Diversifying the Curriculum

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Educating for an Ecologically Sustainable Culture: Rethinking Moral Education, Creativity, Intelligence and Other Modern Orthodoxies

Book
Bowers, C. A.
1995
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
GE70.B68 1995
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
This book is a wake-up call for environmentalists who need to consider how current educational ideals and practices undermine efforts to create a more sustainable future. It is also a wake-up call for educators who continue to base their reform efforts on the primacy of the individual, while ignoring the fact that the individual is nested in culture, and culture is nested in (and thus dependent upon) natural ecosystems. Bowers ...
Additional Info:
This book is a wake-up call for environmentalists who need to consider how current educational ideals and practices undermine efforts to create a more sustainable future. It is also a wake-up call for educators who continue to base their reform efforts on the primacy of the individual, while ignoring the fact that the individual is nested in culture, and culture is nested in (and thus dependent upon) natural ecosystems. Bowers argues that the modern way of understanding moral education, creativity, intelligence, and the role of direct experience in the learning process cannot be supported by evidence. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Toward a Radical and Ecologically Sustainable Approach to Moral Education
ch. 3 Rethinking the Modern Ideal of Creativity
ch. 4 Educational Computing and the Ecological Crisis: Some Critical Concerns
ch. 5 Toward an Ecological View of Intelligence
ch. 6 Toward the Recovery of Trans-Generational Communication in the Educational Process
ch. 7 Educational Models of Community and Environmental Renewal

References
Index
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Education, Cultural Myths, and the Ecological Crisis: Toward Deep Changes

Book
Bowers, C. A.
1993
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
GF27.B69 1993
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Bowers examines how the educational process perpetuates cultural myths that contribute to the ecological crisis, particularly how thought patterns from the past are reproduced through the metaphorical language used in the classroom. He suggests that a more ecologically sustainable ideology is being formulated by such writers as Aldo Leopold and Wendell Berry. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Bowers examines how the educational process perpetuates cultural myths that contribute to the ecological crisis, particularly how thought patterns from the past are reproduced through the metaphorical language used in the classroom. He suggests that a more ecologically sustainable ideology is being formulated by such writers as Aldo Leopold and Wendell Berry. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Cultural Aspects of the Ecological Crisis
ch. 2 The Conservative Misinterpretation of the Educational Crisis
ch. 3 The Liberal Impasse: Technocrats and Emancipators
ch. 4 Anthropocentrism in Textbooks
ch. 5 Toward Deep Changes in the Educational Process
ch. 6 The Political and Spiritual Dimensions of the Ecological Crisis: Toward a New Sense of Balance

Notes
Index
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Developing Teaching Materials and Instructional Strategies for Teaching Asian and Asian American/Canadian Women's Theologies in North America

Book
Brock, Rita et al
1999
Wabash Center Grant Project
Grant projects
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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She Can Read: Feminist Reading Strategies for Biblical Narrative

Book
Cheney, Emily
1996
Trinity Press, Valley Forge, PA
BS521.4.C48 1996
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Using the research of feminist literary critics and building upon the work of feminist biblical scholars, Emily Cheney offers three strategies for women whose ecclesiastical traditions expect them to base their sermons on biblical texts, and for women who want their sermons to reflect a feminist consciousness and compassion. The strategies focus on gender reversal, analogy, and women as exchange objects, all tested on several texts without female characters from ...
Additional Info:
Using the research of feminist literary critics and building upon the work of feminist biblical scholars, Emily Cheney offers three strategies for women whose ecclesiastical traditions expect them to base their sermons on biblical texts, and for women who want their sermons to reflect a feminist consciousness and compassion. The strategies focus on gender reversal, analogy, and women as exchange objects, all tested on several texts without female characters from the Gospel of Matthew. A concluding section reflects upon what role the authority of the text plays when readers use these strategies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
List of Abbreviations
Introduction
ch. 1 The Need for Reading Strategies
ch. 2 Scholarship of Feminist Literary Critics
ch. 3 Gender Reversal
ch. 4 Analogy
ch. 5 Women as Exchange Objects
ch. 6 Application of the Strategies to Mt. 1:18-25
Conclusion
Appendix: Sample Sermon
Notes
Bibliography of Works Cited
Scripture Index
General Index
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The Globalization of Theological Education

Book
Evans, Alice Frazer, Robert A. Evans, and David A. Roozen, eds.
1993
Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY
BV4022.G57 1993
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
These probing essays, factual case studies and critical commentaries by thirty-nine prominent scholars, educators, seminary administrators and church executives together address the emerging issues of the globalization of theological education. What does it mean to minister in a world of both interdependence and polarization? How can leaders be prepared to build up a church able and willing to respond to the challenge of global witness and service? What new ways ...
Additional Info:
These probing essays, factual case studies and critical commentaries by thirty-nine prominent scholars, educators, seminary administrators and church executives together address the emerging issues of the globalization of theological education. What does it mean to minister in a world of both interdependence and polarization? How can leaders be prepared to build up a church able and willing to respond to the challenge of global witness and service? What new ways of teaching and learning can seminaries and congregations develop toward the ultimate goal of faithfully and effectively embracing all of God's creation? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forewords (Walter Brueggemann, Daniel J. Harrington, Garth M. Rosell, and Barbaraa Brown Zikmund)
Introduction (David A. Roozen, Alice Frazer Evans, and Robert A. Evans)

ch. 1 An Historical Survey
Essay: Justo L. González, and Catherine G. González
Case Study: Winning Over the Faculty - The director of a seminary globalization program faces strong opposition from a traditional faculty member.
Teaching Note
Commentary: Susan Brooks Thistlethwaite

ch. 2 Meanings of Globalization
Essay: William E. Lesher
Case Study: Why Globalization? The faculty of an established seminary struggles with the theological rationale for a globilization program and debates the value of experimental education
Teaching Note
Commentary: M. Shawn Copeland

ch. 3 Globalization as Evangelism
Essay: Paul G. Hiebert
Case Study: Changing the Face of the Parish
A parish priest, whose concept of ministry was shaped by required foreign language study, counsels members of his congregation threatened by a growing Hispanic population in their parish and suggestions of a Spanish Mass
Teaching Note
Commentary: Harold J. Recinos

ch. 4 Globalization as Ecumenical/Interfaith Dialogue
Essay: Jane I. Smith
Case Study: Sacred Sites
An Australian pastor must decide on his demination's role in a dispute between the Australian government and an Aborginial community's claim of sacred land.
Teaching Note
Commentary: L. Shannon Jung

ch. 5 Globalization as Cross-Cultural Dialogue
Essay: Robert J. Schreiter
Case Study: Text and Context
A debate between seminary faculty members about written vs. oral reports raises implications for the validity of academic requirements for extension education courses in indigenous communities
Teaching Note
Commentary: Pierre Goldberger

ch. 6 Globalization as Justice
Essay: Alice Frazer Evans and Robert A. Evans
Case Study: Evangelicals in a New Key
A Latin American student in a North American evangelical seminary faces a vocational dilemma as eh questions the relevance of his theological education for addressing "third-world" poverty.
Teaching Note
Commentary: W. L. Herzfeld

ch. 7 Liberation: Gender, Race, and Class
Essay: Toinette M. Eugeme
Case Study: To Go Home Again
A white middle-class seminarian struggles to reconcile her experiences in a required "developing world" immersion seminar with her understanding of the mission of the North American church and the purpose of seminary education
Teaching Note
Commentary: Daniel Spencer

ch. 8 Implications of Globalization for Biblical Understanding
Essay: Craig L. Blomberg
Case Study: Affirmation of Life
A Latin American seminary deals with the implications for its lifestyle and investment policies as a consequence of a radically revised program of study based on biblical and contextual analyses
Teaching Note
Commentary: Elsa Tamez

ch. 9 Global Economy and the Globalization of Theological Education
Essay: M. Douglas Meeks
Case Study: A Place for Reconciliation
A Sough African seminary faculty is divided over the seminary's role int he rebuilding of a community devastated by the economic and political repercussions of apartheid.
Teaching Note
Commentary: Itumeleng J. Mosala

ch. 10 Liberating Pedagogies in the Globalization of Theological Education
Essay: William Bean Kennedy
Case Study: More Questions Than Answers
A dramatic encounter during an international seminar challenges an experienced ethics professor to revise his approach to teaching and his relationship to international students
Teaching Note
Commentary: Heidi Hadsell do Nascimento

ch. 11 Institutional Change and the Globalization of Theological Education
Essay: David A. Roozen
Case Study: Globalization Gone Wild
The president of a seminary involved in a five-year globalization program encounters the complexity of institutional change as he faces competing demands for time and resources
Teaching Note
Commentary: Eleanor Scott Meyers

ch. 12 Mutuality in Global Education
Essay: Mortimer Arias
Cast Study: Apart from His People
Jamaican church leaders debate the costs and benefits of international education following a meeting with a young pastor, trained abroad, who is experiencing serious conflict with his Jamaican parishoners.
Teaching Note
Commentary: Henry S. Wilson

Contributors
Case Authors
Erskine Clarke, Columbia Theological Seminary
Gordon Dicker, United Theological Seminary Australia
Alice Frazer Evans, Plowshares Institute
Robert A. Evans, Plowshares Institute
Lisa Jafta, Rhodes University, South Africa
G. Douglass LEwis, Wesley Theological Seminary
James N. Pankratz, Concord College, Canada
Anne Reissner, Maryknoll School of Theology
Robert L. Stivers, Pacific Lutheran University
Richard F. Vieth, Lancaster Theological Seminary
Ronald C. White, Huntington Library and University of Southern California
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Sociology, Theology and the Curriculum

Book
Francis, Leslie J., ed.
1999
Cassell, London and New York
BV4020.S63 1999
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
In this new volume, theologians reflect on sociological methods, explore social theories of the human agent, and offer a theological transformation of sociology. Spanning such developments as local, non-stipendiary ministries, the identification of the roots of church growth, and giving voice to gay and lesbian Christians, this collection of innovative essays provides a fascinating and important dialogue on how the seemingly disparate fields of sociology and theology can illuminate and ...
Additional Info:
In this new volume, theologians reflect on sociological methods, explore social theories of the human agent, and offer a theological transformation of sociology. Spanning such developments as local, non-stipendiary ministries, the identification of the roots of church growth, and giving voice to gay and lesbian Christians, this collection of innovative essays provides a fascinating and important dialogue on how the seemingly disparate fields of sociology and theology can illuminate and enrich one other. This is essential reading for anyone concerned with the shifting dynamics of these two disciplines. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part I Foundations
ch. 1 Christian Foundations, Sociological Fundamentals (Rev Canon Prof David Martin)
ch. 2 A Theological Response to Sociology (Rev Canon Prof Ronald Preston)

Part II Theoretical Perspectives
ch. 3 Theological Reflection and Sociological Method (Andrew Dawson)
ch. 4 Social Theories of the Human Agent and Monastic Dialogue (Jeff Vass)
ch. 5 The Problem of Charismatic Religious Experience for the Sociology of Religion: Label or Libel? (Rev Canon Dr Martyn Percy)
ch. 6 Sociological Methodologies and the Changing Nature of Contemporary Fundamentalism(Stephen J. Hunt)
ch. 7 Sociology in Evangelical Theological Colleges (Tony Walter)
ch. 8 Is Self-assigned Religious Affiliation Socially Significant?

Part III Empirical Perspectives
ch. 9 The Socialization of Glossolalia (Mark Cartledge)
ch. 10 Pentecostalism: Charismata and Church Growth (William K. Kay)
ch. 11 Student Expectations of a Church College
ch. 12 Sociology Students and Christianity in a Church College (Bernadette Casey Et Al)
ch. 13 Immanent Faith: Young People in Late Modernity (Sylvia Collins)
ch. 14 Gay and Lesbian Christians: The Lived Experiences (Andrew K.t. Yip)
ch. 15 Developing Identity as a Local Non-stipendiary Priest (Rev Canon Dr Michael Wes)

Name Index
Subject Index
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Multicultural Course Transformation in Higher Education: A Broader Truth

Book
Morey, Ann Intili and Margie K. Kitano
1997
Allyn & Bacon, Boston, MA
LB2361.5.M85 1996
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Responding to increasing enrollments of students of color, students with disabilities, students whose first language is not English, and students entering college in their mid-twenties or later, many colleges and universities are including multicultural issues in their course and curriculum preparation. Faculty members and administrators involved in multicultural initiatives will find here a suggested framework for making course and curriculum changes, along with specific examples and scenarios from a variety ...
Additional Info:
Responding to increasing enrollments of students of color, students with disabilities, students whose first language is not English, and students entering college in their mid-twenties or later, many colleges and universities are including multicultural issues in their course and curriculum preparation. Faculty members and administrators involved in multicultural initiatives will find here a suggested framework for making course and curriculum changes, along with specific examples and scenarios from a variety of disciplines. At the heart of the book is a two-dimensional model for infusing multicultural elements into a course or curriculum. The model identifies three levels of change (exclusive, inclusive, transformed) and four course components in which change can be applied (content, instructional strategies, assessment of student knowledge, and classroom dynamics). The authors suggest that instructors approach course change by focusing on one or more of these components and identifying a target level, depending on the instructor's multicultural goals and the nature of the discipline. The book draws upon the skills of experienced college and university educators to show how the model may be applied in specific disciplines and courses. This book is an indispensable, thoroughly documented resource. It will appeal to all post-secondary educators and administrators interested in creating an academic environment that reflects the needs of today's students and the reality of today's diverse society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Background
An Overview of the Book
Authors and Affiliations

ch. 1 A Rationale and Framework for Course Change
ch. 2 What a Course Will Look Like After Multicultural Change
ch. 3 Doing Multiculturalism: Conceptualizing Curricular Change
ch. 4 Instructional Strategies
ch. 5 Assessment of Student Learning
ch. 6 Classroom Dynamics: Disclosing the Hidden Curriculum
ch. 7 Creating an Enabling Learning Environment for Non-Native Speakers of English
ch. 8 Making Mathematics Instruction Inclusive
ch. 9 Multicultural Science: Focus on the Biological and Environmental Sciences
ch. 10 The Humanities
ch. 11 Integrating Race and Gender into Introductory Economics
ch. 12 Multicultural Infusion in Teacher Education: Foundations and Applications
ch. 13 Integrating Transcultural Knowledge into Nursing Curricula: An American Indian Example
ch. 14 The Community College Curriculum
ch. 15 Evaluating the Results of Multicultural Education: Taking the Long Way Home
ch. 16 Organizational Change and Implementation Strategies for
Multicultural Infusion
References
Index
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Learning from Our Lives: Women, Research and Autobiography in Education

Book
Neumann, Anna and Penelope L. Peterson, eds.
1997
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC1757.L416 1997
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
In Learning from Our Lives: Women, Research, and Autobiography in Education, eleven women who are eminent educational researchers speak out intimately, and from these autobiographical accounts, readers experience how research that emerges from diverse women's lives shapes (and reshapes) educational knowledge and discourse. The book offers thoughtful insights into how the field of education might change as women assume positions of intellectual leadership. The distinguished list of contributors includes Kathryn ...
Additional Info:
In Learning from Our Lives: Women, Research, and Autobiography in Education, eleven women who are eminent educational researchers speak out intimately, and from these autobiographical accounts, readers experience how research that emerges from diverse women's lives shapes (and reshapes) educational knowledge and discourse. The book offers thoughtful insights into how the field of education might change as women assume positions of intellectual leadership. The distinguished list of contributors includes Kathryn H. Au, Concha Delgado-Gaitan, Maxine Greene, Patricia J. Gumport, Gloria Ladson-Billings, Ellen Condliffe Lagemann, Martha Montero-Sieburth, Anna Neumann, Nel Noddings, Penelope L. PEterson, and Linda f. Winfield. The book will be an important resource for graduate courses in foundations, teacher education, philosophy of education, women and education, research methods, sociology of education, and politics and education; general readers will find it fascinating reading as well. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Researching Lives: Women, Scholarship, and Autobiography in Education (Anna Neumann, and Penelope L. Peterson)
ch. 2 Exclusions and Awakenings (Maxine Greene)
ch. 3 Dismantling Borders (Concha Delgado-Gaitan)
ch. 4 For colored girls who have considered suicide when the academy's not enough: Reflections of an African American Woman Scholar (Gloria Ladson-Billings)
ch. 5 Schooling, Literacy, and Cultural Diversity in Research and Personal Experience (Kathryn H. Au)
ch. 6 Ways Without Words: Learning from Silence and Story in Post-Holocaust Lives (Anna Neumann)
ch. 7 The Weaving of Personal Origins and Research: Reencuentro y Reflexion en la Investigacion (Martha Montero-Sieburth)
ch. 8 A Subjective Necessity: Being and Becoming an Historian of Education (Ellen Confliffe Lagemann)
ch. 9 Accident, Awareness, and Actualization (Nel Noddings)
ch. 10 First Words. Still Words (Patrica J. Gumport)
ch. 11 Multiple Dimensions of Reality: Recollections of an African American Woman Scholar (Linda F. Winfield)
ch. 12 Learning Out of School and In: Self and Experience at Home, School, and Work (Penelope L. Peterson)
ch. 13 Learning from Research and Everyday Life (Anna Neumann, and Penelope L. Peterson)

About the Editors and the Contributors
Index
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Feminist Teaching in Theory and Practice: Situating Power & Knowledge in Poststructural Classrooms

Book
Ropers-Huilman, Becky
1998
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
HQ1426.R75 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Using a feminist poststructural focus, Ropers-Huilman (Louisiana State Univ.) investigates feminist teachers' positions and styles in order to examine the practices of a theory of teaching. She explores teachers' reflections on power and gender, how they operate in the classroom, and their experiences as innovators in feminist teaching. No one particular approach or process is emphasized. The application of theory to practice allows the 22 teachers who were interviewed to explore ...
Additional Info:
Using a feminist poststructural focus, Ropers-Huilman (Louisiana State Univ.) investigates feminist teachers' positions and styles in order to examine the practices of a theory of teaching. She explores teachers' reflections on power and gender, how they operate in the classroom, and their experiences as innovators in feminist teaching. No one particular approach or process is emphasized. The application of theory to practice allows the 22 teachers who were interviewed to explore and debate the interaction between students and teachers. The complexity of investigating feminist practices, rather than just the teachers themselves, allows a more flexible look at the issues and the social forces defining their interpretations. Ropers-Huilman explores factors contributing to the many forms of feminist teaching and how power affects and shapes the experience. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editor's Foreword
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
ch. 1 Puzzling My Way Toward/Through Feminist Teaching
Pt. I Engaging Change: Social Forces and Feminist Teaching Practice
ch. 2 Multiplicity in Action: Working Through Identities
ch. 3 Unsettling Roles: Teacher and Student Interactions
ch. 4 Mapping the Terrain: Institutional Barriers, Supports, and Strategies
Pt. II Engaging Power: Critical Tensions and Resistances
ch. 5 Powerful Places: (De)constructing Power and Resistance
ch. 6 Situated Texts: Negotiating Knowledge and Knowing
ch. 7 Classroom Ruptures: Politics of Difference
ch. 8 Powers of Language: Interrogating Silence and Speech
ch. 9 Intersections and Interruptions: Letting Loose with Disruption
Notes
References
Index
About the Author
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Multicultural Teaching in the University

Book
Schoem, David, Linda Frankel, Ximena Zuniga
1993
Praeger, Westport, CT
LC1099.3.M86 1993
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This important book includes more than twenty essays by faculty from different disciplines, each articulating the multiple dimensions and components of multicultural teaching. Teachers discuss their own teaching methods and classes in terms of course content, process and discourse, and diversity among faculty and students in the classroom. This volume integrates new scholarship that reflects a more expansive notion of knowledge, and suggests new ways to communicate with diverse populations ...
Additional Info:
This important book includes more than twenty essays by faculty from different disciplines, each articulating the multiple dimensions and components of multicultural teaching. Teachers discuss their own teaching methods and classes in terms of course content, process and discourse, and diversity among faculty and students in the classroom. This volume integrates new scholarship that reflects a more expansive notion of knowledge, and suggests new ways to communicate with diverse populations of students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

Part 1 The Meaning of Multicultural Teaching: An Introduction

Part 2 Courses on Intergroup Relations
ch. 1 Teaching About Ethnic Identity and Intergroup Relations
ch. 2 Continuing the Legacy: On the Importance of Praxis in the Education of Social Work Students and Teachers
ch. 3 Teaching With and About Conflict in the Classroom
ch. 4 Latinos in the United States: A Framework for Teaching
ch. 5 Reflections on the Teaching of Multicultural Courses

Part 3 Courses on Racism, Sexism, and Diversity
ch. 6 Anti-Racism and Multiculturalism in a Law School Class
ch. 7 Our Lives, Our Histories
ch. 8 "A Circle of Learners": Teaching About Gender, Race, and Class ch. 9 Multicultural Teaching in Public Health: A Course on Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Health
ch. 10 The Latina: A Teaching Experience
ch. 11 Lesbian Studies and Multicultural Teaching: A Challenge in Diversity
ch. 12 The 1988 Presidential Campaign and Multicultural Education

Part 4 General Courses Giving Attention to Diversity
ch. 13 Seeing the Whole of the Moon
ch. 14 How I Teach Mathematics to Minorities
ch. 15 Racial Bias in Science Education
ch. 16 Waking Up to the World: A Multicultural Approach to Writing
ch. 17 Should and Can a White, Heterosexual, Middle-Class Man Teach Students About Social Inequality and Oppression? One Person's Experience and Reflections
ch. 18 On Engaging Students in a Multicultural Course on a Global Scale: Risks, Costs, and Rewards
ch. 19 Social Psychology

Part 5 Teacher Training and Nonformal Education
ch. 20 Dialogue Groups: An Innovative Approach to Multicultural Learning
ch. 21 Combating Homophobia Through Education
ch. 22 FAIRteach: Faculty Development on Issues of Racism and Diversity
ch. 23 Constructing a Teaching Assistant Training Program with a Multicultural Emphasis

Part 6 Roundtable Discussion: The Insiders' Critique of Multicultural Teaching

Part 7 Questions and Responses on Multicultural Teaching and Conflict in the Classroom

Part 8 Classroom and Workshop Exercises

Selected Bibliography
Index
About the Contributors
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Teaching the Bible: The Discourses and Politics of Biblical Pedagogy

Book
Segovia, Fernando F. and Mary Ann Tolbert, eds.
1998
Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY
BS600.2.T44 1998
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
This volume gathers together papers from a broad variety of voices in biblical criticism and theological studies. The papers are divided into four major sections in keeping with their major concerns and aims: Biblical interpretation and theological education, social location and Biblical pedagogy in the US, social location and Biblical pedagogy in global perspective, and Biblical interpretation. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This volume gathers together papers from a broad variety of voices in biblical criticism and theological studies. The papers are divided into four major sections in keeping with their major concerns and aims: Biblical interpretation and theological education, social location and Biblical pedagogy in the US, social location and Biblical pedagogy in global perspective, and Biblical interpretation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Pedagogical Discourse and Practices in Contemporary Biblical Criticism

Part I Biblical Interpretation and Theological Education
ch. 1 Theological Education in a New Context: Reflections from the Perspective of Brazilian Theology (Paulo Fernando Carneiro de Andrade)
ch. 2 Constructive Theology and Biblical Worlds (Peter Hodgson)
ch. 3 Globalization in Theological Education (Joseph C. Hough, Jr.)
ch. 4 Jesus/the Native: Biblical Studies from a Postcolonial Perspective (Kwok Pui-lan)
ch. 5 Four Faces of Theology: Four Johannine Conversations (Jean-Pierre Ruiz)

Part II Social Location and Biblical Pedagogy in the United States
ch. 6 Crossing the Line: Three Scenes of Divine-Human Engagement in the Hebrew Bible (Francisco Garcia-Treto)
ch. 7 Reading from an Indigenous Place (Mark Lewis Taylor)
ch. 8 Pedagogical Discourse and Practices in Cultural Studies: Toward a Contextual Biblical Pedagogy (Fernando F. Segovia)
ch. 9 A New Teaching with Authority: A Re-evaluation of the Authority of the Bible (Mary Ann Tolbert)
ch. 10 A Meeting of Worlds: African Americans and the Bible (Vincent L. Wimbush)

Part III Social Location and Biblical Pedagogy in Global Perspective
ch. 11 A Reading of the Story of the Tower of Babel from the Perspective of Non-Identity: Gen 11:1-9 in the Context of Its Production (J. Severino Croatto)
ch. 12 "Go Therefore and Make Disciples of All Nations" (Matt 28:19a): A Postcolonial Perspective on Biblical Criticism and Pedagogy (Musa W. Duba)
ch. 13 Cross-Textual Interpretation and Its Implications for Biblical Studies (Archie C. C. Lee)
ch. 14 Biblical Exegesis and Its Shortcomings in Theological Education (Temba L. J. Mafico)
ch. 15 The Hermeneutics of Liberation: Theoretical Grounding for the Communitarian Reading of the Bible (Pablo Richard)
ch. 16 Biblical Studies in India: From Imperialistic Scholarship to Postcolonial Interpretation (R.S. Sugirtharajah)

Part IV Biblical Interpretation: Pedagogical Practices
ch. 17 A Rhetorical Paradigm for Pedagogy (Rebecca S. Chopp)
ch. 18 Reading the Bible in the Global Context: Issues in Methodology and Pedagogy (Denise Dombkowski Hopkins, Sharon H. Ringe, and Frederick C. Tiffany)
ch. 19 Crossing Borders: Biblical Studies in a Trans-Cultural World (Kathleen M. O'Connor)
ch. 20 Weaving a New Web of Creative Remembering (Elaine M. Wainwright)
ch. 21 Lessons for North America from a Third-World Seminary (Antoinette Clark Wire)

Contributors
Index
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The Education Feminism Reader

Book
Stone, Lynda, ed.
1994
Routledge, New York, NY
LC197.E37 1994
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
The Education Feminism Reader is an anthology of the most important and influential essays written in feminist education theory since the late seventies. Attentive to the quality and diversity of this growing field, The Reader presents the thinking of traditionally liberal feminists, radical postmodern theorists, women of color and those feminists with psychological, philosophical and political agendas.

Contributors: Maxine Greene, Carol Gilligan, Bonnie Thornton Dill, Valerie Walkerdine, Linda ...
Additional Info:
The Education Feminism Reader is an anthology of the most important and influential essays written in feminist education theory since the late seventies. Attentive to the quality and diversity of this growing field, The Reader presents the thinking of traditionally liberal feminists, radical postmodern theorists, women of color and those feminists with psychological, philosophical and political agendas.

Contributors: Maxine Greene, Carol Gilligan, Bonnie Thornton Dill, Valerie Walkerdine, Linda J. Nicholson, Madeleine Arnot, Jane Roland Martin, Barbara Houston, Ruth E. Zambrana, Madeleine Gramet, Nel Noddings, Patricia J. Thompson, Nona Lyons, Lynda Stone, Barbara McKellar, Patti Lather, Jo Anne Pagano, Sue Middleton, Elizabeth Ellsworth, Dianne Smith, Joyce E. King, Deanne Bogdan. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Notes to the Text
Introducing Education Feminism
ch. 1 The Lived World (1978) (Maxine Greene)
ch. 2 Woman's Place in Man's Life Cycle (1979) (Carol Gilligan)
ch. 3 Race, Class, and Gender: Prospects for an All-Inclusive Sisterhood (1983) (Bonnie Thornton Dill)
ch. 4 Femininity as Performance (1987) (Valerie Walkerdine)
ch. 5 Women and Schooling (1980) (Linda J. Nicholson)
ch. 6 Male Hegemony, Social Class, and Women's Education (1982) (Madeleine Arnot)
ch. 7 Excluding Women from the Educational Realm (1982) (Jane Roland Martin)
ch. 8 Should Public Education be Gender Free? (1985) (Barbara Houston)
ch. 9 Toward Understanding the Educational Trajectory and Socialization of Latina Women (1988) (Ruth E. Zambrana)
ch. 10 Conception, Contradiction, and Curriculum (1988) (Madeleine Gramet)
ch. 11 An Ethic of Caring and its Implications for Instructional Arrangements (1988) (Nel Noddings)
ch. 12 Beyond Gender: Equity Issues for Home Economics Education (1986) (Patricia J. Thompson)
ch. 13 Dilemmas of Knowing: Ethical and Epistemological Dimensions of Teachers' Work and Development (1990) (Nona Lyons)
ch. 14 Toward a Transformational Theory of Teaching (1988) (Lynda Stone)
ch. 15 Only the Fittest of the Fittest Will Survive: Black Women and Education (1989) (Barbara McKellar)
ch. 16 The Absent Presence: Patriarchy, Capitalism, and the Nature of Teacher Work (1987) (Pattie Lather)
ch. 17 Teaching Women (1988) (Jo Anne Pagano)
ch. 18 Schooling and Radicalisation: Life Histories of New Zealand Feminist Teachers (1987) (Sue Middleton)
ch. 19 Why Doesn't this Feel Empowering? Working Through the Repressive Myths of Critical Pedagogy (1989) (Elizabeth Ellsworth)
ch. 20 "Why Do We have to Read About Girls Living in Australia and London?": Reflections from a Womanist Theorist on Critical Education (1991) (Dianne Smith)
ch. 21 Dysconscious Racism: Ideology, Identity, and the Miseducation of Teachers (1991) (Joyce E. King)
ch. 22 When Is a Singing School (Not) a Chorus? The Emancipatory Agenda in Feminist Pedagogy and Literature Education (1993) (Deanne Bogdan)
Index
Contributors
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Women Teaching for Change: Gender, Class and Power

Book
Weiler, Kathleen
1988
Bergin & Garvey, Westport, CT
LB2837.W45 1988
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Applying theory to practice, Women Teaching for Change reveals the complexity of being a feminist teacher in a public school setting, in which the forces of sexism, racism, and classism, which so characterize society as a whole, are played out in multiracial, multicultural classrooms. "A fine book, a rich melding of critical theory in education, feminist literature, and pedagogical experience and expertise." Maxine Green, Columbia University. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Applying theory to practice, Women Teaching for Change reveals the complexity of being a feminist teacher in a public school setting, in which the forces of sexism, racism, and classism, which so characterize society as a whole, are played out in multiracial, multicultural classrooms. "A fine book, a rich melding of critical theory in education, feminist literature, and pedagogical experience and expertise." Maxine Green, Columbia University. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction by Henry A. Giroux and Paulo Freire
Critical Educational Theory
Feminist Analyses of Gender and Schooling
Feminist Methodology
The Dialects of Gender in the Lives of Feminist Teachers
The Struggle for a Critical Literacy
Gender, Race and Class in the Feminist Classroom
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
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Gendered Subjects: The Dynamics of Feminist Teaching

Book
Cully, Margo and Catherine Portuges
1985
Routledge, Boston, MA
LC1756.G46 1985
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Two decades after the first Women's Studies courses appeared on campuses in the US, feminist research and teaching are now thriving around the world. The editors of this book provide a rich sample of theoretical and practical reflections on classroom experience by teachers of Women's Studies over the past ten years, raising provocative questions which apply broadly to many areas of progressive teaching. The collection features new, unpublished and original ...
Additional Info:
Two decades after the first Women's Studies courses appeared on campuses in the US, feminist research and teaching are now thriving around the world. The editors of this book provide a rich sample of theoretical and practical reflections on classroom experience by teachers of Women's Studies over the past ten years, raising provocative questions which apply broadly to many areas of progressive teaching. The collection features new, unpublished and original work as well as a selection of the best articles to have appeared in recent years. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Part one - Frameworks and definitions
ch. 1 The politics of nurturance
ch. 2 Taking women students seriously
ch. 3 Classroom pedagogy and the new scholarship on women
ch. 4 Women's studies - a knowledge of one's own
ch. 5 The educational process of Women's Studies in Argentina - reflections on theory and technique
Part two - Transforming the disciplines
ch. 6 Feminist pedagogy as subversive activity
ch. 7 Teaching mediation - a feminist perspective on the study of law
ch. 8 Staging the feminist classroom - a theoretical model
Part three - Teaching as other
ch. 9 Pink elephants - confessions of a black feminist in an all white, mostly male English department...
ch. 10 Is there room for me in the closet, or my life as the only lesbian professor
ch. 11 A male feminist in a women's college classroom
Part four - Experience as text
ch. 12 Breaking silences - life in the feminist classroom
ch. 13 Black-eyed blues connections - teaching black women
Part five - Theory as text
ch. 14 Suspicious pleasures - on teaching feminist theory
ch. 15 The spectacle of gender - cinema and psyche
ch. 16 Mastery, identity and the politics of work - a feminist teacher in the graduate classroom
Part six - Authority and affect
ch. 17 Authority in the feminist classroom - a contradiction in terms?
ch. 18 Anger and authority in the introductory Women's Studies classroom
Part seven - Communication across differences
ch. 19 How racial differences helped us discover our common ground
ch. 20 Toward a pedagogy of Everywoman's Studies
ch. 21 Combating the marginalization of black women in the classroom
ch. 22 Teaching the feminist minority
Pedagogy of the oppressors?
Bibliography
Index
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The Feminist Classroom

Book
Teteault, Mary Katheryn and Frances A. Maher
1994
Basic Books, New York, NY
LC197.M35 1994
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This book provides an intimate view of how feminist teachers are revolutionizing higher education. Drawing on in-depth interviews and on-site observations, and using the actual words of students and teachers, the authors take the reader into the classrooms of seventeen feminist college professors at six colleges and universities - Lewis and Clark College, Wheaton College, the University of Arizona, Towson State University, Spelman College, and San Francisco State University. As ...
Additional Info:
This book provides an intimate view of how feminist teachers are revolutionizing higher education. Drawing on in-depth interviews and on-site observations, and using the actual words of students and teachers, the authors take the reader into the classrooms of seventeen feminist college professors at six colleges and universities - Lewis and Clark College, Wheaton College, the University of Arizona, Towson State University, Spelman College, and San Francisco State University. As these teachers integrate feminist and multicultural content into the curriculum, they demonstrate that pedagogy concerns not only "teaching techniques" but the whole process of the construction of knowledge in classrooms. Learning derives from relationships and interactions among teachers, students, and subject materials, not from any single perspective. In showing how the integration of feminist and multicultural content revitalizes the classroom, the book portrays innovative teaching in action. Feminist and cultural studies scholars have demonstrated that American higher education has traditionally represented the world in terms of the perspectives and achievements of a dominant minority. To educate students for a complex multicultural World, the voices of those who have been excluded need to emerge. There is widespread concern today about the quality of teaching in our colleges, particularly the predominance of lecturing and passive modes of learning. This important book presents a vision of teaching that counteracts the silence and alienation these practices engender. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
ch. 1 Breaking Through Illusion
ch. 2 Creating a Kaleidoscope: Portraits of Six Institutions
ch. 3 Mastery
ch. 4 Voice
ch. 5 Authority
ch. 6 Positionality
ch. 7 Toward Positional Pedagogies
ch. 8 Looking Back, Looking Forward
Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Multicultural Education, Critical Pedagogy and the Politics of Difference

Book
Sleeter, Christine and Peter L. McLaren, eds.
1995
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LC1099.3.M16 1995
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Here is a comprehensive view of leading theories and practices of multicultural education from scholars of various racial and ethnic groups. The perspectives of those often left out of scholarly debate are well represented in this book. Those perspectives offer significant insights into the ways in which dominant ideologies and classroom practices have functioned to serve only one segment of the American population. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Here is a comprehensive view of leading theories and practices of multicultural education from scholars of various racial and ethnic groups. The perspectives of those often left out of scholarly debate are well represented in this book. Those perspectives offer significant insights into the ways in which dominant ideologies and classroom practices have functioned to serve only one segment of the American population. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction: Exploring Connections to Build a Critical Multiculturalism
ch. 1 White Terror and Oppositional Agency: Towards a Critical Multiculturalism (Peter L. McLaren)
ch. 2 Literacy for Stupidification: The Pedagogy of the Big Lies (Donaldo Macedo)
ch. 3 White Culture and the Politics of Racial Difference: Implications for Multiculturalism (Stephen Haymes)
ch. 4 Critical Multiculturalism and Democratic Schooling: An Interview with Peter L. McLaren and Joe Kincheloe (Shirley R. Steinberg)
ch. 5 Mirror Images on Common Issues: Parallels between Multicultural Education and Critical Pedagogy (Geneva Gay)
ch. 6 From Brown Heroes and Holidays to Assimilationist Agendas: Reconsidering the Critiques of Multicultural Education (Sonia Nieto)
ch. 7 Multicultural, Critical, Feminine, and Constructive Pedagogies Seen through the Lives of Youth: A Call for the Revisioning of These and Beyond: Toward a Pedagogy for the Next Century (John Rivera and Mary Poplin)
ch. 8 The Problem with Origins: Race and the Contrapuntal Nature of the Educational Experience (Cameron McCarthy)
ch. 9 Postmodernism, the "Politically Correct," and Liberatory Pedagogy (Carl Allsup)
ch. 10 Culture as an Ongoing Dialog: Implications for Multicultural Teacher Education (Carmen Montecinos)
ch. 11 Whose Voice Is It Anyway?: Vocalizing Multicultural Analysis (Mary Ritchie)
ch. 12 Buscando America: The Contributions of Critical Latino Educators to the Academic Development and Empowerment of Latino Students in the U.S. (Antonio Darder)
ch. 13 An African-centered Pedagogy in Dialog with Liberatory Multiculturalism (Khaula Murtadha)
ch. 14 Multicultural Education beyond the Classroom (Evelyn Newman Phillips)
ch. 15 Cultural Diversity in Higher Education: An American Indian Perspective (Janine Pease-Windy Boy)
ch. 16 Reflections on My Use of Multicultural and Critical Pedagogy When Students Are White (Christine Sleeter)
Afterword
Notes on Contributors
Index
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Transforming Knowledge

Book
Minnich, Elizabeth Kamarck
1990
Temple University Press, Philadelphia, PA
BC177.M55 1990
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Transforming Knowledge suggests that education can serve neither the quest for knowledge nor the promise of a genuinely democratic system until some very basic intellectual errors are uncovered and corrected. Examining the heritage of a tradition created primarily by white Euro-American men who considered themselves the norm and the ideal for all humankind, Elizabeth Kamarck Minnich identifies these errors, characterizes them, and demonstrates how they work to distort and limit ...
Additional Info:
Transforming Knowledge suggests that education can serve neither the quest for knowledge nor the promise of a genuinely democratic system until some very basic intellectual errors are uncovered and corrected. Examining the heritage of a tradition created primarily by white Euro-American men who considered themselves the norm and the ideal for all humankind, Elizabeth Kamarck Minnich identifies these errors, characterizes them, and demonstrates how they work to distort and limit our knowledge. She cites work primarily by feminist scholars and activists, but also from ethnic, peace, and ecological studies, and argues that a reorientation of education and thus thinking and thus knowledge makes sense.

This book is the result of more than twenty years of work in higher education during which the author talked with thousands of faculty members, administrators, students, and community people about the necessity to transform the curriculum in this country. Drawing also on her years of work with Hannah Arendt and on Dewey, Kant, Plato, and Socrates, Minnich confronts the "dominant meaning system" that perpetuates errors in thinking, particularly faulty generalization and universalization, circular reasoning, mystified concepts, and partial knowledge.

In light of the heated debate in which such critics as William Bennett and Allen Bloom charge that a return to "the classics" is the only acceptable route for education, Transforming Knowledge offers a philosophical analysis of the cultural, intellectual, political tradition behind our curriculum. Minnich warns that it is in and through education that a culture, and polity, not only tries to perpetuate but enacts the kinds of thinking it welcomes, and discards and/or discredits the kinds it fears. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction : still transforming knowledge
Still transforming knowledge : circling out, pressing deeper
ch. 1 No one beginning
ch. 2 Contextual approaches : thinking about
ch. 3 Conceptual approaches : thinking through
ch. 4 Errors basic to dominant tradition
ch. 5 Circling back, keeping going
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"Dominance Concealed through Diversity: Implications of Inadequate Perspectives on Cultural Pluralism"

Article
Boyd, Dwight
1996
Harvard Educational Review 66, no. 3 (1996): 609-630
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
In this article, Dwight Boyd focuses on a dilemma that is at the heart of sincere commitments to cultural pluralism. When the moral aspects of cultural diversity are fully appreciated, the "dilemma of diversity" is revealed as the tension point resulting from the acceptance of the fact of "reasonable moral pluralism" conjoined with the perceived need to morally ground prescriptive intentions to promote cultural diversity within a democratic society. After ...
Additional Info:
In this article, Dwight Boyd focuses on a dilemma that is at the heart of sincere commitments to cultural pluralism. When the moral aspects of cultural diversity are fully appreciated, the "dilemma of diversity" is revealed as the tension point resulting from the acceptance of the fact of "reasonable moral pluralism" conjoined with the perceived need to morally ground prescriptive intentions to promote cultural diversity within a democratic society. After discussing this dilemma, Boyd analyzes three perspectives commonly found in response. He argues that each of these perspectives is inadequate by revealing how it fails to come to grips with one or the other side of the dilemma, despite its surface appeal. He then shows how, in each of these perspectives, this failure functions to conceal and protect dominant points of view within the diversity. He concludes by sketching out a positive direction for successfully addressing the dilemma of diversity hinted at in the successes and failures of each of the three perspectives.
Article cover image

"Academic Culture: The Hidden Curriculum"

Article
Adams, Maurianne
1991
Teaching Excellence 3, no. 6 (1991)
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Teaching Authority in Cultural Perspective"

Article
Foster, Charles R.
1992
Quarterly Review (Fall 1992): 27-38
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Ethnic Studies, Women's Studies, and Multiculturalism"

Article
Butler, Johnnella, and Betty Schmitz
1992
Change Jan/Feb (1992): 37-41
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
This article discusses the evolution and impact of ethnic and women's studies on college campuses, noting the existence of about 700 ethnic and 620 women's studies programs. It responds to common criticisms (e.g., such programs emphasize differences and thus foster divisiveness) and notes challenges, both personal and institutional, offered by these programs.
Additional Info:
This article discusses the evolution and impact of ethnic and women's studies on college campuses, noting the existence of about 700 ethnic and 620 women's studies programs. It responds to common criticisms (e.g., such programs emphasize differences and thus foster divisiveness) and notes challenges, both personal and institutional, offered by these programs.
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"Interactive Phases of Curricular and Personal Re-Vision with Regard to Race"

Article
McIntosh, Peggy
1990
Working Paper no. 219, Center for Research on Women, Wellesley College (1990)
Topics: Course Design   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Most white, middle-class citizens see society from a monocultural perspective, a perspective that assumes, often unconsciously, that persons of all races are in the same cultural system together. This single-system form of seeing the world, is blind to its own cultural specificity. People who see persons of other races monoculturally cannot imagine the reality that those "others" think of themselves not in relation to the majority race but in terms ...
Additional Info:
Most white, middle-class citizens see society from a monocultural perspective, a perspective that assumes, often unconsciously, that persons of all races are in the same cultural system together. This single-system form of seeing the world, is blind to its own cultural specificity. People who see persons of other races monoculturally cannot imagine the reality that those "others" think of themselves not in relation to the majority race but in terms of their own culturally specific identities. This paper presents an "interactive phase theory" with regard to race that is intended to reassess school curricula in terms of heightened levels of consciousness concerning race. In the context of U.S. history courses, five phases are presented: phase one: all-white history; phase two: exceptional minority individuals in U.S. history; phase three: minority issues, or minority groups as problems, anomalies, absences, or victims in U.S. history; phase four: the lives and cultures of people of color everywhere as history; and phase five: history redefined and reconstructed to include all people. (DB)
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"White Privilege and Male Privilege: A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences Through Work in Women's Studies"

Article
McIntosh, Peggy
1988
Working Paper No. 189, Center for Research on Women, Wellesley College (1988)
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
In much the same way that men are not taught to acknowledge all the ways they are privileged in society, whites are not taught to recognize how their status as white people confers on them many privileges. Arguing that male privilege and white privilege are interrelated, and that both types of privilege are unearned and unjustified, this paper begins by reviewing several layers of denial that men have about their ...
Additional Info:
In much the same way that men are not taught to acknowledge all the ways they are privileged in society, whites are not taught to recognize how their status as white people confers on them many privileges. Arguing that male privilege and white privilege are interrelated, and that both types of privilege are unearned and unjustified, this paper begins by reviewing several layers of denial that men have about their privilege and that work to protect, prevent awareness about, and entrench that privilege. The paper goes on to present parallels from one woman's personal experience, with the denials that veil the facts of white privilege. Forty-six ordinary and daily ways in which this one individual experiences having white privilege within her life situation and its particular social and political frameworks, are listed, and ways in which the list applies equally to heterosexual privilege are also pointed out. It is concluded that all the various interlocking oppressions take two forms: an active form which can be seen; and an embedded form which members of the dominant group are taught not to see. To redesign the social system therefore requires acknowledgement of its colossal unseen dimensions. (DB)
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"Feminist Pedagogy Theory: Reflections on Power and Authority"

Article
Luke, Carmen
1996
Educational Theory 46, no. 3 (1996): 283-302
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
Focuses on the tensions and contradictions within feminist pedagogy. Contradictory dimensions of feminists' locations in the academy; Power and authority; Pedagogy and performativity; Feminist difference and the politics of positionality; Claims of authority and the impossibility of normative judgments; Contradictions of institutional and pedagogical authority.
Additional Info:
Focuses on the tensions and contradictions within feminist pedagogy. Contradictory dimensions of feminists' locations in the academy; Power and authority; Pedagogy and performativity; Feminist difference and the politics of positionality; Claims of authority and the impossibility of normative judgments; Contradictions of institutional and pedagogical authority.
Article cover image

"Reshaping Religious and Theological Education in the 90's: Toward a Critical Pluralism"

Article
Johnson, Susanne
1993
Religious Education 88, no. 3 (1993): 335-349
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Religious Education

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Postmodernism: What One Needs to Know"

Article
Grassie, William
1997
Zygon 32, no. 1 (1997): 83-94
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
This essay is an introduction to postmodernism and deconstruction as they relate to the special challenges of scholarship and teaching in the science and religion multidiscipline.
Additional Info:
This essay is an introduction to postmodernism and deconstruction as they relate to the special challenges of scholarship and teaching in the science and religion multidiscipline.
Article cover image

"Greening the College Curriculum: Religion"

Article
Rockefeller, Steven C.
1996
in Greening the College Curriculum (Washington, DC : Island Press, 1996), 268-308
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Wabash tree

The Feminist Teacher Anthology: Pedagogies and Classroom Strategies

Book
Cohee, Gail E., Elisabeth Daumer, Theresa D. Kemp, Paula M. Krebs, Sue Lafky, and Sandra Runzo, eds.
1998
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC197.F478 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Learning Designs   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Each selected essay is introduced by its original author who updates the chapter topic. Drawing on examples from their own experiences, the authors provide practical classroom strategies such as readings and resources, writing assignments, classroom exercises, and guidance for using journals, multimedia workshops, and new technologies. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Each selected essay is introduced by its original author who updates the chapter topic. Drawing on examples from their own experiences, the authors provide practical classroom strategies such as readings and resources, writing assignments, classroom exercises, and guidance for using journals, multimedia workshops, and new technologies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Collectively Speaking

Part I - Encountering the Classroom: Developing Feminist Strategies
ch. 1 The Radicalization of a Teacher (Carla Golden)
ch. 2 My Introduction to "Introduction to Women's Studies:" The Role of the Teacher's Authority in the Feminist Classroom (Frances A. Maher)
ch. 3 Warming Up the Classroom Climate for Women (Sue V. Rosser)
ch. 4 Rewriting the Future: The Feminist Challenge to the Malestream Curriculum (Karen J. Warren)
ch. 5 Resistance to Generalizations in the Classroom (Susanne Bohmer)
ch. 6 The Power of No (Martha E. Thompson)
ch. 7 Reflections on Teaching: "Gender, Race, and Class" (Joy James)
ch. 8 Reshaping the Introductory Women's Studies Course: Dealing Up Front with Anger, Resistance, and Reality (Ardeth Deay, and Judith Stitzel)
ch. 9 Enhancing Feminist Pedagogy. Multimedia Workshops on Women's Experience with the Newspaper and Home (Berenice Fisher)
ch. 10 This Class Meets in Cyberspace: Women's Studies via Distance Education (Ellen Cronan Rose)

Part II - Bringing The World Into The Feminist Classroom
ch. 11 Integrating the Study of Race, Gender, and Class: Some Preliminary Observations (Paula Rothenberg)
ch. 12 Homophobia and Sexism as Popular Values (David Bleich)
ch. 13 Breaking the Silence: Sexual Preference in the Composition Classroom (Allison Berg, Jean Kowaleski, Caroline Le Guin, Ellen Weinauer, and Eric A. Wolfe)
ch. 14 A Discourse on the Care and Handling of Feminist Administrators (Lynette Carpenter)
ch. 15 The Hand and the Hammer: A Brief Critique of the Overhead Projector (Eloise Knowlton)
ch. 16 Lesbian Instructor Comes Out: The Personal Is Pedagogy (Janet Wright)
ch. 17 Would You Rather Be a Goddess or a Cyborg? (Suzanne K. Damarin)
ch. 18 Educating the Living, Remembering the Dead: The Montreal Massacre as Metaphor (Jennifer Scanlon)
ch. 19 Gender, Race, and Radicalism: Teaching the Autobiographies of Native and African American Women Activists (Joy James)

Index
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"New Faces, New Knowledge"

Article
Turner, Caroline Sotello Viernes
2000
Academe 86, no. 5 (2000): 34-37
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Explains that diversification of the faculty brings intellectual diversity in scholarship. Importance of ethnic diversity in colleges and universities to the viability of higher education in the United States (U.S.); Status of the recruitment and retention of faculty of color in the U.S.; Advantages of diverse faculty in the academic community; Effects of affirmative actions in higher education to colored people.
Additional Info:
Explains that diversification of the faculty brings intellectual diversity in scholarship. Importance of ethnic diversity in colleges and universities to the viability of higher education in the United States (U.S.); Status of the recruitment and retention of faculty of color in the U.S.; Advantages of diverse faculty in the academic community; Effects of affirmative actions in higher education to colored people.
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Knowledge, Difference, and Power: Essays Inspired by Women's Ways of Knowing

Book
Goldberger, Nancy, Jill Tarule, Blythe Clinchy, and Mary Belenky, eds.
1996
Basic Books, New York, NY
Not catalogued
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Ten years ago, Mary Belenky, Blythe Clinchy, Nancy Goldberger, and Jill Tarule wrote Women's Ways of Knowing, a book The New York Times Book Review called "a framework for future research on women, knowledge, and identity." In the decade that followed, their theory of women's psychology, development, and ways of knowing has been applied in several fields, from the social sciences to the humanities, women's studies, education, psychology, and law. ...
Additional Info:
Ten years ago, Mary Belenky, Blythe Clinchy, Nancy Goldberger, and Jill Tarule wrote Women's Ways of Knowing, a book The New York Times Book Review called "a framework for future research on women, knowledge, and identity." In the decade that followed, their theory of women's psychology, development, and ways of knowing has been applied in several fields, from the social sciences to the humanities, women's studies, education, psychology, and law. But even as it was embraced by readers, Women's Ways of Knowing also became the center of a fierce debate within academic circles. Now, in 14 illuminating new essays, the original authors and invited contributors explore how the theory introduced in Women's Ways of Knowing has developed and shifted over the years and how it has been received, applied, used, and abused. The authors, and others, respond to critics of the original theory. The essays also expand the original argument beyond gender and knowing to address the complicating factors of race, class, and culture. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: The Beginning of the Story: Collaboration and Separation
Introduction: Looking Backward, Looking Forward

ch. 1 Reconfiguring Teaching and Knowing in the College Classroom (Ann Stanton)
ch. 2 Women's Ways of "Knowing" Law: Feminist Legal Epistemology, Pedagogy, and Jurisprudence (Carrie Menkel-Meadow)
ch. 3 Embodying Knowledge, Knowing Desire: Authority and Split Subjectivities in Girls' Epistemological Development (Elizabeth Debold, Deborah Tolman, and Lyn Mikel Brown)
ch. 4 Connected Knowing in Constructive Psychotherapy (Michael J. Mahoney)
ch. 5 Women's Ways of Knowing in Women's Studies, Feminist Pedagogies, and Feminist Theory (A. Maher with Mary Kay Tetreault)
ch. 6 Unknown Women and Unknowing Research: Consequences of Color and Class in Feminist Psychology (Vanessa M. Bing and Paela Trotman Reid)
ch. 7 Connected and Separate Knowing: Toward a Marriage of Two Minds (Blythe McVicker Clinchy)
ch. 8 Reason's "Femininity": A Case for Connected Knowing (Sara Ruddick)
ch. 9 Voices in Dialogue: Collaborative Ways of Knowing (Jill Mattuck Tarule)
ch. 10 Speech Is Silver, Silence Is Gold: The Asymmetrical Intersubjectivity of Communicative Action (Patrocinio P. Schweickart)
ch. 11 Cultural Imperatives and Diversity in Ways of Knowing (Nancy Rule Goldberger)
ch. 12 Strategic Suspensions: Feminists of Color Theorize the Production of Knowledge (Ada Hurtado)
ch. 13 Public Homeplaces: Nurturing the Development of People, Families, and Communities (Mary Field Belenky)
ch. 14 Gendered Ways of Knowing and the "Epistemological Crisis" of the West (Sandra Harding)

Contributors
Index
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Wabash tree

The Practice of Change: Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Women's Studies

Book
Balliet, Barbara J. and Kerrissa Heffernan, eds.
2000
American Association for Higher Education, Washington, D.C.
LC220.5.P73 2000
Topics: Service Learning   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
This volume, seventh in the Service-Learning in the Disciplines Series, explores the important lessons women's history and women's studies hold for the broader service-learning community and the critical opportunity for women's studies to reconnect with its activist past. The book includes essays with real examples of service-learning projects in women's studies and lists an extensive bibliography of service-learning and women's studies sources. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This volume, seventh in the Service-Learning in the Disciplines Series, explores the important lessons women's history and women's studies hold for the broader service-learning community and the critical opportunity for women's studies to reconnect with its activist past. The book includes essays with real examples of service-learning projects in women's studies and lists an extensive bibliography of service-learning and women's studies sources. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part One: Theory and History
On Critical Thinking and Connected Knowing (Blythe McVicker Clinchy)
Educating the Artist: A Political Statement (S.A. Bachman, with D. Attyah)
A Feminist Challenge to Community Service: A Call to Politicize Service-Learning (Tobi Walker)
The History of Women and Service in the United States: A Rich and Complex Heritage (Helen Damon-Moore)
Service-Learning and Women's Studies: A Community College Perspective (Karen Bojar)

Part Two: Educating For Action
The "Different Voice" of Service (Catherine Ludlum Foos)
Learning Across Boundaries: Women' Studies, Praxis, and Community Service (Mary Trigg and Barbara J. Balliet)
Women's Studies and Community-Based Service-Learning: A Natural Affinity (Patricia A. Washington)
Educated in Agency: Student Reflections on the Feminist Service-Learning Classroom (Melissa Kesler Gilbert)
The Urban Educational Initiative: Supporting Educational Partnerships With Young, Urban Girls (Kimberly Farah and Kerrissa Heffernan)

Part Three: Narrating The Journey
Women, AIDS, and Social Justice: An Autobiography of Activism and Academia (Sally Zierler)
TCBY in Limón, Costa Rica: Women's Studies and the (Re)construction of Identity in International Service-Learning (Debra J. Liebowitz)
"Civic Character" Engaged: Adult Learners and Service-Learning (Eve Allegra Raimon and Jan L. Hitchcock)
Resolving a Conundrum: Incorporating Service-Learning Into a Women and the Law Course (Mary Pat Treuthart)

Bibliography
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching from a Multicultural Perspective

Book
Roberts, Helen, Juan C. Gonzales, Olita D. Harris, Delores J. Huff, Ann M. Johns, Ray Lou, Otis L. Scott
1994
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA
LC1099.3.T435 1994
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The authors of this volume, all experienced teachers and administrators, outline how to teach in a multicultural environment. They suggest classroom strategies, curriculum reforms and assessment tools that work for all students. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The authors of this volume, all experienced teachers and administrators, outline how to teach in a multicultural environment. They suggest classroom strategies, curriculum reforms and assessment tools that work for all students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Once You Accept, Then You Can Teach (Juan C. Gonzalez)
ch. 2 Diversity and Change on Campus (Helen R. Roberts)
ch. 3 Teaching All Students Equally (Ray Lou)
ch. 4 Including Multicultural Content and Perspectives in Your Courses (Otis Scott)
ch. 5 Languages and Cultures in the Classroom (Ann Johns)
ch. 6 Equity in Classroom Assessment (Olita Harris)
ch. 7 On Becoming a Mensch or a Mentor (Delores Huff)

Appendix: A Student Profile Questionnaire
About the Authors
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"Pedagogical Expectations of Hispanic Americans: Insights for Leadership Training"

Article
Wilson, Norman G.
1997
Christian Education Journal 1NS, no. 1 (1997): 65-81
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
A review of the literature on learning and teaching styles, with a primary focus on what constitutes valid learning experiences (pedagogical expectations) among Hispanic-American populations. Implications and recommendations are suggested for the creation of Hispanic-American learning experiences and leadership training.
Additional Info:
A review of the literature on learning and teaching styles, with a primary focus on what constitutes valid learning experiences (pedagogical expectations) among Hispanic-American populations. Implications and recommendations are suggested for the creation of Hispanic-American learning experiences and leadership training.
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"Multicultural Education: Historical Development, Dimensions, and Practice"

Article
Banks, James A.
1995
in Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education (New York: Macmillan, 1995), 3-24
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Although there are many different approaches, statements of aims, and definitions of multicultural education, an examination of literature by specialists in the field indicates that there is a high level of consensus about its aims and goals. A major goal, as recognized by specialists in the field, is the reform of schools and other educational institutions so that students from diverse racial, ethnic, and social-class groups can experience equality. The ...
Additional Info:
Although there are many different approaches, statements of aims, and definitions of multicultural education, an examination of literature by specialists in the field indicates that there is a high level of consensus about its aims and goals. A major goal, as recognized by specialists in the field, is the reform of schools and other educational institutions so that students from diverse racial, ethnic, and social-class groups can experience equality. The current debate about the extent to which the histories and cultures of women and people of color should be incorporated into the study of Western civilization has complicated the search for clear disciplinary boundaries within the field. A look at the history of the multicultural education movement and the construction of knowledge about multicultural education reveals insights into the problems and promises of multicultural education today. The most important implication of a review of multicultural education research today is that it must be conceptualized and viewed broadly if it is to bring about meaningful change in education.
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"African-American Cultural Knowledge and Liberatory Education: Dilemmas, Problems, and Potentials in a Postmodern American Society"

Article
Gordon, Beverly M.
1993
Urban Education 27, no. 4 (1993): 448-470
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
Argues that African Americans, other people of color, and those committed to democracy must counter Anglohegemony by using liberatory and emancipatory pedagogy in learning institutions. Examples of interpretive lenses of "the other" are given, and implications of using these lenses are examined. The importance of educational research is discussed.
Additional Info:
Argues that African Americans, other people of color, and those committed to democracy must counter Anglohegemony by using liberatory and emancipatory pedagogy in learning institutions. Examples of interpretive lenses of "the other" are given, and implications of using these lenses are examined. The importance of educational research is discussed.
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"The Canon Debate, Knowledge Construction, and Multicultural Education"

Article
Banks, James A.
1993
Educational Researcher 22, no. 5 (1993): 4-14
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Reviews the debate over multicultural education, and illustrates the roots of the debate between multiculturalists and Western traditionalists. A typology of knowledge is presented; and it is argued that each type should be part of curriculum at elementary school, secondary school, and higher levels.
Additional Info:
Reviews the debate over multicultural education, and illustrates the roots of the debate between multiculturalists and Western traditionalists. A typology of knowledge is presented; and it is argued that each type should be part of curriculum at elementary school, secondary school, and higher levels.
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"The Historical Reconstruction of Knowledge about Race: Implications for Transformative Teaching"

Article
Banks, James A.
1995
Educational Researcher 24, no. 2 (1995): 15-25
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Cognitive Development   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
A historical case study of the construction and reconstruction of race between the late 19th century and the 1940s is used to document the ways in which the social, cultural, political, and historical contexts in which knowers are embedded influence the knowledge they construct and reconstruct.
Additional Info:
A historical case study of the construction and reconstruction of race between the late 19th century and the 1940s is used to document the ways in which the social, cultural, political, and historical contexts in which knowers are embedded influence the knowledge they construct and reconstruct.
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Transforming the Curriculum for Multicultural Understandings: A Practitioner's Handbook

Book
Boyer, James B. and H. Prentice Baptiste, Jr.
1996
Caddo Gap Press, San Francisco, CA
LC1099.3.B48 1996
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This book's basic premise is that present demographics suggest concepts of inclusion and cultural reflection are essential to any academic endeavor. Teachers and future teachers need to be aware of the emergence of multicultural education and how that plays out in the classroom. The volume presents a historical overview of the concept and stresses the need for greater awareness. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book's basic premise is that present demographics suggest concepts of inclusion and cultural reflection are essential to any academic endeavor. Teachers and future teachers need to be aware of the emergence of multicultural education and how that plays out in the classroom. The volume presents a historical overview of the concept and stresses the need for greater awareness. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 "Rationale for a Multicultural Curriculum"
ch. 2 "Historical Look at the Emergence of Diversity"
ch. 3 "A Transformation of the Curriculum"
ch. 4 "Boyer's Stages of Ethnic Growth"
ch. 5 "Institutionalizing a Multicultural Curriculum"
ch. 6 "Baptiste's Typology of Multiculturalism"
ch. 7 "Moving the Environment toward Multiculturalism"
ch. 8 "Cross-Racial, Cross-Ethnic Teaching and Learning"
ch. 9 "Critical Issues for Practitioners"
ch. 10 "Relationships of Poverty and Learning"
ch. 11 "Instruction with a Multicultural Philosophy"
ch. 12 "Diversity Issues in Educational Research"
ch. 13 "Questions about Multicultural Education."

app.1 "The King Holiday"
app.2 "Administrator's Checklist"
app.3 "Boyer's Elementary-Secondary Inventory"
app.4 "Basic Administrative Competencies"

Bibliography
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"Beyond Politics: The Educational Issues Inherent in Multicultural Education"

Article
Gaff, Jerry G.
1992
Change, Jan/Feb (1992): 31-35
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Discusses the educational issues inherent in multicultural education and how students should learn about diverse cultures. Designing and implementing programs that are educationally valuable; Philosophical issues; Curricular issues; Faculty issues; Pedagogy; The process.
Additional Info:
Discusses the educational issues inherent in multicultural education and how students should learn about diverse cultures. Designing and implementing programs that are educationally valuable; Philosophical issues; Curricular issues; Faculty issues; Pedagogy; The process.
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"The Campaign Against Political Correctness: What's Really at Stake?"

Article
Scott, Joan Wallach
1991
Change Nov/Dec (1991): 30-43
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Examines the defense of orthodoxy and the campaign against political correctness on university campuses in the United States. Dangers of a conservative agenda; Analysis of paranoia, fetishism, and impostors among leaders attacking political correctness; Anti-intellectualism in U.S. life; Discrediting of critical efforts by conservatives; Role of diversity of students on college campuses in conflict; Individualism and political correctness; Change in idea of community.
Additional Info:
Examines the defense of orthodoxy and the campaign against political correctness on university campuses in the United States. Dangers of a conservative agenda; Analysis of paranoia, fetishism, and impostors among leaders attacking political correctness; Anti-intellectualism in U.S. life; Discrediting of critical efforts by conservatives; Role of diversity of students on college campuses in conflict; Individualism and political correctness; Change in idea of community.
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"Kitchen Table Banter as Engaged Pedagogy"

Article
Westfield, N. Lynne
2001
Religious Education 96, no. 3 (2001): 423-429
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"The Struggle to Define and Reinvent Whiteness: A Pedagogical Analysis"

Article
Kincheloe, Joe L.
1999
College Literature 26, no. 3 (1999): 162-195
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Theological Literacy for the Twenty-First Century

Book
Petersen, Rodney L. and Nancy M. Rourke, eds.
2002
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
BV4022.T47 2002
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
What constitutes theological literacy in the new millennium? Scholars such as Elisabeth Schssler Fiorenza and David Tracy discuss this weighty question in Theological Literacy for the Twenty-First Century, a heavy but thoughtful collection of essays. The book's most helpful aspect is its diversity of Christian traditions: there are discussions of evangelical, Orthodox, Catholic and mainline Protestant views here, and contributors also weigh in about Hispanic, African-American and feminist hermeneutics. The ...
Additional Info:
What constitutes theological literacy in the new millennium? Scholars such as Elisabeth Schssler Fiorenza and David Tracy discuss this weighty question in Theological Literacy for the Twenty-First Century, a heavy but thoughtful collection of essays. The book's most helpful aspect is its diversity of Christian traditions: there are discussions of evangelical, Orthodox, Catholic and mainline Protestant views here, and contributors also weigh in about Hispanic, African-American and feminist hermeneutics. The essayists' understanding of what is required for theological literacy may be a bit inflated (how many people in the pews spout five-gallon words such as "postcoloniality" or "grandiloquent"?), but academics will appreciate the collection's depth and currency. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword (Rodney L. Petersen)

Pt. I Theology: What is the Real Thing?
ch. 1 On Theological Education: A Reflection (David Tracy)
ch. 2 Theology and Theologians: An Orthodox Perspective (Alkiviadis C. Calivas)
ch. 3 On the Complexity of Theological Literacy (Roberty Cummings Neville)
ch. 4 Renewing Ways of Life: The Shape of Theological Education (S. Mark Heim)
ch. 5 Identity, Formation, Dignity: The Impacts of Artificial Intelligence upon Jewish and Christian Understandings of Personhood (Anne Foerst and Rodney L. Petersen)

Pt. II Theology and Institutional Expression
ch. 6 Where Catholicism Has Been, and Where It Is Going (Raymond G. Helmick)
ch. 7 The Theological Is Also Personal: The "Place" of Evangelical Protestant Women in the Church (Alice Mathews)
ch. 8 Public Works: Bridging the Gap between Theology and Public Ethics (William Johnson Everett)
ch. 9 Christian Scholarship and the Demographic Transformation of the Church (Andrew F. Walls)

Pt. III Hermeneutics: How We Understand and Interpret the Bible
ch. 10 Theological Literacy for the Twenty-first Century (Walter C. Kaiser, Jr.)
ch. 11 The Ethos of Interpretation: Biblical Studies in a Postmodern and Postcolonial Context (Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza)
ch. 12 Living in the Hyphen: Theological Literacy from an Hispanic American Perspective (Alvin Padilla)
ch. 13 Reading the World Religiously: Literate Christianity in a World of Many Religions (Francis X. Clooney)

Pt. IV The Rhetoric of Theology
ch. 14 Healing Traumatic Memories: A Spiritual Journey (Ruth H. Bersin)
ch. 15 A Prophetic Religious Education for Y2K and Beyond: And Black Boys Shall See Visions (Fred Smith)
ch. 16 Theological Literacy and Fluency in a New Millennium: A Pastoral Theological Perspective (Carrie Doehring)
ch. 17 Theological Literacy: Some Catholic Reflections (Brian O. McDermott)
ch. 18 Theological Literacy: Problem and Promise (Wesley J. Wildman)
ch. 19 Wisdom for Life: The Horizon of Theological Literacy (Thomas Groome)

Pt. V Theological Literacy in Seminary and University
ch. 20 Theological Education as Formation for Ministry (John E. MacInnis)
ch. 21 The Classic Idea of the University: Its Relevance in the Twenty-first Century (Jan Milic Lochman)

Contributors
Index of Names and Subjects
Index of Scripture References
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Gender and Teaching

Book
Maher, Frances A. and Janie Victoria Ward
2002
Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ
LC212.92.M34 2001
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Gender and Teaching provides a vivid, focused, and interactive overview of the important gender issues in education today. This is accomplished through conversations among experts, practitioners, and readers that are informed by representative case studies and by a range of theoretical approaches to the issues. Gender and Teaching is the third volume in the "Reflective Teaching and the Social Conditions of Schooling" series edited by Daniel P. Liston and Kenneth ...
Additional Info:
Gender and Teaching provides a vivid, focused, and interactive overview of the important gender issues in education today. This is accomplished through conversations among experts, practitioners, and readers that are informed by representative case studies and by a range of theoretical approaches to the issues. Gender and Teaching is the third volume in the "Reflective Teaching and the Social Conditions of Schooling" series edited by Daniel P. Liston and Kenneth M. Zeichner. It follows the same format as previous volumes in the series.
Part I includes four cases dealing with related aspects of gendered experiences in schools (nonsexist elementary school curricula, gender and race implications of special education assignment practices, homophobia in high schools and classrooms, and teaching as a woman's profession), followed by a set of teachers', administrators', and professors' reactions to each case.
Part II is an elaboration of four "public arguments"--conservative, liberal, women-centered, and radical multicultural--pertaining to the issues raised in the cases in Part I. These arguments exemplify clusters of orientations, organized around general values rather than hard and fast principles.
Part III presents the authors' own interpretations of the issues raised throughout the work and provides activities and topics for reflection and an annotated bibliography of additional resources.
Content and Pedagogical Features:
*Readers are encouraged throughout to interact with the text. They can respond to each case and compare their responses to those of others in the field.
*The cases and discussions that follow help students begin to evolve their own "practical theories"; explore and perhaps modify some of their basic beliefs and assumptions; become acquainted with other points of view; and look further into the connections and intersections of gender with other structural dynamics and practices--those of race, class, and culture--as intrinsic to their explorations into the social conditions of schooling.
*The major strands in feminist theory about women and education are presented so that students can analyze the differences among them, come up with positions of their own, and learn to defend them.
*Although the authors draw on historical and sociological frameworks that show how women have historically been discriminated against in our schools and in our society, their goal is an education that is equally fair to everyone, boys as well as girls.
Gender and Teaching is pertinent for all prospective and practicing teachers at any stage of their training. It can be used in any undergraduate or graduate course that addresses issues of gender and teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Preface
Preface
I Case Studies and Reactions
Case 1: "Sexism and the Classroom"
Case 2: "Gender, Race, and Teacher Expectations"
Case 3: "Who Gets Hurt?"
Case 4: "A Woman's Career?"
II Public Arguments
A "Conservative View": Upholding Traditional Values and High Standards
A "Liberal-Progressive View": Education for Equality and Democracy
A "Women-Centered View": Celebrating Difference
A "Radical-Multicultural View": Gender, Culture, and Societal Transformation
III Final Arguments, and Some Suggestions and Resources for Further Reflection
The Centrality of Gender for Reflective Teaching and Learning: Understanding the Interplay of Gender, Race, Class, and Culture in Educational Settings
Exercises for Further Reflection
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
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"Developing a Wisdom Community As a Feminist Hermeneutic: Pedagogy for a New Millennium"

Article
Pazdan, Mary Margaret
2000
Perspectives in Religious Studies 27, no. 4 (2000): 413-425
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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The Promise and Challenge of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Theological Education (pdf)

Journal Issue
2002
Theological Education 38, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.38no.2
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2002-theological-education-v38-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
ATS Work on Race and Ethnicity (Daniel Aleshire and Marsha Foster Boyd)
Diversity and Accreditation: A Measure of Quality (Michael Gilligan)
Diversity in Theological Education (Charles R. Foster)
Student Diversity and Theological Education (Barbara Mei Leung Lai, Ruth Vuong, and Francis Lonsway)
Reflections on Institutional Issues Related to Race and Ethnicity in ATS Schools (Julia M. Speller and Jack L. Seymour)
The Theological Education of U.S. Hispanics, Edwin I. Hernández (Kenneth G. Davis, and Catherine Wilson)
Theologies in Dialogue—Building Bridges (Anthony Pinn and Benjamin Valentin)

OPEN FORUM
Cultivating A Culture of the Call: A Model for Lay Theological Education (Susan Willhauck)
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Innovations in Interdisciplinary Teaching

Book
Haynes, Carolyn, ed.
2002
Oryx Press, Westport, CT
LB2361.I44 2002
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
According to this book, interdisciplinary pedagogy is not synonymous with a single process, set of skills, method, or technique. Instead, it is concerned primarily with fostering in students a sense of self-authorship and a notion of knowledge that they can use to respond to complex questions, issues, or problems. Most faculty members have disciplinary terminal degrees, little preparation for teaching, and previous experience learning and teaching solely in disciplinary classroom ...
Additional Info:
According to this book, interdisciplinary pedagogy is not synonymous with a single process, set of skills, method, or technique. Instead, it is concerned primarily with fostering in students a sense of self-authorship and a notion of knowledge that they can use to respond to complex questions, issues, or problems. Most faculty members have disciplinary terminal degrees, little preparation for teaching, and previous experience learning and teaching solely in disciplinary classroom settings. This collection is designed to assist both new and experienced faculty members who are teaching in interdisciplinary settings and who want to advance integrative learning with their students, as well as administrators who want to encourage integrative and interdisciplinary teaching in their institutions. The contributors offer many intriguing approaches for achieving the goals of interdisciplinary pedagogy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
About the Editor and Contributors
Introduction: Laying a Foundation for Interdisciplinary Teaching (Carolyn Haynes)

Part I Standard Approaches to Interdisciplinary Teaching
ch. 1 Interdisciplinary Curriculum Design and Instructional Innovation: Notes on the Social Science Program at San Francisco State University (Stanley Bailis)
ch. 2 Enhancing Interdisciplinarity Through Team Teaching (Jay Wentworth, and James R. Davis)
ch. 3 Writing in Interdisciplinary Courses: Coaching Integrative Thinking (Marcia Bundy Seabury)

Part II Innovative Approaches to Interdisciplinary Teaching
ch. 4 Teaching on the Edge: Interdisciplinary Teaching in Learning Communities (Valerie Bystrom)
ch. 5 "Good and Ill Together": Interdisciplinary Teaching with Technology (Robert M. Bender)
ch. 6 Interdisciplinarity, Diversity, and the Future of Liberal Education (Debra Humphreys)

Part III Applying One Disciplinary-Based Pedagogy to Interdisciplinary Teaching
ch. 7 Being There: Performance as Interdisciplinary Teaching Tool (Jeff Abell)
ch. 8 Margaret Sanger, Marie Curie, Maya Angelou, Marcel Duchamp, and Mary Belenky Teach a Women's Studies Course: A Discussion of Innovative Interdisciplinary Approaches to Feminist Pedagogy (Nancy M. Grace)
ch. 9 Transforming Undergraduate Science Through Interdisciplinary Inquiry (Christopher Myers and Carolyn Haynes)

Part IV Interdisciplinary Teaching in Different Settings or to Different Students
ch. 10 It Takes More Than a Passport: Interdisciplinarity in Study Abroad (George Klein)
ch. 11 Interdisciplinarity and the Adult/Lifelong Learning Connection: Lessons from the Classroom (Roslyn Abt Schindler)

Part V Support for Interdisciplinary Teaching
ch. 12 Academic Advising in Interdisciplinary Studies (Virginia N. Gordon)
ch. 13 Transforming Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning Through Assessment (Michael Field and Don Stowe)

Conclusion: Achieving Interdisciplinary Innovation: Leading and Learning in Community (Faith Gabelnick)
Index
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Preaching to Every Pew: Cross-Cultural Strategies

Book
Nieman, James R. and Rogers, Thomas G.
2001
Augsburg Fortress, Minneapolis, MN
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
The growing cultural diversity of American society is mirrored in the pews and parishes of mainline denominations and represents a dynamic challenge to the effective proclamation of the gospel on both Sunday mornings and in parish educational venues. When people from a wide variety of cultural backgrounds listen to the same sermon, it is more than likely that they will not "hear" the same message. Preaching to Every Pew, based ...
Additional Info:
The growing cultural diversity of American society is mirrored in the pews and parishes of mainline denominations and represents a dynamic challenge to the effective proclamation of the gospel on both Sunday mornings and in parish educational venues. When people from a wide variety of cultural backgrounds listen to the same sermon, it is more than likely that they will not "hear" the same message. Preaching to Every Pew, based on extensive field research, takes on the challenge of preaching in such a context.

The authors map an approach to culture from four significant perspectives: ethnicity, class, displacement, and religious beliefs. They describe the significant ways in which culture influences human beings, detail how cultural influences affect and complicate communication in general, and preaching in particular, and then recommend practical strategies for improving communication in culturally diverse settings. Valuable both as a seminary text and as a text to help practicing pastors "re-tool" for more effective proclamation of the gospel. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
ch. 1 And Who Is My Neighbor?
ch. 2 The Frame of Ethnicity
ch. 3 The Frame of Class
ch. 4 The Frame of Displacement
ch. 5 The Frame of Beliefs
ch. 6 Insights and a Final Voice
Suggested Readings
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"What is Feminist Pedagogy?"

Article
Shrewsbury, Carolyn M.
1993
Women's Studies Quarterly 15, no. 3/4 (1987): 6-14
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Diversity in Theological Education" (pdf)

Article
Foster, Charles, Julia M Speller and Jack Seymour
2002
Theological Education 38, no. 2: 15-37, 56-70
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Diversity—gender, class, racial, ethnic, theological, sexual orientation as well as personality, learning style, ability, and experience— exists as threat and promise, problem and possibility in theological education. The negotiations of administrators, faculty, students, and school constituencies that make up the dynamics of difference in theological education are particularly intense, and occasionally volatile, in decisions about who should teach, what should be taught, and how we should teach. Reflecting on ...
Additional Info:
Diversity—gender, class, racial, ethnic, theological, sexual orientation as well as personality, learning style, ability, and experience— exists as threat and promise, problem and possibility in theological education. The negotiations of administrators, faculty, students, and school constituencies that make up the dynamics of difference in theological education are particularly intense, and occasionally volatile, in decisions about who should teach, what should be taught, and how we should teach. Reflecting on my conscientization to these dynamics during my own career as theological educator and administrator, I argue that the interdependence of theological school pedagogies of formation and empowerment for ministry must be revisioned. This means, at least, expanding our assumptions about education and teaching by exploring pedagogical possibilities emerging from the embrace of differences among us and by viewing the community of teaching and learning as an ecology of language processes, cultural patterns, and world views. The essay concludes with three suggestions for altering pedagogical practices in the diverse theological education setting: the diversification of assessment patterns; the clear and expansive articulation of guidelines, criteria, and standards for learning; and the establishment of rules of discourse to ensure the participation of all.
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Interdisciplinary Studies Today

Book
Klein, Julie Thompson and William G. Doty, eds.
1994
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 58)
LB2361.5.I68 1994
Topics: Course Design   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning is a practical compendium of advice and information on the development, administration, and assessment of interdisciplinary studies programs and schools. A bibliographic orientation to hands-on access, including electronic retrieval of information, precedes chapters reviewing the design of interdisciplinary courses, and how the role of administrators in interdisciplinary programs can further institutitonal goals. The final chapter looks beyond the local campus to ...
Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning is a practical compendium of advice and information on the development, administration, and assessment of interdisciplinary studies programs and schools. A bibliographic orientation to hands-on access, including electronic retrieval of information, precedes chapters reviewing the design of interdisciplinary courses, and how the role of administrators in interdisciplinary programs can further institutitonal goals. The final chapter looks beyond the local campus to national and international support networks. The contributors, who share their extensive experience in the teaching and administration of interdisciplinary studies, provide many examples of good (and bad) praxis. This is the 58th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Finding Interdisciplinary Knowledge and Information (Julie Thompson Klein)
ch. 2 Designing Interdisciplinary Courses (William H. Newell)
ch. 3 The Administration and Governance of Interdisciplinary Programs (Beth A. Casey)
ch. 4 Assessing Interdisciplinary Learning (Michael Field, Russell Lee, Mary Lee Field)
ch. 5 Organizational Networking: Taking the Next Step (Nelson E. Bingham)

Index
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Teaching Cross-Culturally: An Incarnation Model for Learning and Teaching

Book
Lingenfelter, Judith E.
2003
Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI
LB45.L53 2003
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
How can Christian educators teach effectively in different cultures? Here are winning principles drawn from educational theory and personal experience. How can Christian educators teach effectively within a culture not their own? In what sense is teaching part of the Great Commission? These questions are being asked more and more often in our increasingly global community. In the opening chapter of Teaching Cross-Culturally, Judith Lingenfelter recounts two contrasting teaching experiences ...
Additional Info:
How can Christian educators teach effectively in different cultures? Here are winning principles drawn from educational theory and personal experience. How can Christian educators teach effectively within a culture not their own? In what sense is teaching part of the Great Commission? These questions are being asked more and more often in our increasingly global community. In the opening chapter of Teaching Cross-Culturally, Judith Lingenfelter recounts two contrasting teaching experiences she had early in her career.

First, she taught junior high students in a rough urban setting near Pittsburgh. Next, she taught elementary students at a school on the small island of Yap in the western Pacific. Both experiences, she discovered, were examples of cross-cultural teaching. Teaching Cross-Culturally is designed to complement Sherwood Lingenfelter's highly successful Ministering Cross-Culturally. It takes similar insights and applies them specifically to an educational setting. It also guides readers with little understanding of cross-cultural challenges in ministry and helps them see how cultural sensitivity and effective teaching are inseparably linked. Chapters include discussions about how to uncover cultural biases, how to address intelligence and learning styles, and teaching for biblical transformation. Teaching Cross-Culturally is ideal for the western-trained educator who plans to work in a non-western setting. Missionaries, "tentmakers, " and those who teach in an increasingly multicultural North America will find this book helpful. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Teaching Cross-Culturally
The Hidden Curriculum
Understanding Traditional Learning Strategies
Formal Schooling and Traditional Learning
Intelligence and Learning Styles
The Role of the Teacher
Teaching for Change
False Expectations
Learning to Teach Cross-Culturally
References
Index
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Beyond Affirmative Action: Reframing the Context of Higher Education

Book
Ibarra, Robert A.
2001
University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, WI
LC191.9.I23 2001
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
A century ago, universities were primarily in the business of molding upper-class young men for the professions. The world has changed, and universities have been forced to keep pace by experimenting with affirmative action, curriculum overhauls, part-time degree programs, and the like. But at the core of the modern university establishment is an ingrained academic culture that has operated in the same ways for centuries, contends Robert Ibarra, and in ...
Additional Info:
A century ago, universities were primarily in the business of molding upper-class young men for the professions. The world has changed, and universities have been forced to keep pace by experimenting with affirmative action, curriculum overhauls, part-time degree programs, and the like. But at the core of the modern university establishment is an ingrained academic culture that has operated in the same ways for centuries, contends Robert Ibarra, and in Beyond Affirmative Action, he calls for a complete paradigm shift.

Why does academic culture, he asks, emphasize individual achievement over teamwork? Why do so many exams test discrete bits of knowledge rather than understanding of the big picture? Why is tenure awarded for scholarly publications rather than for sharing knowledge in diverse ways with students and a wider community? Why do undergraduates drop out? And why do so many bright graduate students and junior faculty—including many minorities, women, and some majority males—become disenchanted with academia or fail to be accepted and rewarded by the tenured faculty?

Ibarra introduces a theory of "multicontextuality," which proposes that many people learn better when teachers emphasize whole systems of knowledge and that education can create its greatest successes by offering and accepting many approaches to teaching and learning. This revolutionary paradigm also addresses why current thinking about academic systems and organizational culture, affirmative action, and diversity must be revised. Ibarra bases his groundbreaking proposals upon his own synthesis of findings from anthropological, educational, and psychological studies of how people from variouscultures learn, as well as findings from extended interviews he conducted with Latinos and Latinas who pursued graduate degrees and then either became university faculty or chose other careers. From his perspectives as a practicing anthropologist, teacher, researcher, and administrator, Ibarra provides a blueprint for change that will interest:
* Administrators developing campus strategic plans
* Boards, commissions, and agencies making policy for educational institutions
* Students and faculty struggling to find ways that academia can serve multiple constituencies
* Academic and career advisors to students
* Researchers in cognitive psychology, sociology, anthropology, education, and ethnic studies
* Businesses rethinking their organizational cultures and strategies
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Tables
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Pt. I Reframing the Context of Higher Education
ch. 1 Critical Junctures for Change
ch. 2 The Latino Study: Reconceptualizing Culture and Changing the Dynamics of Ethnicity
ch. 3 Multicontextuality: A Hidden Dimension in Higher Education
Pt. II Latinas and Latinos in Graduate Education and Beyond
ch. 4 The Graduate School Experience: Ethnicity in Transformation
ch. 5 "They Really Forget Who They Are": Latinos and Academic Organizational Culture
ch. 6 Latinos and Latinas Encountering the Professoriate
Pt. III The Engagement of Cultural in Academia
ch. 7 Teaching, Testing, and Measuring Intelligence: Uncovering the Evidence That Cultural Context Is Important
ch. 8 Reframing the Cultural Context of the Academy: A New Infrastructure for Teaching, Learning, and Institutional Change
App. 1 Institutions Attended by Interviewees
App. 2 Graduate Enrollment, 1986-1996
App. 3 Latino Faculty Issues
Notes
References
Index
Article cover image

"Approaching Diversity: Some Classroom Strategies for Learning Communities"

Article
Koolsbergen, William
2013
Peer Review Vol. 4, No. 1, Summer/Fall
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Using the example of LaGuardia Community College in Long Island, New York, discusses how to use learning communities to promote inclusion and reflective examination on a range of diversity issues. Offers ground rules for class discussion of diversity and other classroom activities for fostering meaningful dialogue.
Additional Info:
Using the example of LaGuardia Community College in Long Island, New York, discusses how to use learning communities to promote inclusion and reflective examination on a range of diversity issues. Offers ground rules for class discussion of diversity and other classroom activities for fostering meaningful dialogue.
Article cover image

"Center to Margin: Dynamics in a Global Classroom"

Article
De Danaan, Llyn
1990
Women's Studies Quarterly 18, no. 1 & 2 (1990): 135-144
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Reading the Bible from the Margins

Book
De La Torre, Miguel A.
2002
Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY
BS476.D4 2002
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
This introduction to reading and understanding the Bible focuses on perspectives that are often ignored. Here, emphasis is placed on how issues involving race, class, and gender influence our understanding of the Bible. The author shows how "standard" readings of the Bible are not always acceptable to people or groups on the "margins." The poor and those who are targets of discrimination because of their ethnic group or gender may ...
Additional Info:
This introduction to reading and understanding the Bible focuses on perspectives that are often ignored. Here, emphasis is placed on how issues involving race, class, and gender influence our understanding of the Bible. The author shows how "standard" readings of the Bible are not always acceptable to people or groups on the "margins." The poor and those who are targets of discrimination because of their ethnic group or gender may have quite different insights and understandings of biblical texts that can be of value to all readers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction
Liberating the Bible
The Bible in the Real World
Reading through Others' Eyes
ch. 1 Learning to Read: The Importance of Words
Defining Terms
Imposing Twenty-First-Century Meanings on Ancient Texts
Defining Racism
The Factor of Language
A Han Reading
Multiple Consciousness
The Center-Margin Dichotomy
ch. 2 Reading the Bible from the Center
A Privileged Reading
A Biblical Paradigm for Justifying Privilege
Pitfalls in Raising Consciousness
Words of Concern
Searching for the Abundant Life
ch. 3 Unmasking the Biblical Justification of Racism and Classism
Justifying Racism
Beyond the Black-and-White Dichotomy
African Americans
Amerindians
Asians
Jews
Justifying Classism
Classism from the Margins
ch. 4 Unmasking the Biblical Justification of Sexism
Justifying Patriarchy
Sexism from the Margins
Feminism among Women of Color
Justifying Homophobia
Homophobia from the Margins
The Hermeneutical Circle
ch. 5 Who Do You Say I Am?
The Economically Marginalized Christ
A Hispanic Christ
An Amerindian Christ
An Asian American Christ
A Black Christ
A Female Christ
A Gay Christ
Perceiving the Character of Divinity
God Sides with Today's Crucified People
God Is Victorious
ch. 6 Jesus Saves
The Rich Young Ruler, the Sinning Tax Collector, and the Begging Blind Man
More Than Just Climbing Sycamore Trees
I Once Was Blind
Of Sheep and Goats
Communal Essence of Justice
Are You Saved?
ch. 7 Can't We All Just Get Along?
The Dysfunctional Family
Forgive and Forget?
Power to Direct the Discourse
Power to Name
Power Not to See a Need to Repent
Power to Become the "Real" Victim
Cheap Forgiveness
What the Center Can Learn about the Bible
Exodus: God the Liberator
Amos: God the Seeker of Justice
The Gospels: God the Doer
Acts and the Letters from Paul: God the Subverter
The Bible in the Twenty-First Century
Notes
Bibliography
General Index
Scripture Index
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A Many Colored Kingdom: Multicultural Dynamics for Spiritual Formation

Book
Conde-Frazier, Elizabeth, S. Steve Kang , Gary A. Parrett
2004
Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI
BV1471.3.C66 2004
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
A Many Colored Kingdom explores Christian formation and teaching in the church, with a particular focus on intercultural and interethnic relationships.

Well qualified to speak on issues of diversity, the authors describe relevant aspects of their own personal journeys, presented in compelling narrative form. They go on to identify key issues emerging from their Scripture studies and teaching experiences. A final chapter contains a conversation among the authors ...
Additional Info:
A Many Colored Kingdom explores Christian formation and teaching in the church, with a particular focus on intercultural and interethnic relationships.

Well qualified to speak on issues of diversity, the authors describe relevant aspects of their own personal journeys, presented in compelling narrative form. They go on to identify key issues emerging from their Scripture studies and teaching experiences. A final chapter contains a conversation among the authors as they respond to one another's insights and concerns.

This book will be required reading for those engaged in as well as those preparing for a life of teaching and ministry in our increasingly multicultural world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction : An exploration and an experiment / Elizabeth Conde-Frazier, S. Steve Kang, and Gary A. Parrett

ch. 1 Three stories / Elizabeth Conde-Frazier, S. Steve Kang, and Gary A. Parrett
ch. 2 Lord of the nations / Gary A. Parrett and S. Steve Kang
ch. 3 The wondrous cross and the broken wall / Gary A. Parrett
ch. 4 Salient theoretical frameworks for forming kingdom citizens / S. Steve Kang
Prejudice and conversion / Elizabeth Conde-Frazier
ch. 5 Becoming a culturally sensitive minister / Gary A. Parrett
ch. 6 The formation process in a learning community / S. Steve Kang
ch. 7 From hospitality to Shalom / Elizabeth Conde-Frazier

Conclusion : Living the biblical vision / Elizabeth Conde-Frazier, S. Steve Kang, and Gary A. Parrett
Article cover image

"What A Course Will Look Like After Multicultural Change"

Article
Kitano, Margie K.
in Multicultural Course ransformation in Higher Education: A Broader Truth (Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon, 1997), 18-34
Topics: Course Design   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Doing Multiculturalism: Conceptualizing Curricular Change"

Article
Rosenfelt, Deborah S.
1996
in Handbook for Multicultural Infusion in Higher Education (New York: Allyn & Bacon, 1996), 35-55
Topics: Course Design   |   Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity

Book
Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky
2003
Duke University Press, Durham, NC
PS3569.E316 T68 2003
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
A pioneer in queer theory and literary studies, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick brings together for the first time in Touching Feeling her most powerful explorations of emotion and expression. In essays that show how her groundbreaking work in queer theory has developed into a deep interest in affect, Sedgwick offers what she calls "tools and techniques for nondualistic thought," in the process touching and transforming such theoretical discourses as psychoanalysis, speech-act ...
Additional Info:
A pioneer in queer theory and literary studies, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick brings together for the first time in Touching Feeling her most powerful explorations of emotion and expression. In essays that show how her groundbreaking work in queer theory has developed into a deep interest in affect, Sedgwick offers what she calls "tools and techniques for nondualistic thought," in the process touching and transforming such theoretical discourses as psychoanalysis, speech-act theory, Western Buddhism, and the Foucauldian "hermeneutics of suspicion."

In prose sometimes somber, often high-spirited, and always accessible and moving, Touching Feeling interrogates-through virtuoso readings of works by Henry James, J. L. Austin, Judith Butler, the psychologist Silvan Tomkins and others-emotion in many forms. What links the work of teaching to the experience of illness? How can shame become an engine for queer politics, performance, and pleasure? Is sexuality more like an affect or a drive? Is paranoia the only realistic epistemology for modern intellectuals? Ultimately, Sedgwick's unfashionable commitment to the truth of happiness propels a book as open-hearted as it is intellectually daring. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Interlude, Pedagogic
ch. 1 Shame, Theatricality, and Queer Performativity: Henry James's The Art of the Novel
ch. 2 Around the Performative: Periperformative Vicinities in Nineteenth-Century Narrative
ch. 3 Shame in the Cybernetic Fold: Reading Silvan Tomkins
ch. 4 Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading, or, You're So Paranoid, You Probably Think This Essay Is About You
ch. 5 Pedagogy of Buddhism
Works Cited
Index
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Twenty-First-Century Feminist Classrooms: Pedagogies of Identity and Difference

Book
MacDonald, Amie A. and Susan Sanchez-Casal, eds.
2002
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
LC197 .T94 2002
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This anti-racist feminist anthology brings together diverse and challenging theoretical perspectives on the experiences of radical educators who work to redefine pedagogies for communicating the claims of both insurgent disciplines--Women's Studies, African-American Studies, Latino Studies, Ethnic Studies, Queer Theory, etc.--and radicalized versions of traditional areas of study--History, Sociology, Foreign Languages, Literature, Philosophy. The authors' analyses of where and how feminist teachers stand in the fray of conflictive classroom dynamics ...
Additional Info:
This anti-racist feminist anthology brings together diverse and challenging theoretical perspectives on the experiences of radical educators who work to redefine pedagogies for communicating the claims of both insurgent disciplines--Women's Studies, African-American Studies, Latino Studies, Ethnic Studies, Queer Theory, etc.--and radicalized versions of traditional areas of study--History, Sociology, Foreign Languages, Literature, Philosophy. The authors' analyses of where and how feminist teachers stand in the fray of conflictive classroom dynamics and institutional politics lead them to outline new inquiries into feminist pedagogy highlighted by an intense focus on identity, experience, and difference. In doing so, Twenty-First Century Feminist Classrooms opens a space for engaged feminist self-criticism that seeks to reinvigorate pedagogical practices grounded in multicultural feminist identities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Feminist Reflections on the Pedagogical Relevance of Identity

ch. 1 Toward a Pedagogy of Coalition
ch. 2 Unleashing the Demons of History: White Resistance in the U.S. Latino Studies Classroom
ch. 3 Student Resistance and Nationalism in the Classroom: Reflections on Globalizing the Curriculum
ch. 4 Feminist Pedagogy and the Appeal to Epistemic Privilege
ch. 5 Negotiating Subject Positions in a Service-Learning Context: Toward a Feminist Critique of Experiential Learning
ch. 6 Antiracist Pedagogy and Concientizacion: A Latina Professor's Struggle
ch. 7 Queer Theory and Feminist Pedagogy
ch. 8 "white girls" and "Strong Black Women:" Reflections on a Decade of Teaching Black History at Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs)
ch. 9 Teaching (About) Genocide
ch. 10 Decentering the White and Male Standpoints in Race and Ethnicity Courses
ch. 11 Representation, Entitlement, and Voyeurism: Teaching Across Difference
Contributors

Index
Cover image

Minding Women: Reshaping the Educational Realm

Book
Woyshner, Christine A. and Holly S. Gelfond, eds.
1998
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LC197 .M55 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Research on women and girls has exploded during the past twenty years. Since 1977, when the Harvard Educational Review published Carol Gilligan's now-classic article "In a Different Voice," in which she argued so persuasively that women and girls must be understood on their own terms, researchers have been discovering, uncovering, and recovering women's ways of knowing, being, thinking, teaching, and learning. Minding Women charts the wealth of thought and writing related ...
Additional Info:
Research on women and girls has exploded during the past twenty years. Since 1977, when the Harvard Educational Review published Carol Gilligan's now-classic article "In a Different Voice," in which she argued so persuasively that women and girls must be understood on their own terms, researchers have been discovering, uncovering, and recovering women's ways of knowing, being, thinking, teaching, and learning. Minding Women charts the wealth of thought and writing related to women and girls and education that this process of discovery has produced.
Minding Women begins with a "Classics" section--articles that call attention to the lack of research on girls and women and describe the effect this has had on knowledge and society. The contributors then discuss feminist pedagogy, and how it has changed and been refined over time. Girls and young women are the focus of the next section. Too often their voices and viewpoints are excluded from these discussions, so some of their own writings are included here. The book then explores women's educational history, showcasing some of the rich work in this area over the past twenty years. Identity issues are addressed in the final section, acknowledging that substantial differences exist among groups of women and girls on how they experience the world and their roles, prospects, and lives. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 In a different voice : women's conceptions of self and morality (Carol Gilligan)
ch. 2 Woman's place in man's life cycle (Carol Gilligan )
ch. 3 Excluding women from the educational realm (Jane Roland Martin )
ch. 4 Placing women in the liberal arts (Marilyn R. Schuster and Susan Van Dyne )
ch. 5 Mujeres unidas en acción: a popular education process (Eva Young and Mariwilda Padilla )
ch. 6 Freire and a feminist pedagogy of difference (Kathleen Weiler )
ch. 7 Chronicles (Kari Larsen ... [et al.] )
ch. 8 Sexuality, schooling, and adolescent females (Michelle Fine )
ch. 9 Voice, play, and a practice of ordinary courage in girls' and women's lives (Annie G. Rogers )
ch. 10 Sexual harassment in school (Nan Stein )
ch. 11 We who believe in freedom cannot rest until it's done (William Ayers )
ch. 12 ch. 1 Reconsidering a classic (Linda Eisenmann )
ch. 13 African American female elite (Linda M. Perkins )
ch. 14 Hidden Half : a history of Native American women's education (Deirdre A. Almeida-- ch. 15 Reflections on writing a history of women teachers (Kathleen Weiler )
ch. 16 How we find ourselves (Alex Wilson )
ch. 17 Colonizer/colonized Chicana ethnographer (Sofia Villenas )
ch. 18 Learning in the dark (Frances A. Maher and Mary Kay Thompson Tetreault)
ch. 19 Road to college (Stacey J. Lee )
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Writing in Multicultural Settings

Book
Severino, Carol, Juan C. Guerra, and Johnnella E. Butler, eds.
1997
Modern Language Association, New York, NY
PE1405.U6W75 1997
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The twenty essays and four responses ("cross-talks") in this volume, the fifth in the Research and Scholarship in Composition series, confront the challenges presented by the racial, ethnic, class, gender, religious, age, and physical-ability differences among today's writing students. The contributors, who teach in classrooms and writing centers at a variety of private and public institutions, discuss their immersion in students' discourses and cultures and balance descriptions of their teaching ...
Additional Info:
The twenty essays and four responses ("cross-talks") in this volume, the fifth in the Research and Scholarship in Composition series, confront the challenges presented by the racial, ethnic, class, gender, religious, age, and physical-ability differences among today's writing students. The contributors, who teach in classrooms and writing centers at a variety of private and public institutions, discuss their immersion in students' discourses and cultures and balance descriptions of their teaching experiences with careful and critical reflection.

The volume begins and ends with sections examining the tensions and conflicts in the classroom; the two sections in between focus more specifically on texts and curricula and on teaching English as a second language. The cross-talks that conclude each section synthesize and critique the essays.

Writing in Multicultural Settings is essential, thought-provoking reading for college administrators, writing teachers, and scholars and students in composition studies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface to the Series
Acknowledgments
Introduction
ch. 1 Embracing a Multicultural Rhetoric (Bonnie Lisle and Sandra Mano)
ch. 2 Whose Voice Is It Anyway? Marked Features in the Writing of Black English Speakers (Denise Troutman)
ch. 3 Teaching American Indian Students: Interpreting the Rhetorics of Silence (Michelle Grijalva)
ch. 4 Exploring Bias in Essay Tests (Liz Hamp-Lyons)
ch. 5 "Real Niggaz's Don't Die": African American Students Speaking Themselves into Their Writing (Kermit E. Campbell)
ch. 6 Negotiating Authority through One-to-One Collaboration in the Multicultural Writing Center (Susan Blalock)
ch. 7 Cross-Talk: Talking Cross-Difference (Gail Y. Okawa)
ch. 8 Two Approaches to "Cultural Text": Toward Multicultural Literacy (Carol Severino)
ch. 9 Decolonizing the Classroom: Freshman Composition in a Multicultural Setting (Esha Niyogi De and Donna Uthus Gregory)
ch. 10 Writing Identities: The Essence of Difference in Multicultural Classrooms (Wendy S. Hesford)
ch. 11 Composition Readers and the Construction of Identity (Sandra Jamieson)
ch. 12 "But Isn't This the Land of the Free?": Resistance and Discovery in Student Responses to Farewell to Manzanar (Virginia A. Chappell)
ch. 13 Cross-Talk: Teachers, Texts, Readers, and Writers (Cecilia Rodríguez Milanés)
ch. 14 Contrastive Rhetoric: Implications for Teachers of Writing in Multicultural Classrooms (Ulla Connor)
ch. 15 Differences in ESL and Native-English-Speaker Writing: The Research and Its Implications (Tony Silva)
ch. 16 Cultural Conflicts in the Writing Center: Expectations and Assumptions of ESL Students (Muriel Harris)
ch. 17 Cross-Talk: ESL Issues and Contrastive Rhetoric (Ilona Leki)
ch. 18 The Place of Intercultural Literacy in the Writing Classroom (Juan C. Guerra)
ch. 19 The Politics of Difference: Toward a Pedagogy of Reciprocity (Mary Soliday)
ch. 20 An Afrocentric Multicultural Writing Project (Henry L. Evans)
ch. 21 "Better Than What People Told Me I Was": What Students of Color Tell Us about the Multicultural Composition Classroom (Carol A. Miller)
ch. 22 Students on the Border (Kate Mangelsdorf )
ch. 23 When the Writing Test Fails: Assessing Assessment at an Urban College (Barbara Gleason)
ch. 24 Cross-Talk: Toward Transcultural Writing Classrooms
Notes on Contributors (Keith Gilyard)
Works Cited
Index
Cover image

Perspectivas: Occasional papers Fall 2000

Journal Issue
Furst-Lambert, Renata, ed.
2000
Hispanic Theological Initiative, Atlanta, GA
BR563.H57P47 2000
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The Impact of Pluralism on Trends in Lain American and U.S. Latino Religions and Society (Gastón Espinosa)
ch. 2 A Spirituality for a Multicultural Ministry (Elizabeth Conde-Frazier)
ch. 3 Response to Elizabeth Conde-Frazier (Gabriel Salguero)
ch. 4 U.S. Hispanic/Latino Identity and Protestant Experience: A Brief Introduction for the Seminarian (Zaida Maldonado Pérez)
Cover image

Perspectivas: Occasional Papers Summer 2001

Journal Issue
Perspectivas
2001
Hispanic Theological Initiative, Atlanta, GA
BR563.H57P47 2001
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Of Satos and Saints: Salvation from the Periphery
ch. 2 Mixed Messages: Encountering Mestzaje in the Book of Ruth
ch. 3 Confesiones de un Macho Cubano
ch. 4 Response to Miguel Angel de la Torre
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Reconstructing the Sacred Tower: Challenge and Promise of Latino/a Theological Education

Book
Davis, Kenneth, OFM and Edwin I. Hernandez
2003
University of Scranton Press, Scranton, PA
BV4030.D38 2003
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
The Hispanic community in the United States is growing by leaps and bounds. The most important institution in Hispanic barrios is the church. Government programs come and go, but the churches remain. So what could be more important than good Hispanic theological leadership? This book is unblinking about the problems involved. Lacking are financial and intellectual resources in otherwise excellent seminaries and other educational institutions. At the same time the ...
Additional Info:
The Hispanic community in the United States is growing by leaps and bounds. The most important institution in Hispanic barrios is the church. Government programs come and go, but the churches remain. So what could be more important than good Hispanic theological leadership? This book is unblinking about the problems involved. Lacking are financial and intellectual resources in otherwise excellent seminaries and other educational institutions. At the same time the book offers a vision of hope. It uses solid data to describe the willingness of many young people to get involved in religious leadership. It shows their eagerness to learn and to serve. The book concludes with a number of well examined and down to earth recommendations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword
ch. 1 The Context: Hispanic Communities Confronting Change
ch. 2 The Leaders: Hispanic Religious Leaders and Future Leaders
ch. 3 Educational Realities and Promises: Hispanic Perspectives and Experience in Advanced Theological Education
ch. 4 The Future: Moving From Implications to Actions
ch. 5 A New Kind of Leadership for a Diverse Theological Community
Conclusion: Reconstructing the Sacred Tower
Bibliography
Index
Article cover image

"A Contending Pedagogy: Asian American Studies as Extracurricular Praxis"

Article
Hyun Yi Kang, Laura
1998
in Teaching Asian America: Diversity and the Problem of Community (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1998),123-141
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Diversifying the Faculty: A Guidebook for Search Committees

Book
Turner, Caroline Sotello Viernes
2002
Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C.
LB2332.72.T87 2002
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This monograph suggests ways in which an institution can diversify its faculty and facilitate the work of the search committee before a candidate ever reaches the interview stage. It outlines a step-by-step process to improve the likelihood of a successful search, and it recommends items to consider after a hire is confirmed to ensure that the new faculty member will be more likely to stay. The sections are: (1) Before the ...
Additional Info:
This monograph suggests ways in which an institution can diversify its faculty and facilitate the work of the search committee before a candidate ever reaches the interview stage. It outlines a step-by-step process to improve the likelihood of a successful search, and it recommends items to consider after a hire is confirmed to ensure that the new faculty member will be more likely to stay. The sections are: (1) Before the Search Begins; (2) The Search Process; and (3) After the Search. Appendixes contain a checklist of best practices, a list of leading institutions for minority Ph.D.s, a list of baccalaureate institutions identified as producers of numbers of female doctorates; and a list of Web resources of programs for building diverse faculties. An annotated bibliography lists 59 sources for additional information. (Contains 36 references.) (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part 1 - Before the search begins
Communicating the educational rationale
Aligning departmental and institutional commitments
Creating a welcoming environment
Securing resources
Countering segregated networks

Part 2 - The Search process
Forming the search committee
Educating the search committee on personnel issues
Debunking the myths
Creating the position description
Attracting a diverse candidate pool
Examining hiring biases
Hosting campus visits
Making the offer

Part 3 - After the search
Supporting the new hire
Assessing the search process and outcome
A final note

Appendices
A. Checklist of best practices
B. Leading Ph.D. institutions of minority Ph.D.s, 1993-1997
C. Baccalaureate institutions identified as women doctorate productivity leaders
D. Web resources of programs for building diverse faculties
Notes
References
Annotated Bibliography
Article cover image

"Critical Race Theory, Latino Critical Theory, and Critical Raced-Gendered Epistemologies: Recognizing Students of Color as Holders and Creators of Knowledge"

Article
Bernal, Dolores Delgado
2002
Qualitative Inquiry 8, no. 1 (2002): 105-126
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
For too long, the histories, experiences, cultures, and languages of students of color have been devalued, misinterpreted, or omitted within formal educational settings. In this article, the author uses critical race theory (CRT) and Latina/Latino critical theory (LatCrit) to demonstrate how critical raced-gendered epistemologies recognize students of color as holders and creators of knowledge. In doing so, she discusses how CRT and LatCrit provide an appropriate lens for qualitative ...
Additional Info:
For too long, the histories, experiences, cultures, and languages of students of color have been devalued, misinterpreted, or omitted within formal educational settings. In this article, the author uses critical race theory (CRT) and Latina/Latino critical theory (LatCrit) to demonstrate how critical raced-gendered epistemologies recognize students of color as holders and creators of knowledge. In doing so, she discusses how CRT and LatCrit provide an appropriate lens for qualitative research in the field of education. She then compares and contrasts the experiences of Chicana/Chicano students through a Eurocentric and a critical raced-gendered epistemological perspective and demonstrates that each perspective holds vastly different views of what counts as knowledge, specifically regarding language, culture, and commitment to communities. She then offers implications of critical raced-gendered epistemologies for both research and practice and concludes by discussing some of the critiques of the use of these epistemologies in educational research.
Cover image

Stony the Road We Trod: African American Biblical Interpretation

Book
Felder, Cain Hope, ed.
Fortress Press, Minneapolis, MN
not catalogued
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
A hallmark of American black religion is its distinctive use of the Bible in creating community, resisting oppression, and fomenting social change. What can critical biblical studies learn from the African American experience with the Bible, and vice versa?
This singular volume marks the emergence of a critical mass of black biblical scholars. Combining sophisticated exegesis with special sensitivity to issues of race, class, and gender, the authors of ...
Additional Info:
A hallmark of American black religion is its distinctive use of the Bible in creating community, resisting oppression, and fomenting social change. What can critical biblical studies learn from the African American experience with the Bible, and vice versa?
This singular volume marks the emergence of a critical mass of black biblical scholars. Combining sophisticated exegesis with special sensitivity to issues of race, class, and gender, the authors of this scholarly collection examine the nettling questions of biblical authority, blacks and African in biblical narratives, and the liberating aspects of Scripture. Together they are reshaping and redefining the questions, concerns, and scholarship that determine how the Bible is appropriated by church, academy, and the larger society today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Map
Introduction

Part I: The Relevance of Biblical Scholarship and the Authority of the Bible
ch. 1 Interpreting Biblical Scholarship for the Black Church Tradition (Thomas Hoyt, Jr.)
ch. 2 The Hermeneutical Dilemma of the African American Biblical Student (Renita J. Weems)
ch. 3 Reading Her Way through the Struggle: African American Women and the Bible (Renita J. Weems)

Part II: African American Sources For Enhancing Biblical Interpretation
ch. 4 The Bible and African Americans: An Outline of an Interpretative History (Vincent L. Wimbush)
ch. 5 "An Ante-bellum Sermon": A Resource for an African American Hermeneutic (David T. Shannon)

Part III: Race and Ancient Black Africa in the Bible
ch. 6 Race, Racism, and the Biblical Narratives (Cain Hope Felder)
ch. 7 The Black Presence in the Old Testament (Charles B. Copher)
ch. 8 Beyond Identification: The Use of Africans in Old Testament Poetry and Narratives (Randall C. Bailey)

Part IV: Reinterpreting Biblical Texts
ch. 9 Who Was Hagar? (John W. Waters)
ch. 10 The Haustafeln (Household Codes) in African American Biblical Interpretation: "Free Slaves" and " Subordinate Women"(Clarice J. Martin)
ch. 11 An African American Appraisal of the Philemon-Paul-Onesimus Triangle (Lloyd A. Lewis)

Index of Ancient Sources
Index of Topics and Names
Contributors
Cover image

Dear Sisters: A Womanist Practice of Hospitality

Book
Westfield, N. Lynne
2001
Pilgrim Press, Cleveland, OH
not catalogued
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
From the Publishers
What allows African American women not just to survive, but to become resilient? N. Lynne Westfield finds an answer to this question as she examines the Dear Sisters' Literary Group. As a Womanist scholar, Westfield reflects on the ways in which the hospitality of the group relates to the long-standing African American tradition of concealed gatherings, the Christian tradition of hospitality, and Christian education.
Additional Info:
From the Publishers
What allows African American women not just to survive, but to become resilient? N. Lynne Westfield finds an answer to this question as she examines the Dear Sisters' Literary Group. As a Womanist scholar, Westfield reflects on the ways in which the hospitality of the group relates to the long-standing African American tradition of concealed gatherings, the Christian tradition of hospitality, and Christian education.

Table Of Content:
Preface
ch. 1 The Resilience of African American Women
ch. 2 Gathering the Voices
ch. 3 Hospitality among Dear Sisters
ch. 4 Doing Womanist Theology with Dear Sisters
ch. 5 Practical Implications for Christian Education
Epilogue
Index
Cover image

The Feminization of Racism: Promoting World Peace in America

Book
Blea, Irene I.
2003
Praeger, Westport, CT
HQ1421.B57 2003
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Blea provides a synthesis of the women's history of Native Americans, Asians, African Americans, and Latinas, and she examines the similarities and differences among these women. From each she extracts suggestions on ways to promote racial and ethnic tolerance. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Blea provides a synthesis of the women's history of Native Americans, Asians, African Americans, and Latinas, and she examines the similarities and differences among these women. From each she extracts suggestions on ways to promote racial and ethnic tolerance. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Tables
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Radical Feminists
ch. 2 Indigenous Women and the American Holocaust
ch. 3 Chicanas and Immigrant Latinas Inherit and Internalize Colonialism
ch. 4 African American Women
ch. 5 Asian and Pacific Islander Women
ch. 6 Healing from Intolerance and Redefining Direction

Selected Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Between Text and Artifact: Integrating Archaeology in Biblical Studies Teaching

Book
Moreland, Milton C.
2003
Brill Academic Publishers, Leiden, The Netherlands
BS621.B48 2003
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Though researchers in both Biblical studies and archaeology have finally recognized the contributions they can make to each others' disciplines, the integration has been difficult to transfer to teaching, so that future scholars will not have to keep climbing over the same wall every generation. Teachers of history and religious studies share some of the approaches they have used to solve the problem. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Though researchers in both Biblical studies and archaeology have finally recognized the contributions they can make to each others' disciplines, the integration has been difficult to transfer to teaching, so that future scholars will not have to keep climbing over the same wall every generation. Teachers of history and religious studies share some of the approaches they have used to solve the problem. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
Between Text and Artifact
Between Heaven and Earth: Educational Perspectives on the Archaeology and Material Culture of the Bible
Where the Girls Are: Archaeology and Women's Lives in Ancient Israel
These Are Your Gods, O Israel: The Challenge of Reconstructing Israelite
Religion Using Both Text and Archaeology
In Search of the Good Book: A Critical Survey of Handbooks on Biblical Archaeology
Why Declare the Things Forbidden? Classroom Integration of Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology with Biblical Studies in Theological Context
On The Convergence of Texts and Artifacts: Using Archaeology to Teach the Hebrew Bible
Archaeology in New Testament Courses
Teaching Second Temple Judaism in Light of Archaeology
Text and Artifact: The Dead Sea Scrolls and Qumran
Realizing Diversity: Reflections on Teaching Pagan Religion(s) in Late Hellenistic and Early Roman Palestine
Here I Am at Khirbet Cana: Integrating Biblical Studies and Archaeology
Annotated Bibliography for Integrating Archaeology into Biblical Studies
Bibliography
Index of Modern Authors
Contributors
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching Inclusively: Resources for Course, Department & Institutional Change in Higher Education

Book
Ouellett, Mathew L., ed.
2005
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LC1099.3.T436 2005
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Teaching Inclusively brings together a broad array of current "best practices" in the design, implementation, and assessment of multicultural change initiatives on college and university campuses. Readers will find that this volume advocates for more transparent connections between change initiatives at individual, departmental, and college-wide levels by highlighting the ways in which such practices and change goals can relate to and support each other, thus addressing a noticeable absence in ...
Additional Info:
Teaching Inclusively brings together a broad array of current "best practices" in the design, implementation, and assessment of multicultural change initiatives on college and university campuses. Readers will find that this volume advocates for more transparent connections between change initiatives at individual, departmental, and college-wide levels by highlighting the ways in which such practices and change goals can relate to and support each other, thus addressing a noticeable absence in the current available literature.

The contributors to this volume present readers with a balance between theoretical models and demonstration projects that address change processes at three levels: individual courses, programs and departments, and across schools and institutions. In addition, there are descriptions of current, multi-year or multi-phase efforts at both departmental and organizational levels. Whenever possible, the contributors include their perspectives on important lessons learned from their efforts. Finally, we offer resource materials that promise concrete support for applications.

Part I addresses models and perspectives that help to conceptualize, implement and assess diversity-related instructional and faculty development programs at the systemic level. Contributors offer models and descriptions of practices aimed at making transparent the values, beliefs, and goals that shape institutional and classroom climates. Note that in the context of this volume, "diversity" is deliberately defined broadly to encourage a more systemic approach to the analyses of and response to diversity-related issues. For many readers, this may offer new dimensions and greater texture to their current conceptualization of diversity. This section reflects the contributors’ interests in analytical tools and organizational frameworks useful in addressing individual, departmental, and institutional changes. Whenever appropriate, authors in this section identify a range of practical applications, such as course-based efforts in the major to courses that fulfill general education requirements.

In Part II, contributors describe change initiatives that use departments (or programs) as the unit of analysis for diversity-related change efforts. In this section, readers will benefit from the descriptions and assessments of programs designed specifically to bring faculty and academic administrators together in cohorts to address diversity and teaching development goals within the disciplines in a sustained dialogue on diversity. Assessment of current efforts indicate that such initiatives illuminate the content, skills, and values necessary for sustained change and that such experiences can become important models for broader institutional change efforts.

In Part III, the contributors discuss multicultural change efforts at the college or institutional level directed at creating and sustaining more inclusive teaching and learning communities. Additionally, contributors describe programs and practices useful in addressing diversity issues across the disciplines as well as within discipline-specific contexts. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding how can systematic multicultural organization change initiatives can support a departmental or campus-wide emphasis on teaching inclusively. These chapters offer rich descriptions of efforts at institutions learning how to address diversity-related initiatives in a sustainable, comprehensive manner. Such efforts can help others determine how best to assess their organization’s needs and strengths, and to determine what is needed in the larger environment to initiate and sustain successful pro-equity organizational change and innovations.

Finally, Part IV pays particular attention to resources and program models particularly useful for faculty developers and centers. Contributors to this section provide a rich set of tools for self and course assessment, planning for new or revised programs, and suggesting well-proven strategies for approaches to diversity-related teaching development and organizational change initiatives. These include descriptions of specific, "hands on" consultation practices, workshop exercises, resource materials, and design elements (e.g., use of writing prompts) proven effective across the disciplines in engaging faculty in reflection, analysis, dialogue and innovation related to diversity-related teaching development goals. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
About the Editor

I. Theoretical Frameworks and Useful Models
ch. 1 The Theory and Practice of Multicultural Organization Development in Education (Bailey W. Jackson)
ch. 2 Letting the Hydra Roam: Attending to Diverse Forms of Diversity in Liberal Arts Education (Sammy Basu)
ch. 3 It Takes a Campus: Situating Professional Development Efforts Within a Campus Diversity Program (Nancy Chism , and Karen Whitney)
ch. 4 Defining the Shape of Diversity Pedagogy (Lynn Leonard, Sue Akersten, Stephen Adkison, and Edward Nuhfer)
ch. 5 Transcultural Issues in Teaching and Learning (Bland Tomkinson)
ch. 6 Building Multiculturalism into Teaching Development Programs (Constance Ewing Cook, and Mary Deane Sorcinelli)
ch. 7 Warming Up the Chill: Teaching Against Structures (Audrey Kleinsasser, and Jane Nelson)
ch. 8 Enhancing the Climate for Diversity in the Classroom: An Experiment in Campus Transformation (Richard C. Turner, Gina Sanchez Gibau, Monica M. Medina, and Sherree A. Wilson)
ch. 9 Positionality and Authority in Curriculum Transformation: Faculty/Student Collaboration in Course Design (Betty Schmitz, and Anupama Taranath)
ch. 10 Teaching and Diversity: Collaborative Lessons Learned (Pamela Ashmore, Kathleen Sullivan Brown, G. O. Akura, and Carole Murphy)
ch. 11 Teaching Inclusively: The Whole Is Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts (Christine Martin)
ch. 12 Renewing Diversity Initiatives Within an English Department (Anne J. Herrington)
ch. 13 Teaching Diversity and Fostering Inclusivity at the University: A Collaborative Approach (Abby L. Ferber, and Andrea O'Reilly Herrera)
ch. 14 Speaking a New Language: An Innovative Program Promotes Discussions in Diversity With Foreign Language Learners (Lisa Calvin)
ch. 15 Transforming Teacher Preparation: Changing Cultures Through Constructivism and Reflective Practices (Miguel Licona)

II. Departmental or Program-Based Change Initiatives
ch. 16 Teaching Together: Interracial Teams (Mathew L. Ouellett, and Edith C. Fraser)
ch. 17 Confronting Issues of Oppression in the University: Creating a Space for Faculty Dialogue, Reflection, and Action (Peter T. Wilson)
ch. 18 Breaking the Silence: Innovative Approaches for Promoting Dialogue About Diversity Issues Within a Communication Disorders Department (Maria Diana Gonzales and Jane A. Baran)
ch. 19 Transforming Higher Education Institutions Using Multicultural Organizational Development: A Case Study of a Large Northeastern University (Linda S. Marchesani and Bailey W. Jackson)
ch. 20 Institutional Transformation to Support Inclusive Teaching Initiatives (Murali Krishnamurthi)
ch. 21 Cultivating Global Understanding Through Campus-Wide Learning Communities (Bonnie B. Mullinix, Rekha Datta and Morris Saldov)

III. Systemic Change Initiatives
ch. 22 Moving the Mountain: Social Justice Education at the University (Julie Andrzejewski and John Alessio)
ch. 23 Multicultural Transformation at Macalester College (Roxane Harvey Gudeman)
ch. 24 Making the Campus Community a Safe and Affirming Space for All (Robert S. Haynor, and Susan A Holton)
ch. 25 Critical Moments: A Case-Based Diversity Project That Engages and Enlivens Campus-Wide Efforts to Teach and Work Inclusively (Diane Gillespie, Gillies Malnarich, and Tina Young)
ch. 26 From Reading Group to Faculty Change Team: The Hamline University Lido Group (James Francisco Bonilla)
ch. 27 But How Can I Talk With Faculty About That? Approaches to Consulting Around Multicultural Issues (Matthew Kaplan, and Beth Glover Reed)
ch. 28 Mainstreaming Feminist Perspectives (Carol Lauer and Lynda M. Glennon)
ch. 29 Faculty Development and Students With Disabilities: Accommodations and Universal Design (Sheryl Burgstahler)
ch. 30 A Catwalk for Kitano: Highlighting Kitano's Paradigm for Multicultural Course Transformation in Consultations With Individual Faculty (Natasha Flowers)
ch. 31 Proving Diversity Classes Make a Difference: Effective Assessment of Students' Learning (Sherwood Smith)
ch. 32 A Framework for Inclusive Teaching in STEM Disciplines (Lois A. Reddick, Wayne Jacobson Angela Linse, and Darryl Yong)
ch. 33 The Multicultural Lab: Diversity Issues in STEM Classes (A.T. Miller)
ch. 34 Science in the Interest of Social Justice: Untangling the Biological Realities of Race and Gender (Leslie S. Jones)
ch. 35 Faculty Development and Organizational Change: Moving From "Minority Relevant" to Intersectionality and Social Justice (Beth Glover Reed, and Melissa R. Peet)
ch. 36 Interactive Theater as a Multicultural Change Agent in Faculty Development (Diana Kardia, A.T. Miller, and Jeffrey Steiger)
ch. 37 Dissemination of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) and Formation of a National Network: Embracing a Common Pedagogy (Pratibha Varma-Nelson, and David Gosser)
ch. 38 Service Learning, Study Circles, and Problem-Based Learning: Student-Initiated Efforts to Confront the Concept of Race (Larry E. Greeson)

IV. Best Practices and Methods
ch. 39 Developing Diversity Management Skills in a University Context: A Direct or Indirect Approach? (Philip Frame, and Jennifer O’Connor)
ch. 40 Creating Inclusive Classrooms: A View Through the Student Lens (James Greenberg and Andre Perry)
ch. 41 Multicultural Course Transformation (Christine A. Stanley, Shari Saunders, and Jamie M. Hart)
ch 42 Teaching With a Social Justice Perspective: A Model for Faculty Seminars Across Academic Disciplines (Maurianne Adams, and Barbara J. Love)
ch. 43 Strategic Action in Hot Moments (Lee Warren)
ch. 44 Inclusive Teaching for Our Queer Students: A Workshop (Michele DiPietro)
ch. 45 Key Resources on Diversity for Faculty Developers: An Idiosyncratic Annotated Bibliography (Stephanie Nickerson)
ch. 46 Multicultural Online Resources: What Are They, Where Are They, and Are They Bias-Free? (Denise C. Camin)
Journal cover image

Spotlight on Teaching about Religion in the Schools: Multiculturalism and the Academic Study of Religion in the Schools

Journal Issue
Grelle, Bruce; Naylor, D. Keith; and Freund, Richard A., eds.
2002
Spotlight on Teaching 17, no. 2 March
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2002-02mar.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/2002-02mar.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Spotlight on Teaching about Religion in the Schools: Multiculturalism and the Academic Study of Religion in the Schools (Bruce Grelle; D. Keith Naylor; and Richard A. Freund)
ch. 2 Guidelines on Religion in Public Schools: An Historic Moment (Marcia Beauchamp)
ch. 3 University Religion Departments and Teaching about the Bible in Public High Schools: A Report from Florida (David Levenson)
ch. 4 Interview: A Teacher’s Perspective (Martha Ball)
ch. 5 Weighty Matters and the Teenage Reader (Jenna Weissman Joselit)
ch. 6 The Program in Religion and Secondary Education at Harvard Divinity School (Diane L. Moore)
ch. 7 The Religion and Public Education Resource Center (Bruce Grelle)
ch. 8 God, gods, and Godot: Thoughts on Teaching about Religion in Secondary Education (Matthew Hicks)
ch. 9 Religion and Education (Michael D. Waggoner)
ch. 10 Moses Who? Literacy, Citizenship, and the Academic Study of Religion in the Schools (Bruce Grelle)
Journal cover image

Alter(ed) Sexualities: Bringing Lesbian and Gay Studies to the Religion Classroom

Journal Issue
Pippin, Tina, and Henking, Susan, eds.
1996
Spotlight on Teaching 4, no. 2 November
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Altered Sexualities: bringing lesbian and gay studies to the religion classroom: Editor's introduction (Tina Pippin, and Susan Henking)
ch. 2 Incorporating Gay and Lesbian Experience into Comparative Religion Courses (Carol S. Anderson)
ch. 3 Scenes From Lesbian and Gay Studies in Religion Classrooms (Carol Anderson, Carol White, and Susan Henking)
ch. 4 Same-Sex Sexualities and Chinese Religions (Miriam Levering)
ch. 5 Multiple Choices: Querying Pedagogy (Susan Henking)
ch. 6 Gay/ Lesbian Liberation and Religious Pedagogy (Carol Wayne White)
ch. 7 Addressing the Issue of Violence against Homosexuals in Ethics Courses (E. N. Gender)
ch. 8 Teaching Gay and Lesbian Issues in biblical Studies Courses (Tina Pippin)
ch. 9 Teaching Sexualities: A Conversation of the Affinity Group
Article cover image

"Realities, Visions, and Promises of a Multicultural Future"

Article
Moore, Mary Elizabeth, Boyung Lee, Katherine Turpin, Ralph Casas, Lynn Bridgers and Veronica Miles
2004
Religious Education 99, no. 3 (2004): 287-315
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Theological Education by Conversation: Particularity and Pluralism"

Article
Moore, Mary Elizabeth Mullino
1996
Theological Education 33, no. 1: 31-47
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
TTR cover image

"Teaching in the Global Village: Notes Towards a Religious Studies Rhetoric"

TTR
Connor, Kimberley Rae
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 1 (2003): 18-23
BL41.T4
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Liberal Arts   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
The author describes her participation in a religious studies teaching workshop where she was asked to think creatively about the art of teaching, what implications result from changes in the field, and the relationship of religious studies to other fields. General conclusions endorse pedagogies that are dialogic, participatory, and experiential and invite possibilities provided by changes in the field that encourage courses that are more inclusive of marginal voices and ...
Additional Info:
The author describes her participation in a religious studies teaching workshop where she was asked to think creatively about the art of teaching, what implications result from changes in the field, and the relationship of religious studies to other fields. General conclusions endorse pedagogies that are dialogic, participatory, and experiential and invite possibilities provided by changes in the field that encourage courses that are more inclusive of marginal voices and attentive to multicultural inflections. In assessing the relationship of religious studies to other fields, the author draws on her interdisciplinary background in religion and literature to apply Aristotelian rhetoric to the interpretation of a short story, thereby providing an actual model of how disciplines can complement each other while also highlighting aspects of the pedagogical and multicultural principles endorsed by the workshop participants. The application of Aristotelian principles of logos, ethos, and pathos becomes for the workshop participants a religious studies rhetoric: a provisional model for how to interpret classroom conduct.
TTR cover image

"Match or Mismatch? Attempting a Feminist Pedagogy for a Course on Biblical Criticisms"

TTR
McKinlay, Judith E.
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 2 (2000): 88-95
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
This paper reports on a project undertaken as part of a wider group exploration of feminist pedagogy. It reflects on the issues this raised in teaching a course on contemporary biblical criticisms, an area of biblical studies where questions of power and ideology are frequently asked of texts. The project therefore asked the question whether there was a match or mismatch between the teaching process and the content of the ...
Additional Info:
This paper reports on a project undertaken as part of a wider group exploration of feminist pedagogy. It reflects on the issues this raised in teaching a course on contemporary biblical criticisms, an area of biblical studies where questions of power and ideology are frequently asked of texts. The project therefore asked the question whether there was a match or mismatch between the teaching process and the content of the course. Of particular concern was the understanding of the role of the teacher, the lecturer's 'what am I doing in this class?' question. The move to open up the student space led to the matter of boundaries. Who decides upon and regulates the limits of what can be discussed? What allows trust in a class and how does one deal with feelings and emotions? This paper engages the class members on all these issues, drawing on their comments gained from the questionnaire that was part of the project design.
TTR cover image

"Integrating Asian Christianity into History of Christianity Courses"

TTR
Keck, David
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 1 (1999): 3-13
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This essay begins with diverse arguments for modifying history of Christianity courses to include the experiences of Asian Christianity. After discussing fundamental assumptions, several problems are articulated. The major portion of the essay describes three different strategies for integrating new materials into current curricular offerings. By conceptualizing the relationships between Asian Christianity and the history of Christianity in terms of (1) parallels, (2) supplements, and (3) challenges, material from theformer can be more ...
Additional Info:
This essay begins with diverse arguments for modifying history of Christianity courses to include the experiences of Asian Christianity. After discussing fundamental assumptions, several problems are articulated. The major portion of the essay describes three different strategies for integrating new materials into current curricular offerings. By conceptualizing the relationships between Asian Christianity and the history of Christianity in terms of (1) parallels, (2) supplements, and (3) challenges, material from theformer can be more readily incorporated into the teaching of the latter. Such strategies can be utilized in different teaching contexts, depending on the needs of students and instructors.
TTR cover image

"Teaching the Introduction to Religions: Religious Pluralism in a Post-Colonial World"

TTR
Southard, Naomi and Richard Payne
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 1 (1998): 51-57
BL41.T4
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Taking seriously the implications of post-colonial theory, the authors revisit the introductory course (normally "World Religions") as a course on the plurality of religions in contemporary U.S. culture. They explain the structure of the course, and discuss practical and ethical issues around student field visits to learn about other religions.
Additional Info:
Taking seriously the implications of post-colonial theory, the authors revisit the introductory course (normally "World Religions") as a course on the plurality of religions in contemporary U.S. culture. They explain the structure of the course, and discuss practical and ethical issues around student field visits to learn about other religions.
Journal cover image

Black Pastors/White Professors: An Experiment in Dialogic Education

Journal Issue
Wilmore, Gayraud S., ed.
1980
Theological Education 16, no. 1, spec. issue (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Gayraud S. Wilmore)
Collaboration and Challenge: Analysis of the Process (Abstract) (James B. Ashbrook, and Louis Charles Harvey)
Our Reflection on the Lilly Project (Paul Garlington, et al.)
Commentary on the Process (Gayraud S. Wilmore)
The Project and Biblical Studies (Werner E. Lemke)
The Project and Historical Studies (Richard M. Spielmann)
The Project and Theological Studies (Kenneth Cauthen)
The Final Interviews with the Pastors (Thomas H. Troeger)
Concluding Commentary (Gayraud S. Wilmore)
Appendix—Biographical Sketches of the Participants
Cover image

Research and Knowledge Production in Religious Education

Journal Issue
2005
Religious Education 100, no. 1 (Religious Education Association, Atlanta, GA 2005)
BV1460R.3V.100NO.1
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Research And Knowledge Production In Religious Education
ch. 2 Analysis Of Contents, Contributors, And Research Directions: Mapping Publication Routes In The Journal (Leona M. English, Mario O. D'Souza, and Leon Chartrand)
ch. 3 Pedagogical Drift: The Evolution Of New Approaches And Paradigms In Religious Education (Michael T. Buchanan)
ch. 4 Educating About Islam And Learning About Self: An Approach For Our Times Free Access Free Access (Terence J. Lovat)
ch. 5 Time Of Uncertain Conversations: Religious Education In Public Schools Of The Post-Soviet Latvia (Anta Filipsone)
ch. 6 Producing Knowledge In A Time Of Sleeper Transitions (Opening Panel Presentation Given At Aprre, 2003) (Leona M. English)
ch. 7 Response: “Sleeper Transitions” And Religious Education (Jack L. Seymour)
ch. 8 Possible New Futures For Our Journal On The World Wide Web (Mary E. Hess)
Cover image

Shaping Beloved Community: Multicultural Theological Education

Book
Esterline, David V., Kalu, Ogbu U., ed.
2006
Westminster John Knox, Louisville, KY
BV 4020.S53 2006
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
This collection of essays presents the theological, pedagogical, and disciplinary framework on which multicultural theological education is built. While many seminaries and divinity schools have expressed their commitment to create diverse communities of faculty and students, fewer schools have developed methods of learning and teaching that are appropriate for these communities. Written by faculty members at McCormick Theological Seminary, a school renowned for its commitment to diversity, these essays provide ...
Additional Info:
This collection of essays presents the theological, pedagogical, and disciplinary framework on which multicultural theological education is built. While many seminaries and divinity schools have expressed their commitment to create diverse communities of faculty and students, fewer schools have developed methods of learning and teaching that are appropriate for these communities. Written by faculty members at McCormick Theological Seminary, a school renowned for its commitment to diversity, these essays provide examples of new ways of learning and teaching that will help shape and sustain multicultural theological education.

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Part 1: Theoretical and Institutional Frameworks
ch. 1 Multicultural theological education and leadership for a church without walls (David V. Esterline)
ch. 2 Toward an intercultural approach to theological education for ministry (José Irizarry)
ch. 3 Multicultural theological education: on doing difference differently (Anna Case-Winters)
ch. 4 Resources for intercultural transformation of theological education from the Latino (Luis R. Rivera Rodriguez)
ch. 5 Libraries and multicultural theological education: beyond nostalgia (Kenneth Sawyer)
ch. 6 From sideline to center: teaching and learning for a racially and culturally diverse church (Deborah Flemister Mullen) Part 2: Biblical and Theoretical Studies
ch. 7 Of every race and peole (Cynthia M. Campbell)
ch. 8 Teaching the Bible in a global context (Robert L. Brawley)
ch. 9 The tower of Babel and cultural diversity: a case study on engaging diversity in the classroom (Theodore Hiebert (instructor), Jennifer Blandford, Andrew Davis, Hardy Kim (students))
ch. 10 Reading the Bible from a postcolonial perspective (Jae Won Lee)
Part 3: Ministerial Formation
ch. 11 Teaching pastoral care and counseling in the cross-cultural classroom (Homer U. Ashby, Jr.)
ch. 12 "La gran encisera": Barcelona and education for interfaith ministry in the shadow of terror (Robert A. Cathey)
ch. 13 Open worship: strategies of hospitality and questions of power (Gary Rand)
ch. 14 The formation of ministerial authority and identity: cross-cultural experiential education (Joanne Lindstrom)
ch. 15 Teaching afresh the history of global Christianity (David D. Daniels III)
ch. 16 Multicultural theological education in a non-Western context: Africa, 1975-2000 (Ogbu U. Kalu)
Bibliography
Contributors
Index of Names
Index of Subjects
Cover image

Confucian Tradition and Global Education

Book
de Bary, Wm. Theodore, ed.
2007
Columbia University Press, New York, NY
LC1090.D35 2007
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religion and Academia   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Drawn from a series of lectures that Wm. Theodore de Bary delivered in honor of the Chinese philosopher Tang Junyi, Confucian Tradition is a unique synthesis of essay and debate concerning the future of Chinese education and the potential political uses of Confucianism in the contemporary world. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Drawn from a series of lectures that Wm. Theodore de Bary delivered in honor of the Chinese philosopher Tang Junyi, Confucian Tradition is a unique synthesis of essay and debate concerning the future of Chinese education and the potential political uses of Confucianism in the contemporary world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Confucian education and the "point of democracy"
ch. 2 Asian classics and global education
ch. 3 Translating the classics
ch. 4 Tang Junyi and the philosophy of "general education" ( Cheung Chan-fai )
ch. 5 The over dominance of English in global education : a global response ( Kwan Tze-wan )

App. 1 Life chronology of Tang Junyi ( Lau Kwok-keung )
App. 2 The Chinese at Columbia : a personal testament
Cover image

Non-Western Perspectives on Learning and Knowing

Book
Merriam, Sharan B., author, ed.
2007
Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, FL
LB1060.N66 2007
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
This book introduces readers to systems of knowing and learning different from our familiar Western educational tradition. As with other areas of education, the knowledge base that has developed around adult learning and education has been firmly lodged in Western values and culture. But we need only look beyond our borders as well as to our own indigenous Native Americans to find major systems of thought and beliefs embedded in ...
Additional Info:
This book introduces readers to systems of knowing and learning different from our familiar Western educational tradition. As with other areas of education, the knowledge base that has developed around adult learning and education has been firmly lodged in Western values and culture. But we need only look beyond our borders as well as to our own indigenous Native Americans to find major systems of thought and beliefs embedded in entirely different cultural values. Chapters on Native American Indigenous Knowledge, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Buddhism, Maori, Latin American Perspectives and African Indigenous Knowledge will acquaint readers with alternative understandings of learning, leading, it is hoped, to a more holistic understanding of adult learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction
Contributors
ch. 1 An Introduction to Non-Western Perspectives on Learning and Knowing (Sharan B. Merriam)
ch. 2 Islam's Lifelong Learning Mandate (Mazalan Kamis Mazanah Muhammad)
ch. 3 American Indian Indigenous Pedagogy (Paula Gunn Allen)
ch. 4 Hinduism and Learning (Swathi Nath Thaker)
ch. 5 Maori Concepts of Learning and Knowledge (Lavinia Tamarua)
ch. 6 Buddhist Learning: A Process to Be Enlightened (Jienshen F. Shih)
ch. 7 African Indigenous Knowledge: The Case of Botswana (Gabo Ntseane)
ch. 8 Liberation Theology and Learning in Latin America (Simone C.O. Conceição Augusto Marcos Fagundes Oliveira)
ch. 9 Adult Learning from a Confucian Way of Thinking (Youngwha Kee)
ch. 10 Broadening Our Understanding of Learning (Sharan B. Merriam)
Cover image

Educations and Their Purposes: A Conversation among Cultures

Book
Ames, Roger T., and Peter D. Hershock, eds.
2008
University of Hawai'i Press, Honolulu
LB45.E15 2005
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religion and Academia   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Chapters included in Part One, Education, Relationality, and Diversity, examine the growing intellectual awareness of a pervasive interdependence amid diversity in all aspects of the human experience brought on by the unrelenting processes of globalization. One of the most distinguished voices in the philosophy of emotions offers a sustained reflection in the opening chapter to Part Two, Educating Emotions: The Phenomenology of Feelings. In Part Three, East Asian traditions of ...
Additional Info:
Chapters included in Part One, Education, Relationality, and Diversity, examine the growing intellectual awareness of a pervasive interdependence amid diversity in all aspects of the human experience brought on by the unrelenting processes of globalization. One of the most distinguished voices in the philosophy of emotions offers a sustained reflection in the opening chapter to Part Two, Educating Emotions: The Phenomenology of Feelings. In Part Three, East Asian traditions of thought that have never committed to the familiar mind-body dualism are appealed to as a resource for rethinking the body in education. The tension between personal authenticity and indoctrination in the role that education plays in preparing a person for a successful life is the subject of Part Four, Creativity and Habilitation, followed by chapters on the mutual accommodation of different approaches to education. The final essays discuss the role of aesthetic sensibilities in moral development with the theme of education and the aesthetics of moral cultivation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Roger T. Ames and Peter D. Hershock)

Part I Education, Relationality, and Diversity
ch. 1 Relating Freely: The Meaning of Educating for Equity and Diversity (Peter D. Hershock)
ch. 2 Philosophy and the Hybridization of Culture (Richard Rorty)
ch. 3 The Overdominance of English in Global Education: Is an Alternative Scenario Thinkable? (Tze-Wan Kwan)
ch. 4 Teaching Philosophy of Religion "Multiculturally": A Lokahi Approach? (Gwen Griffith-Dickson)
ch. 5 Democracy and Science in Education: Lacuna in China's Modernization (Sor-Hoon Tan)

Part II Education and Affectivity
ch. 6 Educating Emotions: The Phenomenology of Feelings (Robert C. Solomon)
ch. 7 Caring and Critical Thinking in Relational Ethics (Nel Noddings)
ch. 8 Cultivating the Mindful Heart: What We May Learn from the Japanese Philosophy of Kokoro (Thomas P. Kasulis)
ch. 9 The Dilemma of Skillful Means in Buddhist Pedagogy: Desire and Education in the Lotus Sutra (Tao Jiang)

Part III Education and Somaticity
ch. 10 With This Very Body: Or What Kukai Has to Teach Us about Ritual Pedagogy (Nikki Bado-Fralick)
ch. 11 The Confucian Body and Virtue Education: On the Balance between Inner Authenticity and Outer Expression (Seung-Hwan Lee)
ch. 12 Ethical Education as Bodily Training: Kitaro Nishida's Moral Phenomenology of "Acting-Intuition" (Joel W. Krueger)

Part IV Creativity and Habilitation
ch. 13 What's Wrong with Being "Creative"? (John Hope Mason)
ch. 14 Constructing Identities: The Shifting Role of Indoctrination in Chinese and American Education (Gay Garland Reed)
ch. 15 Initiating but not Proceeding to the end – a Confucian response to indoctrination (Geir Sigurdsson)
ch. 16 Either Self-realization or transmission of received wisdom in Confucian education? (Hoyt Cleveland Tillman)

Part V Education and Otherness
ch. 17 Oral traditions, African philosophical methods, and their contributions to education and our global knowledge (Workineh Kelbessa)
ch. 18 The ideas of “educating” and “learning” in Confucian thought (Chen Lai)
ch. 19 Spiritual transformation and transthetical life – thinking from advaita (John J. Thatamanil)
ch. 20 Education and responsiveness – On the agency of intersubjectivity (Brian J. Bruya)
ch. 21 Different encounter between teacher and student in Sankara’s Upadesa-Sahasri and in the teaching of Jiddu Krishnamurti (Daniel Raveh)

Part VI Education and Aesthetics of Moral Cultivation
ch. 22 Beautiful freedom – Schiller on the ‘Aesthetic Education’ of Humanity (Fred Dallmayr)
ch. 23 Musical Education for Peace (Kathleen Marie Higgins)
ch. 24 Fact and Value in the Analects – Education and Logic (Joel J. Kupperman)
ch. 25 Xunzi and the role of aesthetic experience in moral cultivation (Scott R. Stroud)
ch. 26 How is weakness of the will NOT possible? Cheng Yi’s Neo-confucian conception of moral knowledge (Yong Huang)

Contributors
Index
Cover image

Getting Culture: Incorporating Diversity Across the Curriculum

Book
Gurung, Regan A.R.; and Prieto, Loreto R., eds.
2009
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC1099.3.G48 2009
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
How do we educate our students about cultural diversity and cultural differences, and eliminate cultural ignorance, stereotyping, and prejudice? What are the conceptual issues involved in reaching this goal? How can we integrate these perspectives in disciplinary and diversity courses, and the curriculum?
This book is a resource for answering these questions. Within the framework of current scholarship and discussion of essential concepts, it offers practical techniques, and empirically ...
Additional Info:
How do we educate our students about cultural diversity and cultural differences, and eliminate cultural ignorance, stereotyping, and prejudice? What are the conceptual issues involved in reaching this goal? How can we integrate these perspectives in disciplinary and diversity courses, and the curriculum?
This book is a resource for answering these questions. Within the framework of current scholarship and discussion of essential concepts, it offers practical techniques, and empirically proven "best practices" for teaching about diversity.
The book opens with a conceptual framework, covering such issues as distinguishing teaching to a diverse audience from teaching about diversity and contrasting the incorporation of culture across the curriculum with tokenistic approaches. Subsequent chapters identify classroom practices that can optimize students' learning, especially those from culturally diverse backgrounds; describe feminist principles of education that that promote learning for all students; and address principles of effective on-line instruction for diverse populations.
The book is intended for faculty integrating diversity into existing courses, and for anyone creating courses on diversity. The ideas and suggestions in the text can be incorporated into any class that includes a discussion of diversity issues or has a diverse student enrollment. The contributors offer pragmatic and tested ways of overcoming student misconceptions and resistance, and for managing emotional responses that can be aroused by the discussion of diversity. The editors aim to stimulate readers' thinking and inspire fresh ideas.
The book further provides teachers ofdiversity with a range of effective exercises, and attends to such issues as teacher stress and burnout.
This book can also serve to inform and guide department chairs and other administrators in the design and implementation of diversity initiatives. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface

Section 1 General Issues in Teaching About Diversity
ch. 1 Teaching About Culture (David Matsumoto)
ch. 2 Got Culture?: Incorporating Culture into the Curriculum (Regan A. R. Gurung)
ch. 3 Teaching About Diversity: Reflections and Future Directions (Loreto R. Prieto)
ch. 4 A Metapedagogical Approach to Culture in the Classroom(Thomas N. Robinson III)
ch. 5 Learning Styles as Self-fulfilling Prophecies (Kris Vasquez)
ch. 6 The "Why's" and "How's" of Being a Social Justice Ally (Sandra L. Neumann)
ch. 7 The Diversity Monologues: Increasing Understanding and Empathy, Decreasing Stereotypes and Prejudice (Amy Hackney-Hansen)
ch. 8 Infusing Cross-Cultural Experiences Into the Classroom(Craig Abrahamson)
ch. 9 Teaching About the Social Psychology of Disability: Issues of Being, Not Becoming (Dana S. Dunn)
ch. 10 Foreign Language Learning: A Different Form of Diversity (Paul C. Smith)

Section 2 Feminism and Diversity Education
ch. 11 Teaching Gender Diversity Through Diverse Lenses (Janet E. Kuebli, Accalia R. Kusto, and Karen Wilson)
ch. 12 Pedagogical Intersections of Gender, Race, and Identity: Signs of a Feminist Teacher (Karlyn Crowley)

Section 3 The Inclusive Classroom
ch. 13 Developing Democracy: Encouraging Multiple Viewpoints and Community in Classrooms (Kathie E. Shiba)
ch. 14 Creating Inclusive Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Courses (Nilhan Gunasekera and Katherine Friedrich)
ch. 15 Teaching Diversity Through Literature: Urging Voyages Toward Deeper Understanding (Nancy L. Chick)
ch. 16 Internationalizing the Psychology Curriculum: Examples of Course Transformation (Leeann Bartolini, Afshin Gharib, and William Phillips)
ch. 17 Experiential Activities for Teaching About Diversity (Carlos M. Diaz-Lazaro, Sandra Cordova, and Rosslyn Franklyn )
ch. 18 Enlisting the Participation of Students in Diversifying the Curriculum
ch. 19 A Seat at the Table for Everyone: Exercises in Valuing Diversity

Section 4 Diversity and Online Environments
ch. 20 Diversity and Distance Education: Cultural Competence for Online Instructors
ch. 21 Using Educational Technology to Teach Diversity Content
ch. 22 Developing Global Connections: Connecting Students in Cross-cultural Online Teaching Activities

Section 5 Methods and Techniques for Faculty and Diversity Trainers
ch. 23 Pleased to Meet You: Introducing Multicultural Competence and Diversity Awareness to Your Students
ch. 24 Intercultural Simulations and Games: Having Fun While Discussing Serious Matters
ch. 25 The Use of Action Learning Techniques in a Race Relations Course
ch. 26 Keeping it Real: Authenticity in the Diversity Learning Environment
ch. 27 Coping Strategies for Diversity Scholars
Section 6 Diversity Across Educational Settings
ch. 28 Teaching Diversity in the High School Classroom
ch. 29 Diversity Issues in Community Colleges
ch. 30 Assignments and Course Content in Teaching Diversity
ch. 31 Beyond the Classroom: An Experiential Model for Developing Multicultural Competence

About the Authors
Index
Additional Info:
If we are all becoming global citizens, what then are our civic responsibilities? Colleges and universities across the United States have responded to this question by making the development of global citizens part of their core mission. A key strategy for realizing this goal is study abroad. After all, there may be no better way for students to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to become effective change-agents in ...
Additional Info:
If we are all becoming global citizens, what then are our civic responsibilities? Colleges and universities across the United States have responded to this question by making the development of global citizens part of their core mission. A key strategy for realizing this goal is study abroad. After all, there may be no better way for students to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to become effective change-agents in international contexts.

The Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad is a comprehensive survey of the field. Each chapter eloquently conveys an enthusiasm for study abroad alongside a critical assessment of the most up-to-date research, theory and practice. This contributed volume brings together expert academics, senior administrators, practitioners of study abroad, and policy makers from across the United States, Canada and other part of the world, who meticulously address the following questions:

What do we mean by global citizenship and global competence?

What are the philosophical, pedagogical and practical challenges facing institutions as they endeavor to create global citizens?

How is study abroad and global citizenship compatible with the role of the academy?

What are the institutional challenges to study abroad, including those related to ethics, infrastructure, finances, accessibility, and quality control?

Which study abroad programs can be called successful?

The Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad is an indispensable reference volume for scholars, higher education faculty, study abroad professionals, policy makers, and the academic libraries that serve these audiences. It is also appropriate for a wide range of courses in Higher Education Master’s and Ph.D. Programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part 1 Defining Global Citizenship in Study Abroad
ch. 1 Global Citizenship in Theory and Practice (Hans Schattle)
ch. 2 Fostering Engagement: The Role of International Education in the Development of Global Civil Society (James M. Skelly)
ch. 3 Global Learning and the Making of Citizen Diplomats (Rebecca Hovey and Adam Weinberg)
ch. 4 International Studies and Foreign Languages: A Critical American Priority (Charles Kolb)
ch. 5 Global Citizenship Education: Challenges and Possibilities (Ian Davies and Graham Pike)

Part 2 Aligning Global Citizenship and Study Abroad With the MIssion of the Academy
ch. 6 Study Abroad and Language: From Maximal to Realistic Models (Dieter Wanner)
ch. 7 Constructive Disequilibrium: Cognitive and Emotional Development through Dissonant Experiences in Less Familiar Destinations (S. Megan Che, Mindy Spearman, and Agida Manizade)
ch. 8 The Liberal Arts and Global Citizenship: Fostering Intercultural Engagement Through Integrative Experiences and Structured Reflection ((Joseph L. Brockington and Margarete D. Wiedenhoeft)
ch. 9 Study Abroad and Nursing: From Cultural to Global Competence (Connie Currier, et. al)
ch. 10 The Role of Study Abroad in Preparing Globally Responsible Teachers (Kenneth Cushner)
ch. 11 Democratizing Study Abroad: Challenges of Open Access, Local Commitments, and Global Competence in Community Colleges (Robert A. Frost and Rosalind Latiner Raby)
ch. 12 North of 49: Global Citizenship a la canadienne (Roopa Desai Trilokekar and Adrian Shubert)
ch. 13 Global Citizenship and Study Abroad: A European Comparative Perspective (Hans de Wit)
ch. 14 Strategy for the Development of a Global City: Study Abroad in Singapore (Peter Pang)

Part 3 Institutional Challenges and Strategies for Fostering Global Citizenship Study Abroad
ch. 15 It Takes an Entire Institution: A Blueprint for the Global University (William Brustein)
ch. 16 Turning Our Back on the World: Study Abroad and the Purpose of U.S. Higher Education (Riall W. Nolan)
ch. 17 Faculty Beliefs and Institutional Values: Identifying and Overcoming These Obstacles to Education Abroad Growth (Joan Elias Gore)
ch. 18 Selling the World: Study Abroad Marketing and the Privatization of Global Citizenship (Talya Zemach-Bersin)
ch. 19 Global Citizenship for All: Low Minority Study Participation in Study Abroad - Seeking Strategies for Success (Earl Picard, Farrah Bernardino, and Kike Ehigiator)
ch. 20 Understanding the Challenges of Assessing Global Citizenship (Darla K. Deardorff)
ch. 21 Here to Stay: Increasing Acceptance of Short-Term Study Abroad Programs (Lisa Chieffor and Lesa Grifiths)
ch. 22 Going Global in the Sciences: A Case Study at Emory University (Philip Wainwright, et al.)
ch. 23 Undergraduate Research During Study Abroad: Scope, Meaning, and Potential (Bernhard T. Streitwieser)

Part 4 Innovative Global Citizenship Study Abroad Program Models
ch. 24 Georgia Tech's Comprehensive and Integrated Approach to Developing Global Competence (Howard Rollins)
ch. 25 Holistic Student Learning and Development Abroad: The IES 3-D Program Model (Joan Gillespie, Larry Braskamp, and Mary Dwyer)
ch. 26 It Takes a Curriculum: Bringing Global Mindedness Home (Kevin Hovland)
ch. 27 Educating Globally Competent Citizens through International Service Learning (William M. Plater, et al.)
ch. 28 Creating Deep Partnerships with Institutions Abroad: Bard College as Global Citizen (Susan H. Gillespie, et al.)
ch. 29 Creating Study Abroad Opportunities for First-Generation College Students (Maria D. Martinez, Bidya Ranjeet, and Helen A. Marx)
ch. 30 It's Not about You: The UConn Social Entrepreneur Corps Global Commonwealth Study Abroad Model (Ross Lewin and Greg Van Kirk)

Contributors
Index
Cover image

Answering the Call: African American Women in Higher Education Leadership

Book
Bower, Beverly L. and Mimi Wolverton
2009
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2341.B625 2009
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Although much has been written about leaders and leadership, we unfortunately know little about women, particularly minority women, who fill this particular role.

This book the second in a series that explores women leaders in different contexts presents the stories, and the reflections on their paths to leadership, of seven African American women. Five are, or have been, college presidents; three have devoted a good portion of their ...
Additional Info:
Although much has been written about leaders and leadership, we unfortunately know little about women, particularly minority women, who fill this particular role.

This book the second in a series that explores women leaders in different contexts presents the stories, and the reflections on their paths to leadership, of seven African American women. Five are, or have been, college presidents; three have devoted a good portion of their lives to leadership in higher education policy at state and/or national levels.

Each has been the first woman, or first African American, or first African American woman in one or more of the positions of authority that she has held. Along the way, they have overcome the double bind of sexism and racism that can inhibit the professional attainment of African American women, particularly as they move toward the top of their professions.

Although their pathways into leadership are different, definite similarities in their experiences, values, and beliefs emerge. Their values took root in the 1960s, a time of strong cohesion in the Black community, a time during which African Americans and women made great strides toward equality. They recognize that they owe their strength to the confidence and sense of empowerment instilled in each of them by parents and early role models. Several of them believe that their leadership skills were born out of their childhood experiences. Grateful for the support they have received, these women leaders express a need to give back to those communities that nourished their growth and leadership of which this book is a manifestation.

At a time when national demographic dataindicate that a significant turnover in college leadership is about to occur presenting increased opportunities for women and minorities these African American women leaders hope that the strategies they describe, the insights they impart, the experiences they recount, and, most of all, the passion they have sustained for the betterment of and greater inclusiveness in higher education, will inspire the next generation of women to answer the leadership call.

The African-American Women Leaders Covered in this Book: Debra Austin, Lois Carson, Marvalene Hughes, Yolanda Moses, Beverly Daniel Tatum, Jerry Sue Thornton, Belle S. Wheelan. These women exude strength and self-confidence. They each hold the belief, as Belle Wheelan puts it, that "with a little heart and a lot of learning I can do anything". (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Forward

ch. 1 The Realities of African American Women in Higher Education Leadership
ch. 2 Being Okay With Being Me
ch. 3 Walking the Talk
ch. 4 Finding Purpose Through Meaningful Leadership
ch. 5 Making Things Happen
ch. 6 Choosing a Commitment to Change
ch. 7 Energized for the Hard Work of Leadership
ch. 8 For the Greater Good
ch. 9 Six C's of Leadership
ch. 10 Project Methodology

Index
Article cover image

"Cultural Diversity and Seminary Teaching"

Article
Fishburn, Janet F.
1995
Taylor & Francis Group, New York, NY
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"On Being up to Snuff: Standards and Multi-culturalism"

Article
Hess, Carol Lakey
1999
Cardiff Academic Press, United Kingdom
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Multicultural and Global Theological Scholarship: An Asian American Perspective"

Article
Lee, Jung Young
1995
Theological Education, (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Cover image

Indigenous Knowledge and Education: Sites of Struggle, Strength, and Survivance

Book
Malia Villegas, Sabina Rak Neugebauer, Kerry R. Venegas, eds.
2008
Harvard Educational Review, Cambridge, MA
LB43.I6 2008
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
This book brings together essays that explore Indigenous ways of knowing and that consider how such knowledge can inform educational practices and institutions.

Indigenous Knowledges is resiliently local in character and this poses a distinct contrast to the international, more impersonal system of knowledge prevalent in Western educational institutions. In the words of Mi'kmaq scholar Marie Battiste - a leading proponent of Indigenous Knowledge and a contributor to ...
Additional Info:
This book brings together essays that explore Indigenous ways of knowing and that consider how such knowledge can inform educational practices and institutions.

Indigenous Knowledges is resiliently local in character and this poses a distinct contrast to the international, more impersonal system of knowledge prevalent in Western educational institutions. In the words of Mi'kmaq scholar Marie Battiste - a leading proponent of Indigenous Knowledge and a contributor to this volume - Indigenous Knowledge expresses "the vibrant relationships between the people, their ecosystems, and the other living beings and spirits that share their lands." Indigenous Knowledge and Education argues that such knowledge has much to offer schools and students in the United States and beyond.

This volume examines a wide range of Indigenous cultures and educational settings, including Native American, Haitian, Mexican, African, and Australian. Uniting all are three themes exemplified by many Indigenous cultures: struggle, strength, and survivance--the later a notion of survival that emphasizes remembrance, regeneration, and spiritual renewal Each of these themes is explored in a rich array of articles and capped with new essays by Marie Battiste, Gregory A. Cajete, and Bryan McKinley Jones Brayboy.

A wide-ranging and persistently stimulating volume, Indigenous Knowledge and Education casts contemporary theories and debates about education in a new--and essential--light. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Editors' Introduction

Part One - Sites of the Struggle
ch. 1 Fundamental Considerations: The Deep Meaning of Native American Schooling, 1880-1900 (David Wallace Adams)
ch. 2 Mexico: Indianismo and the Rural School (Ramon Eduardo Ruiz)
ch. 3 Literacy Colonialism: Books in the Third Word (Philip G. Altbach)
ch. 4 The Use of Argumentation in Haitian Creole Science Classrooms (Josiane Hudicourt-Barnes)
ch. 5 The Struggle and Renaissance of Indigenous Knowledge in Eurocentric Education (Marie Battiste)

Part Two - Sites of Strength
ch. 6 No Longer Overlooked and Undervalued? The Evolving Dynamics of Endogenous Educational Research in the Sub-Saharan Africa (Richard Maclure)
ch. 7 Beyond the Methods Fetish: Toward a Humanizing Pedagogy (Lilia I. Bartolome)
ch. 8 Aboriginal Education: The School at Strelley, Western Australia (Kenneth Liberman)
ch. 9 Nicaragua 1980: The Battle of the ABCs (Fernando Cardenal, S.J., Valerie Miller)
ch. 10 Tribal Sovereigns: Reframing Research in American Indian Education (K. Tsianina Lowawaima)
ch. 11 Site of Strength in Indigenous Research (Gregory A. Cajete)

Part Three - Sites of Survivance
ch. 12 American Indian Geographies of Identity and Power: At the Crossroads of Indigena and Mestizaje (Sandy Marie Anglas Grande)
ch. 13 Education as Transformation: Becoming a Healer among the !Kung and the Fijians (Richard Katz)
ch. 14 Serving the Purpose of Education (Leona Okakok)
ch. 15 "Not Bread Alone": Clandestine Schooling and Resistance in the Warsaw Ghetto during the Holocaust (Susan M. Kardos)
ch. 16 Community Education: To Reclaim and Transform What Has Been Made Invisible (Munir Fasheh)
ch. 17 "Yakkity Yak" and "Talking Back": An Examination of Sites of Survivance in Indigenous Knowledge (Bryan McKinely)

About the Contributors
About the Editors
Cover image

Race and Ethnicity (pdf)

Journal Issue
2009
Theological Education 45, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v. 45 no. 1 2009
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2009-theological-education-v45-n1.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2009-theological-education-v45-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Gifts Differing: The Educational Value of Race and Ethnicity (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Engaging Borders: Lifting Up Difference and Unmasking Division (Gary Riebe-Estrella)
Latino/a Theological Education: Defining the Table (David Maldonado)
Case Study: Hood Theological Seminary (Christopher R. Hutson)
What Do We Do with the Diversity that We Already Are? The Asian and Asian North American in Accredited Graduate Theological Education (Lester Edwin J. Ruiz and Eleazar S. Fernandez)
Online Theological Education: Perspectives from First-Generation Asian American Students (Roger S. Nam)
CORE: An Evolving Initiative (Janice Edwards-Armstrong)
Journal cover image

Diversifying Knowledge Production: The Other within Christianity

Journal Issue
Kassam, Zayn, ed.
2007
Spotlight on Teaching 22, no. 4 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/sotoct07.pdf 
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/sotoct07.pdf 

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Diversifying Knowledge Production: The Other within Christianity (Zayn Kassam)
ch. 2 Hegemonies of Knowledge Production (Zayn Kassam)
ch. 3 On Being the Academic Other (Miguel A. De La Torre)
ch. 4 Redemptive Difference: What Can a Black Woman Teach Me? (Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas)
ch. 5 The Other within Mexican-American Religious Studies (Gastón Espinosa)
ch. 6 Whose Religion? Immigrants and the First Amendment (Simeon O. Ilesanmi)
ch. 7 Homosexualized and Racialized Enemy as Anti/Christ (Erin Runions)
ch. 8 Dialectic Emptying: Self and the Other Within (Andrew Sung Park)
ch. 9 Transmodern, Transnational, Transdisciplinary, Trans (Kwok Pui Lan)
ch. 10 From Theorizing the Other to Theories of Others (Elizabeth A. Castelli)
ch. 11 Survival Strategies for an Ethnic Studies Professor (Andrea Smith)
Cover image

They Were All Together in One Place? Toward Minority Biblical Criticism

Book
Bailey, Randall C., Tat-siong Benny Liew, and Fernando F. Segovia, eds.
2009
Society of Biblical Literature, Atlanta
BS521.88.T44 2009b
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Critics from three major racial/ethnic minority communities in the United States African American, Asian American, and Latino/a American focus on the problematic of race and ethnicity in the Bible and in contemporary biblical interpretation. With keen eyes on both ancient text and contemporary context, contributors pay close attention to how racial/ethnic dynamics intersect with other differential relations of power such as gender, class, sexuality, and colonialism. In ...
Additional Info:
Critics from three major racial/ethnic minority communities in the United States African American, Asian American, and Latino/a American focus on the problematic of race and ethnicity in the Bible and in contemporary biblical interpretation. With keen eyes on both ancient text and contemporary context, contributors pay close attention to how racial/ethnic dynamics intersect with other differential relations of power such as gender, class, sexuality, and colonialism. In groundbreaking interaction, they also consider their readings alongside those of other racial/ethnic minority communities. The volume includes an introduction pointing out the crucial role of this work within minority criticism by looking at its historical trajectory, critical findings, and future directions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction
Toward Minority Biblical Criticism: Framework, Contours, Dynamics

Part 1: Studies

Section 1: Puncturing Objectivity and Universality
ch. 1 Reflections in an Interethnic/racial Era on Interethnic/racial Marriage in Ezra (Cheryl B. Anderson)
ch. 2 Exile in the Hebrew Bible: A Postcolonial Look from the Cuban Diaspora (Francisco O. Garcia-Treto)
ch. 3 They Could Not Speak the Language of Judah: Rereading Nehemiah 13 between Brooklyn and Jerusalem (Jean-Pierre Ruiz)
ch. 4 What Does Manzanar Have to Do with Eden? A Japanese American Interpretation of Genesis 2-3 (Frank M. Yamada)
ch. 5 She Stood in Tears Amid the Alien Corn: Ruth, the Perpetual Foreigner and Model Minority (Gale A. Yee)
ch. 6 Paul and Ethnic Difference in Romans (Jae Won Lee)

Section 2: Expanding The Field
ch. 7 Ancient Ethiopia and the New Testament: Ethnic (Con)texts and Racialized (Sub)texts (Gay L. Byron)

Section 3: Problematizing Criticism
ch. 8 Toward Latino/a American Biblical Criticism: Latin(o/a)ness as Problematic (Fernando F. Segovia)

Section 4: Taking An Interdisciplinary Turn
ch. 9 That's Why They Didn't Call the Book Hadassah! The Intersectionality of Race/Ethnicity, Gender, and Sexuality in the Book of Ester (Randall C. Bailey)
ch. 10 Queering Closets and Perverting Desires: Cross-Examining John's Engendering and Transgendering Word across Different Worlds (Tat-siong Benny Liew)
ch. 11 Upon All Flesh: Acts 2, African Americans, and Intersectional Realities (Demetrius K. Williams)

Part 2: Assessments
ch. 12 Incarnate Words: Images of God and Reading Practices (Mayra Rivera Rivera)
ch. 13 Teaching for Color Consciousness (Evelyn L. Parker)
ch. 14 The Difference That Damage Makes: Rejections of an Ethic Studies Scholar on the Wabash Consultation (James Kyung-Jin Lee)

Conclusion (Fernando F. Segovia)
Minority Biblical Criticism: A Reflection on Achievements and Lacunae
Contributors
Cover image

147 Practical Tips for Teaching Sustainability: Connecting the Environment, the Economy, and Society

Book
Timpson, William M., Dunbar, Brian, Kimmel, Gailmarie, Bruyere, Brett, Newman, Peter, and Mizia, Hillary
2006
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
GE70.A13 2006
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
The stone age didn't end because of a lack of rocks! one educator is fond of stating. While there were certainly an abundance of rocks available, stone age people moved on to a new era because it become possible for them to envision and create a different and more useful way of organizing life. Many believe that we are currently at a similar juncture and can begin to imagine and ...
Additional Info:
The stone age didn't end because of a lack of rocks! one educator is fond of stating. While there were certainly an abundance of rocks available, stone age people moved on to a new era because it become possible for them to envision and create a different and more useful way of organizing life. Many believe that we are currently at a similar juncture and can begin to imagine and construct new ways to live on our planet.

We are the first generation capable of determining the habitability of the plant for humans and other species, writers Anthony Cortese in the introduction. Teachers at every level can play an important role in helping us find a sustainable path.

Exploring ideas about sustainability is appropriate for all disciplines, plus community groups, business and industry. The diverse backgrounds of the authors of this volume demonstrate exciting situations in which sustainability is critical. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
List of Contributions

ch. 1 Defining Sustainability
ch. 2 Historical Perspectives
ch. 3 Systems, Synergy, and Visions
ch. 4 Economics and Consumption
ch. 5 Design, Nature, and Buildings
ch. 6 Ethics, Values, and The Sacred
ch. 7 Personal Responsibility and Empowerment
ch. 8 Plan Ahead
ch. 9 Approaches and Assessments
ch. 10 Learning Through Experience
ch. 11 The Positive Learning Climate
ch. 12 Awareness and Consciousness Expansion
ch. 13 Effective Communication
ch. 14 Cooperation and Collaboration
ch. 15 Community and A Sense of Place
ch. 16 Critical and Creative Thinking
ch. 17 Supporting Change
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Classroom in Conflict: Teaching Controversial Subjects in a Diverse Society

Book
Williams, John A.
1994
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LB2331.W47 1994
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book transcends recent debates about political correctness to address the underlying problems of teaching controversial subjects in the college and university history classroom. The author criticizes both sides of the debate, rejecting, on the one hand, calls for a uniform, chronological history curriculum and, on the other hand, claims that only ethnic or racial "insiders" are qualified to teach about their communities. In chapters on colonial, comparative, and African ...
Additional Info:
This book transcends recent debates about political correctness to address the underlying problems of teaching controversial subjects in the college and university history classroom. The author criticizes both sides of the debate, rejecting, on the one hand, calls for a uniform, chronological history curriculum and, on the other hand, claims that only ethnic or racial "insiders" are qualified to teach about their communities. In chapters on colonial, comparative, and African history, Williams applies the concept of "Gandhian truth" to historical subjects, moving through tentative and flexible perspectives to achieve a complex picture of historical episodes. And in chapters on imperialism, nationalism, racism, and the problem of "the other," he discusses the difficult and contingent nature of conceptual language. In the second half of the book, he addresses framing rules of discussion by which sensitive issues can be discussed with diverse audiences, the relationship of American pluralism to a world perspective, and what can be accomplished through an education in pluralism. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 One Classroom: An Introduction
ch. 2 Conflicting Views of the Classroom Revolution
ch. 3 The Teacher's Pitch and the Student Audience
ch. 4 Insiders and Outsiders
ch. 5 The Colonizer and the Colonized
ch. 6 The Uses of Comparative History
ch. 7 Teaching a Racially Sensitive Subject
ch. 8 On Understanding the South African Freedom Struggle
ch. 9 Imperialism
ch. 10 Nationalism and Racism: The Keywords
ch. 11 Structures of Argument in African History
ch. 12 The Other: The Problem of Authenticity
ch. 13 The World Context of American Pluralism
ch. 14 Learning in the Pluralist Classroom
ch. 15 The Rules of Discussion
ch. 16 In Pursuit of Pluralism

Bibliography
Index
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Women Faculty of Color in the White Classroom

Book
Vargas, Lucila, ed.
2002
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LB2332.32.W66 2002
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
What is it like for women of color to teach in predominantly white college classrooms? This anthology is about the pedagogical implications of diversifying the faculty of higher education. It compiles narratives by women professors of color who interrogate their classroom experiences in predominantly white U.S. campuses to examine the impact of their social positions upon their classroom practices and their teaching-learning selves. The authors reflect upon their unique ...
Additional Info:
What is it like for women of color to teach in predominantly white college classrooms? This anthology is about the pedagogical implications of diversifying the faculty of higher education. It compiles narratives by women professors of color who interrogate their classroom experiences in predominantly white U.S. campuses to examine the impact of their social positions upon their classroom practices and their teaching-learning selves. The authors reflect upon their unique classroom challenges and talk about the teaching-learning strategies they use to find rewards in their interactions with students. This anthology explores the larger question of how social distinctions shape classroom social life and will be a resource for those concerned with enabling the diversification of the faculty of institutions of higher learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction (Lucila Vargas)
ch. 2 Why Are We Still so Few and Why Has Our Progress Been So Slow? (Lucila Vargas)
ch. 3 My Classroom in Its Context: The Struggle for Multiculturalism (Lucila Vargas)
ch. 4 "Passing/Out" in the Classroom: Eradicating Binaries of Identity (Giselle Liza Anatol)
ch. 5 Reading the Body Indian: A Chicana Mestiza's Experience Teaching Literature (Lisa D. Chavez)
ch. 6 Useful Anger: Confrontation and Challenge in the Teaching of Gender, Race, and Violence (Kimberly Nichele Brown)
ch. 7 Negotiating Minefield: Practicing Transformative Pedagogy as a Teacher of Color in a Classroom Climate of Suspicion (Rashmi Luthra)
ch. 8 Teaching with Differences and for Differences: Reflections of a Chinese American Teacher Educator (Xue Lang Rong)
ch. 9 A Foreign Woman Faculty's Multiple Whammies (Cecilia G. Manrique)
ch. 10 The Pacific Asianized Other: Teaching Unlearning among Midwestern Students (Fay Yokomizo Akindes)
ch. 11 Contradictions in the Classroom: Reflections of an Okanogan-Colville Professor (Delores Black-Connor Cleary)
ch. 12 Pushing Beyond the Sterotypes and Fostering Collaboration: One Sistuh's Approach to Teaching Media Production (Zeinabu Irene Davis)
ch. 13 "Results Matter": When the Other Teacher Teaches English in the Bluegrass State (Lou-Ann Crouther)
ch. 14 Guess Who's Coming to Class: Teaching through the Politics of Race, Class, and Gender Anne B. Onyekuluje)
ch. 15 A U.S.-Born Latina Professor: Cultural Stranger in My Own Classroom (Diana I. Rios)
ch. 16 Yellow Lotus in White Lily Pond: An Asian American Woman Teaching in Utah (Priti Kumar)
ch. 17 Marginality as an Asset: Toward at Counter-Hegemonic Pedagogy for Diversity (Ryuko Kubota)
ch. 18 We Do Not Want You to Be Human, We Want You to Be Right: Dilemmas of Legitimacy in Environments of Privilege Fredi Avalos-C'deBaca)
ch. 19 Opening a Dialogue: From a White Student's Perspective (Kristina Casto)

Index
Article cover image

"Toward Liberating Interdependence: Exploring An Intercultural Pedagogy"

Article
Lee, Boyung
2010
Religious Education, Vol. 105, No. 3, May-June, pgs. 283-298
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Queer Theory in Education

Book
Pinar, William F., ed.
1998
Routledge, New York, NY
LC192.6.Q84 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
Theoretical studies in curriculum have begun to move into cultural studies--one vibrant and increasingly visible sector of which is queer theory. Queer Theory in Education brings together the most prominent and promising scholars in the field of education--primarily but not exclusively in curriculum--in the first volume on queer theory in education. In his perceptive introduction, the editor outlines queer theory as it is emerging in the field of education, its ...
Additional Info:
Theoretical studies in curriculum have begun to move into cultural studies--one vibrant and increasingly visible sector of which is queer theory. Queer Theory in Education brings together the most prominent and promising scholars in the field of education--primarily but not exclusively in curriculum--in the first volume on queer theory in education. In his perceptive introduction, the editor outlines queer theory as it is emerging in the field of education, its significance for all scholars and teachers, and its relation to queer theory in literacy theory and more generally, in the humanities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (W.F. Pinar)

ch. 1 Constructing Knowledge: Educational Research and Gay and Lesbian Studies (W.G. Tierney and P. Dilley)
ch. 2 A Generational and Theoretical Analysis of Culture and Male (Homo) Sexuality (J.T. Sears)
ch. 3 Who Am I? Gay Identity and a Democratic Politics of the Self (D. Carlson)
ch. 4 Remember When All the Cars Were Fords and All the Lesbians Were Women? Some Notes on Identity, Mobility, and Capital (E. Meiners)
ch. 5 Queering/Querying Pedagogy? Or, Pedagogy Is a Pretty Queer Thing (S. Luhmann)
ch. 6 Queer Texts and Performativity: Zora, Rap, and Community (R. Walcott)
ch. 7 (Queer) Youth as Political and Pedagogical (N. Rodriquez)
ch. 8 Appropriate Queerness: Hollywood Sanitation (S.R. Steinberg)
ch. 9 Telling Tales of Surprise (D. Sumara and B. Davis)
ch. 10 Understanding Curriculum as Gender Text: Notes on Reproduction, Resistance, and Male-Male Relations (W.F. Pinar)
ch. 11 From the Ridiculous to the Sublime: On Finding Oneself in Educational Research (S. de Castell and M. Bryson)
ch. 12 Carnal Knowledge: Re-Searching (through) the Sexual Body (K.G. Honeychurch)
ch. 13 Unresting the Curriculum: Queer Projects, Queer Imaginings (M. Morris)
ch. 14 Queering the Gaze (M.A. Doll)
ch. 15 Fantasizing Women in the Women's Studies Classroom: Toward a Symptomatic Reading of Negation (A.J. Pitt)
ch. 16 On Some Psychical Consequences of AIDS Education (D.P. Britzman)
ch. 17 We "Were Already Ticking and Didn't Even Know" [It]: Early AIDS Works (R. Platizky)
ch. 18 Of Mad Men Who Practice Invention to the Brink of Intelligibility (W. Haver)
ch. 19 Autobiography as a Queer Curriculum Practice (J.L. Miller)

About the Contributors
Author Index
Subject Index
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Teaching About Asian Pacific Americans: Effective Activities, Strategies, and Assignments for Classrooms and Communities

Book
Chen, Edith Wen-Chu, and Omatsu, Glenn
2006
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
E184.A75 T43 2006
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
The number of Asian American students in schools and colleges has soared in the last twenty-five years, and they make up one of the fastest growing segments of the student population. However, classroom material often does not include their version of the American experience. Teaching about Asian Pacific Americans was created to address this void. This resource guide provides interactive activities, assignments, and strategies for classrooms or workshops. Those new ...
Additional Info:
The number of Asian American students in schools and colleges has soared in the last twenty-five years, and they make up one of the fastest growing segments of the student population. However, classroom material often does not include their version of the American experience. Teaching about Asian Pacific Americans was created to address this void. This resource guide provides interactive activities, assignments, and strategies for classrooms or workshops. Those new to the field of Asian American studies will appreciate the background information on issues that concern Asian Pacific Americans, while experts in the field will find powerful, innovative teaching activities that clearly convey established and new ideas. The activities in this book have been used effectively in classrooms, workshops for staff and practitioners in student services programs, community-based organizations, teacher training programs, social service agencies, and diversity training. Teaching About Asian Pacific Americans serves as a critical resource for anyone interested in race, ethnicity, and Asian Pacific American communities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I: Definitions, Concepts, and Issues
ch. 1 Vietnamese Boat People: Separation and Loss
ch. 2 Feast of Resistance: Asian American History Through Food
ch. 3 "Pin@y Time": Mapping the Filipino American Experience
ch. 4 Deconstructing the Model Minority Image: Asian Pacific Americans, Race, Class, Gender, and Work
ch. 5 Building Allies: Linking Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality in Asian American Studies
ch. 6 Globalization and Transnationalism Role-Playing Activity: Korean Immigrants and the Garment Industry
ch. 7 Expressive Therapies for Asian American Clients: The Value of Nonverbal Sand Tray Therapy
ch. 8 Are High Achieving Asians Individualists?
ch. 9 Representations of Asian Americans in Advertising Constructing Images of Asian Americans
ch. 10 Ripping Up Cultures: Helping Students Reconnect with Their Cultural Values

Part II: War, Colonialism, and Imperialism
ch. 11 Paradise and the Politics of Tourist Hawai'i
ch. 12 Racializing the "Enemy": Japanese Americans after 12/7/41 and American Muslims and Arabs after 9/11/01
ch. 13 Teaching about Hindus and Muslims in the USA: "Any all they will call you will be deportee"
ch. 14 On the Curses and Blessings of War: Discussions for a Filipino American Experience Class
ch. 15 Addressing Redress: Japanese American's Reparations for Their Incarceration during World War II

Part III: Community Building, Learning, and Organizing
ch. 16 Making Student Leadership Development an Integral Part of Our Classrooms
ch. 17 Beyond the Egg Rolls, Fortune Cookies, and Paper Fans: Seeing the Residential Side of Chinatown
ch. 18 Mobilizing Students to Respond to Community Needs: Organizing a Class around a Community Project
ch. 19 Bridging Generations: Bringing the Experiences of Illness, Health, and Aging into the Classroom
ch. 20 Oral History and Multiculturalism
ch. 21 Bridging Asian American and African American Communities

Part IV: Critical Thinking Teaching Strategies
ch. 22 Understanding Privilege in American Society
ch. 23 An Exploration of Meaning: Critically Thinking about History
ch. 24 Generative Thinking: Using a Funding Proposal to Inspire Critical Thinking
ch. 25 Promoting Transgressions through the Automatic Reward System in the Literature Classroom
ch. 26 What's Wrong with a Color-blind Perspective? A New Model of Critical Caring for Teachers
ch. 27 Modeling Whiteness: Minorities, Assimilation, and Resistance

Part V: Resources
ch. 28 Web Resources for Teaching Asian American Studies

Index
About the Contributors
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Empowering Women in Higher Education and Student Affairs: Theory, Research, Narratives, and Practice From Feminist Perspectives

Book
Pasque, Penny A., and Nicholson, Shelley Errington, eds.
2011
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC1567.E47 2011
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
How do we interrupt the current paradigms of sexism in the academy? How do we construct a new and inclusive gender paradigm that resists the dominant values of the patriarchy? And why are these agendas important not just for women, but for higher education as a whole?

These are the questions that these extensive and rich analyses of the historical and contemporary roles of women in higher education— ...
Additional Info:
How do we interrupt the current paradigms of sexism in the academy? How do we construct a new and inclusive gender paradigm that resists the dominant values of the patriarchy? And why are these agendas important not just for women, but for higher education as a whole?

These are the questions that these extensive and rich analyses of the historical and contemporary roles of women in higher education— as administrators, faculty, students, and student affairs professionals—seek constructively to answer. In doing so they address the intersection of gender and women’s other social identities, such as of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, class, and ability.

This book addresses the experiences and position of women students, from application to college through graduate school, and the barriers they encounter; the continuing inequalities in the rates of promotion and progression of women and other marginalized groups to positions of authority, and the gap in earnings between men and women; and pays particular attention to how race and other social markers impact such disparities, contextualizing them across all institutional types.

Written collaboratively by an intergenerational group of women, men, and transgender people with different social identities, feminist perspectives, and professional identities— and who, in the process, built upon each other’s work—this volume constitutes a call to educators and scholars to work toward centering feminist and other marginalized perspectives in their practice and research in order to equitably address the evolving complexities of college and university life. Employing a wide range of theoretical lenses, examining a variety of models of practice, and giving voice to a diversity of personal experiences through narrative, this is a major contribution to the scholarship on women in higher education.

This is a book for all women in the academy who want to better understand their experience, and to dismantle the remaining barriers of sexism and oppression—for themselves, and future generations of students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

Section I: Setting the Context: A Contemporary (Re)Examination of Women in Higher Education and Student Affairs
ch. 1 An Introduction to Feminism and Feminist Perspectives in Higher Education (Shelley Errington Nicholson and Penny A. Pasque)
ch. 2 Reflections From "Professional Feminists" in Higher Education (Susan Marine)
ch. 3 "Each Generation of Women had to Start Anew" (Jennifer LeeHoffman)
ch. 4 The Powerful Collaborations Between Deans of Women and Directors of Physical Education (Thalia Mulvihill)

Section II: Considering Experiences of Women throughout the Academy: An Exploration of Undergraduates, Graduate Students and Administrators
ch. 5 Female Graduate Students Work-Life Balance and the Student Affairs Professional (Rachael L. Simpson and Kim L. Filer)
ch. 6 High Achieving Women (Monica Marcelis Fochtman)
ch. 7 Toward Self-Investment (Annemarie Vaccaro)
ch. 8 The Influence of Gender (Jennifer Sader)

Section III: Exploring Identity Contexts: The Intersections of Class, Gender, Race, and Sexual Orientation for Faculty, Administrators, and Students
ch. 9 How Race Matters: Race as an Instrument for Institutional Transformations, a Study of Tenured Black Female Faculty (Venice Thandi Sule)
ch. 10 Life Stories From the Daughter of First-Generation Italian Immigrants: Gender, Ethnicity, Culture, and Class Intertwine to Form an Italian American Feminist (Florence Guido DiBrito)
ch. 11 Economically Disadvantaged Women in Higher Education: Hearing Their Stories and Striving for Social Justice (Penny J. Rice)
ch. 12 Sister Circles: A Dialogue on the Intersections of Gender, Race, and Student Affairs (Mariama Boney; Linda Contreras Bullock; Cie Cochran; Irene Kao; and Amanda Suniti Niskode-Dossett)
ch. 13 Using Queer Theory to Explore Lesbian College Students’ Multiple Dimensions of Identity (Elisa Abes, and David Kasch)
ch. 14 Identity Development in College Women (Amy Stalzer Sengupta and Yvette Loury Upton)

Section IV: Advancing the Future: Strategies for Changing Dominant Paradigms
ch. 15 The Campus Women’s Center as Classroom: A Model for Thinking and Action (Jennifer R. Wies )
ch. 16 In (Re)Search of Women in Student Affairs Administration (Tamara Yakaboski and Saran Donahoo)
ch. 17 Campus-Based Sexual Assault Prevention: Perspectives and Recommendations From Program Facilitators (Lindsay M. Orchowski, Eric Zimak, Troy Robison, Justin Reeder, Ryan Rhoades, Christine A. Gidycz and Alan Berkowitz )
ch. 18 Learning and Leading Together: A Cohort-Based Model for Women’s Advancement (Lee S. Hawthorne Calizo)

Section V: Envisioning and Acting on a Feminist Future
ch. 19 Envisioning A New Future With Feminist Voices (Amanda Suniti Niskode-Dossett, Shelley Errington Nicholson, and Penny A. Pasque)

About the Contributors
Index
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Black Theology and Pedagogy: Black Religion/Womanist Thought/Social Justice

Book
Erskine, Noel Leo
2008
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
BT82.7.E76 2008
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
This project proposes to look at the emergence of Black theology as a discipline within the academy and how Black theology may serve as a resource for excellence in teaching. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This project proposes to look at the emergence of Black theology as a discipline within the academy and how Black theology may serve as a resource for excellence in teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Introduction
ch. 1 Pedagogy and Black Community
ch. 2 What Can a Black Woman Teach Me?
ch. 3 Pedagogy and Ontological Sameness ch. 4 The Black Church and Pedagogy
ch. 5 Emancipatory Praxis and Liberation for Oppressors
ch. 6 Pedagogy as Celebration

Notes
Bibliography
Index
TTR cover image

"Engaging Diversity in Teaching Religion and Theology: An Intercultural, De-colonial Epistemic Perspective"

TTR
Andraos, Michel Elias
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 1 (2012): 3-15
BL41.T4 v.15 no. 1 2012
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
This essay explores new ways of engaging diversity in the production of knowledge in the classroom using coloniality as an analytical lens. After briefly engaging some of the recent literature on coloniality, focusing on the epistemic dimension, the author uses the example of teaching a course on religion, culture, and theology, where he employs this analysis, to develop a new pedagogical approach as a step towards an intercultural, de-colonial theological ...
Additional Info:
This essay explores new ways of engaging diversity in the production of knowledge in the classroom using coloniality as an analytical lens. After briefly engaging some of the recent literature on coloniality, focusing on the epistemic dimension, the author uses the example of teaching a course on religion, culture, and theology, where he employs this analysis, to develop a new pedagogical approach as a step towards an intercultural, de-colonial theological education.
Cover image

Jesuit and Feminist Education: Intersections in Teaching and Learning in the Twenty-First Century

Book
Boryczka, Jocelyn M., and Petrino, Elizabeth A.
2012
Fordham University Press, New York, NY
LC493.J355 2012
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religion and Academia   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This book explores how the principles and practices of Ignatian pedagogy overlap and intersect with contemporary feminist theory in order to gain deeper insight into the complexities of today's multicultural educational contexts. Drawing on a method of inquiry that locates individual and collective standpoints in relation to social, political, and economic structures, this volume highlights points of convergence and divergence between Ignatian and feminist pedagogies to explore how educators might ...
Additional Info:
This book explores how the principles and practices of Ignatian pedagogy overlap and intersect with contemporary feminist theory in order to gain deeper insight into the complexities of today's multicultural educational contexts. Drawing on a method of inquiry that locates individual and collective standpoints in relation to social, political, and economic structures, this volume highlights points of convergence and divergence between Ignatian and feminist pedagogies to explore how educators might find strikingly similar methods that advocate common goals—including engaging with issues such as race, gender, diversity, and social justice. The contributors to this volume initiate a dynamic dialogue that will enliven our campuses for years to come. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward
Acknowledgements
Introduction: Educating for Transformation - Jesuit and Feminist Approaches in the Classroom and Beyond

Part I. Mapping The "Herstory" of Jesuit Education
ch. 1 "Do as I Do, Not as I Say": The Pedagogy of Action
ch. 2 Mary, the Hidden Catalyst: Reflections from an Ignatian Pilgrimage to Spain and Rome
ch. 3 Early Jesuit Pedagogy and the Subordination of Women: Resources from the Ratio Studiorum

Part II. Intersection I: Transformative Visions For Educating The Whole Person
ch. 4 "The Personal Is Political": At the Intersections of Feminist and Jesuit Education
ch. 5 Paideia and the Political Process: The Unexplored Coincidence of Jesuit and Feminist Pedagogical Visions
ch. 6 Feminist Pedagogy, the Ingnatian Paradigm, and Service-Learning: Distinctive Roots, Common Objectives, and Intriguing Challenges

Part III. Intersection II: The Power of Difference For Teaching Social Justice
ch. 7 The Intersection of Race, Class, and Gender in Jesuit and Feminist Education: Finding Transcendent Meaning in the Concrete
ch. 8 Teaching for Social Justice in the Engaged Classroom: The Intersection of Jesuit and Feminist Moral Philosophies
ch. 9 Transformative Education in a Broken World: Feminist and Jesuit Pedagogy on the Importance of Context
ch. 10 Consciousness-Raising as Discernment: Using Jesuit and Feminist Pedagogies in a Protestant Classroom

Part IV. The Fault Lines of Gender Sex, and Sexuality: Debates, Challenges, and Opportunities For The Future
ch. 11 De Certeau and "Making Do": The Case of Gay Men and Lesbians on a Jesuit Campus
ch. 12 Textual Deviance: Eve Ensler's The Vagina Monologues and Catholic Campuses
ch. 13 Tilling the Soil: Preparing Women for the Vocation of Ministry - A Challenge and Call
ch. 14 Women in Jesuit Higher Education: Ten Years Later

Afterword

Appendix
Decree 14: Jesuits and the Situation of Women in Church and Civil Society of Jesus

Notes
Bibliography
List of Contributors
Index
Article cover image

"Crafting the Ground as We Go: "White" Feminism and the College Classroom"

Article
Harvey, Jennifer
2011
Faith, Feminism, and Scholarship: The Next Generation, Ch. 9, pp. 143-161, Palgrave Macmillan, New York
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Pedagogy with the Repressed: Critical Reflections from a Post-9/11 Biblical Studies Classroom"

Article
Lopez, Davina C.
2011
Faith, Feminism, and Scholarship: The Next Generation, Ch. 10, pp. 163-180, Palgrave Macmillan, New York
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Postmulticulturalism: Shifting the Locus of Learning in Urban Teacher Education

Book
Wilgus, Gay, ed.
2013
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LB1715.K58 2013
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Postmulticulturalism opens for examination the research and experimental pedagogies of a teacher education faculty at a large, urban, public university, where teacher candidates from working-class and ethnic and linguistic minority backgrounds are prepared to work with learners from similar backgrounds. The pedagogies discussed have been expressly designed to elicit the funds of knowledge and community cultural wealth of these teacher education candidates. The research in this volume ...
Additional Info:
Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Postmulticulturalism opens for examination the research and experimental pedagogies of a teacher education faculty at a large, urban, public university, where teacher candidates from working-class and ethnic and linguistic minority backgrounds are prepared to work with learners from similar backgrounds. The pedagogies discussed have been expressly designed to elicit the funds of knowledge and community cultural wealth of these teacher education candidates. The research in this volume calls attention to the distinctive, complex perspectives that individuals from historically marginalized groups bring to the university classroom, and demonstrates how these valuable perspectives can be brought front and center in the university's teacher education curriculum. It counters contemporary trends of discouraging and preventing students and teachers from critically and intellectually engaging with issues of which knowledges are taught, and how. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Discovering Inquiry-based Learning Through Oral History Projects (Megan Blumenreich)
ch. 2 'I'm not just gonna settle for anything:' Inciting Teacher Efficacy through Critical Pedagogies (Vicki Garavuso)
ch. 3. Intertextuality, Music and Critical Pedagogy (Charles Malone)
ch. 4. Transforming Classrooms: Teacher Education, Social Studies (Catherine Franklin)
ch. 5. Incorporating Teacher Candidates' Prior Beliefs and Funds of Knowledge in Theories of Child Development (Amita Gupta)
ch. 6. Prioritizing the Social in Academic Writing: The Experiences of Ethnically, Linguistically and Generationally Diverse Early Childhood Teacher Candidates (Gay Wilgus)
ch. 7. Special Education Teacher Preparation: Growing Disability Studies in the Absence of Resistance (Linda Ware)
ch. 8. Postmulticulturalism: Cultivating Alternative Canons, a Critical Vernacular and Student-Generated Understandings of their 'Lived-Situatedness' (Gay Wilgus)

Appendix A: Writing Background Survey Appendix B: Interview Questions
Additional Info:
An interactive resource hub for higher education, created by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, to illuminate the scope, accomplishments, and educational value of the campus diversity movement, and to help practitioners learn to effectively articulate and communicate the education value.
Additional Info:
An interactive resource hub for higher education, created by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, to illuminate the scope, accomplishments, and educational value of the campus diversity movement, and to help practitioners learn to effectively articulate and communicate the education value.
Additional Info:
A brief list of current book series publishing scholarship on Asian and Asian-American topics.
Additional Info:
A brief list of current book series publishing scholarship on Asian and Asian-American topics.
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching for a Culturally Diverse and Racially Just World

Book
Fernandez, Eleazer S., ed.
2014
Cascade Books, Eugene, OR
BV4020.T43 2014
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
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Abstract: Cultural and ethnic diversity is the reality of our world, and much more so in this age of heightened globalization. Yet, do our ways of doing theological education match with our current reality and hopes for a colorful and just tomorrow? How shall we do theological formation so it helps give birth to a culturally diverse, racially just, and hospitable world? This edited ...
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Abstract: Cultural and ethnic diversity is the reality of our world, and much more so in this age of heightened globalization. Yet, do our ways of doing theological education match with our current reality and hopes for a colorful and just tomorrow? How shall we do theological formation so it helps give birth to a culturally diverse, racially just, and hospitable world? This edited volume gathers the voices of minoritized scholars and their white allies in the profession in response to the above questions. More particularly, this volume gathers the responses of these scholars to the questions: What is the plight of theological education? Who are the teachers? Who are our students? What shall we teach? How shall we teach? How shall we form and lead theological institutions?

It is the hope of this volume to contribute to the making of theological education that is hospitably just to difference/s and welcoming of our diverse population, which is our only viable future. When we embody this vision in our daily educational practices, particularly in the training of our future religious leaders, we may help usher in a new, colorful, and just world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Essay Contributors
Acknowledgements
Introduction: Birthing Culturally Diverse and Racially Just Educational Institutions: Teaching to Transgress and Transform - Eleazar S. Fernandez

ch. 1 Theological Education of Not Yet - (Fumitaka Matsuoka)
ch. 2 When Subjects Matter: The Bodies We Teach By - (Mai-Anh Le Tran)
ch. 3 From Foreign Bodies in Teacher Space to Embodied Spirit in Personas Educadas: or, How to Prevent “Tourists of Diversity” in Education - (Loida I. Martell-Otero)
ch. 4 Racial/Ethnic Diversity and Student Formation - (Peter T. Cha)
ch. 5 You Cannot Teach What You Do Not Know: You Can not Lead Where You Have Not Been - (Archie Smith, Jr)
ch. 6 What Shall We Teach? The Content of Theological Education - (Willie James Jennings)
ch. 7 Thoughts on Curriculum as Formational Praxis for Faculty, Students, and their Communities - (Elizabeth Conde-Frazier)
ch. 8 Teaching Disruptively: Pedagogical Strategies to Teach Cultural Diversity and Race - (Boyung Lee)
ch. 9 A Pedagogy of the Unmasked: “Unheard but Not Unvoiced, Unseen but Not Invisible - (Julia M. Speller)
ch. 10 The Vocational Cycle to Support Institutional Justice: A Pathway for Scholars of Color to Transform Institutional Life and Governance - (Mary Hinton)
ch. 11 Institutional Life and Governance: Realities and Challenges for Racial-Ethic Leadership within Historically White Theological Schools - (David Maldonado, Jr.)
ch. 12 Angle of Vision from a Companion/Ally in Teaching for a Culturally Diverse and Racially Just World - (Paul O. Myhre)
ch. 13 Faculty Colleagues as Allies in Resisting Racism - (Nancy Ramsay)

Bibliography
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In this series (click through to parts one and two), Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
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In this series (click through to parts one and two), Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
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In this series, Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
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In this series, Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
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In this series, Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
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In this series, Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
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Advocating that disability be valued as a form of diversity, Adams summarizes some of the less-obvious ways that campuses and classrooms stigmatize disability and in other ways fail to welcome the physically and cognitively disabled.
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Advocating that disability be valued as a form of diversity, Adams summarizes some of the less-obvious ways that campuses and classrooms stigmatize disability and in other ways fail to welcome the physically and cognitively disabled.
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This free, online tutorial contains 10 modules, each explaining how to better design course materials for learners with physical and cognitive disabilities. Tutorials include: accessibility issues on online learning, and making more accessible PowerPoint presentations, videos, Word and Excel documents, PDFs, Web pages, and Web scripts.
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This free, online tutorial contains 10 modules, each explaining how to better design course materials for learners with physical and cognitive disabilities. Tutorials include: accessibility issues on online learning, and making more accessible PowerPoint presentations, videos, Word and Excel documents, PDFs, Web pages, and Web scripts.
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The OpEd Project scouts and trains  under-represented experts to take thought leadership positions in their fields, connecting them with a national network of high-level media mentors, and channeling the best new experts and ideas directly to media gatekeepers who need them, across all platforms.
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The OpEd Project scouts and trains  under-represented experts to take thought leadership positions in their fields, connecting them with a national network of high-level media mentors, and channeling the best new experts and ideas directly to media gatekeepers who need them, across all platforms.
Article cover image

Sex and the Seminary: Preparing Ministers for Sexual Health and Justice

Article
Ott, Kate M.
2009
Religious Institute on Sexual Morality, Justice, and Healing Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York 
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Ministerial Formation

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A survey of 36 leading seminaries and rabbinical schools, evaluated on criteria for a sexually healthy and responsible seminary. These criteria measure sexuality content in the curriculum; institutional commitment to sexuality and gender equity (e.g., the existence of anti‐discrimination, sexual harassment and full inclusion policies); and advocacy and support for sexuality‐related issues.
Additional Info:
A survey of 36 leading seminaries and rabbinical schools, evaluated on criteria for a sexually healthy and responsible seminary. These criteria measure sexuality content in the curriculum; institutional commitment to sexuality and gender equity (e.g., the existence of anti‐discrimination, sexual harassment and full inclusion policies); and advocacy and support for sexuality‐related issues.
Cover image

Interreligious Learning and Teaching: A Christian Rationale for a Transformative Praxis

Book
Largen, Kristin Johnston
2014
Augsburg Fortress, Minneapolis, MN
BR127.L355 2014
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Religious Diversity

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Abstract: There is still resistance in Christian institutions to interreligious dialogue. Many feel that such a practice weakens Christian faith, and promotes the idea that Christianity is merely one among many different religious options. When it comes to higher education, there is the fear that both college and seminary students will “lose their faith” if they are invited to study other religious traditions from ...
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Abstract: There is still resistance in Christian institutions to interreligious dialogue. Many feel that such a practice weakens Christian faith, and promotes the idea that Christianity is merely one among many different religious options. When it comes to higher education, there is the fear that both college and seminary students will “lose their faith” if they are invited to study other religious traditions from a positive perspective.

Unfortunately, this attitude belies the current culture in which we live, which constantly exposes us to the beliefs and practices of others. Kristin Johnston Largen sees this setting as an opportunity and seeks to provide not only the theological grounding for such a position but also some practical advice on how both to teach and live out this conviction in a way that promotes greater understanding and respect for others and engenders a deeper appreciation of one’s own faith tradition.

Largen’s synopsis of interreligious education and suggested action includes contributions by Mary E. Hess and Christy Lohr Sapp. Hess and Sapp provide practical commentary regarding the successful implementation of Largen’s proposed approach. As a group, Largen, Hess, and Sapp create a text that extends pedagogical innovation in inspiring but practical ways. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
ch. 1 Our Interreligious Life in the Twenty-First Century North American Context (Kristin Johnston Largen)
Chapter Praxis Points (Christy Lohr Sapp)
Praxis Point #1
Praxis Point #2
Praxis Point #3
Praxis Point #4
Praxis Point #5
Praxis Point #6
Chapter Response: What are Students’ Questions? (Mary Hess)

ch. 2 A Christian Rationale for Interreligious Teaching and Learning (Kristin Johnston Largen)
Chapter Praxis Points (Christy Lohr Sapp)
Praxis Point #7
Praxis Point #8
Praxis Point #9
Chapter Response: How Do We Understand Student Learning? (Mary Hess)

ch. 3 Outcomes, Strategies, and Assessment for Interreligious Teaching and Learning (Kristin Johnston Largen)
Chapter Praxis Points (Christy Lohr Sapp)
Praxis Point #10
Praxis Point #11
Praxis Point #12
Chapter Response: How Do Theological of the Pluralism of Faith Help? (Mary Hess)

Epilogue
Returning to the Questions with Which We Begin (Mary Hess)
Endings and Beginnings (Kristin Johnston Largen)
Works Cited
Photo Credits
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A forum on race and teaching theology and religion, launched in the wake of the August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and police response in Ferguson, Missouri, but framed more broadly to encompass teaching for racial and social justice, dismantling the structures of white privilege in academia, and diversifying the faculty, the students, and the canon.
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A forum on race and teaching theology and religion, launched in the wake of the August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and police response in Ferguson, Missouri, but framed more broadly to encompass teaching for racial and social justice, dismantling the structures of white privilege in academia, and diversifying the faculty, the students, and the canon.
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Gender, Experience, and Knowledge in Adult Learning: Alisoun's Daughters

Book
Michelson, Elana
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
BF318.5.M54 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: In this wide-ranging book, Elana Michelson invites us to revisit basic understandings of the 'experiential learner'. How does experience come to be seen as the basis of knowledge? How do gender, class, and race enter into the ways in which knowledge is valued? What political and cultural belief systems underlie such practices as the assessment of prior learning and the writing of life ...
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Abstract: In this wide-ranging book, Elana Michelson invites us to revisit basic understandings of the 'experiential learner'. How does experience come to be seen as the basis of knowledge? How do gender, class, and race enter into the ways in which knowledge is valued? What political and cultural belief systems underlie such practices as the assessment of prior learning and the writing of life narratives?

Drawing on a range of disciplines, from feminist theory and the politics of knowledge to literary criticism, Michelson argues that particular understandings of `experiential learning’ have been central to modern Western cultures and the power relationships that underlie them. Presented in four parts, this challenging and lively book asks educators of adults to think in new ways about their assumptions, theories, and practices:

- Part I provides readers with a short history of the notion of experiential learning.

- Part II brings the insights and concerns of feminist theory to bear on mainstream theories of experiential learning.

- Part III examines the assessment of prior experiential learning for academic credit and/or professional credentials.

- Part IV addresses a second pedagogical practice that is ubiquitous in adult learning, namely, the assigning of life narratives.

Gender, Experience, and Knowledge in Adult Learning will be of value to scholars and graduate students exploring adult and experiential learning, as well as academics wishing to introduce students to a broad range of feminist, critical-race, materialist and postmodernist thinking in the field. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures
Acknowledgements
Credit list
Introduction

Part I - The politics of experience
ch. 1 Purging the transgressive from experiential learning
ch. 2 Gender, reason, and the universal knower
ch. 3 Othering rationality

Part II - Gender, experience, and the body
ch. 4 Body, culture, and the feminist claims for experience
ch. 5 The body in question
ch. 6 Mind and matter: Dewey, Kolb, and embodied knowing

Part III - Power and the assessment of experiential learning
ch. 7 Conservatism and transgression in the assessment of experiential learning
ch. 8 Queering the assessment of experiential learning
ch. 9 Practice studies, complexity, and the assessment of experiential learning

Part IV - Narrating the self
ch. 10 Autobiography and adult learning
ch. 11 Textualizing the self: genre, experience, and adult learning
ch. 12 The ghosts of war: trauma, narrative, and adult learning

Conclusion
Bibliograpy
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching Global Theologies: Power and Praxis

Book
Pui-lan, Kwok; González-Andrieu, Cecilia; and Hopkins, Dwight N., eds.
2015
Baylor University Press, Waco, TX
BR118.T43 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: Theological education, like theology itself, is becoming a truly a global enterprise. As such, theological education has to form, teach, and train leaders of faith communities prepared to lead in a transnational world. The teaching of theology with a global awareness has to wrestle with the nature and scope of the theological curriculum, teaching methods, and the context of learning. Teaching Global Theologies ...
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Abstract: Theological education, like theology itself, is becoming a truly a global enterprise. As such, theological education has to form, teach, and train leaders of faith communities prepared to lead in a transnational world. The teaching of theology with a global awareness has to wrestle with the nature and scope of the theological curriculum, teaching methods, and the context of learning. Teaching Global Theologies directly addresses both method and content by identifying local resources, successful pedagogies of inclusion, and best practices for teaching theology in a global context. The contributors to Teaching Global Theologies are Catholic, mainline Protestant, and evangelical scholars from different racial and ethnic backgrounds, each with sustained connections with other parts of the world. Teaching Global Theologies capitalizes on this diversity to uncover neglected sources for a global theology even as it does so in constructive conversation with the long tradition of Christian thought. Bringing missing voices and neglected theological sources into conversation with the historical tradition enriches that tradition even as it uncovers questions of power, race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality. Teachers are offered successful pedagogies for bringing these questions into the classroom and best practices to promote students’ global consciousness, shape them as ecclesial leaders, and form them as global citizens. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I - Global Theology and Why It Matters
ch. 1 Teaching Theology from a Global Perspective (Kwok Pui-lan)
ch. 2 Listening for Fresh Voices in the History of the Church (William A. Dyrness)
ch. 3 Teaching Global Theology in a Comparative Mode (Veli-Matti Kärkkäinen)

Part II - Identity, Power, and Pedagogy
ch. 4 The Good of Education: Accessibility, Economy, Class, and Power (Cecilia González-Andrieu)
ch. 5 Identity Cross-Dressing while Teaching in a Global Context (Miguel A. Del La Torre)
ch. 6 Teaching Global Theology with Local Resources: A Chinese Theologian’s Strategies (Lai Pan-chiu)
ch. 7 Pedagogy for Being Human in Global Comparison (Dwight N. Hopkins)

Part III - Praxis and Responsibility
ch. 8 Teaching to Transform: Theological Education, Global Consciousness, and the Making of Global Citizens (Teresia Hinga)
ch. 9 Hablando Se Entiende la Gente: Tower of Babble or Gift of Tongues? (Loida I. Martell-Otero)
ch. 10 The Geopolitical and the Glocal: Situating Global Theological Voices in Theological Education (Eleazar S. Fernandez)

Notes
List of Contributors
Index
Tactics cover image

Cloud of Witnesses

Tactic
Junior, Nyasha
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 4 (2015): 361
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 4 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Learning Designs

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One page TTR Teaching Tactic: Inspiring students through informal encounters with the wide diversity of actual living biblical scholars.
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One page TTR Teaching Tactic: Inspiring students through informal encounters with the wide diversity of actual living biblical scholars.
Cover image

Feminist Pedagogy in Higher Education: Critical Theory and Practice

Book
Light, Tracy Penny; Nicholas, Jane; and Bondy, Renée, eds.
2015
Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
LC197.F477 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

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Abstract: In this new collection, contributors from a variety of disciplines provide a critical context for the relationship between feminist pedagogy and academic feminism by exploring the complex ways that critical perspectives can be brought into the classroom.

This book discusses the processes employed to engage learners by challenging them to ask tough questions and craft complex answers, wrestle with timely problems ...
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Abstract: In this new collection, contributors from a variety of disciplines provide a critical context for the relationship between feminist pedagogy and academic feminism by exploring the complex ways that critical perspectives can be brought into the classroom.

This book discusses the processes employed to engage learners by challenging them to ask tough questions and craft complex answers, wrestle with timely problems and posit innovative solutions, and grapple with ethical dilemmas for which they seek just resolutions. Diverse experiences, interests, and perspectives—together with the various teaching and learning styles that participants bring to twenty-first-century universities—necessitate inventive and evolving pedagogical approaches, and these are explored from a critical perspective.

The contributors collectively consider the implications of the theory/practice divide, which remains central within academic feminism’s role as both a site of social and gender justice and as a part of the academy, and map out some of the ways in which academic feminism is located within the academy today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction: Feminist Pedagogy in Higher Education (Renée Bondy, Jane Nicholas, and Tracy Penny Light)

ch. 1 A Restorative Approach to Learning: Relational Theory as Feminist Pedagogy in Universities (Kristina R. Llewellyn and Jennifer J. Llewellyn)
ch. 2 Feminist Pedagogy in the UK University Classroom: Limitations, Challenges, and Possibilities (Jeannette Silva Flores)
ch. 3 Activist Feminist Pedagogies: Privileging Agency in Troubled Times (Linda Briskin)
ch. 4 Classroom to Community: Reflections on Experiential Learning and Socially Just Citizenship (Carm De Santis and Toni Serafini)
ch. 5 Fat Lessons: Fatness, Bodies, and the Politics of Feminist Classroom Practice (Amy Gullage)
ch. 6 Engaged Pedagogy Beyond the Lecture Hall: The Book Club as Teaching Strategy (Renée Bondy)
ch. 7 Teaching a Course on Women and Anger: Learning from College Students about Silencing and Speaking (Judith A. Dorney)
ch. 8 Beyond the Trolley Problem: Narrative Pedagogy in the Philosophy Classroom (Anna Gotlib)
ch. 9 The Power of the Imagination-Intellect in Teaching Feminist Research (Susan V. Iverson)
ch. 10 From Muzzu-Kummik-Quae to Jeanette Corbiere Lavell and Back Again: Indigenous and Feminist Approaches to the First-Year Course in Canadian History (Katrina Srigley)
ch. 11 Don’t Mention the “F” Word: Using Images of Transgressive Texts to Teach Gendered History (Jacqueline Z. Wilson)
ch. 12 Rethinking “Students These Days”: Feminist Pedagogy and the Construction of Students (Jane Nicholas and Jamie Baroud)
ch. 13 Feminist Pedagogies of Activist Compassion: Engaging the Literature and Film of Female Genital Cutting in the Undergraduate Classroom (Jennifer Browdy de Hernandez)
ch. 14 “I Can’t Believe I’ve Never Seen That Before!”: Feminism, the “Sexualization of Culture,” and Empowerment in the Classroom (Tracy Penny Light)
ch. 15 Jane Sexes It Up . . . on Campus? Towards a Pedagogical Practice of Sex (Maggie Labinski)

About the Contributors
Index
Cover image

On Being Included: Racism and Diversity in Institutional Life

Book
Ahmed, Sara
2012
Duke University Press, Durham, NC
LC212.4.A398 2012
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: What does diversity do? What are we doing when we use the language of diversity? Sara Ahmed offers an account of the diversity world based on interviews with diversity practitioners in higher education, as well as her own experience of doing diversity work. Diversity is an ordinary, even unremarkable, feature of institutional life. Yet diversity practitioners often experience institutions as resistant to their ...
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Abstract: What does diversity do? What are we doing when we use the language of diversity? Sara Ahmed offers an account of the diversity world based on interviews with diversity practitioners in higher education, as well as her own experience of doing diversity work. Diversity is an ordinary, even unremarkable, feature of institutional life. Yet diversity practitioners often experience institutions as resistant to their work, as captured through their use of the metaphor of the "brick wall." On Being Included offers an explanation of this apparent paradox. It explores the gap between symbolic commitments to diversity and the experience of those who embody diversity. Commitments to diversity are understood as "non-performatives" that do not bring about what they name. The book provides an account of institutional whiteness and shows how racism can be obscured by the institutionalization of diversity. Diversity is used as evidence that institutions do not have a problem with racism. On Being Included offers a critique of what happens when diversity is offered as a solution. It also shows how diversity workers generate knowledge of institutions in attempting to transform them. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction On Arrival

ch. 1 Institutional Life
ch. 2 The Language of Diversity
ch. 3 Equality and Performance Culture
ch. 4 Commitment as a Non-performative
ch. 5 Speaking about Racism

Conclusion A Phenomenological Practice
Notes
References
Index
Cover image

Liberating Service Learning and the Rest of Higher Education Civic Engagement

Book
Stoecker, Randy
2016
Temple University Press, Philadelphia, PA
LC220.5.S76 2016
Topics: Service Learning   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Civic Engagement

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Abstract: Randy Stoecker has been "practicing" forms of community-engaged scholarship, including service learning, for thirty years now, and he readily admits, "Practice does not make perfect." In his highly personal critique, Liberating Service Learning and the Rest of Higher Education Civic Engagement, the author worries about the contradictions, unrealized potential, and unrecognized urgency of the causes as well as the risks and rewards of ...
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Abstract: Randy Stoecker has been "practicing" forms of community-engaged scholarship, including service learning, for thirty years now, and he readily admits, "Practice does not make perfect." In his highly personal critique, Liberating Service Learning and the Rest of Higher Education Civic Engagement, the author worries about the contradictions, unrealized potential, and unrecognized urgency of the causes as well as the risks and rewards of this work.

Here, Stoecker questions the prioritization and theoretical/philosophical underpinnings of the core concepts of service learning: 1. learning, 2. service, 3. community, and 4. change. By "liberating" service learning, he suggests reversing the prioritization of the concepts, starting with change, then community, then service, and then learning. In doing so, he clarifies the benefits and purpose of this work, arguing that it will create greater pedagogical and community impact.

Liberating Service Learning and the Rest of Higher Education Civic Engagement challenges—and hopefully will change—our thinking about higher education community engagement. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Prelude: Confessions and Acknowledgments

I The Problem and Its Context

ch. 1 Why I Worry

ch. 2 A Brief Counterintuitive History of Service Learning

ch. 3 Theories (Conscious and Unconscious) of Institutionalized Service Learning
Interlude

II Institutionalized Service Learning

ch. 4 What Is Institutionalized Service Learning's Theory of Learning?

ch. 5 What Is Institutionalized Service Learning's Theory of Service?

ch. 6 What Is Institutionalized Service Learning's Theory of Community?

ch. 7 What Is Institutionalized Service Learning's Theory of Change?

III Liberating Service Learning

ch. 8 Toward a Liberating Theory of Change

ch. 9 Toward a Liberating Theory of Community

ch .10 Toward a Liberating Theory of Service

ch. 11 Toward a Liberating Theory of Learning

ch. 12 Toward a Liberated World?

Postlude
References

Index
Cover image

Transforming Understandings of Diversity in Higher Education: Demography, Democracy, and Discourse

Book
Pasque, Penny A.; Ortega, Noe; Burkhardt, John C.; Ting, and Marie P., eds.
2016
LC1099.3.T725 2016
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: This exciting new text examines one of the most important and yet elusive terms in higher education and society: What do we mean when we talk in a serious way about “diversity”?

A distinguished group of diversity scholars explore the latest discourse on diversity and how it is reflected in research and practice. The chapters trace how the discourse on diversity ...
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Abstract: This exciting new text examines one of the most important and yet elusive terms in higher education and society: What do we mean when we talk in a serious way about “diversity”?

A distinguished group of diversity scholars explore the latest discourse on diversity and how it is reflected in research and practice. The chapters trace how the discourse on diversity is newly shaped after many of the 20th century concepts of race, ethnicity, gender and class have lost authority. In the academic disciplines and in public discourse, perspectives about diversity have been rapidly shifting in recent years. This is especially true in the United States where demographic changes and political attitudes have prompted new observations - some which will clash with traditional frameworks.

This text brings together scholars whose research has opened up new ways to understand the complexities of diversity in higher education. Because the essential topic under consideration is changing so quickly, the editors of this volume also have asked the contributors to reflect on the paths their own scholarship has taken in their careers, and to see how they would relate their current conceptualization of diversity to one or more of three identified themes (demography, democracy and discourse). Each chapter ends with a candid graduate student interview of the author that provides an engaged picture of how the authors wrestle with one of the most complicated topics shaping them (and all of us) as individuals and as scholars. Of interest to anyone who is following the debates about diversity issues on our campuses, the book also offers a wonderful introduction to graduate students entering a discipline where critically important ideas are still very much alive for discussion. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Phillip J. Bowman)
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Transforming Understandings of Diversity in Higher Education: History and Context (John C. Burkhardt, Christina Morton, Marie P. Ting, Penny A. Pasque, and Noe Ortega)

ch. 1 Color-Blind Ideology and the Disconnected Power-Analysis Frame Considerations for Historically Black Colleges and Universities’ Diversification (Uma M. Jayakumar and Annie S. Adamian)
ch. 2 An Interview With Uma M. Jayakumar: Social Agency and the Power of Resistance (Diane M. Back)
ch. 3 A Theory of Equity: A Social and Legal Analysis of College Access for Low-Income Students (Jarrett T. Gupton and Karen Miksch)
ch. 4 An Interview With Jarrett T. Gupton: The Value of Uncertainty and the Need for Nuance (Sheela Linstrum)
ch. 5 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Students on Campus: Fostering Inclusion Through Research, Policy, and Practice (Michael R. Woodford, Jessica Joslin, and Kristen A. Renn)
ch. 6 An Interview With Michael R. Woodford: Bringing Invisible Communities to Light: Disciplinary Norms, Collaboration and the Quest for Legitimacy (Timothy Hickey-LeClair)
ch. 7 Racially and Socioeconomically Diverse Students’ Pathways to College: An Exploration of Latin@ Students (Angela M. Locks, Dawn Person, Michelle Cuellar, Jeanette Maduena, and Melba Schneider Castro)
ch. 8 An Interview With Angela M. Locks: Understanding the Complexities of the College-Going Process (James M. Ellis)
ch. 9 Architecture of Diversity: Using the Lens and Language of Space to Examine Racialized Experiences of Students of Color on College Campuses (Michelle Samura)
ch. 10 An Interview With Michelle Samura: How the “Blue Wall” Changes Our Discourses on Race in Higher Education: Stepping Out of the Comfort Zone and Seeing Things in a Different Light (Jimin Kwon)
ch. 11 Including Disability in the Discourse: Extending and Advancing the Defi nition of Diversity in Higher Education (Allison Lombardi and Adam Lalor)
ch. 12 An Interview With Allison Lombardi: Including Disability in the Discourse (Lloyd Edward Shelton)
ch. 13 The Impact of Media Imagery on Academic Identity Development for Black Male Student Athletes (LaVar J. Charleston and Jerlando F. L. Jackson)
ch. 14 An Interview With Jerlando F. L. Jackson: An Instrumental Diversity Researcher (Carly Wegner)
ch. 15 Racialized and Gendered Experiences of African American Female Faculty at Public Community Colleges (Tamara Nichele Stevenson and Eboni M. Zamani-Gallaher)
ch. 16 An Interview With Tamara Nichele Stevenson, Surviving Racial Battle Fatigue: Cultivating Safe Spaces in Radicalized Environments (Tonya Kneff)
ch. 17 Unpacking the Mandate Rhetoric of Historically Black Colleges and Universities’ Diversity Discourses (Courtney Carter)
ch. 18 An Interview With Courtney Carter: Unpacking the Mandate Rhetoric of Historically Black Colleges and Universities’ Diversity Discourses (Demar F. Lewis IV)
ch. 19 Transforming Demography, Democracy, and Discourse Through Diversity in Education and Society (John C. Burkhardt and Marie P. Ting)

Contributors
Index
TTR cover image

The Agency Paradigm: A Pedagogical Tool to Facilitate Nuanced Thinking on Sensitive Issues

TTR
Caufield, Catherine
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 1 (2017): 89-101
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 1
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Learning Designs

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Sensitive issues, rife in religious studies and in theology, present a pedagogical challenge when teaching students to nuance their thinking around positions that are often sharply defined and elicit strong feelings. I developed a learning tool that I call the “Agency Paradigm.” The purpose of this tool is to help students comprehend diversity within religious traditions, particularly regarding the agencies of women who are committed to them. Drawing on the ...
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Sensitive issues, rife in religious studies and in theology, present a pedagogical challenge when teaching students to nuance their thinking around positions that are often sharply defined and elicit strong feelings. I developed a learning tool that I call the “Agency Paradigm.” The purpose of this tool is to help students comprehend diversity within religious traditions, particularly regarding the agencies of women who are committed to them. Drawing on the open and critical dialogue of emancipatory pedagogy, the Agency Paradigm encourages students to explore a range of ways women in world religions choose to act in varying contexts. This approach to teaching world religions increases students’ cognitive knowledge base and expands their understanding of each of the religions studied in the course, as examined through the perspective of differing women; it also assists them in developing their own agency through thoughtful reflection.