Theological School Deans

Wabash Center Blog Series for Theological School Deans

Israel Galindo
Associate Dean, Lifelong Learning at Columbia Theological Seminary.

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Theological school deans hold a unique and challenging position in the field of higher education. The work of the administrative scholar who leads from the center is incredibly complex. Few who have not held the position can appreciate fully the scope of that complexity. The press of the myriad of immediate demands leaves little room for the critical reflection that is crucial to thriving in the work.

Israel Galindo writes for the “Along the Journey” blog of the Columbia Theological Seminary, and, the Digital Flipchart blog. His most recent books include:

 

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At many schools, the new academic year will begin with an interim Dean at the helm of the academic administration office. That's not a stretch for a guess as most deans in theological schools have a 4.3 to 4.5 year tenure. In most cases the interim deans will have come out from ...

Early adopters of instructional technologies, for years, have been trying to raise awareness of the need for theological education to be adaptive (never mind innovative--that just seems not in the DNA of most theological schools) to the emerging realities of learning in higher education. Many have been warning that "the ...

Change is the constant in theological education, though it may not seem so from some vantage points. Most people in an organization desire a sense of permanence. Given the nature of the day-to-day routine, most people experience on the job, it's not difficult to appreciate they are lulled into a ...

Most theological school deans enter the office from an academic field of study---religious, theological, or ministry--distant from the field in which they now hold responsibilities: academic administration. Scholarly research soon takes a back seat to less esoteric and more pragmatic research. Spreadsheets, reports, budgets, and schedules become the daily tools ...

One of the most critical skills theological school deans need, arguably now more than ever before, is that of problem-solving. The challenges facing theological schools continue to become more technologically complex, socially entangled, costly, and multi-faceted. It is evident that most deans are not just dealing with programmatic, administrative, and ...