Vocation of Teaching

Scholarship On Teaching - Topic: Vocation of Teaching - 231 results

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Saving Work: Feminist Practices of Theological Education

Book
Chopp, Rebecca S.
1995
Westminster John Knox, Louisville, KY
BV4020.C48 1995
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
One of the most significant changes in theological education during the past two decades has been a dramatic rise in the enrollment of women in the seminaries. In this ground-breaking book, Rebecca Chopp explores the impact these new voices are having on theological education. She looks at how women and men are actually forming a new Christian praxis through their engagement with feminist practices and thought that often exist outside ...
Additional Info:
One of the most significant changes in theological education during the past two decades has been a dramatic rise in the enrollment of women in the seminaries. In this ground-breaking book, Rebecca Chopp explores the impact these new voices are having on theological education. She looks at how women and men are actually forming a new Christian praxis through their engagement with feminist practices and thought that often exist outside the sphere of official recognition. This important book will be a starting point for dialogue about the role theological education will play as this new Christian praxis emerges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Women as Subjects of Theological Education?
ch. 2 Shaking the Foundations: The Practice of Narrativity
ch. 3 Places of Grace: The Practice of Ekklesia
ch. 4 The Warming Quilt of God: The Practice of Theology
ch. 5 A Particular Vision: New Ways of Thinking about Theological Education

Notes
Index
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Common Fire: Leading Lives of Commitment in a Complex World

Book
Daloz, Laurent A. Parks, Cheryl H. Keen, James P. Keen and Sharon Daloz Parks
1996
Beacon Press, Boston, MA
HM131.C74276 1996
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
This book is as much, perhaps more, an exhortation to action than a piece of social science research. In an age when the idols of the tribe or the centrality of self are aggrandized, is it possible to restore a sense of human purpose that extends beyond place or person? To answer this question a core of 100 people, determined as "capable of sustaining commitment to the common good in the ...
Additional Info:
This book is as much, perhaps more, an exhortation to action than a piece of social science research. In an age when the idols of the tribe or the centrality of self are aggrandized, is it possible to restore a sense of human purpose that extends beyond place or person? To answer this question a core of 100 people, determined as "capable of sustaining commitment to the common good in the face of global complexity," were interviewed, not so much to "prove hypotheses" but to develop "fertile insights" for further research and action in order to "kindle a common fire and forge a new synthesis of practical wisdom." This requires people who can regard space as hospitable, inhabited by mentors and others capable of demonstrating that one can and ought to make a difference in the world; people who can develop habits of mind to engage others and a symbolic world, including the world of story and faith, capable of sustaining a committed consciousness. Two "interludes" describe those who exhibit that concern for the commons, and an epilogue suggests an individual and collective strategy to nourish the sense of the collective. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Connection and Complexity: The Challenge of the New Commons
ch. 2 Community: Becoming at Home in the World
ch. 3 Compassion: Living Within and Beyond the Tribe
ch. 4 Conviction: Developing Critical Habits of Mind
ch. 5 Courage: A Responsible Imagination
ch. 6 Confession: The Struggle with Fallibility
ch. 7 Commitment: The Power of the Double Negative

Epilogue Compass Points: The Power of Location and Direction
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On Trying to Teach: The Mind in Correspondence

Book
Gardner, M. Robert
1994
The Analytic Press, Hillsdale, NJ
LB1025.3.G37 1994
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
In an era in which the teaching enterprise is freighted with tactics, techniques, and methods, M. Robert Gardner guides us back to the spirit of teaching. He writes especially about the dilemmas and challenges of teaching, about how it feels to be trying to teach. A clinical teacher of psychiatry and psychoanalysis for over four decades, Gardner is both enlightening and entertaining in relating his own teacherly struggles, including his ...
Additional Info:
In an era in which the teaching enterprise is freighted with tactics, techniques, and methods, M. Robert Gardner guides us back to the spirit of teaching. He writes especially about the dilemmas and challenges of teaching, about how it feels to be trying to teach. A clinical teacher of psychiatry and psychoanalysis for over four decades, Gardner is both enlightening and entertaining in relating his own teacherly struggles, including his efforts to harness the teacher's ever-present furor to teach" and thence to discern and engage his students' "hidden questions." Written in simple but evocative prose, On Trying to Teach is a wonderful companion volume to Self Inquiry (1983). In the earlier work, Gardner explored the play between patient and analyst; now, in the same gracefully self-reflective voice, he turns to the play between student and teacher. Gardner's provocative, often iconoclastic musings will goad teachers of all subjects to reflect anew on their calling, on what exactly it means to teach. Analysts and other clinical readers will take special pleasure in the humane psychoanalytic sensibility that not only infuses Gardner's own teaching, but shapes his approach to the most basic questions about teaching and learning in general. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
On Essaying Teaching
Beginnings

Bk. I The School of Soft Knocks
The Furor to Teach
The Unknown Student
Gulliver at Home and Abroad
On Teacherly Versatility
The Warp and the Woof
On Creativity, Discipline, and Other Desiderata
A Concise History of Teaching
Concise Addendum to a Concise History of Teaching

Bk. II A Gentle Symbiosis: The Student and the Teacher
On New and Old Beginnings
Gumbel's Gambit
Hidden Questions
On Catching Burrs
A Brief Case Of Hidden-Question Chasing
More on the Besetting Challenges of Hidden-Question Catching
Some Added Questions on the Question of What Attention to Hidden Questions Is Good For
On Passing Events
Other Clues to Hidden Questions
On Purple Trees, Purple Cows, Telling Right from Wrong, and Bearing the Distresses of Being Wrong
More Reflections on the Nature of Hidden Questions
Once More Backward
On the Importance of Being a Bit Off
On Trying to Teach in Large Groups as Well as Small, or Almost as Well
On Finding Three-Ring Circuses and on Other Merits of Tending to Hidden Questions
Afterword: Studenthood
Other Thoughts on Assessing Teaching
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Calling: Essays on Teaching in the Mother Tongue

Book
Griffin, Gail B.
1992
Trilogy Books, Pasadena, CA
LB2332.3.G75 1992
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
With a mixture of autobiographical facts and literary insights, the author (English, Kalamazoo Coll.) supports her belief that the ``motherheart must be at the center of all teaching.'' Teachers should ``create an environment where human beings can grow in and toward the fullness of themselves.'' This type of teaching is exemplified by the women teachers in higher education of the mid-1800s who, as the author found following ...
Additional Info:
With a mixture of autobiographical facts and literary insights, the author (English, Kalamazoo Coll.) supports her belief that the ``motherheart must be at the center of all teaching.'' Teachers should ``create an environment where human beings can grow in and toward the fullness of themselves.'' This type of teaching is exemplified by the women teachers in higher education of the mid-1800s who, as the author found following her ``calling'' to Kalamazoo College, were the leaders in a profession that often brings teacher and student together in crisis situations, situations that the author believes are better confronted from a feminist perspective. This is a well-written, often humorous account of one woman's entry into the feminist side of academe. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The fortunate fall
The fair arcadian hill, or "Yes there really is"
Alma mater
A rite of passage
Serafina: an angel in my house
A good and worthy voice
Man hating: voices in the dark
Teacher’s pet
Orphans of the storm: the F-word and the post-feminist generation
Vocation
A purple creature
No abstract fires: a new year’s message
Unlearning not to speak, or Why the caged bird sings
A room of one’s own revisited, or, Running away to New Jersey and other holy places
To the land of the dead and back again: my "last lecture."
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In Plato's Cave

Book
Kernan, Alvin
1999
Yale University Press, New Haven, CT
LA 227.4.K468 1999
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
In this candid and delightful memoir, Alvin Kernan recalls his life as a student, professor, provost, and dean during turbulent decades of change in the hallowed halls of Columbia, Williams, Oxford, Yale, and Princeton. His vividly remembered account is a unique personal story and more--it is also a history of what has been won, and lost, in the culture wars of the second half of the twentieth century. (From the ...
Additional Info:
In this candid and delightful memoir, Alvin Kernan recalls his life as a student, professor, provost, and dean during turbulent decades of change in the hallowed halls of Columbia, Williams, Oxford, Yale, and Princeton. His vividly remembered account is a unique personal story and more--it is also a history of what has been won, and lost, in the culture wars of the second half of the twentieth century. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Shifting Educational Plates

ch. 1 Theater and Reality in Greenwich Village: Columbia, 1946
ch. 2 The Other End of the Log: Williams College, 1946-1949
ch. 3 Chatter About Shelley: Oxford, 1949-1951
ch. 4 See My George Gascoigne: Yale Graduate School, 1951-1954
ch. 5 Keeping Them Quiet: Yale, 1954-1960
ch. 6 The Two Cultures, Science and Literature
ch. 7 Publish or Perish: Tenure at Yale, 1960-1964
ch. 8 Goodbye, Boola Boola: Yale Administration, 1964-1970
ch. 9 When Do We Want It? Now! The Bobby Seale Trial, New Haven, 1970
ch. 10 Question All Authority: The Breakdown of Meaning and Language, Yale, 1970-1973
ch. 11 A Long Walk After Lunch: Princeton and the Later 1970s
ch. 12 The New Technology Calls All in Doubt: Television, Books, Libraries, Computers
ch. 13 No Obligation to Be Right, Only to Be Interesting: Teaching as Power and Politics, Princeton, the 1980s
ch. 14 The Break Between Generations, Retirement

Epilogue: The Dogs Bark, the Caravan Passes On
Index
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The Art of Theological Reflection

Book
Killen, Patricia O'Connell and John de Beer
1994
Crossroads, New York, NY
BR118.K615 1994
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Here is a book for the millions of Christians who want to make a vital connection between their faith and their lives. This practical book provides a way for all of us to experience greater meaning in life and a more tangible sense of God's creative presence. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Here is a book for the millions of Christians who want to make a vital connection between their faith and their lives. This practical book provides a way for all of us to experience greater meaning in life and a more tangible sense of God's creative presence. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Searching for a Way to Be Faithful
ch. 2 The Movement Toward Insight: The Human Process of Coming to Wisdom
ch. 3 Theology as a Form of Human Reflection
ch. 4 Personal Theological Reflection
ch. 5 Guiding Groups in Theological Reflection
ch. 6 Creating Designs for Theological Reflection
ch. 7 Conclusion

Notes
Resources For Theological Reflection: An Annotated Bibliography
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Wise Teaching: Biblical Wisdom and Educational Ministry

Book
Melchert, Charles F.
1998
Trinity Press, Valley Forge, PA
BS1455.M45 1998
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
This book seeks to be responsible both to biblical scholarship and to pedagogical inquiry. It focuses on wisdom texts in the Bible (Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, Ecclesiasticus, Wisdom of Solomon, and the Synoptic Gospels) and on inferences about teaching and learning that can be drawn from these texts. Acknowledging that we cannot reconstruct the practices of the wise teachers of the biblical tradition with historical methods, Meltbert nevertheless argues that the ...
Additional Info:
This book seeks to be responsible both to biblical scholarship and to pedagogical inquiry. It focuses on wisdom texts in the Bible (Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, Ecclesiasticus, Wisdom of Solomon, and the Synoptic Gospels) and on inferences about teaching and learning that can be drawn from these texts. Acknowledging that we cannot reconstruct the practices of the wise teachers of the biblical tradition with historical methods, Meltbert nevertheless argues that the wisdom texts presumably embody not only what these teachers wanted readers to learn but also how it was to be learned.

What do the literary forms and content of these texts presuppose, entail, or imply about reader-learners and about learning and teaching processes? Are some teaching-learning approaches more suitable than others for these texts or more likely to foster engagement with particular themes? Using a variation of reader-response criticism (the "readerly approach"), Melchert engages the wisdom texts (whose authorship is anonymous and whose particular historical-cultural context cannot be reconstructed with any confidence) in an effort to determine why the sages said and taught as they did and what contemporary teachers and learners might pick up from them about teaching, learning, and being wisely religious in a postmodern world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Abbreviations
Introduction: Then, Now, and Maybe

ch. 1 "Listen, My Child": Proverbs
ch. 2 The Presence of Absence: Job
ch. 3 The Absence of Presence: Ecclesiastes
ch. 4 Sleeping with the Enemy: Education amid Culture Wars
ch. 5 Woman Wisdom: Education as Playing in the Presence of God
ch. 6 Why Didn't Jesus Tell Bible Stories?
ch. 7 What Counts as Education in a Wisdom Approach?

Index of Biblical References
Index of Subjects and Authors
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A Professor's Work

Book
Melko, Matthew
1998
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LB1778.2.M45 1998
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
A Professor's Work attempts to clear up questions about the role of the college professor in society by providing a field study of what a professor actually does. The author organizes a year of his work and his colleagues into an overview of a years teaching, research, and service. The first section describes the service work, including a depiction of the search for a new faculty member, and a committee ...
Additional Info:
A Professor's Work attempts to clear up questions about the role of the college professor in society by providing a field study of what a professor actually does. The author organizes a year of his work and his colleagues into an overview of a years teaching, research, and service. The first section describes the service work, including a depiction of the search for a new faculty member, and a committee that investigated the appearance of extremely large general educational classes. Then the teaching section focuses on the teaching and evaluation of a single course, and the dealing with problems encountered by the wide variety of students who attend an urban university. Finally, the research section exposes the relationship of writing and publishing to the conflicts and interactions of scholars and with the impact the study had on the university community. The author also includes a representation of community activities, the relationship of a professor's work to his family life, and an evaluation of professors studied against two theoretical models of professional behavior and activity. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Perceptions of the Professor
ch. 2 Inside the Department
ch. 3 How an Intrepid Band of Professors Confronted the General Education Monsters
ch. 4 University Encounters
ch. 5 But Don't Professors Also Teach Courses
ch. 6 And Of Course There Were Students
ch. 7 The Scholar Writes War and Peace, Participates in the Scientific Enterprise, and Receives a Call From the East
ch. 8 A Professor's Work Photographs
ch. 9 Serving the Community
ch. 10 Even Professors Have Families
ch. 11 Is the Professor a Professional?

Cast
References
About the Author
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God's Fierce Whimsy: Christian Feminism and Theological Education

Book
Mud Flower Collective
1985
Pilgrim Press, Cleveland, OH
BT704.G63 1985
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
This book is the written record of seven feminists' commitment to practice what they preach-to make incarnate both the fierce and the whimsical character of that which is born in every shared effort to teach and learn with minds set on justice. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book is the written record of seven feminists' commitment to practice what they preach-to make incarnate both the fierce and the whimsical character of that which is born in every shared effort to teach and learn with minds set on justice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 In Search of Common Ground
ch. 2 Can We Be Different But Not Alienated? An Exchange of Letters
ch. 3 In My Voice You Will Hear Pain
ch. 4 Our God-Stories: Sharing Images
ch. 5 The Shape and Significance of Feminist Theology: A Christian Perspective
ch. 6 Trashing the Terrible, Titillating Lesbian: Dialoguing on Sexuality
ch. 7 The Mud and the Flower

Notes
Selected Bibliography
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Learning from Our Lives: Women, Research and Autobiography in Education

Book
Neumann, Anna and Penelope L. Peterson, eds.
1997
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC1757.L416 1997
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
In Learning from Our Lives: Women, Research, and Autobiography in Education, eleven women who are eminent educational researchers speak out intimately, and from these autobiographical accounts, readers experience how research that emerges from diverse women's lives shapes (and reshapes) educational knowledge and discourse. The book offers thoughtful insights into how the field of education might change as women assume positions of intellectual leadership. The distinguished list of contributors includes Kathryn ...
Additional Info:
In Learning from Our Lives: Women, Research, and Autobiography in Education, eleven women who are eminent educational researchers speak out intimately, and from these autobiographical accounts, readers experience how research that emerges from diverse women's lives shapes (and reshapes) educational knowledge and discourse. The book offers thoughtful insights into how the field of education might change as women assume positions of intellectual leadership. The distinguished list of contributors includes Kathryn H. Au, Concha Delgado-Gaitan, Maxine Greene, Patricia J. Gumport, Gloria Ladson-Billings, Ellen Condliffe Lagemann, Martha Montero-Sieburth, Anna Neumann, Nel Noddings, Penelope L. PEterson, and Linda f. Winfield. The book will be an important resource for graduate courses in foundations, teacher education, philosophy of education, women and education, research methods, sociology of education, and politics and education; general readers will find it fascinating reading as well. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Researching Lives: Women, Scholarship, and Autobiography in Education (Anna Neumann, and Penelope L. Peterson)
ch. 2 Exclusions and Awakenings (Maxine Greene)
ch. 3 Dismantling Borders (Concha Delgado-Gaitan)
ch. 4 For colored girls who have considered suicide when the academy's not enough: Reflections of an African American Woman Scholar (Gloria Ladson-Billings)
ch. 5 Schooling, Literacy, and Cultural Diversity in Research and Personal Experience (Kathryn H. Au)
ch. 6 Ways Without Words: Learning from Silence and Story in Post-Holocaust Lives (Anna Neumann)
ch. 7 The Weaving of Personal Origins and Research: Reencuentro y Reflexion en la Investigacion (Martha Montero-Sieburth)
ch. 8 A Subjective Necessity: Being and Becoming an Historian of Education (Ellen Confliffe Lagemann)
ch. 9 Accident, Awareness, and Actualization (Nel Noddings)
ch. 10 First Words. Still Words (Patrica J. Gumport)
ch. 11 Multiple Dimensions of Reality: Recollections of an African American Woman Scholar (Linda F. Winfield)
ch. 12 Learning Out of School and In: Self and Experience at Home, School, and Work (Penelope L. Peterson)
ch. 13 Learning from Research and Everyday Life (Anna Neumann, and Penelope L. Peterson)

About the Editors and the Contributors
Index
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The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher's Life

Book
Palmer, Parker J.
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1775.P25 1998
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Teachers choose their vocation for reasons of the heart, because they care deeply about their students and about their subject. But the demands of teaching cause too many educators to lose heart. Is it possible to take heart in teaching once more so that we can continue to do what good teachers always do - give heart to our students? In The Courage to Teach, Parker Palmer takes teachers on ...
Additional Info:
Teachers choose their vocation for reasons of the heart, because they care deeply about their students and about their subject. But the demands of teaching cause too many educators to lose heart. Is it possible to take heart in teaching once more so that we can continue to do what good teachers always do - give heart to our students? In The Courage to Teach, Parker Palmer takes teachers on an inner journey toward reconnecting with their vocation and their students - and recovering their passion for one of the most difficult and important of human endeavors. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Gratitudes
Introduction: Teaching from Within

I The Heart of a Teacher: Identity and Integrity in Teaching
II A Culture of Fear: Education and the Disconnected Life
III The Hidden Wholeness: Paradox in Teaching and Learning
IV Knowing in Community: Joined by the Grace of Great Things
V Teaching in Community: A Subject-Centered Education
VI Learning in Community: The Conversation of Colleagues
VII Divided No More: Teaching from a Heart of Hope

Notes
The Author
Index
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To Know as We are Known: Education as a Spiritual Journey

Book
Palmer, Parker J.
1993
Harper & Row, San Francisco, CA
LB885.P34T6 1993
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
This primer on authentic education explores how mind and heart can work together in the learning process. Moving beyond the bankruptcy of our current model of education, Parker Palmer finds the soul of education through a lifelong cultivation of the wisdom each of us possesses and can share to benefit others. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This primer on authentic education explores how mind and heart can work together in the learning process. Moving beyond the bankruptcy of our current model of education, Parker Palmer finds the soul of education through a lifelong cultivation of the wisdom each of us possesses and can share to benefit others. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Knowing is loving
ch. 2 Education as spiritual formation
ch. 3 The teaching behind the teaching
ch. 4 What is truth?
ch. 5 To teach is to create a space...
ch. 6 ...In which obedience to truth is practiced
ch. 7 The spiritual formation of teachers

Notes
Index
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Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation

Book
Palmer, Parker J.
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
BV4740.P35 2000
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
With wisdom, compassion, and gentle humor, Parker J. Palmer invites us to listen to the inner teacher and follow its leadings toward a sense of meaning and purpose. Telling stories from his own life and the lives of others who have made a difference, he shares insights gained from darkness and depression as well as fulfillment and joy, illuminating a pathway toward vocation for all who seek the true calling ...
Additional Info:
With wisdom, compassion, and gentle humor, Parker J. Palmer invites us to listen to the inner teacher and follow its leadings toward a sense of meaning and purpose. Telling stories from his own life and the lives of others who have made a difference, he shares insights gained from darkness and depression as well as fulfillment and joy, illuminating a pathway toward vocation for all who seek the true calling of their lives. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Gratitudes.
Listening to Life.
Now I Become Myself.
When Way Closes.
All the Way Down.
Leading from Within.
There Is a Season.
Notes.
The Author.
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The Calling of Education

Book
Shils, Edward
1997
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LB2325.S439 1997
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Throughout his long and prolific career, Edward Shils brought an extraordinary knowledge of academic institutions to discussions about higher education. The Calling of Education features Shils's most illuminating and incisive writing on this topic from the last twenty-five years of his life. The first essay, "The Academic Ethic," articulates the unique ethical demands of the academic profession and directs special attention to the integration of teaching and research. Other pieces, ...
Additional Info:
Throughout his long and prolific career, Edward Shils brought an extraordinary knowledge of academic institutions to discussions about higher education. The Calling of Education features Shils's most illuminating and incisive writing on this topic from the last twenty-five years of his life. The first essay, "The Academic Ethic," articulates the unique ethical demands of the academic profession and directs special attention to the integration of teaching and research. Other pieces, including Shils's renowned Jefferson lectures, focus on perennial issues in higher learning: the meaning of academic freedom, the connection between universities and the state, and the criteria for appointing individuals to academic positions.

Edward Shils understood the university as a great symphonic conductor comprehends the value of each instrument and section, both separately and in cooperation. The Calling of Education offers Shils's insightful perspective on problems that are no less pressing than when he first confronted them. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction

ch. 1 The Academic Ethic
ch. 2 The Criteria of Academic Appointment
ch. 3 Do We Still Need Academic Freedom?
ch. 4 The Eighth Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities: "Render unto Caesar..." - Government, Society, and the Universities in Their Reciprocal Rights and Duties
ch. 5 The Idea of the University: Obstacles and Opportunities in Contemporary Societies
ch. 6 The Modern University and Liberal Democracy

Index
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A Life in School: What the Teacher Learned

Book
Tompkins, Jane
1996
Perseus Books, Reading, MA
LA2317.T65A3 1996
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Tompkins is an English professor at Duke. The book is autobiographical and profoundly evocative. It is an intense interpretation of the innertwinings of her personal and professional life. Tompkins discusses her life--from elementary school, through her doctoral program at Yale, through her life as a nontenured and then tenured faculty member--and, in the process, discusses issues that are important to so many of us in the Academy. She writes wonderfully ...
Additional Info:
Tompkins is an English professor at Duke. The book is autobiographical and profoundly evocative. It is an intense interpretation of the innertwinings of her personal and professional life. Tompkins discusses her life--from elementary school, through her doctoral program at Yale, through her life as a nontenured and then tenured faculty member--and, in the process, discusses issues that are important to so many of us in the Academy. She writes wonderfully about teaching, learning, and working at a research university. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 The Dream of Authority
ch. 2 P.S. 98
ch. 3 Forever
ch. 4 Other People
ch. 5 Teachers
ch. 6 Talking in Class
ch. 7 Higher Education
ch. 8 Making It
ch. 9 Ash Wednesday
ch. 10 The Day I Walked Out of Class
ch. 11 Postcards From the Edge
ch. 12 Reverie
ch. 13 Karate Lesson
ch. 14 Let's Get Lost
ch. 15 The Way We Live Now
ch. 16 Coffee
ch. 17 Time Out
ch. 18 The Cloister and the Heart

Epilogue: Chair, Table, Lamp
List of Works Cited
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Honoring Exemplary Teaching

Book
Menges, Robert and Marilla Svinicki
1996
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 65)
LB2331.H66 1996
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Many colleges and universities are attempting to increase the recognition they give to those faculty who go beyond mere competence and truly represent the best teaching higher education has to offer. What is the promise of programs to honor exemplary teaching? What pitfalls must they avoid? This issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning describes programs in a variety of settings and with varying purposes. It reviews research relevant ...
Additional Info:
Many colleges and universities are attempting to increase the recognition they give to those faculty who go beyond mere competence and truly represent the best teaching higher education has to offer. What is the promise of programs to honor exemplary teaching? What pitfalls must they avoid? This issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning describes programs in a variety of settings and with varying purposes. It reviews research relevant to selection criteria, and it offers guidelines for planning and implementing the kinds of programs most likely to be effective. This is the 65th issue of the journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. For more information on the series, please see the Journals and Periodicals page. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Awards to individuals / Robert J. Menges
Awards to groups: the university of Wisconsin system's departmental teaching award / Susan Kahn
The "certification" paradigm / Hoke Smith, Barbara Walvoord
Teaching academies: honoring and promoting teaching through a community of expertise / Nancy Van Note Chism, Jane M. Fraser, Robert L. Arnold
Characteristics of exemplary teachers / Joseph Lowman
Identifying exemplary teaching: using data from course and teacher evaluations / Kenneth A. Feldman
Identifying exemplary teachers: evidence from colleagues, administrators and alumni / John A. Centra
Relating exemplary teaching to student learning / Thomas A. Angelo
Using portfolios to document teaching excellence / Laurie Richlin, Brenda Manning
Honoring exemplary teaching in research universities / Mary Deane Sorcinelli, Barbara Gross Davis
Honoring exemplary teaching: the two-year college setting / Mardee Jenrette, Karen Hays
Honoring exemplary teaching in the liberal arts institution / Kenneth J. Zahorski
Decentralized/ departmental reward systems / Joyce Povlacs Lunde, Leverne A. Barrett
Promoting exemplary teaching: the case of the U.S. military academy / George B. Forsythe, Anita Gandolfo
Promoting excellence in teaching in pharmaceutical education: the master teacher credentialling program / Susan M. Meyer, Richard P. Penna
Consistency within diversity: guidelines for programs to honor exemplary teaching / Marilla D. Svinicki, Robert J. Menges.
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"Good Teaching: A Matter of Living the Mystery" (pdf)

Article
Palmer, Parker
1990
Change Jan/Feb (1990): 11-16
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Parker Palmer insists that there is a "capricious chemistry" to good teaching that is ultimately irreducible to a simple technical formula. He advises against making the student a spectator simply watching the teacher as he or she lays out a catalog of "objective" facts. Instead, the subject under study must get inside the student as the teacher facilitate the linking of the subject's insights with the student's own biography. Palmer ...
Additional Info:
Parker Palmer insists that there is a "capricious chemistry" to good teaching that is ultimately irreducible to a simple technical formula. He advises against making the student a spectator simply watching the teacher as he or she lays out a catalog of "objective" facts. Instead, the subject under study must get inside the student as the teacher facilitate the linking of the subject's insights with the student's own biography. Palmer cautions against the tendency to try to cover every fact in a field of study and suggests alternative methods of evaluating students that facilitates learning. Palmer believes that fear of conflict is one of the most significant obstacles to teachers creating hospitable space for shared discourse. Good teaching, Palmer claims, requires unusual courage as teachers must expose their ignorance along with their insight, remain open to contradiction as well as invite consent and relinquish some measure of control to a class so that the students are empowered.
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"Spirituality and Higher Learning: Thinking and Loving"

Article
Bondi, Roberta C.
1993
The Cresset (June 1993): 5-12
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
What is the relationship between the life of the intellect and the life of the spirit? This is complex and painful question. In this paper I would like to approach the problem, not by jumping into the middle to answer the whole of it, but by pondering with you only one part of it having to do with what it means for a Christian to think rationally. As members of ...
Additional Info:
What is the relationship between the life of the intellect and the life of the spirit? This is complex and painful question. In this paper I would like to approach the problem, not by jumping into the middle to answer the whole of it, but by pondering with you only one part of it having to do with what it means for a Christian to think rationally. As members of our own culture, all of us have been reared to believe at some level that even for the Christian, intellect and spirit are and need to be kept separate. A good deal of my education, even my Christian education, over the years, and yours too, I suspect, was based in the conviction that our human minds are only really trustworthy, that is, "objective," when we are able to discard from our thought processes in own particular, individual perceptions of the world, our own particular experiences, our own particular points of view, and our own values. In short, in order to meet the criteria of acceptable thought we have not only tried to make a division between intellect and the spiritual. We have actually tried to throw out of our definition of what it means to think a good deal of what we know and who we are as human beings and as Christians. In order to help us think about this, I would like to tell a story. It is my story, but I tell it because I suspect large parts of it are your story as well.
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"Rethinking What It Means to be a Scholar"

Article
Rice, R. Eugene
1990
Teaching Excellence 1, no. 8 (1990)
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
Academia is one of the professions in which socially constructed fictions have tremendous power. Years of graduate study and the power of academic mentors creates an environment which deeply socializes future academics. The image of the academic professional which is currently promulgated emerged during the expansionist (post-World War II) period of higher education. In this conception, the scholar is seen primarily as a researcher pursuing knowledge for its own sake. ...
Additional Info:
Academia is one of the professions in which socially constructed fictions have tremendous power. Years of graduate study and the power of academic mentors creates an environment which deeply socializes future academics. The image of the academic professional which is currently promulgated emerged during the expansionist (post-World War II) period of higher education. In this conception, the scholar is seen primarily as a researcher pursuing knowledge for its own sake. The teaching role has been given much less emphasis. During this same expansionist period, higher education began to serve a much broader and more diverse clientele with more varied academic needs. For these two transformations to now become compatible, a broader conception of scholarship is urgently needed. Such a conception would have at least four elements. While new knowledge acquired through reasoning and analytical theory-building is valuable, knowledge gained through experience must also be seen as legitimate. Second, specialized knowledge must be reintegrated. That is, scholars must look for new relationships between the parts and the whole. This synthesis can be achieved through an emphasis on interdisciplinarity. Third, scholarship must begin to address the pragmatic needs of the larger world. The pursuit of knowledge to solve societal problems must be valued as scholarship of the first order. Finally, the scholarship of teaching, in which research is conducted on effective and appropriate teaching methods, must be emphasized for all scholars. Teaching that is not grounded in the most recent research is not appropriate for a college or university setting. A 21-item bibliography is included. (PAA)
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"Reflections on a Program for 'The Formation of Teachers'"

Article
Palmer, Parker J.
1992
Fetzer Institute (1992)
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
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"Seasons of Academic Life: Honoring Our Collective Autobiography"

Article
Knefelkamp, L. Lee
1990
Liberal Education 76, no. 3, (1990): 4-11
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Focuses on the social aspects of college life in the United States. Transformation of students; Transitions' production of changes in students' ways of knowing; Power of ideas; Faculty role; Public self; Multiple and competing commitments.
Additional Info:
Focuses on the social aspects of college life in the United States. Transformation of students; Transitions' production of changes in students' ways of knowing; Power of ideas; Faculty role; Public self; Multiple and competing commitments.
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"Professing the Faith: Reflections on a Vocation"

Article
Bondi, Roberta, Beverly R. Gaventa, S. Mark Heim, Miroslav Volf, and William H.
1996
Christian Century (Feb 7-14, 1996): 128-137
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
The task of theological education is not always clearly understood in the church -- or it is understood in different ways by various constituencies. We invite five seminary professors to reflect on their vocation, especially on its relation to the life of faith in the church and to the church's effort to be faithful to the gospel. We asked them to consider the ways in which they seek to hand ...
Additional Info:
The task of theological education is not always clearly understood in the church -- or it is understood in different ways by various constituencies. We invite five seminary professors to reflect on their vocation, especially on its relation to the life of faith in the church and to the church's effort to be faithful to the gospel. We asked them to consider the ways in which they seek to hand on Christian traditions and also the ways in which they seek to provide students with skills to critique aspects of those traditions.
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"Social Vision and Moral Courage: Mentoring a New Generation"

Article
Parks, Sharon Daloz
1990
Cross Currents 40, no. 3 (1990): 351-367
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
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"Academic Administration as an Inner Journey"

Article
Smith, Gordon T.
1996
Theological Education 33 (Supplement 61-70
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue
Additional Info:
Journal Issue
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"Calling Prowls About in Our Lives"

Article
Keller, Rosemary
1995
Quarterly Review (Fall, 1995): 227-236
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
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"The Spirituality of the Religious Educator"

Article
Groome, Thomas H.
1988
Religious Education 83, no. 1 (1988): 9-20
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religious Education

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Good Talk About Good Teaching"

Article
Palmer, Parker J.
1993
Change Nov/Dec: 8-13,
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Asserts that faculty lack the continuing conversation with colleagues that could help them grow more fully into the demands of the teacher's craft. Possible reasons for the privatization of teaching; Good teaching as more than technique; Topics for talk about good teaching; Ground rules for creative conversation; More.
Additional Info:
Asserts that faculty lack the continuing conversation with colleagues that could help them grow more fully into the demands of the teacher's craft. Possible reasons for the privatization of teaching; Good teaching as more than technique; Topics for talk about good teaching; Ground rules for creative conversation; More.
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"The New Testament and the Examined Life: Thoughts on Teaching"

Article
Johnson, Luke Timothy
1995
Christian Century (Feb 1-8, 1995): 108-115
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Discusses the historical-critical paradigm in analyzing the New Testament. Gap between the discipline of New Testament studies and its intended purpose; Changing character of student clientele as a challenge to the historical-critical method; Applying sociological methods in theological discussions; Capturing the dimensions of early Christian texts.
Additional Info:
Discusses the historical-critical paradigm in analyzing the New Testament. Gap between the discipline of New Testament studies and its intended purpose; Changing character of student clientele as a challenge to the historical-critical method; Applying sociological methods in theological discussions; Capturing the dimensions of early Christian texts.
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"Of Monks' Cells and Wagon Trains, Excellence and Collegiality"

Article
Jarvis, Donald K.
1996
Focus on Faculty 4, no. 3 (1996): 1-2
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
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"The Heart of a Teacher: Identity and Integrity in Teaching"

Article
Palmer, Parker J.
1997
Change Nov/Dec (1997): 15-21
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Opinion. Presents the author's view on his passion for teaching which is beyond the technicalities of teaching. Integrity and identity as the requirements of good teaching; Importance of holding on when a teacher loses heart; Diversity of techniques among individual teachers.
Additional Info:
Opinion. Presents the author's view on his passion for teaching which is beyond the technicalities of teaching. Integrity and identity as the requirements of good teaching; Importance of holding on when a teacher loses heart; Diversity of techniques among individual teachers.
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"Socializing Future Faculty to the Values of Undergraduate Education"

Article
Gaff, Jerry G., and Leo M. Lambert
1996
Article: Change July/Aug (1996): 38-45
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Focuses on socializing future faculty to the values of undergraduate education. Values of hiring colleges and universities; Approaches to graduate preparation; Preparation of future faculty project; Initiatives and strategic benefits. INSET: More about support programs..
Additional Info:
Focuses on socializing future faculty to the values of undergraduate education. Values of hiring colleges and universities; Approaches to graduate preparation; Preparation of future faculty project; Initiatives and strategic benefits. INSET: More about support programs..
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"The Personal Qualities of Teaching: What Teachers Do Cannot be Distinguished from Who They Are"

Article
Banner, James M. Jr., and Harold C. Cannon
1997
Change Nov/Dec (1997): 40-43
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Discusses the importance of teacher's character in learning and teaching. Reasons for doubting the validity of widespread assertions of faculty members' malfeasance and neglect of their students; Three dimensions of teaching; Qualities that make for effective teaching; Initiative coming from the individual faculty members themselves and not from the administration.
Additional Info:
Discusses the importance of teacher's character in learning and teaching. Reasons for doubting the validity of widespread assertions of faculty members' malfeasance and neglect of their students; Three dimensions of teaching; Qualities that make for effective teaching; Initiative coming from the individual faculty members themselves and not from the administration.
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"The Faculty Members of the Future: How Are They Being Shaped?"

Article
Wheeler, Barbara G.
1998
Christian Century (Feb 4-11, 1998): 106-149
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Focuses on the role of faculty members in the career of students. Anxieties expressed by deans and presidents of schools on how faculty members should be trained; How the popularity of religious studies reshaped the training of theological faculty; Capabilities of most theological faculty.
Additional Info:
Focuses on the role of faculty members in the career of students. Anxieties expressed by deans and presidents of schools on how faculty members should be trained; How the popularity of religious studies reshaped the training of theological faculty; Capabilities of most theological faculty.
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"The Grace of Teaching"

Article
Boys, Mary C.
1996
The Cresset (June 1996): 11-16
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"The Re-examination of Faculty Priorities"

Article
Edgerton, Russell
1993
Change July/Aug (1993): 10-25
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Discusses how university presidents and provosts across America have been re-examining various aspects of the faculty reward system--from the obligations faculty are expected to perform, to the ways teaching and service are evaluated, to the bases for promotion and advancement. What set off this re-examination; Observations into changing expectations; Changes in how faculty are evaluated; Shifts in faculty incentives and rewards.
Additional Info:
Discusses how university presidents and provosts across America have been re-examining various aspects of the faculty reward system--from the obligations faculty are expected to perform, to the ways teaching and service are evaluated, to the bases for promotion and advancement. What set off this re-examination; Observations into changing expectations; Changes in how faculty are evaluated; Shifts in faculty incentives and rewards.
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"Education Marked with the Sign of the Cross"

Article
Buckley, Michael J.
1990
America 163, no. 5 (1990): 100-103
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
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To Know as We Are Known: A Spirituality of Education

Book
Palmer, Parker J.
1983
Harper & Row, San Francisco, CA
Not catalogued
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
This primer on authentic education explores how mind and heart can work together in the learning process. Moving beyond the bankruptcy of our current model of education, Parker Palmer finds the soul of education through a lifelong cultivation of the wisdom each of us possesses and can share to benefit others. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This primer on authentic education explores how mind and heart can work together in the learning process. Moving beyond the bankruptcy of our current model of education, Parker Palmer finds the soul of education through a lifelong cultivation of the wisdom each of us possesses and can share to benefit others. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
ch. 1 Knowing is loving
ch. 2 Education as spiritual formation
ch. 3 The teaching behind the teaching
ch. 4 What is truth?
ch. 5 To teach is to create a space...
ch. 6 ...In which obedience to truth is practiced
ch. 7 The spiritual formation of teachers
Notes
Index
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Wabash tree

The Courage to Teach: A Guide for Reflection and Renewal

Book
Livsey, Rachel C. in collaboration with Parker J. Palmer
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1775.P26 1999
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
This guide will help teachers, individually and in groups, reflect on their teaching and renew their sense of vocation by exploring the inner landscape of their lives along Palmer's three dimensions--intellectual, emotional, and spiritual. The guide will raise questions, examine ideas and images, and suggest practices that emerge from the many insights in The Courage to Teach. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This guide will help teachers, individually and in groups, reflect on their teaching and renew their sense of vocation by exploring the inner landscape of their lives along Palmer's three dimensions--intellectual, emotional, and spiritual. The guide will raise questions, examine ideas and images, and suggest practices that emerge from the many insights in The Courage to Teach. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preparing for A Process of Reflection
Individual Study
Group Study* Leadership and Membership * Physical Space * Intellectual Space * Emotional Space * Spiritual
A Word of Encouragement

Questions and Activities for Each Chapter
The Heart of a Teacher: Identity and Integrity in Teaching
A Culture of Fear: Education and the Disconnected Life
The Hidden Wholeness: Paradox in Teaching and Learning
Knowing in Community: Joined by the Grace of Great Things
Teaching in Community: A Subject-Centered Education
Learning in Community: The Conversation of Colleagues
Divided No More: Teaching from a Heart of Hope

Appendix A: The Clearness Committee: A Communal Approach to Discernment
Appendix B: About the Center for Teacher Formation
Appendix C: About Parker J. Palmer
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"'The Long Obedience...': Biblical Reflections on the Vocation of Administrative Service"

Article
Senior, Donald
1998
The Seminary Journal 2 (Fall 1998)
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
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"Gracious Play: Discipline, Insight, and the Common Good"

TTR
Killen, Patricia O'Connell
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 1 (2001): 2-8
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
The article is a theological reflection on the vocation of university teaching that describes the heart of the matter of what faculty do in the classroom. The author draws on personal narrative, social-psychological analyses of how insight occurs and contexts for insights are constructed, and sociological accounts of shifts that have altered significantly the context of university teaching and learning at the cusp of the millennium to make her case. ...
Additional Info:
The article is a theological reflection on the vocation of university teaching that describes the heart of the matter of what faculty do in the classroom. The author draws on personal narrative, social-psychological analyses of how insight occurs and contexts for insights are constructed, and sociological accounts of shifts that have altered significantly the context of university teaching and learning at the cusp of the millennium to make her case. She argues that the vocation of university teaching involves creating spaces of gracious play that are potentially transformative for students and faculty. Creating such spaces, however, draws faculty into an asceticism that can be understood as a spiritual path. The article is a revision of the author's 1999 St. Elizabeth Seton Lecture at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Cincinnati, Ohio.
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Wabash tree

In Over Our Heads: The Mental Demands of Modern Life

Book
Kegan, Robert
1994
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
BF311.K37 1994
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
If contemporary culture were a school, with all the tasks and expectations meted out by modern life as its curriculum, would anyone graduate? In the spirit of a sympathetic teacher, Robert Kegan guides us through this tricky curriculum, assessing the fit between its complex demands and our mental capacities, and showing what happens when we find ourselves, as we so often do, in over our heads. In this dazzling intellectual ...
Additional Info:
If contemporary culture were a school, with all the tasks and expectations meted out by modern life as its curriculum, would anyone graduate? In the spirit of a sympathetic teacher, Robert Kegan guides us through this tricky curriculum, assessing the fit between its complex demands and our mental capacities, and showing what happens when we find ourselves, as we so often do, in over our heads. In this dazzling intellectual tour, he completely reintroduces us to the psychological landscape of our private and public lives. A decade ago in The Evolving Self, Kegan presented a dynamic view of the development of human consciousness. Here he applies this widely acclaimed theory to the mental complexity of adulthood. As parents and partners, employees and bosses, citizens and leaders, we constantly confront a bewildering array of expectations, prescriptions, claims, and demands, as well as an equally confusing assortment of expert opinions that tell us what each of these roles entails. Surveying the disparate expert "literatures," which normally take no account of each other, Kegan brings them together to reveal, for the first time, what these many demands have in common. Our frequent frustration in trying to meet these complex and often conflicting claims results, he shows us, from a mismatch between the way we ordinarily know the world and the way we are unwittingly expected to understand it. In Over Our Heads provides us entirely fresh perspectives on a number of cultural controversies - the "abstinence vs. safe sex" debate, the diversity movement, communication across genders, the meaning of postmodernism. What emerges in these pages is a theory of evolving ways of knowing that allows us to view adult development much as we view child development, as an open-ended process born of the dynamic interaction of cultural demands and emerging mental capabilities. If our culture is to be a good "school," as Kegan suggests, it must offer, along with a challenging curriculum. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Prologue

pt. I The Mental Demand of Adolescence
ch. 1 The Hidden Curriculum of Youth: "Whaddaya Want from Me?"
ch. 2 Coaching the Curriculum: A Bridge Must Be Well Anchored on Either Side

pt. II The Mental Demand of Private Life: Parenting and Partnering
ch. 3 Parenting: Minding Our Children
ch. 4 Partnering: Love and Consciousness

pt. III The Mental Demand of Public Life: Work and Self-Expansion
ch. 5 Working: On Seeking to Hire the Self-Employed
ch. 6 Dealing with Difference: Communication between the Sexes/Communication between the Theories
ch. 7 Healing: The Undiscussed Demands of Psychotherapy
ch. 8 Learning: "The Teacher Wants Us to Be Self-Directing"

pt. IV The Mental Demand of Postmodern Life
ch. 9 Conflict, Leadership, and Knowledge Creation
ch. 10 On Being Good Company for the Wrong Journey

Epilogue
Notes
Index
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"Blue Collar, Crimson Blazer: Recollections of Class on Campus"

Article
Mar, M. Elaine
1995
Harvard Magazine 98, no. 2 (1995): 47-51
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
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"A Carpenter's Daughter: A Working Class Woman in Higher Education"

Article
Christopher, Renny
1995
in This Fine Place So Far From Home: Voices of Academics From the Working Class (Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 1995), 137-150
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Wabash tree

Wise Women: Reflections of Teachers at Midlife

Book
Freeman, Phyllis R. and Jan Zlotnik Schmidt, eds.
2000
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2837.W58 2000
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Wise Women is a collection of autobiographical essays by important and renowned teachers at mid-life. The essays, which are deeply personal, will focus on how these women negotiate the psychological, physical, and social changes brought on by menopause and how the aging process affects their lives as professionals, feminists, writers, mentors, and instructors in the academy. The book addresses such questions as the following: What challenges are left for the ...
Additional Info:
Wise Women is a collection of autobiographical essays by important and renowned teachers at mid-life. The essays, which are deeply personal, will focus on how these women negotiate the psychological, physical, and social changes brought on by menopause and how the aging process affects their lives as professionals, feminists, writers, mentors, and instructors in the academy. The book addresses such questions as the following: What challenges are left for the feminists who came of age during the women's movement and now have achieved academic success? How do women teachers experience their aging selves in the classroom? and What legacy will mid-life women leave their younger women colleagues? All of these questions, as well as many others, are covered in this insightful and groundbreaking work. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

Part I Body & Time
ch. 1. Teaching Where I Was Taught: Coming Home (Mary Gordon)
ch. 2. Game Plans (Mimi Schwartz)
ch. 3. "Pregnant with [Myself], at Last": Images of Midlife/A Journal Entry (Jan Zlotnik Schmidt)
ch. 4. "Saturating Language with Love": Variations on a Dream (Marlene A. Schiwy)
ch. 5. The Time of Our Lives: The Public Life of Teaching (Patricia C. Phillips)

Part II Ripening & Rootedness
ch. 6. Reverie (Jane Tompkins)
ch. 7. Goodbye, Ms. Chips (Julia Alvarez)
ch. 8. But Tell Me, Do You Like Teaching? (Patricia Hampl)
ch. 9. Me, Myself, Menopause, and I (Dona Lee Davis)
ch. 10. Reflections on Teaching (and Life in General) Once You've Become a Grandmother (Jean Bethke Elshtain)
ch. 11. Mud Ponies (Diane Glancy)
ch. 12. Unsettled Weather (Gail B. Griffin)

Part III Feisty & Girls
ch. 13. Academic Witchery: Snakes and Snails and Scholarly Tales (Dean Falk)
ch. 14. Choice Points and Courage (Diane F. Halpern)
ch. 15. I Can't Hear ... I Can't See ... I Can't Remember Anything (Lynne Taetzsch)
ch. 16. Memories of a "First Woman" (Tikva Simone Frymer)
ch. 17. Rant for Old Teachers (Paula Gunn Allen)

Part IV Teaching in Time
ch. 18. A Teaching Life (Christa L. Walck)
ch. 19. Too Soon Old, Too Late Smart (Gayle Pemberton)
ch. 20. Ecstasy: Teaching and Learning without Limits (Bell Hooks)
ch. 21. Re-viewing Our Professional Lives: Talking (and Listening) for a Living (Margaret Matlin)
ch. 22. On Statutes and Dogs, Poems and "Regs," and Life inside the Classroom (Judy Scales-Trent)
ch. 23. Exploring Critical Feminist Pedagogy: Revelations and Confessions about Teaching at Midlife (Esther Ngan-ling Chow)

Part V Community & Generativity
ch. 24. Themes That Link through Time (Sue V. Rosser)
ch. 25. Naming, Sharing, Speaking: Teaching in Midlife (Jean F. O'Barr)
ch. 26. "Thinking Back through [My] Mother": Reclaiming Anger, Advocacy, and Pleasure in Teaching (Judith A. Dorney)
ch. 27. Charis = Light = Grace (Phyllis R. Freeman)

Notes and References
Selected Bibliography
Contributors
Acknowledgments
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"Crossing Over into Postmodernity: Educational Invitations" (pdf)

Article
Pazmiño, Robert W.
2001
in God Our Teacher: Theological Basics in Christian Education, (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House), 243-252
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
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Spitwad Sutras: Classroom Teaching as Sublime Vocation

Book
Inchausti, Robert
1993
Bergin & Garvey, Westport, CT
LB1775.2.I53 1993
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
This work goes beyond the basics of classroom management to consider the path of both teacher and student toward authentic intellectual maturity and spiritual growth. It provides a framework for stripping away the external and personal pressures that bleed intellectual content out of classroom teaching so that teachers may, in fact, experience their vocation as "sublime." Written in the novelistic first-person narrative, it is a seasoned teacher's story of his ...
Additional Info:
This work goes beyond the basics of classroom management to consider the path of both teacher and student toward authentic intellectual maturity and spiritual growth. It provides a framework for stripping away the external and personal pressures that bleed intellectual content out of classroom teaching so that teachers may, in fact, experience their vocation as "sublime." Written in the novelistic first-person narrative, it is a seasoned teacher's story of his initiation from graduate student at the University of Chicago to ninth-grade teacher in a Catholic high school where he manned the battle lines in provincial, petty, sometime even violent world of American secondary school. It is also the story of how a certain Brother Blake, a 67-year-old practitioner of the "pedagogy of the sublime," passed on his vision of classroom teaching as a sublime vocation. A major contribution to the field by the acclaimed author of The Ignorant Perfection of Ordinary People. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Vocation or Provocation?
ch. 2 The Dialectics of Discipline
ch. 3 Breakthrough
ch. 4 The Lost Art
ch. 5 Classroom Praxis from A to B
ch. 6 Ceremonies Sacred and Profane
ch. 7 Attempting the Impossible
ch. 8 Teaching Social Science: The Lost Civilization of Octopia
ch. 9 Teaching English Composition: The Spirit and the Semicolon
ch. 10 Teaching Social Justice: The Classroom as Culture Clash
ch. 11 Teaching Sex Education
ch. 12 Teaching Literature: Making the World Safe for Franz Kafka
ch. 13 Higher Education
ch. 14 Program Notes
Maxims, Aphorisms, Insights, and Reflections on the Art of Classroom Teaching

Selected Readings
Index
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The Close: A Young Woman's First Year at Seminary

Book
Breyer, Chloe
2000
Basic Books, New York, NY
BV4070.G48B74 2000
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
An intimate and inspiring chronicle of a young woman entering a vocation that for centuries has been the exclusive dominion of menSet in the context of the Church Year, The Close is an enthralling account of one young woman's spiritual journey. It is both a personal meditation on faith, in the spirit of Kathleen Norris's Cloister Walk, and a fascinating behind-the-scenes story of a graduate student's first year, in the ...
Additional Info:
An intimate and inspiring chronicle of a young woman entering a vocation that for centuries has been the exclusive dominion of menSet in the context of the Church Year, The Close is an enthralling account of one young woman's spiritual journey. It is both a personal meditation on faith, in the spirit of Kathleen Norris's Cloister Walk, and a fascinating behind-the-scenes story of a graduate student's first year, in the mode of Scott Turow's One L. Raised in a liberal, interfaith home, Breyer, responding to an inner call to a spiritual vocation, began her training at New York's General Theological Seminary in 1997. She describes her intense immersion in daily prayer, the rigors and rewards of the academic program, and the challenging tension between secular and spiritual that marks her training, including working as a chaplain at Bellevue Hospital. She probes the day-to-day meanings of such profound issues as exaltation, enlightenment, and redemption, illuminating the unique experience of a young person of faith preparing to live and hoping to thrive in a secular modern world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Coming into the Kingdom

ch. 1 Advent
ch. 2 Christmas
ch. 3 Epiphany
ch. 4 Lent
ch. 5 Easter
ch. 6 Pentecost

Acknowledgments
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Riches for the Poor: The Clemente Course in the Humanities

Book
Shorris, Earl
2000
W.W. Norton & Company, New York, NY
HV 4045.S464 2000
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
In this groundbreaking work, Shorris examines the nature of poverty in America today. Why are people poor, and why do they stay poor? Shorris argues that they lack politics, or the ability to participate fully in the public world; knowing only the immediacy and oppression of force, the poor remain trapped and isolated. To test his theory, he created an experimental school teaching art, logic, philosophy, and poetry to poor ...
Additional Info:
In this groundbreaking work, Shorris examines the nature of poverty in America today. Why are people poor, and why do they stay poor? Shorris argues that they lack politics, or the ability to participate fully in the public world; knowing only the immediacy and oppression of force, the poor remain trapped and isolated. To test his theory, he created an experimental school teaching art, logic, philosophy, and poetry to poor people. Shorris hoped that, by studying the humanities, his students would learn to reflect and negotiate rather than simply react -- and would use this knowledge to break the cycle of poverty on their own. The results of his experiment proved nothing short of astonishing.

Here is the full story -- a completely revised and expanded edition of Shorris's New American Blues -- of the landmark endeavor that has spawned nearly two dozen programs in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, and that has been lauded from town meetings in the Yukon to the front page of the New York Times. Included in this book are reading lists and detailed information on the organization, staffing, and teaching methods used in the course. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Intentions

ch. 1 Richer Than Rockefeller
ch. 2 A Game of Poverty: Definitions
ch. 3 Born for Each Other
ch. 4 The Golden Age of Poverty
ch. 5 The Surround of Force
ch. 6 The Mirror of Force
ch. 7 The Fallacy of Work
ch. 8 Citizenship by Exclusion
ch. 9 Across Cultures
ch. 10 Political Inventions
ch. 11 A Prison Epiphany
ch. 12 adical Humanism
ch. 13 The Clemente Experiment Begins
ch. 14 The Bard Course
ch. 15 The Curriculum
ch. 16 Variations and Self-Criticism
ch. 17 Other Countries, Other Cultures
ch. 18 Conclusion: A Dangerous Corollary

Appendix
Index
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Wabash tree

The Scope of Our Art: The Vocation of the Theological Teacher

Book
Jones, L. Gregory and Stephanie Paulsell, eds.
2002
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
BV1533.S36 2002
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
In The Scope of Our Art a diverse group of theological teachers explores the spiritual dimensions of their vocation as religious educators. Drawing on a rich array of resources, including Scripture, The Rule of St. Benedict, medieval women mystics, the Methodist theologian Georgia Harkness, and Simone Weil, as well as their own teaching experiences, the contributors discuss the vital relationships between academic and spiritual formation, religious commitments and teaching practices, ...
Additional Info:
In The Scope of Our Art a diverse group of theological teachers explores the spiritual dimensions of their vocation as religious educators. Drawing on a rich array of resources, including Scripture, The Rule of St. Benedict, medieval women mystics, the Methodist theologian Georgia Harkness, and Simone Weil, as well as their own teaching experiences, the contributors discuss the vital relationships between academic and spiritual formation, religious commitments and teaching practices, and individual and institutional vocation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Formative Practices of the Theological Teacher's Vocation (W. Clark Gilpin)
Writing as a Spiritual Discipline (Stephanie Paulsell)
Reading as a Spiritual Discipline (Paul J. Griffiths)
Contemplation in the Midst of Chaos: Contesting the Maceration of the Theological Teacher (Bonnie J. Miller-McLemore)
My Vocational Kinship with the United States' First Female Theologian (Rosemary Skinner Keller)
Theological Teachers in Their Classrooms Teaching as Conversation (Susan M. Simonaitis)
Teaching as a Ministry of Hope (Paul J. Wadell)
Teaching as Cultivating Wisdom for a Complex World (Lois Malcolm)
Teaching and Learning as Ceaseless Prayer (Michael Battle)
Theological Teachers in Their Schools: "Yea, the Work of Our Hands, Establish Thou It": On Stability in the Academic Life (Claire Mathews McGinnis)
Vocation in the Outback (Frederick W. Norris)
Negotiating the Tensions of Vocation (L. Gregory Jones)
The Formation of Vocation - Institutional and Individual (Leanne van Dyke)
Attending to the Collective Vocation (Gordon T. Smith)
Contributors
Article cover image

"Kitchen Table Banter as Engaged Pedagogy"

Article
Westfield, N. Lynne
2001
Religious Education 96, no. 3 (2001): 423-429
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Toward a Theology of Teaching"

Article
Susan M.
1999
Wabash Consultation on the Vocation of the Teaching Theologian (1999)
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Nice Work if We Can Keep It: Confessions of a Junior Professor"

Article
Newman, Kathy
1999
Academe 85, no. 3 (1999): 29-33
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
A junior faculty member reflects on the dilemma of that professional position, noting that its anxieties fall into two categories: "Is this all there is?" and "What if we lose it?" She examines problems with, and prohibitions against, speaking one's mind in that position, sees solutions as being institutional or individual, and examines how concerns are linked to other campus constituencies.
Additional Info:
A junior faculty member reflects on the dilemma of that professional position, noting that its anxieties fall into two categories: "Is this all there is?" and "What if we lose it?" She examines problems with, and prohibitions against, speaking one's mind in that position, sees solutions as being institutional or individual, and examines how concerns are linked to other campus constituencies.
Article cover image

"Member-at-Large: An Interview with Tina Pippin, Recipient of the Inaugural AAR Excellence in Teaching Award"

Article
Peterson, Thomas
2001
Religious Studies News 16, no. 1 (2001): 19-20
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students in Higher Education: A Perilous Passage?

Book
Weidman, John C., Twale, Darla J., Stein, Elizabeth Leahy
2001
ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, New York, NY
LC192.4.S63 2001
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This report on the process of graduate and professional student socialization provides information that can be of use to graduate program faculty and administrators, professional associations, state legislatures, and professional licensing bodies charged with assuring clients that well qualified professional practitioners are being prepared in the nation's universities. It addresses implications of issues raised in current literature for designing more effective graduate programs. Socialization in graduate school refers to the ...
Additional Info:
This report on the process of graduate and professional student socialization provides information that can be of use to graduate program faculty and administrators, professional associations, state legislatures, and professional licensing bodies charged with assuring clients that well qualified professional practitioners are being prepared in the nation's universities. It addresses implications of issues raised in current literature for designing more effective graduate programs. Socialization in graduate school refers to the processes through which individuals gain the knowledge, skills, and values necessary for successful entry into a professional career requiring an advanced level of specialized knowledge and skills. The first two sections, "The Professional and Socialization" and "Conceptualizing Socialization in Graduate and Professional Programs," describe the various elements of this socialization process, drawing from research on adult socialization, role acquisition, and career development. The third section, "A Framework for the Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students," presents a conceptual model of graduate and professional student socialization that assumes socialization occurs through an interactive set of stages. The fourth section, "Institutional Culture: Recurrent Themes," illustrates several changing patterns in graduate education that are exerting pressure for reform. The fifth section, "Institutional Culture and Socialization: Differences among Academic Programs," contrasts socialization processes across academic program goals, faculty expectations, and student peer culture. The final section, "Easing the Perilous Passage," discusses modifying the graduate degree program and faculty and administrator roles, increasing diversity, and offering support to students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

The Professions and Socialization
The Professions in Society
Characterizing Socialization
Dimensions of Socialization
Conceptualizing Socialization in Graduate and Professional Programs
Stages of Socialization
Core Elements of Socialization
Structural Engagement
A Framework for the Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students
Linear Models of Socialization
Nonlinear Models of Socialization
An Interactive Framework for the Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students
Institutional Culture: Recurrent Themes
Diversity
International Graduate Students
Professionalism
Professionalization
Ethics
Technology and Distance Learning
Institutional Culture and Socialization: Differences Among Academic Programs
Knowledge Acquisition
Investment
Involvement
Structural Engagement
Easing the Perilous Passage
Modifying the Program
Increasing Diversity
Offering Support for Students
Modifying Faculty and Administrative Roles

References
Index
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Exiles from Eden: Religion and the Academic Vocation in America

Book
Schwehn, Mark R.
1993
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
LB1778.2.S38 1993
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Exiles From Eden sounds a call to the American academic community to begin seeking a solution to the many problems facing higher education today by rediscovering a proper sense of its vocation. Schwehn argues that the modern university has forgotten its spiritual foundations and that it needs to reappropriate those foundations before it can creatively and responsibly reform itself. The first part of the book offers a critical examination of ...
Additional Info:
Exiles From Eden sounds a call to the American academic community to begin seeking a solution to the many problems facing higher education today by rediscovering a proper sense of its vocation. Schwehn argues that the modern university has forgotten its spiritual foundations and that it needs to reappropriate those foundations before it can creatively and responsibly reform itself. The first part of the book offers a critical examination of the ethos of the modern academy, especially its understanding of knowledge, teaching, and learning. Schwehn then formulates a description of the "new cultural context" within which the world of higher learning is presently situated. Finally, he develops a view of knowledge and inquiry that is linked essentially to character, friendship, and community. In the process, he demonstrates that the practice of certain spiritual virtues is and always has been essential to the process of genuine learning - even within the secular academy. Schwehn critiques philosophies of higher education he sees as misguided, from Weber and Henry Adams to Derek Bok, Allan Bloom, and William G. Perry, Jr., drawing out valid insights, while always showing the theological underpinnings of the so-called secular thinkers. He emphasizes the importance of community, drawing on both the secular communitarian theory of Richard Rorty and that of the Christian theorist Parker Palmer. Finally, he outlines his own prescription for a classroom-centered spiritual community of scholars. Exiles From Eden examines the relationship between religion and higher learning in a way that is at once historical and philosophical and that is both critical and constructive. It calls for nothing less than a reunion of the intellectual, the moral, and the spiritual virtues within the world of higher education in America. It will engage all those concerned with higher education in America today: faculty, students, parents, alumni, administrators, trustees, and foundation officers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The Academic Vocation
ch. 2 Communities of Learning
ch. 3 Spirited Inquiry
ch. 4 Questions and Considerations
ch. 5 Adams's Education
ch. 6 Conclusion: Adam's Exile

Index
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The Teacher's Calling: A Spirituality for Those Who Teach

Book
Durka, Gloria
2002
Paulist Press, Mahwah, NJ
LB1027.2.D87 2002
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Teaching is more, much more, than getting up in front of a class full of students and presenting information to them. It is, affirms distinguished educator, writer and lecturer Gloria Durka, a true vocation, "a calling that makes claims on our souls".

Her book, which is written for teachers of all grade levels, is a journey into the soul of education and the heart of the teacher. In ...
Additional Info:
Teaching is more, much more, than getting up in front of a class full of students and presenting information to them. It is, affirms distinguished educator, writer and lecturer Gloria Durka, a true vocation, "a calling that makes claims on our souls".

Her book, which is written for teachers of all grade levels, is a journey into the soul of education and the heart of the teacher. In seven chapters, she covers such ideas as teaching from the heart; teaching courageously, creatively, wisely and morally; and, the greatest challenge of all, facing one's own vulnerabilities. Each chapter ends with prayers and reflections that help readers enrich their spirituality. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Teaching from the Heart: The Soul of the Teacher
ch. 2 Teaching Courageously: Showing How
ch. 3 Teaching Creatively: Imagining How
ch. 4 Teaching Wisely: Knowing How
ch. 5 Teaching Morally: The Ethic of Caring
ch. 6 Facing Ourselves Facing the Unfamiliar: Multiple Vulnerabilities
ch. 7 The Joy of Teaching: A Portrait of Possibility

Notes
Bibliography
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Everyone a Teacher

Book
Schwehn, Mark
2000
University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, IN
LB1025.3.E87 2000
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
"All of us teach," begins Mark Schwehn's anthology of readings on teaching and learning. Teaching is woven into the fabric of our everyday lives. It includes training children, forming habits and characters, witnessing to a way of life, nurturing reflection and imagination, and imparting goals as well as facts and skills. Teachers are parents, grandparents, spouses, friends, neighbors, pastors, siblings, and co-workers, as well as professional educators. Most people know ...
Additional Info:
"All of us teach," begins Mark Schwehn's anthology of readings on teaching and learning. Teaching is woven into the fabric of our everyday lives. It includes training children, forming habits and characters, witnessing to a way of life, nurturing reflection and imagination, and imparting goals as well as facts and skills. Teachers are parents, grandparents, spouses, friends, neighbors, pastors, siblings, and co-workers, as well as professional educators. Most people know good teaching when they encounter it, Schwehn argues, and few would identify it with a list of techniques. Although good teaching often seems closer to an art than a skill, teaching is not an occult practice, but a public activity that can be improved by practice and questioning and demonstrated by good examples.

Through Schwehn's choice of examples and deft introductions, Everyone a Teacher is an argument for a rich account of good teaching. It invites reflection yet avoids the abstractions of psychology and educational theory. From Socrates teaching a Greek slave boy geometry to Mark Twain's river-boat pilot on the Mississippi, from a real classroom of kindergarten children in Chicago to the parents who tenderly raise their child in Agee's A Death in the Family, the readings remind us of the historical and human importance of teaching and of the qualities of good teaching. These readings are intended to help us all think about the meaning of teaching and learning, for the sake of improving our teaching in everyday life. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Everyone a Teacher: Introduction

I. Why Teach? The Gains and Losses of Learning
II. What Is Teaching? Ancient Showing and Modern Telling
III. Forms and Ways of Teaching
IV. Teaching at Home; At Home Teaching
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Classrooms Without Fear: A Journey to Rediscover the Joy of Teaching

Book
Marino, Thomas A.
2001
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB1025.3.M37 2001
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Here is one teacher's story about his personal journey toward a safe classroom for his students. He explains how new technologies, rising education costs - but most important personal, inward changes - forced a reexamination of his teaching methods and goals. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Here is one teacher's story about his personal journey toward a safe classroom for his students. He explains how new technologies, rising education costs - but most important personal, inward changes - forced a reexamination of his teaching methods and goals. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: Fear

ch. 1 Teaching: What’s love got to do with it?
ch. 2 Grammar School: The Strength of Memories
ch. 3 Junior High School: It Gets Complicated
ch. 4 High School: For the Fun of It
ch. 5 Brown University: It was a Start
ch. 6 Temple University: Not Learning to Teach
ch. 7 Kansas. If I only had a Heart, Courage and a Brain
ch. 8 The Return To Temple: The Odyssey
ch. 9 I Could Not Do It Anymore
ch. 10 The Garden
ch. 11 The Safe Classroom: Teaching as Community
ch. 12 Jazz

Postscript: Hope
List of Works Cited
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Teaching as An Act of Faith

Book
Migliazzo, Arlin C.
2002
Fordham University Press, New York, NY
BL60.T43 2002
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Interest in church-related higher education has increased greatly in recent years. Teaching as an Act of Faith is a practical guidebook on strategies to incarnate mission and epitomize theological and theoretical reflection in the classroom. In original essays, distinguished practitioners from fourteen liberal arts disciplines and Roman Catholic, Wesleyan, Anabaptist, Lutheran, and Reformed traditions demonstrate how they have been able link religious values more directly to their teaching. (From the ...
Additional Info:
Interest in church-related higher education has increased greatly in recent years. Teaching as an Act of Faith is a practical guidebook on strategies to incarnate mission and epitomize theological and theoretical reflection in the classroom. In original essays, distinguished practitioners from fourteen liberal arts disciplines and Roman Catholic, Wesleyan, Anabaptist, Lutheran, and Reformed traditions demonstrate how they have been able link religious values more directly to their teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction: An Odyssey of the Mind and Spirit

Pt. 1 The Social Sciences
ch. 1 Teaching Economics While Keeping the Faith
ch. 2 Scuttling the Schizophrenic Student Mind: On Teaching the Unity of Faith and Learning in Psychology
ch. 3 At the Lectern Between Jerusalem and Sarajevo: A Christian Approach to Teaching Political Science
ch. 4 Sociology and Faith: Inviting Students into the Conversation

Pt. 2 The Natural Sciences
ch. 5 Developing a Christian Perspective on the Nature of Mathematics
ch. 6 Christian Theism: Alive and Well in the Physics and Astronomy Classroom
ch. 7 A Careful Convergence: Integrating Biology and Faith in the Church-Related College

Pt. 3 The Fine Arts
ch. 8 "I Love to Tell the Story:" Teaching Theatre at a Church-Related College
ch. 9 Toward a Christian Pedagogy of Art
ch. 10 Music Pedagogy and the Christian Faith: A Twenty-Year Journey of Discovery

Pt. 4 The Humanities
ch. 11 An Ignatian Approach to Teaching Philosophy
ch. 12 Teaching Literature as Mediation: A Christian Practice
ch. 13 Faith, Learning, and the Teaching of History
ch. 14 Christian Faith and the Teaching of Speech Communication

Conclusion: A Prudent Synergy: Pedagogy for Mind and Spirit
App Christianity and Higher Education: A Selected Bibliography
App Ecumenical Christian Professional Associations
Notes on Contributors
Index
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Spirituality, Ethics, Religion, and Teaching: A Professor's Journey

Book
Nash, Robert J.
2002
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LB1027.2.N37 2002
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
This book is a first-person, pedagogical reflection on what the author - an applied philosopher with an appointment in a professional school - has learned about being a teacher and a student, over a thirty-five-year career in a "public ivy" university. This narrative recounts a series of life-changing, intellectual, and emotional insights gleaned over three decades from students, colleagues, scholars, and mentors. The author's personal story traces the struggle to ...
Additional Info:
This book is a first-person, pedagogical reflection on what the author - an applied philosopher with an appointment in a professional school - has learned about being a teacher and a student, over a thirty-five-year career in a "public ivy" university. This narrative recounts a series of life-changing, intellectual, and emotional insights gleaned over three decades from students, colleagues, scholars, and mentors. The author's personal story traces the struggle to create a passionate spirituality of teaching, one that reframes traditional notions of religion and spirituality, as well as one that attempts to correct conventional misunderstandings of postmodernism. Nash's story is every educator's story - lived in unique ways at every level of teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Passion to Teach...and to Learn
ch. 2 Meeting My Mentor: The Passion for Politics
ch. 3 Becoming a Constructivist: The Passion to Teach About Morality
ch. 4 Real World Ethics: The Passion To Make the Right Decisions
ch. 5 A Spirituality of Teaching: The Passion for Meaning
ch. 6 Passionate Teaching-Spiritual Learning: The Power of Narratives

References
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Where We Stand: Class Matters

Book
bell hooks
2000
Routledge, New York, NY
HN90.S6H66 2000
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Drawing on both her roots in Kentucky and her adventures with Manhattan Coop boards, Where We Stand is a successful black woman's reflection - personal, straight forward, and rigorously honest - on how our dilemmas of class and race are intertwined, and how we can find ways to think beyond them. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Drawing on both her roots in Kentucky and her adventures with Manhattan Coop boards, Where We Stand is a successful black woman's reflection - personal, straight forward, and rigorously honest - on how our dilemmas of class and race are intertwined, and how we can find ways to think beyond them. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
preface: where we stand
introduction: Class Matters

ch. 1 Making the Personal Political: Class in the Family
ch. 2 Coming to Class Consciousness
ch. 3 Class and the Politics of Living Simply
ch. 4 Money Hungry
ch. 5 The Politics of Greed
ch. 6 Being Rich
ch. 7 The Me-Me Class: The Young and the Ruthless
ch. 8 Class and Race: The New Black Elite
ch. 9 Feminism and Class Power
ch. 10 White Poverty: The Politics of Invisibility
ch. 11 Solidarity with the Poor
ch. 12 Class Claims: Real Estate Racism
ch. 13 Crossing Class Boundaries
ch. 14 Living without Class Hierarchy
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The Foreign Self: Truth Telling as Educational Inquiry

Book
Tochon, Francois V., ed.
2002
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
P106.F654 2002
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Unidentified contributors, but perhaps foreign language teachers, explain how situating oneself outside of a familiar context can lead to self-examination, which is itself the basis of education. Cross-cultural educators and language teachers are the intended audience for this semiotic, intercultural exploration of the idea of self. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Unidentified contributors, but perhaps foreign language teachers, explain how situating oneself outside of a familiar context can lead to self-examination, which is itself the basis of education. Cross-cultural educators and language teachers are the intended audience for this semiotic, intercultural exploration of the idea of self. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Gloria Ladson-Billings)
Introduction (François V. Tochon)

ch. 1 Blending Oil into Water: Making the Invisible Visible and Giving a Voice to the Silenced (Jung Euen Choi)
ch. 2 Hail to the Email: Tales about Foreign Language Education in a Globalized Age (Sabine Raizler and Gloria Carter)
ch. 3 Minority Languages in the Classroom: Promise becomes Possibility (Elizabeth R. Miller)
ch. 4 Practicum Students' Confessions on Truth-telling in Reflections: Kurosawa’s Dreams (Mary K. Thompson-Cooper)
ch. 5 Finding the Truth in Our Inclusive Community (Amy Krauthamer-Maloney)
ch. 6 Between Black-and-White and Blue-White-Red: Pictorial Illustrations and Color in the Foreign Language Textbook (Hyo-Kyung Ahn)
ch. 7 The Truth about Grooms (or, How to Tell Those Tuxedoed Men Apart) (Marcus B. Weaver-Hightower)
ch. 8 Families of the Soul: The Truth on Method (François V. Tochon)

Bibliography
Article cover image

"Creating a Culture of Commitment to Learning and Teaching: Twenty Reflections from Twenty Years Experience in Faculty Development"

Article
Frederick, Peter
1996
Paper presented at Wabash College (June 1996)
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Personalizing Pedagogy: Different Gifts for Teaching and Learning"

Article
Marino, Tom
2002
The Teaching, Learning and Technology Group (2002) http://www.tltgroup.org/PersonalizingPedagogy/Marino.htm
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Personal narrative reflecting on the significance of recognizing your own, different, teaching gifts/skills, in the online teaching environment.
Additional Info:
Personal narrative reflecting on the significance of recognizing your own, different, teaching gifts/skills, in the online teaching environment.
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Teacher: The One Who Made the Difference

Book
Edmundson, Mark
2003
Random House, New York, NY
LA2317.M49E36 2003
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
"When Frank Lears came to teach at Medford High School in the fall of 1969, he looked easy prey to Mark Edmundson and his school-hating pals. At the front of the class, they saw a small, nervous man wearing a moth-eaten suit two sizes too big, with a large paperclip fastened to the left lapel. Lears, just out of Harvard, struck the class as absurd, the kind of teacher they could ...
Additional Info:
"When Frank Lears came to teach at Medford High School in the fall of 1969, he looked easy prey to Mark Edmundson and his school-hating pals. At the front of the class, they saw a small, nervous man wearing a moth-eaten suit two sizes too big, with a large paperclip fastened to the left lapel. Lears, just out of Harvard, struck the class as absurd, the kind of teacher they could torment at will. And for some time, they did just that." "But Edmundson and his classmates radically underestimated Frank Lears. Lears got rid of their tired textbooks and brought in Kesey, Camus, and Freud. He ran a group psychology experiment that no one in the room ever forgot. He opened the class to a panel of SDS members and a crowd of proto-Black Panthers. He risked life and limb in a snowball fight with Edmundson and his football-playing buddies. He shook things up." Lears's opposition to the lockstep life of Medford High got under the skin and into the minds of Mark Edmundson and his friends - friends like Dubby O'Day, a fatalistic goof-off majoring in spitball ballistics. The conflicting ways of life represented by Lears and Medford's formidable football coach, Mace Johnson, confronted Edmundson with a choice. At real cost - the cost of conformity and belonging - Edmundson chose to go Lears's way. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Prologue

ch. 1 First Day
ch. 2 Mustangs
ch. 3 Blind Girl
ch. 4 My father, Frank Lears, tv, me
ch. 5 Franklin Lears fights back
ch. 6 Cute
ch. 7 Walrus
ch. 8 SDS comes to call
ch. 9 Black and white
ch. 10 Socrates rocks
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Academic Life: Hospitality, Ethics, and Spirituality

Book
Bennett, John B.
2003
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LA227.4.B466 2003
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In this profound look at the academy, John Bennett reminds us that our leadership decisions always presuppose our philosophies of life and that understanding precedes practice. How we understand the communities we lead informs the many practical judgments we make about directions to take, structures to create, processes to initiate, and values to uphold.

Bennett argues that faculty may understand their departments or institutions in one of two ...
Additional Info:
In this profound look at the academy, John Bennett reminds us that our leadership decisions always presuppose our philosophies of life and that understanding precedes practice. How we understand the communities we lead informs the many practical judgments we make about directions to take, structures to create, processes to initiate, and values to uphold.

Bennett argues that faculty may understand their departments or institutions in one of two ways: as simply aggregations of individuals or as communities of intertwined persons. From these views, two different leadership values and positions emerge.

The first disposes us toward seeing academic conflict as inevitable and elevates heroic leadership styles where power is understood in terms of advancing one agenda over competitors. The second underwrites leadership as supporting openness to others and emphasizes the vital contributions that can follow.

By providing specific illustrations of the two modes of leadership and the nature of hospitality and openness, Academic Life presents a strong platform from which to build a rich and rewarding academic community. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The nature of insistent individualism
ch. 2 Why the prevalence of insistent individualism?
ch. 3 Hospitality as an essential virtue
ch. 4 Self, others, institutions, and the common good
ch. 5 Conversation as an essential metaphor
ch. 6 The uses of conversation
ch. 7 Community and covenant
ch. 8 Engaged, but not heroic, leadership
Article cover image

"Chapter Nine"

Article
Steiner, George
1998
in Errata: An Examined Life (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1998), 136-158
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"On Minding Your Call- When No One is Calling"

Article
Palmer, Parker J.
Weavings XI, no. 3 (1996)
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Evoking the Spirit in Public Education"

Article
Palmer, Parker J.
1999
Educational Leadership Dec.1998/Jan.
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Provides information on spirituality of teaching and learning. How to evoke the spiritual dimension of public education; Discussion on spiritual lives of teachers; Most important step toward provoking step in public education.
Additional Info:
Provides information on spirituality of teaching and learning. How to evoke the spiritual dimension of public education; Discussion on spiritual lives of teachers; Most important step toward provoking step in public education.
Article cover image

"Scholarship: A Sacred Vocation"

Article
Pelikan, Jaroslav
1984
Scholarly Publishing 16, no. 1 (1984): 19
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Teaching: A Complex and Passionate Experience"

Article
Brookfield, Stephen
in The Skillful Teacher (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1990), 1-14, 192-211
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity

Book
Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky
2003
Duke University Press, Durham, NC
PS3569.E316 T68 2003
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
A pioneer in queer theory and literary studies, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick brings together for the first time in Touching Feeling her most powerful explorations of emotion and expression. In essays that show how her groundbreaking work in queer theory has developed into a deep interest in affect, Sedgwick offers what she calls "tools and techniques for nondualistic thought," in the process touching and transforming such theoretical discourses as psychoanalysis, speech-act ...
Additional Info:
A pioneer in queer theory and literary studies, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick brings together for the first time in Touching Feeling her most powerful explorations of emotion and expression. In essays that show how her groundbreaking work in queer theory has developed into a deep interest in affect, Sedgwick offers what she calls "tools and techniques for nondualistic thought," in the process touching and transforming such theoretical discourses as psychoanalysis, speech-act theory, Western Buddhism, and the Foucauldian "hermeneutics of suspicion."

In prose sometimes somber, often high-spirited, and always accessible and moving, Touching Feeling interrogates-through virtuoso readings of works by Henry James, J. L. Austin, Judith Butler, the psychologist Silvan Tomkins and others-emotion in many forms. What links the work of teaching to the experience of illness? How can shame become an engine for queer politics, performance, and pleasure? Is sexuality more like an affect or a drive? Is paranoia the only realistic epistemology for modern intellectuals? Ultimately, Sedgwick's unfashionable commitment to the truth of happiness propels a book as open-hearted as it is intellectually daring. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Interlude, Pedagogic
ch. 1 Shame, Theatricality, and Queer Performativity: Henry James's The Art of the Novel
ch. 2 Around the Performative: Periperformative Vicinities in Nineteenth-Century Narrative
ch. 3 Shame in the Cybernetic Fold: Reading Silvan Tomkins
ch. 4 Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading, or, You're So Paranoid, You Probably Think This Essay Is About You
ch. 5 Pedagogy of Buddhism
Works Cited
Index
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Feminisms and Pedagogies of Everyday Life

Book
Luke, Carmen
1996
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LC197.F466 1996
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
From the Publishers
Despite the intimidating reference to pedagogy in the title, the anthology is true to the encompassing notion of feminism as a foundation from which theories and disciplines can emanate in order to voice a variety of experience. The American, British, and Australian scholars provide compelling essays on identity, friendship, motherhood, hunger, the media, parenting, childcare, shame, and the silencing influences of legal systems and the academy. ...
Additional Info:
From the Publishers
Despite the intimidating reference to pedagogy in the title, the anthology is true to the encompassing notion of feminism as a foundation from which theories and disciplines can emanate in order to voice a variety of experience. The American, British, and Australian scholars provide compelling essays on identity, friendship, motherhood, hunger, the media, parenting, childcare, shame, and the silencing influences of legal systems and the academy. Unusual for this type of collection is a lone wolf contribution about learning to be a man--the "other half" viewpoint by which feminism marks its progress.

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Learning Identities and Differences
ch. 2 Women and Friendships: Pedagogies of Care and Relationality
ch. 3 Motherhood as Pedagogy: Developmental Psychology and the Accounts of Mothers of Young Children
ch. 4 Learning to Be a Man: Dilemmas and Contradictions of Masculine Experience
ch. 5 Hunger as Ideology
ch. 6 "Girls' Mags" and the Pedagogical Formation of the Girl
ch. 7 Childhood and Parenting in Children's Popular Culture and Childcare Magazines
ch. 8 Play for Profit
ch. 9 Women in the Holocene: Ethnicity, Fantasy, and the Film The Joy Luck Club
ch. 10 The Pedagogy of Shame
ch. 11 Reconsidering the Notions of Voice and Experience in Critical Pedagogy
ch. 12 Legal Pedagogy as Authorized Silence(s)
ch. 13 Everyday Life in the Academy: Postmodernist Feminisms, Generic Seductions, Rewriting and Being Heard

Contributors
Index
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Inquiry and Reflection: Framing Narrative Practice in Education

Book
Brunner, Diane DuBose
1994
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LC196 .B78 1994
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
Inquiry and Reflection shows how stories of schooling can elucidate difficult, and unexamined problems facing teachers. While professional texts tend to raise issues of power and its distribution and questions of culture and ideology, often the manner of presentation is abstract, and pre-service teachers have difficulty making connections. Yet literary, film, and video materials illuminate problems and suggest ideas to which teachers can actively respond. This book offers teacher educators ...
Additional Info:
Inquiry and Reflection shows how stories of schooling can elucidate difficult, and unexamined problems facing teachers. While professional texts tend to raise issues of power and its distribution and questions of culture and ideology, often the manner of presentation is abstract, and pre-service teachers have difficulty making connections. Yet literary, film, and video materials illuminate problems and suggest ideas to which teachers can actively respond. This book offers teacher educators a variety of resources for articulating a critical pedagogy and suggests an alternative to the technical, job training approach to teacher education by providing a unique educational curricula that illuminates issues of power, ideology, and culture. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction: Narrative Frames
ch. 2 Reflection and Teaching
ch. 3 Education as a Liberal Art
ch. 4 Teaching and Teachers in Stories of Schooling
ch. 5 Turning the Gaze: Student Voice and Position in Schooling Narratives
ch. 6 More Stories
ch. 7 Toward Reflexive/Reflective Practice

Notes
Annotated Bibliography of Schooling Narratives
Index
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"Beyond the Faith-Knowledge Dichotomy: Teaching as Vocation"

Article
Newman, Elizabeth
2002
in Professing in the Postmodern Academy : Faculty and the Future of Church-related Colleges (Waco, TX : Baylor University Press, 2002), 131-148
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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I've Got a Story to Tell: Identity and Place in the Academy

Book
Jackson, Sandra, and Jose Solis Jordan, eds.
1999
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LC3731.I94 1999
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Conventional wisdom has it that education is the great equalizer in a society. Notwithstanding, access to higher education and terminal degrees have not proven synonymous with the establishment of legitimacy for many voices. Academics and scholars of color continue to confront barriers constituent of the racialized, gendered, and class(ed) baggage characterizing dominant social relations. In I've Got a Story to Tell different members of academe struggle with the institutionalized ...
Additional Info:
Conventional wisdom has it that education is the great equalizer in a society. Notwithstanding, access to higher education and terminal degrees have not proven synonymous with the establishment of legitimacy for many voices. Academics and scholars of color continue to confront barriers constituent of the racialized, gendered, and class(ed) baggage characterizing dominant social relations. In I've Got a Story to Tell different members of academe struggle with the institutionalized constructs that pose real challenges to the transformation and democratization of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Being in Higher Education: Negotiating Identity and Place (Sandra Jackson and Jose Solis Jordan)

ch. 1 Why Are You So Afraid, Guero? (Jose Solis Jordan)
ch. 2 I Don't Do Dis Here Dat Dere: A Subtext of Authority in Teaching and Learning (Sandra Jackson)
ch. 3 Acaso No Soy Maestra Tambien? (Ain't I a Teacher Too?)(Marisa Alicea)
ch. 4 Race, Nationality, Gender, and the Space of the Classroom: Writing a Pedagogical Story (K.E. Supriya)
ch. 5 "Leaving Normal": Transcending Normativity Within the Feminist/Women's History Classroom (Gladys M. Jimenez-Munoz)
ch. 6 Identity Negotiation in the Classroom (Xing (Lucy)Lu)
ch. 7 "Travelin' a long way on a Broken Road" (Nathan Haymes)
ch. 8 A Cubana in the Classroom: The Experiences of One Latina in Academia (Maria R. Vidal)
ch. 9 Processing (Aminah B. McCloud)
ch. 10 "Have YOU Ever Lived on Brewster Place?": Teaching African-American Literature in a Predominantly White Institution (Clare Oberon Garcia)
ch. 11 Native(s) in the Classroom: Displacement and Cultural Politics (Fassil Demissie)
ch. 12 Ni Eres Ni Te Pareces: Academia as Rapture and Alienation (Alicia Chavira-Prado)
ch. 13 Doing Battle Inside the Beast (Luis Ortiz-Franco)

Notes on Contributors
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Radical Presence: Teaching as Contemplative Practice

Book
O'Reilley, Mary Rose
1998
Boynton/Cook Publishers, Portsmouth, NH
LB1025.3.074 1998
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Radical Presence is a book about our lives as well as our work, suggesting that the "secrets" of good teaching are the same as the secrets of good living. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Radical Presence is a book about our lives as well as our work, suggesting that the "secrets" of good teaching are the same as the secrets of good living. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 To Teach Is to Create a Space
ch. 2 "Love Calls Us to the Things of This World"
ch. 3 An Experiment in Friendship
ch. 4 Listening Like a Cow
ch. 5 Looking at the Moon
ch. 6 Dissonance
ch. 7 Nourishing the Prophetic Vision

References
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Educating for Shalom: Essays on Christian Higher Education

Book
Wolterstorff, Nicholas
2004
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
BV1464.W66 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
In addition to his notable work as a premier Christian philosopher, Nicholas Wolterstorff has become a leading voice on faith-based higher education. This volume gathers the best of Wolterstorff's essays from the past twenty-five years dealing collectively with the purpose of Christian higher education and the nature of academic learning.

Integrated throughout by the biblical idea of shalom, these nineteen essays present a robust framework for thinking about ...
Additional Info:
In addition to his notable work as a premier Christian philosopher, Nicholas Wolterstorff has become a leading voice on faith-based higher education. This volume gathers the best of Wolterstorff's essays from the past twenty-five years dealing collectively with the purpose of Christian higher education and the nature of academic learning.

Integrated throughout by the biblical idea of shalom, these nineteen essays present a robust framework for thinking about education that combines a Reformed confessional perspective with a radical social conscience and an increasingly progressivist pedagogy. Wolterstorff develops his ideas in relation to an astonishing variety of thinkers ranging from Calvin, Kuyper, and Jellema to Augustine, Aquinas, and Kant to Weber, Habermas, and MacIntyre. In the process, he critiques various models of education, classic foundationalism, modernization theory, liberal arts, and academic freedom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

Rethinking Christian Higher Education
Teaching for Shalom: On the Goal of Christian Collegiate Education
The Mission of the Christian College at the End of the Twentieth Century
The Integration of Faith and Learning - The Very Idea
On the Idea of a Psychological Model of the Person That Is Biblically Faithful
The Point of Connection between Faith and Learning
The World for Which We Educate
A Case for Disinterested Learning
The Project of a Christian University in a Postmodern Culture
Teaching for Justice: On Shaping How Students Are Disposed to Act
Autobiography: The Story of Two Decades of Thinking about Christian Higher Education
Can Scholarship and Christian Conviction Mix? Another Look at the Integration of Faith and Learning
Abraham Kuyper on Christian Learning
Particularist Perspectives: Bias or Access?
Academic Freedom in Religiously Based Colleges and Universities
Christian Learning In and For a Pluralist Society
Should the Work of Our Hands Have Standing in the Christian College?
What Is the Reformed Perspective on Christian Higher Education?
Call to Boldness: A Response to Fides et Ratio

Afterword
Bibliography
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

This Fine Place So Far From Home: Voices of Academics from the Working Class

Book
Dews, C.L. Barney and Carolyn Leste Law, eds.
1995
Temple University Press, Philadelphia, PA
LC5051.T45 1995
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
These autobiographical and analytical essays by a diverse group of professors and graduate students from working-class families reveal an academic world in which "blue-collar work is invisible." Describing conflict and frustration, the contributors expose a divisive middle-class bias in the university setting. Many talk openly about how little they understood about the hierarchy and processes of higher education, while others explore how their experiences now affect their relationships with their ...
Additional Info:
These autobiographical and analytical essays by a diverse group of professors and graduate students from working-class families reveal an academic world in which "blue-collar work is invisible." Describing conflict and frustration, the contributors expose a divisive middle-class bias in the university setting. Many talk openly about how little they understood about the hierarchy and processes of higher education, while others explore how their experiences now affect their relationships with their own students. They all have in common the anguish of choosing to hide their working-class background, to keep the language of home out of the classroom and the ideas of school away from home. These startlingly personal stories highlight the fissure between a working-class upbringing and the more privileged values of the institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Carolyn Leste Law)

ch. 1 Stupid Rich Bastards (Laurel Johnson Black)
ch. 2 A Real Class Act: Searching for Identity in the "Classless" Society (Julie A. Charlip)
ch. 3 Bronx Syndrome (Stephen Garger)
ch. 4 The Screenwriter's Tale (Jennifer Lawler)
ch. 5 You Were Raised Better Than That (Naton Leslie)
ch. 6 In the Shadow of My Old Kentucky Home (George T. Martin Jr.)
ch. 7 Todos Vuelven: From Potrero Hill to UCLA (Rosa María Pegueros)
ch. 8 Another Day's Journey: An African American in Higher Education (Gloria D. Warren)
ch. 9 Useful Knowledge (Mary Cappello)
ch. 10 A Carpenter's Daughter (Renny Christopher)
ch. 11 Paper Mills (Heather J. Hicks)
ch. 12 The Social Construction of a Working-Class Academic (Dwight Lang)
ch. 13 Working-Class Women as Academics: Seeing in Two Directions, Awkwardly (Nancy LaPaglia)
ch. 14 Ambivalent Maybe (Wilson J. Moses)
ch. 15 Class Matters: Symbolic Boundaries and Cultural Exclusion (Sharon O'Dair)
ch. 16 Nowhere at Home: Toward a Phenomenology of Working-Class Consciousness (Christine Overall)
ch. 17 Past Voices, Present Speakers (Donna Burns Phillips)
ch. 18 Workin' at the U. (Milan Kovacovic)
ch. 19 Class, Composition, and Reform in Departments of English: A Personal Account (Raymond A. Mazurek)
ch. 20 Complicity in Class Codes: the Exclusionary Function of Education (Irvin Peckham)
ch. 21 Is There a Working-Class History?(William A. Pelz)
ch. 22 Psychology's Class Blindness: Investment in the Status Quo (Deborah Piper)
ch. 23 Working It Out: Values, Perspectives, and Autobiography (John Sumser)
ch. 24 The Work of Professing (A Letter to Home) (Michael Schalbe)

Afterword (C.L. Barney Dews)
About the Contributors
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Working-Class Women in the Academy: Laborers in the Knowledge Factory

Book
Tokarczyk, Michelle M. and Elizabeth A. Fay, eds.
1993
University of Massachusetts Press, Amherst, MA
LB2332.3.W68 1993
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
"My mother still wants me to get a 'real' job. My father, who is retired after forty-four years in the merchant marine, has never read my work. When I visited recently, the only book in his house was the telephone book." "I do not know that my mother's mother ever acknowledged my college education except to ask me once, 'How can you live so far away from your people?'. ...
Additional Info:
"My mother still wants me to get a 'real' job. My father, who is retired after forty-four years in the merchant marine, has never read my work. When I visited recently, the only book in his house was the telephone book." "I do not know that my mother's mother ever acknowledged my college education except to ask me once, 'How can you live so far away from your people?'. Thus write two of the twenty women from working-class backgrounds whose voices are heard in this unique collection of essays. Each of the women has lived through the process of academic socialization - as both student and teacher - and each has thought long and deeply about her experience from an explicitly feminist perspective. Among the questions the contributors explore, What are the issues - pedagogical, theoretical, and personal - that affect the professional and private lives of these women? How do they resolve tensions between their roles as middle-class professionals and their roots in working-class families? How do class and gender intersect in the academy? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction(Tokarczyk, Michelle M. and Elizabeth A. Fay)
Class Discussion (Lillian S. Robinson)

Pt. 1 Belonging
ch. 1 "What's a Nice Working-Class Girl Like You Doing in a Place Like This?" (Saundra Gardner)
ch. 2 Who Am I Now? The Politics of Class Identity (Donna Langston)
ch. 3 Writing and Teaching with Class (Valerie Miner)
ch. 4 A Question of Belonging (Joanna Kadi)

Pt. 2 Pockets of Experience
ch. 5 Keeping Close to Home: Class and Education (Bell Hooks)
ch. 6 A Mennonite "Hard Worker" Moves from the Working Class and the Religious/Ethnic Community to Academia: A Conflict between Two Definitions of Work (Laura H. Weaver)
ch. 7 Grandma Went to Smith, All Right, but She Went from Nine to Five: A Memoir (Patricia Clark Smith)
ch. 8 A Farmer's Daughter in Academia (Jacqueline Burnside)
ch. 9 Yer Own Motha Wouldna Reckanized Ya: Surviving an Apprenticeship in the "Knowledge Factory" (Suzanne Sowinska)

Pt. 3 Going to Class
ch. 10 Pass the Cake: The Politics of Gender, Class, and Text in the Academic Workplace (Pam Annas)
ch. 11 "Someone to Watch Over Me": Politics and Paradoxes in Academic Mentoring (Cheryl Fish)
ch. 12 Working-Class Women as Students and Teachers (Elisabeth Johnson)
ch. 13 Teaching the Working Woman (Rose Zimbardo)

Pt. 4 Ways in and Ways Out
ch. 14 Recasting the "Politics of Truth": Thoughts on Class, Gender, and the Role of Intellectuals (Pamela A. Fox)
ch. 15 Vestments and Vested Interests: Academia, the Working Class, and Affirmative Action (Sharon O'Dair)
ch. 16 Language: Closings and Openings (Pat Belanoff)
ch. 17 Dissent in the Field; or, a New Type of Intellectual? (Elizabeth A. Fay)
ch. 18 Telling Tales in School: A Redneck Daughter in the Academy (Hephzibah Roskelly)

Epilogue: By the Rivers of Babylon (Michelle M. Tokarczyk)
Bibliography
Contributors' Notes
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Letters to a Teacher

Book
Pickering, Sam
2004
Atlantic Monthly Press, New York, NY
LB1775.P56 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Sam Pickering has been teaching, guiding, performing, and inspiring for more than forty years. As a young English teacher at Montgomery Bell Academy in Tennessee, his musings on literature and his maverick pedagogy touched a student named Tommy Schulman, who later wrote the screenplay for Dead Poets Society. Letters to a Teacher is a welcome reminder that teaching is a joy and an art. In ten graceful yet conversational letters ...
Additional Info:
Sam Pickering has been teaching, guiding, performing, and inspiring for more than forty years. As a young English teacher at Montgomery Bell Academy in Tennessee, his musings on literature and his maverick pedagogy touched a student named Tommy Schulman, who later wrote the screenplay for Dead Poets Society. Letters to a Teacher is a welcome reminder that teaching is a joy and an art. In ten graceful yet conversational letters addressed to teachers of all types, Pickering shares compelling, funny, always elucidating anecdotes from a lifetime in the classrooms of school and universities. His priceless, homespun observations touch on topics such as competition, curiosity, enthusiasm, and truth. More than a how-to guide, Letters to a Teacher is an invitation into the hearts and minds of an extraordinary educator and his students, and an irresistible call to reflection for the teacher who knows he or she must be compassionate, optimistic, respectful, firm, and above all dynamic. This is an indispensable guide for teachers and laymen alike. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Author's Note
Introduction

Letter 1 The Teacher's Life
Letter 2 The Good Teacher
Letter 3 Qualities of a Teacher
Letter 4 Words
Letter 5 Interests
Letter 6 Truth
Letter 8 Pressure
Letter 9 Requirements
Cover image

Teaching with Fire: Poetry that Sustains the Courage to Teach

Book
Intrator, Sam and Megan Scribner, eds.
2003
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
PN6101.T36 2003
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Those of us who care about the young and their education must find ways to remember what teaching and learning are really about. We must find ways to keep our hearts alive as we serve our students. Poetry has the power to keep us vital and focused on what really matters in life and in schooling. Teaching with Fire is a wonderful collection of eighty-eight poems from such well-loved poets ...
Additional Info:
Those of us who care about the young and their education must find ways to remember what teaching and learning are really about. We must find ways to keep our hearts alive as we serve our students. Poetry has the power to keep us vital and focused on what really matters in life and in schooling. Teaching with Fire is a wonderful collection of eighty-eight poems from such well-loved poets as Walt Whitman, Langston Hughes, Billy Collins, Emily Dickinson, and Pablo Neruda. Each of these evocative poems is accompanied by a brief story from a teacher explaining the significance of the poem in his or her life's work. This beautiful book also includes an essay that describes how poetry can be used to grow both personally and professionally.

Teaching With Fire was written in partnership with the Center for Teacher Formation and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Royalties from this book will be used to fund scholarship opportunities for teachers to grow and learn. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Gratitudes
A Note to Our Readers(Sam M. Intrator and Megan Scribner)
Introduction (Parker J. Palmer and Tom Vander Ark)

Hearing the Call
Bob O’Meally’s “Make Music with Your Life” (John J. Sweeney)
Marge Piercy’s “To be of use” (Katya Levitan-Reiner)
Pablo Neruda’s “The Poet’s Obligation” (William Ayers)
Gabriele D’Annunzio’s “I pastori” (Susan Etheredge)
Emily Dickinson’s “The Chariot” (Judy R. Smith)
Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s “Crossing the Bar” (Marj Vandenack)
William Stafford’s “The Way It Is” (Lisa Drumheller Sudar)
Walt Whitman’s Preface to “Leaves of Grass” [Excerpt] (Lori Douglas)
Langston Hughes’s “Dream Deferred” (Heather Kirkpatrick)
Marian Wright Edelman’s “I Care and I’m Willing to Serve” (Linda Lantieri)

Cherishing the Work
Billy Collins’s “First Reader” (Sandra Dean)
Gary Snyder’s “Axe Handles” (Curtis Borg)
David Whyte’s “Working Together” (Jani Barker)
Marcie Hans’s “Fueled” (Betsy Motten)
William Carlos Williams’s “The Red Wheelbarrow” (Sarah Fay)
George Venn’s “Poem Against the First Grade” (Theresa Gill)
Jeff Moss’s “On the Other Side of the Door” (Lamson T. Lam)
Lydia Cortés’s “I Remember” (Sonia Nieto)
Robert Frost’s “Nothing Gold Can Stay” (Troyvoi Hicks)
Gary Blankenburg’s “The Mouse” (Ellen Shull)
Lewis Buzbee’s “Sunday, Tarzan in His Hammock” (Dan Mindich)

On the Edge
John Milton’s “Paradise Lost, Book VIII” (John I. Goodlad)
Stephen Sondheim’s “Children Will Listen” (Don Shalvey)
Al Zolynas’s “Love in the Classroom” (Ron Petrich)
Billy Collins’s “On Turning Ten” (Chip Wood)
Li-Young Lee’s “The Gift” (Kelly Gallagher)
Mary Oliver’s “The Journey” (by Marian Mesrobian MacCurdy)
Yehuda Amichai’s “God Has Pity on Kindergarten Children” (Shifra Schonmann)
Jellaludin Rumi’s “The Lame Goat” (Michael Poutiatine)
Linda McCarriston’s “Hotel Nights with My Mother” (Wanda S. Praisner)
Lucile Burt’s “Melissa Quits School” (Leslie Rennie-Hill)

Holding On
Denise Levertov’s “Witness” (Robert Kunzman)
Octavio Paz’s “After” (Catherine Johnson)
Mary Oliver’s “Wild Geese” (Elizabeth V. V. Bedell)
William Butler Yeats’s “Everything That Man Esteems” (Betsy Wice)
May Sarton’s “Now I Become Myself” (Amy Eva-Wood)
Annie Dillard’s “Teaching a Stone to Talk” [Excerpt] (Libby Roberts)
David Whyte’s “Sweet Darkness” submitted( Jeanine O’Connell)
Rubin Alves’s “Tomorrow’s Child” (Sarah Smith)
Donald Hall’s “Names of Horses” (Laurel Leahy)
Judy Brown’s “Fire” (Maggie Anderson)
Margaret Walker’s “For My People” (Tracy Swinton Bailey)

In the Moment
Elizabeth Carlson’s “Imperfection” (Glynis Wilson Boultbee)
David Wagoner’s “Lost” (Fred Taylor)
Wendell Berry’s “A Purification” (Rick Jackson)
Marge Piercy’s “The seven of pentacles” (Sally Z. Hare)
Pablo Neruda’s “Keeping Quiet” (Catherine Gerber)
Gary Snyder’s “What Have I Learned” (Perie Longo)
Wislawa Szymborska’s “There But for the Grace” (Lesley Woodward)
Derek Walcott’s “Love After Love” (David Hagstrom)
William Stafford’s “You Reading This, Be Ready” (Lucile Burt)
Edgar A. Guest’s “Don’t Quit” (Reg Weaver)

Making Contact.
Charles Olson’s “These Days” (John Fox)
Donna Kate Rushin’s “The Bridge Poem” (Debbie S. Dewitt)
Seamus Heaney’s “The Cure at Troy” [Excerpt] (Jim Burke)
Virginia Satir’s “Making Contact” (Dennis Littky)
John Moffitt’s “To Look at Any Thing” (Angela Peery)
Jellaludin Rumi’s “Two Kinds of Intelligence” (Marianne Houston)
Adrienne Rich’s “Dialogue” (Adam D. Bunting)
Galway Kinnell’s “Saint Francis and the Sow” (Libby Falk Jones)
Maxine Kumin’s “Junior Life Saving” (Thomasina LaGuardia)
Gary Soto’s “Saturday at the Canal” (Steve Elia)
Adrienne Rich’s “Diving into the Wreck” (Penny Gill)

The Fire of Teaching.
Wislawa Szymborska’s “A Contribution to Satistics” (Elizabeth Meador)
E.E. Cummings’s “You Shall Above All Things” (Mark Nepo)
Mary Oliver’s “The Summer Day” (Caren Bassett Dybek)
Ranier Maria Rilke’s “Archaic Torso of Apollo” (Rob Reich)
Robert Graves’s “Warning to Children” (Ali Stewart)
Wallace Stevens’s “The Poem That Took the Place of a Mountain” (Samuel Scheer)
Langston Hughes’s “My People” (Mary Cowhey)
nikki giovanni’s “the drum” (Sam Grabelle)
nila northSun’s “moving camp too far” (Tom Weiner)
Czeslaw Milosz’s “Gift” (Suzanne Strauss)
T. S. Eliot’s “East Coker” (Stephen Gordon)
Naomi Shihab Nye’s “Shoulders” (Marcy Jackson)
Bettye T. Spinner’s “Harvest Home” (Linda Powell Pruitt)

Daring to Lead
Rabindranath Tagore’s “Where the Mind Is Without Fear” (Tony Wagner)
Barbara Kingsolver’s “Beating Time” (Susan Klonsky)
Thomas Jefferson’s “Passage from a Letter to William Charles Jarvis” (Theodore R. Sizer)
Robert Herrick’s “Delight in Disorder” (Edward Alan Katz)
Rainer Maria Rilke’s “I Believe in All That Has Never Yet Been Spoken” (Tom Vander Ark)
Langston Hughes’s “Mother to Son” (Joe Nathan)
nikki giovanni’s “ego-tripping” (Janice E. Jackson)
Anne Sexton’s “Courage” (Wendy Kohler)
William Stafford’s “Silver Star” (Jay Casbon)
Walt Whitman’s “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” [Excerpt] (Sandra Feldman)
Vaclav Havel’s “It Is I Who Must Begin” (Diana Chapman Walsh)
Marge Piercy’s “The low road” (Parker J. Palmer)
Tending the Fire: The Utility of Poetry in a Teacher’s Life (Sam M. Intrator)
About the Courage to Teach Program

The Contributors
The Editors
Cover image

This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color

Book
Moraga, Cherrie, and Gloria Anzaldua, eds.
1983
Kitchen Table Press, Latham, New York
Not catalogued
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
The long-awaited reprint of one of SPD's most popular titleS, this book features a new foreword by Gloria E. Anzaldua, as well as an updated bibliography. It also includes the original 1981 foreword (Toni Cade Bambara), the original preface (Cherrie L. Moraga) and the original introduction (Anzaldua & Moraga). (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The long-awaited reprint of one of SPD's most popular titleS, this book features a new foreword by Gloria E. Anzaldua, as well as an updated bibliography. It also includes the original 1981 foreword (Toni Cade Bambara), the original preface (Cherrie L. Moraga) and the original introduction (Anzaldua & Moraga). (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword, (Toni Cade Bambara)
Preface, (Cherrie Moraga)
The Bridge Poem, (Donna Kate Rushin)
Introduction, (Cherrie Moraga and Gloria Anzaldua)
Children Passing in the Streets
The Roots of Our Radicalism
When I Was Growing Up, (Nellie Wong)
on not bein, mary hope lee
For the Color of My Mother, (Cherrie Moraga)
I Am What I Am, (Rosario Morales)
Dreams of Violence, (Naomi Littlebear)
He Saw Chrystos
Entering the Lives of Others
Theory in the Flesh
Wonder Woman, (Genny Lim)
LaGuera, (Cherrie Moraga)
Invisibility is an Unnatural Disaster: Reflections of an Asian American Woman, (Mitsuye Yamada)
It's In My Blood, My Face -My Mother's Voice, The Way I Sweat, (Anita Valerio)
"Gee, You Don't Seem Like An Indian From the Reservation", (Barbara Cameron)
"... And Even Fidel Can't Change That!" (Aurora Levins Morales )
I Walk in the History of My People, (Chrystos)
And When You Leave, Take Your Pictures With You Racism in the Women's Movement And When You Leave, Take Your Pictures With You, (Jo Carrillo)
Beyond the Cliffs of Abiquiu, (Jo Carrillo)
I Don't Understand Those Who Have Turned Away From Me, (Chrystos)
Asian Pacific American Women and Feminism, (Mitsuye Yamada, Millicent Fredericks, Gabrielle Daniels)
"— But I Know You, American Woman", (Judii Moschkovich)
The Pathology of Racism: A Conversation with Third World Wimmin, (doris davenport)
We're All in the Same Boat, (Rosario Morales)
An Open Letter to Mary Daly, (Audre Lorde)
The Master's Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master's House, (Audre Lorde)
Between the Lines On Culture, Class, and Homophobia
The Other Heritage, (Rosario Morales)
billie lives! billie lives!, (hattie gossett)
Across the Kitchen Table: A Sister-to-Sister Dialogue, (Barbara Smith and Beverly Smith)
Lesbianism: An Act of Resistance, (Cheryl Clarke)
Lowriding Through the Women's Movement, (Barbara Noda)
Letter to Ma, (Merle Woo)
I Come With No Illusions, (Mirtha Quintanales)
I Paid Very Hard for My Immigrant Ignorance, (Mirtha Quintanales)
Earth-Lover, Survivor, Musician, (Naomi Littlebear)
Speaking in Tongues
The Third World Woman Writer
Speaking in Tongues: A Letter To Third World Women Writers, (Gloria Anzaldua)
who told you anybody wants to hear from you? you ain't nothing but a black woman!, (hattie gossett)
In Search of the Self as Hero: Confetti of Voices on New Year's Night, (Nellie Wong)
Chicana's Feminist Literature: A Re-vision Through Malintzin/or Malintzin: Putting Flesh Back on the Object, (Norma Alarcon)
Ceremony for Completing a Poetry Reading, (Chrystos)
El Mundo Zurdo
The Vision
Give Me Back, (Chrystos)
LaPrieta, (Gloria Anzaldua)
A Black Feminist Statement
Combahee River Collective The Welder, (Cherrie Moraga)
O.K. Momma, Who the Hell Am I?: An Interview with Luisah Teish, (Gloria Anzaldua)
Brownness, (Andrea Canaan)
Revolution: It's Not Neat or Pretty or Quick, Pat Parker
No Rock Scorns Me as Whore, (Chrystos)
Biographies of the Contributors
Third World Women in the United States - By and About Us: A Selected Bibliography (Cherrie Moraga)
Cover image

Dear Sisters: A Womanist Practice of Hospitality

Book
Westfield, N. Lynne
2001
Pilgrim Press, Cleveland, OH
not catalogued
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
From the Publishers
What allows African American women not just to survive, but to become resilient? N. Lynne Westfield finds an answer to this question as she examines the Dear Sisters' Literary Group. As a Womanist scholar, Westfield reflects on the ways in which the hospitality of the group relates to the long-standing African American tradition of concealed gatherings, the Christian tradition of hospitality, and Christian education.
Additional Info:
From the Publishers
What allows African American women not just to survive, but to become resilient? N. Lynne Westfield finds an answer to this question as she examines the Dear Sisters' Literary Group. As a Womanist scholar, Westfield reflects on the ways in which the hospitality of the group relates to the long-standing African American tradition of concealed gatherings, the Christian tradition of hospitality, and Christian education.

Table Of Content:
Preface
ch. 1 The Resilience of African American Women
ch. 2 Gathering the Voices
ch. 3 Hospitality among Dear Sisters
ch. 4 Doing Womanist Theology with Dear Sisters
ch. 5 Practical Implications for Christian Education
Epilogue
Index
Cover image

The Feminization of Racism: Promoting World Peace in America

Book
Blea, Irene I.
2003
Praeger, Westport, CT
HQ1421.B57 2003
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Blea provides a synthesis of the women's history of Native Americans, Asians, African Americans, and Latinas, and she examines the similarities and differences among these women. From each she extracts suggestions on ways to promote racial and ethnic tolerance. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Blea provides a synthesis of the women's history of Native Americans, Asians, African Americans, and Latinas, and she examines the similarities and differences among these women. From each she extracts suggestions on ways to promote racial and ethnic tolerance. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Tables
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Radical Feminists
ch. 2 Indigenous Women and the American Holocaust
ch. 3 Chicanas and Immigrant Latinas Inherit and Internalize Colonialism
ch. 4 African American Women
ch. 5 Asian and Pacific Islander Women
ch. 6 Healing from Intolerance and Redefining Direction

Selected Bibliography
Index
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Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism

Book
Collins, Patricia Hill
2004
Routledge, New York, NY
E185.86.C58167 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
In Black Sexual Politics, one of America's most influential writers on race and gender explores how images of Black sexuality have been used to maintain the color line and how they threaten to spread a new brand of racism around the world today. In the tradition of her award-winning book, Black Feminist Thought, Patricia Hill Collins now turns her critical eye to race, gender, and sexuality in relation to black ...
Additional Info:
In Black Sexual Politics, one of America's most influential writers on race and gender explores how images of Black sexuality have been used to maintain the color line and how they threaten to spread a new brand of racism around the world today. In the tradition of her award-winning book, Black Feminist Thought, Patricia Hill Collins now turns her critical eye to race, gender, and sexuality in relation to black men and women. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: No Turning Back

Part I African Americans and the New Racism
ch. 1 Why Black Sexual Politics?
ch. 2 The Past Is Ever Present: Recognizing the New Racism
ch. 3 Prisons for Our Bodies, Closets for Our Minds: Racism, Heterosexism, and Black Sexuality

Part II Rethinking Black Gender Ideology
ch. 4 Get Your Freak On: Sex, Babies, and Images of Black Femininity
ch. 5 Booty Call: Sex, Violence, and Images of Black Masculinity
ch. 6 Very Necessary: Redefining Black Gender Ideology

Part III Toward a Progressive Black Sexual Politics
ch. 7 Assume the Position: The Changing Contours of Sexual Violence
ch. 8 No Storybook Romance: How Race and Gender Matter
ch. 9 Why We Can't Wait: Black Sexual Politics and the Challenge of HIV/AIDS

Afterword: The Power of a Free Mind
Notes
Glossary
Bibliography
Index
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What White Looks Like: African-American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question

Book
Yancy, George, ed.
2004
Routledge, New York, NY
E185.615.W438 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
In the burgeoning field of whiteness studies, What White Looks Like takes a unique approach to the subject by collecting the ideas of African-American philosophers. George Yancy has brought together a group of thinkers who address the problematic issues of whiteness as a category requiring serious analysis. What does white look like when viewed through philosophical training and African-American experience?
In this volume, Robert Birt asks if whites can "...
Additional Info:
In the burgeoning field of whiteness studies, What White Looks Like takes a unique approach to the subject by collecting the ideas of African-American philosophers. George Yancy has brought together a group of thinkers who address the problematic issues of whiteness as a category requiring serious analysis. What does white look like when viewed through philosophical training and African-American experience?
In this volume, Robert Birt asks if whites can "live whiteness authentically." Janine Jones examines what it means to be a "goodwill white." Joy James tells of beating her "addiction" to white supremacy, while Arnold Farr writes on making whiteness visible in Western philosophy. What White Looks Like brings a badly needed critique and philosophically sophisticated perspective to central issue of contemporary society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Contributors
Introduction: Fragments of a Social Ontology of Whiteness
ch. 1 Racial Exploitation and the Wages of Whiteness
ch. 2 The Bad Faith of Whiteness
ch. 3 The Impairment of Empathy in Goodwill Whites for African Americans
ch. 4 Deligitimizing the Normativity of "Whiteness": A Critical Africana Philosophical Study of the Metaphoricity of "Whiteness"
ch. 5 A Foucauldian (Genealogical) Reading of Whiteness: The Production of the Black Body/Self and the Racial Deformation of Pecola Breedlove in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye
ch. 6 Whiteness Visible: Enlightenment Racism and the Structure of Racialized Consciousness
ch. 7 Rahabilitate Racial Whiteness?
ch. 8 Critical Reflections on Three Popular Tropes in the Study of Whiteness
ch. 9 Whiteness and Africana Phenomenology
ch. 10 On the Nature of Whiteness and the Ontology of Race: Toward a Dialectical Materialist Analysis
ch. 11 Silence and Sympathy: Dewey's Whiteness
ch. 12 Whiteness and Feminism: Deja Vu Discourses, What's Next?
ch. 13 The Academic Addict: Mainlining (& Kicking) White Supremacy (WS)
Index
Cover image

Teaching as a Sacramental Act

Book
Moore, Mary Elizabeth Mullino
2004
Pilgrim Press, Cleveland, OH
BV1464.M67 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
"In Teaching as a Sacramental Act, Moore asserts that Christian vocation, and the teaching vocation in particular, can be best understood as sacramental, mediating the grace of God through ordinary creation for the sanctification of human life and the well-being of all creation. She develops her argument through three important factors: a historical-theological analysis of the Christian sacraments and sacramentality; a phenomenological study of teaching events; and a description of ...
Additional Info:
"In Teaching as a Sacramental Act, Moore asserts that Christian vocation, and the teaching vocation in particular, can be best understood as sacramental, mediating the grace of God through ordinary creation for the sanctification of human life and the well-being of all creation. She develops her argument through three important factors: a historical-theological analysis of the Christian sacraments and sacramentality; a phenomenological study of teaching events; and a description of six sacramental movements and corresponding teaching practices as informed by Jewish-Christian traditions and Eucharistic practices." Teaching as a Sacramental Act is ideal for students, pastors, Christian educators, spiritual directors, and pastoral caregivers who want to rethink and reshape the teaching ministry of the church. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Searching for the sacred
ch. 2 Sacred teaching : education as sacrament
ch. 3 Expecting the unexpected
ch. 4 Remembering the dismembered
ch. 5 Seeking reversals
ch. 6 Giving thanks
ch. 7 Nourishing life
ch. 8 Reconstructing community and repairing the world
ch. 9 Sacramental saga

App Overview of teaching as a sacramental act
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The Way of the Teacher

Book
Haile, J.M.
2005
Macatea Productions, Central, SC
LB1025.3.H34 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
The Way of the Teacher, written by educator J. M. Haile, is for the dissatisfied teacher: one who conscientiously performs the job but who feels that students are not benefiting as much as they should; one who wants to continue growing in the profession but who needs guidance and encouragement; one who aspires to master teaching and inspire students. Such teachers can be found at every institution of learning, in ...
Additional Info:
The Way of the Teacher, written by educator J. M. Haile, is for the dissatisfied teacher: one who conscientiously performs the job but who feels that students are not benefiting as much as they should; one who wants to continue growing in the profession but who needs guidance and encouragement; one who aspires to master teaching and inspire students. Such teachers can be found at every institution of learning, in every discipline, and at every level of experience.

The intent is to help teachers improve. But no quick fixes are offered here: this book is not about the mechanics of teaching or learning. Instead, in The Way of the Teacher Haile tries to illuminate certain issues that teachers should resolve in their own minds, if they are to master the profession. The most unusual feature of the presentation is its structure: rather than a formal academic monograph, the book is small, of few words, and to the point. The aim is not to convince, but to stimulate: the book is not a map, but a sign post. Nearly every page contains a highly charged phrase that challenges teachers to think more deeply about what they do; e. g., "Let's stop teaching the courses, and start teaching the students."

The Way of the Teacher combines the author's years of experience in the classroom with recent advances in educational psychology and cognitive science. In the book, Haile deftly reaches across established disciplines to explore those difficulties that are common to most teaching and learning situations. The book reflects deep thinking about the plight of the student, who is often unsure of what learning really is, and the plight of the teacher, who is often unsure of what teaching really should be. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching
ch. 2 Learning
ch. 3 Students
ch. 4 Problem Solving
ch. 5 Master Teachers

Appendix
Literature Cited
Index
Journal cover image

Reflections on a Teaching Career in Religion

Journal Issue
Kassam, Tazim R., ed.
2005
Spotlight on Teaching 20, no. 4 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/oct2005sot.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal issue. Full text is available online, here:  http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/oct2005sot.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Reflections on a Teaching Career in Religion (Tazim R. Kassam)
ch. 2 Evoking a World You Might Inhabit (Edward Mooney)
ch. 3 Delight in Learning is Infectious (Margaret Miles)
ch. 4 Against a Narrow View of the World (Peter Paris)
ch. 5 Loving the Future (Rebecca Chopp)
ch. 6 Allowing the Possibility of Multiple Truths (Daniel Boyarin)
ch. 7 Embracing Embodied, Mediated Knowledge (Katie Cannon)
ch. 8 Helping a Mind Grow (Mahmoud Ayoub)
ch. 9 Get Them Inspired First (Martin E. Marty)
Cover image

The Vocation of a Christian Scholar

Book
Hughes, Richard T.
2005
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
LC 383.H84 2005
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Richard T. Hughes's highly praised book on the relationship between Christian faith and secular learning originally published as "How Christian Faith Can Sustain the Life of the Mind" is now available in a revised edition that brilliantly incorporates recent interest in the topic of vocation.While the vocational dimensions of the earlier book were implicit, this revised edition makes them explicit. In the first of two completely new chapters, Hughes ...
Additional Info:
Richard T. Hughes's highly praised book on the relationship between Christian faith and secular learning originally published as "How Christian Faith Can Sustain the Life of the Mind" is now available in a revised edition that brilliantly incorporates recent interest in the topic of vocation.While the vocational dimensions of the earlier book were implicit, this revised edition makes them explicit. In the first of two completely new chapters, Hughes recounts his own vocational journey, telling how he drew on Christian theology to discover his talents and how best to use them. The second new chapter focuses on the vocation of Christian colleges and universities, including the purpose and goals of churchrelated education. The story offered here provides a compelling argument that faith, properly pursued, nourishes the openness and curiosity that make a life of the mind possible. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface to the revised edition : the vocation of the Christian scholar

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 The religion of the republic and the life of the mind
ch. 3 Christian faith and the life of the mind
ch. 4 The power of Christian traditions
ch. 5 What might it mean to teach from a Christian perspective?
ch. 6 The questions of distinctiveness and proclamation
ch. 7 The vocation of a Christian college; or, what makes church-related education Christian?

Postscript : tragedy, Christian faith, and the life of the mind : personal reflections
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Art of Teaching

Book
Parini, Jay
2005
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
LA2317.P335A3 2005
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
"Becoming an effective teacher can be quite painful and exhausting, taking years of trial and error. In The Art of Teaching, writer and critic Jay Parini looks back over his own decades of trials, errors, and triumphs, in an intimate memoir that brims with humor, encouragement, and hard-won wisdom about the teacher's craft." Here is a godsend for instructors of all levels, offering valuable insight into the many challenges that ...
Additional Info:
"Becoming an effective teacher can be quite painful and exhausting, taking years of trial and error. In The Art of Teaching, writer and critic Jay Parini looks back over his own decades of trials, errors, and triumphs, in an intimate memoir that brims with humor, encouragement, and hard-won wisdom about the teacher's craft." Here is a godsend for instructors of all levels, offering valuable insight into the many challenges that educators face, from establishing a persona in the classroom, to fostering relationships with students, to balancing a teaching load with academic writing and research. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Beginnings
ch. 2 My life in school
ch. 3 The teaching life
ch. 4 Nitty-gritty
ch. 5 Endings
Cover image

Building Bridges for Women of Color in Higher Education: A Practical Guide for Success

Book
Battle, Conchita and Chrontrese M. Doswell, eds.
2004
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LB2332.32.B85 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Building Bridges for Women of Color in Higher Education is designed to create a forum for synthesizing collective voices from women of color in academia. This book will serve as a professional development tool for academicians, both embarking upon and maintaining careers in higher education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Building Bridges for Women of Color in Higher Education is designed to create a forum for synthesizing collective voices from women of color in academia. This book will serve as a professional development tool for academicians, both embarking upon and maintaining careers in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction : building bridges

ch. 1 Road to the presidency : women of color assuming leadership roles in the academy
African-American female college presidents' career paths (Anna L. Waring)
The road less traveled (Dolores M. Fernández)
From sorrow valley to the presidency (Algeania Warren Freeman)
The accidental president (Glenda D. Price)
Road to the presidency (Trudie Kibbe Reed)

ch. 2 Climatizing faculty and administrative roles : exploring the nuances of minority serving institutions and predominately white institutions
Black for 31 years : nuances (Cheryl Clarke)
Perceptions of minority women employed by a state system of higher education (Carole Anderson and Brenda Sanders Dédé)
Burning the candle at both ends : managing work-family conflict (Jeycelyn Finley-Hervey and Lynn Perry Wooten)
Black women in higher education : negotiating the cultural workplace (Deborah L. Owens)
European academies, African academics : "sistah-scholars" as a model for survival (Evangeline A. Wheeler)
"White" water challenges : navigating the college climate with well-chosen oars (Ann Janette Alejano-Steele)

ch. 3 The department chair dichotomy : balancing faculty and administration
Confessions of an acting chair (Judi Moore Latta)
In the middle of the vanguard : women of color bridging roles as faculty (Emma T. Lucas)
The challenges of chairing the academic department (Gladys J. Willis)

ch. 4 Wading in the water : negotiating the tenure process
The slippery slope of student evaluations for black women faculty (Beverly A. Davis)
Negotiating the tenure process (Julie E. Stokes)
Lessons from African American faculty women : practical strategies to securing tenure (Sheila T. Gregory)
Finding calm waters during the tenure process : a dozen anchors for success (Cheryl Evans Green and rebekah McCloud)
ch. 5 Putting our words to practice
Using competitive strategic planning to guide you on the higher education ladder of success (Conchita Y. Battle)
Conclusion : coming together to build this bridge (Conchita Y. Battle)
TTR cover image

"Taking Stock at Mid-Career: Challenges and Opportunities for Faculty"

TTR
Baker-Fletcher, Karen, David Carr, Esther Menn and Nancy J. Ramsay
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 1 (2005): 3-10
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Beginning with a series of questions designed to peak reader curiosity and expose key challenges for mid-career faculty, the authors uncover several issues in post-tenure faculty life and work, and they reflect on images for understanding and responding to these challenges. Topics identified include mid-career as an opportunity for deeper investment in one's teaching, challenges associated with competing claims for time, shifts in research that can accompany the transition to ...
Additional Info:
Beginning with a series of questions designed to peak reader curiosity and expose key challenges for mid-career faculty, the authors uncover several issues in post-tenure faculty life and work, and they reflect on images for understanding and responding to these challenges. Topics identified include mid-career as an opportunity for deeper investment in one's teaching, challenges associated with competing claims for time, shifts in research that can accompany the transition to mid-career, challenges in dealing with an increasing generational gap between oneself and one's students, responsibilities associated with being a longer-term member of a faculty, and feelings of fatigue and occasional alienation from one's educational institution and/or church.
TTR cover image

"Creating Visionary and Enhanced Theological Institutions"

TTR
Valantasis, Richard
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 1 (2005): 11-14
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Theological school faculty at mid-career often discover a bifurcated work environment in the theological institutions they serve. Scholarly and pedagogical passions can be set in tension with academic administrative responsibilities – each vying for the lion's share of time. In this essay the author plunges into murky vocational waters to explore possible contributing factors for the bifurcated existence mid-career faculty experience. The essay suggests creative steps toward new visionary paradigms to ...
Additional Info:
Theological school faculty at mid-career often discover a bifurcated work environment in the theological institutions they serve. Scholarly and pedagogical passions can be set in tension with academic administrative responsibilities – each vying for the lion's share of time. In this essay the author plunges into murky vocational waters to explore possible contributing factors for the bifurcated existence mid-career faculty experience. The essay suggests creative steps toward new visionary paradigms to aid theological institutions in adopting and modeling visionary theological education. This transformative model would strive to enhance community life, nurture leadership, foster intellectual formation, cope with institutional strife, and constructively shape an institution's future.
TTR cover image

"Moving at Mid-Career"

TTR
Baker-Fletcher, Karen
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 1 (2005): 15-17
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Discernment about when to make career moves is often clouded by a host of competing desires and motivations. In this essay the author peels back layers of vocational choices in order to begin to reveal motivations behind those choices. Questions pertaining to notions of prestige, imaginative projection into a new position, clarity about what one values in theological education, and shifts in thinking about pedagogy in a new context are ...
Additional Info:
Discernment about when to make career moves is often clouded by a host of competing desires and motivations. In this essay the author peels back layers of vocational choices in order to begin to reveal motivations behind those choices. Questions pertaining to notions of prestige, imaginative projection into a new position, clarity about what one values in theological education, and shifts in thinking about pedagogy in a new context are explored.
TTR cover image

"The Seasons of a Scholar's Calling: Insights from Mid-Field"

TTR
Stortz, Martha E.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 1 (2005): 24-28
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
A scholar's calling at mid-career is latticed with challenges and changing responsibilities. In this essay the author considers faculty role changes during the mid-career phase of life as a teacher. The essay first addresses issues related to the responsibility of mid-career faculty to mentor the next generation of scholars/teachers. Keenly aware of stresses under which pre-tenure faculty labor the author highlights proven strategies and insights for successful mentoring. The ...
Additional Info:
A scholar's calling at mid-career is latticed with challenges and changing responsibilities. In this essay the author considers faculty role changes during the mid-career phase of life as a teacher. The essay first addresses issues related to the responsibility of mid-career faculty to mentor the next generation of scholars/teachers. Keenly aware of stresses under which pre-tenure faculty labor the author highlights proven strategies and insights for successful mentoring. The last half of the essay offers reflections on life as a scholar, colleague and teacher at mid-career. With transparent honesty the author scrawls contours of experience, motivations, and challenges for mid-career faculty and sketches specific strategies for maneuvering through this phase of one's career.
TTR cover image

"The Teacher's Career and Life"

TTR
Williams, Raymond B., Thomas J. Massaro, Phyllis D. Airhart, and Barbara Brown Zikmund
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 4 (2004): 181-200
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Participants in a Wabash Center consultation on vocation discussed the variety of expectations, opportunities, and challenges that create contexts for teaching as they move through careers. These essays emerge from the experiences and reflections of four participants about different stages of careers in diverse contexts. Tom Massaro writes from the perspective of one who recently navigated the challenges leading up to the tenure review in a Jesuit theological school and ...
Additional Info:
Participants in a Wabash Center consultation on vocation discussed the variety of expectations, opportunities, and challenges that create contexts for teaching as they move through careers. These essays emerge from the experiences and reflections of four participants about different stages of careers in diverse contexts. Tom Massaro writes from the perspective of one who recently navigated the challenges leading up to the tenure review in a Jesuit theological school and notes common patterns amidst the diversity of challenges. Phyllis Airhart ponders vocational fidelity in the transitions to new roles and responsibilities at mid-career in a Canadian university. Barbara Brown Zikmund deals with what she calls the 'mature years' and traces a major shift in her career from administration in an American school to teaching in Japan. Raymond Williams reflects on vocation during the process of preparing for retirement from teaching in a liberal arts college, attempting to respond faithfully to the inevitable question, 'What are you going to do when you retire?' Vocation is a thread that runs through each essay as reflection on the integrity and continuity of careers. The authors raise issues and make suggestions that may help others reflect on their vocation as teacher.
TTR cover image

"The Professor's Vocations: Reflections on the Teacher as Writer"

TTR
Jinkins, Michael
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 2 (2004): 64-70
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
The following essay is based on an oral presentation, "On Being a Good Teacher and a Good Writer," which the author was asked to make for the Southwest Commission on Religious Studies, March 16, 2003. The purpose of the presentation was to encourage conversation among theological educators on the character of their vocation. A panel discussion of the theme followed the presentation. The presentation was designed to engage this subject at an ...
Additional Info:
The following essay is based on an oral presentation, "On Being a Good Teacher and a Good Writer," which the author was asked to make for the Southwest Commission on Religious Studies, March 16, 2003. The purpose of the presentation was to encourage conversation among theological educators on the character of their vocation. A panel discussion of the theme followed the presentation. The presentation was designed to engage this subject at an autobiographical and reflective level rather than as an academic argument. The published version of the essay seeks to retain something of the personal reflective character of the original presentation.
TTR cover image

"Echo's Lament: Teaching, Mentoring, and the Danger of Narcissistic Pedagogy"

TTR
Hess, Carol Lakey
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 127-137
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
In this essay, I explore "narcissistic pedagogy," a pedagogy that centers disproportionately on the needs of the teacher – especially the need for admiration. I engage psychological discussions of narcissistic patterns, and I retell the ancient myth of Narcissus. The core of narcissistic pedagogy is that the teacher experiences students not as centers of their own activity but as part of the teacher's self. All educational situations are vulnerable to narcissistic ...
Additional Info:
In this essay, I explore "narcissistic pedagogy," a pedagogy that centers disproportionately on the needs of the teacher – especially the need for admiration. I engage psychological discussions of narcissistic patterns, and I retell the ancient myth of Narcissus. The core of narcissistic pedagogy is that the teacher experiences students not as centers of their own activity but as part of the teacher's self. All educational situations are vulnerable to narcissistic dynamics, and I will consider strongly narcissistic pedagogy as well as milder narcissistic dangers. I will, additionally, explore healthy narcissism. I pose "conversational education" as an alternative to narcissistic patterns.
TTR cover image

"As If Religion Matters: Teaching the Introductory Course as if it Does"

TTR
Thompson, Deanna A.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 85-92
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This essay chronicles the academic odyssey of a young professor who sets out to revise the department's Introduction to Religion course only to realize that she must first clarify her vocational commitments before she can create a teachable course. She is convinced through working with many students who express disdain or even hostility toward the subject matter that she wants to model a relationship to the subject matter that says ...
Additional Info:
This essay chronicles the academic odyssey of a young professor who sets out to revise the department's Introduction to Religion course only to realize that she must first clarify her vocational commitments before she can create a teachable course. She is convinced through working with many students who express disdain or even hostility toward the subject matter that she wants to model a relationship to the subject matter that says religion matters, but is uncertain how to do this. After an autobiographical foray into her academic upbringing in active learning, the author articulates four values to model in her teaching: personal relevance, academic responsibility, ethics, and community. The author then engages current scholarship in active learning, and narrates the process of translating those four values into concrete course goals and particular assignments. The essay concludes with an assessment of teaching the revised course.
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"A Teacher's Life: An Interview with Raymond B. Williams"

TTR
Warford, Malcolm and Lucinda Huffaker
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 4 (2002): 211-220
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Raymond B. Williams, Professor Emeritus of Religion at Wabash College, founding Director of the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion, long–time member of the Executive Board of the American Academy of Religion, and founding editor of the journal Teaching Theology and Religion, has moved on to what will no doubt be a very active retirement. An interview with Williams was conducted by Malcolm Warford to ...
Additional Info:
Raymond B. Williams, Professor Emeritus of Religion at Wabash College, founding Director of the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion, long–time member of the Executive Board of the American Academy of Religion, and founding editor of the journal Teaching Theology and Religion, has moved on to what will no doubt be a very active retirement. An interview with Williams was conducted by Malcolm Warford to be published in a venue unknown to the subject, thus enabling Warford to capture the spontaneous, unguarded vocational narrative of this private, humble scholar–teacher. After Warford transcribed and edited the interview, Lucinda Huffaker, co–editor of Teaching Theology and Religion, inserted commentary to set out themes and emphases on teaching and learning (desig. – LAH). As an autobiography, the article is both a window and a mirror – revealing both the formative influences in one professor's life and providing readers with an opportunity for reflective comparison with their own vocational paths and identities.
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"The Vocation of Teaching: Themes and Models from the Presbyterian Tradition"

TTR
Cowan, Margaret P., Roger P. Ebertz & Mary E. Shiels
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 3 (2002): 141-148
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Historically, the Presbyterian/Reformed tradition has placed a heavy emphasis on education and has honored teaching as an important vocation. This paper begins to explore insights and models that tradition offers to help teachers clarify their calling. The article discusses five themes in Reformed theology and how these themes play out in an educational context, providing examples from one Presbyterian college. The paper concludes by suggesting four ways to think ...
Additional Info:
Historically, the Presbyterian/Reformed tradition has placed a heavy emphasis on education and has honored teaching as an important vocation. This paper begins to explore insights and models that tradition offers to help teachers clarify their calling. The article discusses five themes in Reformed theology and how these themes play out in an educational context, providing examples from one Presbyterian college. The paper concludes by suggesting four ways to think about pedagogy in Presbyterian institutions that are both consistent with Reformed principles and practical in their relevance to teaching and learning.
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"Doing It Together Changing Pedagogies"

TTR
Kollar, Nathan R.
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 3 (1999): 154-162
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Changing pedagogies is an ongoing process consequent upon personal and social change. Those of us who teach in religious studies or theology departments risk failure in changing pedagogies if we attempt such change alone. This essay, cast as a personal journey, reviews the changing student body, the reasons why we must adapt our pedagogies to this change, and the processes and consequences of adapting these new pedagogies. The goal of ...
Additional Info:
Changing pedagogies is an ongoing process consequent upon personal and social change. Those of us who teach in religious studies or theology departments risk failure in changing pedagogies if we attempt such change alone. This essay, cast as a personal journey, reviews the changing student body, the reasons why we must adapt our pedagogies to this change, and the processes and consequences of adapting these new pedagogies. The goal of changing pedagogies is to allow the plurality of voices and pedagogies to speak and be used to sustain a community of love and concern in the midst of diversity.
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"Called to Teach"

TTR
Smith, Gordon T. and Ken R. Badley
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 3 (1998): 171-176
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
During the 1996–97 academic year the authors conducted interviews with seminary professors known by their students, colleagues, and deans as teachers who had remained vibrant into the last decade of their teaching careers. The purpose of the interviews was to hear how these professors viewed the teaching vocation as they had given it expression in their specific institutional settings. From the interview transcripts, the authors have identified eight common threads among ...
Additional Info:
During the 1996–97 academic year the authors conducted interviews with seminary professors known by their students, colleagues, and deans as teachers who had remained vibrant into the last decade of their teaching careers. The purpose of the interviews was to hear how these professors viewed the teaching vocation as they had given it expression in their specific institutional settings. From the interview transcripts, the authors have identified eight common threads among the participants, illustrating these with material quoted from the interviews. The last section of the article relates these threads to four orientations: to educational institutions, to the church, to vocation, and to one's own spiritual life.
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Minding the Light: Essays in Friendly Pedagogy

Book
Dalke, Anne and Barbara Dixson, eds.
2004
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LC571.M56 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
This book presents a series of reflections - excerpts from the inner and outer lives of college teachers - from which emerges a common concern for the interactive and spiritual dimensions of the educational process, and a sense of the light which can and should illuminate it. Informed either by personal commitment to Quakerism, or by individual work within Quaker institutions, the contributors offer perspectives that are important for teachers, ...
Additional Info:
This book presents a series of reflections - excerpts from the inner and outer lives of college teachers - from which emerges a common concern for the interactive and spiritual dimensions of the educational process, and a sense of the light which can and should illuminate it. Informed either by personal commitment to Quakerism, or by individual work within Quaker institutions, the contributors offer perspectives that are important for teachers, parents, and readers generally interested in the classroom experience as a process of growth and exploration. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Anne Dalke and Susan McNaught)

ch. 1 The spiritual roots of Quaker pedagogy (Steve Smith)
ch. 2 Liberating soul sparks : psyche, classroom, and community (Mary Watkins)
ch. 3 "Wait to be gathered" : the classroom as spiritual place (Mike Heller)
ch. 4 A gathered presence : creating a community of conscience in the composition classroom (Richard Johnson)
ch. 5 The American essay : where spirit and silence meet (Barbara Mallonee)
ch. 6 Teaching from the spiritual center (Barbara Dixon)
ch. 7 Teaching as listening : silence as heart knowledge (Stanford J. Searl, Jr.)
ch. 8 "Live up to the light thou hast" : the adult learner (Susan McNaught)
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Spirituality, Action, & Pedagogy: Teaching from the Heart

Book
Denton, Diana and Will Ashton, eds.
2004
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LB1027.3.S65 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Spirituality, Action, & Pedagogy: Teaching from the Heart invites the reader to participate in a personal exploration of what it means to consciously seek the heart of education. The authors in this collection - practitioners in higher education and teaching in such diverse areas as educational foundations, communication, theater, sociology, reading and literacy, and performance studies - respond to this challenge by striking the most personal chords of their lived experience. ...
Additional Info:
Spirituality, Action, & Pedagogy: Teaching from the Heart invites the reader to participate in a personal exploration of what it means to consciously seek the heart of education. The authors in this collection - practitioners in higher education and teaching in such diverse areas as educational foundations, communication, theater, sociology, reading and literacy, and performance studies - respond to this challenge by striking the most personal chords of their lived experience. As they relate their tales of spirituality and teaching, the reader will be coaxed into confronting the question of what it means to teach. Spirituality, Action, & Pedagogy addresses the integration of spirituality into pedagogical practice by providing cutting-edge examples of applications in classroom settings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: teaching from the heart (Diana Denton and Will Ashton)

ch. 1 The songbird in the superstore : how the spirit enters the classroom (Tony Arduini)
ch. 2 Spiritually drained and sexually denied : sketching an engaged pedagogy (John T. Warren and Deanna L. Fasssett)
ch. 3 From the heart of the heart of learning (Robert Hostetter)
ch. 4 Unceasing change turns the wheel of life (Cathy Toll)
ch. 5 Tale of a sorcerer's apprentice (Will Ashton)
ch. 6 Inner calm, holistic human beings, and life purpose (Maria Schmeeckle)
ch. 7 Learning wisdom from the Jewish oral tradition (Peninnah Schram)
ch. 8 Local teaching : the spirit of place (Whitney Hoth)
ch. 9 The spirit of the real in theatre education Andrew Houston)
ch. 10 Healing Susto : fragments of postcritical pedagogy (Denise Menchaca)
ch. 11 Leaning absolutes : honoring the detours in our lives (Celeste N. Snowber)
ch. 12 The heart's geography : compassion as practice (Diana Denton)
ch. 13 Spirited teaching : a pedagogy of courage (Christopher N. Poulos)
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"Scaling the Heights: the Teacher as Mountaineer"

Article
Hill, Nancy K.
1980
The Chronicle of Higher Education, 16 June 1980
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"A Teaching Life"

Article
Walck, Christa L.
1997
Journal of Management Education 21, no. 4 (1997): 473-482
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Inspirational Quotes, Notes, and Anecdotes That Honor Teachers and Teaching

Book
Ramsey, Robert D.
2007
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
PN6084.E38I57 2007
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
The complete uplifting guide for every teacher to enrich each day and a career in teaching!

All teachers need encouragement, affirmation, support, and to be reminded that they are part of a noble profession. Best-selling author Robert D. Ramsey has been an avid collector of inspirational quotes, notes, anecdotes, reflections, testimonials, and tributes for educators, and his new collection provides potentially career-saving homework for the soul of every ...
Additional Info:
The complete uplifting guide for every teacher to enrich each day and a career in teaching!

All teachers need encouragement, affirmation, support, and to be reminded that they are part of a noble profession. Best-selling author Robert D. Ramsey has been an avid collector of inspirational quotes, notes, anecdotes, reflections, testimonials, and tributes for educators, and his new collection provides potentially career-saving homework for the soul of every teacher. This easy-to-read, but hard-to-forget anthology is full of powerful reminders that there is no such thing as "only a teacher."

The contents of this uplifting resource have been carefully harvested by an educator for educators and are designed to:

* Help belabored and beleaguered educators jump start their careers
* Reclaim their professional pride
* Rekindle their passion for teaching
* Get the grit to press on against all odds

Inspirational Quotes, Notes, & Anecdotes That Honor Teachers and Teaching makes a strong unified statement all teachers need to hear! (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: It's a Tough Time to Be a Teacher in America
Acknowledgments
Attributions and Tags
About the Author
Introduction: There's No Such Thing as "Only a Teacher"
The Quotations

ch. 1 Education (Schools and Schooling)
ch. 2 Students
ch. 3 Teaching
ch. 4 Teachers
ch. 5 Tributes and Testimonials
ch. 6 A Final Word: It's Worth It!

Resource A Insights and Observations on Teaching That Only Teachers Will Appreciate
Resource B Other Books That Inspire Teachers
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The Two Worlds of Our Living as Theological Educators

Journal Issue
1964
Theological Education 1, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
The Theologian and the World of Contemporary Thought (Stanley Brice Frost)
The Christian Minister and the Social Problems of the Day (George W. Webber)
The Academic Teacher and the Practical Needs of the Clergy (John Bright)
The Seminary—Academy and Chapel (J. Robert Nelson)
The Seminary President: Teacher of Students and Confidant of Trustees (Sherman E. Johnson)
Notes to:
Administrators (Charles L. Taylor)
Trustees (Winston Paul)
Seminary Staff Officers (John A. Eichelberger)
Librarians (Raymond P. Morris)
Professors (Jesse H. Ziegler)
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From Oppression to Grace: Women of Color and Their Dilemmas within the Academy

Book
Berry, Theodorea Regina and Nathalie D. Mizelle, eds.
2006
Stylus, Sterling
LC212.82.F76 2006
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
From the Publisher
This book gives voice to the experiences of women of color - women of African, Native American, Latina, East Indian, Korean and Japanese descent - as students in pursuing terminal degrees and as faculty members navigating the Academy, grappling with the dilemmas encountered by others and themselves as they exist at the intersections of their work and identities.
Women of color are frequently relegated - ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher
This book gives voice to the experiences of women of color - women of African, Native American, Latina, East Indian, Korean and Japanese descent - as students in pursuing terminal degrees and as faculty members navigating the Academy, grappling with the dilemmas encountered by others and themselves as they exist at the intersections of their work and identities.
Women of color are frequently relegated - on account both of race and womanhood - into monolithic categories that perpetuate oppression, subdue and suppress conflict, and silence voices. This book uses critical race feminism (CRF) to place women of color in the center, rather than the margins, of the discussion, theorizing, research and praxis of their lives as they co-exist in the dominant culture.
This book makes salient three characteristics of critical race feminism. Just as it is places emphasis on the application of theory to real life issues, the authors' narratives address concerns about the academic community, home, and family. Just as CRF supports a discourse of resistance, the book provides a forum for different voices as multi-representations of the counterstories against the acceptance of the dominant culture and the status quo. And, finally, the contributors' stories reflect CRF's emphasis on narrative to deepen the understanding of their lives as women of color.
The first part of the book addresses the issues faced on the way to achieving a terminal degree: the struggles encountered and the lessons learned along the way. Part Two, Pride and Prejudice Finding Your Place After the Degree, describes the complexity of lives of women with multiple identities as scholars with family, friends,and lives at home and at work. The book concludes with the voices of senior faculty sharing their journeys and their paths to growth as scholars and individuals.
This book is for all women of color growing up in the academy, learning to stand on their own, taking first steps, mastering the language, walking, running, falling and getting up to run again, and illuminates the process of self-definition that is essential to their growth as scholars and individuals.

Table Of Content:
Introduction : what the fuck, now what? : the social and psychological dilemmas of multidimensional being as a woman of color in the academy

Part 1 Move on up a little higher : completing the terminal degree
ch. 1 The journey of an African American female chemist-scholar (Amanda C. Bryant-Friedrich)
ch. 2 My skin is brown and I do not wear a tie : exploring my selves as a southern, black, educated, Christian woman (Menthia P. Clark)
ch. 3 Bridging identities : making sense of who we are becoming to be (Aki Murata)
ch. 4 Watching, my other education : vicarious learning about gender and race in the professorate (M. Francyne Huckaby)
ch. 5 Balancing the margin is my center : a Navajo woman's navigations through the academy and her community (Tiffany S. Lee)
ch. 6 Transitions : finding my voice (Tinaya Webb)
ch. 7 In between China and North America (Ming Fang He)
ch. 8 Both oppressor and oppressed : an Asian Indian woman's experience within the academy (Kiran Katira)
ch. 9 Mentoring and its role in scholarly development (Beatrice Bridglall)

Part 2 Pride and prejudice : finding your place after the degree
ch. 10 Being all things to all people : expectations of and demands on women of color in the legal academy (Danielle Conway-Jones)
ch. 11 The "intercultural space" where worlds collide (Amanda Kim)
ch. 12 Sides of the tenure and promotion process : can I be a parental figure, scholar, and spouse? (Cassandra Sligh Dewalt)
ch. 13 Perspectives on negotiating identity and profession at a historically black college or university (Cassandra Slight Dewalt and Cheryl Thompkins Horton)
ch. 14 Choosing my best thing : black motherhood and academica (Kaavonia Hinton-Jonson)
ch. 15 Seen, not heard : a conversation on what it means to be black and female in the academy (Lavada Taylor Brandon)
ch. 16 In this place where I don't quite belong : claiming the ontoepistemological in-between (Ddenise Taliaferro Baszile)
ch. 17 Una Lucha de Fronteras (a struggle of borders) : women of color in the academy (Maria V. Balderrama, Mary T. Texeira and Elsa Valdez)

Part 3 Words of womanhood wisdom : voices of senior faculty who are women of color
ch. 18 Critical race feminist foremothering : multiplicities in the post 9/11 world
ch. 19 A Nuyorican in the academy : lessons learned
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Gladly Learn, Gladly Teach: Living Out One's Calling in the 21st-Century Academy

Book
Dunaway, John Marson, ed.
2005
Mercer University Press, Macon, GA
BV1464.G53 2005
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
These essays come from scholars in a wide variety of fields: not just theology, but law, literature, political science, education, and philosophy. The essayists are teacher-scholars who genuinely seek to live out the sometimes-competing vocations of professor and believer. Though most of them teach in church-related institutions, they not only affirm the need for a clear theological vision on which to base institutional and pedagogical planning; they also stress the ...
Additional Info:
These essays come from scholars in a wide variety of fields: not just theology, but law, literature, political science, education, and philosophy. The essayists are teacher-scholars who genuinely seek to live out the sometimes-competing vocations of professor and believer. Though most of them teach in church-related institutions, they not only affirm the need for a clear theological vision on which to base institutional and pedagogical planning; they also stress the importance of diversity, pluralism, and true academic freedom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Editor's Introduction: John Marson Dunaway
“In Willingham Chapel," a poem by David Bottoms(M.U.1971)
Mercer Contributors
R. Kirby Godsey, "The Higher Calling of the Undergraduate Experience"
Gordon Johnston, "Poetry and Professing"
Charlotte Thomas, "Falling into Grace"
R. Alan Culpepper, "Full of Grace and Truth: A Theology of Teaching"
Jack L. Sammons, "Parables and Pedagogy"
Andrew Silver, "Pluralism at a Baptist University"
Extra mural Contributors
Richard T. Hughes (Pepperdine University), "What Makes Church-Related Education Christian?"
David Lyle Jeffery (Baylor University), "The Calling of the Teacher and the Place of the Community"
Jeanne Heffernan (Villanova University), "Integrating Heart, Mind, and Soul: The Vocation of the Christian Teacher"
William E. Hull (Samford University), "Where are the Baptists in the Higher Education Dialogue?"
Mary S. Poplin (Claremont Graduate University), "The Radical Call to Service"
Afterword: Jean Bethke Elshtain (University of Chicago)
Notes on Contributors
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A Broadening Conversation: Classic Readings in Theological Librarianship

Book
McMahon, Melody Layton and David R. Stewart, eds.
2006
The Scarecrow Press, Inc. Lanham, MYD
Z675.T4B76 2006
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Librarians as Teachers

Additional Info:
The American Theological Library Association has served libraries, librarians, and academic institutions with distinction for sixty years. A Broadening Conversation offers a means of listening in on the rich and vivid conversation of this community over the course of its history so far. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The American Theological Library Association has served libraries, librarians, and academic institutions with distinction for sixty years. A Broadening Conversation offers a means of listening in on the rich and vivid conversation of this community over the course of its history so far. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction (Anne Richardson Womack)
ch. 2 Theological librarianship as a ministry (Raymond P. Morris)
ch. 3 The theological librarian : his commitment and strategy (James J. Kortendick)
ch. 4 Developing professionally on the job (David W. Faupel)
ch. 5 That they all may be one (Simeon Daly)
ch. 6 Some values in theological librarianship (James Dunkly)
ch. 7 On spiritual reading and religious reading in peril : president's address (Milton Joe Coalter)
ch. 8 Power and responsibility : reflections on theological librarianship (Sharon Taylor)
ch. 9 Introduction (Monica Corocoran)
ch. 10 The cataloger and instruction (Helen B. Uhrich)
ch. 11 Problems in manuscript cataloging (Julia H. Macleod)
ch. 12 Archival good works for theologians (Lester J. Cappon)
ch. 13 Changing a pile of books into a library (John J. Shellem)
ch. 14 Collection development in a theological research library (Caroline Whipple)
ch. 15 Circulation in theological libraries : seeking and saving the lost (Thomas F. Gilbert)
ch. 16 Parchment, paper, PDF : the literature of theological librarianship (David R. Stewart)
ch. 17 Introduction (Roger L. Loyd)
ch. 18 Seminary libraries and theological education (L.R.Elliot)
ch. 19 The community of learning (Helen B. Uhrich)
ch. 20 Professors and librarians : partners in the Oikumene (Paul A. Crow, Jr.)
ch. 21 Theological libraries revisited (Leon Pacala)
ch. 22 The structures of religious literature : conceptual frameworks for improving bibliographic instruction (Andrew D. Scrimgeour)
ch. 23 Theological libraries and theological librarians in theological education (James Dunkly)
ch. 24 Introduction (Michael Bramah)
ch. 25 Joint panel discussion : the library in the life of the seminary (Robert F Beach (moderator))
ch. 26 Some thoughts on the joint theological school-liberal arts college library (Arthur E. Jones, Jr.)
ch. 27 The theological library : servant or partner? (Claude Welch)
ch 28 Religious studies and theology (John E. Wilson)
ch. 29 Serving the religion information needs of the public(Mary A. Dempsey)
ch. 30 Introduction (John A. Bollier)
ch. 31 Seminary librarians (greetings and challenge from ATS) (Lewis J. Sherrill)
ch. 32 Six years of ATLA : a historical sketch (L.R. Elliot)
ch. 33 Building on our strengths for the future (Elmer J. O'Brien)
ch. 34 A look at the past (G. Paul Hamm)
ch. 35 A combined greeting to ATLA 40 and reflection on ATLA 1 (Ernest G. White)
ch. 36 Introduction (Eileen K. Crawford)
ch. 37 On the union classification (Julie Pettee)
ch. 38 When Catholic and Protestant theologies meet (Gustave Weigel)
ch. 39 Contemporary challenges to theological librarianship (Connoy C. Gamble, Jr.)
ch. 40 The index to religious periodical literature : past, present, and future (G. Fay Dickerson and John A. Peltz)
ch. 41 Revolution, evolutions, and syndromes (Decherd Turner)
ch. 42 Can serious academic religious book publishing survive in an age of pop culture? (Clayton E. Carlson)
ch. 43 Globalization and theological libraries (Robert J. Schreiter)
ch. 44 Shadow and substance (Roy Stokes)
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The Spiritual Wisdom of the Gospels for Christian Preachers and Teachers: The Relentless Widow: Year C

Book
Shea, John
2006
Liturgical Press, Collegeville, MN
BS2555.52.S54 2004v.C
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Beloved storyteller and theologian John Shea provides a unique commentary that’s ideal for preaching, teaching, or simply meditating on the Gospels. His writing is poignant and conversational, making this book a valuable tool for professional ministers, as well as for Christians who reflect on the Gospels for personal spiritual growth. Shea draws readers into the people and situations for Jesus encountered in ways that are evocative and inspirational. This ...
Additional Info:
Beloved storyteller and theologian John Shea provides a unique commentary that’s ideal for preaching, teaching, or simply meditating on the Gospels. His writing is poignant and conversational, making this book a valuable tool for professional ministers, as well as for Christians who reflect on the Gospels for personal spiritual growth. Shea draws readers into the people and situations for Jesus encountered in ways that are evocative and inspirational. This resource is based on Catholic and Revised Common Lectionaries, making it accessible across Christian denominations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
First Sunday of Advent Engaging Collapse
Second Sunday of Advent Going Beyond the Mind
Third Sunday of Advent Repenting Forever
Fourth Sunday of Advent Evangelizing the Child in the Womb
Second Sunday in Ordinary Time/Second Sunday after Epiphany Supplying Wine
Third Sunday in Ordinary Time/Third Sunday after Epiphany Deepening Spiritual Knowledge
Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Fourth Sunday after Epiphany Pleasing and Displeasing
Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Fifth Sunday after Epiphany Going Fishing
Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Sixth Sunday after Epiphany Taking Hold of the Life That Is Really Life
Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time/Seventh Sunday after Epiphany Pausing for Freedom
Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Eighth Sunday after Epiphany Thanking Teachers
Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Ninth Sunday after Epiphany Obeying the Higher
First Sunday of Lent Rejecting Strategies
Second Sunday of Lent Risking Listening
Third Sunday of Lent Bearing Fruit
Fourth Sunday of Lent Failing to Rejoice
Fifth Sunday of Lent (Lectionary for Mass) Holding in Sin or Forgiving for Life
Fifth Sunday of Lent (Revised Common Lectionary) Walking Us Home
Second Sunday of Easter Resurrecting with Questions
Third Sunday of Easter Leading from Soul
Fourth Sunday of Easter Speaking in Your Own Voice
Fifth Sunday of Easter Remembering Love
Sixth Sunday of Easter Leaving Peace
Seventh Sunday of Easter Practicing Spiritual Presence
Tenth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 5 Peddling Choices
Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 6 Loving Extravagantly
Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time Singing Our Suffering
Sunday between June 19 and June 25 inclusive/Proper 7 Fearing and Loving God
Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 8 Rebuking the Mind
Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 9 Handing on the Mission
Fifteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 10 Flowing From and With Love
Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 11 Integrating Mary and Martha
Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 12 Praying Someone Else's Prayer
Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 13 Balancing Trade-Offs
Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 14 Receiving and Giving
Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 15 Discovering Fire
Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time Striving to Enter
Sunday between August 21 and August 27 inclusive/Proper 16 Setting People Free
Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 17 Laughing at Ourselves
Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 18 Hungering to Build and Battle
Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 19 Getting Back What We Lose
Twenty-Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 20 Surviving Spiritually
Twenty-Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 21 Needing Something More
Twenty-Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 22 Accessing What We Have
Twenty-Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 23 Seizing Second Chances
Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 24 Wearing Down Injustice
Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 25 Checkmating the King
Thirty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 26 Finding the True Self
Thirty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 27 Hoping Without Knowing
Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time/Proper 28 Predicting the Future
Christ the King/Reign of Christ Testing Life by Dying
Scripture Index
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Rethinking Faculty Work

Book
Gappa, Judith M., Ann E. Austin, and Andrea G. Trice
2007
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.72.G375 2007
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Written for educators, administrators, policy makers, and anyone else concerned with the future of higher education, Rethinking Faculty Work shows how changes in higher education are transforming the careers of faculty and provides a model that makes it possible for all faculty to be in a position to do their best. This important resource offers a vision of academic workplaces that will attract superb faculty committed to fulfilling the missions ...
Additional Info:
Written for educators, administrators, policy makers, and anyone else concerned with the future of higher education, Rethinking Faculty Work shows how changes in higher education are transforming the careers of faculty and provides a model that makes it possible for all faculty to be in a position to do their best. This important resource offers a vision of academic workplaces that will attract superb faculty committed to fulfilling the missions of the universities and colleges where they work. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part One: Higher Education's Changing Context
ch. 1 The Changing Context for Faculty Work and Workplaces
ch. 2 Trends in the National Workplace
ch. 3 Faculty Appointments and Faculty Members: Diversification, Growth, and Diversity
ch. 4 The Academic Profession Today: Diverse Appointments to Meet Diverse Needs
ch. 5 Attracting and Retaining Excellent Faculty

Part Two: The Framework
ch. 6 The Framework of Essential Elements
ch. 7 Respect: The Foundation for the Essential Elements
ch. 8 Shared Responsibility and Joint Leadership

Part Three: The Essential Elements
ch. 9 Equity in Academic Appointments
ch. 10 Academic Freedom
ch. 11 Ensuring Flexibility in Academic Appointments
ch. 12 Professional Growth
ch. 13 Collegiality
ch. 14 Why Rethink Faculty Work and Workplaces? A Call to Action

References
Name Index
Subject Index
TTR cover image

"Lucinda Huffaker and the Hospitality of the Wabash Center "

TTR
Placher, William C.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 163-167
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
As associate director and then director of the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion, Lucinda Huffaker has been a key factor in the Center's reputation for hospitality. The Center's work presupposes that reflection on teaching improves teaching and learning, and good reflection on one's teaching requires taking risks and making oneself vulnerable. Hospitality helps create a "safe space" that encourages such risks, even in the current ...
Additional Info:
As associate director and then director of the Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion, Lucinda Huffaker has been a key factor in the Center's reputation for hospitality. The Center's work presupposes that reflection on teaching improves teaching and learning, and good reflection on one's teaching requires taking risks and making oneself vulnerable. Hospitality helps create a "safe space" that encourages such risks, even in the current inhospitable academic world, where factors like competitiveness and the increasing use of adjuncts make honest reflection on teaching difficult.
TTR cover image

"Honoring Teachers for Their Vocation and Potential"

TTR
Williams, Raymond Brady
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 170-171
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
One goal of the Wabash Center is to honor teachers for their potential, and hospitality has been a primary means to that end. A lesson learned is that the intention and effort to honor teachers create contexts for meaningful discussions, creative learning, and personal renewal of those engaged in workshops and consultations. The lesson is valuable for those engaged in all forms of adult learning, especially in colleges and theological ...
Additional Info:
One goal of the Wabash Center is to honor teachers for their potential, and hospitality has been a primary means to that end. A lesson learned is that the intention and effort to honor teachers create contexts for meaningful discussions, creative learning, and personal renewal of those engaged in workshops and consultations. The lesson is valuable for those engaged in all forms of adult learning, especially in colleges and theological schools.
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The Gigantic Book of Teachers' Wisdom

Book
Gruwell,Erin, ed.
2007
Skyhorse Publishing, New York, NY
PN6084.E38G544 2007
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
When we look back with fondness at our school years, one teacher always stands out. This tremendous compendium of wisdom captures that special relationship. With more than 3,000 entries, it includes thoughts on the art of teaching and the acquisition of knowledge from hundreds of professors, scholars, politicians, celebrities, and more. Some of the famous names represented include Socrates, Aristotle, the Buddha, Jesus, Muhammad, Mark Twain, Frederick Douglass, Helen Keller, Freud, ...
Additional Info:
When we look back with fondness at our school years, one teacher always stands out. This tremendous compendium of wisdom captures that special relationship. With more than 3,000 entries, it includes thoughts on the art of teaching and the acquisition of knowledge from hundreds of professors, scholars, politicians, celebrities, and more. Some of the famous names represented include Socrates, Aristotle, the Buddha, Jesus, Muhammad, Mark Twain, Frederick Douglass, Helen Keller, Freud, Albert Einstein, Gandhi, Winston Churchill, and John Lennon. The words will educate, amuse, and perhaps even inspire some readers to focus on this honorable profession as a lifelong pursuit. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction

ch. 1 The Teacher
ch. 2 The Philosophy Behind Good Teaching
ch. 3 Words From the Wise
ch. 4 Those We Teach and Those Who Raise Them
ch. 5 The Philosophy of Learning
ch. 6 Classroom Perspectives
ch. 7 Life Lessons
ch. 8 Civilized Thoughts
ch. 9 Between the Lines
ch. 10 Nuts and Bolts
ch. 11 Fundamental Elements
ch. 12 Extremes of Intelligence
ch. 13 The Funny Side of Teaching
ch. 14 Finding Inspiration

Those Quoted
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Teaching and Religious Imagination: An Essay in the Theology of Teaching

Book
Harris, Maria
1991
Harper & Row, San Francisco, CA
BV1534.H359 1991
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Harris helps teachers discover their own creative resources and aid their students in doing the same. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Harris helps teachers discover their own creative resources and aid their students in doing the same. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

Part One: Teaching
ch. 1 Imagination and the Religious
ch. 2 Teaching
ch. 3 Incarnation
ch. 4 Revelation
ch. 5 The Grace of Power
ch. 6 Re-Creation

Part Two: Teachers
ch. 7 A Pedagogical Model
ch. 8 An Artistic Model
ch. 9 Invitation to Imagination
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The Role of Self in Teacher Development

Book
Lipka, Richard P., ed.
1999
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LB1775.2.R65 1999
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The Role of Self in Teacher Development explores some of the major transition points in becoming a teacher and focuses explicitly on how issues of self and identity bear on these different points. The contributors examine not only pre-service teachers, but also the first years of teaching, the characteristics of the master teacher, and the processes of reexamining and affirming one's identity as a teacher. A recurrent theme throughout the ...
Additional Info:
The Role of Self in Teacher Development explores some of the major transition points in becoming a teacher and focuses explicitly on how issues of self and identity bear on these different points. The contributors examine not only pre-service teachers, but also the first years of teaching, the characteristics of the master teacher, and the processes of reexamining and affirming one's identity as a teacher. A recurrent theme throughout the book is the importance of balancing the personal development of teachers with their professional development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Balancing the Personal and Professional Development of Teachers

ch. 1 Deciding to Teach (Linda F. Tusin)
ch. 2 Deciding to Teach: Implications of a Self-Development Perspective (Stanley J. Zehm)
ch. 3 Becoming a Teacher: The Person in the Process (S. Vianne McLean)
ch. 4 Dimensions of Self That Influence Effective Teaching (Gary D. Borich)
ch. 5 Teacher Self-Appraisal and Appraisal of Self (Les Tickle)
ch. 6 Identity and Induction: Establishing the Self in the First Years of Teaching (Paul G. Schempp, Andrew C. Sparkes, Thomas J. Templin)
ch. 7 Caring: The Way of the Master Teacher (Karen J. Agne)
ch. 8 Effective Teachers: What They Do, How They Do It, and the Importance of Self-Knowledge (Don Hamachek)

Epilogue: How Can the Balance between the Personal and the Professional Be Achieved?
Indices
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The Academic Self: An Owner's Manual

Book
Hall, Donald E.
2002
Ohio State University Press, Columbus, OH
LB2331.H3122 2002
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The Academician's guide to career management offers insights on climbing the college career ladder that will benefit grad students and full professors alike. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The Academician's guide to career management offers insights on climbing the college career ladder that will benefit grad students and full professors alike. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Owning up to Academic Dysfunctions
ch. 1 Self
ch. 2 Profession
ch. 3 Process
ch. 4 Collegiality, Community, and Change
Postscript: Textualizing Success
App Sample Professional Statement
References
Index
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The Promise of Scriptural Reasoning

Book
Ford, David C. and C.C. Pecknold, eds.
2006
Blackwell Publishing, Malden, MA
BL71.P76 2006
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
In 'scriptural reasoning', Jews, Christians and Muslims study their scriptures in conversation with one another. This innovative practice brings core identities into deep engagements with one another by returning to the sacred texts that give rise to their differences and their family resemblances. 'Scriptural reasoning' enables these differences, and agreements, to be worked through in a collegial context. It has already begun to produce fresh approaches to one of the ...
Additional Info:
In 'scriptural reasoning', Jews, Christians and Muslims study their scriptures in conversation with one another. This innovative practice brings core identities into deep engagements with one another by returning to the sacred texts that give rise to their differences and their family resemblances. 'Scriptural reasoning' enables these differences, and agreements, to be worked through in a collegial context. It has already begun to produce fresh approaches to one of the great issues of the 21st century: how can the Abrahamic faiths understand each other and live together in peace?In this book, twelve contributors distil their critical and constructive thinking on 'scriptural reasoning' after nearly a decade of study and discussion. Their reflections range from introductory accounts and guidelines for the practice to literary-critical discussions and interpretations of texts. Several chapters draw on contemporary philosophies, such as pragmatism, phenomenology, and idealism. A critical conclusion invites readers to reflect on the promise of 'scriptural reasoning'. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface : The Promise of Scriptural Reasoning (C. C. Pecknold)

ch. 1 An Interfaith Wisdom : Scriptural Reasoning Between Jews, Christians and Muslims (David F. Ford)
ch. 2 A Handbook For Scriptural Reasoning (Steven Kepnes)
ch. 3 Making Deep Reasonings Public(Nicholas Adams)
ch. 4 Heavenly Semantics: Some Literary-Critical Approaches To Scriptural Reasoning (Ben Quash)
ch. 5 Scriptural Reasoning and The Formation of Identity (Susannah Ticciati)
ch. 6 Reading The burning Bush : Voice, World and Holiness (Oliver Davies)
ch. 7 Qur'anic Reasoning As An Academic Practice (Tim Winter)
ch. 8 Philosophic Warrants For Scriptural Reasoning (Peter Ochs)
ch. 9 Scriptural Reasoning and The Philosophy of Social Science (Basit Bilal Koshul)
ch. 10 The Phenomenology of Scripture : Patterns of Reception and Discovery Behind Scriptural Reasoning (Gavin D. Flood)
ch. 11 Reading With Others : Levinas' Ethics and Scriptural Reasoning (Robert Gibbs)
ch. 12 The Promise of Scriptural Reasoning (Daniel W. Hardy)
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The Vocation of the Religious Educator

Journal Issue
2003
Religious Education 98, no. 3 (Religious Education Association, Atlanta, GA 2003)
BV1460.R3V.98NO.3
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Daring To Lead With Hope: Association Of Professors And Researchers In Religious Education Presidential Address November 3, 2002 (Anne E. Streaty Wimberly)
ch. 2 Reflections On The Vocation Of A Religious Educator (John L. Elias)
ch. 3 Where Shall We Sit? The Vocational Conversations Of A Religious Educator (Charles R. Foster)
ch. 4 Different Bodies, One Body: Inclusive Religious Education And The Role Of The Religious Educator (Trace Haythorn)
ch. 5 Holding Onto Hope: Addressing Theological Conflict Through Christian Religious Education (Jack L. Seymour)
ch. 6 The Religious Educator As Cultural Spec-Actor: Researching Self In Intercultural Pedagogy (José R. Irizarry)
ch. 7 Thelma And Louise Do Religious Education: A Dialogue From The Edge For Leading With Hope (Patty Meyers and Susan Willhauck)
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The Sista' Network: African-American Women Faculty Successfully Negotiating the Road to Tenure

Book
Cooper, Tuesday L.
2006
Anker Publishing Company, Bolton, MA
LB2335.7.C66 2006
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
The “Sista’ Network"”is a term used to describe the relationships between and among professional African-American women which enable them to assist one another in learning the unwritten rules and protocols of various professions. In the context of higher education, the Sista' Network can help new African-American women faculty learn the rules to “the Tenure Game.”
A qualitative inquiry into the lives and experiences of nine African-American women during ...
Additional Info:
The “Sista’ Network"”is a term used to describe the relationships between and among professional African-American women which enable them to assist one another in learning the unwritten rules and protocols of various professions. In the context of higher education, the Sista' Network can help new African-American women faculty learn the rules to “the Tenure Game.”
A qualitative inquiry into the lives and experiences of nine African-American women during various stages of the tenure process, this book partly explores general, practical considerations such as the tenure process; requirements for tenure; and negotiating the balance among teaching, research, service, and collegiality. Yet it delves further into the statistics of African-American women faculty in the academy; issues of isolation, mentoring, and networking; African-American women faculty and the tenure process; African-American feminist thought; and racism, sexism, and the politics of singularity.
Also included are 12 guiding principles for new African-American women faculty members embarking upon the tenure process. Carefully weaving African-American feminist thought with the literature on academic tenure and minority along with stories of women faculty’s experiences in the academy, the author creates an effective and engaging account for minority women embarking on the tenure journey themselves. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction:The Challenges of African-American Women Faculty

ch. 2 Tenure
The Tenure Process
Requirements for Tenure

ch. 3 African-American Women Faculty in the Academy
The Statistics
Isolation, Mentoring, and Networking
The Tenure Process
African-American Feminist Thought

ch. 4 The Research Results
The Methodology and Structure
A Roundtable Discussion
The Tenure Process
Collegiality
Service and Mentoring
Isolation
Networking
Highlights and Lessons Learned

ch. 5 The Game of Tenure
Learning the Rules of the Tenure Game
Negotiating the Balance Among Teaching, Research, and Service
Collegiality as the Fourth Category of the Tenure Process
Finding a Mentor
The Trilogy: Racism, Sexism, and the Politics of Singularity
The Sista’ Network
Guiding Principles for African-American Women Faculty

ch. 6 Conclusion: Six Years Later

Appendix A: Research Design and Methods
Appendix B: Sample Interview Questions
Bibliography
Index
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Faculty of Color: Teaching in Predominantly White Colleges and Universities

Book
Stanley, Christine A., ed.
2006
Anker Publishing Company, Inc., Boston, MA
LB2332.6.F33 2006
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Combining an overview of current research literature and 23 engaging narratives, Faculty of Color invites deeper dialogue on the experiences of faculty of color teaching in predominantly white institutions. By raising issues for commentary and investigation, the book challenges its readers to adopt effective strategies for the recruitment and retention of faculty of color in higher education.

The authors represent a variety of disciplines and share firsthand experiences that ...
Additional Info:
Combining an overview of current research literature and 23 engaging narratives, Faculty of Color invites deeper dialogue on the experiences of faculty of color teaching in predominantly white institutions. By raising issues for commentary and investigation, the book challenges its readers to adopt effective strategies for the recruitment and retention of faculty of color in higher education.

The authors represent a variety of disciplines and share firsthand experiences that range from teaching, recruitment, research, mentoring, institutional climate, and administration, to relationships with colleagues as well as students. Through their stories, they are able to offer useful insights into

* Teaching styles and how they affect promotion decisions
* The impact of mentoring relationships
* Collegiality in the campus and university setting
* Separating self-identity from group membership
* Managing service activities
* Understanding and dealing with racism

Faculty of Color is intended for senior administrators and policymakers, faculty development professionals, current faculty, and future faculty of color who are contemplating academia. Each chapter offers a variety of recommendations designed to guide predominantly white colleges and universities in working to ensure that their institutions continue to change in substantive ways. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Preface
Acknowledgments
An Overview of the Literature (Christine A. Stanley)
Succeeding in the Face of Doubt (Stephanie G. Adams)
Do I Have to Be Black or Brown to Count? An Appeal for Broad Appreciation and Understanding of Diversity (Karla Anhalt)
Free to Be the Me You See: Discovering the Joy of Teaching (K. Denise Bane)
"Are You Here to Move the Piano?" A Latino Reflects on Twenty Years in the Academy (James F. Bonilla)
The Temple of My Unfamiliar (Fred A. Bonner, II)
Racism Will Not Go Away and Neither Will We: Two Scholars of Color Examine Multicultural Education Courses (Bryan Brayboy, Maria C. Estsrada)
In Search of Community: The Challenges and Successes of an Isolated Engineer (Karen Butler-Purry)
Solitary Sojourn: An American Indian Faculty Members' Journey in Academe (Karen Sunday Cockrell)
Putting the Color in Colorado: On Being Black and Teaching Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado-Boulder (Adrian Gaskins)
Living, Breathing, Teaching Sociology: Using the Micro to Illuminate the Macro (Sarah N. Gatson)
Can a Brotha' Get a Break? Teaching on a Majority White Research University Campus (Jeffrey J. Guidry)
Just Because I Choose to Be Me (Reem Haj-Ali)
Anatomy of "Difference": The Meaning of Diversity and the Diversity of Meaning (Rashmi Jaipal)
Color in the Interstice, or, What Color, This Faculty of Color? (Leswin Laubscher)
Reflections From a Minority Faculty in a Majority Institution (Cheryl B. Leggon)
Tenure on My Terms(Antoinette Halsell Miranda)
Teaching and Researching "The Politics of Race" in a Majority White Institution (Byron D'Andra Orey)
Negotiating Identity and Learning From a Native Pacific Perspective: Contradictions of Higher Learning in Cultural Diversity Classes (Michael P. Perez)
Learning to Play the Game (Anthony D. Ross)
I'm Just a Black Woman Troubling the Status Quo (Shari Saunders)
Challenging Racial Battle Fatigue on Historically White Campuses: A Critical Race Examination of Race-Related Stress (William A. Smith, Tara J. Yosso, Daniel G. Solórzano)
Walking Between Two Cultures: The Often Misunderstood Jamaican Woman (Christine A. Stanley)
Institutional Barriers and Myths to Recruitment and Retention of Faculty of Color: An Administrator's Perspective (Christine Yoshinaga-Itano)
Summary and Key Recommendations for the Recruitment and Retention of Faculty of Color (Christine A. Stanley)
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Being Black Teaching Black: Politics and Pedagogy in Religious Studies

Book
Westfield, Nancy Lynne, ed.
2008
Abingdon Press, Nashville, TN
BT82.7.B45 2007
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
A group of eminent African American scholars of religoius and theological studies examines the problems and prospects of Black scholarhip in the theological academy. They assess the role that prominent African American scholars have played in transforming the study and teaching of religion and theology, the need for a more thorough-going incorporation of the fruits of black scholarship into the mainstream of the academic study of religion, and the challenges ...
Additional Info:
A group of eminent African American scholars of religoius and theological studies examines the problems and prospects of Black scholarhip in the theological academy. They assess the role that prominent African American scholars have played in transforming the study and teaching of religion and theology, the need for a more thorough-going incorporation of the fruits of black scholarship into the mainstream of the academic study of religion, and the challenges and opportunities of bringing black art, black intellectual thought, and black culture into predominantly white classrooms and institutions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Nancy Lynne Westfield)
Views

ch. 1 Visible/Invisible: Teaching Popular Culture and the Vulgar Body in Black Religious Studies (Carol B. Duncan)
ch. 2 Using Novels of Resistance to Teach Intercultural Empathy and Cultural Analysis (Arthur L. Pressley)
ch. 3 E-Racing While Black (Stephen G. Ray, Jr.)
ch. 4 Called Out My Name, or Had I Known You Were Somebody: The Pain of Fending Off Stereotypes (Nancy Lynne Westfield)
ch. 5 Reading the Signs: The Body as Non-Written Text (Anthony B. Pinn)
ch. 6 Emancipatory Historiography as Pedagogical Praxis: The Blessing and the Curse of Theological Education for the Black Self and Subject (Juan M. Floyd-Thomas and Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas)
ch. 7 Black Rhythms and Consciousness: Authentic Being and Pedagogy (Lincoln E. Galloway)
ch. 8 From Embodied Theodicy to Embodied Theos (Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas)
ch. 9 Teaching Black: God-Talk with Black Thinkers (Arthur L. Pressley and Nancy Lynne Westfield)

Responses
ch. 10 Teaching Black, Talking Back (Carolyn M. Jones)
ch. 11 Together in Solidarity: An Asian American Feminist's Response (Boyung Lee)
ch. 12 Influences of "Being Black, Teaching Black" On Theological Education (Charles R. Foster)

Notes
Select Bibliography
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On Teaching and Learning: Putting the Principles and Practices of Dialogue Education into Action

Book
Vella, Jane
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LC196.V46 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
On Teaching and Learning takes the ideas explored in renowned educator Jane Vella’s best-selling book Learning to Listen, Learning to Teach to the next level and explores how dialogue education has been applied in educational settings around the world. Throughout the book, she shows how to put the principles and practices of dialogue education into action and uses illustrative stories and examples from her extensive travels. Dialogue education values ...
Additional Info:
On Teaching and Learning takes the ideas explored in renowned educator Jane Vella’s best-selling book Learning to Listen, Learning to Teach to the next level and explores how dialogue education has been applied in educational settings around the world. Throughout the book, she shows how to put the principles and practices of dialogue education into action and uses illustrative stories and examples from her extensive travels. Dialogue education values inquiry, integrity, and commitment to equity—values that are also central to democracy. Learners are treated as beings worthy of respect, recognized for the knowledge and experience they bring to the learning experience. Dialogue education emphasizes the importance of safety and belonging. It is an approach that welcomes one’s certainties and one’s questions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Author
Introduction

Part One: Structured
ch. 1 Why Structure?
ch. 2 Learning Needs and Resources Assessment
ch. 3 The Seven Design Steps

Part Two: Social
ch. 4 The Learning Task in a Small Group
ch. 5 Individual Learning Enhanced

Part Three: Sound
ch. 6 Principles and Practices: Current State of the Art
ch. 7 Open Questions Invite Dialogue
ch. 8 The Designer’s Skill: Trust Your Design

Part Four: Sure
ch. 9 Indicators of Learning, Transfer, and Impact
ch. 10 Impact and the Seven Design Steps

Part Five: Synthesis: Putting It All Together
ch. 11 Putting It All Together: Examples of Dialogue Education Designs
ch. 12 An On-Line Course Using Dialogue Education
ch. 13 Dialogue Education in School Leadership
ch. 14 Dialogue Education in Health Care Settings
ch. 15 Dialogue Education in a College Classroom

Appendix A: Glossary of Terms Used in Dialogue Education
Appendix B: Tough Verbs for Learning Tasks

References
Index
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Authenticity in Teaching

Book
Cranton, Patricia, ed.
2006
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2331.A93 2006
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Becoming an authentic teacher appears to be a developmental process that relies on experience, maturity, self-exploration, and reflection. It is the purpose of this volume to explore a variety of ways of thinking about authenticity in teaching, from the perspective of both scholars and practitioners.
This volume addresses five overlapping and interrelated aspects of teaching that impact a teacher's authenticity:
* self-awareness and self-exploration
* awareness of others (especially ...
Additional Info:
Becoming an authentic teacher appears to be a developmental process that relies on experience, maturity, self-exploration, and reflection. It is the purpose of this volume to explore a variety of ways of thinking about authenticity in teaching, from the perspective of both scholars and practitioners.
This volume addresses five overlapping and interrelated aspects of teaching that impact a teacher's authenticity:
* self-awareness and self-exploration
* awareness of others (especially students)
* relationships with students
* awareness of cultural, social, and educational contexts and their influence on practice
* critical self-reflection on teaching
Authenticity is one of those concepts, like soul, spirit, or imagination, that are easier to define in terms of what they are not than what they are. We can fairly easily say that someone who lies to students or pretends to know or who deliberately dons a teaching persona is not authentic. But do the opposite behaviors guarantee authentic teaching? Not necessarily...
This is the 111th volume of the quarterly journal, New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Authenticity and Power (Stephen D. Brookfield)
ch. 2 Women, Knowing, and Authenticity: Living with Contradictions (Leona M. English)
ch. 3 Authenticity and Imagination (John M. Dirkx)
ch. 4 Authenticity and Relationships with Students (Katherine A. Frego)
ch. 5 Institutional Constraints on Authenticity in Teaching (Russell Hunt)
ch. 6 Cultural Dimensions of Authenticity in Teaching (Lin Lin)
ch. 7 Teaching with Presence (Lloyd Kornelsen)
ch. 8 Integrating Perspectives on Authority (Patricia Cranton)
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A Buddhist in the Classroom

Book
Brown, Sid
2008
State University of New York Press
LB1027.22.B76 2008
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Sid Brown brings a Buddhist perspective into the classroom to explore the ethical quandaries, lived experiences and intimacy of teaching. Addressing such topics as attention, community, rage, wonder, consumerism, and kindness, Brown demonstrates how this centuries-old tradition can enrich and inform classroom life. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Sid Brown brings a Buddhist perspective into the classroom to explore the ethical quandaries, lived experiences and intimacy of teaching. Addressing such topics as attention, community, rage, wonder, consumerism, and kindness, Brown demonstrates how this centuries-old tradition can enrich and inform classroom life. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction In the Event of a Crash Landing

ch. 1 Lie Until It's True: Getting Students' Attention
ch. 2 Viewing Each Other With Kindly Eyes: Community in the Classroom
ch. 3 Stopping an Elephant Dead in Its Tracks: Irritation, Anger, and Rage
ch. 4 Do Not Cross Line: Wonder and Imaginative Engagement
ch. 5 Homicidal Tendencies: The Story of a Teacher and a Student
ch. 6 Letting Women into the Order: Learning from Students
ch. 7 Removing the Arrow: Authentic Teachers and Willing Students, Elements of Reciprocity
ch. 8 Trustful Confidence: Assessing Your Teaching
ch. 9 Conclusion: The Heart of Teaching

Appendix I Nifty assignments
Appendix II Handouts

Notes
Glossary
Bibliography
Index
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Higher Education Reconceived: A Geography of Change

Book
Sherrie Reynolds and Toni Craven
2009
TCU Press, Forth Worth, TX
LA 227.4.R48 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
In "Higher Education Reconceived: A Geography of Change", authors Sherrie Reynolds and Toni Craven examine the process of change in higher education as they engage the reader in conversation about how we relate to ourselves and to one another. They draw on modern and post-modern elements of higher education as well as personal narratives to address personal change, emergent change, and changing ideas about learning, curriculum, and communities of learning. ...
Additional Info:
In "Higher Education Reconceived: A Geography of Change", authors Sherrie Reynolds and Toni Craven examine the process of change in higher education as they engage the reader in conversation about how we relate to ourselves and to one another. They draw on modern and post-modern elements of higher education as well as personal narratives to address personal change, emergent change, and changing ideas about learning, curriculum, and communities of learning. The traditional view in higher education is that teaching causes learning. However, these authors assess how, as our ideas of student learning, research, and disciplines have developed, our understanding of teaching has evolved as well. Throughout, the authors intimate a sense of the spiritual in the processes of teaching and learning. This holistic volume encourages meditation on the multidimensional journey of teaching and learning, sheds new light on current paradigms of education, and presents ways of living together in a pluralistic and globally connected world. Opening each chapter with a labyrinth illustration to depict the winding and porous nature of the topic, this book should find a place on every educator's bookshelf. As teacher-scholars together discover a new understanding of higher education fit for our times, they should never forget that - as Reynolds put it - 'Being a university professor is a sacred trust'.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction Labyrinths

ch. 1 Personal Change
Sherri Reynolds: Change
Change as Process
Change Is Messy
Avoiding Change
Toni Craven: A Story of Change
Ezekiel and Transformative Change
Change and Conversation

ch. 2 Emergent Change
First and Second Order Change
Change as Fractal
Seeing through Old Ideas

ch. 3 Changing Ideas about Consciousness
Bedrock Ideas
The Mechanical Universe
A Transition
From Simple to Complex
From Hierarchy to Heterarchy
From Mechanical to Holographic
From Determinate to Indeterminate
From Linear toward Mutual Casuality
From Assembly toward Morphogenesis
From Objective toward Perspective
How Does This Affect Teaching and Scholarship?

ch. 4 Changing Ideas about Learning
Modern Learning
Darwinism and Neo-Darwinism
Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936)
John Broadus Watson (1878-1958)
B. F. Skinner (1904-1990)
Turning Points in Modern and Post-Modern Learning
Jean Piaget (1896-1980)
Lev Semyonovich Vygotsky (1896-1934)
Post-Modern Learning
Learning through Feedback
Learning Is Self-Organizing
Importance of Unconscious Thought in Learning
Learning as Emergent Order

ch. 5 Changing Ideas About Curriculum
Curriculum as Sequence
Post-Modern Curriculum
William Doll's Curriculum as Matrix
Richness
Recursion
Relations
Rigor
Curriculum as Autobiography
Relationships in a Complex System
Who Are Our Students?

ch. 6 Changing Ideas about Communities of Learning
Caring Relationships
Preparing Myself for Class
Using Feedback
Faculty and Community
Searching for Excellence
A New Story
Metaphors for Teaching
Seeing and More
Caring about Students
Relationality in Process

Notes
Lists of Works Cited
Index
About the Authors
Credits
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How Professors Think: Inside the Curious World of Academic Judgment

Book
Michele Lamont
2009
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2333.L36 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Excellence. Originality. Intelligence. Everyone in academia stresses quality. But what exactly is it, and how do professors identify it?
In the academic evaluation system known as “peer review,” highly respected professors pass judgment, usually confidentially, on the work of others. But only those present in the deliberative chambers know exactly what is said. Michèle Lamont observed deliberations for fellowships and research grants, and interviewed panel members at length. ...
Additional Info:
Excellence. Originality. Intelligence. Everyone in academia stresses quality. But what exactly is it, and how do professors identify it?
In the academic evaluation system known as “peer review,” highly respected professors pass judgment, usually confidentially, on the work of others. But only those present in the deliberative chambers know exactly what is said. Michèle Lamont observed deliberations for fellowships and research grants, and interviewed panel members at length. In How Professors Think, she reveals what she discovered about this secretive, powerful, peculiar world.

Anthropologists, political scientists, literary scholars, economists, historians, and philosophers don’t share the same standards. Economists prefer mathematical models, historians favor different kinds of evidence, and philosophers don’t care much if only other philosophers understand them. But when they come together for peer assessment, academics are expected to explain their criteria, respect each other’s expertise, and guard against admiring only work that resembles their own. They must decide: Is the research original and important? Brave, or glib? Timely, or merely trendy? Pro-diversity or interdisciplinary enough?

Judging quality isn’t robotically rational; it’s emotional, cognitive, and social, too. Yet most academics’ self-respect is rooted in their ability to analyze complexity and recognize quality, in order to come to the fairest decisions about that elusive god, “excellence.” In How Professors Think, Lamont aims to illuminate the confidential process of evaluation and to push thegatekeepers to both better understand and perform their role. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contents

ch. 1 Opening the Black Box of Peer Review
ch. 2 How Panels Work
ch. 3 On Disciplinary Cultures
ch. 4 Pragmatic Fairness: Customary Rules of Deliberation
ch. 5 Recognizing Various Kinds of Excellence
ch. 6 Considering Interdisciplinarity and Diversity
ch. 7 Implications in the United States and Abroad

Appendix: Methods and Data Analysis
Notes
References
Acknowledgments
Index
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Professing to Learn: Creating Tenured Lives and Careers in the American Research University

Book
Neumann, Anna
2009
The John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MYD
LB1778.2.N475 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Research, teaching, service, and public outreach — all are aspects of being a tenured professor. But this list of responsibilities is missing a central component: actual scholarly learning — disciplinary knowledge that faculty teach, explore in research, and share with the academic community. How do professors pursue such learning when they must give their attention as well to administrative and other obligations?

Professing to Learn explores university professors' scholarly growth ...
Additional Info:
Research, teaching, service, and public outreach — all are aspects of being a tenured professor. But this list of responsibilities is missing a central component: actual scholarly learning — disciplinary knowledge that faculty teach, explore in research, and share with the academic community. How do professors pursue such learning when they must give their attention as well to administrative and other obligations?

Professing to Learn explores university professors' scholarly growth and learning in the years immediately following the award of tenure, a crucial period that has a lasting impact on the academic career. Some launch from this point to multiple accomplishments and accolades, while others falter, their academic pursuits stalled. What contributes to these different outcomes?

Drawing on interviews with seventy-eight professors in diverse disciplines and fields at five major American research universities, Anna Neumann describes how tenured faculty shape and disseminate their own disciplinary knowledge while attending committee meetings, grading exams, holding office hours, administering programs and departments, and negotiating with colleagues. By exploring the intellectual activities pursued by these faculty and their ongoing efforts to develop and define their academic interests, Professing to Learn directs the attention of higher education professionals and policy makers to the core aim of higher education: the creation of academic knowledge through research, teaching, and service. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

1. Into the Middle: Mapping the Early Post-Tenure Career in the Research University
2. The Heart of the Matter: Passionate Thought and Scholarly Learning
3. Mindwork: What and How Professors Strive to Learn
4. Location: Where Professors Purse Their Scholarly Learning
5. Becoming Strategic: Recently Tenured University Professors as Agents of Scholarly Learning
6. Organizing to Learn: What Universities Provide for Professors' Scholarly Learning
7. The Middle Remapped: Toward an Ecology of Learning in the Early Post-Tenure Career

Appendix A: Study Designs and Background Data
Appendix B: Interview Protocols and Consent Forms for the Four Universities Project
Appendix C: Framework: University Professors' Scholarly Learning

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Faculty Vocation and Governance Project (pdf)

Journal Issue
2009
Theological Education 44, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v. 44 no. 2 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2009-theological-education-v44-n2.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2009-theological-education-v44-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Governance and the Future of Theological Education (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Governance: What is it?(G. Douglass Lewis)
Faculty Powers in Shared Governance (David L. Tiede)
More than Simply Getting Along: The Goal of Shared Governance in Theological Schools (Rebekah Burch Basinger)
Report from United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities (Eleazar S. Fernandez and Richard D. Weis)
Report from Iliff School of Theology (Jacob Kinnard and Ann Graham Brock)
Report from Multnomah Biblical Seminary (John L. Terveen)
Report from St. Peter's Seminary (John Dool and Brian Dunn)
Report from Denver Seminary (W. David Buschart and Bradley J. Widstrom)
Report from Ashland Theological Seminary (Wyndy Corbin Reuschling and Lee Wetherbee)
Attending to the Collective Vocation (Gordon T. Smith)
The Academic Teaching and the Practical Needs of the Clergy (John Bright)
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Answering the Call: African American Women in Higher Education Leadership

Book
Bower, Beverly L. and Mimi Wolverton
2009
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2341.B625 2009
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Although much has been written about leaders and leadership, we unfortunately know little about women, particularly minority women, who fill this particular role.

This book the second in a series that explores women leaders in different contexts presents the stories, and the reflections on their paths to leadership, of seven African American women. Five are, or have been, college presidents; three have devoted a good portion of their ...
Additional Info:
Although much has been written about leaders and leadership, we unfortunately know little about women, particularly minority women, who fill this particular role.

This book the second in a series that explores women leaders in different contexts presents the stories, and the reflections on their paths to leadership, of seven African American women. Five are, or have been, college presidents; three have devoted a good portion of their lives to leadership in higher education policy at state and/or national levels.

Each has been the first woman, or first African American, or first African American woman in one or more of the positions of authority that she has held. Along the way, they have overcome the double bind of sexism and racism that can inhibit the professional attainment of African American women, particularly as they move toward the top of their professions.

Although their pathways into leadership are different, definite similarities in their experiences, values, and beliefs emerge. Their values took root in the 1960s, a time of strong cohesion in the Black community, a time during which African Americans and women made great strides toward equality. They recognize that they owe their strength to the confidence and sense of empowerment instilled in each of them by parents and early role models. Several of them believe that their leadership skills were born out of their childhood experiences. Grateful for the support they have received, these women leaders express a need to give back to those communities that nourished their growth and leadership of which this book is a manifestation.

At a time when national demographic dataindicate that a significant turnover in college leadership is about to occur presenting increased opportunities for women and minorities these African American women leaders hope that the strategies they describe, the insights they impart, the experiences they recount, and, most of all, the passion they have sustained for the betterment of and greater inclusiveness in higher education, will inspire the next generation of women to answer the leadership call.

The African-American Women Leaders Covered in this Book: Debra Austin, Lois Carson, Marvalene Hughes, Yolanda Moses, Beverly Daniel Tatum, Jerry Sue Thornton, Belle S. Wheelan. These women exude strength and self-confidence. They each hold the belief, as Belle Wheelan puts it, that "with a little heart and a lot of learning I can do anything". (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Forward

ch. 1 The Realities of African American Women in Higher Education Leadership
ch. 2 Being Okay With Being Me
ch. 3 Walking the Talk
ch. 4 Finding Purpose Through Meaningful Leadership
ch. 5 Making Things Happen
ch. 6 Choosing a Commitment to Change
ch. 7 Energized for the Hard Work of Leadership
ch. 8 For the Greater Good
ch. 9 Six C's of Leadership
ch. 10 Project Methodology

Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching What You Don't Know

Book
Huston, Therese
2009
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2331.H875 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Your graduate work was on bacterial evolution, but now you're lecturing to 200 freshmen on primate social life. You've taught Kant for twenty years, but now you're team-teaching a new course on “Ethics and the Internet.” The personality theorist retired and wasn't replaced, so now you, the neuroscientist, have to teach the "Sexual Identity" course. Everyone in academia knows it and no one likes to admit it: faculty often have to ...
Additional Info:
Your graduate work was on bacterial evolution, but now you're lecturing to 200 freshmen on primate social life. You've taught Kant for twenty years, but now you're team-teaching a new course on “Ethics and the Internet.” The personality theorist retired and wasn't replaced, so now you, the neuroscientist, have to teach the "Sexual Identity" course. Everyone in academia knows it and no one likes to admit it: faculty often have to teach courses in areas they don't know very well. The challenges are even greater when students don't share your cultural background, lifestyle, or assumptions about how to behave in a classroom.

In this practical and funny book, an experienced teaching consultant offers many creative strategies for dealing with typical problems. How can you prepare most efficiently for a new course in a new area? How do you look credible? And what do you do when you don't have a clue how to answer a question?

Encouraging faculty to think of themselves as learners rather than as experts, Therese Huston points out that authority in the classroom doesn't come only, or even mostly, from perfect knowledge. She offers tips for introducing new topics in a lively style, for gauging students' understanding, for reaching unresponsive students, for maintaining discussions when they seem to stop dead, and -yes- for dealing with those impossible questions.

Original, useful, and hopeful, this book reminds you that teaching what you don't know, to students whom you may not understand, is not just a job. It's an adventure. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Growing Challenge
ch. 2 Why It's Better Than It Seems
ch. 3 Getting Ready
ch. 4 Teaching and Surviving
ch. 5 Thinking in Class
ch. 6 Teaching Students You Don't Understand
ch. 7 Getting Better
ch. 8 Advice for Administrators

Appendixes
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
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Breaking into the All-Male Club: Female Professors of Educational Administration

Book
Mertz, Norma T., ed.
2009
State University of New York Press, Albany
LC212.862.B74 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Women professors of educational administration share their personal stories of being female firsts. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Women professors of educational administration share their personal stories of being female firsts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Framing the Stories (Norma T. Mertz)
ch. 2 A First Woman with Clout (Edith A. Rusch and Barbara L. Jackson)
ch. 3 Breaking Through (Martha McCarthy)
ch. 4 Nothing Except a Battle Lost Can Be Half So Melancholy as a Battle Won: A Fight for Tenure (Carolyn J. Wood)
ch. 5 Traversing the Fault Line (Ellen V. Bueschel)
ch. 6 Where the Boys Were...With Apologies to Connie Francis (Norma T. Mertz)
ch. 7 Goodness of Fit (Diana G. Pounder)
ch. 8 First Ladies in the Academy (Deborah A. Verstegen)
ch. 9 From School Administrator to University Professor (Betty Malen)
ch. 10 The "Accidental" Professor (Non A. Prestine)
ch. 11 Resistance and Determination: Faculty Experiences of a Women Religious (Patricia A. Bauch, O.P.)
ch. 12 From the Bush to the Ivory Tower (Mary Gardiner)
ch. 13 One Woman's Struggle to Include and Be Included(Carolyn M. Keeler)
ch. 14 Being First: Stories of Social Complexities (Paula Myrick Short)
ch. 15 My Life as a Trophy (Edith A. Rusch)
ch. 16 Making Meaning of the Stories (Norma T. Mertz)

Unfinished, Uncertain Chronology of Women's Entry into the All-Male Educational Administration Professoriate
Contributors
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On Thinking Institutionally

Book
Heclo, Hugh
2008
Paradign Publishers, Boulder
HM826.H43 2008
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
David Brooks discusses On Thinking Institutionally in a recent column. Read it here! David Brooks Column

A brilliant look at institutions as popular as professional sports and as austere as the Supreme Court, all through the lens of what it means to "think institutionally."

The twenty-first-century mind deeply distrusts the authority of institutions. It has taken several centuries for advocates of "critical" thinking to convince Western ...
Additional Info:
David Brooks discusses On Thinking Institutionally in a recent column. Read it here! David Brooks Column

A brilliant look at institutions as popular as professional sports and as austere as the Supreme Court, all through the lens of what it means to "think institutionally."

The twenty-first-century mind deeply distrusts the authority of institutions. It has taken several centuries for advocates of "critical" thinking to convince Western culture that to be rational, liberated, authentic, and modern means to be anti-institutional. In this mold-breaking book, Hugh Heclo moves beyond the abstract academic realm of thinking "about" institutions to the more personal significance and larger social meaning of what it is to "think institutionally." His account ranges from "respect for the game" of baseball to Greek philosophy, from twenty-first-century corporate and political scandals to Christian theology and the concept of "office" and "professionalism." Think what you will about one institution or another, but after Heclo, no reader will be left in doubt about why it matters to think and act institutionally.

What do these things have in common?
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction: Respect for the Game
ch. 2 Our Modern Impasse
ch. 3 From Thinking about Institutions to Thinking Institutionally
ch. 4 Being Institutionally Minded
ch. 5 Applications, Dangers, and the Uphill Journey
ch. 6 Ways of Thinking, Ways of Being

Notes
Appendix: Selected Works of Hugh Heclo
Index
About the Author
TTR cover image

"Changing Institutional Location: A Reflective Conversation on the Move from Undergraduate to Seminary/Divinity School Teaching"

TTR
Marshall, Ellen; Mathews, Matt; Oden, Amy; Thatamanil, John, and Killen, Patricia O'Connell
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 1 (2009): 63-76
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
The editor of Teaching Theology and Religion facilitated this reflective conversation with four teachers who recently moved from undergraduate institutions to seminaries and divinity schools. Three major themes emerge in the conversation: (1) developing their pedagogical craft in undergraduate settings made them better teachers in their new contexts; (2) they moved, in part, to achieve a "better balance" between teaching and scholarship, and while this was generally achieved it was manifest in ...
Additional Info:
The editor of Teaching Theology and Religion facilitated this reflective conversation with four teachers who recently moved from undergraduate institutions to seminaries and divinity schools. Three major themes emerge in the conversation: (1) developing their pedagogical craft in undergraduate settings made them better teachers in their new contexts; (2) they moved, in part, to achieve a "better balance" between teaching and scholarship, and while this was generally achieved it was manifest in unexpected ways; (3) the communities or publics among whom and on behalf of whom they engage in broader service shifted in ways that have effected both their scholarship and their teaching; and (4) the move to a new teaching context enhanced their professional lives because they were able to consider their own visions of career in relation to the mission of their new institutions.
Cover image

The Tradition We Inherit

Book
William Placher
2009
Wabash College Advancement Office
BX9225.P57 A5 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Wisdom and sermons from William Placher throughout his lifetime.
Additional Info:
Wisdom and sermons from William Placher throughout his lifetime.

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Valedictory
On Wabash
Sermons
Callings
Memorials
Eulogy for William C. Placher '70
William C. Placher '70
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Beyond Reflective Practice: New Approaches to Professional Lifelong Learning

Book
Helen Bradbury, Faculty of Heal Leeds Metropolitan Uni, Sue Kilminster, Miriam Zukas, eds.
2010
Routledge New York, NY
LC5215.B5 2010
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Reflective practice has moved from the margins to the mainstream of professional education. However, in this process, its radical potential has been subsumed by individualistic, rather than situated, understandings of practice. Presenting critical perspectives that challenge the current paradigm, this book aims to move beyond reflective practice. It proposes new conceptualisations and offers fresh approaches relevant across professions. Contributors include both academics and practitioners concerned with the training and development ...
Additional Info:
Reflective practice has moved from the margins to the mainstream of professional education. However, in this process, its radical potential has been subsumed by individualistic, rather than situated, understandings of practice. Presenting critical perspectives that challenge the current paradigm, this book aims to move beyond reflective practice. It proposes new conceptualisations and offers fresh approaches relevant across professions. Contributors include both academics and practitioners concerned with the training and development of professionals.

Definitions of reflection (which are often implicit) often focus on the individual's internal thought processes and responsibility for their actions. The individual - what they did/thought/felt – is emphasised with little recognition of context, power dynamics or ideological challenge. This book presents the work of practitioners, educators, academics and researchers who see this as problematic and are moving towards a more critical approach to reflective practice.

With an overview from the editors and fourteen chapters considering new conceptualisations, professional perspectives and new practices, Beyond Reflective Practice examines what new forms of professional reflective practice are emerging. It examines in particular the relationships between reflective practitioners and those upon whom they practise. It looks at the ways in which the world of professional work has changed and the ways in which professional practice needs to change to meet the needs of this new world. It will be relevant for those concerned with initial and ongoing professional learning, both in work and in educational contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
List of Contributors
Introduction and Overview

Part I: Conceptual Challenges
ch. 1 Professionalism and social change – the implications of social change for the ‘reflective practitioner' (Nick Frost)
ch. 2 Relocating reflection in the context of practice (David Boud)
ch. 3 Beyond reflective practice: reworking the "critical" in critical reflection (Jan Fook)
ch. 4 A learning practice: Conceptualizing professional lifelong learning for the healthcare sector (Stephen Billett and Jennifer Newton)
ch. 5 Really reflexive practice: auto/biographical research and struggles for a critical reflexivity (Linden West)

Part II: Professional Perspectives
ch. 6 Voices from the past: professional discourse and reflective practice (Janet Hargreaves)
ch. 7 It’s all right for you two, you obviously like each other: recognizing challenges in pursuing collaborative professional learning through team teaching (Sue Knights, Lois Meyer and Jane Sampson)
ch. 8 Preparing for patient-centered practice: developing the patient voice in health professional learning (Penny Morris, Ernest Dalton, Andrea McGoverin, Fiona O'Neil, Jools Symons)
ch. 9 Informal Learning by Professionals in the United Kingdom (Geoffrey Chivers)
ch. 10 Judgment, narrative and discourse: a critique of reflective practice (David Satltiel)

Part III: New Practices
ch. 11 Re-imagining reflection: creating a theatrical space for the imagination in productive reflection (Kate Collier)
ch. 12 A step too far? From professional reflective practice to spirituality ( Cheryl Hunt)
ch. 13 Developing critical reflection within an interprofessional learning program (Kart Karban and Sue Smith)
ch. 14 Beyond reflection dogma (John Sweet)
TTR cover image

"Tribute to William Placher (Wabash College), 2002 "Excellence in Teaching Award" Winner"

TTR
Williams, Raymond Brady
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 243-244
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Short tribute to Bill Placher, as teacher, on the occasion of a panel of AAR Teacher of the Year Award recipients.
Additional Info:
Short tribute to Bill Placher, as teacher, on the occasion of a panel of AAR Teacher of the Year Award recipients.
TTR cover image

"Responses to Hugh Heclo's On Thinking Institutionally"

TTR
Fennell, Robert C., Ascough, Richard S., Liew, Tat-siong Benny, McLain, Michael, and Westfield, Nancy Lynne
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 272-284
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Hugh Heclo's recent book On Thinking Institutionally (Paradigm Publishers, 2008) analyzes changes that have taken place in the past half century in how North Americans tend to think and act in institutions. The volume is receiving particular attention as it can be applied to higher education and to religious denominations, and so deserves consideration by those who teach in theology and religious studies. At an October 2009 conference, The Wabash Center hosted ...
Additional Info:
Hugh Heclo's recent book On Thinking Institutionally (Paradigm Publishers, 2008) analyzes changes that have taken place in the past half century in how North Americans tend to think and act in institutions. The volume is receiving particular attention as it can be applied to higher education and to religious denominations, and so deserves consideration by those who teach in theology and religious studies. At an October 2009 conference, The Wabash Center hosted a lively discussion of Heclo's volume among invited religion and theology scholars, which resulted in the present compilation of four short responses to the book. What was and is clear from these responses is that while Heclo has identified a crucial issue, his analysis and prescription leave important theoretical and practical questions untouched. Indeed part of the energy around the discussion of the book flowed from the ways in which his lack of attention to social class, gender, race, and age circumscribed his ability to robustly describe and diagnose the challenge that gave rise to his book. In order to orient readers to the volume and discussion of it, the "Conversation" begins with a descriptive review of the book.
Article cover image

"The New Challenges, New Priorities: The Experience of Generation X Faculty: A Study for the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education"

Article
Helms, Robin Matross
2010
COACHE, The Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Inside Education: Depth Psychology in Teaching and Learning

Book
Mayers, Clifford
2007
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB1092.M39 2007
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Education has to do with the mind and spirit of both the learner and the teacher. Those who teach know this instinctively. Yet many of the processes and mandates required in education, at all levels, fail to consider this most basic condition of the learning environment. Mayes, as an educator and therapist, examines the teaching/learning project through the lens of Depth Psychology because he believes that it offers the ...
Additional Info:
Education has to do with the mind and spirit of both the learner and the teacher. Those who teach know this instinctively. Yet many of the processes and mandates required in education, at all levels, fail to consider this most basic condition of the learning environment. Mayes, as an educator and therapist, examines the teaching/learning project through the lens of Depth Psychology because he believes that it offers the best possibility for examining the non-quantifiable dimensions of the student/teacher/learning situation. Depth Psychology, rooted in the work of Carl Jung, offer the educator a very human and humane way to frame interactions with learners. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword By Edward Pajak
Introduction

ch. 1 The Psychoanalytic Foundations of Depth Pedagogy
ch. 2 From The Personal To The Transpersonal: Jung and The Realms of Psyche
ch. 3 Jung's LIfespan Psychology
ch. 4 New Horizons In Archetypal Pedagogy
ch. 5 The Teacher As Shaman
ch. 6 Archetype, Culture, and Gender
ch. 7 Alchemy and The Teacher

Conclusion
Biblography
Index
Cover image

Save the World on Your Own Time

Book
Fish, Stanley
2008
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
LB2331.72.F57 2008
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
What should be the role of our institutions of higher education? To promote good moral character? To bring an end to racism, sexism, economic oppression, and other social ills? To foster diversity and democracy and produce responsible citizens?

In Save the World On Your Own Time, Stanley Fish argues that, however laudable these goals might be, there is but one proper role for the academe in society: to ...
Additional Info:
What should be the role of our institutions of higher education? To promote good moral character? To bring an end to racism, sexism, economic oppression, and other social ills? To foster diversity and democracy and produce responsible citizens?

In Save the World On Your Own Time, Stanley Fish argues that, however laudable these goals might be, there is but one proper role for the academe in society: to advance bodies of knowledge and to equip students for doing the same. When teachers offer themselves as moralists, political activists, or agents of social change rather than as credentialed experts in a particular subject and the methods used to analyze it, they abdicate their true purpose. And yet professors now routinely bring their political views into the classroom and seek to influence the political views of their students. Those who do this will often invoke academic freedom, but Fish argues that academic freedom, correctly understood, is the freedom to do the academic job, not the freedom to do any job that comes into the professor's mind. He insists that a professor's only obligation is "to present the material in the syllabus and introduce students to state-of-the-art methods of analysis. Not to practice politics, but to study it; not to proselytize for or against religious doctrines, but to describe them; not to affirm or condemn Intelligent Design, but to explain what it is and analyze its appeal."

Given that hot-button issues such as Holocaust denial, free speech, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict are regularly debated in classrooms across the nation, Save the World On Your Own Time is certain to spark fresh debate-and to incense both liberals andconservatives-about the true purpose of higher education in America. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Task of Higher Education
ch. 2 Do Your Job
ch. 3 Administrative Interlude
ch. 4 Don't Try to Do Someone Else's Job
ch. 5 Don't Let Anyone Else Do Your Job
ch. 6 Higher Education under Attack
ch. 7 A Conclusion and Two Voices from the Other Side

Selected Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Finding Meaning in Civically Engaged Scholarship: Personal Journeys, Professional Experiences

Book
Diener, Marissa L., and Liese, Hank, eds.
2009
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LC220.5.F56 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
From the Pubisher

The essays in this volume are a collection of reflective narratives, rather than traditional scholarly treatises. The book is divided into two parts. The first part describes our individual journeys as each of us found our way to civically engaged scholarship and came to see it as critical to our academic endeavors and identity. This section also highlights the interdisciplinary nature of our work as ...
Additional Info:
From the Pubisher

The essays in this volume are a collection of reflective narratives, rather than traditional scholarly treatises. The book is divided into two parts. The first part describes our individual journeys as each of us found our way to civically engaged scholarship and came to see it as critical to our academic endeavors and identity. This section also highlights the interdisciplinary nature of our work as we discuss our journeys through our own disciplinary lenses. The second part presents detailed examples of our civic engagement, including service-learning classes, community based research projects, and creation of community service-learning spaces. These chapters provide a varied picture of the available avenues for civic engagement for students and faculty in a higher education setting. We provide sufficient details of our projects and classes to enable replication. The book concludes with a discussion of civic engagement as it is defined in the literature. The conclusion also discusses institutional factors that support and promote civic engagement as well as the importance of community involvement in service learning. Five common themes that emerged across the chapters are described. These themes include the use of service learning and civic engagement as an effective pedagogy, the relationship between civic engagement and political activism, the importance of partnership and collaboration, the meaning found in civic engagement, and the challenges of civically engaged work.

Table Of Content:
Introduction: The Journey

Part I - Journeys To Civically Engaged Scholarship
ch. 1 Reflections on the Search for Meaning in Academia (Marissa L. Diener)
ch. 2 From Service for Meaning to Meaningful Service (Maged Senbel)
ch. 3 The Search for Authentic Citizenship (Luke Garrott)
ch. 4 The Knock on the Door (Marshall Welch)
ch. 5 Expanding Horizons through Service and Service-Learning (Gina Maria Musolino)
ch. 6 Beyond Us and Them: Community-Based Research as a Politics of Engagement (Caitlin Cahill)
ch. 7 Teaching English, Reading Poetry, Living in the World (Janet Kaufman)
ch. 8 A Journey of Voluntarism (Nancy Winemiller Basinger)
ch. 9 The Civically Engaged Scholar: Identity, Relationship, and the RPT Process (Hank Liese)

Part II - Civic Engagement In Action: Community-Based Research and Service-Learning
ch. 10 Children's Development in Context: Understanding through Service-Learning (Marissa L. Diener)
ch. 11 The Story of the Westside Studio (Maged Senbel)
ch. 12 The Professional Journey: Neighborhood Democracy (Luke Garrott)
ch. 13 Reflections on the Eye of the Storm (Marshall Welch)
ch. 14 Integrating Service-Learning for Physical Therapy Programs: Frameworks & Opportunities (Gina Maria Musolino)
ch. 15 Planning for Change: Community-Based Urban Research with Young People (Caitlin Cahill)
ch. 16 Literacy Center: Partnership and Learning for All (Janet Kaufman)
ch. 17 Finding Student Satisfaction in Service-Learning: Implementing Service-Learning in a Graduate Nonprofit Management Class (Nancy Winemiller Basinger)
ch. 18 The Documentary Human Rights, and Social Justice: An Experiment in Service-Learning (Hank Liese)

Conclusion (Hank Liese and Marshall Welch)
About the Authors
Article cover image

"Point of View: Cultivating a Teaching Persona"

Article
Parini, Jay
1997
The Chronicle of Higher Education, September 5, 1997
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

"Additional Responses to Hugh Heclo's On Thinking Institutionally"

TTR
Lincoln, Timothy D., Fennell, Robert C.,
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 1 (2011): 25-33
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

We Can't Teach What We Don't Know: White Teachers, Multiracial Schools, Second Edition

Book
Howard, Gary R.
2006
Teachers College Press, New York
LC212.2.H68 2006
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
With lively stories and compelling analysis, Gary Howard takes his readers on a journey of personal and professional transformation. From his 25 years of experience as a multicultural educator, he looks deeply into the mirror of his own racial identity to discover what it means to be a culturally competent White teacher in racially diverse schools. Inspired by his extensive travel and collaboration with students and colleagues from many different cultures, ...
Additional Info:
With lively stories and compelling analysis, Gary Howard takes his readers on a journey of personal and professional transformation. From his 25 years of experience as a multicultural educator, he looks deeply into the mirror of his own racial identity to discover what it means to be a culturally competent White teacher in racially diverse schools. Inspired by his extensive travel and collaboration with students and colleagues from many different cultures, We Can't Teach What We Don't Know offers a healing vision for the future of education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 White man dancing : a story of personal transformation

ch. 2 White dominance and the weight of the West

ch. 3 Decoding the dominance paradigm

ch. 4 White educators and the river of change

ch. 5 Mapping the journey of white identity development

ch. 6 Ways of being white : a practitioner's approach to multicultural growth

ch. 7 White teachers and school reform : toward a transformationist pedagogy

ch. 8 Our unfinished work : white educators and La Tierra Transformativa
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Women Faculty of Color in the White Classroom

Book
Vargas, Lucila, ed.
2002
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LB2332.32.W66 2002
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
What is it like for women of color to teach in predominantly white college classrooms? This anthology is about the pedagogical implications of diversifying the faculty of higher education. It compiles narratives by women professors of color who interrogate their classroom experiences in predominantly white U.S. campuses to examine the impact of their social positions upon their classroom practices and their teaching-learning selves. The authors reflect upon their unique ...
Additional Info:
What is it like for women of color to teach in predominantly white college classrooms? This anthology is about the pedagogical implications of diversifying the faculty of higher education. It compiles narratives by women professors of color who interrogate their classroom experiences in predominantly white U.S. campuses to examine the impact of their social positions upon their classroom practices and their teaching-learning selves. The authors reflect upon their unique classroom challenges and talk about the teaching-learning strategies they use to find rewards in their interactions with students. This anthology explores the larger question of how social distinctions shape classroom social life and will be a resource for those concerned with enabling the diversification of the faculty of institutions of higher learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction (Lucila Vargas)
ch. 2 Why Are We Still so Few and Why Has Our Progress Been So Slow? (Lucila Vargas)
ch. 3 My Classroom in Its Context: The Struggle for Multiculturalism (Lucila Vargas)
ch. 4 "Passing/Out" in the Classroom: Eradicating Binaries of Identity (Giselle Liza Anatol)
ch. 5 Reading the Body Indian: A Chicana Mestiza's Experience Teaching Literature (Lisa D. Chavez)
ch. 6 Useful Anger: Confrontation and Challenge in the Teaching of Gender, Race, and Violence (Kimberly Nichele Brown)
ch. 7 Negotiating Minefield: Practicing Transformative Pedagogy as a Teacher of Color in a Classroom Climate of Suspicion (Rashmi Luthra)
ch. 8 Teaching with Differences and for Differences: Reflections of a Chinese American Teacher Educator (Xue Lang Rong)
ch. 9 A Foreign Woman Faculty's Multiple Whammies (Cecilia G. Manrique)
ch. 10 The Pacific Asianized Other: Teaching Unlearning among Midwestern Students (Fay Yokomizo Akindes)
ch. 11 Contradictions in the Classroom: Reflections of an Okanogan-Colville Professor (Delores Black-Connor Cleary)
ch. 12 Pushing Beyond the Sterotypes and Fostering Collaboration: One Sistuh's Approach to Teaching Media Production (Zeinabu Irene Davis)
ch. 13 "Results Matter": When the Other Teacher Teaches English in the Bluegrass State (Lou-Ann Crouther)
ch. 14 Guess Who's Coming to Class: Teaching through the Politics of Race, Class, and Gender Anne B. Onyekuluje)
ch. 15 A U.S.-Born Latina Professor: Cultural Stranger in My Own Classroom (Diana I. Rios)
ch. 16 Yellow Lotus in White Lily Pond: An Asian American Woman Teaching in Utah (Priti Kumar)
ch. 17 Marginality as an Asset: Toward at Counter-Hegemonic Pedagogy for Diversity (Ryuko Kubota)
ch. 18 We Do Not Want You to Be Human, We Want You to Be Right: Dilemmas of Legitimacy in Environments of Privilege Fredi Avalos-C'deBaca)
ch. 19 Opening a Dialogue: From a White Student's Perspective (Kristina Casto)

Index
Cover image

Asians in the Ivory Tower: Dilemmas of Racial Inequality in American Higher Education

Book
Teranishi, Robert T.
2010
Teachers College Press, New York
LC2633.6.T47 2010
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This timely and compelling examination of the experience of Asian Americans in higher education explores why and how Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are important to our nation's higher education priorities and places the study of AAPI college participation within a broad set of conditions through which all students must navigate as they pursue higher education. Teranishi captures the intersections of individual agency, social conditions, and organizational structures as ...
Additional Info:
This timely and compelling examination of the experience of Asian Americans in higher education explores why and how Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are important to our nation's higher education priorities and places the study of AAPI college participation within a broad set of conditions through which all students must navigate as they pursue higher education. Teranishi captures the intersections of individual agency, social conditions, and organizational structures as synergetic forces that result in a range of postsecondary outcomes for subpopulations within the larger body of AAPIs.

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

What's Wrong With a Positive Stereotype?
Purpose of the Book
Organization of the Book
Data Sources and Methodology

ch. 1 Transcending Conceptual Blockages
AAPIs and America's Equity Agenda
Race in Comparative Research
Destabilizing Conceptual Blockages

ch. 2 Students, Families, and the Pursuit of College
The Demography of the AAPI Population
Perceptions of Opportunities and Challenges

ch. 3 The Community Context
Portraits of AAPI Communities
Segregated or Integrated?
Hmong and The "Outside World"
"For Chinese, It's Subliminal: It's All About College"

ch. 4 Secondary Schools and Postsecondary Opportunities
Race, Class, and School Inequality
Access to Quality Schooling for AAPI Students
Wilson High School, San Francisco
Hoovet High School, Vallejo
Hancock High School, Sacramento

ch. 5 Predictors of College Participation
Trends in AAPI College Enrollment
Beyond a Single Story: AAPI Precollege Postsecondary Preparation
AAPI College Enrollment Disaggregated

ch. 6 AAPI Degree Attainment and Field Representation
Degree Attainment Among AAPIs
"We're Not All Science Majors"
AAPIs in the Education Sector
Strategies to Improve the AAPI Education Pipeline
Conclusion: Beyond a Single Story
Transcending Categories and Boundaries
The Need for More and Better Research
An Essential Missing Link

Appendix A Data Sources and Methodology
Appendix B Data Instruments: Individual and Group Interview Protocol
Appendix C Languages Spoken in Asian Countries

Notes
References
Index
About the Author
Cover image

Teaching as a Moral Practice: Defining, Developing, and Assessing Professional Dispositions in Teacher Education

Book
Murrell, Jr., Peter C., author ed.; Diez, Mary E., ed.; Feiman-Nemser, Sharon, ed. ; and Schussler, Deborah L., ed.
2010
Harvard Education Publishing Group
LB1025.3.T43385 2010
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Sometimes understood as habits of mind, “dispositions” represents a new concept in teacher education. Conversations about professional dispositions in teaching often touch on issues such as attitudes, values, moral commitment, and social justice.

Based on the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education’s Task Force on Teaching as a Moral Community, this book addresses the philosophical grounding for the concept of teacher dispositions and examines thoughtful examples ...
Additional Info:
Sometimes understood as habits of mind, “dispositions” represents a new concept in teacher education. Conversations about professional dispositions in teaching often touch on issues such as attitudes, values, moral commitment, and social justice.

Based on the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education’s Task Force on Teaching as a Moral Community, this book addresses the philosophical grounding for the concept of teacher dispositions and examines thoughtful examples of emerging practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Dispositions in Teacher Education - Starting Points for Consideration (Mary E. Diez, peter C. Murrell Jr.)
ch. 2 A Journey Toward Humanization in Education (Marie del Carmen Salazar, Karen L. Lowenstein, Andra Brill)
ch. 3 Disconnection as a Path to Discovery (Lisa E. Johnson, Rebecca Evers, Jonatha W. Vare)
ch. 4 Moving fro Reaction to Reflection (Chster Laine)
ch. 5 Learning fro Getting It Wrong (Catherine Fallona, Julie Canniff)
ch. 6 Putting Dispositions in the Driver's Seat (Robert E. Hollon)
ch. 7 Finding a Tipping Point (John Fishetti)
ch. 8 Making the Path by Walking (Elei Katsarou)
ch. 9 Defining, Developing, and Assessing Dispositions: A Cross-Case Analysis (Sharon Feiman-Nemser, Deborah L. Schussler)

Notes
About the Editors
About the Contributors
Index
Article cover image

"Poetry, Prophecy, and Power"

Article
Moore, Mary Elizabeth Mullino
1998
Religious Education, Vol. 93, No. 3, Summer 1998, pgs. 268-287
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religious Education

Additional Info:
Poetry is a bridge across diverse realities; it bridges the expressible and inexpressible, the present and the future. Poetry is also a powerful force in human life; it reveals, nourishes, binds, critiques, empowers, constructs, and confront. From such movement come visions for educational action, both actual and metaphoric. These include: dancing, meditating, singing, chanting, improvising, and drumming.
Additional Info:
Poetry is a bridge across diverse realities; it bridges the expressible and inexpressible, the present and the future. Poetry is also a powerful force in human life; it reveals, nourishes, binds, critiques, empowers, constructs, and confront. From such movement come visions for educational action, both actual and metaphoric. These include: dancing, meditating, singing, chanting, improvising, and drumming.
Article cover image

"The Myth of Objectivity In Public Education: Toward the Intersubjective Teaching of Religion"

Article
Moore, Mary Elizabeth Mullino
1995
Religious Education Vol. 90, No. 2, Spring 1995, pgs. 207-225
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Wisdom, Sophia, and The Fear of Knowing"

Article
Moore, Mary Elizabeth Mullino
1997
Religious Education, Vol. 92, No. 2, Spring 1997
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Wisdom or questing to know God and the world evokes fear through case studies of the controversial Reimagining Conference and the race related responses to the O. J. Simpson verdict, the fear of knowing God (which included the fear of questioning dominant metaphors of God) and the fear of knowing ourselves are explored. From this analysis, a view of wisdom is proposed and also an approach to education that inspires ...
Additional Info:
Wisdom or questing to know God and the world evokes fear through case studies of the controversial Reimagining Conference and the race related responses to the O. J. Simpson verdict, the fear of knowing God (which included the fear of questioning dominant metaphors of God) and the fear of knowing ourselves are explored. From this analysis, a view of wisdom is proposed and also an approach to education that inspires and encourages people to seek to know and respond to God and the world.
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Meaning and Spirituality in the Lives of College Faculty: A Study of Values, Authenticity, and Stress

Book
Astin, Alexander W., and Astin, Helen S.
1999
Higher Education Research Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, November 1999
LB2333.3.A88 1999
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
During the past three years more than 80 scholars, students, and educational leaders have participated with the Higher Education Research Institute in an extended series of dialogues about issues of spirituality, authenticity, meaning, wholeness, and self-renewal in higher education. These dialogues explored issues related to: achieving a greater sense of community, spirituality, and shared purpose in higher education; what are the causes of the divisions and fragmentation experienced by many academics ...
Additional Info:
During the past three years more than 80 scholars, students, and educational leaders have participated with the Higher Education Research Institute in an extended series of dialogues about issues of spirituality, authenticity, meaning, wholeness, and self-renewal in higher education. These dialogues explored issues related to: achieving a greater sense of community, spirituality, and shared purpose in higher education; what are the causes of the divisions and fragmentation experienced by many academics in their institutional and personal lives; what it means to be authentic, both in the classroom and in dealings with students; and what disconnections higher education is experiencing within and in relation to the larger society. Through personal narratives the monograph explores expressions of spirituality, as well as obstacles to and facilitators of spiritual development; value conflicts; personal authenticity; sources of stress, including time pressures, competition between work and family life, research and publication, administrative responsibilities, students and teaching, tenure and peer review, and institutional climate; effect of stress; coping with stress; and sources of renewal. The monograph concludes with a brief review of ongoing and further work on spirituality in higher education. Appended are letters of invitation, the interview protocol, and a list of committee members. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Background of the Study
Method
Major Findings

ch. 1 Spirituality and Meaning
ch. 2 Value Conflicts
ch. 3 Personal Authencitiy
ch. 4 Sources of Stress
ch. 5 Sources of Renewal

Summary and Conclusions
Next Steps In Research
Further Work On Spirituality In Higher Education
Appendix
Article cover image

"Spirit and Nature in Everyday Life: Reflections of a Mestiza in Higher Education"

Article
Chavez, Alcia Fedelina
2001
New Directions For Student Services, No. 96, pp. 69-79, Fall 2001
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Analyzes the spiritual journey of a student affairs practitioner and scholar. Experience gained by the practitioner in educating graduate students; Description of spiritual principles that guided the life of the practitioner; Contribution of the practitioner to student development.
Additional Info:
Analyzes the spiritual journey of a student affairs practitioner and scholar. Experience gained by the practitioner in educating graduate students; Description of spiritual principles that guided the life of the practitioner; Contribution of the practitioner to student development.
Cover image

In Search of the Whole: Twelve Essays on Faith and Academic Life

Book
Haughey, SJ, John C., ed.
2011
Georgetown University Press, Washington, DC
BX1795.I57.I52 2011
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

Additional Info:
The contributors to this inspiring anthology meet the challenge that everyone faces: that of becoming a whole person in both their personal and professional lives. John C. Haughey, SJ, has gathered twelve professionals in higher education from a variety of disciplines—philosophy, theology, health care, business, and administration. What they have in common reflects the creative understanding of the meaning of "catholic" as Haughey has found it to operate in ...
Additional Info:
The contributors to this inspiring anthology meet the challenge that everyone faces: that of becoming a whole person in both their personal and professional lives. John C. Haughey, SJ, has gathered twelve professionals in higher education from a variety of disciplines—philosophy, theology, health care, business, and administration. What they have in common reflects the creative understanding of the meaning of "catholic" as Haughey has found it to operate in Catholic higher education.

Each essay in the first six chapters describes how its author has assembled a unique whole from within his or her particular area of academic competence. The last six chapters are more autobiographical, with each author describing what has become central to his or her identity. All twelve are "anticipating an entirety" with each contributing a coherence that is as surprising as it is delightful. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part One: Whole as Task
ch. 1. Wholeness Through Science, Justice, and Love (Patrick H. Byrne)
ch. 2 From Discovery to Risk (Cynthia Crysdale)
ch. 3 Professional Education as Transformation (Robert J. Deahl)
ch. 4 Learning to Love the Law of the Sea (William P. George)
ch. 5. Catholicity and Faculty Seminars (Rev. Msgr. Richard M. Liddy)
ch. 6 The "Real World" of Business (J. Michael Stebbins)

Part Two: Whole as Identity
ch. 7 Attaining Harmony as a Hindu-Christian (Michael Amaladoss)
ch. 8 Arriving at a Christocentric Universe (Ilia Delio)
ch. 9 Le Petit Philosophe (Patrick A. Heelan)
ch. 10 Towards a Catholic Christianity: A Personal Narrative (Michael McCarthy)
ch. 11 The Hunting and the Haunting (Peter Steele)
ch. 12 Attaining Harmony with the Earth (Cristina Vanin)

Epilogue
List of Contributors
Index
Cover image

Not Drowning But Waving: Women, Feminism and the Liberal Arts

Book
Brown, Susan; Perreault, Jeanne; Wallace, Jo-Ann; and Zwicker, Heather, eds.
2011
University of Alberta Press Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
AZ515.N68 2011
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Twenty-two essays explore topics such as feminism in the liberal arts disciplines; the relationship of the liberal arts to the larger university; the costs and rewards for women in administration; the corporatization of university campuses; intergenerational and transcultural tensions within feminist communities; balancing personal life with professional aspirations; the relationship of feminism to cultural studies; women, social justice, and the liberal arts. Not Drowning But Waving is a welcome progress ...
Additional Info:
Twenty-two essays explore topics such as feminism in the liberal arts disciplines; the relationship of the liberal arts to the larger university; the costs and rewards for women in administration; the corporatization of university campuses; intergenerational and transcultural tensions within feminist communities; balancing personal life with professional aspirations; the relationship of feminism to cultural studies; women, social justice, and the liberal arts. Not Drowning But Waving is a welcome progress report on the variety of feminisms at work in academe and beyond. It provides crucial insights for university administrators, faculty, and literate non-specialists interested in the Arts and Humanities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Not Drowning
ch. 1 "My World as in My Time" - Living in the History of Equity and Backlash (Patricia Clements)
ch. 2 "I forgot the attachment" - and Other Casualties of Academic Labour at the Present Time (Donna Palmateer Pennee)
ch. 3 School/work, Home/work - Academic Mothering and the Unfinished Work of Feminism (Susan Brown)
ch. 4 What to Expect When You're Not Expecting - The Place of Women in the Academy (Cecily Devereux)
ch. 5 Things We Gained in the Fire - Burnout, Feminism, and Radical Collegiality (Heather Zwicker)
ch. 6 On Justice, Exhaustion, Apology, Alienation (Aruna Srivastava)
ch. 7 Feverish Future (Erin Wunker)
ch. 8 What I Learned in Dreamland - Or The Adventures of a (Female) Associate Dean (Christine Overall)
ch. 9 Western Feminism, the Multicultural University, and Institutional Branding - Lessons for Libertarians Now (L.M. Findlay)
ch. 10 Desperately Seeking Equity - Systemic Discrimination and the Canada (Louise H. Forsyth)

Waving
ch. 11 Drowning in Bathtubs (Aritha van Herk)

History/Temporality/Generations
ch. 12 Postsecondary Pyramid - Equity Audit 2010
ch. 13 Waves, Tangles, Archaeologies, and Loops - Historicizing the Second Wave of the Women's Movement (Tessa Elizabeth Jordan, Jo-AnnWallace)
ch. 14 A Vindication and the Imperative of History - Reviving Wollstonecraft for Future Feminisms (Katherine Binhammer, Ann B. Shteir)
ch. 15 The Way They Stayed - The United Alumnae Association and Women's Co-Education at Toronto (Heather Murray)
ch. 16 "Not a Postfeminism Feminist" Feminism's Third Wave (Elizabeth Groeneveld)
ch. 17 Between the Waves - Two Perspectives (Phil Okeke-Ihejirika, Julie Rak)
ch. 18 Mentoring (Isobel Grundy)
ch. 19 Knitters and Night Cleaners - Feminist Alliances in the Academy (Ann Wilson)

Activism
ch. 20 Who Benefits? (Christine Bold)
ch. 21 Inheriting What Lives on from Vancouver's Disappeared Women (Amber Dean)
ch. 22 On Denunciations and Disavowals - Feminism, Trans inclusion, and Nixon v. Vancouver Rape Relief (Lisa Gotell)
ch. 23 Guerrilla Grrris and Sex Trafficking - Activism, Agency, Feminist Debates, and Feminist Oversights (Majorie Stone)

Contributors
Bibliography
Index
Article cover image

"Vocational Journeys: Moving Toward a Creative and Disruptive Womanist Pedgogy"

Article
Buchanan, Deborah
2011
Faith, Feminism, and Scholarship: The Next Generation, Ch. 11, pp. 181-196, Palgrave Macmillan, New York
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

Why Are Associate Professors So Unhappy?

Article
Wilson, Robin
2012
The Chronicle of Higher Education, 3 June 2012
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
The article discusses associate professors in the U.S., focusing on their overall happiness and attitudes related to their positions. The article cites a study conducted by the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education at Harvard University which provides statistics related to the job satisfaction of associate professors in areas such as leadership, collaboration, and workload. The article explores the tenure track process for college teachers, notes that few ...
Additional Info:
The article discusses associate professors in the U.S., focusing on their overall happiness and attitudes related to their positions. The article cites a study conducted by the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education at Harvard University which provides statistics related to the job satisfaction of associate professors in areas such as leadership, collaboration, and workload. The article explores the tenure track process for college teachers, notes that few personal and professional services are offered to mid-career professors, and provides comments from various associate professors including Judith C. Amburgey-Peters, Karen L. Kelsky, and Margaret Soltan.
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Researching and Teaching Social Issues: The Personal Stories and Pedagogical Efforts of Professors of Education

Book
Totten, Samuel, and Pedersen, Jon, eds.
2012
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
H62.R4472 2012
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Researching and Teaching Social Issues: The Personal Stories and Pedagogical Efforts of Professors of Education is comprised of original personal essays in which notable teacher educators delineate the genesis and evolution of their thought and work vis-a-vis the teaching of social issues. In relating their personal stories, the authors were asked to discuss among other issues those individuals and/or scholarly works that have most influenced them and how, their ...
Additional Info:
Researching and Teaching Social Issues: The Personal Stories and Pedagogical Efforts of Professors of Education is comprised of original personal essays in which notable teacher educators delineate the genesis and evolution of their thought and work vis-a-vis the teaching of social issues. In relating their personal stories, the authors were asked to discuss among other issues those individuals and/or scholarly works that have most influenced them and how, their own aspirations in the field, the frustrations they have faced, their perceptions of the field, their major contributions, and their current endeavors. Our goal was that each and every story be as informative, instructive, and engaging as possible. We believe that readers will be thoroughly engaged as they read the stories of these individuals—stories that are inspiring, filled with passion, and reflective in nature. We also believe that readers will gain unique pedagogical insights into the field and ample food for thought.

The individuals selected for inclusion in the book dedicated a great amount of time, thought, energy, and commitment to creating powerful and pedagogically sound ways to teach about social and/or controversial issues. Many have done so for well over forty years, and have been among the strongest advocates vis-à-vis the place social issues have in the extant curriculum and beyond. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Education, Politics, and Social Transformation (Michael W. Apple)
ch. 2 Human Ecology and Science Education Policies and Programs: Reflections on Social Activism, (Roger W. Bybee)
ch. 3 Forty Days and Forty Nights in the Wilderness of Capitalist Schooling (Ronald W. Evans)
ch. 4 Becoming Political: One Woman’s Story (Carole L. Hahn)
ch. 5 The Unending Quest for Social Issues in the Schools: A Personal Narrative (Byron G. Massialas)
ch. 6 Social Justice (Alex Molnar)
ch. 7 My Experience with Social Issues and Education (Fred M. Newmann)
ch. 8 Social Issues and Decision Making: A Career Long Commitment (Anna S. Ochoa-Becker)
ch. 9 The Evolution of an Educator (Jon E. Pedersen.)
ch. 10 A Happenstance-Based Social Issues Career (James P. Shaver)
ch. 11 Serendipity: A Paradigm Shifter’s Friend in Academia (Barbara Solomon Spector)
ch. 12 A Synergy of Awareness, Understanding, Empathy and Action: Confronting Social Issues in the English Classroom and Beyond (Samuel Totten)
ch. 13 Socials Issues as Contexts for Science and Technology Education (Robert E. Yager)

Selected Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Mama, PhD: Women Write About Motherhood and Academic

Book
Evans, Elrena, Grant, Caroline, and Peskowtiz, Miriam, eds.
2008
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
LC1568.M35 2008
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Every year, American universities publish glowing reports stating their commitment to diversity, often showing statistics of female hires as proof of success. Yet, although women make up increasing numbers of graduate students, graduate degree recipients, and even new hires, academic life remains overwhelmingly a man's world. The reality that the statistics fail to highlight is that the presence of women, specifically those with children, in the ranks of tenured faculty ...
Additional Info:
Every year, American universities publish glowing reports stating their commitment to diversity, often showing statistics of female hires as proof of success. Yet, although women make up increasing numbers of graduate students, graduate degree recipients, and even new hires, academic life remains overwhelmingly a man's world. The reality that the statistics fail to highlight is that the presence of women, specifically those with children, in the ranks of tenured faculty has not increased in a generation. Further, those women who do achieve tenure track placement tend to report slow advancement, income disparity, and lack of job satisfaction compared to their male colleagues.

Amid these disadvantages, what is a Mama, PhD to do? This literary anthology brings together a selection of deeply felt personal narratives by smart, interesting women who explore the continued inequality of the sexes in higher education and suggest changes that could make universities more family-friendly workplaces. The contributors hail from a wide array of disciplines and bring with them a variety of perspectives, including those of single and adoptive parents. They address topics that range from the level of policy to practical day-to-day concerns, including caring for a child with special needs, breastfeeding on campus, negotiating viable maternity and family leave policies, job-sharing and telecommuting options, and fitting into desk/chair combinations while eight months pregnant.

Candid, provocative, and sometimes with a wry sense of humor, the thirty-five essays in this anthology speak to and offer support for any woman attempting to combine work and family, as well as anyone who is interested in improving the university's ability to live up to its reputation to be among the most progressive of American institutions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part One: The Conversation
ch. 1 The Conversation (Jamie Warner)
ch. 2 In Medias Res (Sonya Huber)
ch. 3 Scholar, Negated (Jessica Smartt Gullion)
ch. 4 Student/Body
ch. 5 On Being Phyllis's Daughter: Thoughts on Academic Intimacy (Laura Levitt)
ch. 6 Engineering Motherhood (Jennifer Eyre White)
ch. 7 The Wire Mother (Susan O'Doherty)
ch. 8 Fitting In (Elrena Evans)
ch. 9 Motherhood after Tenure: Confessions of a Late Bloomer (Aeron Haynie)

Part Two: That Mommy Thing
ch. 10 First Day of School (Amy Hudock)
ch. 11 Two Boards and a Passion: On Theater, Academia, and the Art of Failure (Anjalee Deshpande Nadkarmi)
ch. 12 Living(!) A Life I Never Planned
ch. 13 Coming to Termas A Full Term (Natalie Kertes Weaver)
ch. 14 One Mams's Dispensable Myths and Indispensable Machines (Angelica Duran)
ch. 15 That Mommy Thing (Alissa McElreath)
ch. 16 Failure to Progress: What Having a Baby Taught Me about Aristotle, Advanced Degrees, Developmental Delays, and Other Natural Disasters (Irena Auerbuch Smith)
ch. 17 Infinite Calculations (Della Fenster)
ch. 18 The Fact, the Stories (Leah Bradshaw)
ch. 19 I Am Not a Head on a Stick: On Being a Teacher and a Doctor and a Mommy (Elisabeth Rose Gruner)
ch. 20 Lip Service (Jennifer Cognard-Black)
ch. 21 Body Double (Leslie Leyland Fields)

Part Three: Recovering Academic
ch. 22 The Long and Winding Road (Jean Kazez)
ch. 23 The Bags I carried (Caroline Grant)
ch. 24 One of the Boys (Martha Ellis Crone)
ch. 25 Free to Be . . . Mom and Me: Finding My Complicated Truth as a Academic Daughter (Megan Pincus Kajitani)
ch. 26 Nontraditional Academics: At Home with Children and a PhD (Susan Bassow, Dana Campbell, Liz Stockwell)
ch. 27 A Great Place to Have a Baby (Rebecca Steinitz)
ch. 28 Recovering Academic (Jeenifer Margulis)

Part Four: Momifesto
ch. 29 The Orange Kangaroo (Julia Spicher Kasdorf)
ch. 30 Ideal Mama, Idea Worker: Negotiating Guilt and Shame in Academe (Jean-Anne Sutherlan)
ch. 31 In Theory/In Practice: On Choosing Children and the Academy (Lisa Harper_
ch. 32 Motherhood Is Easy: Graduate School is Hard (Tedra Osell)
ch. 33 Momifesto: Affirmations for the Academic Mother (Cynthia Kuhn, Josie Mills, Christy Rowe, Erin Webster Garrett)
ch. 34 In Dreams Begin Possibilities - Or, Anybody Have Time for a Change? (Judith Sanders)

Contributors
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Wabash tree

Interpretive Pedagogies for Higher Education: Arendt, Berger, Said, Nussbaum and their Legacies

Book
Nixon, Jon
2012
Continuum International Publishing Group, New York
LB2322.2.N595 2012
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Interpretive Pedagogies for Higher Education focuses on providing a humanistic perspective on pedagogy by relating it to the interpretive practices of particular public educators: thinkers and writers whose work has had an immeasurable impact on how we understand and interpret the world and how our understandings and interpretations act on that world.

Jon Nixon focuses on the work of four public intellectuals each of whom reaches out to ...
Additional Info:
Interpretive Pedagogies for Higher Education focuses on providing a humanistic perspective on pedagogy by relating it to the interpretive practices of particular public educators: thinkers and writers whose work has had an immeasurable impact on how we understand and interpret the world and how our understandings and interpretations act on that world.

Jon Nixon focuses on the work of four public intellectuals each of whom reaches out to a wide public readership and develops our understanding regarding the nature of interpretation in the everyday world: Hannah Arendt’s work on ‘representative thinking’, John Berger’s injunction to ‘hold everything dear’, Edward Said’s notion of ‘democratic criticism’, and Martha Nussbaum’s studies in the intelligence of feeling. These thinkers provide valuable perspectives on the nature and purpose of interpretation in everyday life. The implications of these perspectives for the development of a transformative pedagogy – and for the renewal of an educated public – are examined in relation to the current contexts of higher education within a knowledge society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements

Part I: Origins
ch. 1. The Place of Pedagogy
ch. 2. Public Education
ch. 3. The Interpretive Tradition

Part II: The Legacy
ch. 4. Becoming Thoughtful: Hannah Arendt (1906-1975)
ch. 5. Becoming Attentive: John Berger (b.1926)
ch. 6. Becoming Worldly: Edward W. Said (1935-2003)
ch. 7. Becoming Responsive: Martha C. Nussbaum (b.1947)

Part III: The Futures
ch. 8. Open Futures
ch. 9. Educated Publics
ch. 10. Pedagogic Spaces

References
Index
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Thriving in Leadership: Strategies for Making a Difference in Christian Higher Education

Book
Longman, Karen A.
2012
Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, TX
LC383.T57 2012
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In this book, seventeen senior leaders from faith-based colleges and universities across North America--collectively bringing with them hundreds of years of leadership experience--share fresh insights into the theory and practice of Christian higher education leadership. These authors speak honestly about the successes, failures, and demands that have shaped their current leadership decisions and their visions for the future.In this book, seventeen senior leaders from faith-based colleges and universities across ...
Additional Info:
In this book, seventeen senior leaders from faith-based colleges and universities across North America--collectively bringing with them hundreds of years of leadership experience--share fresh insights into the theory and practice of Christian higher education leadership. These authors speak honestly about the successes, failures, and demands that have shaped their current leadership decisions and their visions for the future.In this book, seventeen senior leaders from faith-based colleges and universities across North America--collectively bringing with them hundreds of years of leadership experience--share fresh insights into the theory and practice of Christian higher education leadership. These authors speak honestly about the successes, failures, and demands that have shaped their current leadership decisions and their visions for the future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction

Part I: The Interior Life of Thriving Leaders
ch. 1 Thriving as a Leader: The Role of Resilience and Relationships
ch. 2 Leading from the Center: Body and Place
ch. 3 Honoring Giftedness: A Strengths Approach to Leadership

Part II: The Social Intelligence of Thriving Leaders
ch. 4 Tell Me a Story: Using as Old Tool to Sustain Culture, Embrace Change, and Envision a Bold Future
ch. 5 The Difference Trust Makes
ch. 6 Orchestrating a Life of Influence
ch. 7 Inside Faculty Culture
ch. 8 Building a Powerful Leadership Team
ch. 9 Mentoring for Leadership

Part III: How Leaders Can Shape a Thriving Organizational Culture
ch. 10 Metaphors Matter: Organizational Culture Shaped by Image
ch. 11 Beyond "Hospitality": Moving out of the Host-Guest Metaphor into an Intercultural "World House"
ch. 12 Toward a Distinctive, Christ-Honoring Campus Culture: Working the Vision
ch. 13 Leading a Turnaround and the Joy of a Third-Class Ticket
ch. 14 Leadership in the Fifth Dimension: Balancing Time with the Timeless

Epilogue
About the Author
About the Contributors
Bibliography
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The Renewal of Joy in Teaching

TTR
Pazmino, Robert W.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 186-187
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

Burning, Yearning, Learning: A Percolation Pedagogy

TTR
Davis, Kenneth G.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 173-174
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

Teaching after Wabash: Lessons for a Lifetime of Scholarship

TTR
Wafawanaka, Robert
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 188-190
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

Living for the Dance

TTR
Koppel,Michael S.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 184-185
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Inspiring Academics: Learning with the World's Great University Teachers

Book
Hay, Iain
2011
Open University Press, McGraw-Hill Education, New York
LB1025.3.I57 2011
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Inspiring Academics draws on the experience and expertise of award-winning university teachers to illuminate exemplary teaching practice. It is structured around five core themes: inspiring learning, command of the field, assessment for independent learning, student development and scholarship.

Mirroring the vast range of practices and characteristics that constitute high quality teaching, 26 distinguished scholars from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK and the USA recount and reflect on the ...
Additional Info:
Inspiring Academics draws on the experience and expertise of award-winning university teachers to illuminate exemplary teaching practice. It is structured around five core themes: inspiring learning, command of the field, assessment for independent learning, student development and scholarship.

Mirroring the vast range of practices and characteristics that constitute high quality teaching, 26 distinguished scholars from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK and the USA recount and reflect on the personal and professional circumstances that have made them great teachers. Through its autoethnographic approach, this book provides captivating and illuminating personal explorations of the 'hows and whys' of excellent university teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of boxes, figures and tables
Notes on contributors
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Opening doors

Part 1: Approaches to teaching that influence, motivate and inspire students to learn
ch. 2 Mindfulness and presence in teaching and learning
ch. 3 The art of loving and learning: Erich Fromm and the learning (of) transformation
ch. 4 I teach as the mountains teach me
ch. 5 The what, why and how of inspiring learning
ch. 6 Your skin or mine? A living drama in interprofessional education

Part 2: Developing curricula and resources that reflect a command of the field
ch. 7 The meaning and evolution of teaching excellence: A 'radical' case study from Radford University, Virginia
ch. 8 No magic needed: Designing instruction for learning - a case study
ch. 9 On scholarly teaching - a personal account
ch. 10 Destinations and pathways: The curriculum challenge

Part 3: Approaches to assessment and feedback that foster independent learning
ch. 11 An assortment of small anomalies
ch. 12 Beyond the classroom walls: Using assessment strategies to foster independent learning
ch. 13 In the lion's den: teaching and assessing medical ethics
ch. 14 Upgrading teaching and assessment in a traditional medical course

Part 4: Respecting and supporting the development of students as individuals
ch. 15 "I am a writer": Unlocking fear and releasing possibility in the classroom
ch. 16 Seeing the tree in the midst of the forest: Respecting and supporting the development of students as individuals
ch. 17 A classroom of colleagues
ch. 18 Extending the reach of higher education inside and outside the classroom
ch. 19 Personalizing the student experience

Part 5: Scholarly activities that influence and enhance learning and teaching
ch. 20 Exploring the 'inner' and 'outer' worlds: Steps along a scholarly journey
ch. 21 Integrating a sustainable academic career around scholarly learning and teaching activities
ch. 22 Useful sharing
ch. 23 Excellence in scholarship in teaching: Some reflections
ch. 24 From fear to flourish
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Random Thoughts IV: The Passion of Teaching

Book
Schmier, Louis
2012
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2331.S35 2012
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Let’s Do the Hokey Pokey!

A few years back, George Will wrote that what we choose to believe, how we dream to live, how we strive to make those ideals become reality, we make self-validating. In that spirit, I’m going to talk about one of my self-evident truths, which I choose to believe, how I dream to live, how I strive to make it and other ...
Additional Info:
Let’s Do the Hokey Pokey!

A few years back, George Will wrote that what we choose to believe, how we dream to live, how we strive to make those ideals become reality, we make self-validating. In that spirit, I’m going to talk about one of my self-evident truths, which I choose to believe, how I dream to live, how I strive to make it and other allied self-evident truths my reality.

In academia, there is something that is often so deadening that it sucks the life out of teaching and learning, something so often depressing that it reduces focus to information gathering and transmission and exiles people to unnoticed corners, something so bland that it is devoid of emotional intensity, something so stagnating that it doesn’t stir the imaginative and creative juices. That something is passion. Now, I am not talking about being passionate about or dedicated to one’s discipline or to the practice of research and publication. I am talking about being passionate about teaching and being dedicated to each student’s learning. So, here is my take on the importance of passion in education, on what I call “hokey pokey teaching.” And, it starts like this:
 
You put your whole self in;
you put your whole self out;
you put your whole self in;
and you shake it all about.

You do the Hokey-Pokey,
And you turn yourself around
That’s what it’s all about!
 
Now that is passion! If you have ever danced the Hokey Pokey you know what I mean. It’s really an exciting experience. And, Hokey Pokey teaching! That’s what it’s all about! (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Hokey Pokey Teaching

ch. 1 Holiness In Teaching
ch. 2 Holiness In Teaching - A Response
ch. 3 Now and The Future
ch. 4 Jill
ch. 5 In The Moment
ch. 6 Life's Little Pleasure Are Never Little
ch. 7 "Water": The First Word In My Dictionary of Good Teaching
ch. 8 "Read": The Second Word In My Dictionary of Good Teaching
ch. 9 Classroom Disruption
ch. 10 A Simple Question
ch. 11 "Darkness": The Third Word In My Dictionary of Good Teaching
ch. 12 An Educational Bumper Sticker
ch. 13 Education Should Be The Bomb
ch. 14 Littleton Tragedy
ch. 15 Wilby: The Fourth Word In My Dictionary of Good Teaching
ch. 16 My Dictionary of Good Teaching - My Long Reply
ch. 17 On Being anEducator
ch. 18 Play: My Fifth Word In My Dictionary For Good Teaching
ch. 19 On This July 4th
ch. 20 My Dictionary of Good Teaching: On This Day
ch. 21 A View of Life and Teaching
ch. 22 Back to Basis
ch. 23 What Would I Ask
ch. 24 A Hope Filled Room
ch. 25 That "High Five" Word
ch. 26 The Stars
ch. 27 Religion and The Public School's
ch. 28 Happy Teaching
ch. 29 That Magnificent "Dum" Question
ch. 30 Have You Noticed That
ch. 31 Have You Noticed . . . My Reply
ch. 32 Real World
ch. 33 Advice On Teaching
ch. 34 There Are Guarantees
ch. 35 A Christmas Card
ch. 36 A Y2K Toas
ch. 37 The "Soft" Skill
ch. 38 The Best Thing
ch. 39 When Knowledge Is Ignorance
ch. 40 Unnoticed
ch. 41 Practice, Practice, Practice
ch. 42 Two Quick Thoughts
ch. 43 The Arts
ch. 44 Dr. Francis Coleman
ch. 45 Who Make a Difference?
ch. 46 To Listen
ch. 47 What Teaching Really Means
ch. 48 Teaching Is Tough?
ch. 49 Keep Learning
ch. 50 Character Does Count
ch. 51 "At The Play"
ch. 52 Hopeless! Hopeless?
ch. 53 Disconnection and Connection
ch. 54 A Small One With Large Impact
ch. 55 Strangers In The Classroom
ch. 56 A "Small" Challenge To Myself
ch. 57 TGIF or TGIM
ch. 58 Ten Stickie
ch. 59 My Most Powerful Teaching Tool
ch. 60 Four Little Big Words
ch. 61 Four Little Big Words: An Update
ch. 62 . . . And I Don't Know How
ch. 63 On Creativity
ch. 64 To Dream
ch. 65 Imprisonment, Freedom, Teaching
ch. 66 Do You Know How Powerful You Are
ch. 67 A Letter To The Editor
ch. 68 Miracles In The Classroom
ch. 69 Teaching Eloquently
ch. 70 More On Teaching Eloquently
ch. 71 "This Is A Place . . . "
ch. 72 "This Is A Place . . . " II
ch. 73 Teach Deliberately
ch. 74 I Am On A High
ch. 75 Three Coaches
ch. 76 Rush To Judgement
ch. 79 On This Valentine's Day
ch. 80 My Teaching Credo
ch. 81 More About My Teaching Credo
ch. 82 That Miserable, Magnificent Magnolia Tree
ch. 83 It's Attitude Stupid
ch. 84 On Higher Education
ch. 85 Be Aware
ch. 86 Isaiah 50:4
ch. 87 At My Best
ch. 88 Tenure
ch. 89 The Real Problem In Education
ch. 90 Garden Smarts/Teach Smarts
ch. 91 Sacred Trust
ch. 91 An Hello and Thank You
ch. 92 Can't Really Do Both At That Same Time
ch. 93 An Hello and Thank You, II
ch. 94 Journey
ch. 95 Compassionate Teaching
ch. 96 Teaching Is So "Iffy"
ch. 97 A Truth
ch. 98 "How Do You Really Think About Teaching"
ch. 99 Acceptance
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Make Yourself a Teacher: Rabbinic Tales of Mentors and Disciples

Book
Handleman, Susan
2011
University of Washing Press, Seattle Washington
BM496.9.T43 H36 2011
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
National Jewish Book Award finalist in Contemporary Jewish Life and Practice category Make Yourself a Teacher is a teaching book and a book about teaching. It discusses three dramatic, well-known stories about the student and teacher Rabbi Eliezer ben Hyrcanus from the Oral Torah. The stories of R. Eliezer serve as teaching texts and models for reflection on the teacher/student relationship in the Jewish tradition and in contemporary culture, ...
Additional Info:
National Jewish Book Award finalist in Contemporary Jewish Life and Practice category Make Yourself a Teacher is a teaching book and a book about teaching. It discusses three dramatic, well-known stories about the student and teacher Rabbi Eliezer ben Hyrcanus from the Oral Torah. The stories of R. Eliezer serve as teaching texts and models for reflection on the teacher/student relationship in the Jewish tradition and in contemporary culture, with special emphasis on the hevruta mode of Jewish learning, a collaborative process that invites the reader into a dialogue with teachers past and present.

Susan Handelman considers how teacher/student relations sustain and renew the Jewish tradition, especially during troubled times. As a commentary on historical and contemporary educational practices, she asks a range of questions about teaching and learning: What is it that teachers do when they teach? How do knowledge, spirituality, and education relate? What might Jewish models of study and commentary say about how we teach and learn today? Handelman not only presents pedagogical issues that remain controversial in today's debates on education but she also brings the stories themselves to life. Through her readings, the stories beckon us to sit among the sages and be their students.

Susan Handelman is professor of English at Bar-Ilan University, Israel. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Note on Translation and Transliteration of Hebrew
Notes on Notes
Introduction

"I Only Want the Piece Which Is in Your Mouth"
ch. 1 "Torah of the Belly": Rabbi Eliezer Starves for a Teacher
ch. 2 "The Gates of Wounded Feelings"" Rabbi Eliezer Is Banned
ch. 3 "Father! Father! Israel's Chariot and Its Horsemen!": The Passing of Rabbi Eliezer

Epilogue
Notes
Selected Bibliography
Index
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Mothers in Academia

Book
Castañeda, Mari; and Isgro, Kirsten, eds.
2013
Columbia University Press, New York, NY
LC1567.M68 2013
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Featuring forthright testimonials by women who are or have been mothers as undergraduates, graduate students, academic staff, administrators, and professors, Mothers in Academia intimately portrays the experiences of women at various stages of motherhood while theoretically and empirically considering the conditions of working motherhood as academic life has become more laborious. As higher learning institutions have moved toward more corporate-based models of teaching, immense structural and cultural changes have transformed ...
Additional Info:
Featuring forthright testimonials by women who are or have been mothers as undergraduates, graduate students, academic staff, administrators, and professors, Mothers in Academia intimately portrays the experiences of women at various stages of motherhood while theoretically and empirically considering the conditions of working motherhood as academic life has become more laborious. As higher learning institutions have moved toward more corporate-based models of teaching, immense structural and cultural changes have transformed women’s academic lives and, by extension, their families. Hoping to push reform as well as build recognition and a sense of community, this collection offers several potential solutions for integrating female scholars more wholly into academic life. Essays also reveal the often stark differences between women’s encounters with the academy and the disparities among various ranks of women working in academia. Contributors—including many women of color—call attention to tokenism, scarce valuable networks, and the persistent burden to prove academic credentials. They also explore gendered parenting within the contexts of colonialism, racism, sexism, ethnocentrism, ageism, and heterosexism. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Speaking Truth to Power to Change the Ivory Tower

Part I. Working/Learning in the Academy While Working/Learning as a Mom
ch. 1 How We Learned to Stop Worrying and to Enjoy Having It All (Michelle Kuhl, Michelle Mouton, Margaret Hostetler, Druscilla Scribner, Tracy Slagter, and Orlee Hauser)
ch. 2 Academia or Bust: Feeding the Hungry Mouths of the University, Babies, and Ourselves (Larissa M. Mercado-López)
ch. 3 Diverse Academic Support for an Employee, Mother, and Nontraditional Student (Wendy K. Wilde)
ch. 4 Breaking the Glass Ceiling While Being a Mother: Parenting, Teaching, Research, and Administration (Kim Powell)
ch. 5 To Tell or Not to Tell: Single Motherhood and the Academic Job Market (Virginia L. Lewis)
ch. 6 Class, Race, and Motherhood: Raising Children of Color in a Space of Privilege (Irene Mata)

Part II. Unexpected Challenges and Momentous Revelations
ch. 7 Four Kids and a Dissertation: Queering the Balance Between Family and Academia (Vanessa Adel)
ch. 8 “Tía María de la Maternity Leave”: Reflections on Race, Class, and the Natural-Birth Experience (Susana L. Gallardo)
ch. 9 Threads That Bind: A Testimonio to Puerto Rican Working Mothers (Maura I. Toro-Morn)
ch. 10 Parenting Within the Nexus of Race, Class, and Gender Oppression in Graduate School at a Historically Black College/University (Olivia Perlow)
ch. 11 Sobreviviendo (and Thriving) in the Academy: My Tías’ Counterconsejos and Advice (J. Estrella Torrez)
ch. 12 Revolving Doors: Mother-Woman Rhythms in Academic Spaces (Allia A. Matta)

Part III. Creating More Parent-Friendly Institutions of Higher Learning
ch. 13 Academic Library Policies: Advocating for Mothers’ Research and Service Needs (Gilda Baeza Ortego)
ch. 14 Reimagining the Fairytale of Motherhood in the Academy (Barbara A. W. Eversole, Darlene M. Hantzis, and Mandy A. Reid)
ch. 15 Tales from the Tenure Track: The Necessity of Social Support in Balancing the Challenges of Tenure and Motherhood (Sandra L. French and Lisa Baker-Webster)
ch. 16 How Higher Education Became Accessible to Single Mothers: An Unfinished Story (Summer R. Cunningham)
ch. 17 Making It Work: Success Strategies for Graduate Student Mothers (Erynn Masi de Casanova and Tamara Mose Brown)
ch. 18 Academic Mothers on Leave (but on the Clock), on the Line (and off the Record): Toward Improving Parental-Leave Policies and Practices (Colleen S. Conley and Devin C. Carey)
ch. 19 Supporting Academic Mothers: Creating a Work Environment with Choices (Brenda K. Bushouse)

Epilogue: Final Reflections
References
List of Contributors
Index
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Teaching and Learning from the Inside Out: Revitalizing Ourselves and Our Institutions

Book
Golden, Margaret, ed.
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 130)
LB1705.T43 2012
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
By reclaiming the passions of our hearts and exploring insights and ideas, we begin a remembering of ourselves. As we begin to reclaim our wholeness, we also have the capacity to renew and revitalize our institutions from within.

After a long career of writing and speaking about how living in congruence—without division between inner and outer life—allows for being present with ourselves and those who journey ...
Additional Info:
By reclaiming the passions of our hearts and exploring insights and ideas, we begin a remembering of ourselves. As we begin to reclaim our wholeness, we also have the capacity to renew and revitalize our institutions from within.

After a long career of writing and speaking about how living in congruence—without division between inner and outer life—allows for being present with ourselves and those who journey with us, Parker Palmer and colleagues at the Center for Courage & Renewal developed a process of shared exploration. This Circle of Trust approach encourages people to live and work more authentically within their families, workplaces, and communities.

This issue explores the transformative power of engaging in a Circle of Trust. The authors examine its direct applications to teaching and learning, and they explore and discuss the research being done by the facilitators of this work.

This is the 130th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. New Directions for Teaching and Learning offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes

ch. 1 Principles and Practices of the Circle of Trust Approach 3- The directors of the Center for Courage & Renewal discuss the principles and practices of a Circle of Trust approach that have broad applicability across disciplines of teaching and learning. (Terry Chadsey, and Marcy Jackson)

ch. 2 Soul and Role Dialogues in Higher Education: Healing the Divided Self - This chapter describes the creation of a university faculty–staff group formed to explore the deep heartfelt and heartbroken nature of work in academia and to develop an intentional community to discuss ways of working productively in the tension between soul and role in higher education. (Paul Michalec, and Gary Brower)

ch. 3 The Circle of Trust Approach and a Counselor Training Program: A Hand in Glove Fit - This chapter explains how the Circle of Trust principles and practices have been actively infused in a Master's of Counseling Psychology, Marriage and Family Therapy Program and issues a call for systemic reform in our institutions of higher education to embrace a model more aligned with the relational and connected world in which we live. (Judith A. Goodell)

ch. 4 Dialing In to a Circle of Trust: A 'Medium' Tech Experiment and Poetic Evaluation - A distance learning model in Montana uses "found poems" as an evaluative tool to provide evidence that elements of transformational learning are achievable without direct face-to-face interaction between participants. (Christine T. Love)

ch. 5 The Power of Paradox in Learning to Teach - This chapter acknowledges the inherent uncertainty of both teaching and learning to teach and how learning to hold paradoxes may help teacher candidates live creatively with ambiguity. (Karen Noordhoff)

ch. 6 The Role of Identity in Transformational Learning, Teaching, and Leading - This chapter explores the relationship between the development of identity and integrity and the process of transformation within the context of a leadership preparation program. (Michael I. Poutiatine, and Dennis A. Conners)

ch. 7 Lessons Learned from Transformational Professional Development - A description and evaluation of a transformational professional development approach resulting in school cultures with greater relational trust and responsibility and commitment therein. (Twyla T. Miranda)

ch. 8 Circles of Learning in Mississippi: Community Recovery and Democracy Building - How an innovative community recovery and democracy building project, begun in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, offers a new approach for social change that addresses the root of human suffering lodged deep in the human heart where seeds of transformation also rest. (Bonnie Allen, and Estrus Tucker)

ch. 9 Measuring the Impact of the Circle of Trust Approach - This research identifies the impact of the Circle of Trust experience on the personal lives of the participants and the ways in which the experience has led to constructive action in their professional roles. (Janet Smith)

Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

What Our Stories Teach Us: A Guide to Critical Reflection for College Faculty

Book
Shadlow, Linda K.
2013
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.S4725 2013
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This book encourages and enables faculty to deeply examine their teaching experiences, stories, and choices so real insight results. The author invites faculty to recall stories from their own biographies, demonstrates how to view these stories as critical incidents instead of mere reminiscences, and introduces an approach faculty can undertake to analyze then interpret these stories for the benefit of professional growth in teaching. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book encourages and enables faculty to deeply examine their teaching experiences, stories, and choices so real insight results. The author invites faculty to recall stories from their own biographies, demonstrates how to view these stories as critical incidents instead of mere reminiscences, and introduces an approach faculty can undertake to analyze then interpret these stories for the benefit of professional growth in teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

ch. 1 Storied Contexts
ch. 2 Living Stories
ch. 3 Storied Accounts
ch. 4 Seeking Patterns
ch. 5 Exploring Patterns
ch. 6 Locating Assumptions
ch. 7 Exploring Paradigmatic Assumptions
ch. 8 Storied Teaching

References
Index
TTR cover image

Hidden Treasures in Theological Education: The Writing Tutor, the Spiritual Director, and Practices of Academic and Spiritual Mentoring

TTR
Yaghjian, Lucretia B.
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 3 (2013): 221-245
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 3
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Mentoring is an important but often overlooked resource in theological education and students' academic and spiritual formation. This essay profiles the mentoring practices and postures of the writing tutor and the spiritual director as exemplars of academic and spiritual mentoring. An extended probe of this analogy affirms the integration of academic and spiritual formation as a core value in theological education; identifies mentoring in theological education as a hidden treasure ...
Additional Info:
Mentoring is an important but often overlooked resource in theological education and students' academic and spiritual formation. This essay profiles the mentoring practices and postures of the writing tutor and the spiritual director as exemplars of academic and spiritual mentoring. An extended probe of this analogy affirms the integration of academic and spiritual formation as a core value in theological education; identifies mentoring in theological education as a hidden treasure fostering this integration and warranting attention as a theological practice; and re-envisions the theological practice of mentoring under the traditional rubric of the “care of souls,” embracing the relational, educational, formational, spiritual, and rhetorical dimensions of this practice.
Cover image

Inspired College Teaching: A Career-Long Resource for Professional Growth

Book
Weimer, Maryellen
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.W385 2010
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Inspired College Teaching challenges faculty to be responsible for their professional growth and development as an ongoing, career-long quest. Written by an experienced college teacher and editor of The Teaching Professor newsletter, this book explores the journey and growth of college teachers. It provides goals best positioned for beginning, mid-career, and senior faculty as well as activities faculty can use to ignite intellectual curiosity from both students and themselves. This ...
Additional Info:
Inspired College Teaching challenges faculty to be responsible for their professional growth and development as an ongoing, career-long quest. Written by an experienced college teacher and editor of The Teaching Professor newsletter, this book explores the journey and growth of college teachers. It provides goals best positioned for beginning, mid-career, and senior faculty as well as activities faculty can use to ignite intellectual curiosity from both students and themselves. This book presents a way for faculty members to obtain and sustain teaching excellence throughout their career. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Author

ch. 1 Principles for the Professional Growth of College Teachersv ch. 2 Reflection for Growth and Change
ch. 3 Rewriting the End-of-Course Ratings Story
ch. 4 Feedback for Teachers That Improves Learning for Students
ch. 5 Colleagues as Collaborators
ch. 6 Implementing Change Successfully
ch. 7 New Faculty: Beliefs That Prevent and Promote Growth
ch. 8 Maintaining Instructional Vitality: The Midcareer Challenge
ch. 9 The Journey Continues: Senior Faculty
ch. 10 Conclusion

References
Index
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Why Teach?: In Defense of a Real Education

Book
Edmundson, Mark
2013
Bloomsbury Academic, New York, NY
LA227.4.E36 2013
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Mark Edmundson's essays reclaim college not as the province of high-priced tuition, career training, and interactive online courses, but as the place where serious people go to broaden their minds and learn to live the rest of their lives. A renowned professor of English at the University of Virginia, Edmundson has felt firsthand the pressure on colleges to churn out a productive, high-caliber ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Mark Edmundson's essays reclaim college not as the province of high-priced tuition, career training, and interactive online courses, but as the place where serious people go to broaden their minds and learn to live the rest of their lives. A renowned professor of English at the University of Virginia, Edmundson has felt firsthand the pressure on colleges to churn out a productive, high-caliber workforce for the future. Yet in these essays, many of which have run in places such as Harper's and the New York Times, he reminds us that there is more to education than greater productivity. With prose exacting yet expansive, tough-minded yet optimistic, Edmundson argues forcefully that the liberal arts are more important today than ever.

Why Teach? offers Edmundson's collected writings on the subject, including several pieces that are new and previously unpublished. What they show, collectively, is that higher learning is not some staid, old notion but a necessary remedy for our troubled times. Why Teach? is brimming with the wisdom and inspiration that make learning possible. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

The Shift
ch. 1 Liberal Arts & Lite Entertainment (1997)
ch. 2 Dwelling in Possibilities (2008)

Fellow Students
ch. 3 Who Are You and What Are You Doing Here?
A Word to the Incoming Class
ch. 4 Do Sports Build Character?
ch. 5 Glorious Failture
2005 Convocation Address, University of Virginia
ch. 6 The Globalists
ch. 7 The Corporate City and the Scholarly Enclave
ch. 8 The English Major
ch. 9 My First Intellectual
ch. 10 The Pink Floyd Night School

Fellow Teachers
ch. 11 A Word to the New Humanities Professor
ch. 12 Against Readings
ch. 13 Narcissus Regards His Book/The Common Reader Now
ch. 14 The Uncoolness of Good Teachers
ch. 15 Teaching the Truths
ch. 16 Under the Sign of Saturn: Blake in the Corporate University
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The Invention of the Biblical Scholar: A Critical Manifesto

Book
Moore, Stephen; and Sherwood, Yvonne
2011
Fortress Press, Minneapolis, MN
BS 500.M655 2011
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
What is a "biblical scholar"? Stephen D. Moore and Yvonne Sherwood provide a thoroughly defamiliarizing and frequently entertaining re–description of this peculiar academic species and its odd disciplinary habitat. The modern—and —biblical scholar, they argue, is a product of the Enlightenment. Even when a biblical scholar imagines that she is doing something else entirely (something confessional, theoretical, literary, or even postmodern), she is sustaining Enlightened modernity and its ...
Additional Info:
What is a "biblical scholar"? Stephen D. Moore and Yvonne Sherwood provide a thoroughly defamiliarizing and frequently entertaining re–description of this peculiar academic species and its odd disciplinary habitat. The modern—and —biblical scholar, they argue, is a product of the Enlightenment. Even when a biblical scholar imagines that she is doing something else entirely (something confessional, theoretical, literary, or even postmodern), she is sustaining Enlightened modernity and its effects. This study poses questions for scholars across the humanities concerned with the question of the religious and the secular. It also poses pressing questions for scholars and students of biblical interpretation: What other forms might biblical criticism have taken? What untried forms might biblical criticism yet take? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface
The Irreducible Strangeness of the Biblical Scholar

ch. 1 Theory and Methodolatry
Theory's Obituaries
Theory in the Cafeteria
Theory before Theory
The Inhumanity of Theory
Method Is Our Madness
Unhistorical Criticism

ch. 2 The Invention of the Biblical Scholar
The Epistemic Abyss
The Invention of "Moral Unbelief"
The Eclipse of Biblical Immorality
The First and Third Quests for the Moral Jesus
The Moral Minority
The Problems of the Biblical Scholar

ch. 3 Theory in the First Wave: When Historical Critics Rules The Earth
The Biblical Sub-Sub-Sub-Specialist
Political Theory
The Dirt on Politics
The Dirt on Biblical Scholars
The Good Book as Great Book
Theory as Second Honeymoon
Revolutionary Old Discoveries
Reader-Response Criticism Is No Picnic
Civil Servants of the Biblical Text

Theory in the Second Wave: The Turn to Religion
Marginalizing the Margins
The Return of the Big, Flabby, Old-Fashioned Words

Index
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Personal narrative reflecting on the significance of recognizing your own, different, teaching gifts/skills, in the online teaching environment.
Additional Info:
Personal narrative reflecting on the significance of recognizing your own, different, teaching gifts/skills, in the online teaching environment.
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Personal, affirming but critical self-reflection on the evolution of a personal teaching style.
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Personal, affirming but critical self-reflection on the evolution of a personal teaching style.
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On Becoming a Teacher

Book
Kearney, Edmund M.
2013
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LB1025.3.K43 2013
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Students deserve great teachers and learning to become a great teacher is a lifelong journey. On Becoming a Teacher guides both the new and experienced teacher through the exhilarating process of learning to educate students in a way that makes a lasting impact on their lives. Dr. Kearney leads the reader through the process of understanding what lies at the foundation of great teaching, loading each essay with ready-for-classroom use ...
Additional Info:
Students deserve great teachers and learning to become a great teacher is a lifelong journey. On Becoming a Teacher guides both the new and experienced teacher through the exhilarating process of learning to educate students in a way that makes a lasting impact on their lives. Dr. Kearney leads the reader through the process of understanding what lies at the foundation of great teaching, loading each essay with ready-for-classroom use applications and challenging ideas. This book is designed to encourage the reader to think deeply about all aspects of education, while instilling, or rekindling, the excitement, enthusiasm, and teaching excellence shared by all great teachers. Written in conversational essay form and supplemented with discussion and reflection questions, this brief book would make an ideal classroom text for student teaching and education seminars. Whether you aspire to teaching excellence at the elementary school, middle school, high school, or collegiate level, On Becoming a Teacher is a must read. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I Beginning the Journey
ch. 1 Choosing Wisely: Your Journey Begins with a Single Choice
ch. 2 Understanding Where You Came From: Appreciating Your Apprenticeship

Part II Being a Teacher
ch. 3 Being Authentic
ch. 4 Being Passonate
ch. 5 Being Zealous
ch. 6 Being Greedy
ch. 7 Being More Than Tolerant: Celebrating Differences

Part III Classroom Culture
ch. 8 Earning Respect
ch. 9 Establishing Rules
ch. 10 Appreciating Group Processes and Dynamics
ch. 11 Creating a Culture of Inquiry

Part IV Knowing Your Students
ch. 12 Getting to Know You . . .
ch. 13 Appreciating Learning Styles
ch. 14 Understanding Standardized Tests
ch. 15 Avoiding Gender, and Other, Biases in the Classroom
ch. 16 Dealing With Disabilities

Part V Teaching
ch. 17 Planning Lessons: Know Your Top Three
ch. 18 Teaching to Mastery
ch. 19 Using Technology
ch. 20 Assessing Learning

Part VI Improving Your Craft
ch. 21 Studying Successful Teachers
ch. 22 Staying Current
ch. 23 Welcoming Feedback I: Stakeholders
ch. 24 Welcoming Feedback II: Managing the Process

Part VII Conclusions
ch. 25 Following the Golden Rule (of Teaching)
ch. 26 Final Words

References
Index
Web cover image

Why I Teach

Web
Ehrlich, Thomas
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
I had absolutely no idea how to shift from the role of student to teacher. The School offered no guidance, apparently expecting me to know by osmosis how to teach.
Additional Info:
I had absolutely no idea how to shift from the role of student to teacher. The School offered no guidance, apparently expecting me to know by osmosis how to teach.
Additional Info:
Before you reconcile yourself to the idea that excellence in teaching and research are mutually exclusive, consider the similarities between the two endeavors.
Additional Info:
Before you reconcile yourself to the idea that excellence in teaching and research are mutually exclusive, consider the similarities between the two endeavors.
Additional Info:
Effective teachers appear again and again to display certain characteristics, while ineffective teachers tend to make the same mistakes repeatedly.
Additional Info:
Effective teachers appear again and again to display certain characteristics, while ineffective teachers tend to make the same mistakes repeatedly.
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"A short bulleted check list of good teaching practices to get a course off to a good start. "
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"A short bulleted check list of good teaching practices to get a course off to a good start. "
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"A short bulleted list of effective techniques when lecturing, from Stanford University's Teaching Commons. "
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"A short bulleted list of effective techniques when lecturing, from Stanford University's Teaching Commons. "
Additional Info:
Baker offers four (4) strategies for being a public intellectual in one's field: Embrace mass media; imrove your communication style; resist the urge to dumb down the message; keep communication channels open.
Additional Info:
Baker offers four (4) strategies for being a public intellectual in one's field: Embrace mass media; imrove your communication style; resist the urge to dumb down the message; keep communication channels open.
Additional Info:
Responding to Nicholas Kristof's widely-read NYT piece lamenting the lack of civic engagement by professors, Goldberg describes how academic institutions can punish civic engagement because it distracts from grant procurement or other institutional service.
Additional Info:
Responding to Nicholas Kristof's widely-read NYT piece lamenting the lack of civic engagement by professors, Goldberg describes how academic institutions can punish civic engagement because it distracts from grant procurement or other institutional service.
Additional Info:
Responding to Nicholas Kristof's widely-read NYT piece lamenting the lack of civic engagement by professors, Robin provides URLs to a great many online "public intellectuals" in several fields. An excellent resource for instructors looking for existing models of "civic engagement."
Additional Info:
Responding to Nicholas Kristof's widely-read NYT piece lamenting the lack of civic engagement by professors, Robin provides URLs to a great many online "public intellectuals" in several fields. An excellent resource for instructors looking for existing models of "civic engagement."
Additional Info:
Nel examines the factors contributing to overwork on the part of faculty members in higher education: habit, economics, a culture of busy-ness, the blurred line between work and "fun," technological connectedness, etc.
Additional Info:
Nel examines the factors contributing to overwork on the part of faculty members in higher education: habit, economics, a culture of busy-ness, the blurred line between work and "fun," technological connectedness, etc.
Additional Info:
First half of podcast looks at belief identities between the sacred and secular. Second half focuses on how to build an academic career, win research funding, and get articles published.
Additional Info:
First half of podcast looks at belief identities between the sacred and secular. Second half focuses on how to build an academic career, win research funding, and get articles published.
Additional Info:
Topics covered: The importance of publication, and the relative merits of different publications; getting teaching experience; services to the discipline and the community; conferences and networking; what to put in your CV; how to keep up-to-date with your field
Additional Info:
Topics covered: The importance of publication, and the relative merits of different publications; getting teaching experience; services to the discipline and the community; conferences and networking; what to put in your CV; how to keep up-to-date with your field
Additional Info:
Zoe Alderton leads a group of academics with experience of all levels of academic publishing in a discussion which aims to demystify the process.
Additional Info:
Zoe Alderton leads a group of academics with experience of all levels of academic publishing in a discussion which aims to demystify the process.
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Podcast: Conversation ranges from the public perception of what Religious Studies does, what to do with a RS degree, to the financial practicalities of doing postgraduate research in the UK and US today.
Additional Info:
Podcast: Conversation ranges from the public perception of what Religious Studies does, what to do with a RS degree, to the financial practicalities of doing postgraduate research in the UK and US today.
Additional Info:
The GradHacker podcasters are joined by three guests who discuss the prospect of #altac (alternative academic) careers for today's graduate students preparing to enter the workforce. (The hosts first discuss recent posts relating to grad-student concerns, including "Training grad students for a new scholarly landscape.")
Additional Info:
The GradHacker podcasters are joined by three guests who discuss the prospect of #altac (alternative academic) careers for today's graduate students preparing to enter the workforce. (The hosts first discuss recent posts relating to grad-student concerns, including "Training grad students for a new scholarly landscape.")
Additional Info:
You're dismayed by the job market in higher ed, and have heard of "alt-ac" (alternative academic) careers, but don't know how to begin exploring the possibilities. Sanders offers a practical set of steps toward discerning and researching the possibilities off the beaten, tenure-track, teaching path.
Additional Info:
You're dismayed by the job market in higher ed, and have heard of "alt-ac" (alternative academic) careers, but don't know how to begin exploring the possibilities. Sanders offers a practical set of steps toward discerning and researching the possibilities off the beaten, tenure-track, teaching path.
Additional Info:
A series of invited blog posts by Wabash Center program participants, reflecting back on earlier moments in their teaching careers, what they learned, and what they wish they had known.
Additional Info:
A series of invited blog posts by Wabash Center program participants, reflecting back on earlier moments in their teaching careers, what they learned, and what they wish they had known.
Article cover image

On Teaching Religion. Essays by Jonathan Z. Smith

Article
Lehrich, Christopher, ed.
2014
Journal of American Academy of Religion, Vol. 82, No. 2, (Oxford University Press, New York, NY 2014): 531-542
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
An iconoclastic review of Jonathan Z. Smith’s teaching practice, in contrast to his collected writings on teaching (“On Teaching Religion,” 2013), written by a prominent scholar, and onetime undergraduate student of his.
Additional Info:
An iconoclastic review of Jonathan Z. Smith’s teaching practice, in contrast to his collected writings on teaching (“On Teaching Religion,” 2013), written by a prominent scholar, and onetime undergraduate student of his.
Cover image

Teaching with Heart: Poetry that Speaks to the Courage to Teach

Book
Intrator, Sam. M.; and Scribner, Megan, eds.
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
PS 591.T4 T43 2014
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Each and every day teachers show up in their classrooms with a relentless sense of optimism. Despite the complicated challenges of schools, they come to and remain in the profession inspired by a conviction that through education they can move individuals and society to a more promising future.

In Teaching with Heart: Poetry that Speaks to the Courage to Teach a diverse group of ninety teachers describe the ...
Additional Info:
Each and every day teachers show up in their classrooms with a relentless sense of optimism. Despite the complicated challenges of schools, they come to and remain in the profession inspired by a conviction that through education they can move individuals and society to a more promising future.

In Teaching with Heart: Poetry that Speaks to the Courage to Teach a diverse group of ninety teachers describe the complex of emotions and experiences of the teaching life – joy, outrage, heartbreak, hope, commitment and dedication. Each heartfelt commentary is paired with a cherished poem selected by the teacher. The contributors represent a broad array of educators: K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, college professors, as well as many non-traditional teachers. They range from first year teachers to mid-career veterans to those who have retired after decades in the classroom.  They come from inner-city, suburban, charter and private schools. 

The teachers identified an eclectic collection of poems and poets from Emily Dickinson, to Richard Wright, to Mary Oliver to the rapper Tupac Shakur. It is a book by teachers and for all who teach.

The book also includes a poignant Foreword by Parker J. Palmer (The Courage to Teach), a stirring Introduction by Taylor Mali (What Teachers Make), and a moving Afterword by Sarah Brown Wessling (Teaching Channel).

Where Teaching with Fire honored and celebrated the work of teachers; Teaching with Heart salutes the tenacious and relentless optimism of teachers and their belief that despite the many challenges and obstacles of the teaching life, much is possible. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
A Note to Our Readers (Sam M. Intrator and Megan Scribner)
Foreword (Parker J. Palmer)
Introduction (Taylor Mali)

ch. 1 Relentless Optimism
Emma Lazarus’s “The New Colossus” reflection (Randi Weingarten)
Fleet Foxes’ “Helplessness Blues” reflection (Stephen Lazar)
Marianne Williamson’s “A Return to Love” [Excerpt] reflection (Rachel Willis)
Edgar Lee Masters’s “George Gray” reflection (Mel Glenn)
Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken” reflection (Kaitlin Roig)
Rudyard Kipling’s “if” reflection (Andy Wood)
Loris Malaguzzi’s “No Way. The Hundred is There.” reflection (Tiffany Poirier)
Gerald Jonas’s “Lessons” reflection (Julie A. Gorlewski)
Taylor Mali’s “What Teachers Make” reflection (Kevin Hodgson)

ch. 2 Teachable Moments
Rainier Maria Rilke’s “All will come again into its strength” reflection (Gregory John)
Richard Wilbur’s “The Writer” reflection (Emily Brisse)
Theodore Roethke’s “The Waking” reflection (Nora Landon)
Emily Dickinson’s “’Tis so much joy! ’Tis so much joy!”
reflection (Lily Eskelsen García)
Paul Boswell’s “This Splendid Speck” reflection (Christine Intagliata)
Stanley Kunitz’s “Halley’s Comet” reflection (Rob Maitra)
Emily Dickinson’s “If I can stop one Heart from breaking” reflection (Annette Breaux)
John O’Donohue’s “Beannacht” reflection (Emanuel Pariser)
D. H. Lawrence’s “The Best of School” reflection (Tom Vander Ark)

ch. 3 Beauty in the Ordinary
Fernando Pessoa’s “To Be Great, Be Entire” reflection (Vicki Den Ouden)
Naomi Shihab Nye’s “Famous” reflection (Safaa Abdel-Magid)
Pablo Neruda’s “In Praise of Ironing” reflection (Cindy O’Donnell-Allen)
Louise Glück’s “Aubade” reflection (Kent Dickson)
W. H. Auden’s “In Memory of W. B. Yeats” [Excerpt] reflection (Jamie Raskin)
Stephen Crane’s “LVIII” reflection (Liam Corley)
Mary Oliver’s “Crossing the Swamp” reflection (Maureen Geraghty)
Philip Levine’s “What Work Is” reflection (Holly Masturzo)
Walt Whitman’s “Section II from ‘Song of Myself’ ” reflection (Jennifer Boyden)

ch. 4 Enduring Impact
Naomi Shihab Nye’s “Kindness” reflection (Hannah Cushing)
Margaret Atwood’s “You Begin” reflection (Karen Harris)
Thich Nhat Hanh’s “Please Call Me by My True Names” reflection (Ruth Charney)
William Stafford’s “Deciding” reflection (Michael Poutiatine)
Li-Young Lee’s “Eating Together” reflection (Wanda S. Praisner)
John O’Donohue’s “Blessing: For Presence” reflection (David Henderson)
Tara Sophia Mohr’s “Your Other Name” reflection (Lianne Raymond)
Jim R. Rogers’s “Good Morning!” reflection (Jane Zalkin)
Galway Kinnell’s “Saint Francis and the Sow” reflection (Kirsten Olson)

ch. 5 The Work Is Hard
Antonio Machado’s “VI” reflection (Michael L. Crauderueff)
Mary Oliver’s “Wild Geese” reflection (Kathleen Melville)
Calvin Coolidge’s “Persistence” reflection (April Niemela)
Sharon Olds’s “On the Subway” reflection (Lori Ungemah)
Anonymous’s “Work Gloves” reflection (Tom Meyer)
William Stafford’s “Next Time” reflection (Leanne Grabel Sander)
Emily Dickinson’s “We grow accustomed to the Dark—” reflection (Rachel Fentin)
Walt Whitman’s “When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer” reflection (Ronald Gordon)
Wislawa Szymborska’s “Life While-You-Wait” reflection (Veta Goler)

ch. 6 Tenacity
Tupac Shakur’s “The Rose That Grew from Concrete” reflection (Jose Vilson)
Philip Levine’s “M. Degas Teaches Art & Science at Durfee Intermediate School, Detroit, 1942” reflection (Laura Roop)
Mel King’s “Struggle” reflection (Susan Rodgerson)
Langston Hughes’s “Theme for English B” reflection (Paola Tineo)
Irene Rutherford McLeod’s “Lone Dog” reflection (LouAnne Johnson)
Billy Collins’s “On Turning Ten” reflection (Will Bangs)
Edgar A. Guest’s “It Couldn’t Be Done” reflection (Glendean Hamilton)
Lao-Tzu’s “On Leadership” reflection (Larry Rosenstock)
William Ernest Henley’s “Invictus” reflection (Caridad Caro)

ch. 7 Feisty
Rumi’s “Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing” reflection (Hugh Birdsall) Mary Oliver’s “The Poet Dreams of the Classroom” reflection (Katie Johnson)
Langston Hughes’s “Mother to Son” reflection (Ron Walker)
Jane Kenyon’s “Otherwise” reflection (Alison Overseth)
Richard Brautigan’s “The Memoirs of Jessie James” reflection (Stephen Mahoney)
Marge Piercy’s “To be of use” reflection (Amy Christie)
Maya Angelou’s “Still I Rise” reflection (Mary Beth Hertz)
Olive Senior’s “Colonial Girls School” reflection (Dena Simmons)
The Freedom Writers with Erin Gruwell’s “An Innocent Freedom Writer” reflection (Kayleigh Colombero)

ch. 8 Moment to Moment
Bill Holm’s “Advice” reflection (Teri O’Donnell) Katha Pollitt’s “Lilacs in September” reflection (David S. Goldstein)
Herman Hesse’s “The Ferryman” reflection (Rachel Boechler)
Mark Nepo’s “The Appointment” reflection (Judy Sorum Brown)
Captain Ed Davidson’s “Footprints by the Sea” reflection (Sandi Bisceglia)
Rumi’s “The Guest House” reflection (Richard H. Ackerman)
Chuang Tzu’s “Flight from the Shadow” reflection (Mark Bielang) Thomas Merton’s “In Silence” reflection (Thomas A. Stewart)
Derek Walcott’s “Love After Love” reflection (Tim Ryan)

ch. 9 Together
John Daniel’s “A Prayer among Friends” reflection (Melissa Madenski)
Maya Angelou’s “Alone” reflection (Nina Ashur)
Stephen Dunn’s “The Sacred” reflection (Dan Mindich)
James A. Autry’s “On Firing A Salesman” reflection (Brian Dixon)
Robert Herrick’s “To the Virgins, to make much of Time” reflection (Cordell Jones)
Lucille Clifton’s “blessing the boats” reflection (Kathleen Glaser)
Raymond Carver’s “Happiness” reflection by (Dennis Huffman)
X. J. Kennedy’s “Little Elegy” reflection (Kenneth Rocke)
Mel Glenn’s “A Teacher’s Contract” reflection (Harriet Sanford)

ch. 10 Called to Teach
Gary Snyder’s “For the Children” reflection (Julia Hill)
Maya Angelou’s “The Lesson” reflection (Jovan Miles)
Gregory Orr’s “It’s not magic; it isn’t a trick” reflection (John Mayer)
Judy Sorum Brown’s “Hummingbirds asleep” reflection (Sandie Merriam)
John Fox’s “When Someone Deeply Listens to You” reflection (Nell Etheredge)
Alexis Rotella’s “Purple” reflection (Leatha Fields-Carey)
William Stafford’s “The Way It Is” reflection (Donna Y. Chin)
Langston Hughes’s “I loved my friend” reflection (Margaret Wilson)
Wendell Berry’s “The Real Work” reflection (Amy Harter)

ch. 11 Using Poetry for Reflection and Conversation

Afterword by Sarah Brown Wessling
Center for Courage & Renewal
The Contributors
The Editors
Gratitudes
Credits
TTR cover image

Teaching Very Large Classes

TTR
DeRogatis, Amy; Honerkamp, Kenneth; McDaniel, Justin; Medine, Carolyn; Nyitray, Vivian-Lee; and Pearson, Thomas
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 4 (2014): 352-368
BL41.T4. v.17 no. 4 2014
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
The editor of Teaching Theology and Religion facilitated this reflective conversation with five teachers who have extensive experience and success teaching extremely large classes (150 students or more). In the course of the conversation these professors exchange and analyze the effectiveness of several active learning strategies they have employed to overcome the passivity and anonymity of the large lecture format. A major point of debate emerges that contrasts the dynamically performative ...
Additional Info:
The editor of Teaching Theology and Religion facilitated this reflective conversation with five teachers who have extensive experience and success teaching extremely large classes (150 students or more). In the course of the conversation these professors exchange and analyze the effectiveness of several active learning strategies they have employed to overcome the passivity and anonymity of the large lecture format. A major point of debate emerges that contrasts the dynamically performative and highly informed and skilled lecturer with the “wasted time and money” that results from encouraging students to participate through various active learning strategies. Other themes include the importance of story telling in the religious studies classroom, the significance of the differences between students' learning styles, and the challenge of teaching and assessing critical thinking and communication skills.
Article cover image

Conflicts and Configurations in a Liminal Space: SoTL Scholars' Identity Development

Article
Simmons, Nicola; Abrahamson, Earle, Deshler, Jessica M.; Kensington-Miller, Barbara; Manarin, Karen; Morón-García, Sue; Oliver, Carolyn; and Rene-Roe, Joanna
2013
JSTOR: Teaching & Learning Inquiry: The ISSOTL Journal, Vol. 1, No. 2 (2013), pp. 9-21
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching

Additional Info:
Although academic identity has received attention in the literature, there have been few attempts to understand the influence on identity from engagement with the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). In this paper, we (a group of eight scholars from five different countries) describe how our interactions with SoTL have impacted the shaping of our academic identities. We have struggled to define the value, purpose, outcomes, and meanings of being ...
Additional Info:
Although academic identity has received attention in the literature, there have been few attempts to understand the influence on identity from engagement with the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). In this paper, we (a group of eight scholars from five different countries) describe how our interactions with SoTL have impacted the shaping of our academic identities. We have struggled to define the value, purpose, outcomes, and meanings of being a disciplined SoTL scholar, sometimes in addition to and sometimes in opposition to being a disciplinary scholar. Through analysis of our own 100-word reflective narratives, we identify common conflicts and configurations around our experiences of developing a SoTL identity. We describe how navigating among conflicting identities can lead us into a troublesome but deeply reflective liminal space, prompting profound realizations and the reconstruction of academic identity. Drawing on this notion of liminality helps us to understand our journeys as moving through a necessary and important transformational landscape, and allows us to suggest ways to support those engaging with SoTL to develop an integrative SoTL identity.
Web cover image

Negotiating the Tricky Maze of Identity in the Classroom

Web
Gputa, Nisha
2013
Delphi Center for Teaching & Learning
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
How do we enter the practice of self-renwal, given the tricky balancing act of negotiating personal identity in the classroom - both the many wye we identify ourselves, and the ways we are identified by others. 
Additional Info:
How do we enter the practice of self-renwal, given the tricky balancing act of negotiating personal identity in the classroom - both the many wye we identify ourselves, and the ways we are identified by others. 
Cover image

Overcoming Adversity in Academia Stories from Generation X Faculty

Book
Watson, Elwood, ed.
2014
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LC2331.094 2014
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
This collection of essays written by seventeen Generation X academics passionately, provocatively, and eloquently demonstrates the personal issues, conflicts, and triumphs that are definitive of this generation. These essays define the voice of an often overlooked and ignored demographic. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This collection of essays written by seventeen Generation X academics passionately, provocatively, and eloquently demonstrates the personal issues, conflicts, and triumphs that are definitive of this generation. These essays define the voice of an often overlooked and ignored demographic. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Elwood Watson)

ch. 1 Only Human: My Experience in Higher Education (Martha Diede)
ch. 2 Confessions of a Bakke Baby: Race, Academia, and the “Joshua Generation” (Terrance Tucker)
ch. 3 Taking Chances: Gay, Male and Feminist in the Academy (Daniel Farr)
ch. 4 Tenured To Contingent: Life Choices and the Academic Career (Annemarie Hamlin)
ch. 5 The Evolution of Tolerance: Growing Up as a White Southerner in the Aftermath of Desegregation (Andria J. Woodell)
ch. 6 Reflections on Navigating Invisibility and the Consequences of Being Black and Gay in the Academy (Darryl Holloman)
ch. 7 Reflections Upon One Experience Leading To a Career in Academia (Douglas Mikutel)
ch. 8 Living Beyond The Dream Deferred: An Auto-Ethnography of My Experiences in the Academy (Antonio C. Cuyler)
ch. 9 In Search of the Abyss: Negotiating Xtra-Academic Potential (David Prescott-Steed)
ch. 10 Team Mollick: Our Two-For-One Academic Journey (Kathleen and George Mollick)
ch. 11 My Ongoing Journey: A Black Generation X Professor’s Story In Appalachia (Elwood Watson)
ch. 12 Leaving the Popular Culture Classroom: Why I’d Rather Keep My Fandom to Myself... (Kristi Key)
ch. 13 Doogie Howser, Ph.D. in Identity Crisis (Zachary Snider)
ch. 14 Changing the State of Tomorrow Today: One Generation Xer’s Journey to End Racism and White Supremacy in the Academy and Beyond (Aimee Glocke)
ch. 15 Hopefully Drifting (Lance Alexis)
ch. 16 The Aftermath of Admission (Jenny R. Sadre-Orafai)
ch. 17 Notes From An In-Betweener (Daryl A. Carter)

Contributors
Index
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Black Faculty in the Academy: Narratives for Negotiating Identity and Achieving Career Success

Book
Bonner, II, Fred A.; Marbley, Aretha Faye; Tuitt, Frank; Robinson, Petra A.; Banda, Rosa M.; and Hughes, Robin L., eds.
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
LC2781.5.B528 2014
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Through candid discussions and personal counter-narrative stories, Black Faculty in the Academy explores the experiences and challenges faced by faculty of color in academe. Black faculty in predominantly White college and university settings must negotiate multiple and competing identities while struggling with issues of marginality, otherness, and invisible barriers. This important book illuminates how faculty can develop a professional identity that leads to ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Through candid discussions and personal counter-narrative stories, Black Faculty in the Academy explores the experiences and challenges faced by faculty of color in academe. Black faculty in predominantly White college and university settings must negotiate multiple and competing identities while struggling with issues of marginality, otherness, and invisible barriers. This important book illuminates how faculty can develop a professional identity that leads to success in academe, while at the same time remaining true to cultural and personal identities. Through rich narratives, chapter authors situate race-related encounters at the center of their experience in an effort to deconstruct and challenge commonly held assumptions about life in academe. They also provide key recommendations and strategies to help faculty of color ensure their continued professional success. Framed by critical race theory, these stories show how faculty can successfully maneuver through all stages of a career in academe, including tenure and promotion, publication, mentoring, networking, teaching, and dealing with institutional climate issues. This valuable book is for faculty and administrators seeking to create an environment that nurtures professional growth and fosters success among Black faculty. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction (Fred A. Bonner II and Frank Tuitt)

I. Black Faculty: Navigating Daily Encounters with Racism
ch. 1 Acclimating to the institutional climate: There’s a "chill" in the air (Mark Giles)
ch. 2 The Life of A Black Male Scholar: Contesting Racial Microaggressions in Academe (Ariel William Moore*) *Denotes pen name used at author’s request
ch. 3 Social networking and support: No, I don’t know how to play golf (Anton Lewis & Katherine Helm)
ch. 4 Cultural Taxation and The Over Commitment of Service at Predominantly White Institutions (Marjorie Shavers, J. Yasmine Butler, & James L. Moore III)

II. Black Faculty: Meaning Making through Multidisciplinary and Intersectional Approaches
ch. 5 Black Faculty Negotiating the Microaggressions in Scholarship (Aretha Faye Marbley, Leon Rouson, Jiaqi Li, Shih-Han Huang, Colette M. Taylor)
ch. 6 Using Endarkened and Critical Race Feminist Perspectives To Question and Analyze Knowledge Production Narratives (Natasha N. Croom, Lori D. Patton)
ch. 7 Navigating Race-Gendered Microaggressions: The Experiences of a Tenure-Track Black Female Scholar (Dorinda Carter Andrews)
ch. 8 Black Queer (Re)presentation in (White) Academe: I am the Hell and the High Water (Dafina-Lazarus Stewart)

III. Black Faculty: Finding Strength through Critical Mentoring Relationships
ch. 9 Self-Reflection as a Critical Tool in the Life of an Early Career African American Male Scholar (Alonzo M. Flowers)
ch. 10 Engaging Mentoring Relationships in Academia: Hard Lessons Learned (Buffy Smith)
ch. 11 The critical need for faculty mentoring: Say brother, can you spare the time? (Fred A. Bonner)
ch. 12 Establishing critical relationships with students: That’s not what white professor "X" told us (Saundra Tomlinson-Clarke)
Article cover image
Wabash tree

"Academics' Teacher, Identities, Authenticity and Pedagogy"

Article
Kreber, Carolin
2010
Studies in Higher Education Vol. 35, No. 2, March, 171-194
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Nine academics participated in semi-structured interviews to explore possible linkages between their teacher identities and the pedagogies they employ. A content analysis of the interviews was performed to gain insight into the factors playing a role in how academics define themselves as teachers, the larger educational goals they espouse and the pedagogies they use. The data were subsequently re-interpreted through the lens of authenticity, an evocative yet elusive construct whose ...
Additional Info:
Nine academics participated in semi-structured interviews to explore possible linkages between their teacher identities and the pedagogies they employ. A content analysis of the interviews was performed to gain insight into the factors playing a role in how academics define themselves as teachers, the larger educational goals they espouse and the pedagogies they use. The data were subsequently re-interpreted through the lens of authenticity, an evocative yet elusive construct whose meaning was clarified in earlier work. The study surfaces several conceptual linkages between teacher identity, pedagogy and authenticity, and suggests that authenticity might constitute a crucial link between teaching and the achievement of complex learning outcomes at undergraduate level. Academics' personal theories of teaching, in particular the conceptions they hold of learners, are revealed as critical to the extent to which their pedagogies are "authentic"; the latter, ideally, offering contexts within which students are supported in developing "their" authenticity. (Contains 1 table and 2 figures.)
TTR cover image

Founders, Finding, Being Found: Women’s Wisdom in Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion

TTR
Hess, Lisa M.; Brosmer, Mary Pierce; and Moore, Mary Elizabeth Mullino
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 2 (2015): 170-185
BL41.T4 v.18 no.2 2015
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This is an edited transcript of a conversation between two founding women on the delights and demands of teaching and learning within and beyond traditional institutional life, facilitated by Lisa M. Hess of the journal's Editorial Board. The conscious feminine practices of a women's writing school, Women Writing for (a) Change (Cincinnati, Ohio), created the circle-container for the sharing of words and wisdom. Narrative, pedagogical, and organizational issues arose as ...
Additional Info:
This is an edited transcript of a conversation between two founding women on the delights and demands of teaching and learning within and beyond traditional institutional life, facilitated by Lisa M. Hess of the journal's Editorial Board. The conscious feminine practices of a women's writing school, Women Writing for (a) Change (Cincinnati, Ohio), created the circle-container for the sharing of words and wisdom. Narrative, pedagogical, and organizational issues arose as the circle listened and examined the realities of contributing as a woman in higher education, yesterday and today.
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Teaching Excellence in Higher Education

Book
Gregory, Marshall
2013
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
LB2331.G716 2013
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   General Overviews

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Abstract: In this volume, the culmination of a lifetime's work as an educator, Marshall Gregory lays out a pedagogical theory and ethical vision for teaching. He argues that teachers across the arts and sciences can reach for teaching excellence by relying on more than good will, good intentions, sincerity, enthusiasm, and trial and error. They can think, individually and collectively, about the educable capacities ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: In this volume, the culmination of a lifetime's work as an educator, Marshall Gregory lays out a pedagogical theory and ethical vision for teaching. He argues that teachers across the arts and sciences can reach for teaching excellence by relying on more than good will, good intentions, sincerity, enthusiasm, and trial and error. They can think, individually and collectively, about the educable capacities of the students they teach and about the ultimate aim of their teaching: not to merely impart information or train their students in a discipline, but to develop their students' abilities for thought, reflection, questioning, and engagement to their fullest extent. Drawing on over forty-five years of teaching and thirty-five years of training teachers to think about pedagogy, Gregory speaks to any teacher wanting to more fully ground the what of teaching in the how and why. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figure
Preface
Acknowlegments

ch. 1 Good Teaching and Educational Vision: Not the Same Thing as Disciplinary Expertise
ch. 2 Forgetting, Learning, and Living: How Education Makes a Difference Even Though We Forget Most of What We Learn
ch. 3 The Dynamics of Desire in Everyday Classrooms
ch. 4 Ethical Pedagogy
ch. 5 From Shakespeare on the Page to Shakespeare on the Stage: What I Learned about Teaching in Acting Class
ch. 6 Love? What’s Love Got to Do with it?
ch. 7 Developing Your Own Philosophy of Education: Principles, Not Personalities
ch. 8 What Is Teaching, After All?
ch. 9 Teacherly Ethos Revisited

Bibliography
Index
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Class Not Dismissed: Reflections on Undergraduate Education and Teaching the Liberal Arts

Book
Aveni, Anthony
2014
University Press of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado
LC1011.A896 2014
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Liberal Arts   |   General Overviews

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Abstract: In Class Not Dismissed, award-winning professor Anthony Aveni tells the personal story of his six decades in college classrooms and some of the 10,000 students who have filled them. Through anecdotes of his own triumphs and tribulations—some amusing, others heartrending—Aveni reveals his teaching story and thoughts on the future of higher education.

Although in recent years the lecture has come ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: In Class Not Dismissed, award-winning professor Anthony Aveni tells the personal story of his six decades in college classrooms and some of the 10,000 students who have filled them. Through anecdotes of his own triumphs and tribulations—some amusing, others heartrending—Aveni reveals his teaching story and thoughts on the future of higher education.

Although in recent years the lecture has come under fire as a pedagogical method, Aveni ardently defends lecturing to students. He shares his secrets on crafting an engaging lecture and creating productive dialogue in class discussions. He lays out his rules on classroom discipline and tells how he promotes the lost art of listening. He is a passionate proponent of the liberal arts and core course requirements as well as a believer in sound teaching promoted by active scholarship.

Aveni is known to his students as a consummate storyteller. In Class Not Dismissed he shares real stories about everyday college life that shed light on serious educational issues. The result is a humorous, reflective, inviting, and powerful inquiry into higher education that will be of interest to anyone invested in the current and future state of college and university education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Why I Teach
I Love You, Miss Cohen
Dreams of Skywatching
The Ones I Remember
Archetype of the Professor
Learning, Loving, Breathing

ch. 2 What I Teach
From Mountaintop to Classroom
Assignment One
Acquiring the Tool of My Trade
Encountering the Liberal Arts
A Little History
The Core of the Liberal Arts: What Is It and What’s It Good For?
Tradition vs. Change, or How to Move a Graveyard
Diversity, Modernity, and Globalization: New Cores for New Generations

ch. 3 How I Teach
Teaching as Storytelling and Showing Learning by Experience
Am I the Sage on the State: What Makes for a Good Lecture?
Or the Guide on the Side: Is Techno-learning the Answer?
What’s on the Test? Teaching and Measuring Basic Student Skills
How To and How Not To Teach?

ch. 4 Questioning Teaching
Are Sound Teaching and Strong Scholarship Compatible?
Should My Job Be Guaranteed for Life?
How Can Teachers Serve the Wider Community?
In Loco Parentis: I’m Not Your Paren - or Am I?
Can We Really Measure Good Teaching?
Better Grades for Better Students?
Why Are Professors under Siege?
How Do We Teach in a Dummied-Down Culture?
The Life of Mind and Body: Do They Really Go Together?
How Can We Improve Our Colleges and Universities?
Why College Anyway?

ch. 5 Epilogue: Class (Not) Dismissed

Notes
Additional Info:
Wabash Center blog spot with periodic postings from a variety of contributors on the teaching life and classroom practices.
Additional Info:
Wabash Center blog spot with periodic postings from a variety of contributors on the teaching life and classroom practices.
Article cover image

Managing Middlescence

Article
Morison, Robert; Erickson, Tamara J.; and Dychtwald, Ken
2006
Harvard Business Review, March
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Institutions face tremendous potential loss if midcareer employees (like mid-career faculty?) are not happy and productive. Midcareer problems are “pervasive, largely invisible, and culturally uncharted.” 
Additional Info:
Institutions face tremendous potential loss if midcareer employees (like mid-career faculty?) are not happy and productive. Midcareer problems are “pervasive, largely invisible, and culturally uncharted.” 
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Mapping Your Academic Career: Charting the Course of a Professor's Life

Book
Burge, Gary M.
2015
InterVarsity Press, Downers Grove, IL
LB1778.2.B87 2015
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
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Abstract: You're finishing your first year of teaching. It's been exciting and gratifying, but there've been some wobbly episodes too. How will you carve out a space to flourish?

You're feeling secure in mid-career, with some accomplishments to be proud of. But what should success really look like?

You're nearing the end of your career, and sometimes apprehensive about the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: You're finishing your first year of teaching. It's been exciting and gratifying, but there've been some wobbly episodes too. How will you carve out a space to flourish?

You're feeling secure in mid-career, with some accomplishments to be proud of. But what should success really look like?

You're nearing the end of your career, and sometimes apprehensive about the blank slate of retirement. What might it look like to finish well?

In Mapping Your Academic Career Gary Burge speaks from decades of teaching, writing and mentoring. Along the way he has experienced and observed the challenges and tensions, the successes and failures of the academic pilgrimage. Now, with discerning wisdom and apt examples, he hosts the conversation he wishes he'd had when he started out as a college professor, identifying three cohorts or stages in the academic career and exploring the challenges, pitfalls and triumphs of each. Wherever you are in your teaching life, this is a book that will reward reading, reflection and discussion. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction: Mapping Our Lives

ch. 1 Cohort 1: Will I Find Security?
Addendum: Mentoring

ch. 2 Cohort 2: Will I Find Success?
Addendum: A Financial Plan
Addendum: Sabbaticals

ch. 3 Cohort 3: Will I Find Significance?
Addendum: Retirement

Select Annotated Bibliography
Subject Index
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Dear Committee Members: A Novel

Book
Schumacher, Julie
2015
Anchor Books, A Division of Penguin Random House, New York, NY
PS3569.C5548 D43 2015
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
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Abstract: Winner of the Thurber Prize for American Humor

Jason Fitger is a beleaguered professor of creative writing and literature at Payne University, a small and not very distinguished liberal arts college in the midwest. His once-promising writing career is in the doldrums, as is his romantic life, in part as the result of his unwise use of his private affairs for ...
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Abstract: Winner of the Thurber Prize for American Humor

Jason Fitger is a beleaguered professor of creative writing and literature at Payne University, a small and not very distinguished liberal arts college in the midwest. His once-promising writing career is in the doldrums, as is his romantic life, in part as the result of his unwise use of his private affairs for his novels. His life, a tale of woe, is revealed in a series of hilarious letters of recommendation that Fitger is endlessly called upon by his students and colleagues to produce, each one of which is a small masterpiece of high dudgeon, low spirits, and passive-aggressive strategies. (From the Publisher)
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Becoming Critical: The Emergence of Social Justice Scholars

Book
Briscoe, Felecia M.; and Khalifa, Muhammad A., eds.
2015
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
HM671.B44 2015
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
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Abstract: Presents the key experiences of a diverse group of teachers and students in their journeys of becoming social justice educator/scholars.

This innovative book is a collection of autoethnographies by a diverse group of contributors who describe and theorize about the critical moments in their development as social justice educator/scholars in the face of colonizing forces. Using a rhizomatic approach, ...
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Abstract: Presents the key experiences of a diverse group of teachers and students in their journeys of becoming social justice educator/scholars.

This innovative book is a collection of autoethnographies by a diverse group of contributors who describe and theorize about the critical moments in their development as social justice educator/scholars in the face of colonizing forces. Using a rhizomatic approach, the editors’ meta-analysis identifies patterns of similarity and differences and theorizes about the exercise of agency in resistance and identity formation. In our increasingly diverse society, Becoming Critical is a wonderful resource for teacher education and sociology of education as it presents an alternative methodological approach for qualitative inquiry. The book contributes to students’ understanding of the development of critical theories—especially as they pertain to identities. The contributors make use of the work of critical scholars such as Collins, hooks, Weber, Foucault, and others relevant to the lives of students and educators today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Section I: Introduction and Overview of Book
ch. 1 Introduction and Conceptual Framework: Critical Theory, Social Justice, Power, and Autoethnography (Felecia M. Briscoe and Muhammad A. Khalifa)

Section II: Critical Race Autoethnographic Case Studies
Section II Introduction: Authoethnography and Critical Race Theory (Muhammad A. Khalifa)
ch. 2 Auditioning for Whiteness: Autoethnography and Critical Race Theory in the Early Schooling Experiences of an African-American Man (Michael E. Jennings)
ch. 3 To Keep It Real or Not to Keep It Real: The Dialectics of the Chapellian Contradiction (Nosakhere Griffin-EL)
ch. 4 Blue Collar Scholar: Social Class, Race, and Life as a Black Man in Academe (Mark S. Giles)
ch. 5 Too Black, Yet Not Black Enough: Challenging White Supremacy in U.S. Teacher Education and the Making of Two Radical Social Misfits (Brenda G. Juárez and Cleveland Hayes)
ch. 6 Unbecoming … Responding to Colorblindness: An Autoethnography (Joy Howard)

Section III: Critical Feminist Autoethnographic Case Studies
Section III Introduction: Critical Feminisms: Gendered Experiences of Oppression and Resistance (Felecia M. Briscoe)
ch. 7 From Fundamentalist Mormon to the Academy: A “Plyg” Girl’s Experiences with the Evolving Sexist Double-Blind (Felecia M. Briscoe)
ch. 8 Where Did the Girls Go?: The Role of Socialization and Institutions in Silencing Female Voices (Damaris Moraa Choti)

Section IV: Critical Intersectional Autoethnographic Case Studies
Section IV Introduction: Intersecting Dimensions of Identity, Oppression, and Resistance (Felecia M. Briscoe)
ch. 9 “You Look Like a Wetback; You Shouldn’t Have Any Trouble”: Deals We Make with the Devil on the Road Less Traveled (Elizabeth de la Portilla)
ch. 10 A Critical Autoethnography of a Black Man from Detroit: Resisting the White Imaginative’s Criminalization of Black Men (Muhammad A. Khalifa)
ch. 11 Working the Hyphens: Ethnographic Snapshots in Becoming Critical-Female-Black-Scholars (Aisha El-Amin, B. Genise Henry, and Crystal T. Laura)
ch. 12 We’re All Half-Breeds Now … in a Not so Ivory Tower (Miguel de Oliver)

Section V: Advances in Rhizomatic Understanding
ch. 13 Autoethnographic Sensemaking: What Does Our Criticality Mean? Patterns and Divergences (Muhammad A. Khalifa and Felecia M. Briscoe)
ch. 14 Rage, Love, Transcendence in the the Co-Construction of Critical Scholars Identities: Escaping the Iron Cage of Technical-Rationality (Felecia M. Briscoe and Muhammad A. Khalifa)

References
Contributors’ Professional Biographies
Index
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Engaged Teaching in Theology and Religion

Book
Harrison, Renee K.; and Knight, Jennie S.
2015
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
BL41.H367 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The goal of Engaged Teaching in Theology and Religion is to guide a process of self-reflection for scholars and teachers of theology and religion that leads to intentional, transformative teaching, dialogue, and reform in theological education and religious studies. Effective teaching approaches must address the selfhood of the teacher, as well as pedagogy, course content, and community engagement. This book sets itself apart ...
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Abstract: The goal of Engaged Teaching in Theology and Religion is to guide a process of self-reflection for scholars and teachers of theology and religion that leads to intentional, transformative teaching, dialogue, and reform in theological education and religious studies. Effective teaching approaches must address the selfhood of the teacher, as well as pedagogy, course content, and community engagement. This book sets itself apart from other works in the field because of this holistic approach. In addition to addressing these four areas, Harrison and Knight provide a variety of practices for teaching that take seriously students' cries for a more socially and personally relevant pedagogy and curriculum in a rapidly changing transnational world. The volume provides a well-reasoned and accessible re-thinking of teaching theology and religion so that schools of theology and departments of religion might better live out their stated goals of forming transformative, courageous, and thoughtful leaders and teachers in the twenty-first century. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction: Why Do We Teach?

PART I: SELF
ch. 2 The Teaching Self: Authority through Authenticity
ch. 3 The Teaching Self and the Name Game
ch. 4 The Practice of Self

PART II: PEDAGOGY
ch. 5 Teaching Matters
ch. 6 Open Pedagogy: The Bank is Closed
ch. 7 Practices of Engaged Pedagogy

PART III: CONTENT
ch. 8 Content that Connects
ch. 9 Content that Opens Us to Other Ways of Knowing
ch. 10 Practices for Integrating Content that Awakens

PART IV: COMMUNITY
ch. 11 Community Engaged Education
ch. 12 Community: Turning Theory Into Action
ch. 13 The Practice of Community

Notes
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Teaching and Christian Imagination

Book
Smith, David I. and Felch, Susan M.
2016
William B Eerdmans Publishing Co., Grand Rapids, MI
BV4596.T43 S65 2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia

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Abstract: This book offers an energizing Christian vision for the art of teaching. The authors - experienced teachers themselves - encourage teacher-readers to reanimate their work by imagining it differently. David Smith and Susan Felch, along with Barbara Carvill, Kurt Schaefer, Timothy Steele, and John Witvliet, creatively use three metaphors - journeys and pilgrimages, gardens and wilderness, buildings and walls - to illuminate a ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: This book offers an energizing Christian vision for the art of teaching. The authors - experienced teachers themselves - encourage teacher-readers to reanimate their work by imagining it differently. David Smith and Susan Felch, along with Barbara Carvill, Kurt Schaefer, Timothy Steele, and John Witvliet, creatively use three metaphors - journeys and pilgrimages, gardens and wilderness, buildings and walls - to illuminate a fresh vision of teaching and learning. Stretching beyond familiar clichés, they infuse these metaphors with rich biblical echoes and theological resonances that will inform and inspire Christian teachers everywhere. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One - Journeys and Pilgrimages
ch. 1 Setting Our Feet on the Road
ch. 2 Are We Tourists or Pilgrims?
ch. 3 Walking the Path
ch. 4 What Sustains the Journey

Part Two - Gardens and Wilderness
ch. 5 Clearing the Ground
ch. 6 Generous Beauty: Is Your Classroom a Royal Garden?
ch. 7 Shaping the Soul
ch. 8 The Just Community

Part Three - Buildings and Walls
ch. 9 Drawing the Blueprints
ch. 10 Laying the Foundations
ch. 11 Building the Walls
ch. 12 Climbing the Steps
ch. 13 Entering the Sanctuary
ch. 14 Setting Up House

ch. 15 An Ending, An Invitation

Notes
General Index
Scripture Index
Index of Reflection
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Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy

Book
Berg, Maggie and Seeber, Barbara
2016
University of Toronto Press, Toronto
LB2331.B47 2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
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Abstract: If there is one sector of society that should be cultivating deep thought in itself and others, it is academia. Yet the corporatisation of the contemporary university has sped up the clock, demanding increased speed and efficiency from faculty regardless of the consequences for education and scholarship.

In The Slow Professor, Maggie Berg and Barbara K. Seeber discuss how adopting the ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: If there is one sector of society that should be cultivating deep thought in itself and others, it is academia. Yet the corporatisation of the contemporary university has sped up the clock, demanding increased speed and efficiency from faculty regardless of the consequences for education and scholarship.

In The Slow Professor, Maggie Berg and Barbara K. Seeber discuss how adopting the principles of the Slow movement in academic life can counter this erosion of humanistic education. Focusing on the individual faculty member and his or her own professional practice, Berg and Seeber present both an analysis of the culture of speed in the academy and ways of alleviating stress while improving teaching, research, and collegiality. The Slow Professor will be a must-read for anyone in academia concerned about the frantic pace of contemporary university life. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Time Management and Timelessness
ch. 2 Pedagogy and Pleasure
ch. 3 Research and Understanding
ch. 4 Collegiality and Community

Conclusion: Collaboration and Working Together
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Teach from the Heart: Pedagogy as Spiritual Practice

Book
Paris, Jenell
2016
Cascade Books, Eugene, OR
LB1025.3.P37 2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
How can a teacher remain whole and happy, able to teach well for an entire semester, an entire year, and an entire career? Teach from the Heart is about finding, rediscovering, or holding on to the heart of the teaching life, which is, quite literally, the teacher's heart. It is an encouragement to take up teaching as more than a service to provide, a profession to master, or a job ...
Additional Info:
How can a teacher remain whole and happy, able to teach well for an entire semester, an entire year, and an entire career? Teach from the Heart is about finding, rediscovering, or holding on to the heart of the teaching life, which is, quite literally, the teacher's heart. It is an encouragement to take up teaching as more than a service to provide, a profession to master, or a job to perform. It is an invitation to artisanry, teaching as a craft that we master by working with our hands over long periods of time, producing results that bear the mark of their maker. Whether you're just beginning, or in it for the long haul, sit down with Teach from the Heart and deepen your heart for the teaching life. We need not bring to class the wisdom and knowledge we gained elsewhere; we can take up teaching as a spiritual practice, with the classroom as a sacred space for our own formation as persons.

With nearly forty years' experience as both student and teacher, Jenell Paris's perspective is hard-won, but still lighthearted and enthusiastic. Teachers from any context will benefit: stories and examples include preschool, K-12, community education, and college teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 The Change You Wish to See
ch. 2 Your Attention Please
ch. 3 Teach Here, Now
ch. 4 Have Fun
ch. 5 Say Yes, Say No
ch. 6 Define the Relationship
ch. 7 Make It by Hand
ch. 8 Nurture Integrity
ch. 9 Survive Crisis
ch. 10 Be True to Your School
ch. 11 Fall in Love

Epilogue: Commencing
Bibliography
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Publicly Engaged Scholars: Next-Generation Engagement and the Future of Higher Education

Book
Post, Margaret A.; Ward, Elaine; Longo, Nicholas V.; Satlmarsh, John, eds.
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC238.P84 2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The concern that the democratic purposes of higher education -- and its conception as a public good -- are being undermined, with the growing realization that existing structures are unsuited to addressing today's complex societal problems, and that our institutions are failing an increasingly diverse population, all give rise to questioning the current model of the university.

This book presents the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The concern that the democratic purposes of higher education -- and its conception as a public good -- are being undermined, with the growing realization that existing structures are unsuited to addressing today's complex societal problems, and that our institutions are failing an increasingly diverse population, all give rise to questioning the current model of the university.

This book presents the voices of a new generation of scholars, educators, and practitioners who are committed to civic renewal and the public purposes of higher education. They question existing policies, structures, and practices, and put forward new forms of engagement that can help to shape and transform higher education to align it with societal needs.

The scholars featured in this book make the case for public scholarship and argue that, in order to strengthen the democratic purposes of higher education for a viable future that is relevant to the needs of a changing society, we must recognize and support new models of teaching and research, and the need for fundamental changes in the core practices, policies, and cultures of the academy.

These scholars act on their values through collaboration, inclusiveness, participation, task sharing, and reciprocity in public problem solving. Central to their approach is an authentic respect for the expertise and experience that all stakeholders contribute to education, knowledge generation, and community building.

This book offers a vision of the university as a part of an ecosystem of knowledge production, addressing public problems with the purpose of advancing a more inclusive, deliberative democracy; and explores the new paradigm for teaching, learning, and knowledge creation necessary to make it a reality. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward (Timothy K. Eatman)
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introducing Next-Generation Engagement (Margaret A. Post, Elaine Ward, Nicholas V. Longo, and John Saltmarsh)

Part One: The Collaborative Engagement Paradigm
ch. 2 The Inheritance of Next Generation Engagement Scholars (John Saltmarsh and Matthew Hartley)
ch. 3 A Brief History of a Movement - Civic Engagement and American Higher Education (Matthew Hartley and John Saltmarsh)
ch. 4 Collaborative Engagement—The Future of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (Nicholas V. Longo and Cynthia M. Gibson)
ch. 5 Collaborative Engagement Research and Implications for Institutional Change (Farrah Jacquez, Elaine Ward, and Molly Goguen)
ch. 6 Legitimacy, Agency, and Inequality - Organizational Practices for Full Participation of Community Engaged Faculty (KerryAnn O’Meara)

Part Two: New Public Scholars
Opening (Elaine Ward)
ch. 7 Disrupting Role Dichotomies (Lina Dostillio, Emily Janke, Margaret A. Post, Annie Miller, and Elaine Ward)
ch. 8 Developing a Community-Engaged Scholarly Identity (Katie Beck, Adam Bush, Lorena Holguin, Demetri Morgan, and Cecilia Orphan)
ch. 9 Paving New Professional Pathways for Community Engaged Scholarship (Patrick Green, Barbara Harrison, Jessica Reading, and Timothy Shaffer)
ch. 10 Critical Commitments to Community and Campus Change (Eric Hartman, Glennys Sanchez, Sabina Shakya, and Brandon Whitney)
ch. 11 Fortunate accidents and winding pathways – The personal and professional spaces of authenticity (Ben Anderson-Nathe, Farrah Jacquez, Rachael Kerns-Wetherington, and Tania D. Mitchell)
ch. 12 Next Generation Engaged Scholars – Stewards of Change (Elaine Ward and Annie Miller)

Part Three: The Future of Engagement
ch. 13 The Future of the Academy with Students as Colleagues (Nicholas V. Longo, Abby Kiesa, and Richard Battistoni)
ch. 14 Next Generation Engagement Scholars in the Neoliberal University (Cecilia M. Orphan and KerryAnn O’Meara)
ch. 15 Building an Organizational Structure that Fosters Blended Engagement (Byron P. White)

Afterword: Practice and Theory in the Service of Social Change (Peter Levine)

About the Authors
Index
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Academic Autoethnographies: Inside Teaching in Higher Education

Book
Pillay, Daisy; Naicker, Inbanathan; Pithouse-Morgan, Kathleen, eds.
2016
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LC191.9.A3 2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
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Abstract: Academic Autoethnographies: Inside Teaching in Higher Education invites readers to experience autoethnography as a challenging, complex, and creative research methodology that can produce personally, professionally, and socially useful understandings of teaching and researching in higher education. The peer-reviewed chapters offer innovative and perspicacious explorations of interrelationships between personal autobiographies, lived educational experiences, and wider social and cultural concerns, across diverse disciplines and university ...
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Abstract: Academic Autoethnographies: Inside Teaching in Higher Education invites readers to experience autoethnography as a challenging, complex, and creative research methodology that can produce personally, professionally, and socially useful understandings of teaching and researching in higher education. The peer-reviewed chapters offer innovative and perspicacious explorations of interrelationships between personal autobiographies, lived educational experiences, and wider social and cultural concerns, across diverse disciplines and university contexts. This edited book is distinctive within the existing body of autoethnographic scholarship in that the original research presented has been done in relation to predominantly South African university settings. This research is complemented by contributions from Canadian and Swedish scholars. The sociocultural, educational, and methodological insights communicated in this book will be valuable for specialists in the field of higher education and to those in other academic domains who are interested in self-reflexive, transformative, and creative research methodologies and methods. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements List of Figures

ch. 1 Writing Academic Autoethnographies: Imagination, Serendipity and Creative Interactions (Daisy Pillay, Inbanathan Naicker and Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan)
ch. 2 A Tinker’s Quest: Embarking on an Autoethnographic Journey in Learning “Doctoralness” (Liz Harrison)
ch. 3 Conversations and the Cultivation of Self-Understanding (Thelma Rosenberg)
ch. 4 Creative Self-Awareness: Conversations, Reflections and Realisations (Chris de Beer)
ch. 5 Curating an Exhibition in a University Setting: An Autoethnographic Study of an Autoethnographic Work (Lasse Reinikainen and Heléne Zetterström Dahlqvist)
ch. 6 My Mother, My Mentor: Valuing My Mother’s Educational Influence (Sizakele Makhanya)
ch. 7 From Exclusion through Inclusion to Being in My Element: Becoming a Higher Education Teacher across the Apartheid–Democratic Interface (Delysia Norelle Timm)
ch. 8 Transforming Ideas of Research, Practice and Professional Development in a Faculty of Education: An Autoethnographic Study (Lesley Wood)
ch. 9 The (In)Visible Gay in Academic Leadership: Implications for Reimagining Inclusion and Transformation in South Africa (Robert J. Balfour)
ch. 10 Informal Conceptual Mediation of Experience in Higher Education (Bert Olivier)
ch. 11 Subject to Interpretation: Autoethnography and the Ethics of Writing about the Embodied Self (Rose Richards)
ch. 12 Autoethnography as a Wide-Angle Lens on Looking (Inward and Outward): What Difference Can This Make to Our Teaching? (Claudia Mitchell)

Contributors Index
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Attuned Learning: Rabbinic Texts on Habits of the Heart in Learning Interactions

Book
Holzer, Elie
2016
Academic Studies Press, Brighton, MA
BM509.E3H65 2016
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching

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Practice-oriented educational philosopher Elie Holzer invites readers to grow as teachers, students, or co-learners through “attuned learning,” a new paradigm of mindfulness. Groundbreaking interpretations of classical rabbinic texts sharpen attention to our own mental, emotional, and physical workings as well as awareness of others within the complexities of learning interactions. Holzer integrates pedagogical pathways with ethical elements of transformative teaching and learning, the repair ...
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Practice-oriented educational philosopher Elie Holzer invites readers to grow as teachers, students, or co-learners through “attuned learning,” a new paradigm of mindfulness. Groundbreaking interpretations of classical rabbinic texts sharpen attention to our own mental, emotional, and physical workings as well as awareness of others within the complexities of learning interactions. Holzer integrates pedagogical pathways with ethical elements of transformative teaching and learning, the repair of educational disruptions, the role of the human visage, and the dynamics of argumentative and collaborative learning. Literary analyses reveal that deliberate self-cultivation not only leads to ethical and spiritual growth, but also offers a corrective for the pitfalls of the contemporary calculative modalities in educational thinking. The author speaks to the existential, humanizing art of learning and of teaching. This book can serve as a companion volume for A Philosophy of Havruta: Understanding and Teaching the Art of Text Study in Pairs, adding a new dimension of its model of joint learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Attuned Acknowledgments

Part One: Conceptual Frameworks
ch. 1 The Concept of Attuned Learning
ch. 2 Reading Rabbinic Texts for Education

Part Two: Co-Learners’ Attuned Learning
Introduction: Collaborative Learning in Rabbinic Literature
ch. 3 Self-Refinement in Argumentative Learning
ch. 4 Study Partners’ Learning

Part Three: Teachers and Students’ Attuned Learning
Introduction: Teaching in Rabbinic Literature
ch. 5 Learning Transformations
ch. 6 Disruptions and Repairs
ch. 7 The Visages of Learning Interactions

Part Four: Attuned Learning and Educational Thought
ch. 8 Attuned Learning in Contemporary Contexts

Glossary of Technical and Foreign Terms and Language Usage
Bibliography
Index
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Well-Being and Higher Education: A Strategy for Change and the Realization of Education's Greater Purposes

Book
Harward, Donald W., ed.
2016
Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C.
LA229W44.2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Religion and Academia   |   Changes in Higher Education

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The newest release from Bringing Theory to Practice, Well-Being and Higher Education, explores the multiple connections of well-being to higher education and why those connections matter—for the individual lives of students and those who teach; for the institution; and for whether or not the unique promise of higher education to a democratic society can be advanced and realized.

The publication’s ...
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The newest release from Bringing Theory to Practice, Well-Being and Higher Education, explores the multiple connections of well-being to higher education and why those connections matter—for the individual lives of students and those who teach; for the institution; and for whether or not the unique promise of higher education to a democratic society can be advanced and realized.

The publication’s thirty-five original essays and provocations—by some of the most highly respected voices within and beyond the academy—address the theoretical underpinnings and practical expressions of these connections. Articles include “Higher Education, the Struggle for Democracy, and the Possibility of Classroom Grace”; “Why Well-Being is Fundamental to Liberal Learning”; “Honoring the Humanity of Our Students”; “Thriving: Expanding the Goal of Higher Education”; and “College Makes Me Feel Dangerous: On Well-Being and Nontraditional Students.”

Well-Being and Higher Education opens the discussion on learning’s connection to well-being; responds to current challenges against the state of higher education today; and brings to the forefront a conversation considering the greater purposes of higher education and the need to preserve and revive the institution’s role to look beyond itself to a greater good. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Preface
Foreword
Introduction

PART 1: Analysis and Meaning
Essays
ch. 1 Measuring and Improving the Effect of Higher Education on Subjective Well-Being (John Bronsteen)
ch. 2 Eudaimonic Well-being and Education: Probing the Connections (Carol D. Ryff)
ch. 3 Higher Education and Education in Virtue (Barry Schwartz)
ch. 4 Higher Education, the Struggle for Democracy, and the Possibility of Classroom Grace (Henry Giroux)

Provocations
ch. 5 Against the Culture of Acquiescence: Why Students Need Liberal Learning for their own Well-Being as well as the Well-Being of Society (William M. Sullivan)
ch. 6 Is Well-Being an Individual Matter? (Kazi Joshua)
ch. 7 Understanding the Complexities of Well-Being (Elizabeth Minnich)
ch. 8 The University as the Common Enemy of Opposing Views of Well-Being (Jerzy Axer)
ch. 9 Education for Well-Being (Todd Gitlin)
ch. 10 Why Well-being is Fundamental to Liberal Learning (Alexander Astin)

PART 2: Manifestation and Implementation
Essays
ch. 11 Why Flourishing? (Corey Keyes)
ch. 12 College Makes Me Feel Dangerous: On Well-Being and Nontraditional Students (David Scobey)
ch. 13 What Constitutes Indices of Well-Being Among College Students? (Sara E. Dahill-Brown & Eranda Jayawickreme)
ch. 14 Thriving: Expanding the Goal of Higher Education (Laurie Schreiner)
ch. 15 Well-Being and Student Persistence: Reframing Student Success (Tricia Seifert)
ch. 16 What Does Doing Good Mean? Well-Being and the Civic Purpose of Higher Education (Andrew Seligsohn)

Provocations
ch. 17 Student Well-Being as a Function of Identity Development (Elsa M. Núñez)
ch. 18 Student Narratives and Well-Being (Thia Wolf & Amalia Rodas)
ch. 19 Well-Being and Agency: Political Education in a Time of Crisis (Brian Murphy)
ch. 20 Spirit, Truth, and The Bright Colors of Books: Institutional Well-Being and Productive Disorder at a Black Women’s College (Mona Taylor Phillips)

PART 3: Facilitation: Curricular, Pedagogic and Across Boundaries
Essays
ch. 21 The Well-Being University (Nance Lucas & Paul Rogers)
ch. 22 Curricular Infusion of Well-Being and Science (Heidi G. Elmendorf & Joan B. Riley)
ch. 23 Bringing Together the Humanities and the Science of Well-Being to Advance Human Flourishing (James O. Pawelski)
ch. 24 Honoring the Humanity of Our Students (David Schoem)

Provocations
ch. 25 Well-Being and Being Safe: Do Guns Change Social Interactions? A Missouri Case Study (Jonathan M. Metzl)
ch. 26 Well-Being and the Community College Mission (Amanda Hyberger)
ch. 27 The Morehouse Mystique and the Collective Well-being Imperative (John Silvanus Wilson, Jr.)
ch. 28 Mobilizing Campus Communities for Well-Being (Theodore Long)
ch. 29 Why Institutional Commitment to Well-Being Bridges the Academic and Student Affairs Divide (Kevin Kruger & Stephanie A. Gordon)
ch. 30 Distilling Career Advice from the Happiness Literature (Robert H. Frank)

PART 4: The Logic of Change: Why, What, and How?
Essays
ch. 31 Institutional Transformation in the Service of Well-being: A Cross-Cultural Perspective (Eric Lister)
ch. 32 Reinventing Higher Education for the 21st Century (Peter Leyden)
ch. 33 Transforming Learning: The LEAP Challenge and the Well-Being of Students (Carol Schneider)

Provocations
ch. 34 Well-being, Disintegration and the Rebundling of Higher Education (Randy Bass)

Contributors
About Bringing Theory to Practice
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Stop Talking: Indigenous Ways of Teaching and Learning and Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education

Book
Merculieff, Ilarion and Roderick, Libby
2013
University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK
LB2331.M47 2013
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

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For 10,000 years, Alaska’s Native peoples have survived and thrived in some of the harshest conditions in the world. During that time, they perfected teaching and learning practices that ensured the survival of their communities and the wellbeing of their natural environments. Those ancient practices offer fresh insights for educators who care about the state of our world and seek ways to make education ...
Additional Info:
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For 10,000 years, Alaska’s Native peoples have survived and thrived in some of the harshest conditions in the world. During that time, they perfected teaching and learning practices that ensured the survival of their communities and the wellbeing of their natural environments. Those ancient practices offer fresh insights for educators who care about the state of our world and seek ways to make education more relevant and engaging.

This book describes a unique higher education project that broke some difficult silences between academic and Native communities by introducing a small group of non-Native faculty members to traditional Alaska Native ways of teaching and learning. It presents a model for a Native-designed and run faculty development intensive, strategies for applying indigenous pedagogies in western learning environments, reflection on education by Alaska Native Elders, and reports from participants on what they learned and what they tried in their classrooms. It is intended to stimulate discussion and reflection about best practices in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Foreword
Who we are

ch. 1 Ground Rules
ch. 2 Indigenizing Education
ch. 3 Difficult Dialogues
ch. 4 One Day with Elders on the Land
ch. 5 Into Our Classrooms
ch. 6 Assessment
ch. 7 Pausing for Reflection

References and Recommended Reading
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How Higher Education Feels: Commentaries on Poems That Illuminate Emotions in Learning and Teaching

Book
Quinlan, Kathleen M.
2016
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LB2324.Q56 2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
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Teaching and learning in higher education can evoke strong feelings, including confusion, anxiety, boredom, curiosity, surprise and exhilaration. These emotions affect students’ learning, progress and overall success. Teachers’ emotions affect how they teach and their relationships and communication with students. Yet the emotional dimensions of teachers’ and students’ experiences are rarely discussed in the context of improving higher education.

This book addresses ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Teaching and learning in higher education can evoke strong feelings, including confusion, anxiety, boredom, curiosity, surprise and exhilaration. These emotions affect students’ learning, progress and overall success. Teachers’ emotions affect how they teach and their relationships and communication with students. Yet the emotional dimensions of teachers’ and students’ experiences are rarely discussed in the context of improving higher education.

This book addresses that gap, offering short, evocative case studies to spark conversation among university teachers. It challenges readers to reflect on how higher education feels, to explore the emotional landscape of courses and programmes they create and consider the emotional effects of messages embedded in various policies and practices.

Following the student lifecycle from enrollment to reunion, each of the main chapters contains 10 to 15 accessible, emotionally-engaging poems that serve as succinct case studies highlighting how some aspect of learning, teaching or development in higher education feels. Each chapter also contains an expert scholarly commentary that identifies emergent themes across the cases and establishes connections to theory and practice in higher education. The poems-as-case-studies are ideal for use in faculty or educational development workshops or for individual reflection. A variety of theoretical perspectives and associated reflection prompts provide lenses for variously interpreting the poems. An appendix offers suggestions for structuring case discussions as part of educational development activities.

The book promotes a person-centered discourse, giving voice to previously neglected aspects of higher education and reminding us that education is essentially a human endeavor. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
ch 1. Introduction
ch 2. Seven Stances on Emotion in Education
ch 3. Transition to Higher Education–In Search of Belonging(Expert Commentary by Terrell Strayhorn)
ch 4. Remaking Self-in-World 53 (Expert Commentary by Marcia B. Baxter Magolda)
ch 5. Taking Care of Students and Ourselves (Expert Commentary by Celia Hunt)
ch 6. Teaching in the Real World 107 (Expert Commentary by Michalinos Zembylas)
ch 7. For Love of People, Culture and Society (Expert Commentary by Monica McLean with Sarah LeFanu and Susan Bruce)
ch 8. For Love of Humanities and Arts (Expert Commentary by David Keplinger)
ch 9. For Love of Science (Expert Commentary by John Bowden and Pamela Green)
ch 10. Success and Failure – Achievement-Related Emotions (Expert Commentary by Reinhard Pekrun)
ch 11. Where We’ve Been, Where We’re Going
ch 12. Conclusion
Appendix 1: Using the Cases as Discussion Prompts – A Sample Discussion Guide
Index by Contributor
Index by Poem Title
TTR cover image

The Best Teacher Is Like a Famous Mage Everyone Knows – Just Not Any of Your Favorites

TTR
Paffenroth, Kim
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 3 (2017): 257-262
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 3
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
An extended metaphor for teaching. This essay draws out the useful parallels between the best kind of teacher and the Good Witch of the North, Glinda, from The Wizard of Oz. Unappealing to many viewers or readers of the classic children's story, Glinda offers an inspiring reminder of four important pedagogical points: (1) the master teacher always treats her student as a peer; (2) the master teacher acknowledges and encourages her student's ...
Additional Info:
An extended metaphor for teaching. This essay draws out the useful parallels between the best kind of teacher and the Good Witch of the North, Glinda, from The Wizard of Oz. Unappealing to many viewers or readers of the classic children's story, Glinda offers an inspiring reminder of four important pedagogical points: (1) the master teacher always treats her student as a peer; (2) the master teacher acknowledges and encourages her student's abilities but lets her learn how to exercise them on her own; (3) the master teacher is often not equivalent or even similar to anyone the student has encountered before; and (4) the master teacher is not a surrogate parent but a more distant figure.
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Teaching with Tenderness - Toward an Embodied Practice

Book
Thompson, Becky
2017
University of Illinois Press, Urbana, IL
LB1060.T53 2017
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
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Imagine a classroom that explores the twinned ideas of embodied teaching and a pedagogy of tenderness. Becky Thompson envisions such a curriculum--and a way of being--that promises to bring about a sea change in education.

Teaching with Tenderness follows in the tradition of bell hooks's Teaching to Transgress and Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed, inviting us to draw upon contemplative practices (...
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Imagine a classroom that explores the twinned ideas of embodied teaching and a pedagogy of tenderness. Becky Thompson envisions such a curriculum--and a way of being--that promises to bring about a sea change in education.

Teaching with Tenderness follows in the tradition of bell hooks's Teaching to Transgress and Paulo Freire's Pedagogy of the Oppressed, inviting us to draw upon contemplative practices (yoga, meditation, free writing, mindfulness, ritual) to keep our hearts open as we reckon with multiple injustices. Teaching with tenderness makes room for emotion, offer a witness for experiences people have buried, welcomes silence, breath and movement, and sees justice as key to our survival. It allows us to rethink our relationship to grading, office hours, desks, and faculty meetings, sees paradox as a constant companion, moves us beyond binaries; and praises self and community care.

Tenderness examines contemporary challenges to teaching about race, gender, class, nationality, sexuality, religion, and other hierarchies. It examines the ethical, emotional, political, and spiritual challenges of teaching power-laden, charged issues and the consequences of shifting power relations in the classroom and in the community. Attention to current contributions in the areas of contemplative practices, trauma theory, multiracial feminist pedagogy, and activism enable us to envision steps toward a pedagogy of liberation. The book encourages active engagement and makes room for self-reflective learning, teaching, and scholarship. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editor’s Foreword (AnaLouise Keating)
Acknowledgments
Introduction
ch 1. Thatched Roof, No Walls
ch 2. Inviting Bodies
ch 3. Creating Rituals
ch 4. Why We Flee
ch 5. To You, I Belong
ch 6. Our Bodies in the World

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Hope, Utopia and Creativity in Higher Education: Pedagogical Tactics for Alternative Futures

Book
Hammond, Craig A.
2017
Bloomsbury Publishing Inc.
LB2322.2.H355 2017
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Critical Pedagogies

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Reappraising ideas associated with Ernst Bloch, Roland Barthes and Gaston Bachelard within the context of a utopian pedagogy, Hope, Utopia and Creativity in Higher Education reframes the transformative, creative and collaborative potential of education offering new concepts, tactics and pedagogical possibilities. Craig A. Hammond explores ways of analysing and democratising not only pedagogical conception, knowledge and delivery, but also the learning experience, and processes ...
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Reappraising ideas associated with Ernst Bloch, Roland Barthes and Gaston Bachelard within the context of a utopian pedagogy, Hope, Utopia and Creativity in Higher Education reframes the transformative, creative and collaborative potential of education offering new concepts, tactics and pedagogical possibilities. Craig A. Hammond explores ways of analysing and democratising not only pedagogical conception, knowledge and delivery, but also the learning experience, and processes of negotiation and peer-assessment. Hammond shows how the incorporation of already existent learner hopes, daydreams, and creative possibilities can open up new opportunities for thinking about popular culture and memory, learning and knowledge, and collaborative communities of support. Drawing together theoretical and cultural material in a teaching and learning environment of empowerment, Hammond illustrates that formative articulations of alternative, utopian futures, across sociological, humanities, and education studies subjects and curricula, becomes possible.

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

Ch 1. Introduction: Critical Pedagogies – Horizons of Possibility

Part I: Tactics: Conceptualising Hope, Utopia & Creativity
Ch 2. Ernst Bloch, Hope and Utopia: The Stuff of Possibility
Ch 3. Roland Barthes: Punctum! The Death of the Author
Ch 4. Gaston Bachelard: Poetics, Space & Daydreaming

Part II: Pedagogical Strategies for Creative Possibilities
Ch 5. Dérive and Détournement: Pedagogical Strategies for Creative Engagement
Ch 6. Bye Bye Badman: The Redemption of Hope through Popular Culture
Ch 7. The Wisdom of the Crowd: Liberating Creativity

Part III: Learner Stories, Reflections and Projections
Ch 8. A Garland of Rhythms
Ch 9. Encounters, Stories, Connections
Ch 10. Beyond the Trace: Reflections from Past Learners
Ch 11. Conclsion Elpis/Eidos – Elpeidetics: Hopeful Visions?

Appendix 1: Student Contact Emails
Appendix 2: Student Information, Questionnaire and Permissions
Bibliography
Index
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Confronting Orientalism - A Self-Study of Educating through Hindu Dance

Book
MisirHiralall, Sabrina D.
2017
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
BL1108.2.M57 2017
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The author aims to use Kuchipudi Indian classical Hindu dance to educate non-Hindus about Hinduism with postcolonialism in mind. This goal arises from her dance experiences and the historical era of imperialism. Colonization occurs when those in power believe there is a need to dominate in a manner that subjugates people. Colonizers created colonies as they moved into territory because they felt there was a need to “civilize” the so-called ...
Additional Info:
The author aims to use Kuchipudi Indian classical Hindu dance to educate non-Hindus about Hinduism with postcolonialism in mind. This goal arises from her dance experiences and the historical era of imperialism. Colonization occurs when those in power believe there is a need to dominate in a manner that subjugates people. Colonizers created colonies as they moved into territory because they felt there was a need to “civilize” the so-called savages of the land. Postcolonialism is an intellectual discourse that confronts the legacy of colonialism and attempts to de-colonize. With the legacy of colonialism and a postcolonial lens in mind, some research questions arise. How does she, as a Kuchipudi dancer, use Hindu dance to educate non-Hindus about the Eastern literature of Hinduism? For non-Hindus, she feels the power of the exoticizing gaze when she dances, which might very well block the educational intention of the dance. This exoticizing gaze prevents the understanding of the traditional nature of the dance and the introduction to Hinduism as a world religion. The author’s problem is moving the exotic gaze of non-Hindus to an educational gaze that seeks to learn about the ethics of Hinduism in a manner that takes into consideration the multiple perspectives of the complex society we live in today.

Table Of Content:
Ch 1. Introduction: A Postcolonial Self-Study
Ch 2. De-Orientalized Pedagogical Spaces
Ch 3. The Gazes
Ch 4. Unveiling the Hidden Curriculum of Hindu
Ch 5. Religious Epistemology with a Focus on the Ramayana Ch 6. Conclusion

References

About the Author

Index
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Vocation Across the Academy - A New Vocabulary for Higher Education

Book
Cunningham, David S.
2017
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
LB2322.2.V64 2017
Topics: Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
Although the language of vocation was born in a religious context, the contributors in this volume demonstrate that it has now taken root within the broad framework of higher education and has become intertwined with a wide range of concerns. This volume makes a compelling case for vocational reflection and discernment in undergraduate education today, arguing that it will encourage faculty and students alike to venture out of their narrow ...
Additional Info:
Although the language of vocation was born in a religious context, the contributors in this volume demonstrate that it has now taken root within the broad framework of higher education and has become intertwined with a wide range of concerns. This volume makes a compelling case for vocational reflection and discernment in undergraduate education today, arguing that it will encourage faculty and students alike to venture out of their narrow disciplinary specializations and to reflect on larger questions of meaning and purpose.

In conversation with a growing range of scholarly resources, these essays advance the cause of vocational reflection and discernment well beyond its occasional mention in general education courses and career placement offices. The book's thirteen contributors all work in higher education, but they do so as biologists and musicians, sociologists and engineers, doctors and lawyers, college presidents and deans, and scholars of history, literature, and business administration. Together, they demonstrate that vocation has an important role to play across the entire range of traditional academic disciplines and applied fields. Regardless of major, all undergraduates need to consider their current and future responsibilities, determine the stories they will live by, and discover resources for addressing the tensions that will inevitably arise among their multiple callings.

Vocation across the Academy will help to reframe current debates about the purpose of higher education. It underscores the important role that colleges and universities can play in encouraging students to reflect more deeply on life's most persistent questions and to consider how they might best contribute to the common good. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction Language that Works (David S. Cunningham)

Part One Calling without Borders: Vocational Themes across the Academy
Ch 1. “Vocation Is Responsibility” (Margaret E. Mohrmann)
Ch 2. The Conflicts in Our Callings (Jason A. Mahn)
Ch 3. Called to Tell Our Stories (Shirley Hershey Showalter)

Part Two Calling in Context: Fields of Study as Resources for Vocational Reflection
Ch 4. Calling over the Life Course (Catherine Fobes)
Ch 5. To Whom Do I Sing, and Why? (David Fuentes)
Ch 6. Coordination, Community, Covenant (Michael E. Cafferky)
Ch 7. The Art and Science of Vocation (Celia Deane-Drummond)

Part Three Called into the Future: Professional Fields and Preparation for Life
Ch 8. Laboring in the Garden (Christine M. Fletcher)
Ch 9. Unplugging the GPS (Jeff R. Brown)
Ch 10. Of Doing and Being (Jerome M. Organ)

Part Four Vocation at Full Stretch: Overcoming Institutional Obstacles to the Language of Call
Ch 11. Colleges Have Callings, Too (David S. Cunningham)
Ch 12. Religion, Reluctance, and Conversations about Vocation (Mark U. Edwards Jr.)
Ch 13. Good Teaching (Mark R. Schwehn)

Epilogue Vocabularies of Vocation (David S. Cunningham)
TTR cover image

Conversation with 2016 American Academy of Religion Excellence in Teaching Award Winner Joanne Maguire Robinson

TTR
Robinson, Joanne Maguire; Gallagher, Eugene V.; Kwok, Pui‐lan; Pearson, Thomas
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 4 (2017): 356-371
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching

Additional Info:
This conversation between the editors of Teaching Theology and Religion and Joanne Maguire Robinson continues an occasional series of interviews that has previously featured Jonathan Z. Smith, Stephen Prothero, Mary Pierce Brosmer, and Mary Elizabeth Mullino Moore. The exchange takes as its point of departure the teaching statement that Professor Robinson produced in support of her candidacy for the American Academy of Religion's Excellence in Teaching Award. Issues addressed include ...
Additional Info:
This conversation between the editors of Teaching Theology and Religion and Joanne Maguire Robinson continues an occasional series of interviews that has previously featured Jonathan Z. Smith, Stephen Prothero, Mary Pierce Brosmer, and Mary Elizabeth Mullino Moore. The exchange takes as its point of departure the teaching statement that Professor Robinson produced in support of her candidacy for the American Academy of Religion's Excellence in Teaching Award. Issues addressed include the impact of institutional context on one's teaching, teaching the humanities in universities that are ever more focused on job training, making the transition from a graduate program focused on research to teaching undergraduates who are unlikely to take even a second course in the study of religion, and ways in which women are challenged to navigate multiple responsibilities while striving to make their way in a male‐dominated academy.