Roger S. Nam

Roger Nam, Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies, Portland Seminary. A California native, Roger lives in Lake Oswego, Ore., with his with his wife, Samantha, and their two sons, Jared and Asher. As California transplants, they freely complain about the lack of sunshine, while secretly loving the cuisine, culture and the natural beauty of the Pacific Northwest. Roger works primarily on understanding the nature of economy in the ancient Near East, particularly as reflected in biblical and extra-biblical texts. He works secondarily on Late Bronze Age civilizations, social scientific approaches to the Bible and inner-biblical exegesis. His doctoral work was at UCLA in Near Eastern Languages and Culture; he has authored Portrayals of Economic Exchange in the Book of Kings (Leiden: Brill, 2012) and is presently writing a book on the economies of Judah during the Persian period. Before entering the academic field of biblical studies, he was a pastor at Choong Hyun Presbyterian Church in Seoul, Korea (1994-1996), and a financial analyst at Maxim Integrated Products (1997-2000). Find him at http://www.georgefox.edu/seminary/faculty/bio/roger-nam.html

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For our final post, we each cover an overarching reflection or two from the 2014-15 academic year. Look for fresh content from the Wabash Center in the fall. In the meantime, feel free to visit our ongoing blog Race Matters in the Classroom or browse our Wabash Center YouTube channel. ...

Editor’s note: Today’s blog is Roger’s final individual entry for this year of Stories from the Front of the Classroom. Look for our final collaborative post on Tuesday May 19. As my yearlong sabbatical in Korea comes to a conclusion, I have been thinking about the multiple seasons ...

During my three years as a student at Chongshin Theological Seminary in Seoul, Korea, I never heard a single discussion related to diversity. The student body was roughly 90% male. Every student and faculty member was a member of the Korean Presbyterian Church, and engaged in some sort of church ministry. ...

  I’m a bit annoyed at the professorial mantra of “teaching, scholarship, and service.” I understand that categories are needed for the various steps of promotion, but I think that this grouping unnecessarily promotes an adversarial relationship between “teaching and scholarship.” The pairing feels analogous to such opposites as “Democrats ...

Last week, Kate Blanchard challenged us to think about our roles as religious educators in light of Chapel Hill. How can I, as a biblical studies professor, teach students to think critically about the events that transpired? The task seemed so overwhelming, but I was thankful to receive inspiration in ...

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