Teaching Diversity and Justice

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Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice: A Sourcebook

Book
Adams, Maurianne, Lee Anne Bell, Pat Griffin, eds.
1997
Routledge, New York, NY
LC196.5.U6T43 1997
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice is a much needed resource that addresses the need to facilitate communication and understanding between members of diverse social groups. It provides a unified framework by which students can engage and critically analyze several forms of social oppression and discrimination. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice is a much needed resource that addresses the need to facilitate communication and understanding between members of diverse social groups. It provides a unified framework by which students can engage and critically analyze several forms of social oppression and discrimination. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Theoretical Foundations for Social Justice Education (Lee Anne Bell)
ch. 2 Conceptual Foundations for Social Justice Courses (Maurianne Adams)
ch. 3 Pedagogical Frameworks for Social Justice Education (Rita Hardiman, Bailey Jackson, & Pat Griffin)
ch. 4 Designing Social Justice Education Courses (Lee Anne Bell, Pat Griffin)
ch. 5 Introductory Module for the Single Issue Courses (Pat Griffin, Matt Ouellett, & Lee Anne Bell)
ch. 6 Racism Curriculum Design (Lee Anne Bell, Barbara J. Love, & Rosemarie A. Roberts)
ch. 7 Sexism Curriculum Design (Lee Anne Bell, Khyati Y. Joshi, Ximena Zúñiga, & Pat Griffin)
ch. 8 Heterosexism Curriculum Design (Steven Botkin, JoAnne Jones, Tanya Kachwaha)
ch. 9 Antisemitism Curriculum Design (Pat Griffin, Katja Hahn D’Errico, Bobbie Harro, Tom Schiff)
ch. 10 Ableism Curriculum Design (Chase Catalano, Linda McCarthy, Davey Shlasko, & Maurianne Adams)
ch. 11 Classism Curriculum Design(Maurianne Adams and Khyati Y. Joshi)
ch. 12 Multiple Issues Course Overview (Maurianne Adams, Katja Hahn d’Errico)
ch. 13 Facilitating Social Justice Education Courses (Betsy Leondar-Wright and Felice Yeskel)
ch. 14 Knowing Ourselves As Instructors (Pat Griffin, Madeline L. Peters, Robin M. Smith)
ch. 15 Knowing Our Students (Barbara J. Love and Kathy Phillips)
ch. 16 Knowing Ourselves As Social Justice Educators (Lee Anne Bell, Barbara Love, Sharon Washington)
ch. 17 Knowing Our Students (Maurianne Adams, JoAnne Jones, Beverly Daniel Tatum)

References
Index
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Unauthorized Methods: Strategies for Critical Teaching

Book
Kincheloe, Joe L. and Shirley R. Steinberg, eds.
1998
Routledge, New York, NY
LC196. U53 1998
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Unauthorized Methods makes accessible some of the best theoretical innovations in critical pedagogy of the last decade. The contributors consider how an integration of popular culture and cultural studies into the lesson plan can enrich and reinvigorate the learning experience. These essays, ranging widely in topic and educational level, are grounded in theory but intended for practical application. By focusing on classroom methods, the contributors provide educators with techniques, strategies, ...
Additional Info:
Unauthorized Methods makes accessible some of the best theoretical innovations in critical pedagogy of the last decade. The contributors consider how an integration of popular culture and cultural studies into the lesson plan can enrich and reinvigorate the learning experience. These essays, ranging widely in topic and educational level, are grounded in theory but intended for practical application. By focusing on classroom methods, the contributors provide educators with techniques, strategies, and examples designed to transform the classroom into a truly multicultural and democratic space. Unauthorized Methods will be an indispensable resource for teachers, students, and policy makers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editor's Foreword

ch. 1 Lesson Plans from the Outer Limits: Unauthorized Methods (Joe L. Kincheloe and Shirley R. Steinberg)
ch. 2 Towards an Alternative Pedagogy (Ivor F. Goodson)
ch. 3 Nurturing the Imagination of Resistance: Young Adults as Creators of Knowledge (Kathleen S. Berry)
ch. 4 Gorillas ... Oops: Guerrillas in our Midst - (RE)dux: Kitchen Knowledge (Karen Anijar, Joshuea Anijar, Ronald Gonzales, and Lana Krievis)
ch. 5 The Critical Transformation of a Special Education Classroom: A Beginning Teacher Puts Theory into Practice (Nina Zaragoza and Marge Scardina)
ch. 6 A Textbook for Everyone: Balancing Canons and Culture in English Textbooks (Timothy A. Dohrer)
ch. 7 Deep Viewing: A Critical Look at Visual Texts (Ann Watts Pailliotet)
ch. 8 Still Crazy After All of These Years: Teaching Critical Media Literacy (Ladi Semali)
ch. 9 Bilingual Education in America: In Search of Equity and Social Justice (Lourdes Diaz Soto)
ch. 10 Innovative Pedagogy in Art Education (Dennis E. Fehr)
ch. 11 Teacher Says, Simon Says: Dualism in Science Learning (David B. Pushkin)
ch. 12 Teaching/Learning Mathematics in School (Peter M. Appelbaum)
ch. 13 Surfing and Getting Wired in a Fifth Grade Classroom: Critical Pedagogical Methods and Techno-Culture (John A. Weaver and Karen Grindall)
ch. 14 Teachers and Administrators: A Vision of Prophetic Practice (Patrick Slattery and Rebecca McElfresh Spehler)

Notes on Editors and Contributors
Index
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Women Teaching for Change: Gender, Class and Power

Book
Weiler, Kathleen
1988
Bergin & Garvey, Westport, CT
LB2837.W45 1988
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Applying theory to practice, Women Teaching for Change reveals the complexity of being a feminist teacher in a public school setting, in which the forces of sexism, racism, and classism, which so characterize society as a whole, are played out in multiracial, multicultural classrooms. "A fine book, a rich melding of critical theory in education, feminist literature, and pedagogical experience and expertise." Maxine Green, Columbia University. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Applying theory to practice, Women Teaching for Change reveals the complexity of being a feminist teacher in a public school setting, in which the forces of sexism, racism, and classism, which so characterize society as a whole, are played out in multiracial, multicultural classrooms. "A fine book, a rich melding of critical theory in education, feminist literature, and pedagogical experience and expertise." Maxine Green, Columbia University. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction by Henry A. Giroux and Paulo Freire
Critical Educational Theory
Feminist Analyses of Gender and Schooling
Feminist Methodology
The Dialects of Gender in the Lives of Feminist Teachers
The Struggle for a Critical Literacy
Gender, Race and Class in the Feminist Classroom
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
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Greening the College Curriculum: A Guide to Environmental Teaching in the Liberal Arts

Book
Collett, Jonathan, and Stephen Karakashian, eds.
1996
Island Press, Washington, D.C.
LC1023.G74 1996
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Greening the College Curriculum provides the tools college and university faculty need to meet personal and institutional goals for integrating environmental issues into the curriculum. Leading educators from a wide range of fields, including anthropology, biology, economics, geography, history, literature, journalism, philosophy, political science, and religion, describe their experience introducing environmental issues into their teaching. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Greening the College Curriculum provides the tools college and university faculty need to meet personal and institutional goals for integrating environmental issues into the curriculum. Leading educators from a wide range of fields, including anthropology, biology, economics, geography, history, literature, journalism, philosophy, political science, and religion, describe their experience introducing environmental issues into their teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Jonathan Collett and Stephen Karakashian)

ch. 1 Reinventing Higher Education (David W. Orr)
ch. 2 Anthropology (William Balée)
ch. 3 Biology (David G. Campbell and Vern Durkee)
ch. 4 Economics (Gerald Alonzo Smith)
ch. 5 Geography (Lisa Naughton-Treves and Emily Young)
ch. 6 History (John Opie and Michael Black)
ch. 7 Literature (Vernon Owen Grumbling)
ch. 8 Media and Journalism (Karl Grossman and Ann Filemyr)
ch. 9 Philosophy (Holmes Rolston III)
ch. 10 Political Science (Michael E. Kraft)
ch. 11 Religion (Steven C. Rockefeller)
ch. 12 Reinventing the Classroom: Connected Teaching (Jonathan Collett)

Contributors
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Empowering Education: Critical Teaching for Social Change

Book
Shor, Ira
1992
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LC196.5.U6.S56 1992
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Ira Shor is a pioneer in the field of critical education who ror over twenty years has been experimenting with learning methods. His work creatively adapts the ideas of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire for North American classrooms. In Empowering Education Shor offers a comprehensive theory and practice for critical pedagogy. For Shor, empowering education is a student-centered, critical and democratic pedagogy for studying any subject matter and for self and ...
Additional Info:
Ira Shor is a pioneer in the field of critical education who ror over twenty years has been experimenting with learning methods. His work creatively adapts the ideas of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire for North American classrooms. In Empowering Education Shor offers a comprehensive theory and practice for critical pedagogy. For Shor, empowering education is a student-centered, critical and democratic pedagogy for studying any subject matter and for self and social change. It takes shape as a dialogue in which teachers and students mutually investigate everyday themes, social issues, and academic knowledge. Through dialogue and problem-posing, students become active agents of their learning. This book shows how students can develop as critical thinkers, inspired learners, skilled workers, and involved citizens. Shor carefully analyzes obstacles to and resources for empowering education, suggesting ways for teachers to transform traditional approaches into critical and democratic ones. He offers many examples and applications for the elementary grades through college and adult education.

"One of the most intelligent discussions of the unique function of education in a democratic society since the work of John Dewey. This theoretically compelling and practically useful book addresses the economic, political, and personal needs of students. Shor has emerged as the most reliable discussant of the uses of the work of Paulo Freire in the U.S."--James Berlin, Purdue University Ira Shor, professor of English at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and the College of Staten Island, is author of Critical Teaching and Everyday Life, and Culture Wars: School and Society in the Conservative Restoration, 1969-1984, both published by the University of Chicago Press. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction The First Day of Class: Passing the Test

ch. 1 Education Is Politics: An Agenda for Empowerment
ch. 2 Problem-Posing: Situated and Multicultural Learning
ch. 3 Three Roads to Critical Thought: Generative, Topical, and Academic Themes
ch. 4 Critical Dialogue versus Teacher-Talk: Classroom Discourse and Social Inequality
ch. 5 Rethinking Knowledge and Society: "Desocialization" and "Critical Consciousness"
ch. 6 Democratic Authority: Resistance, Subject Matter, and the Learning Process
ch. 7 Critical Teaching and Classroom Research: An Interdisciplinary Field for Activist Learning
ch. 8 Becoming an Empowering Educator: Obstacles to and Resources for Critical Teaching
ch. 9 The Third Idiom: Inventing a Transformative Discourse for Education

References
Author Index
Subject Index
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Multicultural Education, Critical Pedagogy and the Politics of Difference

Book
Sleeter, Christine and Peter L. McLaren, eds.
1995
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LC1099.3.M16 1995
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Here is a comprehensive view of leading theories and practices of multicultural education from scholars of various racial and ethnic groups. The perspectives of those often left out of scholarly debate are well represented in this book. Those perspectives offer significant insights into the ways in which dominant ideologies and classroom practices have functioned to serve only one segment of the American population. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Here is a comprehensive view of leading theories and practices of multicultural education from scholars of various racial and ethnic groups. The perspectives of those often left out of scholarly debate are well represented in this book. Those perspectives offer significant insights into the ways in which dominant ideologies and classroom practices have functioned to serve only one segment of the American population. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction: Exploring Connections to Build a Critical Multiculturalism
ch. 1 White Terror and Oppositional Agency: Towards a Critical Multiculturalism (Peter L. McLaren)
ch. 2 Literacy for Stupidification: The Pedagogy of the Big Lies (Donaldo Macedo)
ch. 3 White Culture and the Politics of Racial Difference: Implications for Multiculturalism (Stephen Haymes)
ch. 4 Critical Multiculturalism and Democratic Schooling: An Interview with Peter L. McLaren and Joe Kincheloe (Shirley R. Steinberg)
ch. 5 Mirror Images on Common Issues: Parallels between Multicultural Education and Critical Pedagogy (Geneva Gay)
ch. 6 From Brown Heroes and Holidays to Assimilationist Agendas: Reconsidering the Critiques of Multicultural Education (Sonia Nieto)
ch. 7 Multicultural, Critical, Feminine, and Constructive Pedagogies Seen through the Lives of Youth: A Call for the Revisioning of These and Beyond: Toward a Pedagogy for the Next Century (John Rivera and Mary Poplin)
ch. 8 The Problem with Origins: Race and the Contrapuntal Nature of the Educational Experience (Cameron McCarthy)
ch. 9 Postmodernism, the "Politically Correct," and Liberatory Pedagogy (Carl Allsup)
ch. 10 Culture as an Ongoing Dialog: Implications for Multicultural Teacher Education (Carmen Montecinos)
ch. 11 Whose Voice Is It Anyway?: Vocalizing Multicultural Analysis (Mary Ritchie)
ch. 12 Buscando America: The Contributions of Critical Latino Educators to the Academic Development and Empowerment of Latino Students in the U.S. (Antonio Darder)
ch. 13 An African-centered Pedagogy in Dialog with Liberatory Multiculturalism (Khaula Murtadha)
ch. 14 Multicultural Education beyond the Classroom (Evelyn Newman Phillips)
ch. 15 Cultural Diversity in Higher Education: An American Indian Perspective (Janine Pease-Windy Boy)
ch. 16 Reflections on My Use of Multicultural and Critical Pedagogy When Students Are White (Christine Sleeter)
Afterword
Notes on Contributors
Index
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"Dominance Concealed through Diversity: Implications of Inadequate Perspectives on Cultural Pluralism"

Article
Boyd, Dwight
1996
Harvard Educational Review 66, no. 3 (1996): 609-630
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
In this article, Dwight Boyd focuses on a dilemma that is at the heart of sincere commitments to cultural pluralism. When the moral aspects of cultural diversity are fully appreciated, the "dilemma of diversity" is revealed as the tension point resulting from the acceptance of the fact of "reasonable moral pluralism" conjoined with the perceived need to morally ground prescriptive intentions to promote cultural diversity within a democratic society. After ...
Additional Info:
In this article, Dwight Boyd focuses on a dilemma that is at the heart of sincere commitments to cultural pluralism. When the moral aspects of cultural diversity are fully appreciated, the "dilemma of diversity" is revealed as the tension point resulting from the acceptance of the fact of "reasonable moral pluralism" conjoined with the perceived need to morally ground prescriptive intentions to promote cultural diversity within a democratic society. After discussing this dilemma, Boyd analyzes three perspectives commonly found in response. He argues that each of these perspectives is inadequate by revealing how it fails to come to grips with one or the other side of the dilemma, despite its surface appeal. He then shows how, in each of these perspectives, this failure functions to conceal and protect dominant points of view within the diversity. He concludes by sketching out a positive direction for successfully addressing the dilemma of diversity hinted at in the successes and failures of each of the three perspectives.
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"Walking On Eggs: Mastering the Dreaded Diversity Discussion"

Article
Frederick, Peter J.
1995
College Teaching 43, no. 3 (1995): 83-92
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Discusses how college teachers can deal with multiculturalism in the classroom. Faculty arguments over diversity requirements in the curriculum; Intercultural education among students of diverse cultures and ethnicities; Strategies for multicultural discussions.
Additional Info:
Discusses how college teachers can deal with multiculturalism in the classroom. Faculty arguments over diversity requirements in the curriculum; Intercultural education among students of diverse cultures and ethnicities; Strategies for multicultural discussions.
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"Teaching: Beliefs and Behaviors"

Article
Menges, Robert J.
1990
Teaching Excellence 2, no. 6 (1990)
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
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"Teaching About Inequality: Student Resistance, Paralysis, and Rage"

Article
Davis, Nancy J.
1992
Teaching Sociology 20, no. 3 (1992): 232-238
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Three classroom climates in courses focusing on inequality are identified, those of resistance, paralysis, and rage. In resistant classes, students deny the importance of class, gender, race, and other lines of stratification or fail to see their structural sources. In paralyzed classes, students are so overwhelmed by the pervasiveness of inequality that they become debilitated and depressed; social structures are reified, giving them a false aura of inevitability. In enraged ...
Additional Info:
Three classroom climates in courses focusing on inequality are identified, those of resistance, paralysis, and rage. In resistant classes, students deny the importance of class, gender, race, and other lines of stratification or fail to see their structural sources. In paralyzed classes, students are so overwhelmed by the pervasiveness of inequality that they become debilitated and depressed; social structures are reified, giving them a false aura of inevitability. In enraged classes, the existence of stratification sparks so much anger that students lash out in an unfocused manner that is often blind to the complexities of stratified societies. In this article, I offer suggestions for responding to each of these three classroom climates.
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"Talking about Race, Learning about Racism: The Application of Racial Identity Development Theory in the Classroom"

Article
Tatum, Beverly Daniel
1992
Harvard Educational Review 62, no. 1 (1992): 1-24
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
The inclusion of race-related content in college courses often generates emotional responses in students that range from guilt and shame to anger and despair. The discomfort associated with these emotions can lead students to resist the learning process. Based on her experience teaching a course on the psychology of racism and an application of racial identity development theory, Beverly Daniel Tatum identifies three major sources of student resistance to talking ...
Additional Info:
The inclusion of race-related content in college courses often generates emotional responses in students that range from guilt and shame to anger and despair. The discomfort associated with these emotions can lead students to resist the learning process. Based on her experience teaching a course on the psychology of racism and an application of racial identity development theory, Beverly Daniel Tatum identifies three major sources of student resistance to talking about race and learning about racism, as well as some strategies for overcoming this resistance.
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"Facilitator's guide for race in the classroom: the multiplicity of experience"

Article
Derek Bok Center
1992
Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 1992)
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
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"Fostering Positive Race, Class, and Gender Dynamics in the Classroom"

Article
Cannon, Lynn Weber
1990
Women's Studies Quarterly 18, no. 1 & 2 (1990): 126-134
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
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"Pedagogy of the Distressed"

Article
Tompkins, Jane
1990
College English 52, no. 6 (1990): 653-660
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Identifies a teaching method which calls upon students to prepare and present lessons for most of the semester. Notes that the technique allows the instructor to derive more enjoyment from teaching and spend less time preparing lessons. Describes application of the method in a "Feminist Theory in the Humanities" course.
Additional Info:
Identifies a teaching method which calls upon students to prepare and present lessons for most of the semester. Notes that the technique allows the instructor to derive more enjoyment from teaching and spend less time preparing lessons. Describes application of the method in a "Feminist Theory in the Humanities" course.
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Special Theme Issue: Education and Race

Journal Issue
Teachers College Record
1999
Teachers College Record 100, no. 4, Summer
LC191.2.E3 1999
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 A Movement Against and Beyond Boundaries: Politically Relevant Teaching Among African American Teachers (Tamara Beauboeuf-Lafontant)
ch. 2 How White Teachers Perceive the Problem of Racism in Their Schools: A Case Study in "Liberal" Lakeview (Julie Kailin)
ch. 3 Theorizing Race in the Context of Learning to Teach (Luann M. Duesterberg)
ch. 4 Shifting Identities in Private Education: Reconstructing Race at/in the Cultural Center (Amir Proweller)
ch. 5 Teaching in Tensions: Latino Immigrant Youth, Their Teachers, and the Structures of Schooling (Susan Roberta Katz)
ch. 6 "You Can't Oppress Yourself": Negotiating the Meaning of Opportunity in Post-Apartheid South Africa (Janine Bempechat, and Salie Abrahams)

Essay Review ch. 7 What Is "Racism" in Antiracist Education? (Lawrence Blum)
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The Children Are Watching: How the Media Teach About Diversity

Book
Cortés, Carlos E.
2000
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
P96.M83C67 2000
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Carlos Cortés has been a first-hand observer and participant in the growth of multiculturalism and multicultural education from their birth in the social movements of the 1960s to the present day. In this unique collection of essays about diversity, society, and education, he provides readers with valuable insights, both from his own life story and from some of the most thought-provoking articles he has written over the past three ...
Additional Info:
Carlos Cortés has been a first-hand observer and participant in the growth of multiculturalism and multicultural education from their birth in the social movements of the 1960s to the present day. In this unique collection of essays about diversity, society, and education, he provides readers with valuable insights, both from his own life story and from some of the most thought-provoking articles he has written over the past three decades. In many ways, Cortés's personal and professional story is the story of the multicultural movement itself, and this volume gives witness to the struggles and successes that Cortés and many others have experienced while striving to create a place for the voices, values, and visions of racial and ethnic groups in our culturally diverse nation and shrinking world.

This one-of-a-kind reflective history:

* Examines the evolving nature of multiculturalism and multicultural education as a dynamic and interactive process.
* Features the perspective of a historian who has participated in the multicultural education movement.
* Urges readers to reflect on their own lives, careers, and efforts to meet the challenges and opportunities of our increasingly diverse society.
* Helps educators examine their own reasons for participating in the struggle to build a better multicultural future for our children. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword
Preface
Prologue: It Began with the Gypsies

ch. 1 Holly and Melissa's Multicultural Curriculum
ch. 2 The Societal Curriculum
ch. 3 Mediamakers as Multicultural Curriculum Developers
ch. 4 Media Products as Multicultural Textbooks
ch. 5 Mass Media and Multicultural Learning
ch. 6 October 1997 : A Multicultural Media Journal
ch. 7 The Contemporary Media Curriculum as School Context
ch. 8 Mass Media, Multiculturalism, and Schools
ch. 9 Struggling with Stereotypes: Uses and Abuses of a Critical Concept
ch. 10 Multicultural Education in the Cyberspace Era
Epilogue: She's Black, I'm White

References
Index
About the Author
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Theory Practice Learning: Models in Violence Studies and Conflict Resolution

Journal Issue
Freund, Richard, ed.
2000
Spotlight on Teaching 8, no. 1 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Theory Practice Learning: Models in Violence Studies and Conflict Resolution (Richard Freund)
ch. 2 Experiential Learning: Pedagogy for Life (Barbara A.B. Bobbi Patterson)
ch. 3 The Challenges of Experience for Learning about Violence against Women (Traci C. West)
ch. 4 Religious Practices for Social Change (Thee Smith)
ch. 5 Nonviolence in the Modern World (John E. Cort)
ch. 6 Experiential Education: Pedagogy Across the Spectrum (Peter Gathje)
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Race Matters

Book
West, Cornel
1993
Beacon Press, Boston, MA
E185.615.W43 1993
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
First published in 1993 on the one-year anniversary of the L.A. riots, Race Matters has since become an American classic. Beacon Press is proud to present this hardcover edition with a new introduction by Cornel West. The issues that it addresses are as controversial and urgent as before, and West's insights remain fresh, exciting, and timely. Now more than ever, Race Matters is a book for all Americans—one that ...
Additional Info:
First published in 1993 on the one-year anniversary of the L.A. riots, Race Matters has since become an American classic. Beacon Press is proud to present this hardcover edition with a new introduction by Cornel West. The issues that it addresses are as controversial and urgent as before, and West's insights remain fresh, exciting, and timely. Now more than ever, Race Matters is a book for all Americans—one that will help us build a genuine multiracial democracy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface 1993
Introduction: Race Matters

ch. 1 Nihilism in Black America
ch. 2 The Pitfalls of Racial Reasoning
ch. 3 The Crisis of Black Leadership
ch. 4 Demystifying the New Black Conservatism
ch. 5 Beyond Affirmative Action: Equality and Identity
ch. 6 On Black-Jewish Relations
ch. 7 Black Sexuality: The Taboo Subject
ch. 8 Malcolm X and Black Rage

Epilogue
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"Theological Education and Scholarship as Struggle: The Life of Racial/Ethnic Minorities in the Profession"

Article
Segovia, Fernando F.
1994
Journal of Hispanic/Latino Theology 2, no. 2 (1994): 2-25
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
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Becoming Multicultural: Personal and Social Construction through Critical Teaching

Book
Ford, Terry
1999
Falmer Press, New York, NY
LC1099.F63 1999
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This book argues that becoming multicultural is a process of recursive cycles that must involve confrontational dialogue for change. Multicultural education texts often describe multiculturalism as a process where a person develops competencies of perceiving, evaluating, believing, and doing in multiple ways. However, the dynamic, fluid and changing qualities central to the process of interpersonal interaction often results in mastery of a product, focusing on lists of static features of ...
Additional Info:
This book argues that becoming multicultural is a process of recursive cycles that must involve confrontational dialogue for change. Multicultural education texts often describe multiculturalism as a process where a person develops competencies of perceiving, evaluating, believing, and doing in multiple ways. However, the dynamic, fluid and changing qualities central to the process of interpersonal interaction often results in mastery of a product, focusing on lists of static features of generalized groups rather than on the individuals who make up those groups.

Rather than listing and describing objectified features of cultural groups from a theoretical view, this book details the interactions of 21 ethnically diverse individuals through one classroom experience. First, the personal histories and meanings constructed from lived experience are detailed and analyzed to reveal the ways in which personal identity constructions influence learning events in a singular classroom context. Second, from this analysis, the author develops a conceptual model for the process of becoming multicultural. Then the author applies the model to herself and describes specific ways in which interaction with these individuals has influenced her present teaching strategies for expecting and facilitating confrontational dialogue toward developing education that is multicultural. Specifically the book addresses the questions: 1) What does it mean to become multicultural? 2) What does it mean to be culturally sensitive? 3) How can the process of multiculturalism be facilitated in a classroom setting? 4) What is the teacher's role in the multicultural classroom? 5) What are some expected/predictable outcomes of a multicultural classroom? Includes bibliography and index. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Preface
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Defining Perspectives
ch. 2 Being and Becoming Multicultural
ch. 3 Constructing a Critical Context
ch. 4 Constructing Self as Object: Salient Autobiographical Experiences
ch. 5 Deconstructing Self as Object
ch. 6 (Re)Presenting Self as Subject
ch. 7 Lived Truth and Distorted Honesty
ch. 8 Implications for Critical Teaching

References
Index
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Wabash tree

No Angel in the Classroom: Teaching Through Feminist Discourse

Book
Fisher, Berenice Malka
2001
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LC197.F58 2001
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Taking a fresh look at questions that have long troubled teachers committed to social change, No Angel in the Classroom: Feminist Pedagogy as Political Practice provides a richly conceptualized and down-to-earth account of feminist teaching in higher education. Long-time feminist educator, Berenice Malka Fisher, gives a nuanced interpretation of second wave feminist consciousness-raising that bridges the gap between feminist activism and the academy. Candid classroom stories bring out the contradictions ...
Additional Info:
Taking a fresh look at questions that have long troubled teachers committed to social change, No Angel in the Classroom: Feminist Pedagogy as Political Practice provides a richly conceptualized and down-to-earth account of feminist teaching in higher education. Long-time feminist educator, Berenice Malka Fisher, gives a nuanced interpretation of second wave feminist consciousness-raising that bridges the gap between feminist activism and the academy. Candid classroom stories bring out the contradictions embedded in many activist ideals of the 1970s, while Fisher’s informed analysis builds on these tensions, offering a complex account of experience, emotion, thought, and action in feminist teaching. By developing a theory carefully shaped around practice. Fisher presents a thoughtful repsonse to the numerous attacks on “feminist pedagogy” launced in the 1980s and 90s. No Angel in the Classroom does not offer simple solutions, yet it helps politically engaged teachers to think through knotty problems that arise in their work. Can feminist teachers exercise authority without being authoritarian? Should “caring” lie at the core of feminist teaching’? Where does “safety” fit into classes in which teachers and students voice strong opinions and talk about personal matters? How can feminist teaching give serious attention to “differences” such as race, class, and sexual orientation? Intended for both veteran and beginning teachers, as well as others committed to social change, this groundbreaking book provides a pedagogical vision that inspires both passion and critical thinking. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Where I Come From

ch. 1 What Is Feminist Pedagogy?
ch. 2 Is Women's Experience the Best Teacher? Different Ways of Knowing
ch. 3 The Rocky Road to Feminist Empowerment: Questioning Authority
ch. 4 No Angel in the Classroom: Exploring the Ethic of Care
ch. 5 Dangerous Curves: Safety and Self-Disclosure
ch. 6 "Women Do Not Say 'We'": Difference and the Ideal of Community
ch. 7 Innocents and Intellectuals: Is There Hope for Feminist Teaching

Postscript: Where Can I Go from Here?
Notes
Bibliography
Index
About the Author
Cover image

Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities

Book
Shorris, Earl
2000
W.W. Norton & Company, New York, NY
HV 4045.S464 2000
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
In this groundbreaking work, Shorris examines the nature of poverty in America today. Why are people poor, and why do they stay poor? Shorris argues that they lack politics, or the ability to participate fully in the public world; knowing only the immediacy and oppression of force, the poor remain trapped and isolated. To test his theory, he created an experimental school teaching art, logic, philosophy, and poetry to poor ...
Additional Info:
In this groundbreaking work, Shorris examines the nature of poverty in America today. Why are people poor, and why do they stay poor? Shorris argues that they lack politics, or the ability to participate fully in the public world; knowing only the immediacy and oppression of force, the poor remain trapped and isolated. To test his theory, he created an experimental school teaching art, logic, philosophy, and poetry to poor people. Shorris hoped that, by studying the humanities, his students would learn to reflect and negotiate rather than simply react -- and would use this knowledge to break the cycle of poverty on their own. The results of his experiment proved nothing short of astonishing.

Here is the full story -- a completely revised and expanded edition of Shorris's New American Blues -- of the landmark endeavor that has spawned nearly two dozen programs in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, and that has been lauded from town meetings in the Yukon to the front page of the New York Times. Included in this book are reading lists and detailed information on the organization, staffing, and teaching methods used in the course. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Intentions

ch. 1 Richer Than Rockefeller
ch. 2 A Game of Poverty: Definitions
ch. 3 Born for Each Other
ch. 4 The Golden Age of Poverty
ch. 5 The Surround of Force
ch. 6 The Mirror of Force
ch. 7 The Fallacy of Work
ch. 8 Citizenship by Exclusion
ch. 9 Across Cultures
ch. 10 Political Inventions
ch. 11 A Prison Epiphany
ch. 12 adical Humanism
ch. 13 The Clemente Experiment Begins
ch. 14 The Bard Course
ch. 15 The Curriculum
ch. 16 Variations and Self-Criticism
ch. 17 Other Countries, Other Cultures
ch. 18 Conclusion: A Dangerous Corollary

Appendix
Index
Article cover image

"Liberal Arts Education and the Struggle for Public Life: Dreaming about Democracy"

Article
Giroux, Henry A.
1990
The South Atlantic Quarterly 89, no. 1 (1990): 113-138
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"'Nothing Can Ever Be the Case of 'Us' and 'Them' Again': Exploring the Politics of Difference Through Border Pedagogy and Student Journal Writing"

Article
Cook, Ian
2000
Journal of Geography in Higher Education 24, no. 1 (2000): 13-27
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Linda McDowell (1994) has called for styles of teaching which put into practice arguments about the 'politics of difference', which has become an increasingly central part of human geographical research. This paper draws on a number of years' experience of teaching an undergraduate course on multicultural historical geography, in which this was attempted. Here students were encouraged to get more involved in these debates, to take them more personally, and to ...
Additional Info:
Linda McDowell (1994) has called for styles of teaching which put into practice arguments about the 'politics of difference', which has become an increasingly central part of human geographical research. This paper draws on a number of years' experience of teaching an undergraduate course on multicultural historical geography, in which this was attempted. Here students were encouraged to get more involved in these debates, to take them more personally, and to develop 'situated knowledges' about the UK as a multicultural society. The approach to teaching, learning and assessment which made this possible was based on the principles of 'border pedagogy' and on students writing journals throughout the course which charted the development of their understandings of the materials they encountered.
Cover image

Enter the River: Healing Steps from White Privilege Toward Racial Reconciliation

Book
Shearer, Tobin Miller
1994
Herald Press, Scottdale, PA
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
The Bible tells of Naaman the Syrian, who entered the Jordan River to be cleansed. Comparing the affliction of racism to Naaman's illness, Enter the River by Jody Miller Shearer invites readers into their own healing. He explores definitions of prejudice and racism, the different effects of racism on white persons and people of color, affirmative action, and many other issues. The accessible presentation provides a strong foundation for study ...
Additional Info:
The Bible tells of Naaman the Syrian, who entered the Jordan River to be cleansed. Comparing the affliction of racism to Naaman's illness, Enter the River by Jody Miller Shearer invites readers into their own healing. He explores definitions of prejudice and racism, the different effects of racism on white persons and people of color, affirmative action, and many other issues. The accessible presentation provides a strong foundation for study and action. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
ch. 1 Why Be Concerned About Racism?
ch. 2 Why Is Talking About Racism So Hard?
ch. 3 What Is Prejudice?
ch. 4 What is Racism?
ch. 5 How Does Racism Afflict People of Color?
ch. 6 How Does Racism Afflict White People?
ch. 7 What Does It Mean to Be White?
ch. 8 How Can We Celebrate Our Cultures?
ch. 9 What Does This Mean for the Church?
ch. 10 What About Affirmative Action?
ch. 11 So What Can We Do About Racism?
Afterword
Appendix A: A Church of Many Peoples Confronts Racism
Appendix B: Ten Ways to Make a Third World Person Lose Effectiveness in an Organization
Notes
Resource List
Scripture Index
Index
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Race in the College Classroom: Pedagogy and Politics

Book
TuSmith, Bonnie and Maureen T. Reddy, eds.
2002
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
LC212.42.R33 2002
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Did affirmative action programs solve the problem of race on American college campuses, as several recent books would have us believe? If so, why does talking about race in anything more than a superficial way make so many students uncomfortable? Written by college instructors from many disciplines, this volume of essays takes a bold first step toward a nationwide conversation. Each of the twenty-nine contributors addresses one central question: what ...
Additional Info:
Did affirmative action programs solve the problem of race on American college campuses, as several recent books would have us believe? If so, why does talking about race in anything more than a superficial way make so many students uncomfortable? Written by college instructors from many disciplines, this volume of essays takes a bold first step toward a nationwide conversation. Each of the twenty-nine contributors addresses one central question: what are the challenges facing a college professor who believes that teaching responsibly requires an honest and searching examination of race?

Professors from the humanities, social sciences, sciences, and education consider topics such as how the classroom environment is structured by race; the temptation to retreat from challenging students when faced with possible reprisals in the form of complaints or negative evaluations; the implications of using standardized evaluations in faculty tenure and promotion when the course subject is intimately connected with race; and the varying ways in which white faculty and faculty of color are impacted by teaching about race. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Race in the College Classroom

Part I Authority and (Il)Legitimacy
Two Voices from the Front Lines: A Conversation about Race in the Classroom (Karen Elias and Judith C. Jones)
Teaching in Florida: The End of Affirmative Action and the Politics of Race (Sarika Chandra)
A Ghost in the Collaborative Machine: The White Male Teacher in the Multicultural Classroom (Peter Kerry Powers)
Decentering Whiteness: Resisting Racism in the Women's Studies Classroom (Pattie Duncan)
Smashing the Rules of Racial Standing (Maureen T. Reddy)
When the Political is Personal: Life on the Multiethnic Margins (Jennifer Ho)
The Entanglements of Teaching Nappy Hair (Rebecca Meacham)
Beyond Bull Conner: Teaching Slavery in Alabama (Fred Ashe)
Fear and the Professorial Center (Kevin Everod Quashie)

Part 2 Rewards and Punishments
Out on a Limb: Race and the Evaluation of Frontline Teaching (Bonnie TuSmith)
Whiteness on a White Canvas: Teaching Race in a Predominantly White University (Karyn D. McKinney)
Gift Wrapped or Paper Bagged?: Packaging Race for the Classroom (Rajini Srikanth)
The Question of Comfort: The Impact of Race on/in the College Classroom (Virginia Whatley Smith)
Far More than Frybread: The Tender Issue of Race in Teaching Literature (Roberta J. Hill)
Menaced by Resistance: The Black Teacher in the Mainly White School/Classroom (Gîtahi Gîtîtî)
Strategies for Surviving Race in the Classroom (Karen J. Leong)
Traps, Pitfalls, and Obstacles: Challenges to Confronting Racism in Academia (Brenda Bourdreau and Tami Eggleston)

Part 3 Transformative Practices
Confronting the "Screaming Baboon": Notes on Race, Literature, and Pedagogy (José L. Torres-Padilla)
Centering the Margins: A Chicana in the English Classroom (Norma E. Cantú)
Race, Discomfort, and Love in a University Classroom (Daniel P. Liston)
Moonwalking Technoshamans and the Shifting Margin: Decentering the Colonial Classroom (Louis Owens)
The Colorblind Cyberclass: Myth and Fact (Sharon Packer)
Skinwalking and Color Linecrossing: Teaching Writing Against Racism (Gary L. Lemons)
Racing into the Academy: Pedagogy and Black Faculty (A. Yemisi Jimoh and Charlene Johnson)
Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Teaching the Biology of Human Variation and the Social Construction of Race (Joseph L. Graves Jr.)
Conclusion: Teaching to Make a Difference (Bonnie TuSmit and Maureen T. Reddy
Selected References
Contributors
Article cover image

"Knowing Ourselves as Instructors"

Article
Bell, Lee Anne, Sharon Washington, Gerald Weinstein, and Barbara Love
1997
in Teaching for Diversity and Social Justice (New York: Routledge, 1997), 299-310
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Pedagogy of Freedom: Ethics, Democracy, and Civic Courage

Book
Freire, Paolo
1998
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LC196 .F73713 1998
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
In "Pedagogy of Freedom" Paulo Freire travels ever more deeply into the territory where learning and activism are the essence of human life. This profound new book shows why an engaged way of learning and teaching is central to the creation of the individual, culture, and history. Freire finds in today's emerging global society a new context in which education cannot be indifferent to the reproduction of dominant ideologies and ...
Additional Info:
In "Pedagogy of Freedom" Paulo Freire travels ever more deeply into the territory where learning and activism are the essence of human life. This profound new book shows why an engaged way of learning and teaching is central to the creation of the individual, culture, and history. Freire finds in today's emerging global society a new context in which education cannot be indifferent to the reproduction of dominant ideologies and the interrogation of them. He argues against "progressive" liberalism and its passive acceptance of a world where unemployment and hunger must inevitably co-exist with opulence. In so doing, he shows why an acceptance of fatalism leads to loss of personal and societal freedom-and how those individuals who think without optimism have lost their place in history. This book displays the striking creativity and profound insight that characterized Freire's work to the very end of his life-an uplifting and provocative exploration not only for educators, but for all who learn and live." (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Translator's Notes
Foreword
Introduction

ch. 1 Introductory Reflections
ch. 2 There Is No Teaching without Learning
Methodological Rigor
Research
Respect for What Students Know
A Capacity to Be Critical
Ethics and Aesthetics
Words Incarnated in Example
Risk, Acceptance of What Is New, and Rejection of Discrimination
Critical Reflection on Practice
Cultural Identity
ch. 3 Teaching Is Not Just Transferring Knowledge
Awareness of Our Unfinishedness
Recognition of One's Conditioning
Respect for the Autonomy of the Student
Common Sense
Humility, Tolerance, and the Struggle for the Rights of Educators
Capacity to Apprehend Reality
Joy and Hope
Conviction That Change Is Possible
Teaching Requires Curiosity
ch. 4 Teaching Is a Human Act
Self-Confidence, Professional Competence, and Generosity
Commitment
Education as a Form of Intervention in the World
Freedom and Authority
Decision Making That Is Aware and Conscientious
Knowing How to Listen
Education Is Ideological
Openness to Dialogue
Caring for the Students

Notes
Index
About the Author
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Educating for Freedom: The Paradox of Pedagogy

Book
Finkel, Donald L.
1995
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
LB14.7 .F56 1995
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
The very notion of teaching freedom suggests a paradox. Ever since Rousseau, the project of liberal education has been situated in the matrix of the teacher-student relationship. Some theorists have even seen this relationship as erotic. Part one of this book explores the educational philosophies of Rousseau, Freud, Paolo Freire, Ivan Illich, and Michel Foucault. All these thinkers wrestle with the paradox, How can such a mutually dependent relationship foster ...
Additional Info:
The very notion of teaching freedom suggests a paradox. Ever since Rousseau, the project of liberal education has been situated in the matrix of the teacher-student relationship. Some theorists have even seen this relationship as erotic. Part one of this book explores the educational philosophies of Rousseau, Freud, Paolo Freire, Ivan Illich, and Michel Foucault. All these thinkers wrestle with the paradox, How can such a mutually dependent relationship foster independence? The primary vehicle necessary to a liberating education, the personal relationship, is also the fundamental obstacle to the achievement of genuine liberation.

After reaching this conclusion, the authors turn away from the student-teacher relationship and the paradox of pedagogy to examine another type of teaching and learning--where two teachers who differ in fundamental ways engage in collegial teaching with students they have in common. Collegial teaching is described in its particularity, based on the authors' experiences at an unusual liberal arts college, The Evergreen State College. They find that the changed dynamics of equality and the altered structure of authority created by collegial teaching is rewarding for both teachers and students, and may be a way out of the paradox of pedagogy to intellectual freedom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 The Promise of a Personal Pedagogy: Rousseau's Emile
ch. 2 The Paradox of a Personal Pedagogy: Freud's Concept of Transference
ch. 3 The Promise of a Social Pedagogy: Paulo Freire's Culture Circles
ch. 4 The Paradox of a Social Pedagogy: The Institutional Analyses of Ivan Illich and Michel Foucault
ch. 5 Turning Away from the Student-Teacher Relationship / Turning Toward Colleagues
ch. 6 Collegial Teaching

Conclusion
Notes
Index
Article cover image

"Teaching at the End of Empire"

Article
Slemon, Stephen
1995
in Myrsiades, Kostas, and Jerry McGuire, Order and Partialities Theory, Pedagogy, and the "Post colonial" (Albany NY: SUNY Press, 1995), 285-298
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States

Book
Bonilla-Silva, Eduardo
2003
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
E184.A1B597 2003
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Racism is alive and well although it has changed its clothes. Color-blind racism combines elements of liberalism in the abstract with anti-minority views to justify contemporary racial inequality. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Racism is alive and well although it has changed its clothes. Color-blind racism combines elements of liberalism in the abstract with anti-minority views to justify contemporary racial inequality. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The strange enigma of race in contemporary America
ch. 2 The central frames of color-blind racism
ch. 3 The style of color blindness : how to talk nasty about minorities without sounding racist
ch. 4 "I didn't get that job because of a black man": color-blind racism's racial stories
ch. 5 Peeking inside the (white) house of color blindness : the significance of whites' segregation
ch. 6 Are all whites refined Archie Bunkers? : an examination of white racial progressives
ch. 7 Are blacks color blind, too?
ch. 8 E Pluribus Unum or the same old perfume in a new bottle? : on the future of racial stratification in the United States
ch. 9 Conclusion : "the (color-blind) emperor has no clothes" : exposing the whiteness of color blindness
ch. 10 Queries : answers to questions from concerned readers
Postscript : what is to be done (for real)?
App In-depth interview schedule DAS 98-form B
Cover image

Reversing the Lens: Ethnicity, Race, Gender, and Sexuality Through Film

Book
Xing, Jun, and Lane Ryo Hirabayashi, eds.
2003
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, OK
PN1995.9.M6 X56 2003
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Using Technology   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Reversing the Lens brings together noted scholars in history, anthropology, sociology, ethnic studies, and film studies to promote film as a powerful educational tool that can be used to foster cross-cultural communication with respect to race and ethnicity. Through such films as Skin Deep, Slaying the Dragon, and Mississippi Masala, contributors demonstrate why and how visual media help delineate various forms of "critical visual thinking" and examine how racialization is ...
Additional Info:
Reversing the Lens brings together noted scholars in history, anthropology, sociology, ethnic studies, and film studies to promote film as a powerful educational tool that can be used to foster cross-cultural communication with respect to race and ethnicity. Through such films as Skin Deep, Slaying the Dragon, and Mississippi Masala, contributors demonstrate why and how visual media help delineate various forms of "critical visual thinking" and examine how racialization is either sedimented or contested in the popular imagination. Reversing the Lens is relevant to anyone who is curious about how video and film can be utilized to expose ethnicity, race, gender, and sexuality as social constructions subject to political contestation and in dialogue with other potential forms of difference. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction (Lane Ryo Hirabayashi and Jun Xing)
ch. 2 Media Empowerment, Smashing Stereotypes, and Developing Empathy (Jun Xing)
ch. 3 Video Constructions of Asian America: Teaching Monterey's Boat People (Malcolm Collier and Lane Ryo Hrabayashi)
ch. 4 American Indians in Film: Thematic Contours of Cinematic Colonization (Ward Churchill)
ch. 5 El Espejo/The Mirror: Reflections of Cultural Memory (Carmen Huaco-Nuzum)
ch. 6 Mississippi Masala: Crossing Desire and Interest (Adeleke Adeeko)
ch. 7 Skin Deep: Using Video to Teach Race and Critical Thinking (Brenda J. Allen)
ch. 8 Confronting Gender Stereotypes of Asian American Women: Slaying the Dragon (Marilyn C. Alquizola and Lane Ryo Hirabayashi)
ch. 9 Screens and Bars: Confronting Cinemea Representations of Race and Crime (Lee Bernstein)
ch. 10 The Queering of Chicana Studies: Philosophy, Text, and Image (Elisa Facio)
ch. 11 The Matrix: Using American Popular Film to Teach Concepts of Eastern Mysticism (Jeffrey B. Ho)
ch. 12 Beyond the Hollywood Hype: Unmasking State Oppression Against People of Color (Brett Stockdill, Lisaa Sun-Hee, and David N. Pellow)
ch. 13 Self, Society, and the "Other": Using Film to Teach About Ethnicity and Race (Jun Xing)
ch. 14 The Issue of Reinscription: Pedagogical Responses
Selected Filmography (Lane Ryo Hirabayashi and Marilyn C. Alquizola)

List of Contributors
Index
Cover image

Advocacy in the Classroom: Problems and Possibilities

Book
Spacks, Patricia Meyer, ed.
1996
St. Martin's Press, New York, NY
LC72.2.A38 1996
Topics: Faith in the Classroom   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Noted literary critic Patricia Meyer Spacks has gathered together a group of both liberal and conservative professors to answer the question of whether or not a teacher can still bring passionate commitment to an idea into the classroom as a way of engaging students in a meaningful way. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Noted literary critic Patricia Meyer Spacks has gathered together a group of both liberal and conservative professors to answer the question of whether or not a teacher can still bring passionate commitment to an idea into the classroom as a way of engaging students in a meaningful way. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Professional Obligations of Classroom Teachers (Myles Brand)
ch. 2 The Political Magic of Claims to Neutral Universalisms, Or: How to Appear Fair While Converting Substantive Challenges to Political Advocacy (Troy Duster)
ch. 3 Fear and Loathing in the Classroom: Faculty and Student Rights in Comparative Context (Michael A. Olivas)
ch. 4 Choosing Voices (Ernestine Friedl)
ch. 5 A Brief History of Academic Freedom (Geoffrey R. Stone)
ch. 6 First Amendment and Civil Liberties Traditions of Academic Freedom (Nadine Strossen)
ch. 7 The Open Classroom and Its Enemies (Michael Root)
ch. 8 The New Advocacy and the Old (Gertrude Himmelfarb)
ch. 9 The New Ethicism: Beyond Poststructuralism and Identity Politics (Whitney Davis)
ch. 10 Culture and Advocacy (Louis Menand)
ch. 11 Defining "True" Knowledge: Consensus and the Growing Distrust of Faculty Activism, 1880s-1920s (Julie A. Reuben)
ch. 12 Academics, Advocacy, and the Public Schools: A View from the 1930s (Mark C. Smith)
ch. 13 A Full Circle: Advocacy and Academic Freedom in Crisis (Richard Mucahy)
ch. 14 "Judge" or "Advocate"? Scholars, War, and Protest in the Anti-Vietnam War Teach-Ins of 1965 (Tom Jehn)
ch. 15 Advocacy and Explanation: The Problems of Explaining Adversaries (John O. Voll)
ch. 16 Professional Advocates: When Is"Advocacy" Part of One's Vocation? (Michael Bérubé)
ch. 17 Feminism: A Long Memory (Carolyn G. Heilbrun)
ch. 18 Unveiling the Myth of Neutrality: Advocacy in the Feminist Classroom (Helene Moglen)
ch. 19 Academic Skepticism and the Contexts of Belief (C. Jan Swearingen)
ch. 20 Teachers, Not Advocates: Toward an Open Classroom (Jeffrey Wallen)
ch. 21 The Politics of Aesthetic Distance (Lambert Zuidervaart)
ch. 22 The Internalization of Disinterestedness (Hilde Hein)
ch. 23 The Open Secret: Dilemmas of Advocacy in the Religious Studies Classroom (Susan E. Henking)
ch. 24 "A Teacher Is Either a Witness or a Stranger" (Penny S. Gold)
ch. 25 Theory and Politics of Art History (Felicia Ackerman)
ch. 26 Be Reasonable and Do It My Way: Advocacy in the College Classroom
ch. 27 The Limits of Appropriate Advocacy (Peter Markie)
ch. 28 Some Implications of the Faculty's Obligation to Encourage Student Academic Freedom for Faculty Advocacy in the Classroom (Ernst Benjamin)
ch. 29 When Academic Speech Hits the Courtroom: How Lawyers Might Argue (and Judges Might Decide) - Three Semihypothetical Cases(Martha Chamallas, Richard Seeburger, and Peter M. Shane)
ch. 30 A Different Take on Advocacy in the Public School Classroom (Jyane E. Sbarboro)
ch. 31 Fight Training in the High School Classroom (Ray Linn)
ch. 32 Students Becoming Their Own Advocates (Judith Entes)
ch. 33 A Personal Account of a Struggle to Be Evenhanded in Teaching About Abortion (Samuel W. Calhoun)
ch. 34 Teaching College Students, Teaching Workers (Michael D. Yates)
ch. 35 What Does a Black University Advocate? Student and Faculty Viewpoints (Janice McLane)
ch. 36 Advocacy in the Classroom: The Counseling Perspective (Angela Anselmo)
ch. 37 Ethnography as Advocacy: Allowing the Voices of Women Prisoners to Speak (Shawny Anderson)
ch. 38 Advocacy in the Classroom - Or the Curriculum? A Response (Gerald Graff)
ch. 39 Afterthoughts on the Role of Advocacy in the Classroom (Andrea A. Lunsford)

Biographies
Journal cover image

Embracing Disability in Teaching Religion

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2005
Spotlight on Teaching 20, no. 3 May
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/spotlight-2005-05may.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/spotlight-2005-05may.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Embracing Disability in Teaching Religion (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Integrating Disability in Religious Studies and Theological Education (Nancy L. Eiesland)
ch. 3 Disability Law and the Classroom (F. Rachel Magdalene)
ch. 4 Accommodating Disability in the Classroom (Kerry Wynn)
ch. 5 A Student’s Perspective on the Accessible Classroom (Kirk VanGilder)
ch. 6 New Bodies of Knowledge: Disability Studies and Teaching Biblical Studies (Hector Avalos)
ch. 7 Disability and the Tasks of Social Justice (Roger S. Gottlieb)
ch. 8 Teaching Students Who Are Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Impaired (Jane Hurst)
ch. 9 Students with Learning Disabilities (Kent A. Eaton)
ch. 10 He Who Has Ears to Hear (Rebecca Raphael)
ch. 11 An Academic’s Encounter with Chronic Illness: Teaching, Collegiality and Scholarship, and Students with Chronic Conditions (Mary Jo Iozzio)
ch. 12 The Future of Disability in the Teaching of Religion: Views from the Next Generation (Deborah Creamer)
Cover image

147 Practical Tips for Teaching Diversity

Book
Timpson, William M., Raymond Yang, Evelinn Borrayo, and Silvia Sara Canetto
2005
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LC1099.3.A16 2005
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Diversity is vitally important to today's classroom, but many college teachers remain uncertain as to how to handle this sensitive subject. Compiled from the real-life experiences of over a dozen professors and experts, 147 Practical Tips for Teaching Diversity tackles this question head on. Taking you from the classroom to the committee meeting to the the community at large, this book offers hands-on advice for improving diversity discussions all through the ...
Additional Info:
Diversity is vitally important to today's classroom, but many college teachers remain uncertain as to how to handle this sensitive subject. Compiled from the real-life experiences of over a dozen professors and experts, 147 Practical Tips for Teaching Diversity tackles this question head on. Taking you from the classroom to the committee meeting to the the community at large, this book offers hands-on advice for improving diversity discussions all through the semester.

Some of what you'll find inside:

Safe space: How to create a safe and welcoming learning environment

Prejudice: How both you and your students can work together to unlearn stereotypes

Challenges: How to address taboo subjects and handle conflicts preemptively

Curriculum: How to broaden the subject matter and address current events

Community: How to deepen your institution's commitment to diversity

Whatever your past experiences with teaching diversity, this book is sure to help both you and your students expand your thinking and understanding, both inside and outside of the classroom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Embrace a Pedagogy of Human Diversity
1. See differences as constructed and real
2. Honor expertise on diversity
3. Be inclusive and note intersections
4. Study diversity
5. Examine policies and court decisions
6. Understand similarities

Expand and Deepen Student Thinking
7. Welcome contradictions and get students to think on the edge of their comfort zones
8. Connect thinking and personal experience to research
9. Analyze terms, concepts and the deeper meaning of language
10. Introduce new ways of thinking
11. Pause for reflection
12. Celebrate initiative
13. Emphasize critical thinking
14. Make use of different student perspectives
15. Seek closure
16. Invite new thinking
17. Help students stretch
18. Require deeper analysis of experiences
19. Avoid easy answers and embrace complexity

Support Student-Centered Learning
20. Understand student development
21. Challenge assumptions
22. Encourage self-examination
23. Use off-campus opportunities
24. Use student response sheets
25. Develop and use empathy
26. Build supportive classroom communities
27. Connect to the personal
28. Have students write a cultural autobiography
29. Encourage participation and stir the soul
30. Recognize the mix of the theoretical and the personal
31. Allow time
32. Emphasize constructivist learning
33. De-center authority — maybe

Develop Rapport, Community, and Emotional Maturity
34. Find the positive in student responses
35. Get to know your students and make connections
36. Make connections to student lives
37. Support cooperation
38. Teach students about emotional intelligence
39. Rearrange seating to facilitate interactions
40. Address guilt
41. Share your own struggles
42. Help students understand systems
43. De-emphasize evaluation during practice

Face Conflicts with Intelligence, Sensitivity, and Creativity
44. Discuss possible tensions
45. Know that there’s a time to be objective and detached
46. Counter polarization
47. Prepare for sensitive topics
48. Remember that emotions can be constructive
49. Explore possibilities with the performing arts

Unlearn Stereotyping and Prejudice
50. Discuss stereotypes
51. Recognize that there is no spokesperson for an entire population in your class
52. Admit to your biases
53. Expose contradictions
54. Understand privilege
55. Critically examine the standard or ideal
56. Speak the truth and name the oppression
57. Have courage

Create Safe, Open, Inclusive, and Supportive Classrooms
58. Balance openness and safety
59. Encourage participation
60. Ensure care when speaking
61. Use student dyads
62. Practice generosity
63. Create alliances and contracts with students
64. Practice democracy and promote citizenship
65. Be humble
66. Develop student leadership skills
67. Honor choices
68. Insist on responsible language
69. Ensure safety for instructors
70. Reduce perceived threat
71. Create supportive policies and practices

Develop Your Instructional Skills
72. Manage multiple roles and use varied approaches
73. Use simulations
74. Model what you expect
75. Understand and use your own reactions
76. Connect teaching and learning
77. Be enthusiastic about teaching
78. Use course web sites
79. Solicit feedback from students and evaluate
80. Teach from the heart
81. Invite diverse guests
82. Assign journals
83. Make teaching transparent
84. Solicit feedback from students

Communicate and Collaborate
85. Emphasize collaboration and prosocial skills
86. Practice professionalism
87. Prize relationships
88. Balance participation.
89. Acknowledge group support and build teamwork
90. Be credible
91. Use student legacies
92. Make use of classroom diversity
93. Teach and practice I-messages

Challenge Ideas, Attitudes, and Beliefs
94. Challenge traditions and question basic concepts
95. Value diverse perspectives
96. Address taboo subjects
97. Challenge naiveté
98. Reduce academic distance
99. Teach resistance

Support Positive Change
100. Think of transformation
101. Teach activism
102. Assign change projects
103. Emphasize awareness and involvement
104. Choose a healthy perspective and build on hope

Rethink Curriculum and Expectations
105. Broaden the range of variation under study
106. Address current diversity issues
107. Teach against the grain
108. Search for new material
109. Supplement class readings
110. Use film clips for shared experiences
111. Use case studies
112. Teach about rights
113. Be alert to challenges and opportunities on gender issues
114. Focus on first-year seminars and orientation programs
115. Identify underlying issues
116. Maintain high expectations of your students

Support Personal and Professional Development
117. Challenge yourself
118. Commit to personal growth
119. Find time to read
120. Share strategies with colleagues
121. Understand the dynamics of peer support
122. Make use of professional growth opportunities
123. Emphasize honest self-reflection
124. Overcome silence
125. Develop your own communication skills
126. Question your own status
127. Walk your talk
128. Support campus-wide professional development
129. Lobby for new funds for teaching diversity efforts

Deepen Your Institution’s Commitment to Diversity
130. Recruit supportive leaders
131. Use strategic planning
132. Create action plans
133. Hire and retain diverse personnel
134. Pay attention to campus artifacts as signifiers
135. Advocate for "zero tolerance" policies
136. Seek support from administrators and other allies

Contribute to the Scholarship of Teaching Diversity
137. Conduct research on diversity
138. Write about your teaching
139. Lobby for institutional support for research

Support Diversity by Globalizing the Curriculum
140. Connect to the world on campus
141. Help students see their world through other lenses
142. Expand student worldviews
143. Put students onto a social map
144. Recognize the validity of other worldviews
145. Understand the world with story and metaphor
146. Meet the world through music
147. Approach the world with empathy

Epilogue: Lessons Learned

References
Cover image

Talking Race in the Classroom

Book
Bolgatz, Jane
2005
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC1099.3.B65 2005
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This lively book will help new and veteran teachers develop the knowledge, skills, and confidence needed to successfully address racial controversies in their classrooms. The author first explains what race and racism mean and why we need to talk about these topics in schools. Then, based on an in-depth study of a high school classroom, she shows what happens when teachers and students talked about race and racism in a ...
Additional Info:
This lively book will help new and veteran teachers develop the knowledge, skills, and confidence needed to successfully address racial controversies in their classrooms. The author first explains what race and racism mean and why we need to talk about these topics in schools. Then, based on an in-depth study of a high school classroom, she shows what happens when teachers and students talked about race and racism in a history and language arts classroom. Throughout the book she guides teachers in ways to discuss important issues—from civil rights to institutional racism—that will ultimately help teachers and students to change school culture.

Features:

* Analysis of actual classroom dialogues, illustrating the often-rough conversations that teachers and students engage in while learning to talk constructively about race and racism.
* Useful questions, resources, and activities to help teachers get started.
* Ideas and strategies that teachers can use to get students to address race and racism critically in the classroom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Racial literacy : talking even when "the smooth-sounding words fail us"
ch. 2 What is race? : what is racism?
ch. 3 How come they get mad about the Cleveland Indians? : a case study of discussions of race and racism in the classroom
ch. 4 Creating opportunities to talk about race and racism
ch. 5 Characterizations of race and racism
ch. 6 Social dynamics in the classroom
ch. 7 Cultivating racial literacy in our schools

App. A Research participants
App. B "Poem for the young white man..."
App. C Assumptions and definitions handout
Article cover image

"Teaching Controversial Issues"

Article
Center for Teaching and Learning
2004
Center for Teaching and Learning, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Topics: Discussion   |   Classroom Management   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Educating for Democracy: Paideia in an Age of Uncertainty

Book
Olson, Alan M., David M. Steiner, and Irina S. Tuuli, eds.
2004
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LB14.7.E33 2004
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
The central conflicts of the world today are closely related to cultural, traditional and religious differences between nations. As we move to a globalized world, these differences often become magnified, entrenched and the cause of bloody conflict. Growing out of a conference of distinguished scholars from the MiddleEast, Europe and the United States, this volume is a singular contribution to mutual understanding and cooperative efforts on behalf of peace. The ...
Additional Info:
The central conflicts of the world today are closely related to cultural, traditional and religious differences between nations. As we move to a globalized world, these differences often become magnified, entrenched and the cause of bloody conflict. Growing out of a conference of distinguished scholars from the MiddleEast, Europe and the United States, this volume is a singular contribution to mutual understanding and cooperative efforts on behalf of peace. The term paideia, drawn from Greek philosophy, has to do with responsible education for citizenship as a necessary precondition for effective democracy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Alexander Chumakov)

ch. 1 Introduction : paideia is philosophy and religion (Alan M. Olson)
ch. 2 Paideia : anachronism or necessity? (William Desmond)
ch. 3 Paideia as the unity of knowledge and enlightenment (Mourad Wahba)
ch. 4 Science, education, and the transformation of civilization in the twenty-first century (Viachaslav Stepin)
ch. 5 The noospheric imperative of paideia in the twenty-first century (eduard Girusov)
ch. 6 Paideia, critical thinking and religion in education (Vladislav Lektorsky)
ch. 7 Interreligious dialogues during the Middle Ages and early modernity (Vittorio Hösle)
ch. 8 The impact of modernity on Jewish life (Steven Katz)
ch. 9 Paideia and Adab in Islam (Nur Kirabiev)
ch. 10 The changing face of Islamic radicalism (Alexei Malashenko)
ch. 11 Christian-Islamic dialogue in the twenty-first century (Sidney Griffith)
ch. 12 Introduction : paideia and education (David Steiner)
ch. 13 Paideia : anachronism or necessity? (John Silber)
ch. 14 Paideia in an age of uncertainty (Elemer Hankiss)
ch. 15 After NATO, paideia? (Igor Lukes)
ch. 16 Liberal education in the face of antidemocracy (Kurt Salamun)
ch. 17 Prescribing orthodoxy (Charles Glenn)
ch. 18 Dedogmatizing reason (Mona Abousenna)
ch. 19 Education and democratization in an age of Islamism (Bassam Tibi)
ch. 20 Education to conscience and political disobedience : the role of the role model (Ovadia Ezra)
ch. 21 Face to face with Eudaimonia : the post-Soviet teacher's identity crisis (Elena Trubina)
ch. 22 Reformatting the idea of a university (Gregory Walters)
ch. 23 The ethics of political economy : a roundtable discussion (Alexander Ageev, Bradley Googins, Elena Karpuhina, Katherine Marshall, James Post, Sheila Puffer, and Irina Tuuli)
TTR cover image

"Teaching Effectively in Racially and Culturally Diverse Classrooms"

TTR
Ramsay, Nancy J.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 1 (2005): 18-23
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Issues of racial and cultural diversity and racism pose particular challenges for effective teaching and learning in diverse theological classrooms. In this essay the author outlines specific strategies to confront racism and engage racially and culturally diverse students. Through the use of a model for understanding multicultural dynamics of teaching and learning, the author helps readers consider four epistemological categories: knowing our students, knowing ourselves as instructors, knowing how we ...
Additional Info:
Issues of racial and cultural diversity and racism pose particular challenges for effective teaching and learning in diverse theological classrooms. In this essay the author outlines specific strategies to confront racism and engage racially and culturally diverse students. Through the use of a model for understanding multicultural dynamics of teaching and learning, the author helps readers consider four epistemological categories: knowing our students, knowing ourselves as instructors, knowing how we teach, and knowing what we teach.
Additional Info:
This essay discusses the process and findings of an experiment on the scholarship of teaching and learning conducted in a religious ethics classroom that utilized an experiential approach to teaching and learning about social justice. The first part lays out the focus of the investigation and the pedagogical principles drawn from experiential learning theory that provided the foundation for the experiment. The second part describes all of the components of ...
Additional Info:
This essay discusses the process and findings of an experiment on the scholarship of teaching and learning conducted in a religious ethics classroom that utilized an experiential approach to teaching and learning about social justice. The first part lays out the focus of the investigation and the pedagogical principles drawn from experiential learning theory that provided the foundation for the experiment. The second part describes all of the components of the pedagogical strategy used in the experiment, the social justice action project. The third part discusses the qualitative methodology used to gather evidence and the findings drawn from that evidence. What the evidence shows is that an experiential approach to teaching and learning about social justice can be quite effective. The essay concludes with discussions of areas for further study and the implications for the practice of others.
TTR cover image

"The Role of Moral Exemplars in the Teaching and Learning of Practical Reason in a Catholic University"

TTR
Ingrando, Carla
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 105-112
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
The content of Catholic social teaching suggests that an appropriate pedagogy for the teaching and learning of Catholic social thought is the teaching and learning of practical reason. This article explores the role of moral exemplars in the teaching and learning of practical reason in a Catholic university. Specifically, the article details the use of moral exemplars in the "Profiles in the Catholic Social Tradition" course taught at the University ...
Additional Info:
The content of Catholic social teaching suggests that an appropriate pedagogy for the teaching and learning of Catholic social thought is the teaching and learning of practical reason. This article explores the role of moral exemplars in the teaching and learning of practical reason in a Catholic university. Specifically, the article details the use of moral exemplars in the "Profiles in the Catholic Social Tradition" course taught at the University of Notre Dame in the Fall semester of 2000. After a brief explanation of the appeal to practical reason as an appropriate pedagogy for teaching and learning the content of Catholic social teaching, the article turns to a discussion of our particular experience of using moral exemplars in the classroom.
TTR cover image

"From Pride to Cowardice: Obstacles to the Dialogical Classroom"

TTR
Bain–Selbo, Eric
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 1 (2003): 3-8
BL41.T4
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Drawing on his own work in educational theory as well as his classroom experience, the author identifies important dialogical vices that he finds in his students: pride and cowardice. These vices are put both in the theoretical context of a greater understanding of the role of dialogue in learning and in the social context of the contemporary multicultural ethos from which the students come. In opposition to the vices, the ...
Additional Info:
Drawing on his own work in educational theory as well as his classroom experience, the author identifies important dialogical vices that he finds in his students: pride and cowardice. These vices are put both in the theoretical context of a greater understanding of the role of dialogue in learning and in the social context of the contemporary multicultural ethos from which the students come. In opposition to the vices, the author proposes dialogical virtues (humility, charity, and courage) and a concept of tolerance that help us to avoid pride and cowardice. In this way, we achieve genuine dialogue and multiculturalism and avoid what the author calls a pernicious multiculturalism
TTR cover image

"Beyond Diversity: Cultural Competence, White Racism Awareness, and European–American Theology Students"

TTR
Kujawa-Holbrook, Sheryl
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 3 (2002): 141-148
BL41.T4
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
As the population within our religious institutions and the United States grows increasingly diverse, the need for a greater awareness of cultural and racial differences is a challenge facing theology students who will live and work within a changing context. For European American students this challenge includes an understanding of the power dynamics inherent in "whiteness" and how the resultant social power affects persons of other races and cultures. This ...
Additional Info:
As the population within our religious institutions and the United States grows increasingly diverse, the need for a greater awareness of cultural and racial differences is a challenge facing theology students who will live and work within a changing context. For European American students this challenge includes an understanding of the power dynamics inherent in "whiteness" and how the resultant social power affects persons of other races and cultures. This article focuses on the need for cultural competence among current theology students, and outlines a five-stage developmental process whereby they have an opportunity to enhance their understanding of multiculturalism and anti-racism within their own context.
TTR cover image

"Red Light Means Stop! Teaching Theology through Exposure Learning in Manila's Red Light District"

TTR
Mercer, Joyce Ann
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 2 (2002): 90-100
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This paper explores exposure learning as a strategy for teaching theology in a Christian seminary, by describing and analyzing one multicultural Asian class's exposure to the "Red Light Districts" of Manila (Philippines). Exposures consist of short-term experiential learning events through participation and immersion into a specific context, preceded and followed by a process of study and reflection. Exposure learning has the potential to minimize certain forms of student resistance around ...
Additional Info:
This paper explores exposure learning as a strategy for teaching theology in a Christian seminary, by describing and analyzing one multicultural Asian class's exposure to the "Red Light Districts" of Manila (Philippines). Exposures consist of short-term experiential learning events through participation and immersion into a specific context, preceded and followed by a process of study and reflection. Exposure learning has the potential to minimize certain forms of student resistance around emotionally-charged subjects, such as the integration of race, class, and gender into theological education, because it is the experience together with shared critical reflection on it and not the teacher's viewpoints per se that unsettle prior interpretive frameworks. Exposure learning also carries certain risks and ethical dilemmas, and its long-term effects on transformation remain unclear. In spite of these pedagogical issues which the paper explores in detail, the paper supports exposure learning as an alternative experiential form of education for transformation.
TTR cover image

"How Clearly Must I See? Art and Ethics in Pedagogical Practice"

TTR
Mercer, Joyce Ann and Charles R. Foster
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 3 (2001): 124-132
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
This essay explores pedagogical practices and ethical obligations in the embrace of cultural and religious diversity by a faculty team in a theological school course. Attention is given to the interplay of art and ethical dilemmas in an educational praxis that calls into question students' taken-for-granted worldviews and theologies. In the first of three sections the writers identify several assumptions they brought to the conduct of the course regarding diversity, ...
Additional Info:
This essay explores pedagogical practices and ethical obligations in the embrace of cultural and religious diversity by a faculty team in a theological school course. Attention is given to the interplay of art and ethical dilemmas in an educational praxis that calls into question students' taken-for-granted worldviews and theologies. In the first of three sections the writers identify several assumptions they brought to the conduct of the course regarding diversity, art, and pedagogy. The second section describes student encounters with and responses to art from a variety of cultural contexts. The paper concludes with a critical reflection on ethical and political issues arising from pedagogical practices that engage students with art.
TTR cover image

"Teaching What I'm Not: Embodiment, Race, and Theological Conversation in the Classroom"

TTR
Thompson, Deanna A.
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 3 (2000): 164-169
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This article examines the theoretical and practical concerns of a White professor who teaches a course on African American religious thought. It begins with a discussion of what it means to be embodied White, and how that affects the teaching of another embodied reality. From there it moves to the major assignment of the course, the evolutionary essay, and how this assignment facilitates student reflection upon their own embodied existence, ...
Additional Info:
This article examines the theoretical and practical concerns of a White professor who teaches a course on African American religious thought. It begins with a discussion of what it means to be embodied White, and how that affects the teaching of another embodied reality. From there it moves to the major assignment of the course, the evolutionary essay, and how this assignment facilitates student reflection upon their own embodied existence, particularly in terms of race. The article concludes with a brief reflection on the continuing challenges the author faces when teaching such a course.
Article cover image

"Testing the Limits of Tolerance in a Course on Religion and Sexual Diversity"

Article
Smith, Theresa S.
1999
College Teaching 47, no. 2 (1999): 55
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Journal cover image

Theological Education and Liberation Theology: A Symposium

Journal Issue
1979
Theological Education 16, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Theological Education and Liberation Theology: An Invitation to Respond (Frederick Herzog, with Thomas Ambrogi, Robert McAfee Brown, Lee Cormie, Paul Hammer, Edward Huenemann, Thomas A. Langford, M. Douglas Meeks, Lewis S. Mudge, Benjamin A. Reist, Theodore H. Runyon, George Telford)
A Symposium of Response
1. What is Your Assessment of the Basic Thesis
2. What are its Specific Implications for Theological Education? (John C. Bennett; Donald C. Bloesch; Katie G. Cannon; John H. Carwright; Harvery G. Cox, Jr.; Richard D. N. Dickinson; Virgilio P. Elizondo; C. Douglas Jay; Ernest W. Lefever; Martin E. Marty; Schubert E. Ogden; Aharon Sapsezian; Peter Schineller; Ronald J. Sider; Ronald H. Stone; Charles C. West; and Barbara Brown Zikmund)
Faculty/Staff Development
Announcements
On Writing Theological Scholarship and Research Grant Applications (Joseph M. Kitagawa)
Observations about Good Proposals (John Hurd)
What Makes a Winning Proposal in Administrative Staff Development? (Dayton D. Hultgren)
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Spirit of Service: Exploring Faith, Service, and Social Justice in Higher Education

Book
Johnson, Brian T. and Carolyn R. O'Grady, eds.
2006
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LC220.5.S635 2006
Topics: Service Learning   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Religion and Academia   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
In The Spirit of Service , the contributing authors explore the intersection of faith, service, and social justice in higher education. Reflecting upon the role that higher education plays in preparing future generations of citizens and leaders, this book asserts that spirituality and values necessarily involve one's person—and that educators must begin to connect student learning with the human experiences of faith, service, and commitment to social justice.
Each ...
Additional Info:
In The Spirit of Service , the contributing authors explore the intersection of faith, service, and social justice in higher education. Reflecting upon the role that higher education plays in preparing future generations of citizens and leaders, this book asserts that spirituality and values necessarily involve one's person—and that educators must begin to connect student learning with the human experiences of faith, service, and commitment to social justice.
Each of the authors describes a teaching experience in order to critically reflect upon the divide in academic culture between responsible, rigorous, intellectual competence and personal values. The authors' lessons in success and failure are meant to provide guidance for all institutions that are committed to preparing young students to lead lives of leadership and civic engagement. Divided into three parts, this book:
* Explores the meaning, practice, and implications of religions or spiritually motivated service
* Offers specific examples from faculty for integrating faith or spiritual perspectives with service, including what has worked and what dilemmas remain
* Focuses on specific dilemmas and implications for engaging in service for social justice
Containing a wealth of practical suggestions and strategies, The Spirit of Service represents a conversation in progress; it is an attempt to understand how to help undergraduates integrate service and spirituality for the purpose of social justice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Foreword
Acknowledgements

Part I: Analyzing the Landscape
ch. 1 Why We Started and Why It Matters (Carolyn R. O'Grady and Brian T. Johnson)
ch. 2 Opportunities and Issues: Talking About Faith at a Church-Related College (Florence Amamoto)
ch. 3 The Role of Institutional Narratives, Foundational Documents, and Program Collaboration (Brian T. Johnson and Noreen Buhmann)

Part II: Practicing What We Preach
ch. 4 Teaching Toward Social Justice: Notes From a religion Classroom (Mary M. Solberg)
ch. 5 Faith, Social Justice, and Service-Learning in Environmental Studies: The Struggle for Integration (Mark Bjelland)
ch. 6 Are There Mexicans in Minnesota? Comments on Service-Learning and Lutheran Liberal Arts Education (Gaston A. Alzate)
ch. 7 Faith, Peace, and Politics: Dwelling in Discomfort (Loramy Gerstbauer)
ch. 8 Just Food (Lisa Heldke and Peg O'Connor)
ch. 9 Ora et Labor: Prayer and Service in an International Study Abroad Program(Jenifer K. Ward)

Part III: Getting to the Heart of the Matter
ch. 10 Fear of Disclosure in the Academic Milieu (Leila Brammer)
ch. 11 Speaking Truth to Power (Nadarajan Sethuraju)
ch. 12 Service-Learning for Social Justice: Moving Faculty From Personal to Pedagogical Commitment Through Faculty Development (Elizabeth R. Baer)
ch. 13 Deep Learning and the Big Questions: Reflection in Service-Learning (Chris Johnson)
ch. 14 Student Perspectives (Callista Brown Isabelle and Lillian Zumberge)
ch. 15 Conclusion: What We Know So Far (Brian T. Johnson and Carolyn R. O'Grady)

Index
Cover image

Racial Formation in the United States From the 1960's to the 1990's, Second Edition

Book
Omi, Michael and Howard Winant
1994
Routledge, New York
E184.A1O47 1994
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
First published in 1986, Racial Formation in the United States is now considered a classic in the literature on race and ethnicity. This second edition builds upon and updates Omi and Winant's groundbreaking research. In addition to a preface to the new edition, the book provides a more detailed account of the theory of racial formation processes. It includes material on the historical development of race, the question of racism, race-class-gender ...
Additional Info:
First published in 1986, Racial Formation in the United States is now considered a classic in the literature on race and ethnicity. This second edition builds upon and updates Omi and Winant's groundbreaking research. In addition to a preface to the new edition, the book provides a more detailed account of the theory of racial formation processes. It includes material on the historical development of race, the question of racism, race-class-gender interrelationships, and everyday life. A final chapter updates the developments in American racial politics up to the present, focusing on such key events as the 1992 Presidential election, the Los Angeles riots, and the Clinton administration's racial politics and policies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface to the 1994 Edition
Preface to the 1986 Edition
Introduction
Paradigms of Race: Ethnicity, Class, and Nation

ch. 1 Ethnicity
ch. 2 Class
ch. 3 Nation

Toward a Racial Formation Perspective

ch. 4 Racial Formation
ch. 5 The Racial State
ch. 6 The Great Transformation
ch. 7 Race and Reaction

Conclusion
Epilogue: Closing Pandora's Box - Race and the "New Democrats"
Notes
Index
Cover image

Teaching Defiance

Book
Newman, Michael
2006
Jossey-Bass: A Wiley Imprint, San Francisco, CA
HN 29.N47 2006
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This book is for activist adult educators who want to help people make up their own minds and take control of their own lives. At its heart this book is about choice. It examines how activist educators can help people understand that they do have options and then help those people learn how to make effective choices. It is important as a counter to the increasingly formulaic writing in the ...
Additional Info:
This book is for activist adult educators who want to help people make up their own minds and take control of their own lives. At its heart this book is about choice. It examines how activist educators can help people understand that they do have options and then help those people learn how to make effective choices. It is important as a counter to the increasingly formulaic writing in the fields of organizational learning, HRD and adult education. The author attempts to break free of these constraints and return to what actually happens in the encounter between educator and learner. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part One: Making a Start
ch. 1 Taking Sides

Part Two: Rebelliousness and Defiance
ch. 2 Rebelliousness
ch. 3 Inspiring Rebelliousness
ch. 4 Defiance, Choice and Consciousness

Part Three: Choosing and Taking Control
ch. 5 Teaching Choice
ch. 6 Collective Decision Making
ch. 7 Teaching Dialogue
ch. 8 Conflict, Negotiation and Power
ch. 9 Teaching Negotiation
ch. 10 Negotiation, Consciousness and Reflection
ch. 11 Disruptive Negotiation

Part Four: Insight and Action
ch. 12 Nonrational Discourse and Insight
ch. 13 Facilitating Insight
ch. 14 Revisiting Insight
ch. 15 Teaching About Action

Part Five: Defiance and Morality
ch. 16 Constructing Moralities
ch. 17 Storytelling
ch. 18 Relative and Foundational Moralities
ch. 19 Hating and Loving

Postscript
References
Index
Cover image

Conference Issue: "Religious Education for Peace and Justice"

Journal Issue
2006
Religious Education 101, no. 3 (Religious Education Association, Atlanta, GA 2006)
BV1460.R3V.101NO.3
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
President's Introduction: Religious Education for Peace and Justice
Participatory Action Research: Practical Theology for Social Justice
Ecumenical Theological Education as a Practice of Peace
Justice for the Poor in a Land of Plenty: A Place at the Table
Putting Faith Into Action: A Model for the North American Middle Class
Storytelling as a Means of Peacemaking: A Case Study of Christian Education in Africa
Teaching Justice and Living Peace: Body, Sexuality, and Religious Education in Asian-American Communities
Five Resources for Nurturing the Spiritual Lives of Children, Youth, and Adults
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching To Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom

Book
Bell, Hooks
1994
Routledge, Boston, MA
LC196.H66 1994
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
In this book, bell hooks, one of America's leading black intellectuals, shares her philosophy of the classroom, offering ideas about teaching that fundamentally rethink democratic participation. Hooks advocates the process of teaching students to think critically and raises many concerns central to the field of critical pedagogy, linking them to feminist thought. In the process, these essays face squarely the problems of teachers who do not want to teach, of ...
Additional Info:
In this book, bell hooks, one of America's leading black intellectuals, shares her philosophy of the classroom, offering ideas about teaching that fundamentally rethink democratic participation. Hooks advocates the process of teaching students to think critically and raises many concerns central to the field of critical pedagogy, linking them to feminist thought. In the process, these essays face squarely the problems of teachers who do not want to teach, of students who do not want to learn, of racism and sexism in the classroom, and of the gift of freedom that is, for hooks, the teacher's most important goal. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Teaching to Transgress

ch. 1 Engaged to Pedagogy
ch. 2 A Revolution of Values: The Promise of Multicultural Change
ch. 3 Embracing Change: Teaching in a Multicultural World
ch. 4 Paulo Freire
ch. 5 Theory as Liberatory Practice
ch. 6 Essentialism and Experience
ch. 7 Holding My Sister's Hand: Feminist Solidarity
ch. 8 Feminist Thinking: In the Classroom Right Now
ch. 9 Feminist Scholarship: Black Scholars
ch. 10 Building a Teaching Community: A Dialogue
ch. 11 Language: Teaching New Worlds/New Words
ch. 12 Confronting Class in the Classroom
ch. 13 Eros, Eroticism, and the Pedagogical Process
ch. 14 Ecstasy: Teaching and Learning Without Limits

Index
Cover image

Promoting Diversity and Social Justice: Educating People form Privileged Groups

Book
Goodman, Diana J.
2001
Sage Publications, Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA
HM671.G66 2001
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
In order to implement effectively diversity and social justice initiatives, it is critical to involve people from dominant groups. It is dominant groups that perpetuate oppression. Can educators meet the challenge of implementing diversity and social justice in organizations and in the community?
Promoting Diversity and Social Justice gives theory, perspectives, and strategies that are useful for working with adults on diversity and social justice issues. This book offers ...
Additional Info:
In order to implement effectively diversity and social justice initiatives, it is critical to involve people from dominant groups. It is dominant groups that perpetuate oppression. Can educators meet the challenge of implementing diversity and social justice in organizations and in the community?
Promoting Diversity and Social Justice gives theory, perspectives, and strategies that are useful for working with adults on diversity and social justice issues. This book offers educational and psychological perspectives to inform practice and increase options in addressing conflict situations. The first part of the book helps the educator understand the reasons for resistance and ways to prevent it. The second part explains how educators motivate dominant groups to support social justice.
This book is an excellent resource for group facilitators, counselors, trainers in classrooms and workshops, professors, teacher, higher education personnel, community educators, and any other professionals involved with educating others about diversity and equity. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 About Privileged Groups
ch. 3 Perspectives on Individual Change and Development
ch. 4 Understanding Resistance
ch. 5 Preventing and Reducing Resistance
ch. 6 The Costs of Oppression to People From Privileged Groups
ch. 7 Why People From Privileged Groups Support Social Justice
ch. 8 Developing and Enlisting Support for Social Justice
ch. 9 Issues for Educators
ch. 10 Hope and Possibilities

Appendix
References
Author Index
Subject Index
About the Author
TTR cover image

"Transforming to Teach: Teaching Religion to Today's Black College Student"

TTR
Coleman, Monica A.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 2 (2007): 95-100
BL41.T4
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Emerging from the particular experiences of the marginalized, postmodern pedagogies (bell hooks, Paolo Freire, feminist pedagogies) argue that education is more than conveying information from teacher to student. Rather education should encompass the transformative process of shaping character, values, and politics through the dynamic interaction among the teacher, the students' experiences, and the content of the instructional material. These perspectives argue that educators should reject "the banking model" of education, ...
Additional Info:
Emerging from the particular experiences of the marginalized, postmodern pedagogies (bell hooks, Paolo Freire, feminist pedagogies) argue that education is more than conveying information from teacher to student. Rather education should encompass the transformative process of shaping character, values, and politics through the dynamic interaction among the teacher, the students' experiences, and the content of the instructional material. These perspectives argue that educators should reject "the banking model" of education, and teach to transform. However, religious studies with today's black college student tests the mettle of these approaches. On the one hand, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have long practiced transformative education through a commitment to shaping both the minds and characters of their students. On the other hand, many of today's black college students are less receptive to transformation, particularly in the academic study of religion. This resistance to transformation is a reflection of (1) the socio-economic reality of the current student, and (2) a new black religiosity that portrays the world in binary terms. These economic and religious realities present a teaching context for which few religious scholars are prepared. This essay discusses the particularities of teaching religion to today's black college student by sharing the challenges, failures, successes, and joys of teaching religion at a small church-related, historically black women's college in the south. I will discuss the techniques that fail, and the way in which this unique context causes me to transform the way I teach religion. In the midst of a commitment to postmodern pedagogies, I feel a need to return to the banking model's establishment of authority and emphasis on content. As I negotiate with this method, I find ways to stealthily infuse transformative pedagogical techniques. I also discuss the way such a dramatic shift in pedagogy has transformed me, the teacher.
Cover image

Teaching the Levees: A Curriculum for Democratic Dialogue and Civic Engagement

Book
Crocco, Margaret Smith, ed.
2007
Teachers College Press, New York
HV6362005.N4T43 2007
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Abstract: One powerful response to the disaster of Hurricane Katrina was the Peabody Award-winning HBO documentary film event, When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts, by Spike Lee. Now, through the generosity of the Rockefeller foundaiton, faculty and staff at Teachers College, Columbia University have created this compelling curriculum guide, based on the documentary and for use in high schools, colleges and community groups.
In September 2007, through ...
Additional Info:
Abstract: One powerful response to the disaster of Hurricane Katrina was the Peabody Award-winning HBO documentary film event, When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts, by Spike Lee. Now, through the generosity of the Rockefeller foundaiton, faculty and staff at Teachers College, Columbia University have created this compelling curriculum guide, based on the documentary and for use in high schools, colleges and community groups.
In September 2007, through a generous collaboration between The Rockefeller Foundation, Teachers College, and HBO, 30,000 copies of a new curriculum package addressing the issues of citizenship, race, class and poverty raised in the aftermath of Katrina were distributed to school, college and community educators. The package included a copy of Spike Lee and HBO's epic documentary, 'When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts,' as well as the highly acclaimed multidisciplinary curriculum guide, Teaching The Levees. Due to the continued immense demand for this resource, the accompanying curriculum guide is now available for purchase. Teaching The Levees, developed by faculty at Teachers College, Columbia University, includes chapters on history, media literacy, civics, economics and geography. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Letter From Judith Rodin
Letter From Susan Fuhrman
Introduction
Hurricane Katrina Timelines
Katrina Timeline: 2005--2007
Putting Katrina in Context: 1993--2007
Viewing Guide
Questions by Chapter
Opening and Closing Scenes
People Appearing in the Documentary

ch. 1 An American City (Cally Waite, James Alford, and Sharon Pearson)
ch. 2 In Our Own Image
Using Representations of Katrina to Empower Media-Literate Citizens (Judith Cramer, David Boxer, and Duane Neil)
ch. 3 Race, Class, and Katrina in When the Levees Broke
Lessons Designed for Adult Audiences (Jeanne Bitterman, Addie Rimmer, and Lucia Alcántara)
ch. 4 New Orleans: Past, Present, and Future
A Curriculum for College Students (Ellen Livingston)
ch. 5 What Does It Mean to Be a Citizen?
A Curriculum About Katrina Using Civics and Government (Anand Marri, Christina Morado, and Christopher Zublionis)
ch. 6 Third World Conditions in a First World Country
Using Economics to Understand Events Before and After the Levees Broke (Anand Marri, Christina Morado, and Christopher Zublionis)
ch. 7 A Sense of Place, A Sense of Home
Using Geography to Understand the Levees Catastrophe (William Gaudelli, Thomas Chandler, and Yom Odemtten)
ch. 8 Learning From History in an Effort to Understand the Tragedy of Katrina (William Gaudelli, Thomas Chandler, and Yom Odamtten)
ch. 9 Three Options for Summative Activities
Article cover image

"Our "Special Promise" as Teachers: Scholars of Religion and the Politics of Tolerance"

Article
McCutcheon, Russell T.
2001
In Critics Not Caretakers: Redescribing the Public Study of Religion (Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press, 2001)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Getting Culture: Incorporating Diversity Across the Curriculum

Book
Gurung, Regan A.R.; and Prieto, Loreto R., eds.
2009
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC1099.3.G48 2009
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
How do we educate our students about cultural diversity and cultural differences, and eliminate cultural ignorance, stereotyping, and prejudice? What are the conceptual issues involved in reaching this goal? How can we integrate these perspectives in disciplinary and diversity courses, and the curriculum?
This book is a resource for answering these questions. Within the framework of current scholarship and discussion of essential concepts, it offers practical techniques, and empirically ...
Additional Info:
How do we educate our students about cultural diversity and cultural differences, and eliminate cultural ignorance, stereotyping, and prejudice? What are the conceptual issues involved in reaching this goal? How can we integrate these perspectives in disciplinary and diversity courses, and the curriculum?
This book is a resource for answering these questions. Within the framework of current scholarship and discussion of essential concepts, it offers practical techniques, and empirically proven "best practices" for teaching about diversity.
The book opens with a conceptual framework, covering such issues as distinguishing teaching to a diverse audience from teaching about diversity and contrasting the incorporation of culture across the curriculum with tokenistic approaches. Subsequent chapters identify classroom practices that can optimize students' learning, especially those from culturally diverse backgrounds; describe feminist principles of education that that promote learning for all students; and address principles of effective on-line instruction for diverse populations.
The book is intended for faculty integrating diversity into existing courses, and for anyone creating courses on diversity. The ideas and suggestions in the text can be incorporated into any class that includes a discussion of diversity issues or has a diverse student enrollment. The contributors offer pragmatic and tested ways of overcoming student misconceptions and resistance, and for managing emotional responses that can be aroused by the discussion of diversity. The editors aim to stimulate readers' thinking and inspire fresh ideas.
The book further provides teachers ofdiversity with a range of effective exercises, and attends to such issues as teacher stress and burnout.
This book can also serve to inform and guide department chairs and other administrators in the design and implementation of diversity initiatives. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface

Section 1 General Issues in Teaching About Diversity
ch. 1 Teaching About Culture (David Matsumoto)
ch. 2 Got Culture?: Incorporating Culture into the Curriculum (Regan A. R. Gurung)
ch. 3 Teaching About Diversity: Reflections and Future Directions (Loreto R. Prieto)
ch. 4 A Metapedagogical Approach to Culture in the Classroom(Thomas N. Robinson III)
ch. 5 Learning Styles as Self-fulfilling Prophecies (Kris Vasquez)
ch. 6 The "Why's" and "How's" of Being a Social Justice Ally (Sandra L. Neumann)
ch. 7 The Diversity Monologues: Increasing Understanding and Empathy, Decreasing Stereotypes and Prejudice (Amy Hackney-Hansen)
ch. 8 Infusing Cross-Cultural Experiences Into the Classroom(Craig Abrahamson)
ch. 9 Teaching About the Social Psychology of Disability: Issues of Being, Not Becoming (Dana S. Dunn)
ch. 10 Foreign Language Learning: A Different Form of Diversity (Paul C. Smith)

Section 2 Feminism and Diversity Education
ch. 11 Teaching Gender Diversity Through Diverse Lenses (Janet E. Kuebli, Accalia R. Kusto, and Karen Wilson)
ch. 12 Pedagogical Intersections of Gender, Race, and Identity: Signs of a Feminist Teacher (Karlyn Crowley)

Section 3 The Inclusive Classroom
ch. 13 Developing Democracy: Encouraging Multiple Viewpoints and Community in Classrooms (Kathie E. Shiba)
ch. 14 Creating Inclusive Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Courses (Nilhan Gunasekera and Katherine Friedrich)
ch. 15 Teaching Diversity Through Literature: Urging Voyages Toward Deeper Understanding (Nancy L. Chick)
ch. 16 Internationalizing the Psychology Curriculum: Examples of Course Transformation (Leeann Bartolini, Afshin Gharib, and William Phillips)
ch. 17 Experiential Activities for Teaching About Diversity (Carlos M. Diaz-Lazaro, Sandra Cordova, and Rosslyn Franklyn )
ch. 18 Enlisting the Participation of Students in Diversifying the Curriculum
ch. 19 A Seat at the Table for Everyone: Exercises in Valuing Diversity

Section 4 Diversity and Online Environments
ch. 20 Diversity and Distance Education: Cultural Competence for Online Instructors
ch. 21 Using Educational Technology to Teach Diversity Content
ch. 22 Developing Global Connections: Connecting Students in Cross-cultural Online Teaching Activities

Section 5 Methods and Techniques for Faculty and Diversity Trainers
ch. 23 Pleased to Meet You: Introducing Multicultural Competence and Diversity Awareness to Your Students
ch. 24 Intercultural Simulations and Games: Having Fun While Discussing Serious Matters
ch. 25 The Use of Action Learning Techniques in a Race Relations Course
ch. 26 Keeping it Real: Authenticity in the Diversity Learning Environment
ch. 27 Coping Strategies for Diversity Scholars
Section 6 Diversity Across Educational Settings
ch. 28 Teaching Diversity in the High School Classroom
ch. 29 Diversity Issues in Community Colleges
ch. 30 Assignments and Course Content in Teaching Diversity
ch. 31 Beyond the Classroom: An Experiential Model for Developing Multicultural Competence

About the Authors
Index
Cover image

Learning From Experience: Minority Identities, Multicultural Struggles

Book
Paula M. L. Moya
2002
University of California Press, Berkley
PS 153.M4.M69 2002
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Additional Info:
If we are all becoming global citizens, what then are our civic responsibilities? Colleges and universities across the United States have responded to this question by making the development of global citizens part of their core mission. A key strategy for realizing this goal is study abroad. After all, there may be no better way for students to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to become effective change-agents in ...
Additional Info:
If we are all becoming global citizens, what then are our civic responsibilities? Colleges and universities across the United States have responded to this question by making the development of global citizens part of their core mission. A key strategy for realizing this goal is study abroad. After all, there may be no better way for students to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to become effective change-agents in international contexts.

The Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad is a comprehensive survey of the field. Each chapter eloquently conveys an enthusiasm for study abroad alongside a critical assessment of the most up-to-date research, theory and practice. This contributed volume brings together expert academics, senior administrators, practitioners of study abroad, and policy makers from across the United States, Canada and other part of the world, who meticulously address the following questions:

What do we mean by global citizenship and global competence?

What are the philosophical, pedagogical and practical challenges facing institutions as they endeavor to create global citizens?

How is study abroad and global citizenship compatible with the role of the academy?

What are the institutional challenges to study abroad, including those related to ethics, infrastructure, finances, accessibility, and quality control?

Which study abroad programs can be called successful?

The Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad is an indispensable reference volume for scholars, higher education faculty, study abroad professionals, policy makers, and the academic libraries that serve these audiences. It is also appropriate for a wide range of courses in Higher Education Master’s and Ph.D. Programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part 1 Defining Global Citizenship in Study Abroad
ch. 1 Global Citizenship in Theory and Practice (Hans Schattle)
ch. 2 Fostering Engagement: The Role of International Education in the Development of Global Civil Society (James M. Skelly)
ch. 3 Global Learning and the Making of Citizen Diplomats (Rebecca Hovey and Adam Weinberg)
ch. 4 International Studies and Foreign Languages: A Critical American Priority (Charles Kolb)
ch. 5 Global Citizenship Education: Challenges and Possibilities (Ian Davies and Graham Pike)

Part 2 Aligning Global Citizenship and Study Abroad With the MIssion of the Academy
ch. 6 Study Abroad and Language: From Maximal to Realistic Models (Dieter Wanner)
ch. 7 Constructive Disequilibrium: Cognitive and Emotional Development through Dissonant Experiences in Less Familiar Destinations (S. Megan Che, Mindy Spearman, and Agida Manizade)
ch. 8 The Liberal Arts and Global Citizenship: Fostering Intercultural Engagement Through Integrative Experiences and Structured Reflection ((Joseph L. Brockington and Margarete D. Wiedenhoeft)
ch. 9 Study Abroad and Nursing: From Cultural to Global Competence (Connie Currier, et. al)
ch. 10 The Role of Study Abroad in Preparing Globally Responsible Teachers (Kenneth Cushner)
ch. 11 Democratizing Study Abroad: Challenges of Open Access, Local Commitments, and Global Competence in Community Colleges (Robert A. Frost and Rosalind Latiner Raby)
ch. 12 North of 49: Global Citizenship a la canadienne (Roopa Desai Trilokekar and Adrian Shubert)
ch. 13 Global Citizenship and Study Abroad: A European Comparative Perspective (Hans de Wit)
ch. 14 Strategy for the Development of a Global City: Study Abroad in Singapore (Peter Pang)

Part 3 Institutional Challenges and Strategies for Fostering Global Citizenship Study Abroad
ch. 15 It Takes an Entire Institution: A Blueprint for the Global University (William Brustein)
ch. 16 Turning Our Back on the World: Study Abroad and the Purpose of U.S. Higher Education (Riall W. Nolan)
ch. 17 Faculty Beliefs and Institutional Values: Identifying and Overcoming These Obstacles to Education Abroad Growth (Joan Elias Gore)
ch. 18 Selling the World: Study Abroad Marketing and the Privatization of Global Citizenship (Talya Zemach-Bersin)
ch. 19 Global Citizenship for All: Low Minority Study Participation in Study Abroad - Seeking Strategies for Success (Earl Picard, Farrah Bernardino, and Kike Ehigiator)
ch. 20 Understanding the Challenges of Assessing Global Citizenship (Darla K. Deardorff)
ch. 21 Here to Stay: Increasing Acceptance of Short-Term Study Abroad Programs (Lisa Chieffor and Lesa Grifiths)
ch. 22 Going Global in the Sciences: A Case Study at Emory University (Philip Wainwright, et al.)
ch. 23 Undergraduate Research During Study Abroad: Scope, Meaning, and Potential (Bernhard T. Streitwieser)

Part 4 Innovative Global Citizenship Study Abroad Program Models
ch. 24 Georgia Tech's Comprehensive and Integrated Approach to Developing Global Competence (Howard Rollins)
ch. 25 Holistic Student Learning and Development Abroad: The IES 3-D Program Model (Joan Gillespie, Larry Braskamp, and Mary Dwyer)
ch. 26 It Takes a Curriculum: Bringing Global Mindedness Home (Kevin Hovland)
ch. 27 Educating Globally Competent Citizens through International Service Learning (William M. Plater, et al.)
ch. 28 Creating Deep Partnerships with Institutions Abroad: Bard College as Global Citizen (Susan H. Gillespie, et al.)
ch. 29 Creating Study Abroad Opportunities for First-Generation College Students (Maria D. Martinez, Bidya Ranjeet, and Helen A. Marx)
ch. 30 It's Not about You: The UConn Social Entrepreneur Corps Global Commonwealth Study Abroad Model (Ross Lewin and Greg Van Kirk)

Contributors
Index
Cover image

Pedagogies of Crossing: Meditations on Feminism, Sexual Politics, Memory, and the Sacred

Book
M. Jacqui Alexander
2005
Duke University Press, Durham, NC
HM821.A49 2005
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
M. Jacqui Alexander is one of the most important theorists of transnational feminism working today. Pedagogies of Crossing brings together essays she has written over the past decade, uniting her incisive critiques, which have had such a profound impact on feminist, queer, and critical race theories, with some of her more recent work. In this landmark interdisciplinary volume, Alexander points to a number of critical imperatives made all the more ...
Additional Info:
M. Jacqui Alexander is one of the most important theorists of transnational feminism working today. Pedagogies of Crossing brings together essays she has written over the past decade, uniting her incisive critiques, which have had such a profound impact on feminist, queer, and critical race theories, with some of her more recent work. In this landmark interdisciplinary volume, Alexander points to a number of critical imperatives made all the more urgent by contemporary manifestations of neoimperialism and neocolonialism. Among these are the need for North American feminism and queer studies to take up transnational frameworks that foreground questions of colonialism, political economy, and racial formation; for a thorough re-conceptualization of modernity to account for the heteronormative regulatory practices of modern state formations; and for feminists to wrestle with the spiritual dimensions of experience and the meaning of sacred subjectivity.

In these meditations, Alexander deftly unites large, often contradictory, historical processes across time and space. She focuses on the criminalization of queer communities in both the United States and the Caribbean in ways that prompt us to rethink how modernity invents its own traditions; she juxtaposes the political organizing and consciousness of women workers in global factories in Mexico, the Caribbean, and Canada with the pressing need for those in the academic factory to teach for social justice; she reflects on the limits and failures of liberal pluralism; and she presents original and compelling arguments that show how and why transgenerational memory is an indispensable spiritual practice within differently constituted women-of-color communities as it operates as a powerful antidote to oppression. In this multifaceted, visionary book, Alexander maps the terrain of alternative histories and offers new forms of knowledge with which to mold alternative futures. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

I Transnational erotics: state, capital, and the decolonization of desire
ch. 1 Erotic autonomy as a politics of decolonization : feminism, tourism, and the state in the Bahamas
ch. 2 Imperial desire/sexual utopias : white gay capital and transnational tourism

II Maps of empire, old and new
ch. 3 Whose new world order? : teaching for justice
ch. 4 Anatomy of a mobilization
ch. 5 Transnationalism, sexuality, and the state : modernity's traditions at the height of empire

III Dangerous memory : secular acts, sacred possession
ch. 6 Remembering This bridge called my back, remembering ourselves
ch. 7 Pedagogies of the sacred : making the invisible tangible

Notes
Bibliography
Index
Additional Info:
In Teaching Critical Thinking, renowned cultural critic and progressive educator bell hooks addresses some of the most compelling issues facing teaching issues facing teachers in and out of the classroom today.

In a series of short, accessible, and enlightening essays, hooks explores of the confounding and sometimes controversial topics that teachers and students have urged her to address since the publication of the previous best-selling volums in her ...
Additional Info:
In Teaching Critical Thinking, renowned cultural critic and progressive educator bell hooks addresses some of the most compelling issues facing teaching issues facing teachers in and out of the classroom today.

In a series of short, accessible, and enlightening essays, hooks explores of the confounding and sometimes controversial topics that teachers and students have urged her to address since the publication of the previous best-selling volums in her Teaching series, Teaching to Transgress and Teaching Community. The issues are varied and broad, from whether meaningful teaching can take place in a large classroom setting to confronting issues of self-esteem. One professor, for example, asked how black female professors can maintain positive authority in a classroom without being seen through the lens of negative racist, sexist stereotypes. One teacher asked how to handle tears in the classroom. while another wanted to know how to use humor as a tool for learning.

Addressing questions of race, gender, and class in this work, hooks discusses the complex balance that allows us to teach, value, and learn from works written by racist and sexist authors. Highlighting the importance of reading, she insists on the primacy of free speech, a democratic education of literacy. Throughout these essays, she celebrates the transformative power of critical thinking. This is provocative, powerful, and joyful intellectual work. It is a must read for anyone who is at all interested in education today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Critical Thinking
ch. 2 Democratic Education
ch. 3 Engaged Pedaeos
ch. 4 Decolonization
ch. 5 Inteerit
ch. 6 Purpose
ch. 7 Collaboration
ch. 8 Conversation
ch. 9 Telling the Story
ch. 10 Sharing the story
ch. 11 Imagination
ch. 12 To Lecture or Not
ch. 13 Humor in the Classroom
ch. 14 Crying Time
ch. 15 Conflict
ch. 16 Feminist Revolution
ch. 17 Black, Female, and Academic
ch. 18 Learning Past the Hate
ch. 19 Honoring Teachers
ch. 20 Teachers against Teaching
ch. 21 Self-Esteem
ch. 22 The Joy of Reading
ch. 23 Intellectual Life
ch. 24 Writing Books for Children
ch. 25 Spirituality
ch. 26 Touch
ch. 27 To Love Again
ch. 28 Feminist Change
ch. 29 Moving Past Race and Gender
ch. 30 Talking Sex
ch. 31 Teaching as Prophetic Vocation
ch. 32 Practical Wisdom

Index
Article cover image

"Multimedia Pedagogy and Multicultural Education For The New Millennium"

Article
Hammer, Rhonda, and Kellner, Douglas
2000
Taylor & Francis Group, New York, NY
Topics: Using Technology   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
New technologies provide tools to reconstruct education as we undergo dramatic technological revolution and enter a new millennium. In particular, multimedia technologies, like CD-ROMs and Internet websites produce new resources and material for expanding education. In examining the Shoah Project—which documents the experiences of survivors of the Holocaust—, we demonstrate how this project provides important tools for historical and religious education, as well as making the reality of the ...
Additional Info:
New technologies provide tools to reconstruct education as we undergo dramatic technological revolution and enter a new millennium. In particular, multimedia technologies, like CD-ROMs and Internet websites produce new resources and material for expanding education. In examining the Shoah Project—which documents the experiences of survivors of the Holocaust—, we demonstrate how this project provides important tools for historical and religious education, as well as making the reality of the Holocaust vivid and compelling in the contemporary moment. It is within this context that we discuss how multimedia can provide an important supplement to multicultural education, bringing the experiences of marginal and oppressed groups to the mainstream. Yet we also argue that effective multimedia education also requires historical contextualization, the skills of media literacy, and engaging pedagogical presentation in the classroom to make such new technologies effective as a supplement to traditional classroom and print-based education. Hence, we show how educational technologies, such as those produced by the Shoah Foundation and the UCLA Film and Television Archives, can help reconstruct education for the next century.
TTR cover image

"Disrupting the Luxury of Despair: Justice and Peace Education in Contexts of Relative Privilege"

TTR
Turpin, Katherine
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 3 (2008): 141-152
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
The Iliff School of Theology established a justice and peace concentration within its curriculum to respond to the challenges of racism, class and economic exploitation, sexism, and militarism by fostering social analysis and attending to the contributions of religious thought and resources to the struggles of social change. Within an institution and with a student body who both tend to be relatively privileged in terms of class and racial or ...
Additional Info:
The Iliff School of Theology established a justice and peace concentration within its curriculum to respond to the challenges of racism, class and economic exploitation, sexism, and militarism by fostering social analysis and attending to the contributions of religious thought and resources to the struggles of social change. Within an institution and with a student body who both tend to be relatively privileged in terms of class and racial or ethnic background, one of the persistent issues in teaching justice and peace studies has been addressing the emergence of guilt, anger, and despair as course content challenges students (and faculty) to relinquish self-understandings, historical understandings of their religious tradition and national context, and inadequate theological and faith formation shaped by dominant narratives that ignore social realities of oppression. This pedagogical challenge has encouraged multiple professors to develop unique pedagogical approaches to educating students about justice issues in this context. This paper will draw on the insights of these approaches, in conversation with literature-based analysis, to describe the temptations students experience when learning about justice and peace in contexts of privilege. This paper also describes the pedagogical practices that emerged in this particular context, and the failures and limitations of these practices for individual and institutional transformation.
Additional Info:
This article contends that teaching more effectively for diversity requires a radical re-envisioning of pedagogical practice. Drawing on qualitative interviews with religion and theology professors of color throughout the United States, it explores how faculty can re-imagine their teaching by engaging students where they are, acknowledging the reality of oppression, and dealing with resistance. Stressing mindfulness of social location, it provides examples of liberating teaching activities and competences and shows ...
Additional Info:
This article contends that teaching more effectively for diversity requires a radical re-envisioning of pedagogical practice. Drawing on qualitative interviews with religion and theology professors of color throughout the United States, it explores how faculty can re-imagine their teaching by engaging students where they are, acknowledging the reality of oppression, and dealing with resistance. Stressing mindfulness of social location, it provides examples of liberating teaching activities and competences and shows how literary and visual "texts" from the margins and personal metaphors of embodiment can challenge captivities to hegemonic paradigms in the classroom. The article concludes with responses from colleagues who have worked closely with the author. Ethicist Melanie Harris brings Hill's method into dialogue with Womanist pedagogy, and historian of religion Hjamil Martínez-Vázquez reflects on the role of suffering in building a revolutionary/critical pedagogy.
TTR cover image

"Crossing Pedagogical Borders in the Yucatan Peninsula"

TTR
Willhauck, Susan
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 222-232
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A challenging intercultural teaching experience provided an opportunity for engaging embodied pedagogies that facilitated border crossings of language, age, gender, and experience. Influenced by the work of Augusto Boal, the author describes how improvisation, role-play, music, and drawing led seminary students in Mexico into sacred time and space toward relevant learning. Drawing upon the critical pedagogy of several educators yields implications for teaching theology and religion. The essay also invites ...
Additional Info:
A challenging intercultural teaching experience provided an opportunity for engaging embodied pedagogies that facilitated border crossings of language, age, gender, and experience. Influenced by the work of Augusto Boal, the author describes how improvisation, role-play, music, and drawing led seminary students in Mexico into sacred time and space toward relevant learning. Drawing upon the critical pedagogy of several educators yields implications for teaching theology and religion. The essay also invites readers into dialogue about how such border crossings can benefit their own teaching.
Tactics cover image

"A Surprising Enterprise"

Tactic
Irons, Kendra Weddle
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 250
BL41.T4
Topics: Discussion   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: an exercise that treats student groups unequally, to learn about empathetic identification with biblical figures.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: an exercise that treats student groups unequally, to learn about empathetic identification with biblical figures.
Cover image

Acting Out! Combating Homophobia Through Teacher Activism

Book
Blackburn, Mollie; Caroline T. Clark; Lauren M. Kenney; and Jill M. Smith, eds.
2010
Teachers College Press, New York
LC212.8.A27 2010
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
In this volume, teachers from urban, suburban, and rural districts join together in a teacher inquiry group to challenge homophobia and heterosexism in schools and classrooms. To create safe learning environments for all students they address key topics. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
In this volume, teachers from urban, suburban, and rural districts join together in a teacher inquiry group to challenge homophobia and heterosexism in schools and classrooms. To create safe learning environments for all students they address key topics. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Teacher/Activists Who Became Pink TIGers: An Introduction (Mollie V. Blackburn, Caroline T. Clark, Lauren M. Kenney, Jill M. Smith)
ch. 2 Learning About Heterosexism as a Teacher Educator: The Resistant Student as Catalyst for Change (Jeane F. Copenhaver-Johnson)
ch. 3 Inquiring into Ally Work in Teacher Education: The Possibilities and Limitations of Textual Practice (Caroline T. Clark)
ch. 4 Being Out and Reading Queer-Inclusive Texts in a High School English Classroom (Lauren M. Kenney)
ch. 5 Risk and Threat in Critical Inquiry: Vacancies, Violations, and Vacuums (Jason Gonzales)
ch. 6 Activist Work as Entry- Year Teachers: What We've Learned (Ryan Schey, Ariel Uppstrom)
ch. 7 Facilitating Visibility of LGBTQ Issues in Public Schools: Teacher Resistance and Teachable Moments (Mindy Hall)
ch. 8 Overcoming an Identity of Privilege to Support LGBTQ Inclusivity in School (Jill M. Smith)
ch. 9 Choosing to Stay "In" and the Significance of Race for Lesbian Teachers in Urban Classrooms (Anette Melvin)
ch. 10 Learning to B/Se(e) an Activist Community: The Importance of Differences in Working for Change (Mollie V. Blackburn)
ch. 11 Acting Out! So What? (Caroline T. Clark, Mollie V. Blackburn, Lauren M. Kenney, Jill M. Smith)

Annotated Bibliography
About the Contributors
Index
TTR cover image

"Teaching for Racial Justice: A Participative Approach"

TTR
Reddie, Anthony G.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 95-109
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This article outlines an ongoing method the author developed for seeking to enable predominantly White students in theological education (those training for authorized public ordained ministry) to engage with the central tenets of racial justice. The quest for racial justice has been an important part of the mission of the major church denominations in the United Kingdom over the past twenty years, as they have declared that "Racism is a ...
Additional Info:
This article outlines an ongoing method the author developed for seeking to enable predominantly White students in theological education (those training for authorized public ordained ministry) to engage with the central tenets of racial justice. The quest for racial justice has been an important part of the mission of the major church denominations in the United Kingdom over the past twenty years, as they have declared that "Racism is a sin." Ordained ministers are now charged with the task of seeking to lead church congregations into faithful, anti-racist forms of practice – namely, the quest for racial justice. This paper outlines the working method the author has developed in order to conscientize ministers in training for this significant task.
Tactics cover image

"Living Wage Role Play"

Tactic
Piippin, Tina
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 238-240
BL41.T4
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: role play helps students learn how far a custodian's salary goes.
Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: role play helps students learn how far a custodian's salary goes.
Tactics cover image

"Teaching for Conflict Resolution: Metaethical Case Study Analysis as a Teaching Strategy"

Tactic
Floyd-Thomas, Stacey M.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 254-259
BL41.T4
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: analysis of effective use of case studies for teaching ethics.
Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: analysis of effective use of case studies for teaching ethics.
Cover image

Teaching Diversity: Challenges and Complexities, Identities, and Integrity

Book
Timpson, William M., ed.
2003
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LC1099.3.T4215 2003
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
DIVERSITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION both in the student body and the faculty is an idea much heralded in academia. But how do committed institutions, faculty, and staff plan for diversity, teach it, and find opportunities within courses to expand on the canon of their discipline? How can diversity issues be dealt with in a sensitive and yet exciting manner?

The contributors to this volume asked themselves those questions, ...
Additional Info:
DIVERSITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION both in the student body and the faculty is an idea much heralded in academia. But how do committed institutions, faculty, and staff plan for diversity, teach it, and find opportunities within courses to expand on the canon of their discipline? How can diversity issues be dealt with in a sensitive and yet exciting manner?

The contributors to this volume asked themselves those questions, joined together with like-minded colleagues, and met as a team--exploring their own experiences, sharing what their lives had taught them, and trying to make sense of difficult and sometimes conflicting ideologies. Together, the faculty and staff at Colorado State University created environment for each other to search, question, and then take their new awareness out into the greater community.

This is a compilation of their thoughts and struggles as they explored the complexities of a diverse world and institution. It is a search for ways in which identify is preserved and celebrated, a search that supports integrity for all.

This volume shares a portion of what they learned and shared. It can serve as a starting point for discussions on other campuses eager to move forward with diversity initiatives. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Walking Our Talk: The Special Challenges of Teaching Diversity (William M. Timpson)

ch. 2 Teaching about Human Diversity: Theoretical and Epistemological Issues (Silvia Sara Canetto, Raymond Yang, Evelinn Borray, and William M. Timpson)

ch. 3 From a Minority to a Majority Teaching Environment: Lessons Learned and Transferable (Chance W. Lewis)

ch. 4 Experiencing Diversity in Distance Learning (Gray Davies)

ch. 5 Creating Safe Learning Environments (Nathalie Kees)

ch. 6 Teaching the Diversity of World Religions (James W. Boyd)

ch. 7 Socratic and Therapeutic Underpinnings of Self-Disclosure in the Classroom (Raymond Yang)

ch. 8 Making Space in the Classroom for My Gay Identity: A Letter I've Been Wanting to Write (Eric Aoki)

ch. 9 Reaching the Congregation, Not Just the Choir: Conquering Resistance to Diversity Issues (Val Middleton)

ch. 10 Using Dialogue Discussion Groups When Addressing Sensitive Topics (Mona C.S. Schatz)

ch. 11 Majority as Minority: Transferring Lessons Learned from Teaching K-12 Inner-City Students to the University (Suzanne Tochterman)

ch. 12 E Pluribus Unum: Teaching Diversity in Rural Colorado (Angel V. Paccione)

ch. 13 A Native Perspective on Teaching Low and U.S. Policy: The Inclusion of Federal Indian Law and Policy in a College Curriculum (Roe Bubar and Irene Vernon)

ch. 14 Disability as Part of the Diversity Curriculum (Rosemary Kreston)

ch. 15 Alien Perspectives in Accented Voices: Classroom Dynamics When International Female Instructors Teach Diversity Content (Silvia Sara Canetto and Evelinn A. Borrayo)

ch. 16 The Institution's Commitment to Diversity: An Aid of Hindrance to Teachers of Diversity (James H. Banning)

ch. 17 Recalling the Canon (Jane Kneller)

ch. 18 Teaching about Diversity Issues in Natural Resources and Outdoor Recreation Courses: Challenges and Complexities (Nina S. Roberts)

ch. 19 Student Voices (William M. Timpson)

ch. 20 Analysis: Safety Is the Leitmotif (Raymond Yang)

ch. 21 Teaching about Human Diversity: Lessons Learned and Recommendations (Silvia Sara Canetto, William M. Timpson, Evelinn Borrayo, and Richmond Yang)

Index

Author Biographies
Cover image

Save the World on Your Own Time

Book
Fish, Stanley
2008
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
LB2331.72.F57 2008
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
What should be the role of our institutions of higher education? To promote good moral character? To bring an end to racism, sexism, economic oppression, and other social ills? To foster diversity and democracy and produce responsible citizens?

In Save the World On Your Own Time, Stanley Fish argues that, however laudable these goals might be, there is but one proper role for the academe in society: to ...
Additional Info:
What should be the role of our institutions of higher education? To promote good moral character? To bring an end to racism, sexism, economic oppression, and other social ills? To foster diversity and democracy and produce responsible citizens?

In Save the World On Your Own Time, Stanley Fish argues that, however laudable these goals might be, there is but one proper role for the academe in society: to advance bodies of knowledge and to equip students for doing the same. When teachers offer themselves as moralists, political activists, or agents of social change rather than as credentialed experts in a particular subject and the methods used to analyze it, they abdicate their true purpose. And yet professors now routinely bring their political views into the classroom and seek to influence the political views of their students. Those who do this will often invoke academic freedom, but Fish argues that academic freedom, correctly understood, is the freedom to do the academic job, not the freedom to do any job that comes into the professor's mind. He insists that a professor's only obligation is "to present the material in the syllabus and introduce students to state-of-the-art methods of analysis. Not to practice politics, but to study it; not to proselytize for or against religious doctrines, but to describe them; not to affirm or condemn Intelligent Design, but to explain what it is and analyze its appeal."

Given that hot-button issues such as Holocaust denial, free speech, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict are regularly debated in classrooms across the nation, Save the World On Your Own Time is certain to spark fresh debate-and to incense both liberals andconservatives-about the true purpose of higher education in America. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Task of Higher Education
ch. 2 Do Your Job
ch. 3 Administrative Interlude
ch. 4 Don't Try to Do Someone Else's Job
ch. 5 Don't Let Anyone Else Do Your Job
ch. 6 Higher Education under Attack
ch. 7 A Conclusion and Two Voices from the Other Side

Selected Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Finding Meaning in Civically Engaged Scholarship: Personal Journeys, Professional Experiences

Book
Diener, Marissa L., and Liese, Hank, eds.
2009
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LC220.5.F56 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
From the Pubisher

The essays in this volume are a collection of reflective narratives, rather than traditional scholarly treatises. The book is divided into two parts. The first part describes our individual journeys as each of us found our way to civically engaged scholarship and came to see it as critical to our academic endeavors and identity. This section also highlights the interdisciplinary nature of our work as ...
Additional Info:
From the Pubisher

The essays in this volume are a collection of reflective narratives, rather than traditional scholarly treatises. The book is divided into two parts. The first part describes our individual journeys as each of us found our way to civically engaged scholarship and came to see it as critical to our academic endeavors and identity. This section also highlights the interdisciplinary nature of our work as we discuss our journeys through our own disciplinary lenses. The second part presents detailed examples of our civic engagement, including service-learning classes, community based research projects, and creation of community service-learning spaces. These chapters provide a varied picture of the available avenues for civic engagement for students and faculty in a higher education setting. We provide sufficient details of our projects and classes to enable replication. The book concludes with a discussion of civic engagement as it is defined in the literature. The conclusion also discusses institutional factors that support and promote civic engagement as well as the importance of community involvement in service learning. Five common themes that emerged across the chapters are described. These themes include the use of service learning and civic engagement as an effective pedagogy, the relationship between civic engagement and political activism, the importance of partnership and collaboration, the meaning found in civic engagement, and the challenges of civically engaged work.

Table Of Content:
Introduction: The Journey

Part I - Journeys To Civically Engaged Scholarship
ch. 1 Reflections on the Search for Meaning in Academia (Marissa L. Diener)
ch. 2 From Service for Meaning to Meaningful Service (Maged Senbel)
ch. 3 The Search for Authentic Citizenship (Luke Garrott)
ch. 4 The Knock on the Door (Marshall Welch)
ch. 5 Expanding Horizons through Service and Service-Learning (Gina Maria Musolino)
ch. 6 Beyond Us and Them: Community-Based Research as a Politics of Engagement (Caitlin Cahill)
ch. 7 Teaching English, Reading Poetry, Living in the World (Janet Kaufman)
ch. 8 A Journey of Voluntarism (Nancy Winemiller Basinger)
ch. 9 The Civically Engaged Scholar: Identity, Relationship, and the RPT Process (Hank Liese)

Part II - Civic Engagement In Action: Community-Based Research and Service-Learning
ch. 10 Children's Development in Context: Understanding through Service-Learning (Marissa L. Diener)
ch. 11 The Story of the Westside Studio (Maged Senbel)
ch. 12 The Professional Journey: Neighborhood Democracy (Luke Garrott)
ch. 13 Reflections on the Eye of the Storm (Marshall Welch)
ch. 14 Integrating Service-Learning for Physical Therapy Programs: Frameworks & Opportunities (Gina Maria Musolino)
ch. 15 Planning for Change: Community-Based Urban Research with Young People (Caitlin Cahill)
ch. 16 Literacy Center: Partnership and Learning for All (Janet Kaufman)
ch. 17 Finding Student Satisfaction in Service-Learning: Implementing Service-Learning in a Graduate Nonprofit Management Class (Nancy Winemiller Basinger)
ch. 18 The Documentary Human Rights, and Social Justice: An Experiment in Service-Learning (Hank Liese)

Conclusion (Hank Liese and Marshall Welch)
About the Authors
Cover image

Social Justice Education: Inviting Faculty to Transform Their Institutions

Book
Skubikowski, Kathleen; Wright, Catharine; Graf, Roman, and Alvarez, Julia, eds.
2009
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC192.2.S63 2009
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This book grew out of a project – involving deans and directors of teaching centers and diversity offices from six institutions – to instigate discussions among teachers and administrators about implementing socially just practices in their classrooms, departments, and offices. The purpose was to explore how best to foster such conversations across departments and functions within an institution, as well as between institutions. This book presents the theoretical framework used, and many ...
Additional Info:
This book grew out of a project – involving deans and directors of teaching centers and diversity offices from six institutions – to instigate discussions among teachers and administrators about implementing socially just practices in their classrooms, departments, and offices. The purpose was to explore how best to foster such conversations across departments and functions within an institution, as well as between institutions. This book presents the theoretical framework used, and many of the successful projects to which it gave rise.

Recognizing that many faculty have little preparation for teaching students whose backgrounds, culture, and educational socialization differ from theirs, the opening foundational section asks teachers to attend closely to their and their students’ relative power and positionality in the classroom, and to the impact of the materials, resources and pedagogical approaches employed. Further chapters offer analytical tools to promote inquiry and change.

The concluding sections of the book demonstrate how intra- and inter-institutional collaborations inspired teachers to rise to the challenge of their campuses’ commitments to diversity. Among the examples presented is an initiative involving the faculty development coordinator, and faculty from a wide range of domains at DePauw University, who built upon an existing ethics initiative to embed social justice across the curriculum. In another, professors of mathematics from three institutions describe how they collaborated to create socially just classrooms that both serve mathematical learning, and support service learning or community-based learning activities.

The final essay by a student from the Maldives, describing how she navigated the chasm between life in an American college and her family circumstances, will reinforce the reader’s commitment to establishing social justice in the academy.

This book provides individual faculty, faculty developers and diversity officers with the concepts, reflective tools, and collaborative models, as well as a wealth of examples, to confidently embark on the path to transforming educational practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part I: Theoretical Perspectives on Social Justice Education
ch. 1 A Social Justice Education Faculty Development Framework for a Post-Grutter (Maurianne Adams and Barbara J. Love)
ch. 2 Learning through Story Types about Race and Racism: Preparing Teachers for Social Justice (Lee Anne Bell)
ch. 3 Academic Activism and the Socially Just Academy (Glen David Kuecker)
ch. 4 From Scientific Imagination to Ethical Insight: The Necessity of Personal Experience in Moral Agency (Arthur Zajonc)
ch. 5 Change to Social Justice Education: A Higher Education Strategy (Karen L. St. Clair and James E. Groccia)

Part II: Collaborations
ch. 6 Beyond Diversity: Social Justice Education Across the Curriculum (Kathleen Skubikowski)
ch. 7 Civics Without Cynics: A Campus-wide, Ethics-based Approach to Social Justice Pedagogy (Meryl Altman, Neil Abraham, Terri Bonebright, and Jeannette Johnson-Licon)
ch. 8 On Commitment: If You Don’t Stand for Something, You’ll Fall for Anything (Vijay Prashad)

Part III: Social Justice Pedagogy Across the Curriculum
ch. 9 Mathematics of, for, and as Social Justice (Priscilla Bremser, Chawne Kimber, Rob Root, and Sheila Weaver)
ch. 10 Valued Contingencies: Social Justice in Foreign Language Education (Roman Graf)
ch. 11 Shakespeare Meets Social Justice: Incorporating Literature in the Social Sciences (Carolyn Palmer)
ch. 12 Writing for Social Change: Building a Citizen-Scholar Discourse that Combines Narrative, Theory and Research (Catharine Wright)
ch. 13 Deliberative Dialogue as a Pedagogical Tool for Social Justice (Kamakshi Murti)

Afterword: Oblique I Am (Zaheena Rasheed)
Contributors Index
Cover image

Readings for Diversity and Social Justice, 2nd Edition

Book
Adams, Maurianne; Blumenfeld, Warren; Castaneda, Carmelita Rosie; Hackman, Heather W.; Peters, Madeline L; and Zuniga, Ximena, eds.
2010
Routledge, New York, NY
E184.A1R386 2010
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
For over ten years, Readings for Diversity and Social Justice has been the go-to anthology for the broadest possible coverage of issues related to identity and oppression from a social justice perspective. This highly-anticipated second edition breaks even further ground, boasting over 40 more readings than previously available, updated and original section introductions, and three entirely new chapter sections on Religious Oppression, Transgender Oppression, and Ageism/Adultism. As with the first ...
Additional Info:
For over ten years, Readings for Diversity and Social Justice has been the go-to anthology for the broadest possible coverage of issues related to identity and oppression from a social justice perspective. This highly-anticipated second edition breaks even further ground, boasting over 40 more readings than previously available, updated and original section introductions, and three entirely new chapter sections on Religious Oppression, Transgender Oppression, and Ageism/Adultism. As with the first edition, each chapter section is divided into Contexts, Personal Voices, and Next Steps. The first two parts provide vivid portraits of the meaning of diversity and the realities of oppression. The third part challenges the reader to take action to end oppressive behavior and affirm diversity and social justice.

Added new features to this edition include:

* Over 130 readings, many new and updated, including three entirely new sections.

* A Table of Intersections that enables readers to identify all selections that treat issues of race, religion, gender, sexuality, disability, class, and age, beyond those in designated topical chapters.

* An all new companion website with additional resources, further suggested readings, and teaching materials is also available.

Offering over one-hundred and thirty selections from some of the foremost scholars in a wide range of fields, Readings for Diversity and Social Justice, Second Edition is the indispensible volume for every student, teacher, and social justice advocate. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Table of Intersections

Acknowledgements

Readings for Diversity and Social Justice: A General Introduction

ch. 1 Conceptual Frameworks (Maurianne Adams)

ch. 2 Racism (Carmelita Castaneda, Ximeria Zuniga)

ch. 3 Classism (Maurianne Adams)

ch. 4 Religious Oppression (Maurianne Adams, Khyati Y. Joshi)

ch. 5 Sexism (Heather W. Hackman)

ch. 6 Heterosexism (Warren J. Blumenfeld)

ch. 7 Transgender Oppression (Chase Catalano , Davey Shiasko)

ch. 8 Ableism (Carmellita Casteneda, Larissa E. Hopkins. Madeeline L. Peters)

ch. 9 Ageism & Adultism (Keri DeJong, Barbara J. Love)

ch. 10 Working for Social Justice: Visions and Strategies for Change (Ximena Zuniga)

Permission Acknowledgments

About the Editors
Cover image

Citizenship, Education and Social Conflict: Israeli Political Education in Global Perspective

Book
Alexander, Hanan A., Pinson, Halleli, and Yonah, Yossi, eds.
2011
Routledge, New York, NY
LC1091.C5238 2011
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This volume provides new perspectives into the challenges of citizenship education in the age of globalization and in the context of multicultural and conflict-ridden societies. It calls on us to rethink the accepted liberal and national discourses that have long dominated the conceptualization and practice of citizenship and citizenship education in light of social conflict, globalization, terrorism, and the spread of an extreme form of capitalism.

The contributors ...
Additional Info:
This volume provides new perspectives into the challenges of citizenship education in the age of globalization and in the context of multicultural and conflict-ridden societies. It calls on us to rethink the accepted liberal and national discourses that have long dominated the conceptualization and practice of citizenship and citizenship education in light of social conflict, globalization, terrorism, and the spread of an extreme form of capitalism.

The contributors of the volume identify the main challenges to the role of citizenship education in the context of globalization, conflicts and the changes to the institution of citizenship they entail and critically examine the ways in which schools and education systems currently address – and may be able to improve – the role of citizenship education in conflict-ridden and multicultural contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Preface
Introduction: Theories of Conflict in Citizenship Education

Part I: Conflict Theories in Citizenship Education
ch. 1 The Emergence of Citizenship as a Political Problem in an Era of Globalization (Seyla Benhabib)
ch. 2 Becoming a Critical Citizen: A Marxist-Humanist Critique (Juan Suoranta, Peter McLaren, Nathalia Jaramilo)
ch. 3 Education, Power and the State: Dilemmas of Citizenship in Multicultural Societies (Carlos Alberto Torres)
ch. 4 Addressing Gender Conflict, Sexuality and Violence: Feminist Perspectives on the Challenges Faced By Global Citizenship Education (Madeleine Arnot)
ch. 5 Teaching About Conflict Through Citizenship Education (Lynn Davies)
ch. 6 Tolerance, Education, and Parental Rights (Walter Feinberg)

Part II: Citizenship Education in a Democratic and Jewish State

ch. 7 Reconsidering Zionism: Open Society, Critical Theory, and the Education of Citizens (Hanan A. Alexander)
ch. 8 Democracy, Educational Autonomy, and Israeli Law: The Case of the Ultra-Orthodox Minority (Yossi Dahan, Yoav Hammer)
ch. 9 The Consolidation of Civic Identity in a Particularistic Religious Setting (Zehavit Gross)
ch. 10 Bargaining Over Citizenship: Pre-military Preparatory Activities in the Service of the Dominant Groups (Noa HArel, Edna Lomsky-Feder)
ch. 11 Adverse Aspects of Citizenship Education in the Global Era: The Israeli Case (Yossi Yonah)
ch. 12 Civic Education for the Palestinians in Israel: Dilemmas and Challenges (Ayman K. Agbaria)
ch. 13 One Civic Curriculum, Different Civic Visions (Halleli Pinson)

Conclusion: Transforming Social Conflict: The Burdens and Dilemmas of Citizenship Education in Israel

References
Contributors
Index
Cover image

Radicalizing Learning: Adult Education for a Just World

Book
Brookfield, Stephen D., and Holst, John D.
2011
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco
LC5251.B74 2011
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Praise for Radicalizing Learning

This is a book that is so interesting that I had trouble putting it down. It is well written; there is new material; it articulates familiar concepts in such novel ways that your thought patterns get hijacked reading it. Adult learning and its processes are examined from a socialist perspective with a focus on social justice.

Stephen Brookfield and John Holst have ...
Additional Info:
Praise for Radicalizing Learning

This is a book that is so interesting that I had trouble putting it down. It is well written; there is new material; it articulates familiar concepts in such novel ways that your thought patterns get hijacked reading it. Adult learning and its processes are examined from a socialist perspective with a focus on social justice.

Stephen Brookfield and John Holst have written a monumental text in the field of adult education. It is a bold, ambitious book, beautifully written and uncompromising in its social justice agenda. It is sure to become a classic in the field.

This book offers new readings of the theory, politics, policy, and practice of radical adult education and learning where people's lives are understood as complex and interrelated matters. Brookfield and Holst's poetics and deeply human prose sound rebellious; the authors confront some of the main radical trends in the field of adult education including critical theory, transformative learning, and popular education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Authors

ch. 1 Conceptualizing Adult Learning and Education
ch. 2 Understanding Adult Learning
ch. 3 Understanding Adult Development
ch. 4 Learning in the Context of Training
ch. 5 Planning Educational Programs: Principles, Goals, and Evaluation
ch. 6 Teaching Adults
ch. 7 Globalization and Adult Learning
ch. 8 Aesthetic Dimensions of Learning
ch. 9 Researching Learning
ch. 10 Adult Learning in a Diverse World

Epilogue
References
Name Index
Subject Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Civic Engagement in Higher Education: Concepts and Practices

Book
Jacoby and Associates, Barbara, and, Ehrlich, Thomas
2009
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC220.5.C58 2009
Topics: Service Learning   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Numerous studies have chronicled students lack of trust in large social institutions, declining interest in politics, and decreasing civic skills. This book is a comprehensive guide to developing high-quality civic engagement experiences for college students. The book defines civic engagement and explains why it is central to a college education. It describes the state of the art of education for civic engagement and provides guidelines for designing programs that encourage ...
Additional Info:
Numerous studies have chronicled students lack of trust in large social institutions, declining interest in politics, and decreasing civic skills. This book is a comprehensive guide to developing high-quality civic engagement experiences for college students. The book defines civic engagement and explains why it is central to a college education. It describes the state of the art of education for civic engagement and provides guidelines for designing programs that encourage desired learning outcomes. In addition, the book guides leaders in organizing their institutions to create a campus-wide culture of civic engagement. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Authors
Introduction

ch. 1 Civic Engagement in Today’s Higher Education: An Overview
ch. 2 What We Know about Civic Engagement among College Students
ch. 3 Educating Students for Personal and Social Responsibility: The Civic Learning Spiral
ch. 4 Civic Engagement in the First College Year
ch. 5 Engaging General Education
ch. 6 The Influence of Integrative and Interdisciplinary Learning on Civic Engagement
ch. 7 Capstone Experiences
ch. 8 Enhancing Intercultural Competence through Civic Engagement
ch. 9 Leadership Education and the Revitalization of Public Life
ch. 10 Moving from Service-Learning to Civic Engagement
ch. 11 Community-Based Undergraduate Research: Collaborative Inquiry for the Public Good
ch. 12 Global Civic Engagement
ch. 13 Securing the Future of Civic Engagement in Higher Education

Index
Cover image

An Integrative Analysis Approach to Diversity in the College Classroom

Book
Quellett, Matthew, ed.
2011
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 125)
LC1099.I58 2011
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
College and university instructors continue to seek models that help students to better understand today's complex social relationships. Feminist, Queer, and Ethnic Studies scholars put forward compelling arguments for more integrative understandings of race, class, gender, and sexuality and for centering the experiences of women, people of color, and others traditionally relegated to the margins. Intersectionality is one such approach.

In nine chapters, the contributors to this volume ...
Additional Info:
College and university instructors continue to seek models that help students to better understand today's complex social relationships. Feminist, Queer, and Ethnic Studies scholars put forward compelling arguments for more integrative understandings of race, class, gender, and sexuality and for centering the experiences of women, people of color, and others traditionally relegated to the margins. Intersectionality is one such approach.

In nine chapters, the contributors to this volume offer an overview of key tenets of intersectionality and explore applications of this model in faculty and instructional development in higher education. Gathered from across the disciplines, they draw upon a range of approaches to social identity formation, different theoretical models, and a complement of lived experiences. When read together, these chapters offer a systemic approach to change in higher education by addressing innovations at course, department, and institutional levels.

Intersectionality does not advocate for a flattening of differences. Instead, it argues for another layer of critical analyses that acknowledge the powerful interplay of the many aspects of social identity to address the rapidly shifting ways in which we talk about and describe identities in society and the complexity of classroom dynamics in the academy today. By illuminating the interconnected nature of systems of oppression, we shine a light on the potential for disrupting the status quo and create stronger alliances for social justice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes

Section One: Intersectionality and the Disciplines
ch. 1 The Promises and Challenges of Teaching from an Intersectional Perspective: Core Components and Applied Strategies (Susan R. Jones, Charmaine L. Wijeyesinghe)
ch. 2 The Trouble with Disciplining Disciplines (C. Shaun Longstreet)

Section Two: Collaborating Teaching
ch. 3 The Writers and the Detectives: Cultural Difference, Identify, and Pedagogical Disciplines in an Integrated Classroom (Jennifer DiGrazia, Elizabeth Stassinos)
ch. 4 Using an Intersectional Approach to Deepen Collaborative Teaching (Susan M. Pliner, Jonathan Iuzzini, Cerri A. Banks)

Section Three: Points of Interface
ch. 5 The Intersectional Potential of Queer Theory: An Example from a General Education Course in English (Deborah Carlin)
ch. 6 Teaching "Trans Issues" An Intersectional and Systems-Based Approach (Michel J. Boucher)
ch. 7 Refugees, Veterans, and Continuing Pedagogies of PTSD in Asian American Studies (Shirley Suet-ling Tang, Peter Nien-chu Kiang)

Section Four: Institutional Change
ch. 8 From Difficult Dialogues to Critical Conversations: Intersectionality in Our Teaching and Professional Lives (AnnJanette Alejano-Steele, Maurice Hamington, Lunden MacDonald, Mark Potter, Shaun Schafer, Arlene Sgoutas, Tara Tull)
ch. 9 Re-Seeing Race in a Post-Obama Age: Asian American Studies, Comparative Ethnic Studies, and Intersectional Pedagogies (Cathy J. Schlund-Vials)

Index
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"Educating for Equity and Social Justice: A Conceptual Model for Cultural Engagement"

Article
Hess, Deborah J.; Lanig, Hilreth; Vaughan, Winston
2007
Multicultural Perspectives, Vol. 9, No. 1, pgs. 32-39
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This article presents an alternative approach to using service-learning courses to help students develop cultural competence. Service learning often comes from a deficit model that views the providers of a service as advantaged and the recipients as disadvantaged. The Conceptual Model for Cultural Engagement (CMCE) recognizes that those many deem as the disadvantaged have assets to share. The CMCE develops long-term, asset-based, reciprocal relationships between faculty members, community partners, and ...
Additional Info:
This article presents an alternative approach to using service-learning courses to help students develop cultural competence. Service learning often comes from a deficit model that views the providers of a service as advantaged and the recipients as disadvantaged. The Conceptual Model for Cultural Engagement (CMCE) recognizes that those many deem as the disadvantaged have assets to share. The CMCE develops long-term, asset-based, reciprocal relationships between faculty members, community partners, and higher education students. During this relationship, all of the individuals actively participate in culturally engaged learning. The goal is to develop culturally effective members of our society who are educated to interact effectively with individuals from diverse backgrounds.
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"Challenging White Privilege In Adult Education: A Critical Review of Literature"

Article
Manglitz, Elaine
2003
Adult Education Quarterly, Vol. 53, No. 2, February 2003, pgs. 119-134
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
The article synthesizes and critiques the social science, education, and adult education literature related to the examination of Whiteness and White privilege and offers recommendations for the field of adult education. By examining the historically changing nature of Whiteness, the major themes in this literature are discussed, along with the relevance of these themes for adult education research and practice. In reviewing the current efforts to name and challenge White ...
Additional Info:
The article synthesizes and critiques the social science, education, and adult education literature related to the examination of Whiteness and White privilege and offers recommendations for the field of adult education. By examining the historically changing nature of Whiteness, the major themes in this literature are discussed, along with the relevance of these themes for adult education research and practice. In reviewing the current efforts to name and challenge White privilege, the article provides recommendations for moving beyond naming and critiquing White privilege and racism in the field of adult education to challenging and transforming their impact.
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"Teaching Justice and Living Peace: Body, Sexuality, and Religious Education in Asian-American Communities"

Article
Lee, Boyung
2006
Religious Education, Vol. 101, No. 3, Summer 2006, pgs. 402-419
Topics: Religious Education   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This article examines sexuality, a null curriculum in Asian-American faith communities, and explores pedagogical strategies to move the sexuality discourse to the explicit curriculum. The article first describes the current discussion of sexuality in Asian-American communities, then it critically analyzes the Confucian notion of the body, which has far-reaching influence on Asian-American views about sexuality, including those of Christians. The article then focus on demystification of the body, arguing that ...
Additional Info:
This article examines sexuality, a null curriculum in Asian-American faith communities, and explores pedagogical strategies to move the sexuality discourse to the explicit curriculum. The article first describes the current discussion of sexuality in Asian-American communities, then it critically analyzes the Confucian notion of the body, which has far-reaching influence on Asian-American views about sexuality, including those of Christians. The article then focus on demystification of the body, arguing that demystification is fundamental to Asian-American discussions about sexuality. Finally, it suggests pedagogical strategies for the teaching of sexuality in Asian-American contexts.
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Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues: Bridging Differences, Catalyzing Change

Book
Maxwell, Kelly E., Ngad, Biren (Ratnesh), and Thompson, Monita C.
2011
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB1033.5.F33 2011
Topics: Discussion   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Intergroup dialogue has emerged as an effective educational and community building method to bring together members of diverse social and cultural groups to engage in learning together so that they may work collectively and individually to promote greater diversity, equality and justice.

Intergroup dialogues bring together individuals from different identity groups (such as people of color and white people; women and men; lesbian, gay, and bisexual people and ...
Additional Info:
Intergroup dialogue has emerged as an effective educational and community building method to bring together members of diverse social and cultural groups to engage in learning together so that they may work collectively and individually to promote greater diversity, equality and justice.

Intergroup dialogues bring together individuals from different identity groups (such as people of color and white people; women and men; lesbian, gay, and bisexual people and heterosexual people), and uses explicit pedagogy that involves three important features: content learning, structured interaction, and facilitative guidance.

The least understood role in the pedagogy is that of facilitation. This volume, the first dedicated entirely to intergroup dialogue facilitation, draws on the experiences of contributors and on emerging research to address the multi-dimensional role of facilitators and co-facilitators, the training and support of facilitators, and ways of improving practice in both educational and community settings. It constitutes a comprehensive guide for practitioners, covering the theoretical, conceptual, and practical knowledge they need.

Presenting the work and insights of scholars, practitioners and scholar-practitioners who train facilitators for intergroup dialogues, this book bridges the theoretical and conceptual foundations of intergroup relations and social justice education with training models for intergroup dialogue facilitation.

It is intended for staff, faculty, and administrators in higher education, and community agencies, as well as for human resources departments in workplaces. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

ch. 1 Deepening the Layers of Understanding and Connection: A Critical-Dialogic Approach to Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
ch. 2 In the Hands of Facilitators - Student Experiences in Dialogue and Implications for Facilitator Training

Section One: Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation:Training for Classroom-based Experiences
ch. 3 Training Peer Facilitators as Social Justice Educators: Integrating Cognitive and Affective Learning
ch. 4 Facilitator Training in Diverse, Progressive Residential Communities: Occidental College as a Case Study
ch. 5 Preparing Critically Reflective Intergroup Dialogue Facilitators: A Pedagogical Model and Illustrative Example
ch. 6 (Re)Training Ourselves: Professionals Who Facilitate Intergroup Dialogue

Section Two: Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation Training for Applications to Campus and Community Settings
ch. 7 Training Students to Change Their Own Campus Culture Through Sustained Dialogue
ch. 8 Democracy Lab: Online Facilitation Training for Dialogic Teaching and Learning
ch. 9 Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation for Youth Empowerment and Community Change
ch. 10 Extending Intergroup Dialogue Facilitation to Multicultural Social Work Practice

Section Three: Learning From and With Intergroup Dialogue Facilitators: Voices on Identity, Alliances, and Career Commitments
ch. 11 Identity Matters: Facilitators’ Struggles and Empowered Use of Social Identities in Intergroup Dialogue
ch. 12 Not FOR Others, But WITH Others, For ALL of Us: Weaving Relationships, Co-Creating Spaces of Justice
ch. 13 Changing Facilitators, Facilitating Change:The Lives of Intergroup Dialogue Facilitators Post-College

Contributor Biographies
Index
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"Should ethnicity matter when teaching about 'race' and racism in the classroom?"

Article
Housee, Shirin
2008
Race Ethnicity and Education Vol. 11, No. 4, December 2008, 415-428
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Teaching about "race" and racism to a diverse student group can lead to some very interesting exchanges. Some of these moments are much to do with the subject content. Learning about racism often pulls on our emotional strings: black students sometimes express their hurt and anger, while white students sometimes remain silent or express their hurt, shame and discomfort. The lecturer's racialised identity is an important factor in these emotional ...
Additional Info:
Teaching about "race" and racism to a diverse student group can lead to some very interesting exchanges. Some of these moments are much to do with the subject content. Learning about racism often pulls on our emotional strings: black students sometimes express their hurt and anger, while white students sometimes remain silent or express their hurt, shame and discomfort. The lecturer's racialised identity is an important factor in these emotional exchanges. Black lecturers are sometimes judged for their "loyalties and sensibilities" with the black community, while white lecturers are questioned for their understanding and sympathies with "race"/racism issues. This paper considers how social identities and physical appearances impact on the teaching and learning process and issues of student and lecturer positionalities and identities in the Higher Education context. In particular, it examines how much being white or black can "matter" in teaching and learning about race and racism, and the importance of critical pedagogy. Theoretical reflections on identity construction and management are themed through these discussions. The conclusion argues that the teaching of "race" and racism is not only about identity or ethnicity, but the development of teaching strategies that are inclusive of black experiences; and questions power structures and relations found in whitearchy and patriarchy.
TTR cover image

"Race, Ethnicity, and the Bible: Pedagogical Challenges and Curricular Opportunities"

TTR
Byron, Gay L.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 105-124
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Theological educators are now fostering dialogues, projects, and practices that are designed to acknowledge the challenges and opportunities resulting from the shifting racial and ethnic demographic climate in the U.S. and Canada. As well-intentioned as these efforts are, most of the scholarship focuses on the contemporary experiences of underrepresented minorities, current institutional concerns, or practical classroom scenarios, leaving Scripture courses, which have long been the backbone of theological education, ...
Additional Info:
Theological educators are now fostering dialogues, projects, and practices that are designed to acknowledge the challenges and opportunities resulting from the shifting racial and ethnic demographic climate in the U.S. and Canada. As well-intentioned as these efforts are, most of the scholarship focuses on the contemporary experiences of underrepresented minorities, current institutional concerns, or practical classroom scenarios, leaving Scripture courses, which have long been the backbone of theological education, beyond the scope of critical engagement. In this article I argue that the existing scholarship on teaching and learning in general, and among biblical scholars in particular, does not adequately address the specific challenges that arise when questions about race and ethnicity are exposed in Scripture courses. Therefore, based on my own classroom experiences, I develop a pedagogy of (Emb)Racing the Bible that seeks to bridge the gap between theoretical readings and practical applications of ancient and contemporary discourses about race and ethnicity.
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Researching and Teaching Social Issues: The Personal Stories and Pedagogical Efforts of Professors of Education

Book
Totten, Samuel, and Pedersen, Jon, eds.
2012
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
H62.R4472 2012
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Researching and Teaching Social Issues: The Personal Stories and Pedagogical Efforts of Professors of Education is comprised of original personal essays in which notable teacher educators delineate the genesis and evolution of their thought and work vis-a-vis the teaching of social issues. In relating their personal stories, the authors were asked to discuss among other issues those individuals and/or scholarly works that have most influenced them and how, their ...
Additional Info:
Researching and Teaching Social Issues: The Personal Stories and Pedagogical Efforts of Professors of Education is comprised of original personal essays in which notable teacher educators delineate the genesis and evolution of their thought and work vis-a-vis the teaching of social issues. In relating their personal stories, the authors were asked to discuss among other issues those individuals and/or scholarly works that have most influenced them and how, their own aspirations in the field, the frustrations they have faced, their perceptions of the field, their major contributions, and their current endeavors. Our goal was that each and every story be as informative, instructive, and engaging as possible. We believe that readers will be thoroughly engaged as they read the stories of these individuals—stories that are inspiring, filled with passion, and reflective in nature. We also believe that readers will gain unique pedagogical insights into the field and ample food for thought.

The individuals selected for inclusion in the book dedicated a great amount of time, thought, energy, and commitment to creating powerful and pedagogically sound ways to teach about social and/or controversial issues. Many have done so for well over forty years, and have been among the strongest advocates vis-à-vis the place social issues have in the extant curriculum and beyond. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Education, Politics, and Social Transformation (Michael W. Apple)
ch. 2 Human Ecology and Science Education Policies and Programs: Reflections on Social Activism, (Roger W. Bybee)
ch. 3 Forty Days and Forty Nights in the Wilderness of Capitalist Schooling (Ronald W. Evans)
ch. 4 Becoming Political: One Woman’s Story (Carole L. Hahn)
ch. 5 The Unending Quest for Social Issues in the Schools: A Personal Narrative (Byron G. Massialas)
ch. 6 Social Justice (Alex Molnar)
ch. 7 My Experience with Social Issues and Education (Fred M. Newmann)
ch. 8 Social Issues and Decision Making: A Career Long Commitment (Anna S. Ochoa-Becker)
ch. 9 The Evolution of an Educator (Jon E. Pedersen.)
ch. 10 A Happenstance-Based Social Issues Career (James P. Shaver)
ch. 11 Serendipity: A Paradigm Shifter’s Friend in Academia (Barbara Solomon Spector)
ch. 12 A Synergy of Awareness, Understanding, Empathy and Action: Confronting Social Issues in the English Classroom and Beyond (Samuel Totten)
ch. 13 Socials Issues as Contexts for Science and Technology Education (Robert E. Yager)

Selected Bibliography
Index
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Pedagogy Beyond Piracy: Un-Learning the White Body to Recreate a Body of Learning

TTR
Perkinson, James W.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 4 (2012): 323-337
BL.T4 v.15 no. 4 2012
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This essay highlights a range of questions that arise when white suburban students engage urban neighborhoods of poverty and color in the United States. How can involvement in an “other” context move beyond “educational tourism”? The essay presents a pedagogical style that raises questions of the kind of socialized body one inhabits: either one shaped by presumptions of control and rights of academic observation, or one mobilized to risk involvement ...
Additional Info:
This essay highlights a range of questions that arise when white suburban students engage urban neighborhoods of poverty and color in the United States. How can involvement in an “other” context move beyond “educational tourism”? The essay presents a pedagogical style that raises questions of the kind of socialized body one inhabits: either one shaped by presumptions of control and rights of academic observation, or one mobilized to risk involvement in a differently communalized episteme. And while the pedagogy described may not be replicable by faculty who do not share the author's background or cross-cultural orientation, the rhetorical style of the essay itself enacts the tensions that this pedagogy contends with: the efforts of a white male educator – altered by decades of inner city involvement – to open “white” space in the classroom to other norms of embodiment and other modes of learning. Here is the necessity and impossibility of moving beyond “educational tourism.”
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Wabash tree

When the Text Is the Problem: A Postcolonial Approach to Biblical Pedagogy

Article
Lee, Boyung
2007
Religious Education, Vol. 106, No. 1, Winter 2007, pgs 44-61
Topics: Course Design   |   Religious Education   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Postcolonial biblical scholars use the hermeneutics of decolonization to reinterpret the biblical text. One goal is to find contemporary applications for an age-old message. This article explores the challenges and implications of postcolonial hermeneutics for biblical pedagogy. First, the author explores fundamental hermeneutical principles of postcolonial biblical criticism. Then she reviews its challenges for a liberative biblical pedagogy. Finally, the author applies these principles to a Bible study using the ...
Additional Info:
Postcolonial biblical scholars use the hermeneutics of decolonization to reinterpret the biblical text. One goal is to find contemporary applications for an age-old message. This article explores the challenges and implications of postcolonial hermeneutics for biblical pedagogy. First, the author explores fundamental hermeneutical principles of postcolonial biblical criticism. Then she reviews its challenges for a liberative biblical pedagogy. Finally, the author applies these principles to a Bible study using the story of Hagar.
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Race, Poverty, and Social Justice: Multidisciplinary Perspectives Through Service Learning

Book
Calderón, Jose Z.; Eisman , Gerald; and Corrigan , Robert A., eds.
2007
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC220.5.R33 2007
Topics: Service Learning   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This volume explores multiple examples of how to connect classrooms to communities through service learning and participatory research to teach issues of social justice. The various chapters provide examples of how collaborations between students, faculty, and community partners are creating models of democratic spaces (on campus and off campus) where the students are teachers and the teachers are students. The purpose of this volume is to provide examples of how ...
Additional Info:
This volume explores multiple examples of how to connect classrooms to communities through service learning and participatory research to teach issues of social justice. The various chapters provide examples of how collaborations between students, faculty, and community partners are creating models of democratic spaces (on campus and off campus) where the students are teachers and the teachers are students. The purpose of this volume is to provide examples of how service learning can be integrated into courses addressing social justice issues. At the same time, it is about demonstrating the power of service learning in advancing a course content that is community-based and socially engaged.

To stimulate the adaptation of the approaches described in these books, each volume includes an Activity / Methodology table that summarizes key elements of each example, such as class size, pedagogy, and other disciplinary applications. Click here for the table to this title. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
About This Series
Introduction
Activity/Methodology Table
List of Contributors

Section I: Foundations of Service Learning and Social Justice
ch. 1 Advancing Service Learning as a Transformative Method for Social Justice Work (Robert Stanley Oden, Thomas Amar Casey)
ch. 2 Stimulating Social Justice Theory for Service Learning Practice (David Schulz)
ch. 3 Reflections on Service Learning as a Pedagogical Strategy in Composition Christine Popok)

Section II: The Day Labor Project
ch. 4 Linking Critical Democratic Pedagogy, Multiculturalism, and Service Learning to a Project-Based Approach (Jose Z. Calderon, Gilbert Cadena)
ch. 5 Designing a Safety Program for Day Laborers (Edward V. Clancy)
ch. 6 Community-Based Scholarship: Nutrition Students Learn Spanish in the Classroom and at the City of Pomona Day Labor Center (Susan Algert)

Section III: Social Policy and Homelessness
ch. 7 Social Justice and Public Policy (Roberta Ann Johnson, Robert C. Chope)
ch. 8 Social Responsibility by Design: Interior Design, Graphic Design and Photography Students’ Close Encounter with Homelessness (Jill Pable)
ch. 9 Providing Human Services with a Social Justice Perspective (Robert C. Chope, Rebecca L. Toporek)

Section IV: International Project
ch. 10 Service Learning in the World Community: Video Production in South America (Betsy J. Blosser)

Section V: Culture and Equity
ch. 11 Creating Social Justice in the Classroom: Preparing Students for Diversity through Service-Learning (Tasha Souza)
ch. 12 Social Justice and Community Service Learning in Chicano/Latino/Raza Studies (Velia Garcia)
ch. 13 Reclaiming a Forgotten Past: The San Fernando Valley Japanese American Oral History and Photograph Collection Project (Edith Wen-Chu)
ch. 14 Cultural Issues in American Indian Education
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Teaching, Learning and Intersecting Identities in Higher Education

Book
Pliner, Susan M.; and Banks, Cerri A., eds.
2012
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LC191.94.T43 2012
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book utilizes the theory of intersectionality to focus on the divergent identities and experiences of marginalized groups and to analyze the ways these experiences infiltrate the classroom. It examines teaching and learning as integrated and synergistic practices and highlights the personal and institutional power dynamics existing between scholars and students.

Starting with the premise that institutions of higher education must pay attention to the ways intersecting identities ...
Additional Info:
This book utilizes the theory of intersectionality to focus on the divergent identities and experiences of marginalized groups and to analyze the ways these experiences infiltrate the classroom. It examines teaching and learning as integrated and synergistic practices and highlights the personal and institutional power dynamics existing between scholars and students.

Starting with the premise that institutions of higher education must pay attention to the ways intersecting identities and structures of privilege and disadvantage enter all educational settings, the contributors to this text represent a range of academic disciplines and they are both scholars and students. This approach demonstrates that ideas related to teaching and learning should not follow models that separate teachers, students, and disciplines, but rather that significant learning occurs in the areas where they overlap. Each chapter provides pedagogical strategies and methods for classroom practice that facilitate student learning, equitable classroom environments, and a social justice agenda. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Integrating Intersectionality, Transforming Learning (Kim A. Case, angela R. Miller, Sharpie Bambacigno Jackson)
ch. 2 "We Talk about Race Too Much in This Class!" Complicating the Essentialized Woman through Intersectional Pedagogy (Leah Wing)
ch. 3 Conflict Resolution Education and Intersectionality (Anna Creadick, Jalisa Whitley, Patrice Thomas, Amber Jackson, Katy Wolfe, Martin Quigley, Reina Apraez)
ch. 4 "Check Your Head" (Linda McCarthy/Laura M. Larson)
ch. 5 Using a Pedagogy of Intersectionality in the Community College Classroom (Neeta Bhasin)
ch. 6 The Rhetorical Nature of Intersecting Identities: Actualizing Intersectionality in the Classroom (Lesley Bogad/Ibilolia Holder/Juanita Montes de Oca/Andres Ramirez/Chris Susi)
ch. 7 A.L.L.I.E.D. Across Our Differences: Blogging and the (Un)Reconciled Politics of Intersectionality
ch. 8 Oprah and Obama Made It, Why Can’t Everyone Else? Utilizing Intersectional Pedagogy to Challenge Post-racial Ideologies within the Higher Education Classroom (Susan M. Pliner/Cerri A. Banks/Ashley M. Tapscot)
ch. 9 Intersectional Pedagogy and Transformative Learning (Jennifer Bowen)
ch. 10 Intersectionality and My Practice of Teaching Mathematics (Julia R. Johnson/Mary González/Cris Ray/Jessica Hager/Diana Leon/Sally Spalding/Tiffany Brigham)
ch. 11 Daring Pedagogy: Dialoguing about Intersectionality and Social Justice (Liz Braun)
ch. 12 Reframing "Diversity" in Higher Education: An Argument for an Intersectional Approach (Cerri A. Banks/Susan M. Pliner: Afterword)

Afterword: Final Thoughts
Contributors
Index
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Transforming Ourselves, Transforming the World: Justice in Jesuit Higher Education

Book
Combs, Mary Beth; and Schmidt, Patricia Ruggiano
2013
Fordham University Press, New York, NY
LC493.T73 2013
Topics: Faith in the Classroom   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Transforming Ourselves, Transforming the World is an insightful collection that articulates how Jesuit colleges and universities create an educational community energized to transform the lives of its students, faculty, and administrators and to equip them to transform a broken world. The essays are rooted in Pedro Arrupe’s ideal of forming men and women for others and inspired by Peter-Hans Kolvenbach’s October 2000 ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Transforming Ourselves, Transforming the World is an insightful collection that articulates how Jesuit colleges and universities create an educational community energized to transform the lives of its students, faculty, and administrators and to equip them to transform a broken world. The essays are rooted in Pedro Arrupe’s ideal of forming men and women for others and inspired by Peter-Hans Kolvenbach’s October 2000 address at Santa Clara in which he identified three areas where the promotion of justice may be manifested in our institutions: formation and learning, research and teaching, and our way of proceeding.

Using the three areas laid out in Fr. Kolvenbach’s address as its organizing structure, this stimulating volume addresses the following challenges: How do we promote student life experiences and service? How does interdisciplinary collaborative research promote teaching and reflection? How do our institutions exemplify justice in their daily practices? Introductory pieces by internationally acclaimed authors such as Rev. Dean Brackley, S.J.; David J. O’Brien; Lisa Sowle Cahill; and Rev. Stephen A. Privett, S.J., pave the way for a range of smart and highly creative essays that illustrate and honor the scholarship, teaching, and service that have developed out of a commitment to the ideals of Jesuit higher education. The topics covered span disciplines and fields from the arts to engineering, from nursing to political science and law. The essays offer numerous examples of engaged pedagogy, which as Rev. Brackley points out fits squarely with Jesuit pedagogy: insertion programs, community-based learning, study abroad, internships, clinical placements, and other forms of interacting with the poor and with cultures other than our own. This book not only illustrates the dynamic growth of Jesuit education but critically identifies key challenges for educators, such as: How can we better address issues of race in our teaching and learning? Are we educating in nonviolence? How can we make the college or university “greener”? How can we evoke a desire for the faith that does justice?

Transforming Ourselves, Transforming the World is an indispensable volume that has the potential to act as an academic facilitator for the promotion of justice within not only Jesuit schools but all schools of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: A Fruitful New Branch

Part I: Formation and Learning
ch. 1 Beauty Limned in Violence: Experimenting with Protest Music in the Ignatian Classroom
ch. 2 Teaching Poverty in America through the Arts
ch. 3 Encuentro Dominicano: Creighton University's Commitment to Education for Transformation
ch. 4 Teaching Social Analysis through Academic Immersion
ch. 5 Adopting the Mission of Social Justice in a Political Science Department

Part II: Research and Teaching
ch. 6 Social Justice Themes in the Foreign Language Classroom
ch. 7 Coffee for Justice
ch. 8 Personal Transformation and Curricula Change
ch. 9 Doing Well by Doing Good: The Application of Ignatian Principles to Legal Education
ch. 10 Promoting Social Justice: Closing the Gap Between Rhetoric and Reality

Part III: Our Way of Proceeding
ch. 11 Opening Remarks to the Jesuit Justice Conference, June 18, 2009
ch. 12 Transforming Ourselves in Order to Transform the World
ch. 13 Nonviolently Transforming the Road to Jericho
ch. 14 The Ethic of Environmental Concern and the Jesuit Mission
ch. 15 Companions, Prophets, Martyrs: Jesuit Education as Justice Education

Conclusion: Further and Deeper

Notes
References
List of Contributors
Index
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Wabash tree

When Race Breaks Out: Conversations about Race and Racism in College Classrooms, Revised Edition

Book
Fox, Helen
2009
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LB2331.F635 2009
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
When Race Breaks Out is a guide for instructors who want to promote more honest and informed conversations about race and racism. Based on the author's personal practice and interviews with students and faculty from a variety of disciplines, this book combines personal memoirs, advice, teaching ideas, and lively stories from college classrooms. A unique « insider's guide to the main ideas, definitions, and opinions about race helps instructors answer students' ...
Additional Info:
When Race Breaks Out is a guide for instructors who want to promote more honest and informed conversations about race and racism. Based on the author's personal practice and interviews with students and faculty from a variety of disciplines, this book combines personal memoirs, advice, teaching ideas, and lively stories from college classrooms. A unique « insider's guide to the main ideas, definitions, and opinions about race helps instructors answer students' questions and anticipate their reactions, both to the material and to each other. An annotated bibliography of over 150 articles, books, and videos with recommendations for classroom use is also included. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction to the Second Edition
Introduction

ch. 1 Starting With Ourselves: Telling Our Stories About Race
ch. 2 Insider's Guide Part I: Race, Ethnicity, and Identity
ch. 3 Insider's Guide Part II: Discrimination, Racism, and Race Hatred
ch. 4 Classroom Confrontations
ch. 5 Having a "Civil Conversation"
ch. 6 Start With Students Where They Are: While Student Reactions
ch. 7 Mixing It Up: Reactions of Students of Color
ch. 8 Exercises, Assignments, and Advice

Annotated Resources and More Ideas for Assignments and Discussions
Appendix: Critical Incidents for Faculty Discussion
Bibliography
Additional Info:
An index of more than 25,000 peace and conflict resolution related Web pages, books, articles, audio-visual materials, organizational profiles, events, and current news articles – including links for syllabi, simulations and case studies for use in higher education settings.
Additional Info:
An index of more than 25,000 peace and conflict resolution related Web pages, books, articles, audio-visual materials, organizational profiles, events, and current news articles – including links for syllabi, simulations and case studies for use in higher education settings.
Additional Info:
Links to a self-assessment tool, and articles about hidden stereotypes and biases. Part of the larger Tolerance.org website, aimed more at K-12 instructors.
Additional Info:
Links to a self-assessment tool, and articles about hidden stereotypes and biases. Part of the larger Tolerance.org website, aimed more at K-12 instructors.
Additional Info:
A kinetic group classroom exercise consisting of a series of questions that move participants forward and backward on a scale, to make visible comparative levels of privilege in our lives and histories.
Additional Info:
A kinetic group classroom exercise consisting of a series of questions that move participants forward and backward on a scale, to make visible comparative levels of privilege in our lives and histories.
Additional Info:
Questions to ask when working issues of diversity into a course redesign.
Additional Info:
Questions to ask when working issues of diversity into a course redesign.
Additional Info:
AASHE is helping to create a brighter future of opportunity for all by advancing sustainability in higher education. By creating a diverse community engaged in sharing ideas and promising practices, AASHE provides administrators, faculty, staff and students, as well as the business that serve them, with: thought leadership and essential knowledge resources; outstanding opportunities for professional development; and a unique framework for demonstrating the value and competitive edge created by ...
Additional Info:
AASHE is helping to create a brighter future of opportunity for all by advancing sustainability in higher education. By creating a diverse community engaged in sharing ideas and promising practices, AASHE provides administrators, faculty, staff and students, as well as the business that serve them, with: thought leadership and essential knowledge resources; outstanding opportunities for professional development; and a unique framework for demonstrating the value and competitive edge created by sustainability initiatives.
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The Art of Effective Facilitation: Reflections from Social Justice Educators

Book
Landreman, Lisa M., ed.
2013
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC192.2.A78 2013
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: How can I apply learning and social justice theory to become a better facilitator?
Should I prepare differently for workshops around specific identities?
How do I effectively respond when things aren’t going as planned?

This book is intended for the increasing number of faculty and student affairs administrators – at whatever their level of experience -- who are being ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: How can I apply learning and social justice theory to become a better facilitator?
Should I prepare differently for workshops around specific identities?
How do I effectively respond when things aren’t going as planned?

This book is intended for the increasing number of faculty and student affairs administrators – at whatever their level of experience -- who are being are asked to become social justice educators to prepare students to live successfully within, and contribute to, an equitable multicultural society.

It will enable facilitators to create programs that go beyond superficial discussion of the issues to fundamentally address the structural and cultural causes of inequity, and provide students with the knowledge and skills to work for a more just society. Beyond theory, design, techniques and advice on practice, the book concludes with a section on supporting student social action.

The authors illuminate the art and complexity of facilitation, describe multiple approaches, and discuss the necessary and ongoing reflection process. What sets this book apart is how the authors illustrate these practices through personal narratives of challenges encountered, and by admitting to their struggles and mistakes.

They emphasize the need to prepare by taking into account such considerations as the developmental readiness of the participants, and the particular issues and historical context of the campus, before designing and facilitating a social justice training or selecting specific exercises.

They pay particular attention to the struggle to teach the goals of social justice education in a language that can be embraced by the general public, and to connect its structural and contextual analyses to real issues inside and outside the classroom.

The book is informed by the recognition that “the magic is almost never in the exercise or the handout but, instead, is in the facilitation”; and by the authors’ commitment to help educators identify and analyze dehumanizing processes on their campuses and in society at large, reflect on their own socialization, and engage in proactive strategies to dismantle oppression. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface

Part I: Frameworks from Theory to Practice
ch. 1 The Evolution of Social Justice Education and Facilitation (Lisa M. Landreman, and Christopher MacDonald-Dennis)
ch. 2 Building a Framework for Social Justice Education: One Educator's Journey (Annematrie Vaccaro)
ch. 3 The Evolution of a Social Justice Educator’s Professional Identity: Impacts of Professional Maturation and Multiple Discourse Perspectives on Personal Practice (Kelly Carter Merrill)

Part II: Understanding Identities and Facilitation
ch. 4 Developing Gender Inclusive Facilitation: Understanding Genderism (Brent L. Bilodeau)
ch. 5 Engaging Whiteness in Higher Education (Rebecca Ropers-Huilman)
ch. 6 Developing & Sustaining Effective Co-Facilitation Across Identities (Tanya Williams, Elaine Brighan)
ch. 7 Understanding and Supporting Multiracial Students (Adam J. Ortiz)

Part III: Facilitation Design and Techniques
ch. 8 From Safe Spaces To Brave Spaces: A New Way to Frame Dialogue Around Diversity and Social Justice (Brian Arao, and Kristi Clemens)
ch. 9 Navigating Triggering Events: Critical Competencies for Social Justice Educators (Kathy Obear)
ch. 10 When Neutrality Is Not Enough (Wrestling With the Challenges of Multipartiality (Robbie Routenberg, Elizabeth Thompson, and Rhian Waterberg)
ch. 11 Facilitating Interactive Privilege Awareness Programs: Employing Intentionality From Design Through Implementation (Gregory I. Meyer, Karen Connors, Rebecca Haselmeyer, Dusty M. Krihau, Tracy L. Lanier, Matthew R. Lee, Chris D. Orem, and Nancy Trantham Poe)

Part IV: Supporting Student Social Action
ch. 12 Training and Supporting Peer Facilitators (Heather Wilhelm, and Robbie Routenberg)
ch. 13 Why is it so Hard to Take Action? A Reflective Dialogue about Preparing Students for Social Action Engagement (Andrea D. Domingue, and David S. Neely)

About the Editor and Contributors
Index
Cover image

Sustainability in Higher Education: Stories and Strategies for Transformation

Book
Bartlett, Peggy F.; and Chase, Geoffrey W., eds.
2013
MIT Press, Cambridge, MA
LB3223.3.S88 2013
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In colleges and universities across the United States, students, faculty, and staff are forging new paths to sustainability. From private liberal arts colleges to major research institutions to community colleges, sustainability concerns are being integrated into curricula, policies, and programs. New divisions, degree programs, and courses of study cross traditional disciplinary boundaries; Sustainability Councils become part of campus governance; and new sustainability issues ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In colleges and universities across the United States, students, faculty, and staff are forging new paths to sustainability. From private liberal arts colleges to major research institutions to community colleges, sustainability concerns are being integrated into curricula, policies, and programs. New divisions, degree programs, and courses of study cross traditional disciplinary boundaries; Sustainability Councils become part of campus governance; and new sustainability issues link to historic social and educational missions. In this book, leaders from twenty-four colleges and universities offer their stories of institutional and personal transformation.

These stories document both the power of leadership—whether by college presidents, faculty, staff, or student activists—and the potential for institutions to redefine themselves. Chapters recount, among other things, how inclusive campus governance helped mobilize students at the University of South Carolina; how a course at the Menominee Nation’s tribal college linked sustainability and traditional knowledge; how the president of Furman University convinced a conservative campus community to make sustainability a strategic priority; how students at San Diego State University built sustainability into future governance while financing a LEED platinum-certified student center; and how sustainability transformed pedagogy in a lecture class at Penn State. As this book makes clear, there are many paths to sustainability in higher education. These stories offer a snapshot of what has been accomplished and a roadmap to what is possible. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Page
Dedication
Preface and Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I – Leadership and Commitment
ch. 1 Drury University: A Story of Personal and Institutional Transformation (Wendy B. Anderson)
ch. 2 Building a Decentralized, Grassroots, Campus Sustainability Organization and Community: The Transformational Impact of Green Values (David Whiteman)
ch. 3 Science and Technology Leaders for a Sustainable Future (Richard D. Schulterbrandt Gragg, III, LaRae Donnellan, Ryan Mitchell, Clayton J. Clark, II, and Viniece Jennings)
ch. 4 Bowling Gutter Balls: My First Year as the Energy Conservation Committee Chair (Julie Snow)

Part II – Curricular Transformation
ch. 5 Curriculum for the Bioregion: Putting Communities and Ideas in Place (Jean MacGregor)
ch. 6 From Environmental Advocates to Sustainability Entrepreneurs: Rethinking a Sustainability-Focused General Education Program (William Throopo)
ch. 7 From Soybeans and Silos to the Prairie Project: The Journey to Restorative Global Sustainability Education at Central College (Jim Zaffiro)
ch. 8 Take-Home Messages that Transform Individuals and Institutions: The Student Leaders on Global Environmental Issues Program (John Cusick)
ch. 9 Learning Sustainability in a Tribal College Context (William Van Lopik)

Part III – Defining the Paradigm for Change
ch. 10 Driving Transformative Change by Empowering Student Sustainability Leaders at the University of Michigan (Mike Shriberg, Andrew J. Horning, Katherine Lund, John Callewaert, and Donald Scavia)
ch. 11 Metabolism and Resiliency: Key Concepts for Catalyzing Transformational Change (E. Chrstian Wells)
ch. 12 Reimagining Professional Development: Collaborative Circles for Creative Change (Krista Hiser)

Part IV – Institutional Mission and the Culture of Sustainability
ch. 13 The Journey to Green: Becoming Sustainable Spelman (Beverly Daniel Tatum)
ch. 14 Weaving a Culture of Sustainability: Santa Clara University’s Evolving Story (Sherry Booth, Lindsey Cromwell Kalbrenner, Leslie Gray, and Amy Shachter)
ch. 15 Sustainability as Leadership Ethos (Margo Flood)
ch. 16 Sustainability as Turnaround: The Case of Unity College (Mitchell Thomashow)
ch. 17 Transformational Leadership at Furman University: Tradeoffs and Transitions (Angela C. Halfacre)

Part V – Accountability
ch. 18 Sustainability Strategic Planning: Establishing Accountability in a World of Distractions (Julie Newman)
ch. 19 Transforming the Silos: Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability (Charles L. Redman)
ch. 20 Fair Trade, Social Justice, and Campus Sustainability at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh (James W. Feldman, and David Barnhill)
ch. 21 Creating and Sustaining a Student Movement at San Diego State University (Grant A. Mack)

Part VI – Professional and Personal Transformation
ch. 22 Living the Questions: Contemplative and Reflective Practices in Sustainability Education (Marie Eaton, Kate Davies, Michael Gillespie, Karen Harding, and Sharon Daloz Parks)
ch. 23 Cultivating Pedagogies of Resilience: Practicing Place, Expanding Perspectives, Sustaining Life (Bobbie Patterson)
ch. 24 Awakening to the Hero’s Journey in Teaching and Learning (Christopher Uhl, and Greg Lankenau)

About the Contributors
Index
Series List
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

Getting Out of the Left Lane: The Possibility of White Antiracist Pedagogy

TTR
Teel, Karen
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 1 (2014): 3-26
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 1 2014
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This article maintains that knowledge of the literature on multicultural education and social justice pedagogy is indispensable for white college professors who desire to teach effectively about racial justice concerns. In exploring this literature, I have noticed that many publications either articulate theory or reflect on concrete classroom strategies, while relatively few deploy theory to evaluate specific attempts at teaching for justice. This seems to me a gap worth filling. ...
Additional Info:
This article maintains that knowledge of the literature on multicultural education and social justice pedagogy is indispensable for white college professors who desire to teach effectively about racial justice concerns. In exploring this literature, I have noticed that many publications either articulate theory or reflect on concrete classroom strategies, while relatively few deploy theory to evaluate specific attempts at teaching for justice. This seems to me a gap worth filling. Speaking as a white, conventionally trained, Catholic theologian, I begin by explaining why I deem it appropriate to employ antiracist pedagogy. I then demonstrate that the literature on multicultural education and social justice pedagogy is essential to this effort by utilizing both types of literature, theoretical and practical, to analyze my own strategies and goals to date. Throughout, I discuss white antiracist theological pedagogy not as an accomplished fact, but as an emerging endeavor. See a companion essay in this issue of the journal (Anna Floerke Scheid and Elisabeth T. Vasko, “Teaching Race: Pedagogical Challenges in Predominantly White Undergraduate Theology Classrooms”), and responses by the authors of both essays, also published in this issue of the journal (“Responses: Toward an Antiracist Pedagogy”).
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching Race: Pedagogical Challenges in Predominantly White Undergraduate Theology Classrooms

TTR
Scheid, Anna Floerke; and Vasko, Elisabeth T.
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 1 (2014): 27-45
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 1 2014
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
While a number of scholars in the field of Christian theology have argued for the importance of teaching diversity and social justice in theology and religious studies classrooms, little has been done to document and assess formally the implementation of such pedagogy. In this article, the authors discuss the findings of a yearlong Scholarship of Multicultural Teaching and Learning (SoMTL) study, which examined student learning and faculty teaching regarding race ...
Additional Info:
While a number of scholars in the field of Christian theology have argued for the importance of teaching diversity and social justice in theology and religious studies classrooms, little has been done to document and assess formally the implementation of such pedagogy. In this article, the authors discuss the findings of a yearlong Scholarship of Multicultural Teaching and Learning (SoMTL) study, which examined student learning and faculty teaching regarding race and white privilege in two theology classrooms. After a brief overview of the study's design and execution, we reflect upon our findings and draw out implications for pedagogical practices. In particular we discuss students' emotional responses to the material and the role of cognitive dissonance in student learning with respect to racial inequality via social structures. See a companion essay in this issue of the journal (Karen Teel, “Getting Out of the Left Lane: The Possibility of White Antiracist Pedagogy”) and responses by the authors of both essays, also published in this issue of the journal (“Responses: Toward an Antiracist Pedagogy”).
TTR cover image

Response: Toward an Antiracist Pedagogy

TTR
Scheid, Anna Floerke; Vasko, Elisabeth T.; and Teel, Karen
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 1 (2014): 46-49
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 1 2014
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
The authors respond here to each other's essays published in this issue of the journal. In “Holding Us Accountable,” Anna Floerke Scheid and Elisabeth T. Vasko respond to Karen Teel's essay, “Getting Out of the Left Lane.” In “Challenges and Convergences,” Karen Teel responds to the essay “Teaching Race” by Anna Floerke Scheid and Elisabeth T. Vasko.
Additional Info:
The authors respond here to each other's essays published in this issue of the journal. In “Holding Us Accountable,” Anna Floerke Scheid and Elisabeth T. Vasko respond to Karen Teel's essay, “Getting Out of the Left Lane.” In “Challenges and Convergences,” Karen Teel responds to the essay “Teaching Race” by Anna Floerke Scheid and Elisabeth T. Vasko.
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Deconstructing Privilege: Teaching and Learning as Allies in the Classroom

Book
Case, Kim, ed.
2013
Routledge, New York, NY
LC 4941.D43 2013
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Although scholarly examinations of privilege have increased in recent decades, an emphasis on privilege studies pedagogy remains lacking within institutions. This edited collection explores best practices for effective teaching and learning about various forms of systemic group privilege such as that based on race, gender, sexuality, religion, and class. Formatted in three easy-to-follow sections, Deconstructing Privilege charts the history of privilege studies and provides intersectional approaches to the topic.
<...
Additional Info:
Although scholarly examinations of privilege have increased in recent decades, an emphasis on privilege studies pedagogy remains lacking within institutions. This edited collection explores best practices for effective teaching and learning about various forms of systemic group privilege such as that based on race, gender, sexuality, religion, and class. Formatted in three easy-to-follow sections, Deconstructing Privilege charts the history of privilege studies and provides intersectional approaches to the topic.

Drawing on a wealth of research and real-life accounts, this book gives educators both the theoretical foundations they need to address issues of privilege in the classroom and practical ways to forge new paths for critical dialogues in educational settings. Combining interdisciplinary contributions from leading experts in the field-- such as Tim Wise and Abby Ferber-- with pedagogical strategies and tips for teaching about privilege, Deconstructing Privilege is an essential book for any educator who wants to address what privilege really means in the classroom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword: Teaching about Privilege: Transforming Learned Ignorance into Usable Knowledge
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Beyond Diversity and Whiteness: Developing a Transformative and Intersectional (Kim A. Case) Model of Privilege Studies Pedagogy

Part I: Transformative Pedagogy: Teaching and Learning about Privilege
ch. 2 Pedagogy for the Privileged: Addressing Inequality and Injustice without Shame or Blame (Tim Wise, and Kim A. Case)
ch. 3 Deconstructing Privilege When Students Resist: The Journey Back into the Community of Engaged Learners (Kim A. Case, and Elizabeth R. Cole)
ch. 4 Teaching Social Justice Ally Development among Privileged Students (Paul B. Perrin, Sriya Bhattacharyya, Daniel J. Snipes, Rebecca R. Hubbard, Martin Heesacker, Jenna M. Calton, Ruperto M. Perez, and Jill Lee-Barber)
ch. 5 "Colorblindness is the New Racism:" Raising Awareness about Privilege Using Color Insight (Margalynne J. Armstrong, and Stephanie M. Wildman)

Part II: Intersectional Privilege Studies Pedagogy
ch. 6 Teaching Privilege through an Intersectional Lens (Abby L. Ferber, and Andrea O'Reilly Herrera)
ch. 7 Intersectionality and Paradigms of Privilege: Teaching for Social Change (Cerri A. Banks, Susan M. Pliner, and Morgan B. Hopkins)
ch. 8 Recognizing Privilege by Reducing Invisibility: The Global Feminisms Project as a Pedagogical Tool (Desdamona Rios, and Abigail J. Stewart)
ch. 9 Intergroup Dialogue Pedagogy: Teaching about Intersectional and Under-examined Privilege in Heterosexual, Christian, and Jewish Identities (Adrienne B. Desssel, Johanna C. Mossé, and Lauren T. Walker)

Part III: Privilege in the Classroom: Strategies and Applications
ch. 10 Are We Queer Yet? Addressing Heterosexual and Gender-Conforming Privilege (Markie L. C. Blumer, Mary S. Green, Nicole L. Thonte, and Parris M. Green)
ch. 11 Class Action: Using Experiential Learning to Raise Awareness of Social Class Privilege (Wendy R. Williams, and Kala J. Melchiori)
ch. 12 Teaching the Taboo: Walking the Tightrope of Christian Privilege (Kim A. Case, Mike McMullen, and Beth Hentges)
ch. 13 Blazing the Trail: Teaching the Privileged about Privilege (Lisa F. Platt)

List of Contributors
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching for a Culturally Diverse and Racially Just World

Book
Fernandez, Eleazer S., ed.
2014
Cascade Books, Eugene, OR
BV4020.T43 2014
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Cultural and ethnic diversity is the reality of our world, and much more so in this age of heightened globalization. Yet, do our ways of doing theological education match with our current reality and hopes for a colorful and just tomorrow? How shall we do theological formation so it helps give birth to a culturally diverse, racially just, and hospitable world? This edited ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Cultural and ethnic diversity is the reality of our world, and much more so in this age of heightened globalization. Yet, do our ways of doing theological education match with our current reality and hopes for a colorful and just tomorrow? How shall we do theological formation so it helps give birth to a culturally diverse, racially just, and hospitable world? This edited volume gathers the voices of minoritized scholars and their white allies in the profession in response to the above questions. More particularly, this volume gathers the responses of these scholars to the questions: What is the plight of theological education? Who are the teachers? Who are our students? What shall we teach? How shall we teach? How shall we form and lead theological institutions?

It is the hope of this volume to contribute to the making of theological education that is hospitably just to difference/s and welcoming of our diverse population, which is our only viable future. When we embody this vision in our daily educational practices, particularly in the training of our future religious leaders, we may help usher in a new, colorful, and just world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Essay Contributors
Acknowledgements
Introduction: Birthing Culturally Diverse and Racially Just Educational Institutions: Teaching to Transgress and Transform - Eleazar S. Fernandez

ch. 1 Theological Education of Not Yet - (Fumitaka Matsuoka)
ch. 2 When Subjects Matter: The Bodies We Teach By - (Mai-Anh Le Tran)
ch. 3 From Foreign Bodies in Teacher Space to Embodied Spirit in Personas Educadas: or, How to Prevent “Tourists of Diversity” in Education - (Loida I. Martell-Otero)
ch. 4 Racial/Ethnic Diversity and Student Formation - (Peter T. Cha)
ch. 5 You Cannot Teach What You Do Not Know: You Can not Lead Where You Have Not Been - (Archie Smith, Jr)
ch. 6 What Shall We Teach? The Content of Theological Education - (Willie James Jennings)
ch. 7 Thoughts on Curriculum as Formational Praxis for Faculty, Students, and their Communities - (Elizabeth Conde-Frazier)
ch. 8 Teaching Disruptively: Pedagogical Strategies to Teach Cultural Diversity and Race - (Boyung Lee)
ch. 9 A Pedagogy of the Unmasked: “Unheard but Not Unvoiced, Unseen but Not Invisible - (Julia M. Speller)
ch. 10 The Vocational Cycle to Support Institutional Justice: A Pathway for Scholars of Color to Transform Institutional Life and Governance - (Mary Hinton)
ch. 11 Institutional Life and Governance: Realities and Challenges for Racial-Ethic Leadership within Historically White Theological Schools - (David Maldonado, Jr.)
ch. 12 Angle of Vision from a Companion/Ally in Teaching for a Culturally Diverse and Racially Just World - (Paul O. Myhre)
ch. 13 Faculty Colleagues as Allies in Resisting Racism - (Nancy Ramsay)

Bibliography
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Education article (May 2013). Discusses experiences of an openly gay professor teaching a year-long first-year core course. He struggles with fear of teaching a text that dealt with issues of homosexuality while also allowing an open forum for discussion.
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Education article (May 2013). Discusses experiences of an openly gay professor teaching a year-long first-year core course. He struggles with fear of teaching a text that dealt with issues of homosexuality while also allowing an open forum for discussion.
Additional Info:
Provides 12 tips on enhancing student learning when teaching issues of diversity in the college classroom. Examples: Gain awareness of biases; specify course objectives; encourage higher order thinking skills; and create and safe and engaging classroom climate. Includes links to more detailed discussion of each tip.
Additional Info:
Provides 12 tips on enhancing student learning when teaching issues of diversity in the college classroom. Examples: Gain awareness of biases; specify course objectives; encourage higher order thinking skills; and create and safe and engaging classroom climate. Includes links to more detailed discussion of each tip.
Article cover image

College Diversity Experiences and Cognitive Development: A Meta-Analysis

Article
Bowman, Nicholas A.
2010
Review of Educational Research, Vol. 80, No. 1 (March 2010), pp. 4-33
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This study uses meta-analysis to examine the relationship between exposure to diversity and cognitive development systematically. Findings suggest that several types of diversity experiences are positively related to several cognitive outcomes, but magnitude of effect varies substantially depending on type of diversity experience, type of cognitive outcome, and study design.
Additional Info:
This study uses meta-analysis to examine the relationship between exposure to diversity and cognitive development systematically. Findings suggest that several types of diversity experiences are positively related to several cognitive outcomes, but magnitude of effect varies substantially depending on type of diversity experience, type of cognitive outcome, and study design.
Additional Info:
As students develop cognitively, integrating knowledge in ways that reflect their learning, they also need to grow both interpersonally, by considering themselves as part of a larger whole, and intrapersonally, by establishing a belief system that can influence and guide their choices and experiences.
Additional Info:
As students develop cognitively, integrating knowledge in ways that reflect their learning, they also need to grow both interpersonally, by considering themselves as part of a larger whole, and intrapersonally, by establishing a belief system that can influence and guide their choices and experiences.
Additional Info:
Study used the Measure of Epistemology Reflection to explore impact of service-learning and social justice education on cognitive development. Results showed service-learning courses had a positive impact on cognitive development, while service-learning courses w/a social justice emphasis appeared to have more impact on students’ cognitive development than those without.
Additional Info:
Study used the Measure of Epistemology Reflection to explore impact of service-learning and social justice education on cognitive development. Results showed service-learning courses had a positive impact on cognitive development, while service-learning courses w/a social justice emphasis appeared to have more impact on students’ cognitive development than those without.
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Muslim Women, Transnational Feminism and the Ethics of Pedagogy: Contested Imaginaries in Post-9/11 Cultural Practice

Book
Taylor, Lisa K.; and Zine, Jasmin, eds.
2014
HQ1170.M8477 2014
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Following a long historical legacy, Muslim women’s lives continue to be represented and circulate widely as a vehicle of intercultural understanding within a context of the "war on terror." Following Edward Said’s thesis that these cultural forms reflect and participate in the power plays of empire, this volume examines the popular and widespread production and reception of Muslim women’s lives ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Following a long historical legacy, Muslim women’s lives continue to be represented and circulate widely as a vehicle of intercultural understanding within a context of the "war on terror." Following Edward Said’s thesis that these cultural forms reflect and participate in the power plays of empire, this volume examines the popular and widespread production and reception of Muslim women’s lives and narratives in literature, poetry, cinema, television and popular culture within the politics of a post-9/11 world. This edited collection provides a timely exploration into the pedagogical and ethical possibilities opened up by transnational, feminist, and anti-colonial readings that can work against sensationalized and stereotypical representations of Muslim women. It addresses the gap in contemporary theoretical discourse amongst educators teaching literary and cultural texts by and about Muslim Women, and brings scholars from the fields of education, literary and cultural studies, and Muslim women’s studies to examine the politics and ethics of transnational anti-colonial reading practices and pedagogy. The book features interviews with Muslim women artists and cultural producers who provide engaging reflections on the transformative role of the arts as a form of critical public pedagogy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Contested Imaginaries of Reading Muslim Women and Muslim Women Reading Back (Jasmin Zine and Lisa K. Taylor)

Part I: Transnational Anti-Colonial Feminist Reading Practices
ch. 1 SUR/VEIL: The Veil as Blank(et) Signifier (Megan MacDonald)
ch. 2 Khamosh Pani: Reading Partition Muslim Masculinities and Femininities in an Age of Terror (Shahnaz Khan)
ch. 3 Breaking the Stigma? The Anti-Heroine in Fatih Akin’s Head On (Mine Eren)
ch. 4 Pedagogies of Solidarity in Suheir Hammad’s "First Writing Since" (Dana M. Olwan)

Part II: The Politics of Production and Reception
ch. 5 A Too-Quick Enthusiasm for the Other": North American Women’s Book Clubs and the Politics of Reading (Catherine Burwell)
ch. 6 Of Activist Fandoms, Auteur Pedagogy and Imperial Feminism: From Buffy the Vampire Slayer to "I am Du’a Khalil" (Trish Salah)

Part III: Transformative Pedagogies
ch. 7 Cartographies of Difference and Pedagogies of Peril: Muslim Girls and Women in Western Young Adult Fiction Novels (Jasmin Zine)
ch. 8 “Shaking Up" Vision: The Video Diary as Personal and Pedagogical Intervention in Mona Hatoum’s Measures of Distance (Mehre Gomez Fonseca)
ch. 9 From Empathy to Estrangement, From Enlightenment to Implication: A Pedagogical Framework for (Re)Reading Literary Desire Against the "Slow Acculturation of Imperialism" (Lisa K. Taylor)

Part IV: Reflections on Cultural Production
ch. 10 Interview with Mohja Kahf (Jasmin Zine)
ch. 11 Interview with Zarqa Nawaz (Jasmin Zine)
ch. 12 Interview with Rasha Salti (Rasha Salti and Lisa K. Taylor)
ch. 13 Interview with Tayyibah Taylor (Jasmin Zine)
ch. 14 Interview with Sofia Baig (Jasmin Zine)
ch. 15 Interview with Sahar Ullah (Jasmin Zine)
ch. 16 Interview with Jamelie Hassan (Lisa K. Taylor)

Contributors
Index
Journal cover image

Intercultural and Transnational Pedagogy

Journal Issue
Posman, Ellen, and Locklin, Reid B., eds.
2011
Spotlight on Teaching, October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Intercultural and Transnational Pedagogy: Editors' Introduction (Ellen Posman, and Reid B. Locklin)
ch. 2 Thoughts on Intercultural Education in Religious Studies (Edwin David)
ch. 3 The 2010 Census and the Undergraduate Classroom (Philip Wingeier-Rayo)
ch. 4 Teaching Buddhism, Teaching Otherness?: “Many Buddhisms” in Transnational Chicago (Anne Mocko)
ch. 5 Chi, Postcolonial Theory, and Theological Pedagogy (Grace Ji-Sun Kim)
ch. 6 Interrogating the University Archive (Gregory Lee Cuéllar)
ch. 7 Teaching Religion and Theology: Intercultural and Transnational Online Resources (Jonathan Y. Tan)
ch. 8 Intercultural and Transnational Pedagogies: Suggested Resources
Additional Info:
Includes syllabi from a variety of college and university courses, across all disciplines, that have a strong flavor of “civic agency,” the capacity to work across differences to solve public problems, create lasting civic goods, and shape the world around us in democratic ways. The project emphasizes courses that speak to citizens as citizens, concerned about co-creating their communities of different scale.
Additional Info:
Includes syllabi from a variety of college and university courses, across all disciplines, that have a strong flavor of “civic agency,” the capacity to work across differences to solve public problems, create lasting civic goods, and shape the world around us in democratic ways. The project emphasizes courses that speak to citizens as citizens, concerned about co-creating their communities of different scale.
TTR cover image

Challenging Racism and White Privilege in Undergraduate Theology Contexts: Teaching and Learning Strategies for Maximizing the Promise of Community Service-Learning

TTR
Reed-Bouley, Jennifer; and Kyle, Eric
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 20-36
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Service Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This paper explores the possibilities and challenges inherent in employing community service-learning as a pedagogy for engaging undergraduates in theology and religious studies courses that contribute to racial reconciliation. The paper summarizes research from the scholarship of teaching and learning on best practices for structuring service-learning projects and processes that hold the possibility of students' genuine engagement with issues of race and the wisdom of the Catholic tradition.
Additional Info:
This paper explores the possibilities and challenges inherent in employing community service-learning as a pedagogy for engaging undergraduates in theology and religious studies courses that contribute to racial reconciliation. The paper summarizes research from the scholarship of teaching and learning on best practices for structuring service-learning projects and processes that hold the possibility of students' genuine engagement with issues of race and the wisdom of the Catholic tradition.
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Revisiting The Great White North?: Reframing Whiteness, Privilege, and Identity in Education (Second Edition)

Book
Lund, Darren E.; and Carr, Paul R., eds.
2015
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LA412.R48 2015
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Returning seven years later to their original pieces from this landmark book, over 20 leading scholars and activists revisit and reframe their rich contributions to a burgeoning scholarship on Whiteness. With new reflective writings for each chapter, and valuable sections on relevant readings and resources, this volume refreshes and enhances the first text to pay critical and sustained attention to Whiteness in education, with ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Returning seven years later to their original pieces from this landmark book, over 20 leading scholars and activists revisit and reframe their rich contributions to a burgeoning scholarship on Whiteness. With new reflective writings for each chapter, and valuable sections on relevant readings and resources, this volume refreshes and enhances the first text to pay critical and sustained attention to Whiteness in education, with implications far beyond national borders. Contributors include George Sefa Dei, Tracey Lindberg, Carl James, Cynthia Levine-Rasky, and the late Patrick Solomon. Courageously examining diverse perspectives, contexts, and institutional practices, contributors to this volume dismantle the underpinnings of inequitable power relations, privilege, and marginalization. The book’s relevance extends to those in a range of settings, with abundant and poignant lessons for enhancing and understanding transformative social justice work in education.

Revisiting The Great White North? offers terrific grist for examining the persistence of Whiteness even as it shape-shifts. Chapters are comprehensive, theoretically rich, and anchored in personal experience. Authors’ reflections on the seven years since publication of the first edition of this book complexify how we understand Whiteness, while simultaneously driving home the need not only to grapple with it, but to work against it. (From Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword to the Second Edition (2014)
Foreword (2007) (George J. Sefa Dei)
Acknowledgements (2014)
Acknowledgements (2007)
Introduction: Reframing Whiteness (2014) (Darren E. Lund & Paul R. Carr)

Section 1: Conceptualizing Whiteness
ch. 1 Exploring the Authority of Whiteness in Education: An Auto-Ethnographic Journey (Kathelln S. Berry)
ch. 2 Reframing: Kathleen S. Berry (2014)
ch. 3 Before I Was White I Was Presbyterian (Tim McCaskell)
ch. 4 Reframing: Tim McCaskell (2014)
ch. 5 Being White and Being Right: Critiquing Individual and Collective Privilege (James Frideres)
ch. 6 Reframing: James Frideres (2014)

Section 2: Whiteness and Second Peoples
ch. 7 Going Native: A White Guy’s Experience Teaching in an Aboriginal Context (Herbert C. Northcott)
ch. 8 Reframing: Herbert C. Northcott (2014)
ch. 9 On Indigenous Academia: The Hermeneutics of Indigenous Western Institutional Participation - Eleven Theorems (2014) (Tracey Lindberg)
ch. 10 “Don’t Blame Me for What My Ancestors Did”: Understanding the Impact of Collective White Guilt (Julie Caouette and Donald M. Taylor)
ch. 11 Reframing: Julie Caouette & Donald M. Taylor (2014)

Section 3: Developing and De-Constructing White Identity
ch. 12 Development of Anti-Racist White Identity in Canadian Educational Counsellors (Christine Wihak)
ch. 13 Reframing: Christine Wihak (2014)
ch. 14 “Radical Stuff”: Starting a Conversation about Racial Identity and White Privilege (Susan A. Tilley and Kelly D. Powick)
ch. 15 Reframing: Susan A. Tilley & Kelly D. Powick (2014)
ch. 16 Who Can/Should Do This Work? The Colour of Critique (Carl E. James)
ch. 17. Reframing: Carl E. James (2014)

Section 4: Learning, Teaching, and Whiteness
ch. 18 The Parents of Baywoods: Intersections between Whiteness and Jewish Ethnicity (Cynthia Levine-Rasky)
ch. 19 Reframing: Cynthia Levine-Rasky
ch. 20 Re-inscribing Whiteness through Progressive Constructions of “the Problem” in Anti-Racist Education (Lisa Comeau)
ch. 21 Reframing: Lisa Comeau (2014)
ch. 22 Discourses on Race and “White Privilege” in the Next Generation of Teachers (R. Patrick Solomon and Beverly-Jean M. Daniel)
ch. 23 Reframing: Beverly-Jean M. Daniel (2014)
ch. 24 White Female Teachers and Technology in Education: Reproducing the Status Quo (Brad J. Portfilio)
ch. 25 Reframing: Brad J. Porfilio (2014)

Section 5: The Institutional Merit of Whiteness
ch. 26 Whiteness and Philosophy: Imagining Non-White Philosophy in Schools (Laura Mae Lindo)
ch. 27 Reframing: Laura Mae Lindo (2014)
ch. 28 De-Centering Normal: Negotiating Whiteness as White School Administrators in a Diverse School Community (Debbie Donsky and Matt Champion)
ch. 29 Reframing: Debbie Donsky and Matt Champion (2014)
ch. 30 “A Group That Plays Together Stays Together”: Tracing a Story of Racial Violence (Gulzar R. Charonia)
ch. 31 Reframing: Gulzar R. Charania (2014)
ch. 32 The Whiteness of Educational Policymaking (Paul R. Carr)
ch. 33 Reframing: Paul R. Carr (2014)
ch. 34 A Chronic Identity Intoxication Syndrome: Whiteness as Seen by an African-Canadian Francophone Woman (2014) (Gina Thésée)
ch. 35 Additional Whiteness Resources (2014)

Biographies (2014)
Index
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Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race

Book
Wing Sue, Derald
2015
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco
HM1019.S84 2015
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
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Abstract: Learn to talk about race openly, honestly, and productively
Most people avoid discussion of race-related topics because of the strong emotions and feelings of discomfort that inevitably accompany such conversations. Rather than endure the conflict of racial realities, many people choose instead to avoid the topic altogether, or remain silent when it is raised. Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding ...
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Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Learn to talk about race openly, honestly, and productively
Most people avoid discussion of race-related topics because of the strong emotions and feelings of discomfort that inevitably accompany such conversations. Rather than endure the conflict of racial realities, many people choose instead to avoid the topic altogether, or remain silent when it is raised. Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race puts an end to that dynamic by sharing strategies for smoothing conversations about race in a productive manner.

A guide for facilitating and participating in difficult dialogues about race, author Derald Wing Sue – an internationally recognized expert on multiculturalism, diversity, and microaggressions – explores the characteristics, dynamics, and meaning behind discussions about race as well as the hidden "ground rules" that inhibit honest and productive dialogue. Through emotional and visceral examples, this book explains why conversations revolving around racial issues are so difficult, and provides guidelines, techniques, and advice for navigating and leading honest and forthright discussions. Readers will develop a stronger ability to build rapport with people unlike themselves, and discover how not talking about race impacts society as a whole.

• Overcome and make visible the fears associated with race talk
• Learn practical ideas for talking openly about race
• Facilitate and navigate discussion with expert strategy
• Examine the hidden rules that govern race talk
• Understand the benefits of successful conversations

Discussions about race do not have to result in disastrous consequences, and can in fact be highly beneficial to all parties involved. It's important that people have the ability to converse openly and honestly with their students, colleagues, children, and neighbors, and Race Talk provides the path for achieving this goal. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

SECTION ONE: THE CHARACTERISTICS, DYNAMICS, AND MEANING OF RACE TALK
ch. 1 What Is Race Talk?
Race Talk Represents a Potential Clash of Racial Realities
Race Talk Pushes Emotional Hot Buttons
Race Talk Evokes Avoidance Strategies
Why Is Successful Race Talk Important?

ch. 2 The Characteristics and Dynamics of Race Talk
What Are Characteristics of Race Talk?
How Do Societal Ground Rules (Norms) Impede Race Talk?
Why Is Race Talk So Difficult and Uncomfortable for Participants?
Conclusions

ch. 3 The Stories We Tell: White Talk Versus Back Talk
Race Talk: Narratives and Counter-Narratives
Telling on Racism: Unmasking Ugly Secrets

SECTION TWO: THE CONSTRAINING GROUND RULES FOR RACE TALK
ch. 4 “The Entire World’s a Stage!”
The Politeness Protocol and Race Talk
The Academic Protocol and Race Talk

ch. 5 Color-Blind Means Color-Mutev Color-Evasion: “We Are All the Same Under the Skin”
Stereotype-Evasion: “I Don’t Believe in Those Stereotypes”
Power-Evasion: “Everyone Can Make It in Society, If They Work Hard Enough”
Myth of the Melting Pot

SECTION THREE: WHY IS IT DIFFICULT FOR PEOPLE OF COLOR TO HONESTLY TALK ABOUT RACE?
ch. 6 “What Are the Consequences for Saying What I Mean?”
Ethnocentric Monoculturalism
Power and Oppression

ch. 7 “To Speak or How to Speak, That Is the Question”
Communication Styles
Nonverbal Communication
Nonverbal Communication in Race Talk: Sociopolitical Considerations
Being Constrained and Silenced: Impact on People of Color
Conclusions

SECTION FOUR: WHY IS IT DIFFICULT FOR WHITE PEOPLE TO HONESTLY TALK ABOUT RACE?
ch. 8 “I’m Not Racist!”
Cognitive Avoidance—Racism Denial
Emotional Avoidance—Fear, Guilt, and Other Feelings
Behavioral Avoidance—Helplessness and Hopelessness
Emotional Roadblocks to Race Talk

ch. 9 “I’m Not White; I’m Italian!”
What Does It Mean to Be White?
The Invisibility of Whiteness: What Does It Mean?
The Fear of Owning White Privilege
Fear of Taking Personal Responsibility to End Racism: Moving From Being Nonracist to Becoming Antiracist

SECTION FIVE: RACE TALK AND SPECIAL GROUP CONSIDERATIONS
ch. 10 Interracial/Interethnic Race Talk: Difficult Dialogues Between Groups of Color
Interracial/Interethnic Relationship Issues
Race Talk: Fears of Divide and Conquer
Sources of Conflict Between People of Color

ch. 11 Race Talk and White Racial Identity Development: For Whites Only
Developing a Nonracist and Antiracist Racial Identityv White Racial Identity Development and Race Talk

SECTION SIX: GUIDELINES, CONDITIONS, AND SOLUTIONS FOR HAVING HONEST RACIAL DIALOGUES
ch. 12 Being an Agent of Change: Guidelines for Educators, Parents, and Trainers
Talking to Children About Race and Racism
Guidelines for Taking Personal Responsibility for Change

ch. 13 Helping People Talk About Race: Facilitation Skills for Educators and Trainers
Ineffective Strategies: Five Things Not to Do
Successful Strategies: Eleven Potentially Positive Actions

References
Author Index
Subject Index
Cover image

This Is Not a Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education

Book
Vilson, Jose Luis
2014
Haymarket Books, Chicago, IL
LC196.5.U6 V55 2014
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

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Abstract: Graduating from Syracuse University with a degree in computer science, Jose Vilson left campus with no job and a few hundred dollars to his name, propelling him (eventually) to his calling: teaching middle school children math in a public school in Washington Heights / Inwood, Manhattan. From his own background as a boy growing up on the drug-tainted, community-centered projects of the Lower East ...
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Abstract: Graduating from Syracuse University with a degree in computer science, Jose Vilson left campus with no job and a few hundred dollars to his name, propelling him (eventually) to his calling: teaching middle school children math in a public school in Washington Heights / Inwood, Manhattan. From his own background as a boy growing up on the drug-tainted, community-centered projects of the Lower East Side of Manhattan, this book takes the reader on the coming-of-age story of a naïve young man struggling to mature through the first few years of his career, balancing the lows of murder, poverty, and academic failure to the highs of growth and eventual triumph.

His career takes a twist when he starts a blog with incisive commentary on the state of education on his eponymous blog TheJoseVilson.com, taking prominent figures and institutions like NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, and The New York Times to task. (As of this letter, the site is banned from most NYC Department of Education computers, yet read by central offices.) In his collection of multifaceted essays, he provokes discussion on issues of race, gentrification, and the teaching profession from the eyes of a Black-Latino educator with a mix of research and first-hand experience.

This education book is not to be missed! (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by Karen Lewis
On Perspetive: An Introduction

Part One
ch. 1 Please Put Your Pencils Down
ch. 2 Can It Be That It Was All So Simple Then?
ch. 3 Band of Brothers
ch. 4 What Happened
ch. 5 Negotiating My Own Skin
ch. 6 It’s Not About A Salary

Part Two
ch. 7 The Post-TFA Assessment
ch. 8 Blue Magic
ch. 9 The Homeroom Is A Home
ch. 10 White Noise (On Behalf of Ruben Redman)
ch. 11 Where the Hustle Comes From
ch. 12 The World Is Yours, The Works Is Yours
ch. 13 Yes, I Still Want To Teach
ch. 14 Safer Spaces
ch. 15 Snitches Open Stiches
ch. 16 God Got Jokes, Son
ch. 17 “I Don’t Want To Talk About Privilege. Now Here’s My Good Glass.”
ch. 18 We Don’t Need No Education

Part Three
ch. 19 What You Post-Racialists Get It Wrong . . . Again
ch. 20 How To Drop The Mic
ch. 21 To Make Sure It’s Broke (On Teacher Voice)
ch. 22 Getting Less Than You Give (On Common Core State Standards)
ch. 23 The Eagle Versus The Hummingbird: A Cautionary Note To Burgeoning Teacher Leaders
ch. 24 Every Day Above Ground It A Good One
ch. 25 Why Teach?
ch. 26 Conclusion: A Note From This Native Son

Afterword by Pedro Noguera
Acknowledgments
Index
TTR cover image

From Empathetic Understanding to Engaged Witnessing: Encountering Trauma in the Holocaust Classroom

TTR
Gubkin, Liora
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 2 (2015): 103-120
BL41.T4 v.18 no.2 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
A commitment to empathetic understanding shaped the field of religious studies; although subject to critique, it remains an important teaching practice where students are charged with the task of recognizing, and perhaps even appreciating, a worldview that appears significantly different from their own. However, when the focus of the course is historical trauma there are significant epistemological and ethical reasons empathetic understanding may not be our best pedagogical strategy. Drawing ...
Additional Info:
A commitment to empathetic understanding shaped the field of religious studies; although subject to critique, it remains an important teaching practice where students are charged with the task of recognizing, and perhaps even appreciating, a worldview that appears significantly different from their own. However, when the focus of the course is historical trauma there are significant epistemological and ethical reasons empathetic understanding may not be our best pedagogical strategy. Drawing primarily on my experience teaching a general education class “The Holocaust and Its Impact” at California State University, Bakersfield, I advocate replacing empathetic understanding with engaged witnessing as a pedagogical framework and strategy for teaching traumatic knowledge. To make this case, I delineate four qualities of engaged witnessing and demonstrate their use in teaching about the Holocaust.
Journal cover image

ARTS Online - Teaching Tactics for Race Matters in the Classroom

Journal Issue
Posted by Kimberly Vrudny Contributors to the “Race Matters” Blog
2015
Arts 26.2, Volume 26, March 18,
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Nine contributors to the Wabash Center's “Race Matters” blog (http://wabashcenter.typepad.com/antiracism_pedagogy/) provide short teaching tactics they have used to help students engage difference in meaningful ways. 
Additional Info:
Nine contributors to the Wabash Center's “Race Matters” blog (http://wabashcenter.typepad.com/antiracism_pedagogy/) provide short teaching tactics they have used to help students engage difference in meaningful ways. 

Table Of Content:
Children’s Picture Books: Visualizing Race and Gender (Elias Ortega-Aponte)
Finding God -- and Ourselves -- in Art (Mara Brecht)
Engaging the City: Memorials and the Making of Theology (Andre E. Johnson)
Teaching (Re-)Humanization: Using Film in Anti-Racist Education (Ella Johnson)
Learning about the Game of Implicit Bias with Jerry Kang (Gerald C. Liu)
Reflect, Reconsider, and Reposition: Raising Awareness of Racial Experience and History through Art (Miriam Y. Perkins)
Engaging Historical Pain: An Ethical Imperative for Doing Ministry in the 21st Century (Marcia Y. Riggs)
Embodied Empathy: An Exercise in Courageous Self-Awareness (Mindy McGarrah Sharp)
Musical Mashups: Examining Whiteness and the Politics of Social Location (Elisabeth T. Vasko)
Cover image
Wabash tree

Collaborative Futures: Critical Reflections on Publicly Active Graduate Education

Book
Gilvin, Amanda; Roberts, Georgia M.; and Martin, Craig, eds.
2012
Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, New York
LB2371.4.C66 2012
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Collaborative Futures places graduate education at the center of ongoing efforts to legitimize publicly engaged scholarship within the academic profession. It is indispensable reading not only for graduate students seeking inspiration, resources, and usable frameworks for their engaged scholarship, but for the faculty who are called upon to mentor them and for university administrators seeking encouraging answers to questions about the future of graduate education. Given the erosion of the ...
Additional Info:
Collaborative Futures places graduate education at the center of ongoing efforts to legitimize publicly engaged scholarship within the academic profession. It is indispensable reading not only for graduate students seeking inspiration, resources, and usable frameworks for their engaged scholarship, but for the faculty who are called upon to mentor them and for university administrators seeking encouraging answers to questions about the future of graduate education. Given the erosion of the tenure system and the casualization of teaching labor, graduate programs and professional organizations in many fields now recognize the imperative to prepare doctoral students for careers wholly or partially outside academe. This book powerfully indicates both the need and the means to change institutional cultures and forge a publicly active path for graduate education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Illustrations
Contributors
Foreword (Kevin Bott)
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Amanda Gilvin)

PART ONE: THEORY IN PRACTICE: Contextualizing Collaboration: Publicly Active Graduate Scholarship in United States Higher Education
ch. 1 The Arc of the Academic Career Bends Toward Publicly Engaged Scholarship (Timothy K. Eatman)
ch. 2 The Land-Grant System and Graduate Education: Reclaiming a Narrative of Engagement (Timothy J. Shaffer)
ch. 3 To Hell With Good Intentions (Ivan Illich)
ch. 4 Publicly Engaged Graduate Research and the Transformation of the American Academy (Susan Curtis, Shirley Rose, and Kristina Bross)
ch. 5 From Returning to Our Roots: The EngagedInstitution; Executive Summary with “Seven-Part Test” (Kellogg Commission on the Future of State and Land-Grant Universities)
ch. 6 Publicly Engaged Scholarship and Academic Freedom: Rights and Responsibilities (Nicholas Behm and Duane Roen)
Interchapter  ~  Statements of the American Association of University Professors
ch. 7 The Scholarship of Engagement (Ernest L. Boyer)
ch. 8 Community (Miranda Joseph)

PART TWO: Programs of Action: Institutionalizing Publicly Active Graduate Education
ch. 9 New Ways of Learning, Knowing, and Working: Diversifying Graduate Student Career Options Through Community Engagement (Kristen Day, Victor Becerra, Vicki L. Ruiz, and Michael Powe)
ch. 10 Getting Outside: Graduate Learning Through Art and Literacy Partnerships with City Schools (Judith E. Meighan)
ch. 11 Crossing Figueroa: The Tangled Web of Diversity and Democracy (George J. Sánchez)
ch. 12 The Engaged Dissertation: Three Points of View (Linda S. Bergmann, Allen Brizee, and Jaclyn M. Wells)
ch. 13 When the Gown Goes to Town: The Reciprocal Rewards of Fieldwork for Artists (Jan Cohen-Cruz)
ch. 14 Reimagining the Links Between Graduate Education and Community Engagement (Marcy Schnitzer and Max Stephenson Jr.)
ch. 15 Graduate Mentoring Against Common Sense (Ron Krabill)
ch. 16 First and Lasts: Lessons from Launching the Patient Voice Project at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop (Austin Bunn)

PART THREE: A Balancing Act: Publicly Active Graduate Students' Reflections and Analyses
ch. 17 Arcs, Checklists, and Charts: The Trajectory of a Public Scholar? (Sylvia Gale)
Interchapter  ~  Specifying the Scholarship of Engagement: Skills for Community-Based Projects in the Arts, Humanities, and Design (Imagining America)
ch. 18 Leveraging the Academy: Suggestions for Radical Grad Students and Radicals Considering Grad School (Chris Dixon and Alexis Shotwell)
ch. 19 Collaboration Conversation: Collaborative Ethnography as Engaged Scholarship (Ali Colleen Neff)
ch. 20 Reality Is Stranger than Fiction: The Politics of Race and Belonging in Los Angeles, California (Damien M. Schnyder)
ch. 21 Participatory Art, Engaged Scholarship: The Embedded Critic in Nadia Myre’s Scar Project (Amanda Jane Graham)

Resources
Index
Additional Info:
A forum on race and teaching theology and religion, launched in the wake of the August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and police response in Ferguson, Missouri, but framed more broadly to encompass teaching for racial and social justice, dismantling the structures of white privilege in academia, and diversifying the faculty, the students, and the canon.
Additional Info:
A forum on race and teaching theology and religion, launched in the wake of the August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and police response in Ferguson, Missouri, but framed more broadly to encompass teaching for racial and social justice, dismantling the structures of white privilege in academia, and diversifying the faculty, the students, and the canon.
Additional Info:
Provides culturally responsive teaching and learning resources for faculty and staff working with Native students -- building bridges across cultural boundaries and crossing bridges to increase understanding between Native and Non-Native educators and students.
Additional Info:
Provides culturally responsive teaching and learning resources for faculty and staff working with Native students -- building bridges across cultural boundaries and crossing bridges to increase understanding between Native and Non-Native educators and students.
Cover image

Teaching Gender through Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Texts and Cultures

Book
Gómez, Leila; Horno-Delgado, Asunción; Long, Mary K.; and Silleras-Fernández, Núria, eds.
2015
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
HQ1075.T43 2015
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Teaching Gender through Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Texts and Cultures provides a dynamic exploration of the subject of teaching gender and feminism through the fundamental corpus encompassing Latin American, Iberian and Latino authors and cultures from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. The four editors have created a collaborative forum for both experienced and new voices to share multiple theoretical and practical approaches to the topic. The volume ...
Additional Info:
Teaching Gender through Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Texts and Cultures provides a dynamic exploration of the subject of teaching gender and feminism through the fundamental corpus encompassing Latin American, Iberian and Latino authors and cultures from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. The four editors have created a collaborative forum for both experienced and new voices to share multiple theoretical and practical approaches to the topic. The volume is the first to bring so many areas of study and perspectives together and will serve as a tool for reassessing what it means to teach gender in our fields while providing theoretical and concrete examples of pedagogical strategies, case studies relating to in-class experiences, and suggestions for approaching gender issues that readers can experiment with in their own classrooms. The book will engage students and educators around the topic of gender within the fields of Latin American, Latino and Iberian studies, Gender and Women’s studies, Cultural Studies, English, Education, Comparative Literature, Ethnic studies and Language and Culture for Specific Purposes within Higher Education programs.

“Teaching Gender through Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Texts and Cultures makes a compelling case for the central role of feminist inquiry in higher education today … Startlingly honest and deeply informed, the essays lead us through classroom experiences in a wide variety of institutional and disciplinary settings. Read together, these essays articulate a vision for twenty-first century feminist pedagogies that embrace a rich diversity of theory, methodology, and modality.” – Lisa Vollendorf, Professor of Spanish and Dean of Humanities and the Arts, San José State University. Author of The Lives of Women: A New History of Inquisitional Spain

“What is it like to teach feminism and gender through Latin American, Iberian, and Latino texts? This rich collection of texts … provides a series of insightful and exhaustive answers to this question … An essential book for teachers of Latin American, Iberian and Latino/a texts, this volume will also spark new debates among scholars in Gender Studies.” – Mónica Szurmuk, Researcher at the National Scientific and Technical Research Council of Argentina. Author of Mujeres en viaje and co-editor of the Cambridge History of Latin American Women’s Literature (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction: Gender Pedagogy through Latin American, Iberian, and Latino Texts - That What, How, and Who (Leila Gómez)

Part I - Feminism in the Aftermath in Latin American, Iberian, and Latino Studies
ch. 2 Mobilizing Meanings: Questions for a Pedagogy of Women’s Writing (Sara Castro-Klarén)

Part II - New Canons, New Readings in the Classroom
ch. 3 Cada Maestrillo Tiene su Librillo: Personal Reflections on Teaching Gender through Medieval Iberian Texts (Núria Silleras-Fernández)
ch. 4 “The Personal is Political”: Teaching Gender and Nation through Nineteenth-Century Texts (Vanesa Miseres)
ch. 5 Teaching Hispanic Feminism: From Academic Consciousness-Raising to Activism (Ellen Mayock)
ch. 6 Gendered Matters; Engaging Early Modern Dramaturgas in the Classroom ( Valerie Hegstrom & Amy R. Williamsen)

Part III - Shifting the Ground When Reading
ch. 7 How to Read a Masculine Canon: Gender and Indigenismo (Leila Gómez)
ch. 8 Wile Naked Ladies: Shifting Paradigms, Gendered Approaches to María Victoria Menis’s Cámara oscura [Camera Obscura] (2008) and Alberta Carri’s La rabia [Anger] (2008) (Cynthia Tompkins)

Part IV - Breaking the Agreement of Silence, Teaching Uncomfortable Subjects
ch. 9 Interrogating Gendered Mexican Cultural Icons in a “Border” Classroom (Amanda L. Petersen)
ch. 10 Approaches to Teaching Rape in the Spanish Literature Classroom: Alicia Giménez Bartlett’s (Ritos de Muerte Shelley Godsland)

Part V - Interdisciplinary and Crossroads
ch. 11 Teaching Gender for the Multicultural Workplace (Mary K. Long)
ch. 12 Performing Gender in the Classroom and on the Stage (Debra A. Castillo)

About the Contributors
About the Editors
Cover image

Gender, Experience, and Knowledge in Adult Learning: Alisoun's Daughters

Book
Michelson, Elana
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
BF318.5.M54 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In this wide-ranging book, Elana Michelson invites us to revisit basic understandings of the 'experiential learner'. How does experience come to be seen as the basis of knowledge? How do gender, class, and race enter into the ways in which knowledge is valued? What political and cultural belief systems underlie such practices as the assessment of prior learning and the writing of life ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In this wide-ranging book, Elana Michelson invites us to revisit basic understandings of the 'experiential learner'. How does experience come to be seen as the basis of knowledge? How do gender, class, and race enter into the ways in which knowledge is valued? What political and cultural belief systems underlie such practices as the assessment of prior learning and the writing of life narratives?

Drawing on a range of disciplines, from feminist theory and the politics of knowledge to literary criticism, Michelson argues that particular understandings of `experiential learning’ have been central to modern Western cultures and the power relationships that underlie them. Presented in four parts, this challenging and lively book asks educators of adults to think in new ways about their assumptions, theories, and practices:

- Part I provides readers with a short history of the notion of experiential learning.

- Part II brings the insights and concerns of feminist theory to bear on mainstream theories of experiential learning.

- Part III examines the assessment of prior experiential learning for academic credit and/or professional credentials.

- Part IV addresses a second pedagogical practice that is ubiquitous in adult learning, namely, the assigning of life narratives.

Gender, Experience, and Knowledge in Adult Learning will be of value to scholars and graduate students exploring adult and experiential learning, as well as academics wishing to introduce students to a broad range of feminist, critical-race, materialist and postmodernist thinking in the field. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures
Acknowledgements
Credit list
Introduction

Part I - The politics of experience
ch. 1 Purging the transgressive from experiential learning
ch. 2 Gender, reason, and the universal knower
ch. 3 Othering rationality

Part II - Gender, experience, and the body
ch. 4 Body, culture, and the feminist claims for experience
ch. 5 The body in question
ch. 6 Mind and matter: Dewey, Kolb, and embodied knowing

Part III - Power and the assessment of experiential learning
ch. 7 Conservatism and transgression in the assessment of experiential learning
ch. 8 Queering the assessment of experiential learning
ch. 9 Practice studies, complexity, and the assessment of experiential learning

Part IV - Narrating the self
ch. 10 Autobiography and adult learning
ch. 11 Textualizing the self: genre, experience, and adult learning
ch. 12 The ghosts of war: trauma, narrative, and adult learning

Conclusion
Bibliograpy
Index
Cover image

Racial Battle Fatigue in Higher Education: Exposing the Myth of Post-Racial America

Book
Fasching-Varner, Kenneth; Albert, Katrice A.; Mitchell, Roland W.; and Allen, Chaunda, eds.
2015
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LC3731.R27 2015
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Racial Battle Fatigue is described as the physical and psychological toll taken due to constant and unceasing discrimination, microagressions, and stereotype threat. The literature notes that individuals who work in environments with chronic exposure to discrimination and microaggressions are more likely to suffer from forms of generalized anxiety manifested by both physical and emotional syptoms. This edited volume looks at RBF from the perspectives of graduate students, middle level academics, ...
Additional Info:
Racial Battle Fatigue is described as the physical and psychological toll taken due to constant and unceasing discrimination, microagressions, and stereotype threat. The literature notes that individuals who work in environments with chronic exposure to discrimination and microaggressions are more likely to suffer from forms of generalized anxiety manifested by both physical and emotional syptoms. This edited volume looks at RBF from the perspectives of graduate students, middle level academics, and chief diversity officers at major institutions of learning. RBF takes up William A. Smith’s idea and extends it as a means of understanding how the “academy” or higher education operates. Through microagressions, stereotype threat, underfunding and defunding of initiatives/offices, expansive commitments to diversity related strategic plans with restrictive power and action, and departmental climates of exclusivity and inequity; diversity workers (faculty, staff, and administration of color along with white allies in like positions) find themselves in a badlands where identity difference is used to promote institutional values while at the same time creating unimaginable work spaces for these workers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Introduction (Roland W. Mitchell, Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Katrice A. Albert, and Chaunda M. Allen)

ch. 1 A Testimony of a Black Male Cadet Facing Racial Battle Fatigue (Melvin (Jai) Jackson)
ch. 2 Navigating the Academy, Creating Counterspaces: Critically Examining the Experiences of Three PhD Students of Solor (Laura S. Yee, Roderick L. Carey, and Wyletta S. Gamble)
ch. 3 What Are You Anyway?: Racial Fatigue as a Daily Experience in Public Schools (Boni Wozolek)
ch. 4 The Ubiquitous White Shadow: A Counternarrtive of a Doctoral Student in a “Liberal" Teacher Education Program (Roberto Montoya)
ch. 5 Traumatic Pedagogy: When Epistemic Privilege and White Privilege Collide (Tapo Chimbganda)
ch. 6 Black. Woman. Non-Traditional Other: Creating Hybrid Spaces in Higher Education (Tammie Jenkins)
ch. 7 Indigenous Peoples in the Racial Battle Lands (Bryan McKinley Jones Brayboy)
ch. 8 I Ain't Your Doc Student ": The Overwhelming Presence of Whiteness and Pain at the Academic Neo Plantation (Cheryl E. Matias)
ch. 9 Assault in the Academy: When it Becomes More Than Racial Battle Fatigue (Cleveland Hayes)
ch. 10 Psychological Heuristics: Mental/Emotional Designs of Racial Battle Fatigue and the Tenure/Promotion Terrain for Faculty of Color (Noelle Witherspoon Arnold)
ch. 11 Examining Intra-Group Racism and Racial Battle Fatigue in Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Leslie V. Collins)
ch. 12 Narratives From the Allied Front: Can People Not of Color Have Racial Battle Fatigue? (Walter S. Gershon and Robert J. Helfenbein)
ch. 13 Wearing You Down: The Influence of Racial Battle Fatigue on Academic Freedom for Faculty of Color (Holley Locher & Rebecca Ropers-Huilman)
ch. 14 An Adopted Korean Speaks Out About His Racialized Experiences as a Faculty Member at a PWI (Nicholas D. Hartlep)
ch. 15 Racial Battle Fatigue and/as (Impostorship: Implications for Academic Mentoring and Psychosocial Development (T. Elon Dancy III)
ch. 16 We Didn't Know You Meant That by Diversity": Contested Diversity and Strategic (Administrative) Responses in Colleges of Education (Francisco Rios and Karen B. McLean Dade)
ch. 17 Standing on My Head Spitting (Indian Head) Nickels: Racial Battle Fatigue as it Relates to Native Americans in Predominately White Institutions of Higher Education (Deirdre A. Almeida)
ch. 18 Behind Enemy LineE: Critical Race Theory, Racial Battle Fatigue and Higher Education (Mark S. Giles)
ch. 19 A Hyphenated Life: Power and Liberation Within the Research Academy (David M. Callejo Perez)
ch. 20 Exploiting the Body and Denouncing the Mind: Navigating a Black Female Professional Identity Within the Academy (Kristie A. Ford)
ch. 21 Exercising Agency in the Midst of Racial Battle Fatigue: A Case for Intragroup Diversity (Gregory J. Vincent, Sherri L. Sanders, and Stella L. Smith)
ch. 22 Racial (and Gender) Battle Fatigue: The Transdisciplinary Applied Social Justice? Approach (Menah A.E. Pratt-Clarke)
ch. 23 Clashing with Tradition: The Chief Diversity Officer at White Public Institutions (Charles Robinson)

References
About the Contributors
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A method for fostering constructive dialogue where conflicts are driven by differences in identity, beliefs, and values. Workshops, resources, blog, client services.
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A method for fostering constructive dialogue where conflicts are driven by differences in identity, beliefs, and values. Workshops, resources, blog, client services.
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A clearinghouse for information, analysis, and resources related to state sanctioned violence in the United States
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A clearinghouse for information, analysis, and resources related to state sanctioned violence in the United States
Article cover image

Teaching for Globalized Consciousness: Black Professor, White Student and Shame

Article
Westfield, Nancy Lynne
2004
Black Theology: An International Journal, Volume 2, Issue 1, 73-83, January
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

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Environmental Justice and Interreligious Ecotheology

Journal Issue
Belser, ed., Julia Watts
2013
Spotlight on Theological Education, March
BV4019.S66
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/theo-ed/environemental-justice/environmental-justice-and-interreligious-ecotheology
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/theo-ed/environemental-justice/environmental-justice-and-interreligious-ecotheology

Table Of Content:
Environmental Justice and Interreligious Ecotheology(Julia Watts Belser, ed.)

ch. 1 Earth-honoring Faith: A Decade Project, Ghost Ranch, Abiquiu, New Mexico (Larry L. Rasmussen)
ch. 2 Where Sustainability and Social Justice Meet in Theological Education (Cynthia Moe-Lobeda)
ch. 3 Teaching toward Ecojustice: Integrating Womanist Justice and Environmental Concern in the Classroom (Melanie L. Harris)
ch. 4 Of Disability and the Garden State (Sharon V. Betcher)
ch. 5 Practicing Ahimsa: Nonviolence toward Humans, Animals, and Earth (Pankaj Jain)
ch. 6 On Beauty and Sustainability (Sandra B. Lubarsky)
Cover image

Intersectionality in Theological Education: Engaging Complexity, Activism, and Multiple Consciousness

Journal Issue
Stevenson-Moessner, ed., Jeanne
2015
Spotlight on Theological Education, April 29,
BV4019.S66
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/SOTE/April%202015%20Spotlight%20on%20Theological%20Education.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/SOTE/April%202015%20Spotlight%20on%20Theological%20Education.pdf

Table Of Content:
Contributors
ch. 1 Intersectionality in Theological Education: Engaging Complexity, Activism, and Multiple Consciousness (Jeanne Stevenson-Moessner)
ch. 2 Making the Way Together (Emilie M. Townes)
ch. 3 Intersectionality and Theological Education (Nancy Ramsay)
ch. 4 Thinking at the Intersections of Theology and the Matrix of Differences: From Intersectionality to Interconnectivity (Robyn Henderson-Espinoza)
ch. 5 Intersectionality and Disclosure as Pedagogical Tools (Kirk VanGilder)
ch. 6 Intersections: A Zimbabwe-US Class (Maaraidzo E. Mutambara, and Traci C. West)
ch. 7 Performing Bodies in the Classroom: Multiple Identities and (Mis)Recognition (Heike Peckruhn)

Resources
Cover image

Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town

Book
Krakauer, Jon
2015
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, New York, NY
HV6568.M57 K73 2015
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

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Meeting the Challenge: Teaching Sensitive Subject Matter

Web
Crosby, Dorian B.
2012
Journal of Effective Teaching, Vol. 12, No. 2,
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
When teaching diversity courses that discuss sensitive issues, such as racial, gender, sexuality, religious, and ethnic discrimination, it is possible to encounter student resistance, which can subsequently prevent students from comprehending the content. While teaching an introductory course on African American history in a Black Studies Department at a predominantly white institution of higher education in Middle America, I experienced such resistance. This article discusses how I initially taught the ...
Additional Info:
When teaching diversity courses that discuss sensitive issues, such as racial, gender, sexuality, religious, and ethnic discrimination, it is possible to encounter student resistance, which can subsequently prevent students from comprehending the content. While teaching an introductory course on African American history in a Black Studies Department at a predominantly white institution of higher education in Middle America, I experienced such resistance. This article discusses how I initially taught the course, evaluated and then restructured my active learning approach to include reflective learning and Black Studies techniques to address that resistance.
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Wabash tree

Teaching Global Theologies: Power and Praxis

Book
Pui-lan, Kwok; González-Andrieu, Cecilia; and Hopkins, Dwight N., eds.
2015
Baylor University Press, Waco, TX
BR118.T43 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Theological education, like theology itself, is becoming a truly a global enterprise. As such, theological education has to form, teach, and train leaders of faith communities prepared to lead in a transnational world. The teaching of theology with a global awareness has to wrestle with the nature and scope of the theological curriculum, teaching methods, and the context of learning. Teaching Global Theologies ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Theological education, like theology itself, is becoming a truly a global enterprise. As such, theological education has to form, teach, and train leaders of faith communities prepared to lead in a transnational world. The teaching of theology with a global awareness has to wrestle with the nature and scope of the theological curriculum, teaching methods, and the context of learning. Teaching Global Theologies directly addresses both method and content by identifying local resources, successful pedagogies of inclusion, and best practices for teaching theology in a global context. The contributors to Teaching Global Theologies are Catholic, mainline Protestant, and evangelical scholars from different racial and ethnic backgrounds, each with sustained connections with other parts of the world. Teaching Global Theologies capitalizes on this diversity to uncover neglected sources for a global theology even as it does so in constructive conversation with the long tradition of Christian thought. Bringing missing voices and neglected theological sources into conversation with the historical tradition enriches that tradition even as it uncovers questions of power, race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality. Teachers are offered successful pedagogies for bringing these questions into the classroom and best practices to promote students’ global consciousness, shape them as ecclesial leaders, and form them as global citizens. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I - Global Theology and Why It Matters
ch. 1 Teaching Theology from a Global Perspective (Kwok Pui-lan)
ch. 2 Listening for Fresh Voices in the History of the Church (William A. Dyrness)
ch. 3 Teaching Global Theology in a Comparative Mode (Veli-Matti Kärkkäinen)

Part II - Identity, Power, and Pedagogy
ch. 4 The Good of Education: Accessibility, Economy, Class, and Power (Cecilia González-Andrieu)
ch. 5 Identity Cross-Dressing while Teaching in a Global Context (Miguel A. Del La Torre)
ch. 6 Teaching Global Theology with Local Resources: A Chinese Theologian’s Strategies (Lai Pan-chiu)
ch. 7 Pedagogy for Being Human in Global Comparison (Dwight N. Hopkins)

Part III - Praxis and Responsibility
ch. 8 Teaching to Transform: Theological Education, Global Consciousness, and the Making of Global Citizens (Teresia Hinga)
ch. 9 Hablando Se Entiende la Gente: Tower of Babble or Gift of Tongues? (Loida I. Martell-Otero)
ch. 10 The Geopolitical and the Glocal: Situating Global Theological Voices in Theological Education (Eleazar S. Fernandez)

Notes
List of Contributors
Index
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Becoming Critical: The Emergence of Social Justice Scholars

Book
Briscoe, Felecia M.; and Khalifa, Muhammad A., eds.
2015
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
HM671.B44 2015
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Presents the key experiences of a diverse group of teachers and students in their journeys of becoming social justice educator/scholars.

This innovative book is a collection of autoethnographies by a diverse group of contributors who describe and theorize about the critical moments in their development as social justice educator/scholars in the face of colonizing forces. Using a rhizomatic approach, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Presents the key experiences of a diverse group of teachers and students in their journeys of becoming social justice educator/scholars.

This innovative book is a collection of autoethnographies by a diverse group of contributors who describe and theorize about the critical moments in their development as social justice educator/scholars in the face of colonizing forces. Using a rhizomatic approach, the editors’ meta-analysis identifies patterns of similarity and differences and theorizes about the exercise of agency in resistance and identity formation. In our increasingly diverse society, Becoming Critical is a wonderful resource for teacher education and sociology of education as it presents an alternative methodological approach for qualitative inquiry. The book contributes to students’ understanding of the development of critical theories—especially as they pertain to identities. The contributors make use of the work of critical scholars such as Collins, hooks, Weber, Foucault, and others relevant to the lives of students and educators today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Section I: Introduction and Overview of Book
ch. 1 Introduction and Conceptual Framework: Critical Theory, Social Justice, Power, and Autoethnography (Felecia M. Briscoe and Muhammad A. Khalifa)

Section II: Critical Race Autoethnographic Case Studies
Section II Introduction: Authoethnography and Critical Race Theory (Muhammad A. Khalifa)
ch. 2 Auditioning for Whiteness: Autoethnography and Critical Race Theory in the Early Schooling Experiences of an African-American Man (Michael E. Jennings)
ch. 3 To Keep It Real or Not to Keep It Real: The Dialectics of the Chapellian Contradiction (Nosakhere Griffin-EL)
ch. 4 Blue Collar Scholar: Social Class, Race, and Life as a Black Man in Academe (Mark S. Giles)
ch. 5 Too Black, Yet Not Black Enough: Challenging White Supremacy in U.S. Teacher Education and the Making of Two Radical Social Misfits (Brenda G. Juárez and Cleveland Hayes)
ch. 6 Unbecoming … Responding to Colorblindness: An Autoethnography (Joy Howard)

Section III: Critical Feminist Autoethnographic Case Studies
Section III Introduction: Critical Feminisms: Gendered Experiences of Oppression and Resistance (Felecia M. Briscoe)
ch. 7 From Fundamentalist Mormon to the Academy: A “Plyg” Girl’s Experiences with the Evolving Sexist Double-Blind (Felecia M. Briscoe)
ch. 8 Where Did the Girls Go?: The Role of Socialization and Institutions in Silencing Female Voices (Damaris Moraa Choti)

Section IV: Critical Intersectional Autoethnographic Case Studies
Section IV Introduction: Intersecting Dimensions of Identity, Oppression, and Resistance (Felecia M. Briscoe)
ch. 9 “You Look Like a Wetback; You Shouldn’t Have Any Trouble”: Deals We Make with the Devil on the Road Less Traveled (Elizabeth de la Portilla)
ch. 10 A Critical Autoethnography of a Black Man from Detroit: Resisting the White Imaginative’s Criminalization of Black Men (Muhammad A. Khalifa)
ch. 11 Working the Hyphens: Ethnographic Snapshots in Becoming Critical-Female-Black-Scholars (Aisha El-Amin, B. Genise Henry, and Crystal T. Laura)
ch. 12 We’re All Half-Breeds Now … in a Not so Ivory Tower (Miguel de Oliver)

Section V: Advances in Rhizomatic Understanding
ch. 13 Autoethnographic Sensemaking: What Does Our Criticality Mean? Patterns and Divergences (Muhammad A. Khalifa and Felecia M. Briscoe)
ch. 14 Rage, Love, Transcendence in the the Co-Construction of Critical Scholars Identities: Escaping the Iron Cage of Technical-Rationality (Felecia M. Briscoe and Muhammad A. Khalifa)

References
Contributors’ Professional Biographies
Index
Cover image

Teaching the Moral Traditions of Others: Editor’s Introduction

Journal Issue
Glennon, Frederick, ed.
2015
Spotlight on Teaching, October 28,
BL41.S72
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Case Study Method   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/teaching/moral-traditions/teaching-moral-traditions-others-editor%E2%80%99s-introduction
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/teaching/moral-traditions/teaching-moral-traditions-others-editor%E2%80%99s-introduction

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching the Moral Traditions of Others: Editor's Introduction (Fred Glennon)
ch. 2 Educating Students as Immanent Critics of Religious-Moral Traditions (Rosemary B. Kellison)
ch. 3 Marriage and Moral Traditions of Others: Teaching Religious Ethics and World Religions (Irene Oh)
ch. 4 Using Group Work and Case Study to Teach about Islamic Law (Nahed Artoul Zehr)
ch. 5 Critical Thinking and Teaching the Religious Traditions of Others (Steven Benko)
ch. 6 Wider Moral Communities: A Framework for Teaching Comparative Religious Ethics (Mark Larrimore)
ch. 7 The Personal is Pedagogical: Embracing Moral Debate in the Religious Studies Classroom (Elizabeth Barre)

Resources
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Integrating Mindfulness into Anti-Oppression Pedagogy: Social Justice in Higher Education

Book
Berila, Beth
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LC192.2.B47 2016
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Drawing from mindfulness education and social justice teaching, this bookexplores an anti-oppressive pedagogy for university and college classrooms. Authentic classroom discussions about oppression and diversity can be difficult; a mindful approach allows students to explore their experiences with compassion and to engage in critical inquiry to confront their deeply held beliefs and value systems. This engaging book is full of practical tips for ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Drawing from mindfulness education and social justice teaching, this bookexplores an anti-oppressive pedagogy for university and college classrooms. Authentic classroom discussions about oppression and diversity can be difficult; a mindful approach allows students to explore their experiences with compassion and to engage in critical inquiry to confront their deeply held beliefs and value systems. This engaging book is full of practical tips for deepening learning, addressing challenging situations, and providing mindfulness practices in anti-oppression classrooms. Integrating Mindfulness into Anti-Oppression Pedagogy is for all higher education professionals interested in pedagogy that empowers and engages students in the complex unlearning of oppression. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements
Permissions

ch. 1 Mindful Anti-Oppression Pedagogy
ch. 2 Bringing the Body Back In
ch. 3 Recognizing and Unlearning Internalized Oppression
ch. 4 Dismantling Privilege with Mindful Listening
ch. 5 Reframing Student Resistance as Mindful Dissonance
ch. 6 Critiques and Challenges of Mindful Anti-Oppression Pedagogy
ch. 7 Building Empowered, Compassionate Communities

Index
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Exploring Race in Predominantly White Classrooms: Scholars of Color Reflect

Book
Yancy, George; and Davidson, Maria del Guadalupe
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LC1099.3.E98 2014
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Although multicultural education has made significant gains in recent years, with many courses specifically devoted to the topic in both undergraduate and graduate education programs, and more scholars of color teaching in these programs, these victories bring with them a number of pedagogic dilemmas. Most students in these programs are not themselves students of color, meaning the topics and the faculty teaching them are often faced with groups of students ...
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Although multicultural education has made significant gains in recent years, with many courses specifically devoted to the topic in both undergraduate and graduate education programs, and more scholars of color teaching in these programs, these victories bring with them a number of pedagogic dilemmas. Most students in these programs are not themselves students of color, meaning the topics and the faculty teaching them are often faced with groups of students whose backgrounds and perspectives may be decidedly different – even hostile – to multicultural pedagogy and curriculum. This edited collection brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars of color to critically examine what it is like to explore race in predominantly white classrooms. It delves into the challenges academics face while dealing with the wide range of responses from both White students and students of color, and provides a powerful overview of how teachers of color highlight the continued importance and existence of race and racism. Exploring Race in Predominately White Classrooms is an essential resource for any educator interested in exploring race within the context of today’s classrooms (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editor’s Introduction (Michael W. Apple)
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 ”The Whiteness is Thick": Predominantly White Classrooms, Student of Color Voice, and Freirian Hopes (Kirsten T. Edwards)
ch. 2 This Bridge Called My Body: Talking Race through Embodying Difference (Antonia Randolph)
ch. 3 Staying in the Conversation (Dyan Watson)
ch. 4 Race-ing the Curriculum: Reflections on a Pedagogy of Social Change (Kathy Glass)
ch. 5 Teaching White Settler Subjects Antiracist Feminisms (Jo-Anne Lee)
ch. 6 Pedagogical Contours of Race and Racism (Clarence Sholé Johnson)
ch. 7 A Letter to My Kinfolk on the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Emancipation (A. Todd Franklin)
ch. 8 Racialized Consciousness and Learned Ignorance: Trying to help White People Understand (Arnold Farr)
ch. 9 On Why Race Matters: Teaching the Relevance of the Semantics and Ontology of Race (Clevis Headley)
ch. 10 Unveiling Whiteness in Higher Education: Scholars of Color and Double Consciousness (Zeus Leonardo)
ch. 11 Metacognitive RACLaGE Reflection: A Black Professor’s Journey to Use the Master’s Tools to Dismantle His House (Karsonya Wise Whitehead)
ch. 12 The Racialized Feminist Killjoy in White Academia: Contesting White Entitlement (Benita Bunjun)
ch. 13 Race In(Out)side the Classroom: On Pedagogy and the Politics of Collegiality (Nana Osei-Kofi)
ch. 14 Immersion Diversity: Teaching Tourism, Travel Writing and Race from the Inside Out (Meta G. Carstarphen)
ch. 15 Pedagogical challenges of "Teaching the Global": Race, Nation, and Transnational feminist praxis (Sanjukta Mukherjee)
ch. 16 Teaching Indigenous Classes in Non-Indigenous Classrooms (Joe Watkins)

Afterword (Maria del Guadalupe Davidson)
List of Contributors
Index
TTR cover image

From My Place, Teaching the Holocaust and Judaism at the University of Mississippi Fifty-Three Years After James Meredith

TTR
Johnson, Willa M.
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 1 (2016): 57-75
BL41.T4 v.19 no.1
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This essay explores classroom dynamics when students identify and connect their own painful experiences to structural racism or ethnocentrism exhibited in the Holocaust or parts of Jewish history. The intrusion of this proximal knowledge can be an obstacle to student learning. If engaged by professors, however, I argue that proximal knowledge can be a catalyst that promotes learning. Social scientific theory provides a useful lens for helping students to better ...
Additional Info:
This essay explores classroom dynamics when students identify and connect their own painful experiences to structural racism or ethnocentrism exhibited in the Holocaust or parts of Jewish history. The intrusion of this proximal knowledge can be an obstacle to student learning. If engaged by professors, however, I argue that proximal knowledge can be a catalyst that promotes learning. Social scientific theory provides a useful lens for helping students to better grasp and contextualize both their old experiences and the new materials that are being taught in the course within the larger structural frames of race, religion, and ethnicity that they have selected, but may not fully appreciate. Reflective guided journaling is an essential part of the learning experience.
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Designing Transformative Multicultural Initiatives: Theoretical Foundations, Practical Applications, and Facilitator Considerations

Book
Watt, Sherry K.
2015
LB2322.2.D47 2015
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Higher education is facing a perfect storm as it contends with changing demographics, shrinking budgets and concerns about access and cost, while underrepresented groups – both in faculty ranks and students – are voicing dissatisfaction with campus climate and demanding changes to structural inequities.

This book argues that, to address the inexorable changes ahead, colleges and universities need both to centralize the value ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Higher education is facing a perfect storm as it contends with changing demographics, shrinking budgets and concerns about access and cost, while underrepresented groups – both in faculty ranks and students – are voicing dissatisfaction with campus climate and demanding changes to structural inequities.

This book argues that, to address the inexorable changes ahead, colleges and universities need both to centralize the value of diversity and inclusion and employ a set of strategies that are enacted at all levels of their institutions. It argues that individual and institutional change efforts can only be achieved by implementing “diversity as a value” – that is embracing social change efforts as central and additive rather than episodic and required – and provides the research and theoretical frameworks to support this approach, as well as tools and examples of practice that accomplish change.

The contributors to this book identify the elements that drive successful multicultural initiatives and that strengthen the effectiveness of campus efforts to dismantle systemic oppression, as well as the individual and organization skills needed to manage difference effectively. Among these is developing the capacity of administrators, faculty and student affairs professionals as conscious scholar practitioners to sensitively manage conflicts on campus, deconstruct challenging structures and reconstruct the environment intentionally to include in respectful ways experiences of historically marginalized groups and non-dominant ways of being in the world.

The books’ focus on developing capacities for multicultural competence aligns with higher education’s increasing emphasis on civic engagement and institutional goals promote skills to interact in meaningful and responsible ways around difference, whether of people, ideas or identities.

Designing Transformative Multicultural Initiatives provides guiding principles and practical strategies to successfully transform higher education to become fully inclusive and advance the success of all constituents and stakeholders. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part One: Guiding Principles for Transformative Multicultural Initiatives (What are some useful guiding principles that help conscious scholar practitioners design transformative multicultural initiatives?)
ch. 1 Multicultural Initiatives as a Practice of Freedom (Sherry K. Watt)
ch. 2 Authentic, Action-Oriented Framing for Environmental Shifts (AAFES) Method (Sherry K. Watt)
ch. 3 Privilege Identity Exploration (PIE) Model Revisited: Strengthening Skills for Engaging Difference (Sherry K. Watt)

Part Two: Designing Multicultural Initiatives: A How to Manual (What techniques do conscious scholar practitioners use to develop a multicultural initiative that will lead to a successful outcome?)
ch. 4 Multicultural Initiatives as Bridges: Structures Necessary for Successful Facilitation (Cindy Ann Kilgo and Richard Barajas)
ch. 5 In Pursuit of a Strong, Clear Vision: Initiating and Sustaining Multicultural Change in Higher Education Organizations (Lacretia Johnson Flash)
ch. 6 Sharing Power and Privilege through the Scholarly Practice of Assessment (Wayne Jacobson)

Part Three: Scholarly Examples of Multicultural Initiatives in Teaching, Higher Education Administration, and Student Affairs Practice (What are examples of the varying types of multicultural initiatives in higher education and student affairs?)
ch. 7 Teaching Contemporary Leadership: Advancing Students’ Capacities to Engage
With Difference (John P. Dugan and Daviree Velázquez)
ch. 8 Aligning Actions With Core Values: Reflections of a Chief Diversity Officer and National Science Foundation ADVANCE Director on Advancing Faculty Diversity (Paulette Granberry Russell and Melissa McDaniels)
ch. 9 Creating Inclusive Organizations: One Student Affairs Division’s Efforts to Create Sustainable, Systemic Change (Kathy Obear and Shelly Kerr)
ch. 10 Dialogue Matters: Applying Critical Race Theory to Conversations About Race (Sherri Edvalson Erkel)
ch. 11 Confronting Systems of Privilege and Power Through Classroom Discussion: Uses of Power (Bridget Turner Kelly and Joy Gaston Gayles)
ch. 12 The Transformational Potential of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs Partnerships for Enacting Multicultural Initiatives (Lucy A. LePeau)

Part Four: Conscious Scholar Practitioners' Reflections on Identity, Power, and Privilege
(How do conscious scholar practitioners face the challenges within the convergence of identity, power, and privilege that are inherent to multicultural initiatives and campus organizational change?)
ch. 13 Politics of Intersecting Identities (John A. Mueller and Craig S. Pickett)
ch. 14 Toxic Environments: Perseverance in the Face of Resistance (Mary F. Howard)
ch. 15 Facing the Proverbial Lion of Racism (Jodi L. Linley and Sherry K. Watt)
ch. 16 The Art of Reflective Teaching (Ellen E. Fairchild)
ch. 17 Daring Greatly: A Reflective Critique of the Authentic, Action-Oriented Framing for Environmental Shifts (AAFES) Method (Tracy Robinson-Wood and Sherry K. Watt)

About the Editor and Contributors
Index
Article cover image

"The Climate for Underrepresented Groups and Diversity on Campus"

Article
Hurtado, Sylvia and Ruiz, Adriana
The Higher Education Research Institute (HERI)
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Race continues to be a significant issue on campus. Underrepresented college students at low-diversity institutions reported more incidents of stereotyping, discrimination and harassment on campus. Data indicate more hospitable racial climates on the most diverse campuses and suggest that campuses must continue to work to improve intergroup relations even as enrollments begin to change. 
Additional Info:
Race continues to be a significant issue on campus. Underrepresented college students at low-diversity institutions reported more incidents of stereotyping, discrimination and harassment on campus. Data indicate more hospitable racial climates on the most diverse campuses and suggest that campuses must continue to work to improve intergroup relations even as enrollments begin to change. 
Cover image

The Sustainable Learning Community: One University's Journey to the Future

Book
Aber, John; Kelly, Tom; and Mallory, Bruce
2009
University of New Hampshire Press, Lebanon, NH
LD3779.N43 S87 2009
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
University communities have the potential to serve as models in the development and application of sustainability principles and practices, not only by what they teach and study, but also by how they operate facilities and engage with off-campus partners. With the oldest endowed campus-wide sustainability program in the country, established in 1997, the University of New Hampshire has become a leader in advancing a campus culture of sustainability. The UNH experience ...
Additional Info:
University communities have the potential to serve as models in the development and application of sustainability principles and practices, not only by what they teach and study, but also by how they operate facilities and engage with off-campus partners. With the oldest endowed campus-wide sustainability program in the country, established in 1997, the University of New Hampshire has become a leader in advancing a campus culture of sustainability. The UNH experience provides a unique window into the development of a new and integrated approach to teaching, learning, research, and operations. It is also a valuable guide for other institutions that aim to enhance the quality of campus life while reducing their environmental footprint. The book’s organization along four functional domains (curriculum, operations, research, and engagement) allows faculty, staff, students, and managers to focus on sections of particular relevance to their university roles. Each chapter develops standards of best practices and presents interesting case studies to humanize the larger effort. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Preface (John Aber)

Acknowledgments


ch. 1 Sustainability as an Organizing Principle for Higher Education (Tom Kelly)


ch. 2 Teaching and Learning Sustainability: Curriculum and Pedagogy (John Carroll, ed.)


Curriculum: Biodiversity and Ecosystems

Engaging Students in the Sciences (George Hurtt)

How Does a Local Master of Public Health Program Address Global Emerging Infectious Disease? (Rosemary Caron)

Sustainable Science and Engineering (Kevin Gardner and Nancy Kinner)

UNH-EcoQuest and Sustainability in New Zealand (Te Rarangahau Taiao, Ria Brejaart, Kim Babbitt and Donna Dowal)


Curriculum: Climate and Energy

ESCI 405: Global Environmental Change (Cameron Wake)

The Energy Waste Watch Challenge and Student Energy Captains (Michele Holt-Shannon and Sara Cleaves)

Organizing a Curriculum on the Environment—Inclusiveness or Security? (John Aber)

Science, Politics, and Policy from Global to Local in an Undergraduate Seminar (Stacy Van Deveer)


Curriculum: Food and Society

Dual Major in EcoGastronomy (Joanne Currancelentano)

Integrating Sustainability into the Professional Development of Dietetic Interns (Joanne Burke)

“The Real Dirt” (John E. Carroll)

UNH Cream (Drew Conroy and Peter Erickson)


Curriculum: Culture and Sustainability

The Promise of the Sun (Tom Kelly)

Artistic Engagement—Discovering and Developing a Theatrical Response to Sustainability (David Kaye)

The University Dialogue and a Sense of Place (Joanne Curran-Celentano)

How the Sustainable Living Minor Came to Be (Robert Eckert and Bert Cohen)


ch. 3 Practicing Sustainability: Campus Operations (Douglas Bencks, ed.)


Operations: Biodiversity and Ecosystems

Landscape Master Plan (Douglas Bencks)

Land Use Committee (Tom Lee)

The MUB Meadow (John L. Hart)


Operations: Climate and Energy

It’s Risky Business Doing the Right Thing—The Co-Gen Plant and EcoLine (Paul Chamberlin and Matt O’Keefe)

Transportation and Land Use (Steve Pesci)

The UNH Greenhouse Gas Inventory (Brett Pasinella)

The Energy Task Force—A Cross-Campus Collaboration to Address Climate Change (Sara Cleaves)


Operations: Food and Society

The UNH Compost Program—From Waste to Compost (Elisabeth Farrell and Rick MacDonald)

Acting Locally—The UNH Local Harvest Initiative (Elisabeth Farrell and Rick MacDonald)

Innovative Dining Hall Hours and Plate Waste (Rick MacDonald)


Operations: Culture and Sustainability

Developing Our Sense of Place—The Role of the Committee for Campus Aesthetics (Vicki C. Wright)

Sustainable Building Design (Douglas Bencks)

Moving the Kingsbury Mural (Douglas Bencks)

Sustainable Buildings—Do You Want Fries with Your Building? No Thank You! (Douglas Bencks)


ch. 4 Creating the Intellectual Basis for Sustainability Research and Scholarship (John Aber and Cameron Wake, ed.)


Research on Biodiversity and Ecosystems

Cooperative Institute for Coastal and Estuarine Environmental Technology (Rich Langan and Dolores Leonard)

The History of Marine Animal Populations (Andrew Rosenberg, Jeff Bolster, Karen Alexander, and Bill Leavenworth)

The Stormwater Research Center (Tom Ballestero)

Oyster Restoration—Planning, Research, and Implementation in New Hampshire (Ray Grizzle)


Research on Climate and Energy

The Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (David S. Bartlett)

The Environmental Research Group (Kevin Gardner and Taylor Eighmy)

Multidisciplinary Design Competition (Jenna Jambeck and Kevin Gardner)

Regional Climate Assessments—Supporting Informed Public Policy (Cameron Wake)


Research on Food and Society

The UNH Organic Dairy Research Farm (John E. Carroll and Tom Kelly)

The Atlantic Marine Aquaculture Center (Rich Langan and Dolores Leonard)

The UNH Community Food, Nutrition, and Wellness Profile (Joanne Burke)

From Campus Farm to Dining Hall (John McLean)


Research on Culture and Sustainability

The Undergraduate Research Conference—A Key Ingredient in the Sustainable Learning Community (Eleanor Abrams)

The Carsey Institute—Building Knowledge to Support Opportunity for Families in Sustainable Communities (Mil Duncan)

The Growing a Green Generation Project (John Nimmo)


ch. 5 Sustaining the Larger Community: Engagement (Jeffrey A. Schloss, ed.)


Engagement in Biodiversity and Ecosystems

The New Hampshire Lakes Lay Monitoring Program—A Sustainable Model for Engaging Citizens (Jeffrey A. Schloss)

Forest Watch—Enhancing Pre-College Understanding of Biodiversity and Ecosystems (Barry Rock)

The UNH Marine Docent Program (Mark Wiley)

Students Without Borders (Jenna Jambeck and Kevin Gardner)


Engagement in Climate and Energy

Collaboration for a Low-Carbon Society—Carbon Solutions New England (Cameron Wake)

The New Hampshire Carbon Challenge (Chris Skoglund, Denise Blaha, and Julia Dundorf)

WildCAP Discount Program (Brett Pasinella)

Informing Public Policy—Engagement on Climate with the State of New Hampshire (Cameron Wake)


Engagement in Food and Society

The New Hampshire Farm to School Program (Elisabeth Farrell and Lynda Brushett)

Cooperative Fisheries Research—The Innovative Fisherman (Ken LaValley)

The Organic Garden Club (Rebecca Grube)

New Hampshire Center for a Food Secure Future (Elisabeth Farrell)


Engagement in Culture and Sustainability

Deliberation in the Civic Sector—The Role of Higher Education in Sustaining Democracy (Bruce L. Mallory)

Building a Sustainable Community of Engaged Scholars—The UNH Outreach Scholars Academy (Julie E. Williams, Eleanor Abrams, and Christine Shea)

Portsmouth Black Heritage Trail (Valerie Cunningham)

Four Hands, One Heart—Ed and Mary Scheier Documentary and Exhibit (Tom Kelly)


ch. 6 How the Sustainability Ethic Developed at UNH and the Next Phase of our “Journey to the Future” (Sara Cleaves, Tom Kelly, and John Aber)


Contributors
Index
Cover image

Incarcerated Religion: Teaching behind Walls - Editor’s Introduction

Journal Issue
Glennon, Frederick, ed.
2016
Spotlight on Teaching, May 31,
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/teaching/incarcerated-religion/editor%E2%80%99s-introduction
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/teaching/incarcerated-religion/editor%E2%80%99s-introduction

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Incarcerated Religion: Teaching behind Walls – Editor's Introduction (Fred Glennon)
ch. 2 Opening My Eyes: Teaching in a Women's Prison (Elizabeth M. Bounds)
ch. 3 Education as Social Transformation (Andrew Skotnicki)
ch. 4 Incarcerated Trust: The Challenge of Prison Teaching (James Wetzel)
ch. 5 Quotes, Notes, Questions (Joshua Dubler)
ch. 6 Theology and Ministry at Garden State Correctional Facility (Melanie Webb)

Resources
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Publicly Engaged Scholars: Next-Generation Engagement and the Future of Higher Education

Book
Post, Margaret A.; Ward, Elaine; Longo, Nicholas V.; Satlmarsh, John, eds.
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC238.P84 2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The concern that the democratic purposes of higher education -- and its conception as a public good -- are being undermined, with the growing realization that existing structures are unsuited to addressing today's complex societal problems, and that our institutions are failing an increasingly diverse population, all give rise to questioning the current model of the university.

This book presents the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The concern that the democratic purposes of higher education -- and its conception as a public good -- are being undermined, with the growing realization that existing structures are unsuited to addressing today's complex societal problems, and that our institutions are failing an increasingly diverse population, all give rise to questioning the current model of the university.

This book presents the voices of a new generation of scholars, educators, and practitioners who are committed to civic renewal and the public purposes of higher education. They question existing policies, structures, and practices, and put forward new forms of engagement that can help to shape and transform higher education to align it with societal needs.

The scholars featured in this book make the case for public scholarship and argue that, in order to strengthen the democratic purposes of higher education for a viable future that is relevant to the needs of a changing society, we must recognize and support new models of teaching and research, and the need for fundamental changes in the core practices, policies, and cultures of the academy.

These scholars act on their values through collaboration, inclusiveness, participation, task sharing, and reciprocity in public problem solving. Central to their approach is an authentic respect for the expertise and experience that all stakeholders contribute to education, knowledge generation, and community building.

This book offers a vision of the university as a part of an ecosystem of knowledge production, addressing public problems with the purpose of advancing a more inclusive, deliberative democracy; and explores the new paradigm for teaching, learning, and knowledge creation necessary to make it a reality. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward (Timothy K. Eatman)
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introducing Next-Generation Engagement (Margaret A. Post, Elaine Ward, Nicholas V. Longo, and John Saltmarsh)

Part One: The Collaborative Engagement Paradigm
ch. 2 The Inheritance of Next Generation Engagement Scholars (John Saltmarsh and Matthew Hartley)
ch. 3 A Brief History of a Movement - Civic Engagement and American Higher Education (Matthew Hartley and John Saltmarsh)
ch. 4 Collaborative Engagement—The Future of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (Nicholas V. Longo and Cynthia M. Gibson)
ch. 5 Collaborative Engagement Research and Implications for Institutional Change (Farrah Jacquez, Elaine Ward, and Molly Goguen)
ch. 6 Legitimacy, Agency, and Inequality - Organizational Practices for Full Participation of Community Engaged Faculty (KerryAnn O’Meara)

Part Two: New Public Scholars
Opening (Elaine Ward)
ch. 7 Disrupting Role Dichotomies (Lina Dostillio, Emily Janke, Margaret A. Post, Annie Miller, and Elaine Ward)
ch. 8 Developing a Community-Engaged Scholarly Identity (Katie Beck, Adam Bush, Lorena Holguin, Demetri Morgan, and Cecilia Orphan)
ch. 9 Paving New Professional Pathways for Community Engaged Scholarship (Patrick Green, Barbara Harrison, Jessica Reading, and Timothy Shaffer)
ch. 10 Critical Commitments to Community and Campus Change (Eric Hartman, Glennys Sanchez, Sabina Shakya, and Brandon Whitney)
ch. 11 Fortunate accidents and winding pathways – The personal and professional spaces of authenticity (Ben Anderson-Nathe, Farrah Jacquez, Rachael Kerns-Wetherington, and Tania D. Mitchell)
ch. 12 Next Generation Engaged Scholars – Stewards of Change (Elaine Ward and Annie Miller)

Part Three: The Future of Engagement
ch. 13 The Future of the Academy with Students as Colleagues (Nicholas V. Longo, Abby Kiesa, and Richard Battistoni)
ch. 14 Next Generation Engagement Scholars in the Neoliberal University (Cecilia M. Orphan and KerryAnn O’Meara)
ch. 15 Building an Organizational Structure that Fosters Blended Engagement (Byron P. White)

Afterword: Practice and Theory in the Service of Social Change (Peter Levine)

About the Authors
Index
Additional Info:
A global leadership training and consulting program serving religious and civic leaders who are committed to solving society’s most intractable problems, such as racism, extremism, and economic justice. Includes resources suitable for classroom use.
Additional Info:
A global leadership training and consulting program serving religious and civic leaders who are committed to solving society’s most intractable problems, such as racism, extremism, and economic justice. Includes resources suitable for classroom use.
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

Embodied Learning: Teaching Sexuality and Religion to a Changing Student Body

TTR
Ott, Kate; and Stephens, Darryl W.
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 2 (2017): 106-116
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Sexuality, more so than other subject areas, magnifies the embodied nature of teaching and learning as well as conspicuously silences open dialogue given its taboo status in many religious and theological contexts. Yet, student learning about sexuality that incorporates knowledge of and about religion, in particular, may greatly improve the public discourse about sexuality through our students as responsible citizens and as leaders in their chosen professions. To bridge this ...
Additional Info:
Sexuality, more so than other subject areas, magnifies the embodied nature of teaching and learning as well as conspicuously silences open dialogue given its taboo status in many religious and theological contexts. Yet, student learning about sexuality that incorporates knowledge of and about religion, in particular, may greatly improve the public discourse about sexuality through our students as responsible citizens and as leaders in their chosen professions. To bridge this gap, through a year-long collaboration, a group of professors and instructors with expertise and experience teaching sexuality and religion in a variety of disciplines and diverse institutional and religious contexts developed, tested, and refined classroom teaching strategies to shift from a content-based “subject matter” to an embodied learning experience, resulting in perspective transformation as a primary student-learning outcome. Findings in the form of “guiding questions,” encourage instructors to attend to contextual, experiential, and performative aspects of the classroom environment.
Additional Info:
How do we deal with our own sexuality as teachers and as learners in the classroom? As a seminary professor in a mainline Christian context, I find that discussing sexuality increases student discomfort levels by threatening to raise questions about the connections between morality, behavior, and bodies of those in the room – questions we have been culturally trained to avoid. In order to decrease discomfort, many instructors approach sexuality only ...
Additional Info:
How do we deal with our own sexuality as teachers and as learners in the classroom? As a seminary professor in a mainline Christian context, I find that discussing sexuality increases student discomfort levels by threatening to raise questions about the connections between morality, behavior, and bodies of those in the room – questions we have been culturally trained to avoid. In order to decrease discomfort, many instructors approach sexuality only as content-based subject matter. Particularly for ministry students, this approach can be a disservice to their discernment process and preparation for future ministry contexts, especially for those in turmoil regarding sexuality-related issues. By explicitly engaging how personal experience and cultural contexts shape our sexuality, pedagogical models can promote critical self-reflection and seek perspective transformation, not values change, as a resource for professional sexual ethics training in ministry.
Additional Info:
Sexual assault is prevalent, but many educators find themselves ill-prepared to address it in the classroom. This article conceptualizes a trauma sensitive pedagogy that engages the psychological, social, and theological implications of sexual assault for classroom conversations about sex and sexuality. First, the article examines the impact of the classic power disparity between student and teacher as a dynamic that can trigger recall of the abuse of power inherent in ...
Additional Info:
Sexual assault is prevalent, but many educators find themselves ill-prepared to address it in the classroom. This article conceptualizes a trauma sensitive pedagogy that engages the psychological, social, and theological implications of sexual assault for classroom conversations about sex and sexuality. First, the article examines the impact of the classic power disparity between student and teacher as a dynamic that can trigger recall of the abuse of power inherent in sexual violence. Next the article reframes understandings of trigger warnings to consider how they can be used to support educators in taking seriously the vulnerability of those who have experienced sexual assault. The article also presents perspectives on the role of “teacher self-disclosure” in facilitating conversations that acknowledge sexual assault, followed by a teaching strategy that demonstrates pedagogical sensitivity to trauma. Suggestions on how to support students through and beyond conversations that can trigger traumatic stress conclude the article.
Tactics cover image

Beginning With Social Context: Human Sexuality and the Bible

Tactic
Johnson,-DeBaufre, Melanie
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 2 (2017): 150
Topics: Discussion   |   Teaching Religion   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: begins discussion of human sexuality and the Bible from students' social context rather than “what does the Bible say?” -- derails the rush to judgment and demonstrates the multiplicity of sexuality “issues” in the room.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: begins discussion of human sexuality and the Bible from students' social context rather than “what does the Bible say?” -- derails the rush to judgment and demonstrates the multiplicity of sexuality “issues” in the room.
TTR cover image

Teaching About Sexuality and Veiling in Islam

TTR
Defibaugh, Amy; and Krutzsch, Brett
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 2 (2017): 153-161
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This article proposes strategies for teaching about sexuality in Islam through student-centered learning activities, such as self-reflection, multimedia presentations, and small group discussions. We focus on a diversity of perspectives related to veiling in Islam. The approaches we describe help students deconstruct and reevaluate common U.S. cultural assumptions that equate veiling in Islam with the oppression of Muslim women. Through the use of Likert scale questionnaires and written reflection ...
Additional Info:
This article proposes strategies for teaching about sexuality in Islam through student-centered learning activities, such as self-reflection, multimedia presentations, and small group discussions. We focus on a diversity of perspectives related to veiling in Islam. The approaches we describe help students deconstruct and reevaluate common U.S. cultural assumptions that equate veiling in Islam with the oppression of Muslim women. Through the use of Likert scale questionnaires and written reflection papers, we have found that students are able to acknowledge and distinguish a multiplicity of perspectives regarding veiling and sexuality in Islam after they have been introduced to academic scholarship on the history of veiling, and after they have had multiple opportunities to engage in small and large group discussions on the topic.
TTR cover image

Civic Learning and Teaching as a Resource for Sexual Justice: An Undergraduate Religious Studies Course Module

TTR
Vasko, Elisabeth T.
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 2 (2017): 162-170
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Civic learning and teaching, a form of critical and democratically engaged pedagogy, is utilized in an upper-level undergraduate sexual ethics course to leverage public problem solving around the sexual violence on a mid-size Catholic collegiate campus. Through the course, students, faculty, staff, and community members work together to deepen understanding of the causes and consequences of sexual violence within society and the local community in order to evaluate and design ...
Additional Info:
Civic learning and teaching, a form of critical and democratically engaged pedagogy, is utilized in an upper-level undergraduate sexual ethics course to leverage public problem solving around the sexual violence on a mid-size Catholic collegiate campus. Through the course, students, faculty, staff, and community members work together to deepen understanding of the causes and consequences of sexual violence within society and the local community in order to evaluate and design programming for bystander intervention, education, and sexual violence prevention advocacy. After a discussion of the application of civic teaching and learning to sexual violence, the course module describes the learning outcomes and assignments used to assess them. See as well Donna Freitas's response to this essay, “The Risk and Reward of Teaching about Sexual Assault for the Theologian on a Catholic Campus,” published in this issue of the journal.
Additional Info:
This article is a response to Elisabeth T. Vasko's essay “Civic Learning and Teaching as a Resource for Sexual Justice: An Undergraduate Religious Studies Course Module” published in this issue of the journal.
Additional Info:
This article is a response to Elisabeth T. Vasko's essay “Civic Learning and Teaching as a Resource for Sexual Justice: An Undergraduate Religious Studies Course Module” published in this issue of the journal.
Additional Info:
Sexual activity and desire have often been seen as inimical to Christian spirituality and practice, and many people have come to view Christianity as austere and shaming regarding sexuality. However, sexuality, religion, and policy-making have become so intertwined, that to ignore how they intersect and affect particular individuals' lives does a disservice to students. This article presents resources and strategies for incorporating the topic of sexuality into liberal undergraduate and ...
Additional Info:
Sexual activity and desire have often been seen as inimical to Christian spirituality and practice, and many people have come to view Christianity as austere and shaming regarding sexuality. However, sexuality, religion, and policy-making have become so intertwined, that to ignore how they intersect and affect particular individuals' lives does a disservice to students. This article presents resources and strategies for incorporating the topic of sexuality into liberal undergraduate and graduate theological classrooms. It provides guidance to instructors lacking research expertise in sexuality and focuses on three main pedagogical categories: perspective transformation; embodiment pedagogy; and sexual violence and trauma. One purpose of this article is to generate conversation: there is a need for further collaboration with colleagues who are experts in various disciplines to continue mining resources to offer diverse strategies and resources.
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching About Teaching Sexuality and Religion

TTR
Stephens, Darryl W.
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 2 (2017): 189-199
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Classroom instructors implementing pedagogical strategies for embodied learning about sexuality and religion need institutional support and assistance from colleagues and mentors to be successful. One means of providing institutional and peer support for classroom instructors is to host and lead a pedagogy workshop. Building on the work of Ott and Stephens on embodied learning and other articles and teaching tactics found throughout this issue of Teaching Theology and Religion, this ...
Additional Info:
Classroom instructors implementing pedagogical strategies for embodied learning about sexuality and religion need institutional support and assistance from colleagues and mentors to be successful. One means of providing institutional and peer support for classroom instructors is to host and lead a pedagogy workshop. Building on the work of Ott and Stephens on embodied learning and other articles and teaching tactics found throughout this issue of Teaching Theology and Religion, this article presents a sample design for a two-hour workshop with faculty and/or graduate teaching assistants on the topic of teaching sexuality and religion. Non-expert facilitators can lead this workshop and it is intended to start a conversation about pedagogy rather than to provide definitive answers to end the discussion. The goals are to demystify a taboo topic and to provide concrete strategies for teaching that will promote responsible engagement and a better-integrated learning experience for students.
Cover image

Teaching for a Multifaith World

Book
Fernandez, Eleazar S.
2017
Pickwick Publications, Eugene OR
BV1471.3.T43
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
When religious diversity is our reality, radical hospitality to people of other faiths is not a luxury but a necessity. More than necessary for our survival, radical hospitality to religious diversity is necessary if we are to thrive as a global society. By no means does the practice of hospitality in a multifaith world require that we be oblivious of our differences. On the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
When religious diversity is our reality, radical hospitality to people of other faiths is not a luxury but a necessity. More than necessary for our survival, radical hospitality to religious diversity is necessary if we are to thrive as a global society. By no means does the practice of hospitality in a multifaith world require that we be oblivious of our differences. On the contrary, it demands a respectful embrace of our differences because that's who we are. Neither does radical hospitality require that we water down our commitment, because faithfulness and openness are not contradictory. We must be able to say with burning passion that we are open to the claims of other faiths because we are faithful to our religious heritage. The essays in this book do not offer simply theological exhortations; they offer specific ways of how we can become religiously competent citizens in a multifaith world. Let's take the bold steps of radical openness with this book on our side! (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1. Our Journey in Multifaith Education (Robert Hunt)
ch. 2. Multifaith Context and Competencies (Eleazaar S. Fernandez)
ch. 3. Designing Curricular Approaches for Interfaith Competency or Why Does Learning How to Live in a Community of Communities Matter? (Mary E. Hess)
ch. 4. Religious Self, Religious Other: Coformation as a Model for Interreligious Education (Jennifer Peace)
ch. 5. Beyond World Religions: Pedagogical Principles and Practices for the Encouragement of Interfaith Hospitality and Collaboration (Lucinda Mosher)
ch. 6. Pursuing and Teaching Justice in Multifaith Contexts (Justus Baird)
ch. 7. Spiritual Formation in a Multifaith World (Ruben L. F. Habito)
ch. 8. Pastoral and Spiritual Care in Multifaith Contexts (Daniel S. Schipani)
ch. 9. Chaplaincy Education Meets Multireligious Literacy Development: Strategies for Teaching Models and Methods of Spiritual Caregiving in Multifaith Contexts (Lucinda Mosher)
ch. 10. Public Ministry in a World of Many Faiths (Shanta Premawardhana)
ch. 11. Letting the Arts Lead: The role of the Arts in Interfaith Dialogue (Cindi Beth Johnson with Jann Cather Weaver)
ch. 12. "The Sacrament of Human Life": Cultivating Intentional Interreligious Learning in Congregations (Sheryl A. Kujawa-Holbrook)
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Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies: Teaching and Learning for Justice in a Changing World

Book
Paris, Django; Alim, H. Samy
2017
Teachers College Press
LC1099.3.C849 2017
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies raises fundamental questions about the purpose of schooling in changing societies. Bringing together an intergenerational group of prominent educators and researchers, this volume engages and extends the concept of culturally sustaining pedagogy (CSP)—teaching that perpetuates and fosters linguistic, literate, and cultural pluralism as part of schooling for positive social transformation. The authors propose that schooling should be a site for sustaining the cultural practices of communities ...
Additional Info:
Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies raises fundamental questions about the purpose of schooling in changing societies. Bringing together an intergenerational group of prominent educators and researchers, this volume engages and extends the concept of culturally sustaining pedagogy (CSP)—teaching that perpetuates and fosters linguistic, literate, and cultural pluralism as part of schooling for positive social transformation. The authors propose that schooling should be a site for sustaining the cultural practices of communities of color, rather than eradicating them. Chapters present theoretically grounded examples of how educators and scholars can support Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian/Pacific Islander, South African, and immigrant students as part of a collective movement towards educational justice in a changing world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1. What is Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Why Does it Matter? (H. Samy Alim and Django Paris)
PART I: Enacting Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies: Students, Teachers, and Schools
ch. 2. "You Ain't Making Me Write": Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies and Black Youths' Performances of Resistance (Valerie Kinlock)
ch. 3. Language and Culture as Sustenance (Mary Bucholtz,Dolores Ines Casillas and Jin Sook Lee)
ch. 4. Upholding Indigenous Education Sovereignty Through Critical Culturally Sustaining/Revitalizing Pedagogy (Tiffany S.Lee and Teresa L. McCarty)
ch. 5. "For Us, By Us": A Vision for Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies Forwarded by Latinx Youth (Jason G. Irizarry)
ch. 6. "This Stuff Interests Me": Re-Centering Indigenous Paradigms in Colonizing Schooling Spaces (Timothy J. San Pedro)
ch. 7. Policing and Performing Culture: Rethinking "Culture" and the Role of the Arts in Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies (Casey Wong and Courtney Pena)
PART II: Envisioning CSP Forward Through Theories of Practice
ch. 8. The (R)Evolution Will Not Be Standardized: Teacher Education, Hip Hop Pedagogy, and Culturally Relevant Pedagogy 2.0 (Gloria Ladson-Billings)
ch. 9. Reviving Soul(s) with Afrikaaps: Hip Hop as Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy in South Africa (H. Samy Alim and Adam Haupt)
ch. 10. Do You Hear What I Hear? Raciolinguistic Ideologies and Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies (Jonathan Rosa and Nelson Flores)
ch. 11. Socially Just, Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy for Diverse Immigrant Youth: Possibilities, Challenges, and Directions (Stacey J. Lee and Daniel Walsh)
ch. 12. Finding Sustenance: An Indigenous Relational Pedagogy (Amanda Holmes and Norma Gonzalez)
ch. 13. "Se Hace Puentes al Andar": Decolonial Teacher Education as a Needed Bridge to Culturally Sustaining and Revitalizing Pedagogies (Michael Dominguez)
ch. 14. Understanding Identity Sampling and Cultural Repertoires: Advancing a Historicizing and Syncretic System of Teaching and Learning in Justice Pedagogies (Kris S. Gutierrez and Patrick Johnson)
ch. 15. An Ecological Framework for Enacting Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy (Carol D. Lee)
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Teaching with Tenderness - Toward an Embodied Practice

Book
Thompson, Becky
2017
University of Illinois Press, Urbana, IL
LB1060.T53 2017
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Imagine a classroom that explores the twinned ideas of embodied teaching and a pedagogy of tenderness. Becky Thompson envisions such a curriculum--and a way of being--that promises to bring about a sea change in education.

Teaching with Tenderness follows in the tradition of bell hooks's Teaching to Transgress and Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed, inviting us to draw upon contemplative practices (...
Additional Info:
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Imagine a classroom that explores the twinned ideas of embodied teaching and a pedagogy of tenderness. Becky Thompson envisions such a curriculum--and a way of being--that promises to bring about a sea change in education.

Teaching with Tenderness follows in the tradition of bell hooks's Teaching to Transgress and Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed, inviting us to draw upon contemplative practices (yoga, meditation, free writing, mindfulness, ritual) to keep our hearts open as we reckon with multiple injustices. Teaching with tenderness makes room for emotion, offer a witness for experiences people have buried, welcomes silence, breath and movement, and sees justice as key to our survival. It allows us to rethink our relationship to grading, office hours, desks, and faculty meetings, sees paradox as a constant companion, moves us beyond binaries; and praises self and community care.

Tenderness examines contemporary challenges to teaching about race, gender, class, nationality, sexuality, religion, and other hierarchies. It examines the ethical, emotional, political, and spiritual challenges of teaching power-laden, charged issues and the consequences of shifting power relations in the classroom and in the community. Attention to current contributions in the areas of contemplative practices, trauma theory, multiracial feminist pedagogy, and activism enable us to envision steps toward a pedagogy of liberation. The book encourages active engagement and makes room for self-reflective learning, teaching, and scholarship. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editor’s Foreword (AnaLouise Keating)
Acknowledgments
Introduction
ch 1. Thatched Roof, No Walls
ch 2. Inviting Bodies
ch 3. Creating Rituals
ch 4. Why We Flee
ch 5. To You, I Belong
ch 6. Our Bodies in the World

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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"What Would we be Doing if we Weren't Doing This?: A Journey in Democratic Departmental Practices"

Article
Pippin, Tina; College, Agnes Scott
2017
International Journal of Critical Pedagogy, Vol. 8, No. 1 (2017)
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Almost twenty-five years ago a small, liberal arts college began a journey into critical pedagogies, both in some classes and at the departmental level. Students and faculty engage in department work together--setting curriculum, assessing programs, planning events, and rotating chairing of meetings. We are attempting to engage in transformative leadership with each other, as we re-imagine what a truly radical, democratic department would look like.
Additional Info:
Almost twenty-five years ago a small, liberal arts college began a journey into critical pedagogies, both in some classes and at the departmental level. Students and faculty engage in department work together--setting curriculum, assessing programs, planning events, and rotating chairing of meetings. We are attempting to engage in transformative leadership with each other, as we re-imagine what a truly radical, democratic department would look like.
Additional Info:
Inspired by the #FergusonSyllabus, the #StandingRockSyllabus, the #BlackIslamSyllabus and others, this reading list provides resources for teaching and learning about anti-Muslim racism in the United States. 
Additional Info:
Inspired by the #FergusonSyllabus, the #StandingRockSyllabus, the #BlackIslamSyllabus and others, this reading list provides resources for teaching and learning about anti-Muslim racism in the United States. 
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Wabash tree

"Other People's Problems: Student Distancing, Epistemic Responsibility, and Injustice"

Article
Whitt, Matt S.
2015
Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, June 2015
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
In classes that examine entrenched injustices like sexism or racism, studentssometimes use ‘‘distancing strategies’’ to dissociate themselves from the injustice being studied. Education researchers argue that distancing is a mechanism through which students, especially students of apparent privilege, deny their complicity in systemic injustice. While I am sympathetic to this analysis, I argue that there is much at stake in student distancing that the current literature fails to recognize. On ...
Additional Info:
In classes that examine entrenched injustices like sexism or racism, studentssometimes use ‘‘distancing strategies’’ to dissociate themselves from the injustice being studied. Education researchers argue that distancing is a mechanism through which students, especially students of apparent privilege, deny their complicity in systemic injustice. While I am sympathetic to this analysis, I argue that there is much at stake in student distancing that the current literature fails to recognize. On my view, distancing perpetuates socially sanctioned forms of ignorance and unknowing, through which students misrecognize not only their complicity in injustice, but also the ways that injustice shapes the world, their lives, and their knowledge. Thus, distancing is pedagogically problematic because it prevents students from understanding important social facts, and because it prevents them from engaging with perspectives, analyses, and testimonies that might beneficially challenge their settled views and epistemic habits. To substantiate this new analysis, I draw on recent work on epistemologies of ignorance, especially Jose´ Medina’s account of ‘‘active ignorance.’’ In order to respond to student distancing, I argue, it is not sufficient for teachers to make students aware of injustice, or of their potential complicity in it. Beyond this, teachers should cultivate epistemic virtue in the classroom and encourage students to take responsibility for better ways of knowing. The article ends by outlining several classroom practices for beginning this work. Keywords Pedagogy Distancing Epistemology of ignorance Active ignorance
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Wabash tree

Fighting Imperviousness with Vulnerability: Teaching in a Climate of Conservatism (pdf)

Article
Weekes Schroer, Jeanine
2007
Teachingn Philosophy, Vol. 30, No. 2, June 2007
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This essay explores challenges that arise for professors who teach critical theory in our current climate of conservatism. Specifically, it is argued that the conservative commitments to non-revolutionary change and reverence for tradition are corrupted in our current political and intellectual climate. This corruption, called "ideological imperviousness," undermines the institutional structures put in place to produce a functional educational environment that imposes an unjust vulnerability on professors and risks depriving ...
Additional Info:
This essay explores challenges that arise for professors who teach critical theory in our current climate of conservatism. Specifically, it is argued that the conservative commitments to non-revolutionary change and reverence for tradition are corrupted in our current political and intellectual climate. This corruption, called "ideological imperviousness," undermines the institutional structures put in place to produce a functional educational environment that imposes an unjust vulnerability on professors and risks depriving students of the opportunity to acquire the critical skills necessary to combat their own vulnerabilities.