Role-Playing

Scholarship On Teaching - Topic: Role-Playing - 24 results

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So You Want to Use Role-Play? A New Approach in How to Plan

Book
Bolton, Gavin and Dorothy Heathcote
1999
Trentham Books, Staffordshire, UK
HD5715.B65 1999
Topics: Role-Playing

Additional Info:
Role-play has escaped from the drama studio and established itself as one of the most effective learning techniques in language, literature, history, geography and other curriculum subjects. It is also a crucial component of most management and human relationship training.

Few teachers have the expertise to maximize the potential of role-play. In this accessible volume the authors demonstrate through numerous examples, how role-play can be applied to all ...
Additional Info:
Role-play has escaped from the drama studio and established itself as one of the most effective learning techniques in language, literature, history, geography and other curriculum subjects. It is also a crucial component of most management and human relationship training.

Few teachers have the expertise to maximize the potential of role-play. In this accessible volume the authors demonstrate through numerous examples, how role-play can be applied to all kinds of interactive contexts. They provide a wealth of proven practical strategies and techniques, including sound advice on what not to do. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Examples of a Range of Genres (1)
ch. 2 Role-Work for Training Adults-Examples of a Range of Genres (2)
ch. 3 Dimensions of Role-Play
ch. 4 Sign in Role-Play
ch. 5 Who Are You Teaching?
ch. 6 How Do We Tackle Racism?
ch. 7 Role-Work With The Police on Racism-`Stereotyping'
ch. 8 Practical Issues, Leader Taking a Role And Learning Outcomes

Index
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Using Simulations to Promote Learning in Higher Education: An Introduction

Book
Hertel, John P. and Barbara J. Millis
2002
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1029.S53H48 2002
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
Simulations create and use a complete environment within which students can interact to apply theory and practice skills to real-world issues related to their discipline. Simulations constitute a powerful tool for learning. They allow teachers simultaneously to integrate multiple teaching objectives in a single process. They motivate students, provide opportunities for active participation to promote deep learning, develop interactive and communication skills, and link knowledge and theory to application.
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Additional Info:
Simulations create and use a complete environment within which students can interact to apply theory and practice skills to real-world issues related to their discipline. Simulations constitute a powerful tool for learning. They allow teachers simultaneously to integrate multiple teaching objectives in a single process. They motivate students, provide opportunities for active participation to promote deep learning, develop interactive and communication skills, and link knowledge and theory to application.

This book provides an introduction to the use of simulations - from creating simple scenarios that can be completed in a single class period, to extended, complex simulations that may encompass a semester's curriculum.

Assuming no prior experience in their use, the authors provide a recipe approach to selecting and designing scenarios for all sizes of class; offer guidance on creating simulated environments to meet learning objectives; and practical advice on managing the process in the classroom through to the crucial processes of debriefing and assessment.

The detailed concluding description of how to plan and manage a complex simulation -- complete with its sample scenario and examples of documentation - provides a rich demonstration of the process.

This book will appeal to anyone, in virtually any field of study, looking for effective ways to bridge the gap between academic learning and discipline-specific practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Why Simulations Further Educational Goals
ch. 2 What is an Education Simulation?
ch. 3 Designing an Education Simulation
ch. 4 Managing an Education Simulation
ch. 5 Debriefing an Education Simulation
ch. 6 Responsible Assessment
ch. 7 An Extended Simulation

App. A Scenario Summary: SCIC/Inglewood v. City of L.A.
App. B Single-Synopsis Scenario: Pirates Landing
App. C Selective and Sequenced Scenario: SCIC/Inglewood v. City of Los Angeles Scenario Guide and Plan
App. D The Simulation News
App. E Simulation Office Memorandum: Logs
App. F Simulation Office Memorandum: General Office Procedures
App. G Simulation Office Memorandum: Simulation Center

References
Index
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"Role Plays and Congruence: Some Suggested Teaching Principles"

Article
Goldman, Barry
2000
Conflict Management in Higher Education Report 1, no. 3 (2000)
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Ritualized Play Using Role Play to Teach Pastoral Care and Counseling"

TTR
Couture, Pamela D.
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 2 (1999): 96-102
BL41.T4
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
The author's experience of reflection-on-action and reflection-in-action in clinical supervision for counseling provides the basis for an analogous experience in the classroom that promotes the teaching of the practice of general pastoral care. A classroom ritual of role play within a specific process for reflection provides the basis for integrating theory and practice.
Additional Info:
The author's experience of reflection-on-action and reflection-in-action in clinical supervision for counseling provides the basis for an analogous experience in the classroom that promotes the teaching of the practice of general pastoral care. A classroom ritual of role play within a specific process for reflection provides the basis for integrating theory and practice.
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Creating Learning Scenarios: A Planning Guide for Adult Educators

Book
Errington, Ed
2005
CoolBooks, New Zealand
LC5225.L42E33 2005
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
This guide is intended for educators from all subject, discipline, and workplace/vocational areas of adult education. It has been written to help educators plan, deliver, evaluate and reflect on the uses of scenarios for learning and teaching purposes. The guide begins with a rationale for using ‘scenario-based learning’ – why educators employ it, some motivational qualities of scenarios (through their closeness to film and television), and a note on what ...
Additional Info:
This guide is intended for educators from all subject, discipline, and workplace/vocational areas of adult education. It has been written to help educators plan, deliver, evaluate and reflect on the uses of scenarios for learning and teaching purposes. The guide begins with a rationale for using ‘scenario-based learning’ – why educators employ it, some motivational qualities of scenarios (through their closeness to film and television), and a note on what constitutes ‘successful scenarios.’ This is followed by an in-depth look at four main scenario options, and how these can be used to achieve particular learning intentions. The guide then focuses on a systematic approach to the planning of learning scenarios including the conditions necessary to optimize success. From here attention is given to the actual delivery of scenarios and selected moments for evaluation, and reflection. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 A Rationale for Scenario-Based Learning
ch. 2 Four Main Scenario Options
ch. 3 Planning Scenario Learning
ch. 4 Delivering Scenario Learning

Evaluating and Reflecting on Scenarios
Troubleshooting/Optimising Success
References and Bibliography
Materials to Support Scenarios
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"Debating Paul"

TTR
Torbett, David
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 4 (2007): 244-250
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
This classroom note describes the lessons I learned from the use of formal debates during the two semesters I taught "Paul and Early Christianity" to undergraduates at a liberal arts college in Ohio. The purpose of the course was primarily to give students the exegetical skills to understand Paul in his own context. The secondary purpose was to help students understand the role that exegetical differences play in different moral ...
Additional Info:
This classroom note describes the lessons I learned from the use of formal debates during the two semesters I taught "Paul and Early Christianity" to undergraduates at a liberal arts college in Ohio. The purpose of the course was primarily to give students the exegetical skills to understand Paul in his own context. The secondary purpose was to help students understand the role that exegetical differences play in different moral and theological uses of Paul. I found that the debates helped students understand the controversial nature of biblical exegesis, to read the course material carefully, to develop clear arguments, and to empathize with different points of view. The debates also entailed certain problems, some of which were hindrances that needed to be corrected. However, some apparent problems actually turned out to be teaching opportunities and even served as their own solutions. Appendices, including the course syllabus and debate questions and readings, can be found at: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu/journal/article2.aspx?id=11362
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Promoting Active Learning: Strategies for the College Classroom

Book
Meyers, Chet and Thomas B. Jones
1993
Jossey-Bass Publishers, San Francisco
LB1027.23.M49 1993
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Case Study Method   |   Role-Playing   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Gives an abundance of practical advice on how active learning techniques can be used by teachers across the disciplines. Using real-life examples, the authors discuss how various small-group exercises, simulations, and case studies can be blAnded with the technological and human resources available outside the classroom. The book is engagingly written for all classroom teachers. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Gives an abundance of practical advice on how active learning techniques can be used by teachers across the disciplines. Using real-life examples, the authors discuss how various small-group exercises, simulations, and case studies can be blAnded with the technological and human resources available outside the classroom. The book is engagingly written for all classroom teachers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Understanding Active Learning
ch. 1 The Case for Active Learning
ch. 2 What Active-Learning Is and How It Works
ch. 3 Creating an Active Learning Environment

Strategies and Techniques
ch. 4 Informal Small Groups
ch. 5 Cooperative Student Projects
ch. 6 Simulations
ch. 7 Case Studies

Resources That Encourage Active Learning
ch. 8 Integrating Reading Materials and Guest Speakers
ch. 9 Using Technology Effectively
ch. 10 Developing and Assessing Instructional Expertise
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"Role-Playing and Religion: Using Games to Educate Millennials"

TTR
Porter, Adam L.
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 4 (2008): 230-235
BL41.T4
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
I have been experimenting with using role-playing and games in my religion classes for several years and have found that students respond well to these pedagogical tools and methods. After reviewing my experiences, I explore the reasons for students' positive response. I argue that role-playing games capitalize on our students' educational expectations and fondness for game-play, by drawing them into exploring significant texts and ideas. Of particular interest for religion ...
Additional Info:
I have been experimenting with using role-playing and games in my religion classes for several years and have found that students respond well to these pedagogical tools and methods. After reviewing my experiences, I explore the reasons for students' positive response. I argue that role-playing games capitalize on our students' educational expectations and fondness for game-play, by drawing them into exploring significant texts and ideas. Of particular interest for religion and theology professors, these sorts of games also encourage empathy towards other viewpoints.
Tactics cover image

"Living Wage Role Play"

Tactic
Piippin, Tina
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 238-240
BL41.T4
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: role play helps students learn how far a custodian's salary goes.
Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: role play helps students learn how far a custodian's salary goes.
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“I Did Not Wash My Feet with that Woman”: Using Dramatic Performance to Teach Biblical Studies"

TTR
Torbett, David
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 4 (2010): 307-319
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
The student dramatic performance is an effective way for undergraduates to learn biblical studies. In this article I will give an example of a dramatic performance assignment that I developed over a number of courses and used most recently and most successfully in an undergraduate course in the Hebrew Bible at a small liberal arts college in the Midwest/Appalachian region in 2008. Drawing on my own experience as a teacher, ...
Additional Info:
The student dramatic performance is an effective way for undergraduates to learn biblical studies. In this article I will give an example of a dramatic performance assignment that I developed over a number of courses and used most recently and most successfully in an undergraduate course in the Hebrew Bible at a small liberal arts college in the Midwest/Appalachian region in 2008. Drawing on my own experience as a teacher, as well as on the ideas of philosophers, educators, playwrights, and biblical scholars, I will explain why such performances are effective teaching tools. I will also give guidance on how to use dramatic performances effectively. I intend to show that the success of this assignment depends on, and ultimately validates, two basic trusts: trust in the intellectual and creative capacity of students, as well as trust in the wealth of meaning in the biblical text.
Additional Info:
Having students work in groups lets them practice the skills they are learning.
Additional Info:
Having students work in groups lets them practice the skills they are learning.
Additional Info:
In “Reacting to the Past” courses students learn by taking on roles, informed by classic texts, in elaborate games set in the past; they learn skills—speaking, writing, critical thinking, problem solving, leadership, and teamwork—in order to prevail in difficult and complicated situations. That is because Reacting roles, unlike those in a play, do not have a fixed script and outcome. While students will be obliged to adhere to ...
Additional Info:
In “Reacting to the Past” courses students learn by taking on roles, informed by classic texts, in elaborate games set in the past; they learn skills—speaking, writing, critical thinking, problem solving, leadership, and teamwork—in order to prevail in difficult and complicated situations. That is because Reacting roles, unlike those in a play, do not have a fixed script and outcome. While students will be obliged to adhere to the philosophical and intellectual beliefs of the historical figures they have been assigned to play, they must devise their own means of expressing those ideas persuasively, in papers, speeches or other public presentations; and students must also pursue a course of action they think will help them win the game.
Additional Info:
A simple "How to Use Role Playing Guide" that includes Define Objectives, Choose Context & Roles, Introducing the Exercise, Student Preparation/Research, The Role-Play,Concluding Discussion and Assessment
Additional Info:
A simple "How to Use Role Playing Guide" that includes Define Objectives, Choose Context & Roles, Introducing the Exercise, Student Preparation/Research, The Role-Play,Concluding Discussion and Assessment
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Role-Playing in the Classroom

Web
Schumaecker, Pat
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
Focus is on using Role-Play to help historical figures come alive.
Additional Info:
Focus is on using Role-Play to help historical figures come alive.
Additional Info:
Overview of How and Why to Use Role-Playing, Including a collection of role-playing scenarios
Additional Info:
Overview of How and Why to Use Role-Playing, Including a collection of role-playing scenarios
Additional Info:
Suggestions for using role-play with adult learners in online learning environments, both synchronous and asynchronous. Includes three models, student reactions, integration with Bloom's taxonomy, and assessment considerations.
Additional Info:
Suggestions for using role-play with adult learners in online learning environments, both synchronous and asynchronous. Includes three models, student reactions, integration with Bloom's taxonomy, and assessment considerations.
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Role Playing with Social Media

Web
Brumley, Mark
Topics: Using Technology   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
A short, practical introduction to using online social media tools (like Twitter) to facilitate role-playing in courses involving literature or history.
Additional Info:
A short, practical introduction to using online social media tools (like Twitter) to facilitate role-playing in courses involving literature or history.
Additional Info:
This University of Illinois resource provides all an instructor needs to get started with role-playing as an online (synchronous or asynchronous) learning activity: description, examples, goals & objectives, lesson outline and procedures, and guidelines for assessment and managing accessibility/accommodations.
Additional Info:
This University of Illinois resource provides all an instructor needs to get started with role-playing as an online (synchronous or asynchronous) learning activity: description, examples, goals & objectives, lesson outline and procedures, and guidelines for assessment and managing accessibility/accommodations.
Additional Info:
Active Learning Techniques including Peer Instruction, Class Debate, Role-Playing, Case Studies, and Creative Scenarios and Simulations.
Additional Info:
Active Learning Techniques including Peer Instruction, Class Debate, Role-Playing, Case Studies, and Creative Scenarios and Simulations.
Additional Info:
This teaching piece first invites the instructor to consider four criteria when planning a small-group discussion (class size, type of class, instructor preparedness, size of groups). Then, it briefly describes a great many variations on the small-group discussion, such as the jigsaw, the KWL, the fishbowl, the buzz group, the snowball, and several others. This lesson gives the instructor a solid start on a great many kinds of discussion activities.
Additional Info:
This teaching piece first invites the instructor to consider four criteria when planning a small-group discussion (class size, type of class, instructor preparedness, size of groups). Then, it briefly describes a great many variations on the small-group discussion, such as the jigsaw, the KWL, the fishbowl, the buzz group, the snowball, and several others. This lesson gives the instructor a solid start on a great many kinds of discussion activities.
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Wabash tree

Minds on Fire: How Role-Immersion Games Transform College

Book
Carnes, Mark C.
2014
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2395.7.C38 2014
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs   |   Role-Playing   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Why are so many students intellectually disengaged? Faculty, administrators, and tuition-paying parents have been asking this question for nearly two centuries. And the answer is always more or less the same: students are so deeply absorbed in competitive social play (fraternities, sports, beer pong, World of Warcraft, social media) that they neglect academics.

In Minds on Fire, Mark Carnes shows how ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Why are so many students intellectually disengaged? Faculty, administrators, and tuition-paying parents have been asking this question for nearly two centuries. And the answer is always more or less the same: students are so deeply absorbed in competitive social play (fraternities, sports, beer pong, World of Warcraft, social media) that they neglect academics.

In Minds on Fire, Mark Carnes shows how role-immersion games channel students’ competitive (and sometimes mischievous) impulses into transformative learning experiences. His discussion is based on interviews with scores of students and faculty who have used a pedagogy called Reacting to the Past, which features month-long games set during the French revolution, Galileo’s trial, the partition of India, and dozens of other epochal moments in disciplines ranging from art history to the sciences. These games have spread to over three hundred campuses around the world, where many of their benefits defy expectations. Students think more critically by internalizing alternative selves, and they understand the past better by filtering it through their present. Fierce competition between opposing sides leads to strong community bonds among teammates and develops speaking, writing, leadership, and problem-solving skills.

Minds on Fire is a provocative critique of educational reformers who deplored role-playing pedagogies, from Plato to Dewey to Erikson. Carnes also makes an impassioned appeal for pedagogical innovation. At a time when cost-cutting legislators and trustees are increasingly drawn to online learning, Carnes focuses on how bricks-and-mortar institutions of higher education can set young minds on fire. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Debate at Dawn

ch. 1 “All Classes Are Sorta Boring”
ch. 2 Subversive Play: The Bane of Higher Education
ch. 3 Creating an Academic Subversive Play World
ch. 4 Critical Thinking and Our Selves
ch. 5 Overcoming the Silence of the Students
ch. 6 Learning by Failing
ch. 7 Building Community and Global Citizenship
ch. 8 Inculcating Morality and Empathy (!)
ch. 9 Teaching Leadership through Teamwork
ch. 10 Teaching the Past by Getting It Wrong?
ch. 11 The Strange World outside the Box

Socrates at Sunset
Appendix: List of Reacting Games
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
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The Case Study Fishbowl

Tactic
Yust, Karen-Marie
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 2 (2015): 186
BL41.T4 v.18 no.2 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: in groups, students perform roles of different theorists as they discuss case studies in ministry.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: in groups, students perform roles of different theorists as they discuss case studies in ministry.
Additional Info:
Online learning tools that teach ethical awareness, critical thinking and ethical decision making. Several “products” are available through contract, including the Ethical Lens Inventory providing students with an awareness of their ethical orientation, Hot Topics Simulations, Ethics Exercises, and the Core Values Simulations
Additional Info:
Online learning tools that teach ethical awareness, critical thinking and ethical decision making. Several “products” are available through contract, including the Ethical Lens Inventory providing students with an awareness of their ethical orientation, Hot Topics Simulations, Ethics Exercises, and the Core Values Simulations
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The Mock Conference as a Teaching Tool: Role Play and “Conplay” in the Classroom

TTR
Ricker, Aaron, Peterfeso, Jill, Zubko, Katherine C., Yoo, William and Blanchard, Kate
2018
Teaching Theology and Religion 21, no. 1 (2018): 60-72
BL41.T4 v.21 no. 1
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Role-Playing   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
In our ostensibly secular age, discussing the real-world contexts and impacts of religious traditions in the classroom can be difficult. Religious traditions may appear at different times to different students as too irrelevant, too personal, or too inflammatory to allow them to engage openly with the materials, the issues, and each other. In this “Design & Analysis” article Aaron Ricker describes an attempt to address this awkward pedagogical situation with an ...
Additional Info:
In our ostensibly secular age, discussing the real-world contexts and impacts of religious traditions in the classroom can be difficult. Religious traditions may appear at different times to different students as too irrelevant, too personal, or too inflammatory to allow them to engage openly with the materials, the issues, and each other. In this “Design & Analysis” article Aaron Ricker describes an attempt to address this awkward pedagogical situation with an experiment in role-play enacted on the model of a mock conference. This description is followed by four short responses by authors who have experimented with this form of pedagogy themselves. In “Conplay,” students dramatize the wildly varying and often conflicting approaches to biblical tradition they have been reading about and discussing in class. They bring the believers, doubters, artists, and critics they have been studying into the room, to interact face-to-face with each other and the class. In Ricker's experience, this playful and collaborative event involves just the right amount of risk to allow high levels of engagement and retention, and it allows a wide range of voices to be heard in an immediate and very human register. Ricker finds Conplay to be very effective, and well worth any perceived risks when it comes to inviting students to take the reins.