10 Intersectionality and My Practice of Teaching Mathematics (Julia R. Johnson/Mary González/Cris Ray/Jessica Hager/Diana Leon/Sally Spalding/Tiffany Brigham)
ch. 11 Daring Pedagogy: Dialoguing about Intersectionality and Social Justice (Liz Braun)
ch. 12 Reframing "Diversity" in Higher Education: An Argument for an Intersectional Approach (Cerri A. Banks/Susan M. Pliner: Afterword)

Afterword: Final Thoughts
Contributors
Index
Cover image

Latinos in Higher Education and Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Creating Conditions for Student Success

Book
Nunez, Anne-Marie; Hoover, Richard E.; Pickett, Kellie; Stuart-Carruthers, A. Christine; and Vazquez, Maria
2013
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC2670.6.N86 2013
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Latinos’ postsecondary educational attainment has not kept pace with their growing representation in the U.S. population. How can Latino educational attainment be advanced?

This monograph presents relevant contemporary research, focusing on the role of institutional contexts. Drawing particularly on research grounded in Latino students’ perspectives, it identifies key challenges Latino students face and discuss various approaches to address these challenges. ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Latinos’ postsecondary educational attainment has not kept pace with their growing representation in the U.S. population. How can Latino educational attainment be advanced?

This monograph presents relevant contemporary research, focusing on the role of institutional contexts. Drawing particularly on research grounded in Latino students’ perspectives, it identifies key challenges Latino students face and discuss various approaches to address these challenges. Because so many Latino students are enrolled in federally designated Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), it also specifically explores HSIs’ role in promoting Latinos’ higher education access and equity. As a conclusion, it offers recommendations for institutional, state, and federal policies that can foster supportive contexts.

This is Volume 39 Issue 1 of the Jossey-Bass publication ASHE Higher Education Report. Each monograph in the series is the definitive analysis of a tough higher education problem, based on thorough research of pertinent literature and institutional experiences. Topics are identified by a national survey. Noted practitioners and scholars are then commissioned to write the reports, with experts providing critical reviews of each manuscript before publication. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Executive Summary
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction
Postsecondary Attainment
Economic Implications of Low Educational Attainment
Organization of This Monograph

ch. 2 Demographic, Social, and Cultural Background
A Demographic Dividend?
Ethnic Subgroups
Cultural and Social Influences
Summary

ch. 3 Classic and Contemporary Theories of Latino Identity Development
Ethnic and Racial Identity Development in College Students
Supporting Latino Students in Identity Development
Summary

ch. 4 Challenges to Latino Student Success
Casting Success Within a Broader Societal Context
Role of Resources
Summary

ch. 5 Mainstream Approaches to Latino Student Success
Academic Capital
Financial Capital
Cultural Capital
Social Capital
Summary

ch. 6 Culturally Responsive Approaches to Latino Student Success
Family Concerns
Assumptions About Latinos’ Background and Potential
Campus Racial/Ethnic Climate
Conclusion

ch. 7 The Role of Hispanic-Serving Institutions in Access and Equity
Historical Background and Funding of HSIs
Students in HSIs
Faculty and Administrators at HSIs
Emerging Hispanic-Serving Institutions
Challenges for HSIs
Summary

ch. 8 Conclusion and Implications
Role of Demographics and Social and Cultural Factors
Developing Culturally Responsive Research, Policy, and Practice
Institutionalizing Strategies to Serve Latino Students
Teaching and Learning in the Classroom
Role of Finances
Collaborative Researchv Role of State Legislators and Policymakers
Role of Federal Representatives and Agencies
Final Thoughts

References
Name Index
Subject Index
About the Authors
Cover image

Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Postmulticulturalism: Shifting the Locus of Learning in Urban Teacher Education

Book
Wilgus, Gay, ed.
2013
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LB1715.K58 2013
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Postmulticulturalism opens for examination the research and experimental pedagogies of a teacher education faculty at a large, urban, public university, where teacher candidates from working-class and ethnic and linguistic minority backgrounds are prepared to work with learners from similar backgrounds. The pedagogies discussed have been expressly designed to elicit the funds of knowledge and community cultural wealth of these teacher education candidates. The research in this volume ...
Additional Info:
Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Postmulticulturalism opens for examination the research and experimental pedagogies of a teacher education faculty at a large, urban, public university, where teacher candidates from working-class and ethnic and linguistic minority backgrounds are prepared to work with learners from similar backgrounds. The pedagogies discussed have been expressly designed to elicit the funds of knowledge and community cultural wealth of these teacher education candidates. The research in this volume calls attention to the distinctive, complex perspectives that individuals from historically marginalized groups bring to the university classroom, and demonstrates how these valuable perspectives can be brought front and center in the university's teacher education curriculum. It counters contemporary trends of discouraging and preventing students and teachers from critically and intellectually engaging with issues of which knowledges are taught, and how. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Discovering Inquiry-based Learning Through Oral History Projects (Megan Blumenreich)
ch. 2 'I'm not just gonna settle for anything:' Inciting Teacher Efficacy through Critical Pedagogies (Vicki Garavuso)
ch. 3. Intertextuality, Music and Critical Pedagogy (Charles Malone)
ch. 4. Transforming Classrooms: Teacher Education, Social Studies (Catherine Franklin)
ch. 5. Incorporating Teacher Candidates' Prior Beliefs and Funds of Knowledge in Theories of Child Development (Amita Gupta)
ch. 6. Prioritizing the Social in Academic Writing: The Experiences of Ethnically, Linguistically and Generationally Diverse Early Childhood Teacher Candidates (Gay Wilgus)
ch. 7. Special Education Teacher Preparation: Growing Disability Studies in the Absence of Resistance (Linda Ware)
ch. 8. Postmulticulturalism: Cultivating Alternative Canons, a Critical Vernacular and Student-Generated Understandings of their 'Lived-Situatedness' (Gay Wilgus)

Appendix A: Writing Background Survey Appendix B: Interview Questions
Cover image

Religion & Education Volume 40, no.2

Journal Issue
2013
Taylor & Francis, Inc. Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 v.40 no.2
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Special Issue on Religion, Spirituality and the Schooling of Black Students

ch. 1 On the Horns of a Dilemma: The Institutional Vision of Church-Affiliated HBCU's
ch. 2 It's Good Enough for Me: The Role of Religion in School Choice in Post-Katrina New Orleans
ch. 3 Establishing Martin Luther King's Beloved Community for the Education of Black Youth
ch. 4 African-American Adolescent Spirituality: Implications for School Counseling
ch. 5 Disability in the Context of Blackness: Is It a Manifestation of Past Sins or a Blessing in Disguise?
ch. 6 Advocacy in Academia: Blurring the Boundaries between Critical Race Theory, Caring, and Spirituality
Cover image

Identity and Pedagogy in Higher Education: International Comparisons

Book
Bhopal, Kalwant; and Danaher, Patrick
2013
Bloomsbury Academic, New York, NY
LC212.3.G7 B56 2013
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Kalwant Bhopal and Patrick Danaher examine 'race', identity and gender within education and explore the difficulties of relating these concepts to the experience of students in higher education. In drawing together the experience of local and international students in the UK and in Australia, they examine the ways identities are understood and conceptualized within higher education in local contexts and on a global level. They consider the complexity of 'race', ...
Additional Info:
Kalwant Bhopal and Patrick Danaher examine 'race', identity and gender within education and explore the difficulties of relating these concepts to the experience of students in higher education. In drawing together the experience of local and international students in the UK and in Australia, they examine the ways identities are understood and conceptualized within higher education in local contexts and on a global level. They consider the complexity of 'race', gender and identity in relation to education within the context that education continues to be dominated by predominantly white, middle class values and perspectives.

Identity and Pedagogy in Higher Education examines the extent to which education as a vehicle for change in the light of the controversial debates surrounding race and gender inequalities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Abbreviations
Introduction

ch. 1 Key Debates about Identity, 'Race', Gender and Culture
ch. 2 Theoretical Understandings of Identity
ch. 3 Identity and the Context of Higher Education
ch. 4 Educational Identities in the UK and Australia
ch. 5 Researching Racialized Identities
ch. 6 Student Understandings of Racialized Identities
ch. 7 Conclusions

References
Index
Additional Info:
Responding To Distressed Students Extensive list of topics, prepared for UC Santa Barbara teaching assistants, with do’s and don’ts in responding to student issues such as anxiety, hazing, depression, eating disorders.
Additional Info:
Responding To Distressed Students Extensive list of topics, prepared for UC Santa Barbara teaching assistants, with do’s and don’ts in responding to student issues such as anxiety, hazing, depression, eating disorders.
Additional Info:
An interactive resource hub for higher education, created by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, to illuminate the scope, accomplishments, and educational value of the campus diversity movement, and to help practitioners learn to effectively articulate and communicate the education value.
Additional Info:
An interactive resource hub for higher education, created by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, to illuminate the scope, accomplishments, and educational value of the campus diversity movement, and to help practitioners learn to effectively articulate and communicate the education value.
Additional Info:
Handbook of ideas and teaching techniques to help create an inclusive classroom atmosphere, created by the University of North Carolina Center for Teaching and Learning in 1997.
Additional Info:
Handbook of ideas and teaching techniques to help create an inclusive classroom atmosphere, created by the University of North Carolina Center for Teaching and Learning in 1997.
Additional Info:
From the University of Washington, provides perspectives on what excludes students, as well as strategies and resources for inclusive teaching.
Additional Info:
From the University of Washington, provides perspectives on what excludes students, as well as strategies and resources for inclusive teaching.
Additional Info:
Harvard University’s Derek Bok Center provides teaching tips for the racially diverse college classroom. Recommends that instructor educate himself or herself and not make assumptions regarding individual students. Includes suggestions for teaching preparation and classroom engagement.
Additional Info:
Harvard University’s Derek Bok Center provides teaching tips for the racially diverse college classroom. Recommends that instructor educate himself or herself and not make assumptions regarding individual students. Includes suggestions for teaching preparation and classroom engagement.
Additional Info:
Collection of tip sheets on how to teach responsively to persons with various disabilities. From UC Berkeley’s Disabled Students’ Program
Additional Info:
Collection of tip sheets on how to teach responsively to persons with various disabilities. From UC Berkeley’s Disabled Students’ Program
Additional Info:
Looks at some of the roles that cultural context plays in developing and using various teaching and learning styles. Re-print of chapter 7 of “Teaching, Testing, and Measuring Intelligence” (University of Wisconsin Press).
Additional Info:
Looks at some of the roles that cultural context plays in developing and using various teaching and learning styles. Re-print of chapter 7 of “Teaching, Testing, and Measuring Intelligence” (University of Wisconsin Press).
Additional Info:
Magazine article-style discussion of the challenges and needs of first generation college students.
Additional Info:
Magazine article-style discussion of the challenges and needs of first generation college students.
Additional Info:
Nearly a hundred or more citations on the issue of students and plagiarism, especially with international students, compiled by Rebecca Moore Howard, Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University, and specialist in "authorship studies."
Additional Info:
Nearly a hundred or more citations on the issue of students and plagiarism, especially with international students, compiled by Rebecca Moore Howard, Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University, and specialist in "authorship studies."
Additional Info:
Video. Powerpoint, videos and lists of resources on topics focused by concerns for various kinds of diversity in issues such as: managing student questions and evaluating comprehension, forming teams, and plagiarism -- provided by Thomson Rivers University Centre for Teaching and Learning (Canada).
Additional Info:
Video. Powerpoint, videos and lists of resources on topics focused by concerns for various kinds of diversity in issues such as: managing student questions and evaluating comprehension, forming teams, and plagiarism -- provided by Thomson Rivers University Centre for Teaching and Learning (Canada).
Cover image

Managing and Supporting Student Diversity in Higher Education: A Casebook

Book
Benson, Robyn; Heagney, Margaret; Hewitt, Leslie; Crosley, Glenda; and Devos, Anita
2013
Chandos Publishing, Oxford
LC12.M32 2013
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Government initiatives in many countries emphasise social inclusion in higher education, resulting in a more diverse student population. This presents opportunities and challenges for academic and professional staff in managing and supporting these students. Managing and Supporting Student Diversity in Higher Education focuses on how students succeed amidst a culture of widening participation. The book is divided into seven chapters. The first introduces ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Government initiatives in many countries emphasise social inclusion in higher education, resulting in a more diverse student population. This presents opportunities and challenges for academic and professional staff in managing and supporting these students. Managing and Supporting Student Diversity in Higher Education focuses on how students succeed amidst a culture of widening participation. The book is divided into seven chapters. The first introduces current literature and policies to present an international perspective on widening participation in higher education. The following five chapters present students’ stories on topics including getting into higher education, the international experience, coping with education later in life, and identity. Stories are followed by implications for management and support, and discussion topics for practitioners. The book concludes by looking at how students succeed in higher education and the implications for managing and supporting student diversity. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Preface
About the authors

ch. 1 Setting the context
ch. 2 Finding the way to higher education: Miranda and Rochelle
ch. 3 This time it’s different: Sesh and Shannon
ch. 4 The international experience: Lam and Zelin
ch. 5 Coming to education later in life: Alex Carole and Virginia
ch. 6 Finding my voice at last: Lillian, Marie, and Harriet
ch. 7 Helping students to succeed

References
Index
Tactics cover image
Wabash tree

"Background Knowledge Probe"

Tactic
Howell, David B.
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 1 (2014): 78
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 1 2014
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic to diagnose the level of learning students' bring to a course.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic to diagnose the level of learning students' bring to a course.
Cover image

The Handbook of Race and Adult Education: A Resource for Dialogue on Racism

Book
Sheared, Vanessa; Johnson-Bailey, Juanita; Colin, III, Scipio A. J.; Peterson, Elizabeth; and Brookfield, Stephen D., eds.
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC212.5.H36 2010
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The Handbook of Race and Adult Education provides a discourse on the theory, the real-life experiences, and the structure of privileges within race and racism. Edited by leaders in this field, the unique resource presents ways for changes in classrooms, communities, and homes for marginalized or oppressed groups and individuals. As the first comprehensive resource on race, racism, and adult education, this book is essential for introductory level graduate students ...
Additional Info:
The Handbook of Race and Adult Education provides a discourse on the theory, the real-life experiences, and the structure of privileges within race and racism. Edited by leaders in this field, the unique resource presents ways for changes in classrooms, communities, and homes for marginalized or oppressed groups and individuals. As the first comprehensive resource on race, racism, and adult education, this book is essential for introductory level graduate students in understanding the complexity of race and racism in an educational context. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Acknowledgments
Foreword
The Beginning: Kitchen Table Dialogue

Part One: The Myth Versus the Reality of Race and Racism
ch. 1 Rebirth of the Indigenous Spirit: Turning the World Right Side Up (Rose Borunda)
ch. 2 Reading, Writing, and Racism: Developing Racial Literacy in the Adult Education English Classroom (Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz)
ch. 3 Experiencing the Race, Gender, and Socioeconomic Divide in Academia: A Chicana Perspective (Raquel A. Gonzales and Maria Mejorado)
ch. 4 Transforming Teaching and Learning: Teaching Race (Nichole M. Ray)
ch. 5 "Who Is This Cowboy?" Challenging the Cultural Gatekeepers (Lesley Ngatai)
Reflection One: Healing: A Journey Through Conversations on Race and Gender

Part Two: Problematizing "Whiteness," Supremacy, and Privilege: Their Impact on Race
ch. 6 White Whispers: Talking About Race in Adult Education (Lisa M. Baumgartner)
ch. 7 Transforming White Consciousness (Doug Paxton)
ch. 8 Adult Education and the Problem of the Color (Power) Line: Views from the Whiter Side (Elaine Manglitz, Ronald M. Cervero)
ch. 9 White on White: Developing Capacity to Communicate About Race with Critical Humility (European-American Collaborative Challenging Whiteness)
Reflection Two: Struggling: A Journey of Comfort and Discomfort

Part Three: Theoretical Responses to Race and Racism
ch. 10 An Exploration of Critical Race Theory (Rosemary B. Closson)
ch. 11 Musings on Controversial Intersections of Positionality: A Queer Crit Perspective in Adult and Continuing Education (Mitsunori Misawa)
ch. 12 Challenging Racism Through Postcolonial Discourse: A Critical Approach to Adult Education Pedagogy (Mary V. Alfred)
ch. 13 Black Skins, No Mask (Taj Johns)
ch. 14 Immigration, Racial Identity, and Adult Education: Reflections on a Transnational Paradigm of Resistance (Luis Kong)
ch. 15 A River Runs Through It: Building Bridges Across Racial Divisions in Urban Graduate Education (Catherine H. Monaghan and Catherine A. Hansman)
Reflection Three: Looking Inward: A Journey Through Dialogue and Reflections on Race

Part Four: Reframing the Field Through the Lens of Race
ch. 16 Mammies, Maids, and Mamas: The Unspoken Language of Perceptual and Verbal Racism (Doris A. Flowers)
ch. 17 The Race Card (Barbara Ford)
ch. 18 Expanding the Racialized Discourse: An Asian American Perspective (Ming-yeh Lee)
ch. 19 Challenges and Approaches to Racializing Discourse in a Privileged, White Dominant Society (LaJerne Terry Cornish)
ch. 20 Using an African-Centered Paradigm for Understanding Race and Racism in Adult Education (Derise E. Toliver)
Reflection Four: Inpowering the Self: A Journey Toward Ending Racism

Part Five: Individual and Collective Responses to Race and Racism
ch. 21 Epilogue: Implications for Curriculum, Programming, and Research (Scipio A. J. Colin III, Vanessa Sheared, Juanita Johnson-Bailey, Stephen D. Brookfield)

Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Class and the College Classroom: Essays on Teaching

Book
Rosen, Robert C.
2013
LC 196.5.U6 C534 2013
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: We have long been encouraged to look to education, especially higher education, for the solution to social problems, particularly as a way out of poverty for the talented and the hard working. But in its appointed role as the path to upward mobility that makes inequality more acceptable, higher education is faltering these days. As funds for public institutions are cut and tuition ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: We have long been encouraged to look to education, especially higher education, for the solution to social problems, particularly as a way out of poverty for the talented and the hard working. But in its appointed role as the path to upward mobility that makes inequality more acceptable, higher education is faltering these days. As funds for public institutions are cut and tuition costs soar everywhere; as for-profit education races into the breach; and as student debt grows wildly; the comfortable future once promised to those willing to study hard has begun to fade from sight.

So now is a good time to take a more serious look at the ways class structures higher education and the ways teachers can bring it into focus in the classroom. In recent decades, scholarly work and pedagogical practice in higher education have paid increasing attention to issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality.But among these four terms of analysis -- and clearly they are interrelated -- class is often an afterthought, and work that does examine class and higher education tends to focus only on admissions, on who is in the college classroom, not on what happens there.

Class and the College Classroom offers a broader look at the connections between college teaching and social class.It collects and reprints twenty essays originally published in Radical Teacher, a journal that has been a leader in the field of critical pedagogy since 1975. This wide-ranging and insightful volume addresses the interests, concerns, and pedagogical needs of teachers committed to social justice and provides them with new tools for thinking and teaching about class. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Permissions
Acknowledgments

Introduction

Part One - What Is Class?

ch. 1 Is Class an Identity?

Part Two - Who Gets To Be in the Classroom

ch. 2 A Dream Deferred: Undocumented Students at CUNY

ch. 3 Last In and First Out: Poor Students in Academe in Times of Fiscal Crisis

ch. 4 Welfare "Reform" and One Community College

ch. 5 Teaching Freire and CUNY Open Admissions

Part Three - Class and the Working Teacher

ch. 6 A Teaching Temp Talks Back

ch. 7 Instruction

ch. 8 Contingent Teaching, Corporate Universities, and the Academic Labor Movement

ch. 9 Anti-Intellectualism, Homophobia, and the Working-Class Gay/Lesbian Academic

Part Four - Students’ Class and Classroom Dynamics

ch. 10 Stories Out of School: Poor and Working-Class Students at a Small Liberal Arts College

ch. 11 Class Privilege, Oppression, and the World in the Classroom

ch. 12 Enforcing the Rules
ch. 13 Upward Mobility and Higher Education: Mining the Contradictions in a Worker Education Program

Part Five - Teaching About Class in the Humanities

ch. 14 Working-Class Cultural Studies in the University

ch. 15 All That Hollywood Allows: Film and the Working Class

ch. 16 Canon Contexts and Class Contexts: Teaching American Literature from a Market Perspective

ch. 17 Teaching Howards End to the Basts: Class Markers in the Classroom and in the Bourgeois Novel

Part Six - Teaching About Class Across the Campus

ch. 18 Empathy Education: Teaching About Women and Poverty in the Introductory Women's Studies Classroom

ch. 19 Teaching an Interdisciplinary Course on the American Upper Class

ch. 20 Teaching About Class in the Library


PostScript

Contributors

Index
Additional Info:
How can we make experiences with those who are different from ourselves beneficial to everyone, both instructors and students? How can we turn this into an opportunity to value and learn from new, different, and worthwhile perspectives in our changing world?
Additional Info:
How can we make experiences with those who are different from ourselves beneficial to everyone, both instructors and students? How can we turn this into an opportunity to value and learn from new, different, and worthwhile perspectives in our changing world?
Additional Info:
In tiered classrooms (also sometimes called differentiated classrooms), the instructor’s approaches to teaching content and evaluating student performance are adjusted to accommodate for the diversity of students’ readiness, degree of interest, and learning profiles.
Additional Info:
In tiered classrooms (also sometimes called differentiated classrooms), the instructor’s approaches to teaching content and evaluating student performance are adjusted to accommodate for the diversity of students’ readiness, degree of interest, and learning profiles.
Additional Info:
The best way to ensure that all of your students feel comfortable is to explore ways to foster an open, safe environment for all students, while learning more about the varied backgrounds and experiences that your students bring to your classroom.
Additional Info:
The best way to ensure that all of your students feel comfortable is to explore ways to foster an open, safe environment for all students, while learning more about the varied backgrounds and experiences that your students bring to your classroom.
Additional Info:
There are two kinds of academically vulnerable students: those who struggle with material and those who believe that their instructors and peers doubt their abilities.
Additional Info:
There are two kinds of academically vulnerable students: those who struggle with material and those who believe that their instructors and peers doubt their abilities.
Cover image

The Transnational Character of Theological Education

Journal Issue
Stevenson-Moessner, ed., Jeanne
2014
Spotlight on Theological Education, March
BV4019.S66
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/theo-ed/transnational-character/issue-introduction
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/theo-ed/transnational-character/issue-introduction

Table Of Content:
Introduction to the New Spotlight Editor, Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner

ch. 1 The Transnational Character of Theological Education: Issue Introduction (Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner)
ch. 2 Teaching Theology in a Global and Transnational World (Kwok Pui-lan)
ch. 3 Cross-Cultural Trans-Pacific Team Teaching in Theological Education (Randi Jones Walker)
ch. 4 The Politics of Interreligious Education (Najeeba Syeed-Miller)
ch. 5 Radical Border-Traversing: Theological Education in a Glocalized World of Disjuncture (Namsoon Kang)

Postscript (Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner)
Suggested Resources
TTR cover image

Teaching Exegesis in Historically Black Theological Schools

TTR
Mbuvi, Andrew; Ashmore, James; Ogden Bellis, Alice; Wafawanaka, Robert; Bailey, Randall C.; Mbuwayesango, Dora; and Willett Newheart, Michael
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 2 (2014): 141-164
BL41.T4 v.17 no.2
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This Forum collects the papers presented at a 2010 panel at the Society of Biblical Literature, an outcome of a Wabash Center funded grant project. The project examined the unique dimensions and experiences of teaching Biblical exegesis at the six historically black theological schools (HBTSs), including discussion of the unique needs of HBTS students and their communities, and appropriate learning goals and effective teaching practices for this context. None of the ...
Additional Info:
This Forum collects the papers presented at a 2010 panel at the Society of Biblical Literature, an outcome of a Wabash Center funded grant project. The project examined the unique dimensions and experiences of teaching Biblical exegesis at the six historically black theological schools (HBTSs), including discussion of the unique needs of HBTS students and their communities, and appropriate learning goals and effective teaching practices for this context. None of the biblical studies faculty were prepared as graduate students for the unique challenges that they have encountered teaching at a HBTS, so they have all had to “learn on the job” how best to approach the unique needs of the student body. The brief statements collected here summarize the findings from the project, describe and analyze some effective teaching strategies, and offer suggestions for continuing the conversation.
Additional Info:
Summer 2013 article in AAC&U’s journal “Diversity and Democracy.” Uses survey data to argue for the importance of inclusive learning environments and incorporating diversity into teaching and learning.
Additional Info:
Summer 2013 article in AAC&U’s journal “Diversity and Democracy.” Uses survey data to argue for the importance of inclusive learning environments and incorporating diversity into teaching and learning.
Web cover image
Wabash tree

Creating Inclusive College Classrooms

Web
Saunders, Shari; and Kardia, Diana
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Discusses five aspects of creating an inclusive classroom: course content choices; awareness of assumptions; course planning; getting to know students; and awareness during the process of teaching.
Additional Info:
Discusses five aspects of creating an inclusive classroom: course content choices; awareness of assumptions; course planning; getting to know students; and awareness during the process of teaching.
Additional Info:
PDF includes 13 essays by faculty at the University of Colorado who participated in a Faculty Teaching Excellence Program. Faculty in various disciplines wrote essays with specific teaching tips addressing particular forms of diversity. Those essays were collected into this volume.
Additional Info:
PDF includes 13 essays by faculty at the University of Colorado who participated in a Faculty Teaching Excellence Program. Faculty in various disciplines wrote essays with specific teaching tips addressing particular forms of diversity. Those essays were collected into this volume.
Additional Info:
Provides suggestions for instructors of college students with disabilities. Highlights confidentiality issues and syllabus preparation including accommodation and modification statements.
Additional Info:
Provides suggestions for instructors of college students with disabilities. Highlights confidentiality issues and syllabus preparation including accommodation and modification statements.
Additional Info:
Focuses on issues relating to “international students.” Discusses major differences between U.S. and international students in terms of background and understanding of academic environment. Provides suggestions for instructor on coping with cultural differences.
Additional Info:
Focuses on issues relating to “international students.” Discusses major differences between U.S. and international students in terms of background and understanding of academic environment. Provides suggestions for instructor on coping with cultural differences.
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Education article (May 2013). Discusses experiences of an openly gay professor teaching a year-long first-year core course. He struggles with fear of teaching a text that dealt with issues of homosexuality while also allowing an open forum for discussion.
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Education article (May 2013). Discusses experiences of an openly gay professor teaching a year-long first-year core course. He struggles with fear of teaching a text that dealt with issues of homosexuality while also allowing an open forum for discussion.
Additional Info:
Two-page PDF on the Indiana University website with seven quick tips on improving communication with culturally diverse students. Examples: learn names; listen; and limit unclear language.
Additional Info:
Two-page PDF on the Indiana University website with seven quick tips on improving communication with culturally diverse students. Examples: learn names; listen; and limit unclear language.
Additional Info:
Provides suggestions on how to improve scores on IDEA item #16 relating to sharing with others who are different or whose viewpoints are different. Gives background on this item and other similar items; identifies tips for classroom engagement; addresses issues relating to online learning; and identifies assessment issues.
Additional Info:
Provides suggestions on how to improve scores on IDEA item #16 relating to sharing with others who are different or whose viewpoints are different. Gives background on this item and other similar items; identifies tips for classroom engagement; addresses issues relating to online learning; and identifies assessment issues.
Additional Info:
Helpful, brief list of teaching strategies. Addresses why and how to use inclusive teaching strategies in the college classroom. Highlights potential benefits
Additional Info:
Helpful, brief list of teaching strategies. Addresses why and how to use inclusive teaching strategies in the college classroom. Highlights potential benefits
Additional Info:
Interview with L. Lee Knefelkamp, a professor of psychology and education at Columbia University. Stresses the diversity of higher education learners, including adult learners. Emphasizes the notion of faculty as co-learners with students. Notes the importance of the work of K. Patricia Cross regarding adult learners.
Additional Info:
Interview with L. Lee Knefelkamp, a professor of psychology and education at Columbia University. Stresses the diversity of higher education learners, including adult learners. Emphasizes the notion of faculty as co-learners with students. Notes the importance of the work of K. Patricia Cross regarding adult learners.
Additional Info:
Manual developed by Baker College Effective Teaching and Learning Development. Provides background on the psychology of adult learners. Describes basic characteristics and general preferences of four generations of adult learners: the silent generation; baby boomers; generation X; and millennials. Explores the implications of teaching multi-generational learners.
Additional Info:
Manual developed by Baker College Effective Teaching and Learning Development. Provides background on the psychology of adult learners. Describes basic characteristics and general preferences of four generations of adult learners: the silent generation; baby boomers; generation X; and millennials. Explores the implications of teaching multi-generational learners.
Web cover image
Wabash tree

The Myth of Learning Styles

Web
Reinar, Cedar; and Willingham, Daniel
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Counters the persistent claim that there are distinguishable sensory learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic). Argues that instructors should acknowledge and attempt to address differences in student ability, interest, background knowledge, and learning disability.
Additional Info:
Counters the persistent claim that there are distinguishable sensory learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic). Argues that instructors should acknowledge and attempt to address differences in student ability, interest, background knowledge, and learning disability.
Web cover image

Instructing Multi-Generational Students

Web
McCraw, Mary Anne; and Martindale, Trey
Topics: Adult Learners   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Describes different generational groupings of adult learners and different learning preferences. Provides suggestions on effective course design and highlights characteristics of excellent instructors across generational lines.
Additional Info:
Describes different generational groupings of adult learners and different learning preferences. Provides suggestions on effective course design and highlights characteristics of excellent instructors across generational lines.
Additional Info:
Outlines seven traits of Millennials and provides strategies on preparing and delivering effective instruction with these students. Acknowledges difficulties in addressing issues of race/ethnicity and class in generational theory.
Additional Info:
Outlines seven traits of Millennials and provides strategies on preparing and delivering effective instruction with these students. Acknowledges difficulties in addressing issues of race/ethnicity and class in generational theory.
Additional Info:
Preparing the way to advocate for a more "brain based" approach to diverse learners, Inglis asserts that even the creator of "multiple intelligences," Howard Garner, announced a decade ago that he was "over" the theory and that educators need to "move on."
Additional Info:
Preparing the way to advocate for a more "brain based" approach to diverse learners, Inglis asserts that even the creator of "multiple intelligences," Howard Garner, announced a decade ago that he was "over" the theory and that educators need to "move on."
Additional Info:
In this series (click through to parts one and two), Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
Additional Info:
In this series (click through to parts one and two), Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
Additional Info:
In this series, Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
Additional Info:
In this series, Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
Additional Info:
In this series, Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
Additional Info:
In this series, Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
Additional Info:
Advocating that disability be valued as a form of diversity, Adams summarizes some of the less-obvious ways that campuses and classrooms stigmatize disability and in other ways fail to welcome the physically and cognitively disabled.
Additional Info:
Advocating that disability be valued as a form of diversity, Adams summarizes some of the less-obvious ways that campuses and classrooms stigmatize disability and in other ways fail to welcome the physically and cognitively disabled.
Additional Info:
This free, online tutorial contains 10 modules, each explaining how to better design course materials for learners with physical and cognitive disabilities. Tutorials include: accessibility issues on online learning, and making more accessible PowerPoint presentations, videos, Word and Excel documents, PDFs, Web pages, and Web scripts.
Additional Info:
This free, online tutorial contains 10 modules, each explaining how to better design course materials for learners with physical and cognitive disabilities. Tutorials include: accessibility issues on online learning, and making more accessible PowerPoint presentations, videos, Word and Excel documents, PDFs, Web pages, and Web scripts.
Additional Info:
This "help" document by Microsoft drills down into the details of making documents that are better accessible to users with physical and cognitive disabilities. Excellent organization and detail. Calls attention also to MS Word's "Accessibility Checker."
Additional Info:
This "help" document by Microsoft drills down into the details of making documents that are better accessible to users with physical and cognitive disabilities. Excellent organization and detail. Calls attention also to MS Word's "Accessibility Checker."
Additional Info:
This piece first describes the unprecedented possibilities offered by the Web to people with physical or cognitive disabilities. It then describes, with links, laws pertaining to accessibility. Finally, the work offers detailed guidance on creating Web (and also non-HTML electronic) content following the principles of assessible design.
Additional Info:
This piece first describes the unprecedented possibilities offered by the Web to people with physical or cognitive disabilities. It then describes, with links, laws pertaining to accessibility. Finally, the work offers detailed guidance on creating Web (and also non-HTML electronic) content following the principles of assessible design.
Additional Info:
Great site that advocates for non-traditional students
Additional Info:
Great site that advocates for non-traditional students
Additional Info:
Criteria used to identify nontraditional students: 1) enrollment patterns, 2) financial and family status, and 3) high school graduation status.
Additional Info:
Criteria used to identify nontraditional students: 1) enrollment patterns, 2) financial and family status, and 3) high school graduation status.
Additional Info:
Article that walks you through your own understandings of diversity, how to creat an inclusive classroom including assignments.
Additional Info:
Article that walks you through your own understandings of diversity, how to creat an inclusive classroom including assignments.
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Confronting Racism in Higher Education: Problems and Possibilities for Fighting Ignorance, Bigotry and Isolation

Book
Brooks, Jeffrey S.; and Witherspoon-Arnold, Noelle, eds.
2013
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LC212.2. C667 2013
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Racism and ignorance churn on college campuses as surely as they do in society at large. Over the past fifteen years there have been many discussions regarding racism and higher education. Some of these focus on formal policies and dynamics such as Affirmative Action or The Dream Act, while many more discussions are happening in classrooms, dorm rooms and in campus communities. Of course, corollary to these conversations, some of ...
Additional Info:
Racism and ignorance churn on college campuses as surely as they do in society at large. Over the past fifteen years there have been many discussions regarding racism and higher education. Some of these focus on formal policies and dynamics such as Affirmative Action or The Dream Act, while many more discussions are happening in classrooms, dorm rooms and in campus communities. Of course, corollary to these conversations, some of which are generative and some of which are degenerative, is a deafening silence around how individuals and institutions can actually understand, engage and change issues related to racism in higher education. This lack of dialogue and action speaks volumes about individuals and organizations, and suggests a complicit acceptance, tolerance or even support for institutional and individual racism. There is much work to be done if we are to improve the situation around race and race relation in institutions of higher education.

There is still much work to be done in unpacking and addressing the educational realities of those who are economically, socially, and politically underserved and oppressed by implicit and overt racism. These realities manifest in ways such as lack of access to and within higher education, in equitable outcomes and in a disparity of the quality of education as a student matriculates through the system. While there are occasional diversity and inclusion efforts made in higher education, institutions still largely address them as quotas, and not as paradigmatic changes. This focus on “counting toward equity rather” than “creating a culture of equity” is basically a form of white privilege that allows administrators and policymakers to show incremental “progress” and avoid more substantive action toward real equity that changes the culture(s) of institutions with longstanding racial histories that marginalize some and privilege others.

Issues in higher education are still raced from white perspectives and suffer from a view that race and racism occur in a vacuum. Some literature suggests that racism begins very early in the student experience and continues all the way to college (Berlak & Moyenda). This mis-education, mislabeling and mistreatment based on race often develops as early as five to ten years old and “follows” them to postgraduate education and beyond. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Confronting Racism in Higher Education. Problems and Possibilities for Fighting Ignorance, Bigotry and Isolation, (Noelle Witherspoon Arnold and Jeffrey S. Brooks)

ch. 1 Examining the Blockages of Race-Related Conversations in the Classroom: From Recognition to Action, (Sarah Diem and Bradley W. Carpenter)
ch. 2 Persistence is Chess, Not Checkers: A Counterstory on the Lives and Strategies of Six African American Administrators at One Predominantly White Institution, (Brandon L. Wolfe)
ch. 3 Combat in the Academy: Racial Battle Fatigue, Role Strain, and African American Faculty at Public Community Colleges, (Tamara Nichele Stevenson)
ch. 4 Critical Race Theory and College Readiness: A Review of the Literature, (Chad Everett Kee)
ch. 5 An Overview of the History, Research, and Culture of Historically Black Greek Letter Organizations, (Andre Brown)
ch. 6 Legal and Educational Foundations in Critical Race Theory, (Evelyn Y. Young)
ch. 7 Critical Race Theory and Its Viability as a Tool for Critiquing Current Theoretical Leadership: Constructions of African American Women, (Collette Madeleine Bloom)
ch. 8 Re(thinking) Race: Positioning Multiracial Representations within Critical Pedagogy, (Claire Peinado Fraczek)
ch. 9 Who’s Zoomin’ Who?: A Critical Race Analysis of Florida’s Public High School Graduates, (Terri Watson and Jennifer Sughrue)
ch. 10 Neither Latino nor White Enough: Educational Experiences of Meso Hispanic, Meso American, Urban, and Suburban Public High School Students, (Paula Marie Gallegos)

About the Contributors
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Proleptic Pedagogy: Theological Education Anticipating the Future

Book
Matthaei, Sondra Higgins; and Howell, Nancy R., eds.
2014
Wipf & Stock Publishers, Eugene, OR
BV4020.P76 2014
Topics: Theological Education   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Using Technology   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Could we have imagined how much theological education would change in the new millennium? Shifting needs of students, classrooms, and churches have demanded constant revisions of the curriculum, course design, classroom technology, and pedagogical strategies.

Saint Paul School of Theology felt the tide of change within our own walls and designed a project called "Proleptic Pedagogy" to address three distinct pedagogical ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Could we have imagined how much theological education would change in the new millennium? Shifting needs of students, classrooms, and churches have demanded constant revisions of the curriculum, course design, classroom technology, and pedagogical strategies.

Saint Paul School of Theology felt the tide of change within our own walls and designed a project called "Proleptic Pedagogy" to address three distinct pedagogical challenges for the future of theological education. First, instead of fitting new technologies into old pedagogies, how are teaching and learning transformed by shifting needs of students who are "digital natives," "digital immigrants," or distance learners? Second, instead of reactive strategies, what pedagogy proactively eliminates "accommodations" because courses are designed with flexibility and openness to diverse learning styles, disabilities, and needs? Third, instead of engaging student diversity with the tools of the 1960s, what new teaching and learning strategies anticipate future student racial and ethnic demographics and interracial educational experiences?

This volume of essays narrates our classroom stories, teases out pedagogical issues, examines pedagogical literature, reflects on theology of pedagogy, and constructs pedagogical proposals—with an open invitation for other theological educators to join our conversation about the future of theological education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Contributors

ch. 1 Proleptic Pedagogy, Transition, and Teaching toward the Future: An Introduction (Nancy R. Howell)
ch. 2 Proleptic Pedagogy, Pluralism, and Pedagogical Agility (Nancy R. Howell)
ch. 3 From Objectifying to Contemplating the Other: An Incarnational Approach to Pedagogy in Theological Education (Robert Martin)
ch. 4 Student Formation through Experiential and Transformative Learning: Pedagogical Insights from/for Contextual Education (James M. Brandt)
ch. 5 Immediacy: The Intersection of Technological and Face-to-face Modalities in Educating a Younger Generation (Claire Annelise Smith)
ch. 6 Teaching Integrative Theological Reflection as a Way of Life (Nancy R. Howell, and F. Douglas Powe Jr.)
ch. 7 Pedagogical Issues ion Theological Education for Diverse Peoples and Divergent Thinkers (Sondra Higgins Matthaei with Jami Moss)
ch. 8 Hip-Hop in the Classroom (F. Douglas Powe, Jr.)

Bibliography
Index
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Men of Color in Higher Education: New Foundations for Developing Models for Success

Book
Bitsói, LeManuel; Gordon, Edmund T.; Harper, Shaun R. Sáenz, Victor B.; and Teranshi, Robert T., eds.
2014
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC2781.M46 2014
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Given the continued plight of men of color in college after a decade of ineffective interventions focused more on “fixing the student” than on addressing the social, structural and institutional forces that undermine his academic achievement, this book is intended as a catalyst to change the direction of the dialogue, by providing a new theoretical framework and strength-based models for developing strategies for ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Given the continued plight of men of color in college after a decade of ineffective interventions focused more on “fixing the student” than on addressing the social, structural and institutional forces that undermine his academic achievement, this book is intended as a catalyst to change the direction of the dialogue, by providing a new theoretical framework and strength-based models for developing strategies for success.

This book brings together five of today’s leading scholars concerned with the condition of males of color in higher education – LeManuel Bitsóí, Edmund T. Gordon, Shaun Harper, Victor Sáenz and Robert Teranishi, who collaborated closely through of a series of conversations convened by the College Board to diagnose the common factors impeding the success of under-represented males and to identify the particular barriers and cultural issues pertaining to the racial and ethnic groups they examine.

This cohesive volume starts with the recognition that understanding males' disengagement from the classroom requires determining what it means to be a male in a non-dominant group in today’s society. The authors use the methods of feminist theory to uncover the impact of dominant paradigms of White, middle-class, heteronormative masculinity on men of color in general, to define what comprises masculinity for various groups, subgroups and individuals, and to lay bare the social and institutional forces that perpetuate constructions of masculinity that negatively impact men of color. They demonstrate that researchers and practitioners alike must pay more careful attention to within-group diversity as they study college men of color and create initiatives that respond to their varied needs. They establish the need for men of color campus initiatives to be mindful of the masculinities with which students enter college, as well as how they develop, negotiate and perform their gender identities on campus; the vital importance, in developing programs and interventions, of addressing the sociological undercurrents of men’s bad behaviors and poor help-seeking tendencies; and for providing opportunities for men to engage in critical individual and collective reflection on how they have been socialized to think of themselves as men.

This book advances the critical priorities of increasing enrollments and completion rates among college men of color, and of graduating well-developed men with strong, conflict-free gender identities.

For practitioners who work with these populations, it offers insights and signposts to create successful programs; for researchers it offers a set of new directions for analysis; and for policymakers, new ways of thinking about how policy and funding mechanisms ought to be reconsidered to be more effective in responding this issue. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Freeman A. Hrabowski, III)
Preface (Ronald A. Williams)

ch. 1 The Problem of Patriarchy (Edmund T. Gordon and Celeste Henery)
ch. 2 Ahistoricism in the Native American Experience (LeManuel Bitsóí and Lloyd L. Lee)
ch. 3 Intersectionality (Robert T. Teranishi and Loni Bordoloi Pazich)
ch. 4 Masculinity (Victor Sáenz and Beth Bukoski)
ch. 5 (Re)Setting the Agenda for College Men of Color: Lessons Learned from a 15-Year Movement to Improve Black Male Student Success (Shaun R. Harper)

Author/Editor Bios
References
Index
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Writing Across Borders

Article
Robertson, Wayne
2010
Oregon State University’s Center for Writing and Learning and its Writing Intensive Curriculum Program
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
A 10 minute YouTube clip from the beginning of a longer film produced to help teachers work with international students in writing environments. (http://www.amazon.com/Writing-Across-Borders/product-reviews/B004HU7SUY)  How do we assess international student writing and what teaching practices disadvantage international students and which help them improve as writers? 
Additional Info:
A 10 minute YouTube clip from the beginning of a longer film produced to help teachers work with international students in writing environments. (http://www.amazon.com/Writing-Across-Borders/product-reviews/B004HU7SUY)  How do we assess international student writing and what teaching practices disadvantage international students and which help them improve as writers? 
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The New Science of Learning: How to Learn in Harmony With Your Brain

Book
Doyle, Terry; and Zakrajesek, Todd
2013
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB1134.D68 2013
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Learning to learn is the key skill for tomorrow. This breakthrough book builds the foundation every student needs, from freshman orientation to graduate school

Recent advances in brain science show that most students’ learning strategies are highly inefficient, ineffective or just plain wrong. While all learning requires effort, better learning does not require more effort, but rather effectively aligning how the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Learning to learn is the key skill for tomorrow. This breakthrough book builds the foundation every student needs, from freshman orientation to graduate school

Recent advances in brain science show that most students’ learning strategies are highly inefficient, ineffective or just plain wrong. While all learning requires effort, better learning does not require more effort, but rather effectively aligning how the brain naturally learns with the demands of your studies. This book shows you what is involved in learning new material, how the human brain processes new information, and what it takes for that information to stick with you even after the test.

Taking a small amount of time to read and act upon the material in this book will prove to be one of the best decisions you can make as a learner. What you discover will change the way you learn in college and will be helpful in your personal and professional life. You live in a world where you will have to be a lifelong learner, constantly updating your skills and changing jobs to compete in the global marketplace. Most college students today will have as many as 10-14 different jobs by age 38. Learning how to learn in harmony with your brain is crucial to your long-term success.

This succinct book explains straightforward strategies for changing how you prepare to learn, engage with your course material, and set about improving recall of newly learned material whenever you need it. This is not another book about study skills and time management strategies, but instead an easy-to-read description of the research about how the human brain learns in a way that you can put into practice right away.

Did you know neuroscientists have shown that memories are made while you sleep, and by studying right before sleeping you can make stronger memories for your information? In this book the authors explain the role that sleep, exercise and your senses play in learning; how memory works and what makes the brain pay attention; the importance of your mindset towards learning and pattern recognition; as well as new breakthroughs in brain science that can enhance your ability to learn new information and make later recall (for tests or everyday life) easier. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword (Jeannie H. Loeb)
Introduction

ch. 1 A New Look at Learning
ch. 2 Sleep, Naps, and Breaks
ch. 3 Exercise and Learning
ch. 4 Using All Your Senses to Learn
ch. 5 Patterns and Learning
ch. 6 Memory
ch. 7 Mindsets Toward Learning
ch. 8 Paying Attention
ch. 9 A Message From the Authors

Appendix
Index
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Wise Latinas: Writers on Higher Education

Book
Leon, Jennifer De, ed.
2014
University of Nebraska Books, Lincoln, NE
LC2670.6.W57 2014
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: College can be a complex time for Latinas, who are traditionally expected to leave home when they get married. In her essay “Only Daughter,” author Sandra Cisneros remarks, “After four years in college and two more in graduate school, and still no husband, my father shakes his head even now and says I wasted all that education.”

Wise Latinas is a ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: College can be a complex time for Latinas, who are traditionally expected to leave home when they get married. In her essay “Only Daughter,” author Sandra Cisneros remarks, “After four years in college and two more in graduate school, and still no husband, my father shakes his head even now and says I wasted all that education.”

Wise Latinas is a collection of personal essays addressing the varied landscape of the Latina experience in higher education. For some Latinas, college, where they are vastly underrepresented, is the first time they are immersed in American culture outside their homes—and where the values of two cultures often clash. Wise Latinas is in part a response to this widening gap.

Featuring acclaimed writers such as Sandra Cisneros, Norma Cantú, and Julia Alvarez, to name a few, Wise Latinas shows that there is no one Latina college experience. With thoughtful and engaging pieces, Wise Latinas provides a platform for Latina writers to share their experiences in higher education and gives a voice to the many Latina women who have taken risks; embraced the new, confronted change; and maintained (and in some cases found) their roots. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Source Acknowledgments
Introduction (Jennifer De Leon)

I - Worlds Apart
ch. 1 Going the Distance (Blanca Torres)
ch. 2 Scrambled Channels (Yalitza Ferreras)
ch. 3 WhiteGirlColorlessAfriPana (Gail M. Dottin)
ch. 3 Nomadic (Ingrid Rojas Contreras)
ch. 4 Leaving Miami (Chantel Acevedo)

II - Rooms of Our Own
ch. 5 Las Otras (Celeste Guzman Mendoza)
ch. 6 Pancakes at 2 a.m. (Stephanie Elizondo Griest)
ch. 7 Independence (Iris Gomez)
ch. 8 Stories She Told Us (Daisy Hernández)
ch. 9 Who Goes to College? (Cecilia Rodriguez Milanés)
ch. 10 I’m Living in a Foreign Country (Toni Margarita Plummer)
ch. 11 My Stalker (Lorriane M. López)

III - Inside These Academic Walls
ch. 12 Rapunzel’s Ladder (Julia Alvarez)
ch. 13 Derrumbando Muros along an Academic Path (Norma Elia Cantú)
ch. 14 On Becoming Educated (Joy Castro)
ch. 15 La Silla (Ruth Behar)

IV - In Tribute, In Time
ch. 16 The Weight of Paper (Beatriz Terrazas)
ch. 17 To My Young Self (Erika Martinez)
ch. 18 After Yale (Li Yun Alvarado)
ch. 19 How to Leave Hialeah (Jennine Capó Crucet)
ch. 20 Only Daughter (Sandra Cisneros)

Contributors
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Wabash tree

Culturally Proficient Instruction: A Guide for People Who Teach, Third Edition

Book
Robins, Kikanza J. Nuri; Lindsey, Delores B.; Lindsey, Randall B.; and Terrell, Raymond D.
2011
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LC1099.3 C845 2012
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Are you doing all you can to improve teaching and learning?

Culturally proficient instruction is the result of an inside-out journey of teaching and learning during which you explore your values and behaviors while evaluating the policies and practices of your workplace. The journey deepens your understanding of yourself and your community of practice. In the newest version of their best-selling book, the authors invite you to reflect ...
Additional Info:
Are you doing all you can to improve teaching and learning?

Culturally proficient instruction is the result of an inside-out journey of teaching and learning during which you explore your values and behaviors while evaluating the policies and practices of your workplace. The journey deepens your understanding of yourself and your community of practice. In the newest version of their best-selling book, the authors invite you to reflect on how you engage with your students and your colleagues as a community of learners. The third edition features a case study to show cultural proficiency in practice and:

• An updated discussion of standards-based education guidelines
• A conceptual framework for the tools of cultural proficiency
• New language for understanding the microaggressions of dominant cultures
• An integrated guide for use with study groups

Each chapter contains reflective activities and group work conducive to collaborative professional development. Culturally Proficient Instruction is invaluable for anyone dedicated to creating an environment in which all learners can succeed. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forewords
Introduction
About the Authors
How to Use This Book

Part I: An Introduction to Cultural Proficiency
ch. 1 What Is Cultural Proficiency?
ch. 2 The Case for Cultural Proficiency
ch. 3 Culturally Proficient Standards

Part II: The Tools of Cultural Proficiency
ch. 4 Guiding Principles
ch. 5 Barriers to Cultural Proficiency
ch. 6 The Cultural Proficiency Continuum

Part III: The Essential Elements
ch. 7 Assessing Your Culture
ch. 8 Valuing Diversity
ch. 9 Managing the Dynamics of Difference
ch. 10 Adapting to Diversity
ch. 11 Institutionalizing Cultural Knowledge
ch. 12 Your Action Plan

References
Index
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The Culturally Inclusive Educator: Preparing for a Multicultural World

Book
Samuels, Dena R.
2014
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC1099.3.S36 2014
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The Culturally Inclusive Educator asks educators to consider what they can do differently to create a welcoming, inclusive, and exciting environment for the 21st century. Based on the author’s national research and consulting work, this book examines the discrepancy between the current educational cultural climate and the need for educators and their institutions to prepare for a growing multicultural population. It asks ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The Culturally Inclusive Educator asks educators to consider what they can do differently to create a welcoming, inclusive, and exciting environment for the 21st century. Based on the author’s national research and consulting work, this book examines the discrepancy between the current educational cultural climate and the need for educators and their institutions to prepare for a growing multicultural population. It asks what constitutes effective preparation, and provides guidance on overcoming personal and institutional challenges to cultural inclusiveness (stereotype threats, microaggressions, colorblindness/identity-blindness, implicit bias, among others). Samuels begins with the challenges facing the higher education community and then offers 8 transformative steps to help build cultural inclusiveness that any educator teaching any subject can utilize to increase their effectiveness. Culturally inclusive leadership is highlighted as the model for educators and institutions to embrace for success in today’s world.

Book Features:
- Diversity training and inclusiveness strategies for transforming curricula.
- Reflective practices that unearth personal biases and behaviors.
- Insights about faculty preparedness drawn from an unprecedented national study.
- Attention to specific issues and intersections of race, gender, sexual orientation, and disability.
- A lens for understanding cultural inclusiveness as a fundamental leadership practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Are Educators Prepared for a Growing Multicultural Population?
The Challenge Ahead Why is Cultural Inclusiveness Important?
How Does Exclusion Happen?
Theoretical Framework

ch. 2 We’re Not as Prepared as We Think We Are
What Does It Mean to Be Prepared?
Preparedness Research
Preparedness Study

ch. 3 Becoming Prepared
The Facts About Diversity Initiatives
The Benefits of Diversity Training
The Challenges of Diversity Training
Overcoming the Challenges of Diversity Training: Best Practices
Evaluating Campus Diversity Initiatives
Other Effective Inclusiveness Solutions

ch. 4 Building Culturally Inclusive Classrooms
Traditional Classrooms
Nontraditional Classrooms
Transformative Learning
Transforming the Curriculum
Transforming the Classroom
Transforming the Campus/School

ch. 5 Going Deeper: Reflecting on What We Don’t Know We Don’t Know
Transforming Our Selves
Stereotypes and Confirmation Bias
Eight Transformative Steps to Building Cultural Inclusiveness

ch. 6 Building Inclusiveness Across Difference
Transforming Our Relationships
Transforming Our Interactions
Transforming Our Reactions
Transformation Self-Awareness
Transforming Our Language
Transforming Our Practices

ch. 7 Culturally Inclusive Leadership
Inclusive Leadership
Inclusive Policies for Sustainable Change
Are We Ready?

Appendix A: Survey Items
Appendix B: Research Methods and Analysis Procedures
References
Index
About the Author
Cover image

Swimming Upstream: Black Males in Adult Education

Book
Rosser-Mims, Dionne; Schwartz, Joni; Drayton, Brendaly; and Guy, Talmadge C., eds.
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, Number 144)
LC2717.S956 2014
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Here is an introduction to salient topics and issues affecting Black males as they engage in adult basic education programs, pursue employment, and obtain higher education. The chapters include academic research as well as program descriptions and personal narratives with a concern for the “lived experiences” and the voices of the men.

While not exhaustive, this volumne does hope to challenge ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Here is an introduction to salient topics and issues affecting Black males as they engage in adult basic education programs, pursue employment, and obtain higher education. The chapters include academic research as well as program descriptions and personal narratives with a concern for the “lived experiences” and the voices of the men.

While not exhaustive, this volumne does hope to challenge commonly held stereotypes, interactions, and policies. It is designed to raise questions about the unique experiences of this specific population and to explore the sociocultural dynamics that impact their education.

This is the 144th volume of the Jossey Bass series New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. Noted for its depth of coverage, it explores issues of common interest to instructors, administrators, counselors, and policymakers in a broad range of education settings, such as colleges and universities, extension programs, businesses, libraries, and museums. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Dionne Rosser-Mims, Joni Schwartz, Brendaly Drayton, Talmadge C. Guy)

ch. 1 Race, the Black Male, and Heterogeneous Racisms in Education (Juanita Johnson-Bailey, Nichole Ray, Tennille Lasker-Scott)
This chapter explores the effects of historical and current racism on the educational experiences of American Black males. The authors use critical race theory to illustrate how assumptions about culture and gender have subverted the egalitarian ideals of adult education. Teachers and students are urged to use critical reflection and open discussion about racial issues.

ch. 2 The (End)angered Black Male Swimming Against the Current (Talmadge C. Guy)
This chapter discusses the sociohistorical and deeply embedded myths and stereotypes that have dominated narratives about Black men and how these shape the educational and professional experiences of Black men.

ch. 3 The Good Provider: Missing or Overlooked? (Brendaly Drayton)
This chapter explores Black men’s reasons for participating in an adult basic education and literacy program through the lens of gender identity.

ch. 4 High School Equivalency as Counter-Space (Joni Schwartz)
This chapter is based on the findings of an ethnographic study of an urban General Education Development (GED®) program and suggests that, for some marginalized African American and other young men of color, adult education programs are counter-spaces (Yosso, Ceja, Smith, & Solorzano, 2009) of spatial justice in opposition to previous negative school spaces. The chapter is framed from the perspective of critical race theory.

ch. 5 A New Normal: Young Men of Color, Trauma, and Engagement in Learning (Carlyle Van Thompson, Paul J. Schwartz)
This chapter will center on the continuing impact of systemic and persistent educational trauma experienced by Black and Latino males and how trauma affects their current learning. The young men’s counterstories from a phenomenological study and documentary are included.

ch. 6 The Reentry Adult College Student: An Exploration of the Black Male Experience (Dionne Rosser-Mims, Glenn A. Palmer, Pamela Harroff)
This chapter shares findings from a qualitative study on reentry adult Black males’ postsecondary education experiences and identifies strategies to help this population matriculate through college and graduate.

ch. 7 Returning to School After Incarceration: Policy, Prisoners, and the Classroom (Brian Miller, Joserichsen Mondesir, Timothy Stater, Joni Schwartz)
This chapter addresses the challenges facing men of color who return to adult education after incarceration. It frames their experience as a war from a sociopolitical and cultural context, and then explains the support men need to succeed both in and outside the classroom.

ch. 8 Empty Promise: Black American Veterans and the New GI Bill (Alford H. Ottley)
The 2008 GI Bill offers college funds for veterans. Yet Black male vets are not taking advantage of these benefits. This chapter examines personal and societal problems that hinder access to higher education for Black vets, and suggests some ways adult educators can advocate for these young men.

ch. 9 Black Males and Adult Education: A Call to Action (Brendaly Drayton, Dionne Rosser-Mims, Joni Schwartz, Talmadge C. Guy)
In this concluding chapter, the editors offer their reflections on the key themes of this volume and implications for future research and practitioners of adult education.

Index
Cover image

Vygotsky in 21st Century Society: Advances in Cultural Historical Theory and Praxis with Non-Dominant Communities

Book
Portes, Pedro R.; and Salas Spencer, eds.
2011
Peter Lang, New York, NY
HM1027.R8 V94 2011
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Vygotsky in Twenty-first Century Society is an ensemble of novel perspectives about the legacy of Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria. The book illustrates how well the legacy of their work is being applied and continued in contemporary research, and how cultural historical theory has been constructed and re-constructed. Together, these collected essays inform a broader discussion of how a developmentally-oriented cultural paradigm can guide learning and teaching in social and ...
Additional Info:
Vygotsky in Twenty-first Century Society is an ensemble of novel perspectives about the legacy of Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria. The book illustrates how well the legacy of their work is being applied and continued in contemporary research, and how cultural historical theory has been constructed and re-constructed. Together, these collected essays inform a broader discussion of how a developmentally-oriented cultural paradigm can guide learning and teaching in social and educational policy and in group or individual counseling. Readers will find discussions of issues in human development that have previously been overlooked. This book is important and timely in addressing these issues and fault-lines, particularly for advancing both equity and scientific understandings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One
ch. 1 Dynamics in the “Sabor” of Vygotsky (Joseph Glick)
ch. 2 The Path to Subjectivity: Advancing Alternative Understandings of Vygotsky and the Cultural Historical Legacy (Fernando González Rey)
ch. 3 The Process of Producing Knowledge: Vygotsky Revisited (Guillermo Arias Beatón)
ch. 4 Cognitive Aspects of the Transition from a Traditional to a Modern Technological Society (Alex Kozulin)
ch. 5 Macro Cultural Psychology, the Psychology of Oppression, and Cultural-Psychological Enrichment (Carl Ratner)
ch. 6 Vygotsky’s Significance in Advancing Counseling and Psychotherapy (Pedro R. Portes)
ch. 7 A Cultural-Historical Approach to Neuropsychological Treatment: Understanding Latino and Other Non-Dominant Groups (Jose Dergan)

Part Two
ch. 8 Only Life Educates: Immigrant Families, the Cultivation of Biliteracy, and the Mobility of Knowledge (Luis C. Moll)
ch. 9 Computer-Mediated Learning and Young Latino/a Students’ Developing Expertise (Carmen M. Martínez-Roldán and Peter Smagorinsky)
ch. 10 An Integrated Approach to the Study of Transitions as Learning Activity: Two Cases from Spanish Immersion Classrooms (Patricia Baquedano-López, Ariana Mangual Figueroa, and Sera Jean Hernandez)
ch. 11 Faculty Views of Underrepresented Students in Community College Settings: Cultural Models and Cultural Practices (Leticia Tomas Bustillos, Robert Rueda, and Estela Mara Bensimon)
ch. 12 Praxis in Dis-coordination (Margaret Gallego and Olga A. Vásquez)
ch. 13 Development of Latino Family-School Engagement Programs in U.S. Contexts: Enhancements to Cultural Historical Activity Theory Accounts (Richard Durán)

References
Cover image

Teaching Across Cultures: Building Pedagogical Relationships in Diverse Contexts

Book
Ikpeze, Chinwe H.
2015
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LB1025.3.I43 2015
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Teaching across Cultures: Building Pedagogical Relationships in Diverse Contexts captures the tensions and complexities, as well as the transformational potentials, of teaching across multiple cultural contexts. The book evolved from cumulative self-studies that examined one teacher educator’s teaching practice, the cultural impact on that practice, and how she facilitated transformative teaching and learning. While every act of teaching occurs across cultures, such ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Teaching across Cultures: Building Pedagogical Relationships in Diverse Contexts captures the tensions and complexities, as well as the transformational potentials, of teaching across multiple cultural contexts. The book evolved from cumulative self-studies that examined one teacher educator’s teaching practice, the cultural impact on that practice, and how she facilitated transformative teaching and learning. While every act of teaching occurs across cultures, such as institutional culture, invisible cultures, and classroom cultures, among others, educators who teach as cultural outsiders have to navigate the tensions, complexities, and contradictory realities of cross-cultural teaching. The tensions can be reduced or managed through responsive pedagogy, relationship building, and teaching in the third space. These transformational approaches not only help to identify and close the perpetual gaps in teaching and learning, but they also position effective teaching within a pedagogical common ground that values student voices, facilitates pedagogical flexibility, and uses diversity as a teaching tool. In a world of ubiquitous and interactive learning environments, both the physical and virtual spaces play a vital role in teaching and teacher-student relationships. The book points to the necessity of teacher educators’ learning through diverse, professional networks and, more importantly, through self-study. It is only through this introspective examination of one’s teaching and students’ learning, as well as taking an ontological attitude toward teaching, can educators achieve success in diverse contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Teaching as a Cultural Artifact
Introduction
Understanding Culture
Culture and Teaching
Perspectives on Culture
Cultural Assumptions and Practices
Cultural Politics and Education
Toward (Inter) Cultural Competence in Teacher Education
Concluding Thoughts

ch. 2 Self-Study: Studying Self and Others
Introduction
Self-Study: Understanding Self and Others
Uncovering My Assumptions
Identifying Differences
Research Questions
Beliefs and Visions about Literacy Teacher Education
Why Teacher Educators Engage in Self-Study
Theoretical Framework
Minding the Gaps in Teaching and Learning
Concluding Thoughts

ch. 3 Data Collection and Analysis
Introduction
Context of the Study
Characteristics of Self-Study Research Methods and Its Application to Current Study
Data Analysis
Conclusion

ch. 4 Tensions in Teaching across Cultures
Introduction
Understanding Tensions
Institutional Culture
The Entitlement Culture
The Digital Culture
Invisible Cultures
Classroom Cultures
Tensions across Situations & Differences
Relational Tensions
Concluding Thoughts

ch. 5 Toward Responsive Pedagogy
Introduction
Understanding Culturally Responsive Teaching
Characteristics of Culturally Responsive Teachers
Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Teacher Education
Approaches to Culturally Responsive Pedagogy in Teacher Education
Rethinking Culturally Responsive Teaching
Toward Responsive Pedagogy in Teacher Education
Identifying the Gaps in Teaching and Learning
Closing the Gaps in Teaching and Learning
Responding to the Digital Culture through Technology Integration
Concluding Thoughts

ch. 6 Building Relationships in Physical and Virtual Spaces
Introduction
Teaching as a Relational Process: Dimensions of Relationships
Building Relationship with Prospective Teachers
Utilizing Student Reflections
Making My Personal Life Visible
Students’ Perceptions and Relationships
Individual Conferencing
Modeling Best Practice
Maintaining Academic Rigor
Negotiating Authority
The Student and Peer Context of Relationship Building
Unfriendly, Difficult, or Disruptive Students
Strategies for Dealing with Hard-to-Relate to and Difficult Students
Small Group Collaboration
Building Relationship in Virtual Spaces
Blogging as a Pedagogical Tool
Meet the Academic Blogger: A Case of Jackie
Other Individualized Blog Conversations
E-mails, Gratitude, and Teacher-Student Relationship
Concluding Thoughts

ch. 7 Teaching in the Third Space
Introduction
Theoretical Perspectives on Third Space
Social and Spatial Production of Space
Third Space, Globalization, and Teacher Education
Third Space and Teacher Education Practices
Facilitating Prospective Teachers’ Learning in the Third Space
Concluding Thoughts

ch. 8 Social and Professional Networks
Introduction
Professional Socialization
Professional Organizations and Teacher Educator Development
A Day at the Literacy Research Association Conference
Special Interest Groups and the Professional Development of Educators
The Impact of Other Professional Associations
Concluding Thoughts

ch. 9 Teaching across Cultures: Perspectives and Implications
Lessons Learned from the Cumulative Self-Studies
Teaching across Cultures: Implications
Concluding Thoughts

References
Index
Additional Info:
A short essay written by a student in the 1990s who regards herself as extrovert, describing the particular qualities and experiences associated with her personal style. Posted on Mark Unno’s website, who teaches Buddhism at the University of Oregon.
Additional Info:
A short essay written by a student in the 1990s who regards herself as extrovert, describing the particular qualities and experiences associated with her personal style. Posted on Mark Unno’s website, who teaches Buddhism at the University of Oregon.
Additional Info:
A short essay written by a student in the 1990s who regards herself as introverted, describing the particular qualities and experiences associated with her personal style. Posted on Mark Unno’s website, who teaches Buddhism at the University of Oregon.
Additional Info:
A short essay written by a student in the 1990s who regards herself as introverted, describing the particular qualities and experiences associated with her personal style. Posted on Mark Unno’s website, who teaches Buddhism at the University of Oregon.
Additional Info:
A forum on race and teaching theology and religion, launched in the wake of the August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and police response in Ferguson, Missouri, but framed more broadly to encompass teaching for racial and social justice, dismantling the structures of white privilege in academia, and diversifying the faculty, the students, and the canon.
Additional Info:
A forum on race and teaching theology and religion, launched in the wake of the August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and police response in Ferguson, Missouri, but framed more broadly to encompass teaching for racial and social justice, dismantling the structures of white privilege in academia, and diversifying the faculty, the students, and the canon.
Article cover image

One for the Team: Goal Orientation and Gender-Correlated Task Division

Article
Linder, Benjamin; Somerville, Mark; Eris, Özgür; and Tatar, Nick
2010
40th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Assessments of student behavior in first- semester design experiences suggest that early team- based design projects can promote a team performance goal orientation that undermines students’ learning goals. In particular, we find that gender-correlated division of work can easily and unconsciously occur in these teams and that performance-oriented teams may be more likely to undermine womens’ learning goals then mens’ learning goals. We propose mechanisms to explain the effect and ...
Additional Info:
Assessments of student behavior in first- semester design experiences suggest that early team- based design projects can promote a team performance goal orientation that undermines students’ learning goals. In particular, we find that gender-correlated division of work can easily and unconsciously occur in these teams and that performance-oriented teams may be more likely to undermine womens’ learning goals then mens’ learning goals. We propose mechanisms to explain the effect and present results of promising interventions. 
Additional Info:
Provides culturally responsive teaching and learning resources for faculty and staff working with Native students -- building bridges across cultural boundaries and crossing bridges to increase understanding between Native and Non-Native educators and students.
Additional Info:
Provides culturally responsive teaching and learning resources for faculty and staff working with Native students -- building bridges across cultural boundaries and crossing bridges to increase understanding between Native and Non-Native educators and students.
TTR cover image

Transformations: The World Religions Survey through an Adjunct Feminist Lens

TTR
Downie, Alison
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 193-206
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This essay describes a transformation in my experience as an adjunct teaching underprepared students from one of shame toward a desire to assert the value of this work. Insights from my feminist theological training helped me to affirm the importance of encouraging transformative learning in teaching the academically marginalized and prompted my analysis of student writing in an introductory World Religions course, in order to determine whether or not the ...
Additional Info:
This essay describes a transformation in my experience as an adjunct teaching underprepared students from one of shame toward a desire to assert the value of this work. Insights from my feminist theological training helped me to affirm the importance of encouraging transformative learning in teaching the academically marginalized and prompted my analysis of student writing in an introductory World Religions course, in order to determine whether or not the course was a site of transformative learning. I argue that despite many contextual limitations, the movement toward deepening self-awareness and increasing openness to religious diversity seen in student writing demonstrates that transformative learning began in this course, and that is valuable for students' lives whether or not they are academically successful.
Cover image

From the Confucian Way to Collaborative Knowledge Co-Construction

Book
Schalkwyk, Gertina J.; and D'Amato, Rik Carol, eds.
2015
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 142)
LB2331.V36 2015
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Sharing and engaging in interactions and discussion as required for collaborative teaching and learning can be a foreign concept to students coming from Asia or growing up in an Asian family. As such, this first volume in a two-volume edition helps lecturers, educators, and teachers create collaborative teaching and learning experiences with multicultural adult learners in higher education. Topics include:

- ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Sharing and engaging in interactions and discussion as required for collaborative teaching and learning can be a foreign concept to students coming from Asia or growing up in an Asian family. As such, this first volume in a two-volume edition helps lecturers, educators, and teachers create collaborative teaching and learning experiences with multicultural adult learners in higher education. Topics include:

- assessment and evaluation techniques that focus on collaborative teaching and learning with diverse students
- students’ cultural beliefs and strategies for outcomes-based collaborative teaching and learning in Asia, and
- an understanding of the unique learning motivations of contemporary Asian students.

This is the 142nd volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Prologue (Gertina J. van Schalkwyk, Rik Carl D’Amato)

ch. 1 Learning the Confucian Way (Tieyuan Guo)
ch. 2 Outcomes-Based Collaborative Teaching and Learning in Asian Higher Education (Gertina J. van Schalkwyk)
ch. 3 Doing Outcomes-Based Collaborative Teaching and Learning in Asia (Gertina J. van Schalkwyk)
ch. 4 Authentic Assessment of Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes (Brenda C. Litchfield, John V. Dempsey)
ch. 5 Connectivism and the Use of Technology/Media in Collaborative Teaching and Learning (Neena Thota)

Index
Cover image

Gender, Experience, and Knowledge in Adult Learning: Alisoun's Daughters

Book
Michelson, Elana
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
BF318.5.M54 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In this wide-ranging book, Elana Michelson invites us to revisit basic understandings of the 'experiential learner'. How does experience come to be seen as the basis of knowledge? How do gender, class, and race enter into the ways in which knowledge is valued? What political and cultural belief systems underlie such practices as the assessment of prior learning and the writing of life ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In this wide-ranging book, Elana Michelson invites us to revisit basic understandings of the 'experiential learner'. How does experience come to be seen as the basis of knowledge? How do gender, class, and race enter into the ways in which knowledge is valued? What political and cultural belief systems underlie such practices as the assessment of prior learning and the writing of life narratives?

Drawing on a range of disciplines, from feminist theory and the politics of knowledge to literary criticism, Michelson argues that particular understandings of `experiential learning’ have been central to modern Western cultures and the power relationships that underlie them. Presented in four parts, this challenging and lively book asks educators of adults to think in new ways about their assumptions, theories, and practices:

- Part I provides readers with a short history of the notion of experiential learning.

- Part II brings the insights and concerns of feminist theory to bear on mainstream theories of experiential learning.

- Part III examines the assessment of prior experiential learning for academic credit and/or professional credentials.

- Part IV addresses a second pedagogical practice that is ubiquitous in adult learning, namely, the assigning of life narratives.

Gender, Experience, and Knowledge in Adult Learning will be of value to scholars and graduate students exploring adult and experiential learning, as well as academics wishing to introduce students to a broad range of feminist, critical-race, materialist and postmodernist thinking in the field. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures
Acknowledgements
Credit list
Introduction

Part I - The politics of experience
ch. 1 Purging the transgressive from experiential learning
ch. 2 Gender, reason, and the universal knower
ch. 3 Othering rationality

Part II - Gender, experience, and the body
ch. 4 Body, culture, and the feminist claims for experience
ch. 5 The body in question
ch. 6 Mind and matter: Dewey, Kolb, and embodied knowing

Part III - Power and the assessment of experiential learning
ch. 7 Conservatism and transgression in the assessment of experiential learning
ch. 8 Queering the assessment of experiential learning
ch. 9 Practice studies, complexity, and the assessment of experiential learning

Part IV - Narrating the self
ch. 10 Autobiography and adult learning
ch. 11 Textualizing the self: genre, experience, and adult learning
ch. 12 The ghosts of war: trauma, narrative, and adult learning

Conclusion
Bibliograpy
Index
Cover image

Mentoring At-Risk Students through the Hidden Curriculum of Higher Education

Book
Smith, Buffy
2013
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LC4091.S57 2013
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Mentoring At-Risk Students through the Hidden Curriculum of Higher Education reveals how the institutional culture and social networks of universities influence the academic success of underrepresented students. This book is based on a qualitative study that integrates a sociological and higher education theoretical framework to examine the impact of mentoring programs on students’ acquisition of institutional cultural capital and social capital during their ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Mentoring At-Risk Students through the Hidden Curriculum of Higher Education reveals how the institutional culture and social networks of universities influence the academic success of underrepresented students. This book is based on a qualitative study that integrates a sociological and higher education theoretical framework to examine the impact of mentoring programs on students’ acquisition of institutional cultural capital and social capital during their college experience.

This book offers an innovative mentoring model that illuminates how students can navigate the hidden curriculum of higher education. In addition, the book provides practical strategies on how to avoid academic mine fields in order to thrive in college. This book is written for administrators, faculty, student affairs professionals and students to promote retention, academic success, and create a more transparent, inclusive, and equitable higher education system. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Invest Now or Pay Later
ch. 2 Learning at the Margins
ch. 3 Decoding the Hidden Curriculum
ch. 4 Transforming Mentoring Programs
ch. 5 Play to Win: Learn the Rules
ch. 6 Overcoming Mentoring Barriers: Do Not Give Up

Conclusion
Appendix A
Appendix B
Appendix C
Cover image

Racial Battle Fatigue in Higher Education: Exposing the Myth of Post-Racial America

Book
Fasching-Varner, Kenneth; Albert, Katrice A.; Mitchell, Roland W.; and Allen, Chaunda, eds.
2015
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LC3731.R27 2015
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Racial Battle Fatigue is described as the physical and psychological toll taken due to constant and unceasing discrimination, microagressions, and stereotype threat. The literature notes that individuals who work in environments with chronic exposure to discrimination and microaggressions are more likely to suffer from forms of generalized anxiety manifested by both physical and emotional syptoms. This edited volume looks at RBF from the perspectives of graduate students, middle level academics, ...
Additional Info:
Racial Battle Fatigue is described as the physical and psychological toll taken due to constant and unceasing discrimination, microagressions, and stereotype threat. The literature notes that individuals who work in environments with chronic exposure to discrimination and microaggressions are more likely to suffer from forms of generalized anxiety manifested by both physical and emotional syptoms. This edited volume looks at RBF from the perspectives of graduate students, middle level academics, and chief diversity officers at major institutions of learning. RBF takes up William A. Smith’s idea and extends it as a means of understanding how the “academy” or higher education operates. Through microagressions, stereotype threat, underfunding and defunding of initiatives/offices, expansive commitments to diversity related strategic plans with restrictive power and action, and departmental climates of exclusivity and inequity; diversity workers (faculty, staff, and administration of color along with white allies in like positions) find themselves in a badlands where identity difference is used to promote institutional values while at the same time creating unimaginable work spaces for these workers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Introduction (Roland W. Mitchell, Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Katrice A. Albert, and Chaunda M. Allen)

ch. 1 A Testimony of a Black Male Cadet Facing Racial Battle Fatigue (Melvin (Jai) Jackson)
ch. 2 Navigating the Academy, Creating Counterspaces: Critically Examining the Experiences of Three PhD Students of Solor (Laura S. Yee, Roderick L. Carey, and Wyletta S. Gamble)
ch. 3 What Are You Anyway?: Racial Fatigue as a Daily Experience in Public Schools (Boni Wozolek)
ch. 4 The Ubiquitous White Shadow: A Counternarrtive of a Doctoral Student in a “Liberal" Teacher Education Program (Roberto Montoya)
ch. 5 Traumatic Pedagogy: When Epistemic Privilege and White Privilege Collide (Tapo Chimbganda)
ch. 6 Black. Woman. Non-Traditional Other: Creating Hybrid Spaces in Higher Education (Tammie Jenkins)
ch. 7 Indigenous Peoples in the Racial Battle Lands (Bryan McKinley Jones Brayboy)
ch. 8 I Ain't Your Doc Student ": The Overwhelming Presence of Whiteness and Pain at the Academic Neo Plantation (Cheryl E. Matias)
ch. 9 Assault in the Academy: When it Becomes More Than Racial Battle Fatigue (Cleveland Hayes)
ch. 10 Psychological Heuristics: Mental/Emotional Designs of Racial Battle Fatigue and the Tenure/Promotion Terrain for Faculty of Color (Noelle Witherspoon Arnold)
ch. 11 Examining Intra-Group Racism and Racial Battle Fatigue in Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Leslie V. Collins)
ch. 12 Narratives From the Allied Front: Can People Not of Color Have Racial Battle Fatigue? (Walter S. Gershon and Robert J. Helfenbein)
ch. 13 Wearing You Down: The Influence of Racial Battle Fatigue on Academic Freedom for Faculty of Color (Holley Locher & Rebecca Ropers-Huilman)
ch. 14 An Adopted Korean Speaks Out About His Racialized Experiences as a Faculty Member at a PWI (Nicholas D. Hartlep)
ch. 15 Racial Battle Fatigue and/as (Impostorship: Implications for Academic Mentoring and Psychosocial Development (T. Elon Dancy III)
ch. 16 We Didn't Know You Meant That by Diversity": Contested Diversity and Strategic (Administrative) Responses in Colleges of Education (Francisco Rios and Karen B. McLean Dade)
ch. 17 Standing on My Head Spitting (Indian Head) Nickels: Racial Battle Fatigue as it Relates to Native Americans in Predominately White Institutions of Higher Education (Deirdre A. Almeida)
ch. 18 Behind Enemy LineE: Critical Race Theory, Racial Battle Fatigue and Higher Education (Mark S. Giles)
ch. 19 A Hyphenated Life: Power and Liberation Within the Research Academy (David M. Callejo Perez)
ch. 20 Exploiting the Body and Denouncing the Mind: Navigating a Black Female Professional Identity Within the Academy (Kristie A. Ford)
ch. 21 Exercising Agency in the Midst of Racial Battle Fatigue: A Case for Intragroup Diversity (Gregory J. Vincent, Sherri L. Sanders, and Stella L. Smith)
ch. 22 Racial (and Gender) Battle Fatigue: The Transdisciplinary Applied Social Justice? Approach (Menah A.E. Pratt-Clarke)
ch. 23 Clashing with Tradition: The Chief Diversity Officer at White Public Institutions (Charles Robinson)

References
About the Contributors
Cover image

Working With Students in Community Colleges: Contemporary Strategies for Bridging Theory, Research, and Practice

Book
Kelsay, Lisa S.; and Zamani-Gallaher, Eboni M., eds.
2014
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2328.15.U6 W67 2014
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This timely volume addresses the urgent need for new strategies and better ways to serve community colleges’ present and future students at a time of rapid diversification, not just racially and ethnically, but including such groups as the undocumented, international students, older adult learners and veterans, all of whom come with varied levels of academic and technical skills.

The contributing researchers, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This timely volume addresses the urgent need for new strategies and better ways to serve community colleges’ present and future students at a time of rapid diversification, not just racially and ethnically, but including such groups as the undocumented, international students, older adult learners and veterans, all of whom come with varied levels of academic and technical skills.

The contributing researchers, higher education faculty, college presidents, and community college administrators provide thorough understanding of student groups who have received scant attention in the higher education literature. They address the often unconscious barriers to access our institutions have erected and describe emerging strategies, frameworks, and pilot projects that can ease students’ transition into college and through the maze of the college experience to completion.

They offer advice on organizational culture, on defining institutional outcomes, on aligning shifting demographics with the multiple missions of the community college, on strengthening the collaboration of student and academic affairs to leverage their respective roles and resources, and on engaging with the opportunities afforded by technology.

Divided into three parts – understanding today’s community college campuses; supporting today’s community college learners; and specialized populations and communities – this book offers a vision and solutions that should inform the work of faculty, administrators, presidents, and board members. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Foreword (Susan Salvador)
Preface

Part 1 - Understanding Today’s Community College Campuses
ch. 1 Junior Grows Up: A Brief History of Community Colleges (Lisa S. Kelsay and Betsy Oudenhoven)
ch. 2 Community College Economic Climate, Policy Landscape, and the American Graduation Initiative (John L. Jamrogowicz)
ch. 3 College Readiness and the Open Door Mission (Patricia Munsch, Tania Velazquez, and Corinne Kowpak)
ch. 4 Technology: The New Core Competency (Susan J. Procter and Julie Uranis)

Part 2 - Welcome to Campus! Supporting Today’s Community College Learners
ch. 5 Who Are Our Students? (Patricia Munsch and Lisa S. Kelsay)
ch. 6 Academic and Student Affairs Collaboration: A Value for Student Success Within the Community College Environment (Cara McFadden and Martha Mazeika)
ch. 7 Student Orientation at Community Colleges (Jessica Hale)
ch. 8 Residence Life at Community Colleges: Building New Opportunities for Student Learning (Carin W. Barber and Daniel J. Phelan)

Part 3 - A Closer Look: Specialized Populations and Communities on Two-Year Campuses
ch. 9 Older Adult Learning in Community Colleges: A New Wave of Adult Learners (Ramona Meraz Lewis, Eboni M. Zamani-Gallaher, and Christopher Bonapace)
ch. 10 Two- and Four-Year College Contexts for Student Veterans (Tara Fagan and Shaftone Dunklin)
ch. 11 Women Community College Student Leaders of Color: An Examination of Student Involvement Theory (Dimpal Jain)
ch. 12 Looking Across the Research: Social and Cultural Capital’s Interplay with Marginalized Student Communities (Jesse S. Watson and Elizabeth Cox Brand)

Afterword (Stephanie R. Bulger)
Additional Resources (Tamara N. Stevenson)
Editors and Contributors
Index
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The Department Chair as Transformative Diversity Leader: Building Inclusive Learning Environments in Higher Education

Book
Chun, Edna; and Evans, Alvin
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC2341.C48 2015
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

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Abstract: With the imminent demographic shifts in our society and the need to prepare students for citizenship in a global, knowledge-based society, the role of the academic department chair in creating diverse and inclusive learning environments is arguably the most pivotal position in higher education today.

In the United States, increasing minority student enrollment coupled with the emergence of a minority majority ...
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Abstract: With the imminent demographic shifts in our society and the need to prepare students for citizenship in a global, knowledge-based society, the role of the academic department chair in creating diverse and inclusive learning environments is arguably the most pivotal position in higher education today.

In the United States, increasing minority student enrollment coupled with the emergence of a minority majority American nation by 2042 demands that academic institutions be responsive to these changing demographics. The isolation of the ivory tower is no longer an option. This is the first book to address the role of the department chair in diversity and addresses an unmet need by providing a research-based, systematic approach to diversity leadership in the academic department based upon survey findings and in-person interviews.

The department chair represents the nexus between the faculty and the administration and is positioned uniquely to impact diversity progress. Research indicates that more than 80 percent of academic decisions regarding appointment, curriculum, tenure and promotion, classroom pedagogy, and student outcomes are made by the department chair in consultation with the faculty.

This book examines the multidimensional contributions that chairs make in advancing diversity within their departments and institutions in the representation of diverse faculty and staff; in tenure and promotion; curricular change; student learning outcomes; and departmental climate. The scope and content of the book is not limited to institutions in the United States but is applicable to academic institutions globally in their efforts to address the access and success of increasingly diverse student populations.

It addresses institutional power structures and the role of the dean in relation to the appointment of chairs and their impact on the success of chairs from non-dominant groups, including female, minority, and lesbian/gay/transgendered individuals who serve in predominantly white male departments.

Using qualitative and quantitative research methods, the book analyzes predominant structural and behavioral barriers that can impede diversity progress within the academic department. It then focuses upon the opportunities and challenges chairs face in their collaborative journey with faculty and administration toward inclusive departmental and institutional practices. Each chapter provides concrete strategies that chairs can use to strengthen diversity in the academic department.

Addressed to department chairs, deans, faculty, and administrative leaders in higher education in all Western societies facing demographic change and global challenges, this book offers a critical road map to creating the successful academic institutions that will meet the needs of our changing populations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Illustrations
Foreword (Walter H. Gmelch)
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Prelude
ch. 2 Retooling the Educational Playing Field
ch. 3 The Chair’s Vantage Point on Diversity
ch. 4 Building a New Taxonomy for Diversity in the Academic Department
ch. 5 The Chair’s Leadership Role in Formal and Informal Processes
ch. 6 Bridge Building: The Chair’s Role in Fostering Diversity Learning Outcomes and Student Identity Development
ch. 7 Developing a Comprehensive Action Plan for Diversity
ch. 8 Summation and Recommendations

Appendix A: Distribution of Chairs by Discipline, Region, and Institutional Type
Appendix B: Blind Spots and Levers
About the Authors
Index
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Culture and Online Learning: Global Perspectives and Research

Book
Jung, Insung; and Gunawardena, Charlotte Nirmalani, eds.
2014
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC5803.C65 C85 2014
Topics: Online Learning   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: Culture plays an overarching role that impacts investment, planning, design, development, delivery, and the learning outcomes of online education. This groundbreaking book remedies a dearth of empirical research on how digital cultures and teaching and learning cultures intersect, and offers grounded theory and practical guidance on how to integrate cultural needs and sensibilities with the innovative opportunities offered by online learning.

...
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Abstract: Culture plays an overarching role that impacts investment, planning, design, development, delivery, and the learning outcomes of online education. This groundbreaking book remedies a dearth of empirical research on how digital cultures and teaching and learning cultures intersect, and offers grounded theory and practical guidance on how to integrate cultural needs and sensibilities with the innovative opportunities offered by online learning.

This book provides a unique analysis of culture in online education from a global perspective, and offers:

* An overview of the influences that culture has on teaching, online learning, and technology

* Culture-sensitive instructional design strategies and teaching guidelines for online instructors and trainers

* Facilitation and support strategies for online learners from different cultures

* An overview on issues of design, development, communication, and support from a cross-cultural perspective

* An overview of how online education is perceived, planned, implemented, and evaluated differently in various cultural contexts

Written by international experts in the field of online learning, this text constitutes with a comprehensive comparative introduction to the role of culture in online education. It offers essential guidance for practitioners, researchers, instructors, and anyone working with online students from around the world.

This text is also appropriate for graduate-level Educational Technology and Comparative and International Learning programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Foreword (Michael Grahame Moore)

ch. 1 Perspectives on Culture and Online Learning (Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena and Insung Jung)
ch. 2 Cultural Influences on Online Learning (Insung Jung)
ch. 3 Culture and Technology (Insung Jung)
ch. 4 Online Identity and Interaction (Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena)
ch. 5 Emerging Visual Culture in Online Learning Environments (Ilju Rha)
ch. 6 Accounting for Culture in Instructional Design (Casey Frechette, Ludmila C. Layne, and Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena)
ch. 7 Facilitating Online Learning and Cross-Cultural E-Mentoring (Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena and Buddhini Gayathri Jayatilleke)
ch. 8 Supporting Diverse Online Learners (Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena)
ch. 9 Diversity in Expectations of Quality and Assessment (Albert Sangrà, Stella Porto, and Insung Jung)
ch. 10 Developing Global Digital Citizens: A Professional Development Model (Chih-Hsiung Tu and Marina Stock McIsaac)
ch. 11 Leadership Challenges in Transcultural Online Education (Michael F. Beaudoin)
ch. 12 Gender Issues in Online Learning (Colin Latchem)
ch. 13 Transformative Learning Through Cultural Exchanges in Online Foreign Language Teaching (Kerrin Ann Barrett)
ch. 14 International Interpretations of Icons and Images Used in North American Academic Websites (Eliot Knight, Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena, Elena Barbera, and Cengiz Hakan Aydin)
ch. 15 An Analysis of Culture-Focused Articles in Open, Distance, and Online Education Journals (Aisha S. Al-Harthi)
ch. 16 Many Faces of Confucian Culture: Asian Learners’ Perceptions of Quality Distance Education (Li Chen, Xinyi Shen, Aya Fukuda, and Insung Jung)
ch. 17 Looking Ahead: A Cultural Approach to Research and Practice in Online Learning (Insung Jung and Charlotte Nirmalani Gunawardena)

About the Editors and Contributors
Index
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Higher Education Access and Choice for Latino Students: Critical Findings and Theoretical Perspectives

Book
Perez, Patricia A.; and Ceja, Miguel, eds.
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
LC2670.6.H54 2015
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

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Abstract: Now the largest and fastest-growing ethnic population in the U.S., Latino students face many challenges and complexities when it comes to college choice and access. This edited volume provides much needed theoretical and empirical data on how the schooling experiences of Latino students shape their educational aspirations and access to higher education. It explores how the individual and collective influence of the home, school and policy shape the college decision-making process.

This unique collection of original scholarly articles offers critical insight on educational pathways that will help families, educators and policy makers intervene in ways that foster and sustain college access and participation for Latino students. It considers destination preferences and enrollment selections, elementary and secondary school experiences, and intervention programs that shed light on how practitioners can promote participation and retention. This multi-conceptual, multi-methodological volume offers directions for future research, programming and policy in Latino education. (From the Publisher)


Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction: What do we Know About Latina/o College Access and Choice? (Patricia A. Pérez and Miguel Ceja)

Part I: Home, Elementary, & Secondary Context
ch. 2 Sixth Grade Teachers’ Perceptions of the College Bound Student (Jolene McCall, Maria Estela Zarate, and Wendy Y. Perez)
ch. 3 Constructing College "Choice" for Latino Students: The Organizational Culture of an Urban Catholic High School (Paul Rodriguez and Anne-Marie Nuñez)
ch. 4 Unpacking the Layers: Financial Aid and Latino High School Students’ Postsecondary Plans (José Muñoz and Blanca Rincón)
ch. 5 A Model for Understanding the Latina/o Student and Parent College-going Negotiation Process (Cynthia Alvarez)

Part II: Political Context & Postsecondary Choice
ch. 6 Neoliberal Futures and Postsecondary Opportunity: Janet Napolitano and the Politics of Latina/o College Choice (Ryan Evely Gildersleeve, Carlos Cruz, Diana Madriz, and Cindy Melendrez-Flores)
ch. 7 Rising Voices: College Opportunity and Choice Among Latina/o Undocumented Students (Patricia A. Pérez, James L. Rodríguez, and Josue Guadarrama)
ch. 8 The Behavioral Typology of First-time Latina/o Students: The Application in Three Hispanic-serving Community Colleges (Lu Liu, Barbara McNeice-Stallard, Dustin Tamashiro, John Barkman, and Lan Hao)
ch. 9 Latina/o Students’ College Destinations: Gender, Generational Status, and College Sector Selectivity (Karla I. Loya, Jihee Hwang, and Leticia Oseguera)
ch. 10 La Selección Latina: Latina/o Students at Selective Four-year Colleges and Universities (Joseph J. Ramirez and Sylvia Hurtado)

Part III: Model College Access & Transition Programs
ch. 11 Rethinking College Access Programs: Latinos, Immigrants, and Community Colleges (Mary Martinez-Wenzl and Patricia Gándara)
ch. 12 Community Cultural Wealth and Latina/o College Choice: The Role of a College Access Program (Brianne A. Dávila and Roseanne M. Macias)
ch. 13 Supporting the College Transition Process and Early Academic Success Through an Integrative Summer Learning Experience (Jermaine F. Williams and Frank E. Ross III)
ch. 14 Conclusion: Toward a New Latina/o College Access and Choice Agenda (Miguel Ceja and Patricia A. Pérez)

Index
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Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town

Book
Krakauer, Jon
2015
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, New York, NY
HV6568.M57 K73 2015
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

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Are College Lectures Unfair?

Article
Paul, Annie Murphy
2015
The New York Times, New York, NY, September 12,
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Short, accessible, review of several recent studies showing that lectures are a pedagogical technique that “favor some people while discriminating against others, including women, minorities and low-income and first-generation college students.” All the more reason for adopting active learning strategies that have proved to be more effective for ALL learners.
Additional Info:
Short, accessible, review of several recent studies showing that lectures are a pedagogical technique that “favor some people while discriminating against others, including women, minorities and low-income and first-generation college students.” All the more reason for adopting active learning strategies that have proved to be more effective for ALL learners.
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Wabash tree

Teaching Global Theologies: Power and Praxis

Book
Pui-lan, Kwok; González-Andrieu, Cecilia; and Hopkins, Dwight N., eds.
2015
Baylor University Press, Waco, TX
BR118.T43 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: Theological education, like theology itself, is becoming a truly a global enterprise. As such, theological education has to form, teach, and train leaders of faith communities prepared to lead in a transnational world. The teaching of theology with a global awareness has to wrestle with the nature and scope of the theological curriculum, teaching methods, and the context of learning. Teaching Global Theologies ...
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Abstract: Theological education, like theology itself, is becoming a truly a global enterprise. As such, theological education has to form, teach, and train leaders of faith communities prepared to lead in a transnational world. The teaching of theology with a global awareness has to wrestle with the nature and scope of the theological curriculum, teaching methods, and the context of learning. Teaching Global Theologies directly addresses both method and content by identifying local resources, successful pedagogies of inclusion, and best practices for teaching theology in a global context. The contributors to Teaching Global Theologies are Catholic, mainline Protestant, and evangelical scholars from different racial and ethnic backgrounds, each with sustained connections with other parts of the world. Teaching Global Theologies capitalizes on this diversity to uncover neglected sources for a global theology even as it does so in constructive conversation with the long tradition of Christian thought. Bringing missing voices and neglected theological sources into conversation with the historical tradition enriches that tradition even as it uncovers questions of power, race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality. Teachers are offered successful pedagogies for bringing these questions into the classroom and best practices to promote students’ global consciousness, shape them as ecclesial leaders, and form them as global citizens. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I - Global Theology and Why It Matters
ch. 1 Teaching Theology from a Global Perspective (Kwok Pui-lan)
ch. 2 Listening for Fresh Voices in the History of the Church (William A. Dyrness)
ch. 3 Teaching Global Theology in a Comparative Mode (Veli-Matti Kärkkäinen)

Part II - Identity, Power, and Pedagogy
ch. 4 The Good of Education: Accessibility, Economy, Class, and Power (Cecilia González-Andrieu)
ch. 5 Identity Cross-Dressing while Teaching in a Global Context (Miguel A. Del La Torre)
ch. 6 Teaching Global Theology with Local Resources: A Chinese Theologian’s Strategies (Lai Pan-chiu)
ch. 7 Pedagogy for Being Human in Global Comparison (Dwight N. Hopkins)

Part III - Praxis and Responsibility
ch. 8 Teaching to Transform: Theological Education, Global Consciousness, and the Making of Global Citizens (Teresia Hinga)
ch. 9 Hablando Se Entiende la Gente: Tower of Babble or Gift of Tongues? (Loida I. Martell-Otero)
ch. 10 The Geopolitical and the Glocal: Situating Global Theological Voices in Theological Education (Eleazar S. Fernandez)

Notes
List of Contributors
Index
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Facilitative Collaborative Knowledge Co-Construction

Book
van Schalkwyk, Gertina J.; and D'Amato, Rich Carl, eds.
2015
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 143)
LB1032.F33 2015
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

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Abstract: Collaborative teaching and learning has been a focus of research recently, yet it can sometimes be a challenge for multicultural students in an educational setting. This second volume of a two-volume edition helps lecturers, educators, and teachers create collaborative teaching and learning experiences with multicultural adult learners in higher education.

The authors of this volume provide:

- outlines of ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: Collaborative teaching and learning has been a focus of research recently, yet it can sometimes be a challenge for multicultural students in an educational setting. This second volume of a two-volume edition helps lecturers, educators, and teachers create collaborative teaching and learning experiences with multicultural adult learners in higher education.

The authors of this volume provide:

- outlines of some of the positive relationships that can be developed among students and educators when the process of gaining knowledge is seen as a co-constructed process,
- approaches to relational intelligence and collaborative learning,
- research from neuropsychology and practical applications to teaching, and
- characterizations of emotional intelligence and sociocognitive skills needed in collaborative learning environments.

Though focused on Asian students and their experiences, this volume includes information for all students and educators who are engaged in the collaborative search for knowledge.

This is the 143rd volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Prologue (Gertina J. van Schalkwyk, Rik Carl D’Amato)

ch. 1 Knowledge Construction: A Paradigm Shift (Hugh Gash)
This chapter explores the move toward a constructivist paradigm and collaborative knowledge construction in the broader institutional context of education.

ch. 2 Relational Intelligence and Collaborative Learning (Sheila McNamee, Murilo Moscheta)
This chapter explores the ways in which a relational understanding of the educational process might inform and transform university teaching.

ch. 3 Using a Brain-Based Approach to Collaborative Teaching and Learning with Asians (Rik Carl D’Amato, Yuan Yuan Wang)
This chapter advocates for a more contemporary ecological neuropsychology approach, where brain-learner-environmental interactions are the focus of study, assessment, and evidence-based intervention.

ch. 4 Emotional Intelligence and Sociocognitive Skills in Collaborative Teaching and Learning (Helen Y. Sung)
This chapter explores emotional intelligence as the glue that binds people together regardless of cultural differences.

ch. 5 Reading and Writing for Critical Reflective Thinking (Mary M. Chittooran)
This chapter examines the use of reading and writing activities to promote critical reflection among Asian students in higher education settings.

Index
Cover image

Inclusive Teaching: Presence in the Classroom

Book
Thomas, Cornell, ed.
2014
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 140, Winter)
LC1099.3.I63 2014
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: In this volume, the authors focus on the importance of inclusive teaching and the role faculty can play in helping students achieve, though not necessarily in the same way. To teach with a focus on inclusion means to believe that every person has the ability to learn. It means that most individuals want to learn, to improve their ability to better understand the ...
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Abstract: In this volume, the authors focus on the importance of inclusive teaching and the role faculty can play in helping students achieve, though not necessarily in the same way. To teach with a focus on inclusion means to believe that every person has the ability to learn. It means that most individuals want to learn, to improve their ability to better understand the world in which they live, and to be able to navigate their pathways of life.

This volume includes the following topics:
• best practices for teaching students with social, economic, gender, or ethnic differences
• adjustments to the teaching and learning process to focus on inclusion
• strategies for teaching that help learners connect what they know with the information presented
• environments that maximize learners’ academic and social growth.

The premise of inclusive teaching works to demonstrate that all people can and do learn. Educators and administrators can incorporate the techniques of inclusive learning and help learners retain more information. This is the 140th volume of the quarterly Jossey-Bass higher education series New Directions for Teaching and Learning. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 No Longer Invisible (Cornell Thomas)
A discussion about generalizations regarding groups of people provides a pathway in this chapter leading to the realization that we are all unique individuals with the ability to grow and learn. This realization redirects how educators attempt to bring meaning to the content they are attempting to teach.

ch. 2 Presence in the Classroom (Don Hufford)
The recognition of the individual identities of students and the importance of presence as a way to maximize learning is the focus of this chapter.

ch. 3 Identity, Status, and Culture: Examining Barriers of Success for Students from Low Socioeconomic Backgrounds (Anthony Walker)
The author of this chapter believes that we can improve the quality of teaching and learning when we examine personal biases, critique the filters of knowledge and information that guide your learning and values, and institute criticality into our practice.

ch. 4 Addressing Racial Awareness and Color-Blindness in Higher Education (Kimberly Diggles)
This chapter offers recommendations for transforming traditional programs into programs with a focus on antiracism using a Critical Race Theory platform.

ch. 5 The Value of Connectedness in Inclusive Teaching (Ivan Figueroa)
This chapter discusses the importance of relationship development as a way to enhance teaching and learning, especially in more diverse learning communities.

ch. 6 A Journey with a Refugee Family: Raising Culturally Relevant Teaching Awareness (Freyca Calderon Berumen, Cecilia Silva)
This chapter explores ways to promote linguistic and cultural awareness among preservice teachers as they prepare to work with a more diverse student population.

ch. 7 Difference Does Not Mean Less Than: Our Pathway for Educating an Entire Nation of Learners (Cornell Thomas)
Taking notions of culture based on sets of group generalization and transgressing our thinking of culture based on individual, personal identities as a way to improve teaching and learning are discussed in this chapter.

ch. 8 Curriculum Retention and Programming for Inclusive Teaching (Anthony Walker)
In this chapter, the author talks about the importance of developing learning environments that are prepared tomeet the demands of amore diverse and interconnected society. This work brings support to the call for more inclusive teaching and learning environments.

Index
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Internationalizing Higher Education: Critical Collaborations across the Curriculum

Book
Williams, Rhiannon D.; and Lee, Amy, eds.
2015
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LC1090.I65 2015
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: Higher education is facing unprecedented change as today’s graduates need particular skills, awareness, and knowledge to successfully navigate a complex and interconnected world. Higher education institutions and practitioners are under pressure to be attentive to internationalization initiatives that support increasingly diverse student populations and foster the development of global citizenship competencies which include, “problem-defining and solving perspectives that cross disciplinary and cultural ...
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Abstract: Higher education is facing unprecedented change as today’s graduates need particular skills, awareness, and knowledge to successfully navigate a complex and interconnected world. Higher education institutions and practitioners are under pressure to be attentive to internationalization initiatives that support increasingly diverse student populations and foster the development of global citizenship competencies which include, “problem-defining and solving perspectives that cross disciplinary and cultural boundaries” (Hudzik, 2004, p. 1 as cited in Leask & Bridge, 2013).

Internationalizing Higher Education: Critical Collaborations across the Curriculum is for current and future faculty, student affairs staff, and administrators from diverse disciplinary, institutional, and geographic contexts. This edited volume invites readers to investigate, better understand, and inform intercultural pedagogy that supports the development of mindful global citizenship. This edited volume features reflective practitioners exploring the dynamic and evolving nature of intercultural learning as well as the tensions and complexities. Contributors include institutional researchers, directors and key implementers of EU/Bologna process in Poland (one of the newest members and one that is facing unprecedented change in the diversity of its students), international partners in learning abroad programs, and scholars and instructors across a range of humanities, STEM, and social sciences. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Internationalizing Higher Education: Critical Collaborations across the Curriculum (Rhiannon D. Williams and Amy Lee)

Section 1: Mindful Global Citizenship: Critical Concepts and Current Contexts
ch. 1 On the Hologram of International Education: With Raya Hegerman-Davis, Amy Lee, Nue Lor, & Rhiannon Williiams (Josef A. Mestenhauser)
ch. 2 Promoting Holistic Global Citizenship in College: Implications for Education Practitioners (Elena Galinova)
ch. 3 The Challenges and Implications of Globalization for Undergraduate Pedagogy (Marta A. Shaw)
ch. 4 Institutional and Instructional Techniques to Promote Undergraduates’ Intercultural Development: Evidence from a Multi-Institutional Student Survey (Krista M. Soria)

Section 2: Developing Intercultural Programs and Practitioners
ch. 5 Internationalizing Teaching and Learning: Transforming Teachers, Transforming Students (Gayle Woodruff, Kate Martin and Mary Katherine O’Brien)
ch. 6 Strategies for the Development of an Intercultural Environment (Jill E. Blondin)
ch. 7 Global Citizenship: Surfacing the Gap between Rhetoric and Reality in Internationalization of Management Curricula (Diana Rajendra, Janet Bryant, Patricia Buckley and Ryan Jopp)
ch. 8 Social Competencies in the European and Polish Qualifications Framework: A Tool for Designing Intercultural Environments (Ewa Chmielecka and Izabela Buchowicz)

Section 3: Critical Reflections from across the Curriculum
ch. 9 Internationalizing Teaching and Learning in a Graduate Doctor of Nursing Program Curriculum (Mary Benbenek)
ch. 10 Internationalizing College Algebra (Susan Staats)
ch. 11 Illuminating a Course Transformation Journey (Catherine Solheim, Mary Katherine O’Brien and Scott Spicer)
ch. 12 Social Media & Intercultural Competence: Using Each to Explore the Other (Barbara Gibson, Meredith Hyde and Troy Gordon)
ch. 13 Developing Diversity-Related Competences in Creativity Workshop for Teachers (Adam Jagiello-Rusilowski)
ch. 14 On Becoming a Global Citizen: Critical Pedagogy and Crossing Borders in and out of the University Classroom (Sahtiya Hosoda Hammell, Rose Cle, Lauren Start, Chrissie Monaghan and Carol Anne Spreen)
ch. 15 “Unpacking” International Experience through Blended Intercultural Praxis (Jane Jackson)

Notes on Contributors
Cover image

On Being Included: Racism and Diversity in Institutional Life

Book
Ahmed, Sara
2012
Duke University Press, Durham, NC
LC212.4.A398 2012
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: What does diversity do? What are we doing when we use the language of diversity? Sara Ahmed offers an account of the diversity world based on interviews with diversity practitioners in higher education, as well as her own experience of doing diversity work. Diversity is an ordinary, even unremarkable, feature of institutional life. Yet diversity practitioners often experience institutions as resistant to their ...
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Abstract: What does diversity do? What are we doing when we use the language of diversity? Sara Ahmed offers an account of the diversity world based on interviews with diversity practitioners in higher education, as well as her own experience of doing diversity work. Diversity is an ordinary, even unremarkable, feature of institutional life. Yet diversity practitioners often experience institutions as resistant to their work, as captured through their use of the metaphor of the "brick wall." On Being Included offers an explanation of this apparent paradox. It explores the gap between symbolic commitments to diversity and the experience of those who embody diversity. Commitments to diversity are understood as "non-performatives" that do not bring about what they name. The book provides an account of institutional whiteness and shows how racism can be obscured by the institutionalization of diversity. Diversity is used as evidence that institutions do not have a problem with racism. On Being Included offers a critique of what happens when diversity is offered as a solution. It also shows how diversity workers generate knowledge of institutions in attempting to transform them. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction On Arrival

ch. 1 Institutional Life
ch. 2 The Language of Diversity
ch. 3 Equality and Performance Culture
ch. 4 Commitment as a Non-performative
ch. 5 Speaking about Racism

Conclusion A Phenomenological Practice
Notes
References
Index
Cover image

Aspirations to Achievement: Men of Color and Community Colleges (A Special Report from the Center for Community College Student Engagement)

Book
2014
Center for Community College Student Engagement. Aspirations to achievement: Men of color and community colleges (A special report from the Center for Community College Student Engagement). Austin, TX: The University of Texas at Austin, Program in Higher Education Leadership.
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This report shares data related to readiness, student engagement, performance, and the achievement gap. The experience of stereotype threat is addressed and heard from the voices of students.  
Additional Info:
This report shares data related to readiness, student engagement, performance, and the achievement gap. The experience of stereotype threat is addressed and heard from the voices of students.  

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Race Matters
Improving Outcomes for Men of Color in Community Colleges
Just the Facts: Men of Color and Higher Education
What Students Say
Data Show Unsettling Patterns of Engagement and Achievement
Understanding the Unexpected
College Action for Equity
What Do We Do Now?
Conducting Courageous Conversations
Reflections: Listening to Learn
Center National Advisory Board
References
National Advisory Committee
Cover image

Critical Race Theory in Higher Education: 20 Years of Theoretical and Research Innovations: ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 41, Number 3

Book
McCoy, Dorian L.; and Rodricks, Dirk J.
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC212.2.C655 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
">Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Critical race theory (CRT) was introduced in 1995 and for almost twenty years, the theory has been used as a tool to examine People of Color’s experiences with racism in higher education. This monograph reviews the critical race literature with a focus on race and racism’s continued role and presence in higher education, including:

• legal studies and history,
• methodology ...
Additional Info:
">Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Critical race theory (CRT) was introduced in 1995 and for almost twenty years, the theory has been used as a tool to examine People of Color’s experiences with racism in higher education. This monograph reviews the critical race literature with a focus on race and racism’s continued role and presence in higher education, including:

• legal studies and history,
• methodology and student development theory,
• the use of storytelling and counterstories, and
• the types of and research on microaggressions.

The goal of the editors is to illuminate CRT as a theoretical framework, analytical tool, and research methodology in higher education. As part of critical race theory, scholars and educators are called upon to extend their commitment to social justice and to the eradication of racism and other forms of oppression.

This is the 3rd issue of the 41st volume of the Jossey-Bass series ASHE Higher Education Report. Each monograph is the definitive analysis of a tough higher education issue, based on thorough research of pertinent literature and institutional experiences. Topics are identified by a national survey. Noted practitioners and scholars are then commissioned to write the reports, with experts providing critical reviews of each manuscript before publication. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Executive Summary
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Critical Race Theory
Critical Race Theory in Higher Education
Critical Legal Studies
The Origins of Critical Race Theory
Critical Race Theory
Key Tenets of Critical Race Theory
Critical Race Theory in Higher Education: 20 Years of Theoretical and Research Innovations

ch. 2 Critical Race Theory in Higher Education
Tensions and Possibilities
Race and Racism on the U.S. University Campus
Engaging with Students of Color’s Experiences
Understanding Faculty of Color’s Experiences
Critical Race Theory, Higher Education Policy, and the Law
Conclusion

ch. 3 Critical Race as a Methodology
A Critical Race Methodology
Elements of a Critical Race Methodology
Providing Voice and Legitimizing People of Color’s Experiences
Master Narrative/Majoritarian Stories
Storytelling
Counterstories
Functions of the Counterstory
Types of Counterstories
Descendant Theories of Critical Race Theory
Growing the Counterstory?
Positionality
Conclusion

ch. 4 Critical Race Theory as a (Student) Development Theory
Centering Race in Student Development
Critical Race Theory and Intersectionality
Critical Race Theory and Campus Environments
The Ecological Perspective of Campus Space
Impact to Student Development
Toward a Critical Race Theory of (Student) Leadership
Conclusion: The Educator as Architect

ch. 5 Racial Microaggressions
Racial Microaggressions in Scholarship
Contextualizing Microaggressions
Types of Microaggressions
Research on Microaggressions
Microaggressions and Critical Race Theory
Decolonizing Microaggressions: A Concluding Thought

ch. 6 Critical Race Theory and the Next 20 Years
Reflexivity and Listening
Call to Praxis

Glossary
Notes
References
Name Index
Subject Index
About the Authors
Cover image

Transnational Migration, Social Inclusion, and Adult Education: New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, Number 146

Book
Gui, Shibao; and Lange, Elizabeth, eds.
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Adult & Continuing Education, Number 146)
LC5219.T73 2015
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: As a result of transnational migration, many countries are becoming increasingly ethnoculturally diverse, creating both new opportunities and challenges for practices of adult education. This volume examines the changing nature of adult education in the age of increased transnational migration and:

• synthesize the latest research, policies, and practices in transnational migration and adult education,
• examines the larger historical and structural ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: As a result of transnational migration, many countries are becoming increasingly ethnoculturally diverse, creating both new opportunities and challenges for practices of adult education. This volume examines the changing nature of adult education in the age of increased transnational migration and:

• synthesize the latest research, policies, and practices in transnational migration and adult education,
• examines the larger historical and structural issues of race and gender in immigration and newer theories, such as diaspora studies, in relation to adult education, and
• provides examples and recommendations for enhancing socially just and inclusive adult education environments for newcomers.

Transborder injustices and multiple dimensions of social justice permeate immigration dynamics and challenge adult educators to rethink social justice in a transnational age.

This is the 146th volume of the Jossey Bass series New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. Noted for its depth of coverage, it explores issues of common interest to instructors, administrators, counselors, and policymakers in a broad range of education settings, such as colleges and universities, extension programs, businesses, libraries, and museums. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Shibao Guo, Elizabeth Lange)

ch. 1 The Changing Nature of Adult Education in the Age of Transnational Migration: Toward a Model of Recognitive Adult Education (Shibao Guo)
This chapter maps the changing context of transnational migration and its impact on adult education and proposes recognitive adult education as an inclusive model of adult education.

ch. 2 Settlement Services in the Training and Education of Immigrants: Toward a Participatory Mode of Governance (Hongxia Shan)
This chapter reviews the roles that settlement services have played historically in the training and education of immigrants in Canada and promotes a participatory mode of governance as a means to expanding immigrants life world.

ch. 3 Informal Adult Learning and Emotion Work of Service Providers for Refugee Claimants (Susan M. Brigham, Catherine Baillie Abidi, Evangelia Tastsoglou, Elizabeth Lange)
Recognizing the life and death realities of refugees who are claiming asylum in another country, this chapter examines the informal learning and emotion work of service providers who accompany refugee claimants through the refugee application process.

ch. 4 Language Policies and Programs for Adult Immigrants in Canada: Deconstructing Discourses of Integration (Yan Guo)
From a critical multicultural approach, this chapter explores the various purposes of English as a Second Language (ESL) programs and the policy shifts over time, and it deconstructs discourse that is assimilationist in intent.

ch. 5 Literacy and Language Education: The Quantification of Learning (Tara Gibb)
This chapter describes international policy contexts of adult literacy and language assessment and considers the implications that the quantification of learning outcomes has for pedagogy and practice as well as for social inclusion of transnational migrants.

ch. 6 Migrating Professional Knowledge: Progressions, Regressions, and Dislocations (Bonnie L. Slade)
This chapter argues that adult educators need to have a critical awareness of transnational migration dynamics to be able to work in meaningful ways with immigrant professionals, particularly in regard to deskilling issues.

ch. 7 Race and Gender in Immigration: A Continuing Saga With Different Encryptions (Edward Joaquin, Juanita Johnson-Bailey)
From a postcolonial framework, this chapter offers a historical analysis of the immigrant experience, highlighting raced and gendered perspectives that have shaped a persistent colonial mindset, and the potential of transnational adult education for social inclusion.

ch. 8 Diaspora, Migration, and Globalization: Expanding the Discourse of Adult Education (Mary V. Alfred )
This article explores how notions of diaspora,migration, and globalization intersect to inform identities and social realities of immigrant adults.

ch. 9 Rethinking Social Justice and Adult Education for Welcoming, Inclusive Communities: Synthesis of Themes (Elizabeth Lange, Catherine Baillie Abidi)
In synthesizing themes across preceding chapters using a more expansive social justice frame, this chapter discusses the historical and transnational dynamics of migration and profiles adult education spaces as places for building welcoming, inclusive communities.

Index
Cover image

Sex and the Soul: Juggling Sexuality, Spirituality, Romance, and Religion on America's College Campuses

Book
Freitas, Donna
2010
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
BL625.9.C64 F74 2008
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Based on dozens of face-to-face interviews, Sex and the Soul explores the sexual and spiritual lives of today's college students. Donna Freitas crisscrossed the country, visiting a range of America's colleges and universities--from public to private, Catholic to evangelical--to find out what students had to say about these highly personal subjects. Their stories will not only engage readers, but, in many cases, move them with the painful struggles these candid ...
Additional Info:
Based on dozens of face-to-face interviews, Sex and the Soul explores the sexual and spiritual lives of today's college students. Donna Freitas crisscrossed the country, visiting a range of America's colleges and universities--from public to private, Catholic to evangelical--to find out what students had to say about these highly personal subjects. Their stories will not only engage readers, but, in many cases, move them with the painful struggles these candid young women and men face. Indeed, the book uncovers aspects of college life that may unsettle some readers, especially parents. Many campuses, for instance, are dominated by the pervasiveness of hook-up culture. Moreover, many students see little connection between sex and religion, even as they seek one between sex and spirituality. Indeed, these observations hold true even at Catholic schools. Only at evangelical colleges is religion an important factor when deciding whether or not to engage in sex. But Freitas's research also reveals that, even at secular schools, students are not comfortable with a culture of casual sex, and that they do want spirituality, at least, if not also religion, to speak about what they should do and who they should try to be--not just what they should avoid doing.

Sex and the Soul will offer readers the chance to hear college students speaking honestly about extremely sensitive topics, in a book that will be of great interest to students, parents, clergy, teachers, and anyone who wants to know what's happening on today's college campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Lauren Winner)
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Welcome to College. Meet Amy Stone: Tour Guide, Fashion Model, Straight-A Student

Section 1: The Varieties of College Religious Experience
ch. 1 The Spiritual Colleges: Souls Adrift
ch. 2 Why Catholic Schools (and Their Students) Are "Spiritual but Not Religious"
ch. 3 Evangelical Extroverts: Faithful and Diverse

Section 2: The Romantic Ideal
ch. 4 Evangelical Purity Culture: Its Princesses and Warriors
ch. 5 Wanted: A Little Romance

Section 3: The Truth About Sex On Campus
ch. 6 Where Dating=Marriage and a Kiss Means Everything
ch. 7 Hookups, Ho's, and Losing It

Section 4: Reconciling Sex and the Soul (or Not) on Campus
ch. 8 God vs. My Boyfriend
ch. 9 Dividing Sex from the Soul: Why Religion Doesn't Matter When It Comes to Sex

Section 5: Conclusions and Practical Implications
ch. 10 Seeking a Sexy Spirituality for Students on Campus

A Practical Guide to Sex and the Soul: Three Musts for Your College To-Do List, What to Say to Your Child, Student, Parishioner, Friend

Appendix: On Methodology
Notes
Index
Cover image

Latina/o College Student Leadership: Emerging Theory, Promising Practice

Book
Lozano, Adele, ed.
2015
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LC2670.6.L38 2015
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Latina/o College Student Leadership: Emerging Theory, Promising Practice examines Latina/o college student leadership and leadership development in higher education. This edited collection examines emerging frameworks, empirical research, leadership models, essays, and promising practices from the perspectives of scholars, educators, practitioners, and activists. Latina/o student leadership is analyzed through the lens of various institutional contexts (e.g. large research institution, community college, Hispanic-serving institution) as well as diverse ...
Additional Info:
Latina/o College Student Leadership: Emerging Theory, Promising Practice examines Latina/o college student leadership and leadership development in higher education. This edited collection examines emerging frameworks, empirical research, leadership models, essays, and promising practices from the perspectives of scholars, educators, practitioners, and activists. Latina/o student leadership is analyzed through the lens of various institutional contexts (e.g. large research institution, community college, Hispanic-serving institution) as well as diverse intra-institutional contexts (e.g. academic, student organizations, student government, fraternities and sororities). The focus on theory and practice within various contexts, combined with an emphasis on student voice, helps provide deeper insight into how Latina/o students experience leadership in higher education, as well as how to promote and support the leadership development of Latina/o college students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Adele Lozano)

I: Theoretical Perspectives, Models and Research
ch. 1 Re-imagining Latina/o Success at an Historically White Institution: Student Perspectives on Leadership (Adele Lozano)
ch. 2 Never Created with Nosotros in Mind: Combating Colorblind Leadership Education with Cultural Competency and Intersectionality of Identities (Cecilia E. Suarez)
ch. 3 Latin@ Student Organizations as Pathways to Leadership Development (Cameron Beatty)
ch. 4 Leadership and Identity Development Through a Latino/a Fraternity and Sorority Lens (Juan R. Guardia)

II: Promising Practices
ch. 5 Voices on the Margin: The Latina/o Resilience Network and Retention Strategies (Veronica M. Kann and Alicia P. Rodríguez)
ch. 6 Latino/a Leadership Retreats (Cristobal Salinas, Jr.)
ch. 7 El Día de los Muertos, Chicana/o Studies, and Cultural Centers: Promoting Transformational Leadership through Celebratory Socialization Co-Curricular Programming (Corina Benavides López)
ch. 8 From the Margins to the Forefront: Cultivating Leadership Among Latina/o Students at a Community College (Moises Orozco and Eduardo Coronel)

III: New Approaches to Leadership Development
ch. 9 UndocuLeadership: Understanding the Role of Legality in College Student Engagement for Undocumented Students (Susana Muñoz and Juan Escalante)
ch. 10 Applying White Followership in Campus Organizing: A Leadership Tool for Latinx Students Working for Racial Justice (Jesse Villalobos)

Bibliography
Index
About the Editor and Contributors
Article cover image

"The Climate for Underrepresented Groups and Diversity on Campus"

Article
Hurtado, Sylvia and Ruiz, Adriana
The Higher Education Research Institute (HERI)
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Race continues to be a significant issue on campus. Underrepresented college students at low-diversity institutions reported more incidents of stereotyping, discrimination and harassment on campus. Data indicate more hospitable racial climates on the most diverse campuses and suggest that campuses must continue to work to improve intergroup relations even as enrollments begin to change. 
Additional Info:
Race continues to be a significant issue on campus. Underrepresented college students at low-diversity institutions reported more incidents of stereotyping, discrimination and harassment on campus. Data indicate more hospitable racial climates on the most diverse campuses and suggest that campuses must continue to work to improve intergroup relations even as enrollments begin to change. 
Cover image

Ensuring the Success of Latino Males in Higher Education: A National Imperative

Book
Saenz, Victor B.; Ponjuan, Luis; and Figueroa, Julia, eds.
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC2670.6.E67 2016
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Latino males are effectively vanishing from the American higher education pipeline. Even as the number of Latinas/os attending college has actually increased steadily over the last few decades, the proportional representation of Latino males continues to slide relative to their Latina female counterparts.

The question of why Latino males are losing ground in accessing higher education—relative to their peers—is an important and complex one, and ...
Additional Info:
Latino males are effectively vanishing from the American higher education pipeline. Even as the number of Latinas/os attending college has actually increased steadily over the last few decades, the proportional representation of Latino males continues to slide relative to their Latina female counterparts.

The question of why Latino males are losing ground in accessing higher education—relative to their peers—is an important and complex one, and it lies at the heart of this book. There are several broad themes highlighted, catalogued along with the four dimensions of policy, theory, research, and practice. The contributors to this book present new research on factors that inhibit or promote Latino success in both four-year institutions and community colleges in order to inform both policy and practice. They explore the social-cultural factors, peer dynamics, and labor force demands that may be perpetuating the growing gender gap, and consider what lessons can be learned from research on the success of Latinas. This book also closely examines key practices that enable first generation Latino male undergraduates to succeed which may seem counterintuitive to institutional expectations and preconceived notions of student behavior.

Using narrative data, the book also explores the role of family in persistence; outlines how Latino men conceptualize fulfilling expectations, negotiate the emasculization of the educational process, and how they confront racialization in the pursuit of a higher education; uncovers attitudes to help-seeking that are detrimental to their success: and analyzes how those who succeed and progress in college apply their social capital – whether aspirational, navigational, social, linguistic, familial, or resistant.

While uncovering the lack of awareness at all levels of our colleges and universities about the depth and severity of the challenges facing Latino males, this book provides the foundation for rethinking policy; challenges leaders to institutionalize male-focused programs and services; and presents data to inform needed changes in practice for outreach and retention. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (William Serrata)
Preface (Victor B. Sáenz)
Acknowledgments

Part One: Introduction and Context-Setting: Latino Males in K–12 and Higher Education
ch. 1 Current Trends and Future Outlooks on the Pervasive Gender Gap in Educational Attainment for Latino Males (Victor B. Sáenz, Luis Ponjuán, and Julie López Figueroa)
ch. 2 Latino Males in American High Schools: An Examination of the 2012 High School Longitudinal Study (Luis Ponjuán)

Part Two: Exploring Theories to Understand the Pathways for Latino Males in Higher Education
ch. 3 The Geography of Academic Support: A Framework to Understand the Latino Male Perceptions and Practices in Higher Education (Julie López Figueroa)
ch. 4 (Re)Constructing Masculinity: Understanding Gender Expectations Among Latino Male College-Going Students (Julie López Figueroa, Patricia Pérez, and Irene I. Vega)
ch. 5 An Intersectionality Analysis of Latino Men in Higher Education and Their Help-Seeking Behaviors (Nolan L. Cabrera, Fatemma D. Rashwan-Soto, and Bryant G. Valencia)

Part Three: Research on Preparation, Persistence, and Success for Latino Males in Secondary and Postsecondary Education
ch. 6 Latino Male High School Math Achievement: The Influential Role of Psychosociocultural Factors (Ismael Fajardo, José M. Hernandez, and José Muñoz)
ch. 7 Examining the Role of Family in Mexican American College Men’s Academic Persistence (Lizette Ojeda and Linda G. Castillo)
ch. 8 Over the Ivy Wall: Latino Male Achievers Nurturing Cultural Wealth at a Highly Selective Predominantly White Research University (David Pérez II)
ch. 9 Caballeros Making Capital Gains in College: The Role of Social Capital in First-Year Persistence at a Predominantly White 4-Year Institution (Tracy L. Arámbula)

Part Four: Moving From Research to Practice: Meeting the Needs of Latino Males in Higher Education
ch. 10 Latino Males In Higher Education: Administrator Awareness of the Emerging Challenges (Victor B. Sáenz, Sarah Rodriguez, Katie Ortego Pritchett,Jennifer Estrada, and Kelty Garbee)
ch. 11 Educational Opportunity, College Choices, and Higher Education: What Can We Learn From Research on Latinas? (Miguel A. Ceja)
ch. 12 Collaborative Consciousness: Improving Latino Male Student Research, Policy, and Practice (Luis Ponjuán)

Editors and Contributors
Index
Cover image

Teaching Across Cultural Strengths: A Guide to Balancing Integrated and Individuated Cultural Frameworks in College Teaching

Book
Chavez, Alicia Fedelina; and Longerbeam, Susan Diana
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2331.C5125 2016
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Promoting learning among college students is an elusive challenge, and all the more so when faculty and students come from differing cultures. This comprehensive guide addresses the continuing gaps in our knowledge about the role of culture in learning; and offers an empirically-based framework and model, together with practical strategies, to assist faculty in transforming college teaching for all their students through an ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: Promoting learning among college students is an elusive challenge, and all the more so when faculty and students come from differing cultures. This comprehensive guide addresses the continuing gaps in our knowledge about the role of culture in learning; and offers an empirically-based framework and model, together with practical strategies, to assist faculty in transforming college teaching for all their students through an understanding of and teaching to their strengths.

Recognizing that each student learns in culturally influenced ways, and that each instructor’s teaching is equally influenced by her or his background and experiences, the authors offer an approach by which teachers can progressively learn about culture while they transform their teaching through reflection and the application of new practices that enrich student learning.

The key premise of the book is that deepening student learning and increasing retention and graduation rates requires teaching from a strengths based perspective that recognizes the cultural assets that students bring to higher education, and to their own learning.

Derived through research and practice, the authors present their Model of Cultural Frameworks in College Teaching and Learning that highlights eight continua towards achieving the transformation of teaching, and developing more culturally balanced and inclusive practices, over time. They present techniques – illustrated by numerous examples and narratives – for building on cultural strengths in teaching; offer tips and strategies for teaching through cultural dilemmas; and provide culturally reflective exercises.

This guide is intended for all faculty, faculty developers or administrators in higher education concerned with equitable outcomes in higher education and with ensuring that all student cultural groups learn and graduate at the same rates. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Joseph L. White)
Preface

ch. 1 Balancing Cultural Strengths in Teaching
ch. 2 Culture in College Teaching
ch. 3 Rewards, Dilemmas, and Challenges of Teaching Across Cultural Frameworks
ch. 4 Applying Cultural Introspection to Teaching and Learning
ch. 5 Strengths-Based Teaching in Cultural Context
ch. 6 Top 10 Things Faculty Can Do to Teach Across Cultures
ch. 7 Spreading the Cultural Word: Faculty Development on a Larger Scale
ch. 8 The Story of Our Work With Faculty

Final Reflections: Toward Learning Equity: Cultivating a Culture of Belief in Students
Appendix A: Guide to Writing a Culture and Teaching Autobiography
Appendix B: Resources
References
About the Authors
Index
Cover image

Incarcerated Religion: Teaching behind Walls - Editor’s Introduction

Journal Issue
Glennon, Frederick, ed.
2016
Spotlight on Teaching, May 31,
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/teaching/incarcerated-religion/editor%E2%80%99s-introduction
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/teaching/incarcerated-religion/editor%E2%80%99s-introduction

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Incarcerated Religion: Teaching behind Walls – Editor's Introduction (Fred Glennon)
ch. 2 Opening My Eyes: Teaching in a Women's Prison (Elizabeth M. Bounds)
ch. 3 Education as Social Transformation (Andrew Skotnicki)
ch. 4 Incarcerated Trust: The Challenge of Prison Teaching (James Wetzel)
ch. 5 Quotes, Notes, Questions (Joshua Dubler)
ch. 6 Theology and Ministry at Garden State Correctional Facility (Melanie Webb)

Re