Using Technology

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The Death of Distance: How the Communications Revolution Will Change Our Lives

Book
Cairncross, Frances
1997
Harvard Business School Publishing, Boston, MA
HE7631.C34 1997
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Geography, borders, time zones - all are rapidly becoming irrelevant to the way we conduct our business and personal lives, courtesy of the communications revolution. According to renowned Economist journalist Frances Cairncross, this "death of distance" will be the single most important economic force shaping all of society over the next half century. In her new book, Cairncross provides a trend-spotter's guide to thriving in the new millennium. Friends, colleagues, ...
Additional Info:
Geography, borders, time zones - all are rapidly becoming irrelevant to the way we conduct our business and personal lives, courtesy of the communications revolution. According to renowned Economist journalist Frances Cairncross, this "death of distance" will be the single most important economic force shaping all of society over the next half century. In her new book, Cairncross provides a trend-spotter's guide to thriving in the new millennium. Friends, colleagues, and customers could easily be anywhere - around the corner or around the world - and the new ways of communicating will effectively wipe out distance as a cost factor, indeed as a perceptible concept from our lives. Cairncross helps us to recognize the patterns and seize the opportunities in these early days of the death of distance. She describes the ways, now only dimly imaginable, that telecommunications and our altered perception of distance will transform relationships between countries and citizens, companies and employees, parents and children. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Trend-spotter's Guide to New Communications

ch. 1 The Communications Revolution
ch. 2 The Telephone
ch. 3 The Television
ch. 4 The Internet
ch. 5 Commerce and Companies
ch. 6 Competition, Concentration, and Monopoly
ch. 7 Policing the Electronic World
ch. 8 The Economy
ch. 9 Society, Culture, and the Individual
ch. 10 Government and the Nation State

Notes
Index
About the Author
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Wabash tree

Using Technology in Teaching and Learning

Book
Maier, Pat, Liz Barnett, Adam Warren, David Brunner
1998
Kogan Page, London
LB1044.87.U7 1998
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
This highly focused and practical book looks at the issues involved in integrating learning technologies within teaching and learning.

With in-text activities to encourage readers to think about what they do, the book demonstrates how academics can improve their teaching using technology. It raises issues about the educational value of using technology and considers the pressures forcing change in higher education. The book covers a wide range, from ...
Additional Info:
This highly focused and practical book looks at the issues involved in integrating learning technologies within teaching and learning.

With in-text activities to encourage readers to think about what they do, the book demonstrates how academics can improve their teaching using technology. It raises issues about the educational value of using technology and considers the pressures forcing change in higher education. The book covers a wide range, from making lecture aids to creating multimedia resources, and includes discussion of:

+educational perspectives
+developing new teaching strategies for larger student groups
+using computers to deliver teaching and learning resources
+using computers to communicate with and between students.

This book can stand alone or can be used in conjunction with Technology In Teaching And Learning. The two books cover all aspects of transforming teaching using technology. This book covers the educational issues.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

ch. 1 Educational perspectives
ch. 2 Larger student groups: developing new teaching strategies
ch. 3 Using computers to deliver teaching and learning resources
ch. 4 Using computers to communicate with and between students
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Technology in Teaching and Learning: An Introductory Guide

Book
Barnett, Brunne
1998
Kogan Page, London
LB1044.87.T43 1998
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
The inclusion of learning technologies within education at all levels is becoming a reality: it is something educators cannot ignore.

This book provides a well-written and illustrated introduction to the whole range of technologies in current use, from multimedia PCs to the Internet and the World Wide Web. This guide covers the whole gamut from choosing a computer to creating images for Web pages, from making overhead slides ...
Additional Info:
The inclusion of learning technologies within education at all levels is becoming a reality: it is something educators cannot ignore.

This book provides a well-written and illustrated introduction to the whole range of technologies in current use, from multimedia PCs to the Internet and the World Wide Web. This guide covers the whole gamut from choosing a computer to creating images for Web pages, from making overhead slides to using desktop video conferencing.

Full of activities, case studies and notes, this detailed book provides practical advice on :

+getting material into and out of your computer.
+getting connected to the Internet.
+using Internet resources.
+communicating using computers.
+using the World Wide Web.

This book stands alone or can be used in conjunction with Using Technology In Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)
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Teaching in the Information Age: The Role of Educational Technology

Book
Albright, Michael and David Graf
1992
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1028.5.T3224 1992
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
New instructional programs and services involving technology are being established which have significant implications for the way teaching and learning will be conducted in the future. This volume contains 10 papers which examine some of the current trends in instructional technology in higher education and discuss implications for teaching and learning in the postsecondary setting. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
New instructional programs and services involving technology are being established which have significant implications for the way teaching and learning will be conducted in the future. This volume contains 10 papers which examine some of the current trends in instructional technology in higher education and discuss implications for teaching and learning in the postsecondary setting. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Instructional Technology and the Faculty Member
ch. 2 New Directions in Presentation Graphics: Impact on Teaching and Learning
ch. 3 Multimedia and the Teaching-Learning Process in Higher Education
ch. 4 Academic Computing: How to Address the Teaching and Learning Challenge
ch. 5 Computer Communications and Learning
ch. 6 Distance Education: Meeting Diverse Learners' Needs in a Changing World
ch. 7 The Emerging Potential of Virtual Reality in Postsecondary Education
ch. 8 The Research Library and Emerging Information Technology
ch. 9 The Future of Campus Media Centers
ch. 10 Faculty Development's Role in Improving Undergraduate Education

Index
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"Technology and Classroom Authority"

Article
Stensaas, Starla
1999
Radical Pedagogy 1, no. 1 (1999)
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This paper discusses how the growth of technology and its impact on our communication paradigm requires a deconstruction of power and authority in the classroom. It exposes the ways in which faculty expertise in content in a technological environment, that is, being the most skilled and competent computer user in the classroom, negatively informs our understanding of classroom authority and teaching success. It argues that a creative problem-solving process is ...
Additional Info:
This paper discusses how the growth of technology and its impact on our communication paradigm requires a deconstruction of power and authority in the classroom. It exposes the ways in which faculty expertise in content in a technological environment, that is, being the most skilled and competent computer user in the classroom, negatively informs our understanding of classroom authority and teaching success. It argues that a creative problem-solving process is a more useful measure of successful teaching and calls for flexible pedagogies that focus on community-building while maintaining clear conceptual and theoretical frameworks. This paper also provides a case study of the author's approach to altering classroom authority by examining, for example, such practices as teaching multiple courses concurrently, eliciting student voice, discussing course pedagogy in the classroom, involving students in decision-making about grading and deadlines, giving students peer teaching responsibilities, and focusing on consensus as the classroom decision-making process.
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"Asking the Hard Questions About Technology Use and Education"

Article
Ehrmann, Stephen C.
1999
Change Mar/Apr (1999): 25-29
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Provides information on the availability of data on teaching, learning and technology. Details on the study questions posed by the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute which focused on results; Role of technology in the quality and cost of lower-division composition courses of the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI); Disadvantages of the IUPUI composition students; Effect of technology use on costs.
Additional Info:
Provides information on the availability of data on teaching, learning and technology. Details on the study questions posed by the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute which focused on results; Role of technology in the quality and cost of lower-division composition courses of the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI); Disadvantages of the IUPUI composition students; Effect of technology use on costs.
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"Seven Principles for Good Course Web Site Design"

Article
Creed, Tom and Kathryn Plank
1998
The National Teaching & Learning Forum 7, no. 3(1998): 8-10
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

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"PowerPoint, No! Cyberspace, Yes"

Article
Creed, Tom
1997
The National Teaching & Learning Forum 6, no. 3 (1997): 5-7
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Lectures and Large Classes

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"High-Tech Christianity"

Article
O'Donnell, James J.
1996
Lilly Endowment and Auburn Theological Seminary (1996) http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/jod/texts/lilly.html
Topics: Theological Education   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
A 1996 article commissioned by Lilly Endowment Inc. and Auburn Theological Seminary. reflecting on the significance of information technology in seminary education.
Additional Info:
A 1996 article commissioned by Lilly Endowment Inc. and Auburn Theological Seminary. reflecting on the significance of information technology in seminary education.
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Education Technology and Change: Queries

Article
Gilbert, Seve
1997
Second International Congress on Quaker Education, 1997
Topics: Theological Education   |   Using Technology

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"Ten Paradoxical Truths about Conference Software in the Classroom"

Article
Ottenhoff, John, and David Lawrence
1999
Syllabus 13, no. 3 (1999): 54-57
Topics: Using Technology

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Adult Learning and the Internet

Book
Cahoon, Brad
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5219.A38 1998
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
More than thirty-six million people in the United States are already using the Internet, and many more will join them in the years to come. Tools such as e-mail, Web browsers, and on-line conferencing present exciting opportunities for both adult learners and their instructors. The purpose of this volume of New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education is to explore the effects of the Internet on adult learning--both as that ...
Additional Info:
More than thirty-six million people in the United States are already using the Internet, and many more will join them in the years to come. Tools such as e-mail, Web browsers, and on-line conferencing present exciting opportunities for both adult learners and their instructors. The purpose of this volume of New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education is to explore the effects of the Internet on adult learning--both as that learning is facilitated through formal instruction and as it occurs spontaneously in the experiences of individuals and groups--and to provide guidance to adult and continuing educators searching for ways to use the Internet more effectively in their practice. Taken as a whole, the sourcebook provides a thorough survey of the research literature. The chapters also reflect the hard-won personal experiences of the authors, all of whom are directly involved in the use of Internet technologies to facilitate adult learning. This is the 78th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching and Learning Internet Skills (Brad Cahoon)
ch. 2 Intranets for Learning and Performance Support (Linda S. Gilbert)
ch. 3 Course Development on the World Wide Web (Kathleen P. King)
ch. 4 Adult Learners and Internet-Based Distance Education (Daniel V. Eastmond)
ch. 5 Facilitating Group Learning on the Internet (Margaret E. Holt, Pamela B. Kleiber, Jill Dianne Swenson, E. Frances Rees, Judy Milton)
ch. 6 On-Line Education: A Study of Emerging Pedagogy (Lynne Schrum)
ch. 7 Ethical Considerations in Internet-Based Adult Education (Margaret E. Holt)
ch. 8 Adult Learning and the Internet: Themes and Things to Come (Brad Cahoon)
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Teaching and Learning with Technology: A Thoughtful Consideration

Book
2000
Florida International University, Miami
LB2395.7.T4 2000
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

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Wabash tree

The Virtual University: The Internet and Resource-Based Learning

Book
Ryan, Steve, Bernard Scott, Howard Freeman, and Daxa Patel
2000
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2395.7.V57 2000
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The Virtual University provides up-to-date practical advice on a technology-based delivery system that can offer solutions to many of the problems of increasing demand for, and changing expectations about, higher education.

This book discusses the increased accessibility to the Internet, the development of new educational possibilities and how these have led to a variety of resources being used for learning. In clear and accessible terms the authors show ...
Additional Info:
The Virtual University provides up-to-date practical advice on a technology-based delivery system that can offer solutions to many of the problems of increasing demand for, and changing expectations about, higher education.

This book discusses the increased accessibility to the Internet, the development of new educational possibilities and how these have led to a variety of resources being used for learning. In clear and accessible terms the authors show how to use web sites, software, and the other resources necessary to design and deliver complete and effective virtual courses. Chapters include valuable information on how to access digital archives and databases, virtual museums, and electronic journals.

The book concludes with an eye to the future of education, and the authors highlight a number of the upcoming issues and debates that all educators will need to be aware of as education enters the next century. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the authors
Series editor's foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction

ch. 1 A changing context - education and the Internet
ch. 2 Learning, teaching and course design with resource-based learning
ch. 3 Technologies of delivery and interaction on the Internet
ch. 4 Using the Internet: course development and delivery
ch. 5 Resources on the World Wide Web
ch. 6 Computer mediated communications for collaborative learning
ch. 7 Using the Internet: Computer Aided Assessment
ch. 8 Integrated systems
ch. 9 Changing cultures in HE
ch. 10 Around the corner

Glossary
References
Subject Index
Author Index
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"Implementing the Seven Principles: Technology as Lever"

Article
Chickering, Arthur W., and Stephen C. Ehrmann
1993
American Association for Higher Education Bulletin 49, no. 2 (1993): 3-6
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This seminal 1996 essay, still widely referenced, describes some of the most effective and appropriate ways to use technology to advance the “Seven Principles for Good Practices in Undergraduate Education (the widely influential1987 Chickering and Gamson article).
Additional Info:
This seminal 1996 essay, still widely referenced, describes some of the most effective and appropriate ways to use technology to advance the “Seven Principles for Good Practices in Undergraduate Education (the widely influential1987 Chickering and Gamson article).
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"Extending the Classroom Walls Electronically"

Article
Creed, Tom
1997
in New Paradigms for College Teaching (Edina, MN: Interaction Book Company, 1997), 149-84
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

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"PowerPoint Is Not Evil"

Article
Rocklin, Tom
1999
Center for Teaching, University of Iowa (1999) http://www.ntlf.com/html/sf/notevil.htm
Topics: Using Technology   |   Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
Short essay acknowledging the critique of PowerPoint, but arguing for its more effective use.
Additional Info:
Short essay acknowledging the critique of PowerPoint, but arguing for its more effective use.
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"The Scholarly Use of Technology in Instruction: A Case Studies Approach to New Millennium Issues"

Article
Kuhlenschmidt, Sally
2000
Paper presented at the meeting of the Professional Organizational & Development Network in Higher Education, Vancouver, BC (2000)
Topics: Using Technology

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"Using Computers in Theological Education: Rules of Thumb"

Article
Cormode, Scott
1999
Theological Education 36, no. 1: 101-115
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
There has been little systematic thought about the pedagogical issues that technology creates in theological schools. Addressed both theological institutions and individual professors, this paper addresses basic pedagogical questions. What are the most effective ways to employ technology in the classroom? Are there guidelines for distinguishing productive activities from merely flashy ones? And, what "rules of thumb" exist for enabling novices to make the best use of computer technology for ...
Additional Info:
There has been little systematic thought about the pedagogical issues that technology creates in theological schools. Addressed both theological institutions and individual professors, this paper addresses basic pedagogical questions. What are the most effective ways to employ technology in the classroom? Are there guidelines for distinguishing productive activities from merely flashy ones? And, what "rules of thumb" exist for enabling novices to make the best use of computer technology for theological learning?
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"Getting Technical: Information Technology in Seminaries"

Article
Williams, Raymond B.
2001
Christian Century (Feb 7-14, 2001): 14-15
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Discusses information technology in theological schools. Challenges in the implementation of technology; Sample of theological resources; Factors that drive the creation of virtual seminaries.
Additional Info:
Discusses information technology in theological schools. Challenges in the implementation of technology; Sample of theological resources; Factors that drive the creation of virtual seminaries.
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Interactive Learning: Vignettes from America's Most Wired Campuses

Book
Brown, David G., ed.
2000
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB1028.3.I5663 2000
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Interactive Learning is a rich collection of best practices in the use of instructional technology from 36 of America's most wired campuses. In 93 brief, informal, and practical vignettes, professors show how they transformed courses with technology, discuss how the technology affected teaching and learning, and distill important lessons learned. The accounts are written in lay language and are brimming with information and examples that will help anyone from the novice to ...
Additional Info:
Interactive Learning is a rich collection of best practices in the use of instructional technology from 36 of America's most wired campuses. In 93 brief, informal, and practical vignettes, professors show how they transformed courses with technology, discuss how the technology affected teaching and learning, and distill important lessons learned. The accounts are written in lay language and are brimming with information and examples that will help anyone from the novice to the computer-savvy who is interested in classroom applications of technology.

The book is divided into two parts. Part 1 provides a useful overview of the educational philosophies that are driving the redesign of college courses, the most effective technology tools available, and a clear and concise list of lessons learned from the 93 vignettes. Part 2 is the heart of the volume the compelling vignettes that candidly describe and assess real experiments with the use of technology by real professors and students.

The vignettes are organized into broad discipline categories: physical sciences and engineering; computer science, information systems, and mathematics; biological sciences and medicine; social sciences; fine arts; and literature, languages, writing, and humanities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1 Introduction
Part 2 Vignettes

ch. 1 Physical Sciences and Engineering
ch. 2 Computer Science, Information Systems and Mathematics
ch. 3 Biological Sciences and Medicine
ch. 4 Social Sciences
ch. 5 Fine Arts
ch. 6 Literature, Languages, Writing and Humanities

Indexes
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Wabash tree

Web Teaching Guide: A Practical Approach to Creating Course Web Sites

Book
Horton, Sarah
2000
Yale University Press, New Haven, CT
LB1044.87.H68 2000
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Prompted by student enthusiasm and by the opportunity to enhance college courses, more and more faculty members in higher education are incorporating the Web into their teaching. This helpful book is designed to answer the questions an educator who lacks extensive technical experience asks about creating a Web site: Why should I use the Web? How can the Web enhance my teaching? How do I make a Web site? How ...
Additional Info:
Prompted by student enthusiasm and by the opportunity to enhance college courses, more and more faculty members in higher education are incorporating the Web into their teaching. This helpful book is designed to answer the questions an educator who lacks extensive technical experience asks about creating a Web site: Why should I use the Web? How can the Web enhance my teaching? How do I make a Web site? How can I make it effective?

Multimedia specialist Sarah Horton draws on extensive experience as a faculty Web consultant to explain the entire process of creating a site, from initial planning through site assessment. She examines the strengths of the Web and its many possible uses. More than just a way to distribute course handouts, a Web site can provide richer content, multiple expressions of an idea, interactivity, opportunities for collaboration and customization, and flexibility for updates. Horton urges teachers to consider the ever-growing possibilities that information technology presents. Her focus is on practical matters related to creating Web-based instructional materials. With case studies throughout, she discusses the planning process, content creation, site development, and finally site implementation in the curriculum. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Planning
ch. 2 Developing content
ch. 3 Creating the site
ch. 4 Using the site
ch. 5 Site assessment

Bibliography
Index
Illustration credits
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"The Impact of Technology on Teaching"

Article
Betsch, David
2002
The Faculty Network, Special Issue (Spring 2002)
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

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"The Impact of Technology on Teaching"

Article
Curran, Jim, and Ron Pitt
2002
The Faculty Network, Special Issue Spring 2002)
Topics: Using Technology   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

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"The Impact of Technology on Teaching"

Article
Morrison, Julie
2002
The Faculty Network, Special Issue (Spring 2002)
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

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"Unrolling Roles in Techno-Pedagogy: Toward New Forms of Collaboration in Traditional College Settings"

Article
Cook-Sather, Alison
2001
Innovative Higher Education 26, no. 2 (2001): 121-139
Topics: Using Technology   |   Changes in Higher Education

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"Why Bother?"

Article
Gilbert, Steven W.
2001
The Teaching, Learning and Technology Group (2001) http://www.tltgroup.org/gilbert/WhyBother.htm
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Brief, schematic argument for the ways in which new information technologies can improve student learning.
Additional Info:
Brief, schematic argument for the ways in which new information technologies can improve student learning.
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"The Electronic Classroom: Using E-mail in the Classroom"

Article
Nelson, Lance E.
2001
Religious Studies News 16, no. 1 (2001): 17
Topics: Using Technology

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"Using Learning Styles to Adapt Technology for Higher Education"

Article
O'Connor, Terry
1997
Center for Teaching and Learning, Indiana State University (1997)
Topics: Online Learning   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Using Technology

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"What to Do About the New Crunch: Ten Most Obvious Cost-Effective Strategies for Improving Teaching and Learning with Technology"

Article
Gilbert, Steven W.
2002
The Teaching, Learning and Technology Group (2002) http://www.tltgroup.org/CostEffective/TenBest.htm
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
not currently available on the web
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not currently available on the web
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Using Film to Teach New Testament

Book
Boyer, Mark G.
2002
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
BS2530.B65 2002
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Boyer describes a teaching method which uses popular movies to explore themes encountered in the New Testament. Topics include, for example, martyrdom in Witness and The Gospel of Luke and apocalypse in Waterworld and The Book of Revelation. A modernized film interpretation of Shakespeare's Rome. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Boyer describes a teaching method which uses popular movies to explore themes encountered in the New Testament. Topics include, for example, martyrdom in Witness and The Gospel of Luke and apocalypse in Waterworld and The Book of Revelation. A modernized film interpretation of Shakespeare's Rome. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Teaching Literature
The New Testament is Literature
Literary Redaction Criticism: The Dreamer of Oz: L. Frank Baum and The Wizard of Oz
The Elements of a Story: The Wizard of Oz
Teaching Mark's Gospel
The Good Mother
Phenomenon
Sommersby
The Shawshank Redemption
Teaching Matthew's Gospel
Being There
Willow
Teaching Luke's Gospel
Witness
Teaching John's Gospel
Jeremiah Johnson
Powder
The Shawshank Redemption
Teaching the Acts of the Apostles
The Mission
Teaching Pauline Theology
Regarding Henry
The Doctor
Teaching the Book of Revelation
Pale Rider
The Milagro Beanfield War
Waterworld
Teaching the "Vineyard" Metaphor
A Walk in the Clouds
Teaching Hermeneutics
Romeo and Juliet
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Effective Teaching with Technology in Higher Education: Foundations for Success

Book
Bates, A. W. (Tony) and Gary Poole
2003
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.B378 2003
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Effective Teaching with Technology in Higher Education draws on current research and best practice to show how to integrate technology into teaching in higher education. This book provides a comprehensive theoretical and pedagogical foundation for helping instructors make critical decisions about the use of technology within the college curriculum.

The book is essential reading for both new and experienced instructors contemplating using technology for teaching in higher education. (...
Additional Info:
Effective Teaching with Technology in Higher Education draws on current research and best practice to show how to integrate technology into teaching in higher education. This book provides a comprehensive theoretical and pedagogical foundation for helping instructors make critical decisions about the use of technology within the college curriculum.

The book is essential reading for both new and experienced instructors contemplating using technology for teaching in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables, Figures, and Exhibits
Preface

ch. 1 The Challenge of Technology
ch. 2 Introductory Remarks on Knowledge, Learning, and Teaching
ch. 3 The Role of Media and Technology in Education
ch. 4 A Framework for Selecting and Using Technology
ch. 5 The Organization of Teaching with Technology
ch. 6 Planning for Teaching with Technology
ch. 7 Approaches to the Design of Technology-Based Learning
ch. 8 Course Development and Maintenance
ch. 9 Supporting Technology-Based Learning
ch. 10 Change and Stability in Teaching with Technology

References
Index
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Visual Pedagogy: Media Cultures in and Beyond the Classroom

Book
Goldfard, Brian
2002
Duke University Press, Durham, NC
LB1043.G57 2002
Topics: Using Technology   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
In classrooms, museums, public health clinics and beyond, the educational uses of visual media have proliferated over the past fifty years. Film, video, television, and digital media have been integral to the development of new pedagogical theories and practices, globalization processes, and identity and community formation. Yet, Brian Goldfarb argues, the educational roles of visual technologies have not been fully understood or appreciated. He contends that in order to understand ...
Additional Info:
In classrooms, museums, public health clinics and beyond, the educational uses of visual media have proliferated over the past fifty years. Film, video, television, and digital media have been integral to the development of new pedagogical theories and practices, globalization processes, and identity and community formation. Yet, Brian Goldfarb argues, the educational roles of visual technologies have not been fully understood or appreciated. He contends that in order to understand the intersections of new media and learning, we need to recognize the sweeping scope of the technologically infused visual pedagogy both in and outside the classroom. From Samoa to the United States mainland to Africa and Brazil, from museums to city streets, Visual Pedagogy explores the educational applications of visual media in different institutional settings during the past half century. Looking beyond the popular media texts and mainstream classroom technologies that are the objects of most analyses of media and education, Goldfarb encourages readers to see a range of media subcultures as pedagogical tools. He illuminates the educational uses of visual technologies in schools and other venues. The projects he analyzes include media produced by AIDS/HIV advocacy groups and social services agencies for classroom use in the 90s; documentary and fictional cinemas of West Africa used by the French government and then by those resisting it; museum exhibitions; and TV Anhembi, a municipally sponsored collaboration between the television industry and community-based videographers in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Combining media studies, pedagogical theory, and art history, and including an appendix of visual media resources and ideas about the most productive ways to utilize visual technologies for educational purposes, Visual Pedagogy will be useful to educators, administrators, and activists. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: An Ethos of Visual Pedagogy

Pt. 1 Historicizing New Technologies in the Classroom
ch. 1 Media and Global Education: Television's Debut in Classrooms from Washington, D.C., to American Samoa
ch. 2 Students a Producers: Critical Video Production
ch. 3 Critical Pedagogy at the End of the Rainbow Curriculum: Media Activism in the Sphere of Sex Ed
ch. 4 Peer Education and Interactivity: Youth Cultures and New Media Technologies in Schools and Beyond

Pt. 2 Visual Pedagogy beyond Schools
ch. 5 Museum Pedagogy: The Blockbuster Exhibition as Educational Technology
ch. 6 A Pedagogical Cinema: Development Theory, Colonialism, and Postliberation African Film
ch. 7 Local Television and Community Politics in Brazil: Sao Paulo's TV Anhembi

App An Annotated List of Media Organizations, Distributors, and Resources
Notes
Bibliography
Index
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"Using the Web in Religious Studies Courses"

TTR
Moore, Rebecca
2001
Journal of Religious and Theological Information 3, no. 3/4 (2001): 139-150
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

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"'Hybrid' Teaching Seeks to End the Divide Between Traditional and Online Instruction"

Article
Young, Jeffrey R.
2002
The Chronicle of Higher Education, 22 March 2002
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Focuses on the introduction of hybrid teaching which aims to end the gap between traditional and online instruction in the U.S. Advantages of hybrid courses and hybrid degree programs; Colleges offering hybrid instruction; Skepticism on online education projects.
Additional Info:
Focuses on the introduction of hybrid teaching which aims to end the gap between traditional and online instruction in the U.S. Advantages of hybrid courses and hybrid degree programs; Colleges offering hybrid instruction; Skepticism on online education projects.
Cover image

Teaching With Technology

Book
Lloyd, Les, ed.
1997
Information Today, Medford, NJ
LB2395.7 .T425 1997
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Higher education faculty detail techniques used to enhance the classroom experience with multimedia technology, offering case studies of actual programs at institutions including Wellesley College, Washington State University, City University Business School, and New England Conservatory. Topics include the affect of computers on college writing, integrating electronic media into the art and design classroom and into the health information management curriculum, developing a multimedia computer/video environment in a community ...
Additional Info:
Higher education faculty detail techniques used to enhance the classroom experience with multimedia technology, offering case studies of actual programs at institutions including Wellesley College, Washington State University, City University Business School, and New England Conservatory. Topics include the affect of computers on college writing, integrating electronic media into the art and design classroom and into the health information management curriculum, developing a multimedia computer/video environment in a community college, and establishing a networked lab. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 When everyone buys in : a case study of technological change (Carole Carmody)
ch. 2 The affect of computers on college writing : a view from the field (Jo Ellen Winters)
ch. 3 A professional development needs-assessment of computing and information technology : a case study at Lock Haven University (Punnipa Hossain, Robert O. Little)
ch/ 4 Computing in the curriculum at Wellesley College (Alan Shuchat)
ch. 5 Some experiences integrating electronic media into the art and design curriculum (Wayne Draznin)
ch. 6 Developing a multimedia computer/video environment in a comprehensive community college (S. James Corvey)
ch. 7 MacCycle : an extensible multimedia for teaching the physiology and histology of the menstrual cycle (James F. Aiton, Susan Whiten, Nils S. Peterson)
ch. 8 Multimedia : a systematic approach to its placement in education (Robert A. Saldarini)
ch. 9 Software for sociology : a tool for a more effective learning paradigm (Christopher Sullivan)
ch. 10 DATASIM : a general purpose data simulator (Drake R. Bradley)
ch. 11 An integrative approach to writing with computers (W. Brett McKenzie)
ch. 12 Chronicles from a U.S. Department of Education Title III grant (Jeanne Buckley, Marilyn Puchalski)
ch. 13 Learning information systems through a mail-enabled business simulation : the case of Trent Engineering (Clive Holtham, Martin Rich)
ch. 14 Integrating technology into the health information management curriculum (Dorine Bennett, Paulette Wiesen)
ch. 15 The computer-mediated English department (Patricia Ericsson, Eric Johnson)
ch. 16 Using technology in a computer concepts course (James S. McKeown, Lynette Molstad)
ch. 17 Energies Plus, Inc. (N. Faye Angel)
ch. 18 TransIT and refocused strategies in teaching advanced translation (Doug Thompson)
ch. 19 Chemistry and art : developing a new course with NSF grants (John L. Bordley, Jr.)
ch. 20 Evolution of the classroom with new technology (Abigail M. Thomas)
ch. 21 CAL heuristics in the United Kingdom's UMIST (Marie C. Hayet)
ch. 22 Medaille College : integrating computers into course syllabi (Donna Marie Kaputa in collaboration with Douglas Anderson, Carol Harrison, and Janice Schlegel)
ch. 23 Computer information systems and art : the development of a symbiotic relationship (Ellen M. Dauwer)
ch. 24 Student Information Skills Project (Susan P. Fowell)
ch. 25 A case study in the use of Union College's Teagle Writing Lab (Najmuddin Shaik, Dianne Ferris)
ch. 26 Using computer software in a literature class : rereading a text with SEEN by Conduit (Nancy Enright)
ch. 27 Professors as developers : exploiting the NeXTstep environment (Joel M. Smith)
ch. 28 Establishing a networked lab with focus on integrating computers into the writing curriculum (Constance Chismar)
ch. 29 The value of portable computers in the classroom (Garrett Bozylinsky, William Creighton)
ch. 30 Music, computers, and learning at New England Conservatory (Paul Burdick, Lyle Davidson)
ch. 31 Academic computing case history : establishment of microcomputer access at a community college (Dick W. Birkholz)
ch. 32 Development of an advanced technology classroom (Eugene P. Buccini, Ronald G. Benson)
ch. 33 The advanced technology classroom (Marla J. Fischer)
ch. 34 A syllabus for a World Wide Web writing workshop (Jack R. Kayser)
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Reversing the Lens: Ethnicity, Race, Gender, and Sexuality Through Film

Book
Xing, Jun, and Lane Ryo Hirabayashi, eds.
2003
University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, OK
PN1995.9.M6 X56 2003
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Using Technology   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Reversing the Lens brings together noted scholars in history, anthropology, sociology, ethnic studies, and film studies to promote film as a powerful educational tool that can be used to foster cross-cultural communication with respect to race and ethnicity. Through such films as Skin Deep, Slaying the Dragon, and Mississippi Masala, contributors demonstrate why and how visual media help delineate various forms of "critical visual thinking" and examine how racialization is ...
Additional Info:
Reversing the Lens brings together noted scholars in history, anthropology, sociology, ethnic studies, and film studies to promote film as a powerful educational tool that can be used to foster cross-cultural communication with respect to race and ethnicity. Through such films as Skin Deep, Slaying the Dragon, and Mississippi Masala, contributors demonstrate why and how visual media help delineate various forms of "critical visual thinking" and examine how racialization is either sedimented or contested in the popular imagination. Reversing the Lens is relevant to anyone who is curious about how video and film can be utilized to expose ethnicity, race, gender, and sexuality as social constructions subject to political contestation and in dialogue with other potential forms of difference. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction (Lane Ryo Hirabayashi and Jun Xing)
ch. 2 Media Empowerment, Smashing Stereotypes, and Developing Empathy (Jun Xing)
ch. 3 Video Constructions of Asian America: Teaching Monterey's Boat People (Malcolm Collier and Lane Ryo Hrabayashi)
ch. 4 American Indians in Film: Thematic Contours of Cinematic Colonization (Ward Churchill)
ch. 5 El Espejo/The Mirror: Reflections of Cultural Memory (Carmen Huaco-Nuzum)
ch. 6 Mississippi Masala: Crossing Desire and Interest (Adeleke Adeeko)
ch. 7 Skin Deep: Using Video to Teach Race and Critical Thinking (Brenda J. Allen)
ch. 8 Confronting Gender Stereotypes of Asian American Women: Slaying the Dragon (Marilyn C. Alquizola and Lane Ryo Hirabayashi)
ch. 9 Screens and Bars: Confronting Cinemea Representations of Race and Crime (Lee Bernstein)
ch. 10 The Queering of Chicana Studies: Philosophy, Text, and Image (Elisa Facio)
ch. 11 The Matrix: Using American Popular Film to Teach Concepts of Eastern Mysticism (Jeffrey B. Ho)
ch. 12 Beyond the Hollywood Hype: Unmasking State Oppression Against People of Color (Brett Stockdill, Lisaa Sun-Hee, and David N. Pellow)
ch. 13 Self, Society, and the "Other": Using Film to Teach About Ethnicity and Race (Jun Xing)
ch. 14 The Issue of Reinscription: Pedagogical Responses
Selected Filmography (Lane Ryo Hirabayashi and Marilyn C. Alquizola)

List of Contributors
Index
Journal cover image

Technology and Educational Practices (pdf)

Journal Issue
2005
Theological Education 41, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4020 .T48 2005
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2005-theological-education-v41-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
ISSUE FOCUS
Planning for Innovation: A Framework for Reflective Practice, Victor Klimoski
What Does All This (Technology) Mean for the Church?, John P. Jewell
Not Just One More Good Idea: A Reflection on the Integration of Digital Technology in Theological Education, Jan Viktora
Theological Reflection, Theology and Technology: When Baby Boomer Theologians Teach Generations X & Y, Edward Foley
Implications of a Digital Age for Theological Education, William J. Hook
Mapping Structural Change, David Neidert and John Aukerman
What Difference Does it Make? Digital Technology in the Theological Classroom, Mary Hess
Low Cost Things One Can Do that Have an Impact, James Rafferty
A New Tool or a New Way of Doing Theological Education?, Steve Delamarter

OPEN FORUM
Tethered Together: A Study of the Relationship between a Seminary and its Denomination, David G. Forney
Is Preaching Taught or Caught? How Practitioners Learn, Ronald Allen
Revisiting H. Richard Niebuhr’s The Purpose of the Church and Its Ministry: Love of God and Neighbor as the Goal of Theological Education, Frederick W. Guyette
Considering Consortia, William R. Myers
Article cover image

"10 Techniques to Change Your Teaching"

Article
2005
The Chronicle of Higher Education, 51, no. 42, June, 2005
Topics: Using Technology   |   Learning Designs   |   Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
American colleges and universities have invested millions of dollars in equipment and "smart classrooms," but the jury is still out on whether computers have led to a revolutionary improvement in the quality of teaching.

Professors are finding new ways to lecture, to run lab sessions, and to interact with students, however. The Chronicle dispatched reporters to classrooms across the country to find some of the most promising or ...
Additional Info:
American colleges and universities have invested millions of dollars in equipment and "smart classrooms," but the jury is still out on whether computers have led to a revolutionary improvement in the quality of teaching.

Professors are finding new ways to lecture, to run lab sessions, and to interact with students, however. The Chronicle dispatched reporters to classrooms across the country to find some of the most promising or unusual methods of teaching with technology.

Some of the courses involve teams of professors and designers, as well as serious investments of time and money, while others are techniques that individual professors have developed using tools that are common on most campuses. No matter how much support they have, the professors have hit their share of roadblocks. But these wired teachers say students are responding positively as class sessions become more interactive. (From the Publisher)
TTR cover image

"Making the Most of a Good Story: Effective Use of Film as a Teaching Resource for Ethics"

TTR
Marshall, Ellen Ott
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 93-98
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Many faculty members reach for powerful clips or entire films to give background information to a topic or to provoke discussion. We do this because we have a sense that such materials engage students in a way that more theoretical texts, speculative discussions, or even case studies do not. In the field of ethics, however, one meets resistance to employing narratives that are too engaging. The wary ethicist doubts that ...
Additional Info:
Many faculty members reach for powerful clips or entire films to give background information to a topic or to provoke discussion. We do this because we have a sense that such materials engage students in a way that more theoretical texts, speculative discussions, or even case studies do not. In the field of ethics, however, one meets resistance to employing narratives that are too engaging. The wary ethicist doubts that a medium that manipulates the viewer, engages the emotions, and elicits a personal connection to the characters is the best resource for ethical reflection. This paper argues that film, like other narrative forms, is indeed an appropriate medium for teaching ethics and suggests methods for doing so effectively.
TTR cover image

"Discoveries and Dangers in Teaching Theology with PowerPoint"

TTR
Pauw, Amy Plantinga
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 1 (2002): 39-41
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
PowerPoint can be a genuine aid to theological education by providing a medium for employing visual art in the classroom. But PowerPoint does not and should not replace the ordinary stuff of teaching and learning theology: reading, lecturing, discussing texts, and writing papers. Like any other tool, its pedagogical benefit depends on discerning use. Particular care must be used to blunt PowerPoint's tendency to produce a disembodied, decontextualized learning environment. ...
Additional Info:
PowerPoint can be a genuine aid to theological education by providing a medium for employing visual art in the classroom. But PowerPoint does not and should not replace the ordinary stuff of teaching and learning theology: reading, lecturing, discussing texts, and writing papers. Like any other tool, its pedagogical benefit depends on discerning use. Particular care must be used to blunt PowerPoint's tendency to produce a disembodied, decontextualized learning environment. Using PowerPoint to incorporate art into theology classes is not merely a strategy for making verbal points more powerfully. Art can sometimes go where theological words cannot.
TTR cover image

"Ancient Christianity in Cyberspace: A Digital Media Lab for Students"

TTR
Royalty, Robert M.
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 1 (2002): 42-48
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
"Ancient Christianity, Ancient Cities – and Cyberspace?" was a teaching experiment combining the study of theology, religion, history, and new computer technologies. The course included both a regular class meeting and a concurrent digital media lab. All student assignments were digital. Students came in with a wide variety of technical knowledge and backgrounds in classical and religious studies. In addition to learning about the history and theology of early Christianity, students ...
Additional Info:
"Ancient Christianity, Ancient Cities – and Cyberspace?" was a teaching experiment combining the study of theology, religion, history, and new computer technologies. The course included both a regular class meeting and a concurrent digital media lab. All student assignments were digital. Students came in with a wide variety of technical knowledge and backgrounds in classical and religious studies. In addition to learning about the history and theology of early Christianity, students became critical learners of technology within the ideal of a liberal arts education.
TTR cover image

"Webs of Connection Using Technology in Theological Education"

TTR
Litchfield, Randy G.
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 2 (1999): 103-108
BL41.T4
Topics: Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
The author uses a variety of Internet-related technologies to support pedagogical approaches where students become conscious of their role in the production of knowledge in a public and critically collaborative environment. These approaches also seek to address theory/practice dichotomies by using the Internet to bridge academic and parish contexts. The article describes and assesses three courses utilizing web-based technology. One course features student portfolios posted on a website with ...
Additional Info:
The author uses a variety of Internet-related technologies to support pedagogical approaches where students become conscious of their role in the production of knowledge in a public and critically collaborative environment. These approaches also seek to address theory/practice dichotomies by using the Internet to bridge academic and parish contexts. The article describes and assesses three courses utilizing web-based technology. One course features student portfolios posted on a website with peer- and parish-based reviewers. A second course features student creation of the course text with contributions from external professionals. A third course features a ministry resource website created by students.
TTR cover image

"'Cyber' Barth"

TTR
McKim, Donald K.
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 3 (1998): 183-186
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
This article describes a study of the theology of Karl Barth carried out by four students at Memphis Theological Seminary who used the Internet and e-mail in addition to other means for learning. Dr. Donald K. McKim taught the class and here describes the way in which the class was structured, how students used the World Wide Web, a Newsgroup in which students participated, and their use of e-mail to ...
Additional Info:
This article describes a study of the theology of Karl Barth carried out by four students at Memphis Theological Seminary who used the Internet and e-mail in addition to other means for learning. Dr. Donald K. McKim taught the class and here describes the way in which the class was structured, how students used the World Wide Web, a Newsgroup in which students participated, and their use of e-mail to amplify discussion. McKim indicates the advantage of using these resources which introduced students to a "new world" of media and unique resources, linked them with others throughout the world who also had an interest in Barth, and provided an enhanced means of communication for the students with each other and with the professor. He also provides further reflections about the experience in relation to seminary teaching.
TTR cover image

"The Method of Interactive Writing and University Pedagogy"

TTR
Boisvert, Mathieu
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 1 (1998): 58-61
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
For many years now, specialists in learning have remarked that a specific method of writing is used for the elaboration of interactive multimedia systems. This method of writing, which I qualify as interactive, has a primary objective: facilitating information access for the user. In this paper I propose an analysis of the different elements that characterize this method of writing and, more specifically, the different ways in which this new ...
Additional Info:
For many years now, specialists in learning have remarked that a specific method of writing is used for the elaboration of interactive multimedia systems. This method of writing, which I qualify as interactive, has a primary objective: facilitating information access for the user. In this paper I propose an analysis of the different elements that characterize this method of writing and, more specifically, the different ways in which this new method can be integrated into the elaboration of magistral university courses without using any added computer technology. The professor would then resemble a multimedia system while the students would be the users of this system. This new method of writing and pedagogical structure would be highly propitious for the stimulation of exchange and interactivity, while leaving students the possibility to choose a structure of the presentation that best fits the group. However, for this to happen we must first envisage the possibility of adapting certain multimedia learning methods, recognized as functional, to the more conventional learning methods that the classroom represents.
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Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms

Book
Richardson, Will
2006
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1044.87.R53 2006
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
This book brings teachers a bold vision and on-the-ground Monday morning practicality. It will move educators to think differently about technology’s potential for strengthening students' critical thinking, writing, reflection, and interactive learning. Will Richardson demystifies words like "blog," "wiki," and "aggregator" making classroom technology an easily accessible component of classroom research, writing, and learning.

This guide demonstrates how Web tools can generate exciting new learning formats, and ...
Additional Info:
This book brings teachers a bold vision and on-the-ground Monday morning practicality. It will move educators to think differently about technology’s potential for strengthening students' critical thinking, writing, reflection, and interactive learning. Will Richardson demystifies words like "blog," "wiki," and "aggregator" making classroom technology an easily accessible component of classroom research, writing, and learning.

This guide demonstrates how Web tools can generate exciting new learning formats, and explains how to apply these tools in the classroom to engage all students in a new world of synchronous information feeds and interactive learning. With detailed, simple explanations, definitions and how-tos, critical information on Internet safety, and helpful links, this exciting book opens an immense toolbox, with specific teaching applications for

* Web logs, the most widely adopted tool of the read/write Web
* Wikis, a collaborative Webspace for sharing published content
* Rich Site Summary (RSS), feeding specific content into the classroom
* Aggregators, collecting content generated via the RSS feed
* Social bookmarking, archiving specific Web addresses
* Online photo galleries
This book makes it possible for anyone, no matter how inexperienced, to harness this amazing technology for the classroom today! (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

ch. 1 The Read/Write Web
A New World Wide Web
Extraordinary Changes
The Read/Write Web in Education
Digital Natives
The Toolbox
Keeping Students Safe
Summary

ch. 2 Weblogs: Pedagogy and Practice
Weblogs in Schools
The Pedagogy of Weblogs
Blogging Across the Curriculum
Blogs as Resources
Classroom Uses of Weblogs
Standards for the English Language Arts Sponsored by NCTE and IRA

ch. 3 Weblogs: Get Started!
Start Small
Blogging With Students
Blog Safety
Blog Software
Blogging Step-by-Step
Making a Blog Roll

ch. 4 Wikis: Easy Collaboration for All
The Challenge of Wikipedia in Schools
Wikis in Schools
Examples of Wikis in K-12 Education
Wiki Tools for Schools
Other Wiki Tools and Resources

ch. 5 RSS: The New Killer App for Educators
Setting Up an RSS Feed Reader
Finding and Adding Feeds
Using RSS Feeds in the Classroom
Combining RSS Feeds
Including RSS Feeds in Your Weblog
Reading RSS Feeds

ch. 6 The Social Web: Learning Together
Social Bookmarking Services

ch. 7 Fun With Flickr: Creating, Publishing, and Using Images Online
Introducing Flickr
Learning With Flickr
Flickr in Practice
More Flickr Fun

ch. 8 Podcasting and Screencasting: Multimedia Publishing for the Masses
Podcasting
Podcasts and Schools
Getting Started With Podcasting
Screencasting

ch. 9 What It all Means
New Literacies
The Big Shifts
Just the Beginning

Epilogue: The Classroom of the Read/Write Web
References
Further Resources
Index
Journal cover image

Technology, Teaching, and Learning: Reports from the Field (pdf)

Journal Issue
2007
Theological Education 42, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v.42 no.2 2007
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2007-theological-education-v42-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
ISSUE FOCUS
Cross Cultural Learning as a Paradigm for Encountering Educational Technology, Gayle Gerber Koontz
Technology in the Classroom: A Missiologist's Perspective, Arun W. Jones
Using Film to Teach Theology, Linda Mercadante,br> Beyond Entertainment: A Rationale for the Pedagogy of Technology in the Classroom, Kenneth D. Snyder
Information Technology for Theological Education at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Elizabeth Van Kleek
Technology Development at Ashland Theological Seminary, Vickie Taylor and Dale Stoffer
The Times, They Are A-Changin': How a Training Seminar for Online Education Changed a Seminary One Faculty Member at a Time, Jeff Groeling and Lester Ruth
A Case Narrative of Bethel Seminary's InMinistry Program, Kristin M. Anderson
Taking Control of our Future: Kenrick-Glennon Seminary, Sebastian Mahfood
Establishing Social Presence in Online Courses: Why and How, Mary Hinkle Shore
Web Site Design as a Dynamic Companion in Developing Learning Resources, Barbara Anne Keely

OPEN FORUM
A Dozen Qualities of the Good Dean, Mark G. Toulouse
Using Participatory Action Research in Seminary Internships
What's in an Instrument? The Answer from the Profiles of Ministry Program, Francis A. Lonsway,br>
Cover image

Film & Religion: An Introduction

Book
Flesher, Paul V. M. and Robert Torry
2007
Abingdon Press, Nashville, TN
PN1995.5.F54 2007
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Is there such a thing as too much historical context? Flesher and Torry, both academics, make an important point at the start of these loosely confederated essays about the religious themes of American major-release films since World War II: that it is crucial to understand films in the historical context in which they were written and released. Fair enough, but the execution can be clunky and obvious: historical overviews about ...
Additional Info:
Is there such a thing as too much historical context? Flesher and Torry, both academics, make an important point at the start of these loosely confederated essays about the religious themes of American major-release films since World War II: that it is crucial to understand films in the historical context in which they were written and released. Fair enough, but the execution can be clunky and obvious: historical overviews about religion in America could be more seamlessly integrated into the much better discussions of various films, ranging from the overtly religious (The Last Temptation of Christ; The Ten Commandments; Little Buddha) to the prophetically spiritual (Field of Dreams; Close Encounters of the Third Kind). The book is worth it for the film discussions, because whether they are analyzing supernatural horror flicks like The Exorcist and The Omen or dissecting the surprising Hindu themes latent in The Legend of Bagger Vance, Flesher and Torry often have valuable and incisive observations about the ways films both reflect and shape religious culture. Though of use primarily for the college classroom (and with a teacher's preface to this end), serious students of film and religion will discover interpretive nuggets. (June) (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface for Teachers
Introduction

ch. 1 Christmas Films: The Search for Meaning
...How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1967)

Section One: Ultimate Destruction and the Cold War in the 1950s
ch. 2 Religion, Science Fiction, and the Bomb
...When Worlds Collide (1951)
...The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)
ch. 3 Making Rome Christian
...Quo Vadis (1951)
...The Robe (1953)
ch. 4 The Ten Commandments and America's Fight against Tyranny
...The Ten Commandments (1956)

Section Two: Filming Jesus
ch. 5 The Messiah of Peace
...King of Kings (1961)
ch. 6 The Accidental Superstar
...Jesus Christ, Superstar (1973)
ch. 7 Tormenting Christ
...The Last Temptation of Christ (1988)
ch. 8 Violence and Redemption
...The Passion of the Christ (2004)

Section Three: Varieties of Religion in American Film
ch. 9 The Devil: Screening Humanity's Enemy
...The Exorcist (1973)
...The Omen (1976)
ch. 10 God as Alien: Humanity's Helper
...2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
...Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)
ch. 11 Religion and Scandal, Crime and Innocence
...Agnes of God (1985)
...The Apostle (1998)
ch. 12 The Religion of Baseball
...The Natural (1984)
...Field of Dreams (1989)

Section Four: World Religions in Film
ch. 13 American Dharma
...Little Buddha (1993)
...The Legend of Bagger Vance (2000)
ch. 14 Jewish Films: Finding the Path Between Torah and Modernity
...The Chosen (1982)
...The Quarrel (1990)
ch. 15 Islam and Fanaticism: Only in the Eye of the Beholder?
...Destiny (1997)
...My Son the Fanatic (1997)

Appendix
Filmography
Cover image

Faith and Film: A Guidebook for Leaders

Book
McNulty, Edward N.
2007
Westminster John Knox Press, Louisville, KY
BV1643.M36 2007
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Growing numbers of church leaders are discovering that many films are able to impact viewers with gospel truths almost as well as a good sermon. Former pastor and longtime reviewer of films Ed McNulty offers this insightful guide to help church leaders enter into dialogue with contemporary films. McNulty carefully crafts a theology of movies and then provides practical suggestions for creating and leading movie discussions with groups. In addition, ...
Additional Info:
Growing numbers of church leaders are discovering that many films are able to impact viewers with gospel truths almost as well as a good sermon. Former pastor and longtime reviewer of films Ed McNulty offers this insightful guide to help church leaders enter into dialogue with contemporary films. McNulty carefully crafts a theology of movies and then provides practical suggestions for creating and leading movie discussions with groups. In addition, he provides people from all across the theological spectrum with a framework to understand whether the overall message of a film outweighs concerns over profanity, violence, or sex in the film. He concludes by introducing twenty-seven films and including provocative questions about each that will prepare leaders to assemble and facilitate a group. Popular films explored include The Color Purple; Crash; Hotel Rwanda; The Matrix; Million Dollar Baby, O Brother, Where Art Thou? and Shawshank Redemption. Faith and Film accessibly and comprehensively helps readers and moviegoers develop "eyes that see and ears that hear" how God's messages of hope and love are revealed in contemporary films. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1: Looking for the Light of the World While Sitting in the Dark
Introduction: Developing a Theology of Seeing
What Has Jerusalem to Do with Hollywood?
Four Types of Films
More on Parable and Film
Help for Becoming Your Own Critic
Settings for a Film Discussion
Using the Guides in This Book

Part II: Movie Discussion Guides
American Beauty
Amistad
Babe: Pig in the City
Beyond the Sea
Chocolat
The Color Purple
Crash
Dogma
Erin Brockovich
Final Solution
The Grapes of Wrath
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
Hotel Rwanda
The Insider
The Iron Giant
Les Miserables
The Matrix
Million Dollar Baby
O Brother, Where Art Thou?
Pieces of April
Road to Perdition
Shawshank Redemption
The Spitfire Grill
Tender Mercies
The Thin Red Line
To End all Wars
Walking across Egypt

Appendix 1: List of Films and Their DVD Distributors
Appendix 2: Church and Theater

Notes
Bibliography
Cover image

Teaching Religion and Film

Book
Watkins, Gregory J., ed.
2008
Oxford University Press, Oxford
PN1995.9.T37 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
In a culture increasingly focused on visual media, students have learned not only to embrace multimedia presentations in the classroom, but to expect them. Such expectations are perhaps more prevalent in a field as dynamic and cross-disciplinary as religious studies, but the practice nevertheless poses some difficult educational issues — the use of movies in academic coursework has far outpaced the scholarship on teaching religion and film. What does it mean ...
Additional Info:
In a culture increasingly focused on visual media, students have learned not only to embrace multimedia presentations in the classroom, but to expect them. Such expectations are perhaps more prevalent in a field as dynamic and cross-disciplinary as religious studies, but the practice nevertheless poses some difficult educational issues — the use of movies in academic coursework has far outpaced the scholarship on teaching religion and film. What does it mean to utilize film in religious studies, and what are the best ways to do it?
In Teaching Religion and Film, an interdisciplinary team of scholars thinks about the theoretical and pedagogical concerns involved with the intersection of film and religion in the classroom. They examine the use of film to teach specific religious traditions, religious theories, and perspectives on fundamental human values. Some instructors already teach some version of a film-and-religion course, and many have integrated film as an ancillary to achieving central course goals. This collection of essays helps them understand the field better and draws the sharp distinction between merely "watching movies" in the classroom and comprehending film in an informed and critical way. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction Teaching Religion and Film Gregory J. Watkins

Part I Establishing Shot: Viewing the Field of Religion and Film
ch. 1 What Are We Teaching When We Teach "Religion and Film"? (William L. Blizek and Michele Desmarais)
ch. 2 Teaching Religion and Film: A Fourth Approach (Conrad Ostwalt)

Part II Film and the Teaching of Religious Traditions
ch. 3 Teaching Biblical Tourism: How Sword-and-Sandal Films Clouded My Vision (Alice Bach)
ch. 4 Designing a Course on Religion and Cinema in India (Gayatri Chatterjeee)
ch. 5 Buddhism, Film, and Religious Knowing: Challenging the Literary Approach to Film (Francisca Cho)
ch. 6 The Pedagogical Challenges of Finding Christ Figures in Film (Christopher Deacy)
ch. 7 Film and the Introduction to Islam Course (Amir Hussain)
ch. 8 Is It All about Love Actually? Sentimentality as Problem and Opportunity in the Use of Film for Teaching Theology and Religion (Clive Marsh)
ch. 9 Women, Theology, and Film: Approaching the Challenge of Interdisciplinary Teaching (Gaye Williams Ortiz)

Part III The Religious Studies Approach
ch. 10 Seeing Is Believing, but Touching's the Truth: Religion, Film, and the Anthropology of the Senses (Richard M. Carp)
ch. 11 There Is No Spoon? Teaching The Matrix, Postperennialism, and the Spiritual Logic of Late Capitalism (Gregory Grieve)
ch. 12 Teaching Film as Religion (John Lyden)
ch. 13 Filmmaking and World Making: Re-Creating Time and Space in Myth and Film (S. Brent Plate)
ch. 14 Introducing Theories of Religion through Film: A Sample Syllabus (Greg Watkins)

Part IV The Values Approach
ch. 15 Touching Evil, Touching Good (Irena S. M. Makarushka)
ch. 16 Teaching Ethics with Film: A Course on the Moral Agency of Women (Ellen Ott Marshall)
ch. 17 Searching for Peace in Films about Genocide (Jolyon Mitchell)

Index
Article cover image

"Multimedia Pedagogy and Multicultural Education For The New Millennium"

Article
Hammer, Rhonda, and Kellner, Douglas
2000
Taylor & Francis Group, New York, NY
Topics: Using Technology   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
New technologies provide tools to reconstruct education as we undergo dramatic technological revolution and enter a new millennium. In particular, multimedia technologies, like CD-ROMs and Internet websites produce new resources and material for expanding education. In examining the Shoah Project—which documents the experiences of survivors of the Holocaust—, we demonstrate how this project provides important tools for historical and religious education, as well as making the reality of the ...
Additional Info:
New technologies provide tools to reconstruct education as we undergo dramatic technological revolution and enter a new millennium. In particular, multimedia technologies, like CD-ROMs and Internet websites produce new resources and material for expanding education. In examining the Shoah Project—which documents the experiences of survivors of the Holocaust—, we demonstrate how this project provides important tools for historical and religious education, as well as making the reality of the Holocaust vivid and compelling in the contemporary moment. It is within this context that we discuss how multimedia can provide an important supplement to multicultural education, bringing the experiences of marginal and oppressed groups to the mainstream. Yet we also argue that effective multimedia education also requires historical contextualization, the skills of media literacy, and engaging pedagogical presentation in the classroom to make such new technologies effective as a supplement to traditional classroom and print-based education. Hence, we show how educational technologies, such as those produced by the Shoah Foundation and the UCLA Film and Television Archives, can help reconstruct education for the next century.
TTR cover image

"E-jing: Using Information Technology to Teach about Chinese Religions"

TTR
Deitrick, Jim
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 3 (2008): 153-158
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This article discusses ways in which modern online information technologies may be used to enhance students' understanding of Chinese religions and religious texts. This discussion is predicated upon a model of linguistic communication that places significant weight on the structures and "sedimented presuppositions" of language in determining the meanings of discourse. Assignments are presented that use online technologies to give even beginning students insight into the presuppositions of Chinese religious ...
Additional Info:
This article discusses ways in which modern online information technologies may be used to enhance students' understanding of Chinese religions and religious texts. This discussion is predicated upon a model of linguistic communication that places significant weight on the structures and "sedimented presuppositions" of language in determining the meanings of discourse. Assignments are presented that use online technologies to give even beginning students insight into the presuppositions of Chinese religious discourse, while also allowing them to explore, kinesthetically, one of Confucianism's central practices, the reading and writing of Chinese characters. Appendices providing additional materials related to the course are available online: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu/journal/article2.aspx?id=14153.
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Cognitive Style of PowerPoint: Pitching Out Corrupts Within

Book
Edward R. Tufte
2006
Graphics Press LLC, Cheshire, CT
P93.5.T838 2006
Topics: Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
In corporate and government bureaucracies, the standard method for making a presentation is to talk about a list of points organized onto slides projected up on the wall. For many years, overhead projectors lit up transparencies, and slide projectors showed high-resolution 35mm slides. Now "slideware" computer programs for presentations are nearly everywhere. Early in the 21st century, several hundred million copies of Microsoft PowerPoint were turning out trillions of slides ...
Additional Info:
In corporate and government bureaucracies, the standard method for making a presentation is to talk about a list of points organized onto slides projected up on the wall. For many years, overhead projectors lit up transparencies, and slide projectors showed high-resolution 35mm slides. Now "slideware" computer programs for presentations are nearly everywhere. Early in the 21st century, several hundred million copies of Microsoft PowerPoint were turning out trillions of slides each year.

Alas, slideware often reduces the analytical quality of presentations. In particular, the popular PowerPoint templates (ready-made designs) usually weaken verbal and spatial reasoning, and almost always corrupt statistical analysis. What is the problem with PowerPoint? And how can we improve our presentations?

This slim volume from legendary "information design" guru Edward Tufte answers these questions with Tufte's usual wit, concision, and style. (From the Publisher)
Tactics cover image

"The Religious Web-Quest"

Tactic
Woodard, Randall, and Woodard, Rose
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 139-139
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: providing a series of web pages for students to visit and respond to in online posts.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: providing a series of web pages for students to visit and respond to in online posts.
TTR cover image

"Teaching the Bible and Film: Pedagogical Promises, Pitfalls, and Proposals"

TTR
Rindge, Matthew S., Runions, Erin, and Ascough, Richard S.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 140-155
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
This article begins by recognizing the increasing use of film in Religion, Theology, and Bible courses. It contends that in many Biblical Studies (and Religious Studies and Theology) courses, students are neither taught how to view films properly, nor how to place films into constructive dialogue with biblical texts. The article argues for a specific pedagogical approach to the use of film in which students learn how to view a ...
Additional Info:
This article begins by recognizing the increasing use of film in Religion, Theology, and Bible courses. It contends that in many Biblical Studies (and Religious Studies and Theology) courses, students are neither taught how to view films properly, nor how to place films into constructive dialogue with biblical texts. The article argues for a specific pedagogical approach to the use of film in which students learn how to view a film closely, in its entirety, on its own terms, and in its own voice. Viewing a film in this manner by attending to its aesthetic integrity is a prerequisite for constructing a fruitful dialogue between films and biblical texts. The essay concludes with three specific examples of what this approach might look like. Two responses follow the essay; Erin Runions of Pomona College considers two additional learning goals we might consider, and Richard Ascough of Queens University at Kingston helpfully distinguishes a range of possible pedagogical goals for introducing film into the Biblical Studies classroom.
Tactics cover image

"Concept Mapping"

Tactic
Pui-lan, Kwok
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 263-265
BL41.T4
Topics: Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: overview and resources for creating concept maps to organize ideas.
Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: overview and resources for creating concept maps to organize ideas.
Cover image

Rethinking Learning for a Digital Age:How learners are shaping their own experiences

Book
Sharpe, Rhona, Beetham, Helen, and Freitas Sara de
2010
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1028.5.R438 2010
Topics: Online Learning   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Using Technology   |   Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
Rethinking Learning for a Digital Age addresses the complex and diverse experiences of learners in a world embedded with digital technologies. The text combines first-hand accounts from learners with extensive research and analysis, including a developmental model for effective e-learning, and a wide range of strategies that digitally-connected learners are using to fit learning into their lives. A companion to Rethinking Pedagogy for a Digital Age (2007), this book focuses on ...
Additional Info:
Rethinking Learning for a Digital Age addresses the complex and diverse experiences of learners in a world embedded with digital technologies. The text combines first-hand accounts from learners with extensive research and analysis, including a developmental model for effective e-learning, and a wide range of strategies that digitally-connected learners are using to fit learning into their lives. A companion to Rethinking Pedagogy for a Digital Age (2007), this book focuses on how learners’ experiences of learning are changing and raises important challenges to the educational status quo.

Moves beyond stereotypes of the net generation to explore the diversity of e-learning experiences today • *Analyses learners' experiences holistically, across the many technologies and learning opportunities they encounter • *Reveals digital-age learners as creative actors and networkers in their own right, who make strategic choices about their use of digital applications and learning approaches

Today’s learners are active participants in their learning experiences and are shaping their own educational environments. Professors, learning practitioners, researchers, and policy-makers will find Rethinking Learning for a Digital Age invaluable for understanding the learning experience, and shaping their own responses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
An introduction to rethinking learning

Part I. New contexts for learning
ch. 1 The influence of pervasive and integrative tools on learners’ experiences and expectations of study
ch. 2 Social networking: key messages from the research
ch. 3 Managing study and life with technology
ch. 4 Constructs that impact the Net Generation’s satisfaction with online learning
ch. 5 Provisionality, play and pluralism in liminal spaces

Part II. Frameworks for understanding learners’ experiences
ch. 6 Understanding students’ uses of technology for learning: towards creative appropriation
ch. 7 Expanding conceptions of study, context and educational design
ch. 8 How learners change: critical moments, changing minds
ch. 9 Listening with a different ear: understanding disabled students’ relationship with technologies
ch. 10 Strengthening and weakening boundaries: students negotiating technology mediated learning

Part III. New learning practices
ch. 11 The changing practices of knowledge and learning
ch. 12 Analysing digital literacy in action – a case study of a problem orientated learning process
ch. 13 Collaborative knowledge building
ch. 14 ‘But it’s not just developing like a learner, it’s developing as a person’: Reflections on e-portfolio based learning
ch. 15 Skills and strategies for e-learning in a participatory culture

Index
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Learning to Learn with Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT): A Practical Guide for Academic Success

Book
Kitsantas, Anastasia, and Dabbagh, Nada
2009
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB2395.7.K57 2009
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
The purpose of this practical guide is to facilitate college students' academic success by fostering self-regulated learning skills or learning to learn through the use of Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT). It enables the college instructor, online instructor, instructional developer, or educator to envision, plan for, and implement customized instructional and curricular designs that foster learning to learn and motivate students to take ownership of their own learning. Specifically, this book ...
Additional Info:
The purpose of this practical guide is to facilitate college students' academic success by fostering self-regulated learning skills or learning to learn through the use of Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT). It enables the college instructor, online instructor, instructional developer, or educator to envision, plan for, and implement customized instructional and curricular designs that foster learning to learn and motivate students to take ownership of their own learning. Specifically, this book demonstrates how college faculty who use Learning Management Systems (LMS) as well as emerging technologies such as Web 2.0 applications and social software can design learning tasks and course assignments that support and promote student: goal setting use of effective task strategies self-monitoring and self-evaluation time management help seeking motivation and affect Given the emphasis on retention of freshmen as a measure of institutional effectiveness, the focus on student success, and the increasing use of ILT in higher education, this book fulfills a dire need in the literature on the integration of technology and self-regulated learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction to Learning How to Learn
ch. 2 Defining Integrative Learning Technologies
ch. 3 Self-Regulatory Training with Integrative Learning Technologies: A Theory-Based Model
ch. 4 Goal Setting
ch. 5 Task Strategies
ch. 6 Self-Monitoring and Self-Evaluation
ch. 7 Time Management
ch. 8 Help Seeking
ch. 9 Motivation, Affect, and Learning Communities
ch. 10 New Approaches to Integrative Learning Technologies
TTR cover image

“There Is a Lot of Junk on the Web!”: Using Web Site Evaluation in an Introductory Religion Course"

TTR
Junior, Nyasha, and Edward, Amy
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 2 (2011): 175-181
BL41.T4
Topics: Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This essay describes a web site evaluation project which served as the final assignment for an undergraduate “Introduction to Religion” course. The essay discusses lessons learned from the design and implementation of this web-based research assignment over three consecutive semesters. It includes insights from an instructor and a reference librarian who collaborated on this project.
Additional Info:
This essay describes a web site evaluation project which served as the final assignment for an undergraduate “Introduction to Religion” course. The essay discusses lessons learned from the design and implementation of this web-based research assignment over three consecutive semesters. It includes insights from an instructor and a reference librarian who collaborated on this project.
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The Professor's Guide to Taming Technology: Leveraging Digital Media, Web 2.0

Book
Ping, Kathleen P., Cox, Thomas D., eds.
2011
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB2395.7.P76 2011
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
A Volume in the Series: Instructional Innovations in Teaching and Learning Series Editor(s): Kathleen P. King, University of South Florida and Mark Gura, Fordham University This book is provided as a guide, encouragement and handbook for faculty to introduce digital media in language you can understand and provide strategies and activities you can quickly assimilate into your teaching. We are excited that more people will be able to benefit ...
Additional Info:
A Volume in the Series: Instructional Innovations in Teaching and Learning Series Editor(s): Kathleen P. King, University of South Florida and Mark Gura, Fordham University This book is provided as a guide, encouragement and handbook for faculty to introduce digital media in language you can understand and provide strategies and activities you can quickly assimilate into your teaching. We are excited that more people will be able to benefit from the powerful help and guidance contained in this book. We are even more exhilarated as we anticipate how each of you will discover applications and new directions we would never anticipate, and look forward. We look forward to your innovations as you use the material you discover here.

This book responds to the needs of our changing world and students by revealing innovative technology applications and how faculty are and can use digital media in teaching in higher education because faculty make the quickest changes and learn how to do it best. It is a valuable resource for faculty from faculty, because it allows the sharing of successful teaching experiences with digital media with our worldwide colleagues so they may modify it, extend it, and improve it.

Moreover, in our work with faculty across all disciplines, we also find that many struggle to think about teaching in ways in which they can incorporate technology meaningfully. While we might be experts in our discipline (chemistry, philosophy, music, etc) due to the curriculum of terminal degrees, we might not have strong preparation in instructional design.

We have been fortunate to bring together faculty experts across different disciplines to specifically speak about how and why to use digital media in higher education settings. We realize we are asking you to think about your way of teaching with new ideas and strategies. Therefore, we try to illustrate them with clear examples. These different approaches include clear descriptions of what these activities look like, why to develop and implement them, and how to do so for your specific needs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: Bridging the Gap of Change
Acknowledgments

Part I Vision and Foundations
ch. 1 Using Digital Media in Higher Education: An Adult Learning Perspective (Thomas D. Cox and Kathleen P. King)
ch. 2 Voice Empowerment, and Impact: Using Digital Technologies in the Classroom (Kathleen P. King)

Part II Digital Media
ch. 3 Podcasting: Learning on Demand and Content Creation (Kathleen P. King)
ch. 4 Using Online Asynchronous Audio Communication in Higher Education (Jody Oomen-Early, Mary Bold, Kristin L. Wiginton, and Tara Gallien)
ch. 5 Video Development and Instructional Use: Simple and Powerful Options (Kathleen P. King and Thomas D. Cox)
ch. 6 Blogging as a Reflective Practice in the Graduate Classroom (Teresa J. Carter)
ch. 7 Narrated Digital Presentations: An Educator's Journey and Strategies for Integrating and Enhancing Education (Brian W. Donavant)
ch. 8 The Use of wikis for Collaboration in Higher Education (Pooneh Lari)
ch. 9 Virtual Office Hours (April Williams and Thomas D. Cox)
ch. 10 Skype and Other Virtual Conferencing Tools (Ellen Manning)
ch. 11 Facebook Goes on "Prac": Using Social Networking Tools to Support Students Undertaking Teaching Practicium (Jennifer Duncan-Howell and Rebecca English)

Part III Special Topics
ch. 12 Revelations of Adaptive Technology Hiding in Your Operating System (Kathleen P. King)
ch. 13 Accessible Technology for Online and Face-to-Face Teaching (Sheryl Burgstahler and Alice AndersonMike Litzkow)
ch. 14 Incorporating 3D Virtual Laboratory Specimen to Enhance Online Science: Examples from Paleontology and Biology (Kevin F. Downing and Jennifer K. Holtz)
ch. 15 A Guide to Using Technology in the History Classroom (Keith Sisson and Kathleen P. King)

Part IV Thinking Ahead
ch. 16 Action Steps for Continued Faculty Success in Taming Technology ( Kathleen P. King and Thomas D. Cox)

The Authors and Contributors
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Computer Games and Instruction

Book
Tobias, Sigmund, and Fletcher, J. D., eds.
2011
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB1029.G3C67 2011
Topics: Online Learning   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
There is intense interest in computer games. A total of 65 percent of all American households play computer games, and sales of such games increased 22.9 percent last year. The average amount of game playing time was found to be 13.2 hours per week. The popularity and market success of games is evident from both the increased earnings from games, over $7 Billion in 2005, and from the fact that over 200 academic institutions worldwide now ...
Additional Info:
There is intense interest in computer games. A total of 65 percent of all American households play computer games, and sales of such games increased 22.9 percent last year. The average amount of game playing time was found to be 13.2 hours per week. The popularity and market success of games is evident from both the increased earnings from games, over $7 Billion in 2005, and from the fact that over 200 academic institutions worldwide now offer game related programs of study.

In view of the intense interest in computer games educators and trainers, in business, industry, the government, and the military would like to use computer games to improve the delivery of instruction. Computer Games and Instruction is intended for these educators and trainers. It reviews the research evidence supporting use of computer games, for instruction, and also reviews the history of games in general, in education, and by the military. In addition chapters examine gender differences in game use, and the implications of games for use by lower socio-economic students, for students’ reading, and for contemporary theories of instruction. Finally, well known scholars of games will respond to the evidence reviewed. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Section I - Introduction To Computer Games
ch. 1 Introduction ( Sigmund Tobias and J.D. Fletcher)
ch. 2 Searching for the Fun in Learning: A Historical Perspective on the Evolultion of Educational Video Games (Alex Games and Kurt D. Squire)
ch. 3 Using Video Games as Educational Tools in Healthcare (Janis A. Cannon- Bowers)
ch. 4 After the Revolution: Game-Informed Training in the U.S. Military (Ralph Ernest Chatham)
ch. 5 Multi-User Games and Learning: A Review of the Research (Jonathon Richter and Daniel Livingstone)

Section II - Review of The Literature and Reactions
ch. 6 Review of Research on Computer Games (Sigmund Tobias, J.D. Fletcher, David Yun Dai, and Alexander P. Wind)
ch. 7 Reflections on Empirical Evidence on Games and Learning (James Paul Gee)
ch. 8 Developing a Research Agenda for Educational Games and Simulations ((Chris Dede)
ch 9 Comments on Research Comparing Games to Other Instructional Methods (Marc Prensky)

Section III - Computer Games Issues
ch. 10 Multimedia Learning and Games (Richard E. Mayer)
ch. 11 Action Game Play as a Tool to Enhance Perception, Attention and Cognition (Ashley F. Anderson and Daphne Bavelier)
ch. 12 Developing an Electronic Game for Vocabulary Learning: A Case Study (Michael L. Kamil and Cheryl Taitague)
ch. 13 Instructional Support in Games (Henny Leemkuil and Ton de Jong)
ch. 14 Implications of Constructivism for the Design and Use of Serious Games (Jamie R. Kirkley, Thomas M. Duffy, Sonny E. Kirkley, and Deborah L. H. Kremer)
ch. 15 Implications of Game Use for Explicit Instruction )Putai Jin and Renae Low)
ch. 16 Cost Analysis in Assessing Games for Learning (J. D. Fletcher)
ch. 17 Using Computer Games to Teach Adult Learners Problem Solving (Joan (Yuan-Chung) Lang and Harold F. O’Neil)
ch. 18 Gender and Gaming (Elisabeth R. Hayes)
ch. 19 Computer Games and Opportunity to Learn: Implications for Teaching Students from Low Socioeconomic Backgrounds (David Yun Dai and Alexander P. Wind)

Section IV - Evaluations and Summing Up
ch. 20 Stealth Assessments in Computer-Based Games to Support Learning (Valerie J. Shute)
ch. 21 Computer Games, Present and Future ( Sigmund Tobias and J. D. Fletcher)

Author Identification
TTR cover image

"Narratives or Sources? Active Learning and the Teaching of Ancient Jewish History and Texts"

TTR
Satlow, Michael L.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 1 (2012): 48-60
BL41.T4 v.15 no. 1 2012
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
During my career, I have regularly taught a survey course on the history of Jews and Judaism in the Persian, Greek, and early Roman periods (ca. 520 BCE – 70 CE). Student performance in the course has long concerned and puzzled me. By the end of the course students demonstrated familiarity with the narratives and concepts we covered, but most did not really “think historically.” They had great difficulties using and applying the ...
Additional Info:
During my career, I have regularly taught a survey course on the history of Jews and Judaism in the Persian, Greek, and early Roman periods (ca. 520 BCE – 70 CE). Student performance in the course has long concerned and puzzled me. By the end of the course students demonstrated familiarity with the narratives and concepts we covered, but most did not really “think historically.” They had great difficulties using and applying the historical tools they learned to new situations and evidence. In 2006 and again in 2010 I overhauled the course not only to improve it, but also to figure out how my students learned history. Using a wiki exercise, I traced how students learned and then applied these insights the next time I taught the course. In this essay I report on what I learned.
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The Multiplayer Classroom: Designing Coursework as a Game, 1st Edition

Book
Sheldon, Lee
2012
Course Technology/Cenage Learning, Boston, MA
LB1027.23.S53 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Discover how to engage your students and raise their grades and attendance in your classroom. The Multiplayer Classroom: Designing Coursework as a Game is your detailed guide to designing any structured learning experience as a game. Written for professional educators or those learning to be educators, here are the tools to engage and excite students by using principles learned in the development of popular video games. Suitable for use in ...
Additional Info:
Discover how to engage your students and raise their grades and attendance in your classroom. The Multiplayer Classroom: Designing Coursework as a Game is your detailed guide to designing any structured learning experience as a game. Written for professional educators or those learning to be educators, here are the tools to engage and excite students by using principles learned in the development of popular video games. Suitable for use in the classroom or the boardroom, the book features a reader-friendly style that introduces game concepts and vocabulary in a logical way. You don't need any experience making games or even playing games to use this book. Yet, you will learn how to create multiplayer games for any age on any subject. Bring your classroom into the 21st century! (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part I: Introduction
ch. 1 Level 1: "Good Morning. You All Have an F"
ch. 2 Level 2: Games in the Classroom

Part II: Multiplayer Classrooms
ch. 3 Level 3: Theory and Practice of Game Design Syllabi
ch. 4 Level 4: Theory and Practice of Game Design Class
ch. 5 Case Histories Introduction
ch. 6 Case History 1: Marked Tree High School
ch. 7 Level 5: Multiplayer Game Design Syllabi
ch. 8 Level 6: Multiplayer Game Design Class
ch. 9 Case History 2: University of Arizona South: Teaching with Technology
ch. 10 Level 7: Introduction to Game Design Syllabus
ch. 11 Level 8: Introduction to Game Design Class
ch. 12 Case History 3: Louisiana State University: Introduction to the Study of Education
ch. 13 Level 9: Designing Interactive Characters Syllabus
ch. 14 Level 10: Designing Interactive Characters Class
ch. 15 Case History 4: Valencia Community College: United States History to 1877

Part III: Game Design and Development
ch. 16 Level 11: Identifying Learning Objectives and Student Needs
ch. 17 Case History 5: Robert Louis Stevenson Middle School: General Math
ch. 18 Level 12: Student Demographics
ch. 19 Case History 6: Texas Tech University: History of Higher Education in the United States
ch. 20 Level 13: How Games are Designed
ch. 21 Case History 7: Ohio Valley College of Technology: Introduction to Keyboarding & Business Writing, Introduction to Computers
ch. 22 Level 14: Production

Part IV: After The Launch
ch. 23 Level 15: Playing the Game
ch. 24 Case History 8: Waunakee Community High School: Computer Science Classes

Part V: After This Book
ch. 25 Level 16: Designing the Future
ch. 26 Level 17: Resources

Index
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The New Digital Shoreline: How Web 2.0 and Millennials Are Revolutionizing Higher Education

Book
McHaney, Roger
2011
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB1044.87.M34 2011
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Two seismic forces beyond our control – the advent of Web 2.0 and the inexorable influx of tech-savvy Millennials on campus – are shaping what Roger McHaney calls “The New Digital Shoreline” of higher education. Failure to chart its contours, and adapt, poses a major threat to higher education as we know it.

These forces demand that we as educators reconsider the learning theories, pedagogies, and practices on which we have ...
Additional Info:
Two seismic forces beyond our control – the advent of Web 2.0 and the inexorable influx of tech-savvy Millennials on campus – are shaping what Roger McHaney calls “The New Digital Shoreline” of higher education. Failure to chart its contours, and adapt, poses a major threat to higher education as we know it.

These forces demand that we as educators reconsider the learning theories, pedagogies, and practices on which we have depended, and modify our interactions with students and peers—all without sacrificing good teaching, or lowering standards, to improve student outcomes.

Achieving these goals requires understanding how the indigenous population of this new shoreline is different. These students aren’t necessarily smarter or technologically superior, but they do have different expectations. Their approaches to learning are shaped by social networking and other forms of convenient, computer-enabled and mobile communication devices; by instant access to an over-abundance of information; by technologies that have conferred the ability to personalize and customize their world to a degree never seen before; and by time-shifting and time-slicing.

As well as understanding students’ assumptions and expectations, we have no option but to familiarize ourselves with the characteristics and applications of Web 2.0—essentially a new mind set about how to use Internet technologies around the concepts of social computing, social media, content sharing, filtering, and user experience.

Roger McHaney not only deftly analyzes how Web 2.0 is shaping the attitudes and motivations of today’s students, but guides us through the topography of existing and emerging digital media, environments, applications, platforms and devices – not least the impact of e-readers and tablets on the future of the textbook – and the potential they have for disrupting teacher-student relationships; and, if appropriately used, for engaging students in their learning.

This book argues for nothing less than a reinvention of higher education to meet these new realities. Just adding technology to our teaching practices will not suffice. McHaney calls for a complete rethinking of our practice of teaching to meet the needs of this emerging world and envisioning ourselves as connected, co-learners with our students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

ch. 1 Discovering a New Shoreline
* Obsessions
* Educational Tipping Point
* Our Zahir
* The Law of the Few
* The Stickiness Factor
* The Power of Context
* Briefly, a Long Tale
* Musing on Our Zahir

ch. 2 Indigenous Populations on the Shoreline
* New Population
* Who was that Guy (or Gal)? Shaper Shifters
* What, Me Wait? Time Shifters
* Persistent and Accessible: Piracy and Storage
* Are You Paying [for] Attention?
* Not Now, I’m Busy Vs. Of Course Now, I’m Busy: Timeslicing
* Thinking in Circles? Non-Linear Thinkers
* Are We There Yet? Mobility and the Tech savvy Millennials
* If I Can’t Find It, I’ll Make It: Creators
* Honor Among Thieves or High Tech Con Artists?
* Higher Education’s Opportunity with Tech savvy Millennials

ch. 3 The New Shoreline’s Topography: Platforms for Learning
* Technological Change and the Future
* Overview of Platforms
* Interaction Devices
* Content Development Tools for Students
* Video Game Consoles and Devices
* Mobile Devices
* Virtual Learning Environments
* Summary

ch. 4 The New Shoreline’s Topography: Web 2.0 and Social Learning
* Web 2.0 Overview
* Social Computing
* Social Media
* Summary

ch. 5 The New Shoreline’s Topography: Web 2.0 Content, Filtering, and Apps
* Content Sharing
* Filtering and Recommendations
* Web Applications (Apps)
* Emergent Behaviors on the Web
* Summary

ch. 6 What Students are Finding on the New Shore
* Student Expectations of Higher Education
* The Reality of New Media
* Class Delivery on the New Shoreline
* Summary

ch. 7 Convergence on the New Shoreline
* Metaphorical Visit to Randolph, Kansas
* Pedagogy
* Pedagogy Vs. Learning Theory
* Fallacies of Learning Theories
* Learning and the Tech savvy Millennial
* Technologies and Learning Theory
* The Connectivist Classroom
* Summary

ch. 8 Taking the Next Step
* Moving Forward in Changing Times: Settling the New Shoreline
* Coping as a Teacher
* Students’ Roles on the New Shoreline
* The Long Tail Revisited
* Finding the Next Big Thing in Education
* Conclusion

Bibliography
Appendix: Absolutes for Teaching Excellence
Index
Article cover image

Film and the Introduction to Islam Course

Article
Hussain, Amir
2008
Teaching Religion and Film, New York: Oxford University Press
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

Teaching Religion and Film

Article
Ostwalt, Conrad
2008
Teaching Religion and Film, New York: Oxford University Press
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

Touching Evil, Touching Good

Article
Makarushka, Irena S. M.
2008
Teaching Religion and Film, New York: Oxford University Press
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
This chapter looks at the teaching of special topics in the study of religion, in this case the representation of evil. Employing the medium of film to teach this topic enables students to reflect on “religious” assumptions and their implications for how we experience ourselves in the world. With the focus on a particular film, Crash, and the theoretical work of Paul Ricoeur, this chapter considers evil by analyzing the ...
Additional Info:
This chapter looks at the teaching of special topics in the study of religion, in this case the representation of evil. Employing the medium of film to teach this topic enables students to reflect on “religious” assumptions and their implications for how we experience ourselves in the world. With the focus on a particular film, Crash, and the theoretical work of Paul Ricoeur, this chapter considers evil by analyzing the racism in Crash and its relationship to alienation, confession, and redemption. The more general project of a similar course would be to introduce students to evil as a complex dimension of human experience. Reading films critically increases the likelihood that students will move beyond either/or and black/white dichotomies toward a more integrated understanding of the problem of evil.
Article cover image

What Are We Teaching When We Teach Religion and Film?

Article
Blizek, Willliam L., and Desmaralis, Michele
2008
Teaching Religion and Film, New York: Oxford University Press
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Intelligent and Adaptive Learning Systems: Technology Enhanced Support for Learners and Teachers

Book
Graf, Sabine, author, ed.; Lin, Fuhua, ed.; Kinshuk, ed.; and McGreal, Rory, ed.
2012
IGI Global, Hershey PA
LB1028.73.I577 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
sequence of learning objects that is adapted to an individual user’s goals, preferences, and... Sample PDF $37.50 Chapter 5Technology enhanced learning takes place in many different forms and contexts, including formal and informal settings, individual and collaborative learning, learning in the classroom, at home, at work, and outdoor in real life situations, as well as desktop-based learning and learning by using mobile devices. Environments range from desktop-based learning systems such ...
Additional Info:
sequence of learning objects that is adapted to an individual user’s goals, preferences, and... Sample PDF $37.50 Chapter 5Technology enhanced learning takes place in many different forms and contexts, including formal and informal settings, individual and collaborative learning, learning in the classroom, at home, at work, and outdoor in real life situations, as well as desktop-based learning and learning by using mobile devices. Environments range from desktop-based learning systems such as learning management systems, which present learners with learning material and activities, to mobile, pervasive, and ubiquitous learning environments which are used in real life settings and enable learners to learn from real learning objects. In each of these forms and contexts, adaptive and intelligent support has potential to contribute in making such learning environments more personalized, user-friendly, and effective in supporting learners in learning.

Intelligent and Adaptive Learning Systems: Technology Enhanced Support for Learners and Teachers focuses on how intelligent support and adaptive features can be integrated in currently used learning systems and discusses how intelligent and adaptive learning systems can be improved in order to provide a better learning environment for learners. This book provides academics as well as professional practitioners innovative research work for enhancing learning environments with adaptively and intelligent support in different contexts and settings, ranging from provision of courses and assessment in formal desktop-based learning systems to learning environments that support collaborative, informal, ubiquitous learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgement
Writing Competence
ch. 1 Decision Models in the Design of Adaptive Educational Hypermedia Systems (Demetrios G Sampson, Pythagoras Karampiperis)

ch. 2 Automatic Personalization in E-Learning Based on Recommendation Systems: An Overview (Mohamed Koutheaïr Khribi, Mohamed Jemni, Olfa Nasraoui)

ch. 3 Engineering and Reengineering of Technology Enhanced Learning Scenarios Using Context Awareness Processes (Clara Inés Peña de Carrillo, Christophe Choquet, Christophe Després, Sébastien Iksal, Pierre Jacoboni, Aina Lekira, El Amine Ouraiba, Diem Pham Thi-Ngoc)

ch. 4 From Europe to China: Adapting Courseware Generation to a Different Educational Context Xiaohong Tan, Carsten Ullrich, Ruimin Shen

ch. 5 An Architecture for Learning Environments Based on the Lightweight Integration of Intelligent Agents (Sergey Butakov, Denis Smoline, Nousheen Naimat Samuel, Naima Naimat Samuel)

ch. 6 Intelligent Model-Based Feedback: Helping Learners to Monitor their Individual Learning Progress (Dirk Ifenthaler)

ch. 7 A Knowledge-Based Approach of Modeling an Internet-Based Intelligent Learning Environment for Comprehending Common Fraction Operations (Siu Cheung Kong)

ch. 8 From “Self-Tested” to “Self-Testing”: A Review of Self-Assessment Systems for Learning (Mingming Zhou)

ch. 9 A Tool for Adaptive E-Assessment of Project Management Competences (Constanta-Nicoleta Bodea, Maria-Iuliana Dascalu)

ch. 10 E-Learning Tools with Intelligent Assessment and Feedback for Mathematics Study (Christine Bescherer, Daniel Herding, Ulrich Kortenkamp, Wolfgang Müller, Marc Zimmermann)

ch. 11 Boosting Semantic Relations for Example Population in Concept Learning (pages 165-181) (Ming-Chi Liu, Kinshuk, Yueh-Min Huang, Dunwei Wen)

ch. 12 Improving User Profiling for a Richer Personalization: Modeling Context in E-Learning (Isabela Gasparini, Victoria Eyharabide, Silvia Schiaffino, Marcelo S. Pimenta, Analía Amandi, José Palazzo M. de Oliveira)

ch. 13 Tracing the Metacognitive Competencies of Online Learners (Vive Kumar)

ch. 14 A Multi-Actor Ontology-Based Assistance Model: A Contribution to the Adaptive Semantic Web (Gilbert Paquette, Olga Marino)

ch. 15 Context-aware Framework for Supporting Personalisation and Adaptation in Creation of Learning Designs (Patricia Charlton, George D. Magoulas)

ch. 16 Analyzing Critical Functions of Recording Tools for Synchronous Cyber Classroom Instruction (Chun-Wang Wei, I-Chun Hung, Kinshuk, Nian-Shing Chen)

ch. 17 Software Agent Systems for Supporting Student Team Project Working (Janice Whatley)

ch. 18 Embodied and Embedded Intelligence: Actor Agents on Virtual Stages (Bob Heller, Mike Procter)

ch. 19 Technology Enhanced Language Learning in Virtual Worlds (Tosti H.C. Chiang, Tom T.C. Tsai, Irene Y.S. Li, Indy Y.T. Hsiao, Stephen J.H. Yang)

ch. 20 Mobile Learning: An Economic Approach (Andreea Molnar, Cristina Hava Muntean)

ch. 21 Mobile Computing and Mixed-Initiative Support for Writing Competence (pages 327-341) (Vive Kumar, Maiga Chang, Tracey L. Leacock)

Compilation of References
About the Contributors
Index
Cover image

Educational Technology, Teacher Knowledge, and Classroom Impact: A Research Handbook on Frameworks and Approaches

Book
Ronau, Robert N., author, editor; Rakes, Christopher R., ed.; and Niess, Margaret L., ed.
2012
IGI Global, Hershey PA
LB1028.3.E423 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Recent technological innovation has altered the way educators approach teaching and learning. These new technologies provide countless advantages in the classroom; however, we are not yet clear on how they should be implemented. The pedagogical value of specific technology tools and the cumulative effects of technology exposure over time on student learning are two areas that need to be explored in order to better determine the effectiveness of technology as ...
Additional Info:
Recent technological innovation has altered the way educators approach teaching and learning. These new technologies provide countless advantages in the classroom; however, we are not yet clear on how they should be implemented. The pedagogical value of specific technology tools and the cumulative effects of technology exposure over time on student learning are two areas that need to be explored in order to better determine the effectiveness of technology as a teaching tool.

Educational Technology, Teacher Knowledge, and Classroom Impact: A Research Handbook on Frameworks and Approaches provides a framework for evaluating and conducting educational technology research, sharing research on educational technology in education content areas, and proposing structures to guide, link, and build new structures with future research. This book provides essential support for compiling the resulting literature and envisioning future research directions in this area. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgement

Section I - Strategies for Conducting Educational Technology or Teacher Knowledge Research
ch. 1 Teacher Knowledge for Teaching with Technology: A TPACK Lens (Margaret L. Niess)
ch. 2 How Do We Measure TPACK? Let Me Count the Ways (Matthew J. Koehler, Tae Seob Shin, Punya Mishra)
ch. 3 Assessment in Authentic Environments: Designing Instruments and Reporting Results from Classroom-Based TPACK Research (Thomas C. Hammond, R. Curby Alexander, Alex M. Bodzin)

Section 2 - The Current Landscape in Educational Technology and Teacher Knowledge Research
ch. 4 A Comprehensive Framework for Teacher Knowledge (CFTK): Complexity of Individual Aspects and Their Interactions (Robert N. Ronau, Christopher R. Rakes)
ch. 5 The TRACK of Dynamic Representations (Lynn Bell, Nicole Juersivich, Thomas C. Hammond, Randy L. Bell)
ch. 6 Overcoming the Tensions and Challenges of Technology Integration: How Can We Best Support our Teachers? (Erica C. Boling, Jeanine Beatty)

Section 3 - Examining the Role of Educational Technology and Teacher Knowledge Research in Guiding Individual, Classroom, and School Instructional Practice
ch. 7 TPACK Vernaculars in Social Studies Research (John K. Lee, Meghan M. Manfra)
ch. 8 Principles of Effective Pedagogy within the Context of Connected Classroom Technology: Implications for Teacher Knowledge (Stephen J. Pape, Karen E. Irving, Clare V. Bell, Melissa L. Shirley, Douglas T. Owens, Sharilyn Pwens, Jonathan D. Bostic, Soon Chun Lee)
ch. 9 A Model for Examining the Criteria Used by Pre-Service Elementary Teachers in Their Evaluation of Technology for Mathematics Teaching (Christopher J. Johnson, Patricia S. Moyer-Packenham)
ch. 10 Technologizing Teaching: Using the WebQuest to Enhance Pre-Service Education (Joseph M. Piro, Nancy Marksbury)
ch. 11 A Theoretical Framework for Implementing Technology for Mathematics Learning (Travis K. Miller)
ch. 12 Successful Implementation of Technology to Teach Science: Research Implications (David A. Slykhuis, Rebecca McNall Krall)
ch. 13 The Effects of Teacher Content Authorizing on TPACK and on Student Achievement in Algebra: Research on Instruction with the TI-Nspire Handheld (Irina Lyublinskaya, Nelly Tournaki)
ch. 14 Making the Grade: Reporting Educational Technology and Teacher Knowledge Research (robert N. Ronau, Christopher R. Rakes)

Complication of Reference
About the Contributors
Index
TTR cover image

Hub-and-Spoke Student Blogging and Advantages for Classroom Discussion

TTR
Walatka, Todd
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 4 (2012): 372-383
BL.T4 v.15 no. 4 2012
Topics: Discussion   |   Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Digital Games and Learning

Book
Maharg, Paul, author; de Freitas, Sara, ed.
2011
Continuum International Publishing Group, New York
LB1029.G3 D535 2011
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
The popularity of entertainment gaming over the last decades has led to the use of games for non-entertainment purposes in areas such as training and business support. The emergence of the serious games movement has capitalized on this interest in leisure gaming, with an increase in leisure game approaches in schools, colleges, universities and in professional training and continuing professional development.

The movement raises many significant issues and ...
Additional Info:
The popularity of entertainment gaming over the last decades has led to the use of games for non-entertainment purposes in areas such as training and business support. The emergence of the serious games movement has capitalized on this interest in leisure gaming, with an increase in leisure game approaches in schools, colleges, universities and in professional training and continuing professional development.

The movement raises many significant issues and challenges for us. How can gaming and simulation technologies be used to engage learners? How can games be used to motivate, deepen and accelerate learning? How can they be used to greatest effect in learning and teaching? The contributors explore these and many other questions that are vital to our understanding of the paradigm shift from conventional learning environments to learning in games and simulations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Notes on Contributors
Foreword
Introduction

Part I: Theoria - Theoretical Positions
ch. 1 Digital Games and Learning: Modelling learning experiences in the digital age (Paul Maharg and Sara de Freitas)
ch. 2 Four-dimensional Consideration of Feedback in Serious Games (Ian Dunwell, Sara de Freitas and Steve Jarvis)
ch. 3 A Complex Systems Framework for Simulating Teaching and Learning David Gibson (David Gibson)

Part II: Cultura - Cultural Perspectives
ch. 4 Revolution: Experiential learning through virtual role play (Russell Francis)
ch. 5 Stealth Learning in Online Games (Esther MacCallum-Stewart)
ch. 6 Murder on Grimm Isle: The design of a game-based learning environment (Michele Dickey)
ch. 7 Are Games All Child’s Play? (Scot Osterweil and Eric Klopfer)

Part III: Praxis - Theory into practice
ch. 8 Constructions of Games, Teachers and Young People in Formal Learning (Richard Sandford, Keri Facer and Ben Williamson)
ch. 9 Games and Simulations in Informal Science Education (Kurt Squire and Nathan J. Patterson)
ch. 10 From Master to Games-Master: Managing disequilibrium and scaffolding in simulation-based learning (Karen Barton and Patricia McKellar)
ch 11 Designing Serious Games for Cultural Heritage Purposes (Francesco Bellotti, Riccardo Berta, Alessandro De Gloria, Giulia Panizza, Matteo Pellegrino and Ludovica Primavera)

Index
Cover image

Best Practices for Teaching with Emerging Technologies

Book
Pacansky-Brock, Michelle
2013
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1028.3.P22 2013
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
As social media and Web 2.0 technologies continue to transform the learning trends and preferences of students, educators need to understand the applicability of these new tools in all types of learning environments. Best Practices for Teaching with Emerging Technologies will provide both new and experienced online, hybrid, and face-to-face instructors with:

• practical examples of how low-cost and free technologies can be used to support student learning
• best ...
Additional Info:
As social media and Web 2.0 technologies continue to transform the learning trends and preferences of students, educators need to understand the applicability of these new tools in all types of learning environments. Best Practices for Teaching with Emerging Technologies will provide both new and experienced online, hybrid, and face-to-face instructors with:

• practical examples of how low-cost and free technologies can be used to support student learning
• best practices for integrating web-based tools into a course management system and managing student privacy in a Web 2.0 environment
• "Showcase" spotlights woven throughout the book, providing examples of how the tools described in the book are already being used effectively in educational settings
• an easy-to-reference format, organized with visual icons used to delineate each tool's visual, video, voice, and mobile features
• ideas for integrating mobile learning into your students' learning experiences.

This practical, easy-to-use guide will serve the needs of both two- and four-year college educators seeking to refresh or transform their instruction. Readers will be rewarded with an ample yet manageable collection of proven emerging technologies that can be leveraged for generating content, enhancing communications with and between students, and cultivating participatory, student-centered learning activities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction: The Flipped Classroom

ch. 1 Building a Solid Foundation
ch. 2 A New Paradigm for a New Century
ch. 3 Essentials Toolkit
ch. 4 Tools for Communication and Content Creation … Beyond Text!
ch. 5 Backchannels & Tools for Participatory Learning
ch. 6 Mobile and Beyond
ch. 7 Online Resources

Notes
Index
Cover image

Using Social Media Effectively in the Classroom: Blogs, Wikis, Twitter, and More

Book
Seo, Kay
2013
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1044.87.S46 2013
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
The rapid expansion of blogs, Twitter, wikis, and virtual worlds has dramatically transformed the landscape of education. Through highly accessible networks, these new media can integrate students into a learning community by enabling them to create, customize, and share content online. Using Social Media Effectively in the Classroom shows educators how to:

• utilize social media to best support learners
• resolve potential problems
• create a powerful sense ...
Additional Info:
The rapid expansion of blogs, Twitter, wikis, and virtual worlds has dramatically transformed the landscape of education. Through highly accessible networks, these new media can integrate students into a learning community by enabling them to create, customize, and share content online. Using Social Media Effectively in the Classroom shows educators how to:

• utilize social media to best support learners
• resolve potential problems
• create a powerful sense of community within user-centered Web 2.0 technologies.

Moving beyond basic explanations of technologies and how to use them, this book provides research-based, jargon-free, practical examples of what works, what doesn’t, and why when it comes to social media. Organized according to the systematic process of instructional design, contributors describe innovative strategies for incorporating social media into educational settings as well as significant issues to be taken into consideration at each phase of planning, designing, teaching, and evaluation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Preface

Unit I: Planning a Socially Enriched Learning Environment
ch. 1 Analysis in Virtual Worlds: The Influence of Learner Characteristics on Instructional Design
ch. 2 Blurring the Lines: Teacher Insights on the Pitfalls and Possibilities of Incorporating Online Social Media into Instructional Design
ch. 3 Analysis of Second Life as a Delivery Mechanism in EFL Education

Unit II: Developing Powerful Instructional Strategies with Social Media
ch. 4 Designing Recorded Voice Reflection as a Pedagogical Strategy
ch. 5 Live in Your World, Learn in Ours: Virtual Worlds… Engaging the New Generation of Students!
ch. 6 Developing a Wiki for Problem-Based Online Instruction and Web 2.0 Exploration
ch. 7 Learning and Teaching as Communicative Actions: Social Media as Educational Tool

Unit III: Teaching Successfully with Social Media
ch. 8 Everyone’s All a-Twitter about Twitter: Three Operational Perspectives on Using Twitter in the Classroom
ch. 9 Online Videos in the Classroom: Exploring the Opportunities and Barriers to the Use of YouTube in Teaching Introductory Sociology
ch. 10 A Framework to Enrich Student Interaction via Cross-Institutional Microblogging

Assessing Instructional Effectiveness with Social Media
ch. 11 Designing Assessments for Differentiated Instruction Using Social Media Applications
ch. 12 VoiceThread as a Facilitator of Instructional Critique
ch. 13 Is There (still) a Place for Blogging in the Classroom?: Using Blogging to Assess Writing, Facilitate Engagement and Evaluate Student Attitudes
Cover image

Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age

Book
Starkey, Louise
2012
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1028.3.S737 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age is for all those interested in considering the impact of emerging digital technologies on teaching and learning. It explores the concept of a digital age and perspectives of knowledge, pedagogy and practice within a digital context.

By examining teaching with digital technologies through new learning theories cognisant of the digital age, it aims to both advance thinking and offer strategies for ...
Additional Info:
Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age is for all those interested in considering the impact of emerging digital technologies on teaching and learning. It explores the concept of a digital age and perspectives of knowledge, pedagogy and practice within a digital context.

By examining teaching with digital technologies through new learning theories cognisant of the digital age, it aims to both advance thinking and offer strategies for teaching technology-savvy students that will enable meaningful learning experiences.

Illustrated throughout with case studies from across the subjects and the age range, key issues considered include:

• how young people create and share knowledge both in and beyond the classroom and how current and new pedagogies can support this level of achievement
• the use of complexity theory as a framework to explore teaching in the digital age
• the way learning occurs – one way exchanges, online and face-to-face interactions, learning within a framework of constructivism, and in communities
• what we mean by critical thinking, why it is important in a digital age, and how this can occur in the context of learning
• how students can create knowledge through a variety of teaching and learning activities, and how the knowledge being created can be shared, critiqued and evaluated.

With an emphasis throughout on what it means for practice, this book aims to improve understanding of how learning theories currently work and can evolve in the future to promote truly effective learning in the digital age. It is essential reading for all teachers, student teachers, school leaders, those engaged in Masters’ Level work, as well as students on Education Studies courses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures and tables
Introduction
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 The complexity of schools
ch. 2 The digital age
ch. 3 Knowledge and connectivism
ch. 4 Connections and relationships
ch. 5 Creating Knowledge
ch. 6 Critical thinking
ch. 7 Learning in the digital age
ch. 8 Teaching in the digital age
ch. 9 The start of the digital age

Notes
References
Index
Cover image

Cloud Computing for Teaching and Learning: Strategies for Design and Implementation

Book
Chao, Lee
2012
IGI Global, Hershey, PA
QA76.9.C58 C585 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
With its cost efficiency, enabling of collaboration and sharing of resources, and its ability to improve access, cloud computing is likely to play a big role in the classrooms of tomorrow.

Cloud Computing for Teaching and Learning: Strategies for Design and Implementation provides the latest information about cloud development and cloud applications in teaching and learning. The book alsos include empirical research findings in these areas for professionals ...
Additional Info:
With its cost efficiency, enabling of collaboration and sharing of resources, and its ability to improve access, cloud computing is likely to play a big role in the classrooms of tomorrow.

Cloud Computing for Teaching and Learning: Strategies for Design and Implementation provides the latest information about cloud development and cloud applications in teaching and learning. The book alsos include empirical research findings in these areas for professionals and researchers working in the field of e-learning who want to implement teaching and learning with cloud computing, as well as provide insights and support to executives concerned with cloud development and cloud applications in e-learning communities and environments. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Section 1 - Education and Research in Cloud Computing Environments
ch. 1 Overview of Cloud Computing and its Application in E-Learning
ch. 2 A Semantic Framework for Cloud Learning Environments
ch. 3 Utilizing Open Source Cloud Computing Environments to Provide Cost Effective Support for University Education and Research
ch. 4 Conducting Research in the Cloud
ch. 5 Cloud Computing for Education and Research in Developing Countries

Section 2 - Teaching and Learning with Cloud
ch. 6 Teaching Clouds: Lessons Taught and Lessons Learnt
ch. 7 Implement Virtual Programming Lab with Cloud Computing for Web-Based Distance Education
ch. 8 Cloud Computing for On-Demand Virtual Desktops and Labs
ch. 9 Developing a Private Cloud Based IP Telephony Laboratory and Curriculum

Section 3 - Policies and Legal Issues in Education Cloud
ch. 10 Harnessing the Potential of Cloud Computing to Transform Higher Education
ch. 11 Mobile Cloud Services as Catalysts for Pedagogical Change
ch. 12 Cloud Computing: Next Generation Education
ch. 13 Legal and Contractual Issues of Cloud Computing for Educational Institutions
ch. 14 Security Issues in Cloud Computing

Section 4 - Cloud Computing and its Technical Foundation
ch. 15 Cloud Computing Solution for Internet Based Teaching and Learning
ch. 16 Data Partitioning for Highly Scalable Cloud Applications
ch. 17 Intelligent Clouds: By Means of Using Multi-Agent Systems Environments
ch. 18 Large-Scale Systems and Society

Compilation of References
About the Contributors
Index
TTR cover image

Using Twitter to Teach Reader-Oriented Biblical Interpretation: “Tweading” the Gospel of Mark

TTR
Williamson, Jr., Robert
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 3 (2013): 274-286
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 3
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Twitter offers an engaging way to introduce students to reader-oriented interpretation of the Bible. The exercise described here introduces students to the idea that the reader has a role in the production of a text's meaning, which thus varies from reader to reader. Twitter enables us to capture the real-time thoughts of a variety of respondents to the text of Mark as it is read aloud. Students can concretely observe ...
Additional Info:
Twitter offers an engaging way to introduce students to reader-oriented interpretation of the Bible. The exercise described here introduces students to the idea that the reader has a role in the production of a text's meaning, which thus varies from reader to reader. Twitter enables us to capture the real-time thoughts of a variety of respondents to the text of Mark as it is read aloud. Students can concretely observe the effects of particular textual moments on individual respondents as well as analyze their general interpretive stances with regard to the text as a whole. Students come to grasp that the meaning of the text varies depending on the reader, setting the stage for more complex theoretical discussion of reader-response theory, the reader's role in the production of meaning, the adjudication of “allowed” and “disallowed” interpretations, and the appropriateness of “reader-response” criticisms for texts that were composed to be encountered orally.
Cover image

Using e-Books and e-Readers for Adult Learning: With a Focus on Adult Literacy

Book
Gay, Sandie; and Richardson, Tina
2013
National Institute of Adult Continuing Education NIACE (England and Wales)
LC5256.G7 G39 2012
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: With e-books increasingly becoming an everyday and high-profile technology, how can they be used most effectively to help develop literacy skills, cultivate a love of reading, provide greater accessibility to texts for all, and offer portable access to a vast range of resources? Specifically written with the adult education sector in mind, this invaluable and straightforward guide will take the reader through the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: With e-books increasingly becoming an everyday and high-profile technology, how can they be used most effectively to help develop literacy skills, cultivate a love of reading, provide greater accessibility to texts for all, and offer portable access to a vast range of resources? Specifically written with the adult education sector in mind, this invaluable and straightforward guide will take the reader through the advantages and effective features that e-books have to offer. The text covers the necessities in e-book technologies: how to take advantage of the features that e-books offer adult learners * the options available, including dedicated e-readers, tablets, and smartphones * the costs * technical and management issues * real-world case studies of current uses and experiences in adult learning settings * current research and projects * pointers on the innovative uses of e-book technologies. The book also includes a chapter on useful links. It is a timely, original, and practical guide to a popular and increasingly accessible technology, with a specific focus on applications to adult learning. (From the Publisher.)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 What are e-books?
E-books in different languages

ch. 2 What are e-readers and e-book apps?
Dedicated e-readers
Multifunctional devices
Hybrid devices
E-reader features
E-book apps

ch. 3 Access and accessibility
E-book format
Digital rights management (DRM)
Text to speech (TTS)
Support Organisations

ch. 4 E-readers and e-books in use
Example of use in learning
Dudley College: Stimulating the use of mobile technologies in work-based learning (2010)
Newcastle City Learning: Using e-readers with adult literacy leaners (2011)
ReKindling the fire: Using Kindles for literacy in the classroom (2010)
Using electronic books in the classroom to enhance emergent literacy skills (2010)
GABES (Galway Adult Basic Education Service): The iPad in adult education (2011)

ch. 5 Our own action research

ch. 6 Investing in e-readers and e-books
Factors to consider
Free e-books and e-book websites
Obtaining e-books for adult learners
Readability of e-books

ch. 7 Suggested uses for the classroom
Speaking and listening
Writing
Reading
Creating your own e-books

Conclusion
Innovations in the e-reader market
Innovations int he e-book market
Our though piece
And finally . . .

Useful websites

Glossary

Appendix: Feature of popular e-readers available in the UK
Cover image

Research Perspectives and Best Practices in Educational Technology Integration

Book
Keengwe, Jared, ed.
2013
IGI Global, Hershey PA
LB1028.3.R463 2013
Topics: Using Technology   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: With advancements in technology continuing to influence all areas of society, students in current classrooms have a different understanding and perspective of learning than the educational system has been designed to teach.

Research Perspectives and Best Practices in Educational Technology Integration highlights the emerging digital age, its complex transformation of the current educational system, and the integration of educational technologies into ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: With advancements in technology continuing to influence all areas of society, students in current classrooms have a different understanding and perspective of learning than the educational system has been designed to teach.

Research Perspectives and Best Practices in Educational Technology Integration highlights the emerging digital age, its complex transformation of the current educational system, and the integration of educational technologies into teaching strategies. This book offers best practices in the process of incorporating learning technologies into instruction and is an essential resource for academicians, professionals, educational researchers in education and educational-related fields. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgment

ch. 1 Pedagogical and Technological Considerations Designing Collaborative Learning Using Educational Technologies
ch. 2 Integrating Technology in Teacher Education Programs
ch. 3 Increasing Student Engagement and Extending the Walls of Classroom with Emerging Technologies
ch. 4 Technology Expanding Horizons in Teacher Education: Transformative Learning Experiences
ch. 5 A State of the Art Cart: Visual Arts and Technology Integration in Teacher Education
ch. 6 Media and Technology Integration through Media Literacy Education
ch. 7 Librarians' Roles in Informatics to Support Classroom Incorporation of Technology
ch. 8 Employing Emerging Technologies in Educational Settings: Issues and Challenges
ch. 9 Internet Technology Levels in a Higher Education Teaching and Learning Environment: Discriminant Function Analysis Approach
ch. 10 Integration of the Computer Games into Early Childhood Education Pre-Service Teachers' Mathematics Teaching
ch. 11 A Case Study i Online Delivery: Boarding the Bullet Train to an Online Music Degree
ch. 12 Using Social Media to Enhance Instruction in Higher Education
ch. 13 A TPACK Course for Developing Pre-Service Teachers' Technology Integration Competencies: From Design and Application to Evaluation
ch. 14 Changing the Face of ELA Classrooms: A Case Study of TPACK Professional Development
ch. 15 Integrating Technology into Mathematics Teaching: A TPACK (Technological, Pedagogical, Content Knowledge)-Based Course Design for College Students
ch. 16 Privacy and Identity Management in Social Media: Driving Factors for Identity Hiding

Compilation of References
About the Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
Teaching Learning, and Technology – a non-profit corporation that helps educational institutions make appropriate use of information technology through workshops, external evaluation, consulting, assessment tools, specialized tools and guides, institutional subscription programs, webcasts and online workshops, free resources and publications.
Additional Info:
Teaching Learning, and Technology – a non-profit corporation that helps educational institutions make appropriate use of information technology through workshops, external evaluation, consulting, assessment tools, specialized tools and guides, institutional subscription programs, webcasts and online workshops, free resources and publications.
Additional Info:
Brief analyses of why and how to use technology effectively when teaching large classes.
Additional Info:
Brief analyses of why and how to use technology effectively when teaching large classes.
Additional Info:
A site is designed to stimulate theological reflection on the uses of technology in theological education, with links to sites on a host of issues on teaching and technology.
Additional Info:
A site is designed to stimulate theological reflection on the uses of technology in theological education, with links to sites on a host of issues on teaching and technology.
Additional Info:
Extensive page of tools, resources, and support for using new technologies in the classroom, from the University of Washington.
Additional Info:
Extensive page of tools, resources, and support for using new technologies in the classroom, from the University of Washington.
Additional Info:
An online tutorial for using Power Point as a teaching tool.
Additional Info:
An online tutorial for using Power Point as a teaching tool.
Additional Info:
An extended article describing the benefits and best practices of classroom technology use.
Additional Info:
An extended article describing the benefits and best practices of classroom technology use.
Additional Info:
Extended and nuanced conference paper on the issues around evaluating web content, by the director of Libraries at Babson College.
Additional Info:
Extended and nuanced conference paper on the issues around evaluating web content, by the director of Libraries at Babson College.
Additional Info:
An extensive list of links to the many other sites available on evaluating information; part of the Information Quality WWW Virtual Library.
Additional Info:
An extensive list of links to the many other sites available on evaluating information; part of the Information Quality WWW Virtual Library.
Additional Info:
Data and analysis-rich article (2003) in “Educause,” an education journal, focused especially on the “millennial generation” and computer technology. The author discusses how the learning styles, attitudes, and aptitudes of today's "new students" vary depending on age, experience, and preferences, requiring colleges and universities to find a variety of ways to meet students' expectations.
Additional Info:
Data and analysis-rich article (2003) in “Educause,” an education journal, focused especially on the “millennial generation” and computer technology. The author discusses how the learning styles, attitudes, and aptitudes of today's "new students" vary depending on age, experience, and preferences, requiring colleges and universities to find a variety of ways to meet students' expectations.
Additional Info:
Short essay acknowledging the critique of PowerPoint, but arguing for its more effective use.
Additional Info:
Short essay acknowledging the critique of PowerPoint, but arguing for its more effective use.
Additional Info:
Short essay that argues that digital technology can enhance our students' learning, but only if our goals for student learning drive its use – and the implications there of.
Additional Info:
Short essay that argues that digital technology can enhance our students' learning, but only if our goals for student learning drive its use – and the implications there of.
Additional Info:
Extensive discussion of how to promote effective online learning, and the design challenges for adult learners. Lots of bibliography.
Additional Info:
Extensive discussion of how to promote effective online learning, and the design challenges for adult learners. Lots of bibliography.
Additional Info:
A thorough and accessible introduction to concept mapping: graphic organizers, strategies for visualizing knowledge or graphically representing ideas. Includes brief description of process, short lists of best practices, and links to additional resources and software.
Additional Info:
A thorough and accessible introduction to concept mapping: graphic organizers, strategies for visualizing knowledge or graphically representing ideas. Includes brief description of process, short lists of best practices, and links to additional resources and software.
Additional Info:
A page of annotated links to resources on how to improve students' use of the internet for academic purposes - posted by Pam Berger (a librarian/consultant).
Additional Info:
A page of annotated links to resources on how to improve students' use of the internet for academic purposes - posted by Pam Berger (a librarian/consultant).
Additional Info:
A paper by Curtis Bonk of Indiana University discussing ways to use videos as 'Anchors and Enders' for learning experiences.
Additional Info:
A paper by Curtis Bonk of Indiana University discussing ways to use videos as 'Anchors and Enders' for learning experiences.
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, showcasing a variety of Audience Response Systems uses --  including “clicker” devises for multiple choice test taking, surveys, and reflective learning.
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, showcasing a variety of Audience Response Systems uses --  including “clicker” devises for multiple choice test taking, surveys, and reflective learning.
Additional Info:
Video. Extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, showing faculty from a variety of disciplines (foreign language, math, teacher education, and educational leadership) analyzing what happens to classroom learning when you utilize a combination of virtual and physical learning environments (hybrid formats and contexts).
Additional Info:
Video. Extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, showing faculty from a variety of disciplines (foreign language, math, teacher education, and educational leadership) analyzing what happens to classroom learning when you utilize a combination of virtual and physical learning environments (hybrid formats and contexts).
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, analyzing faculty use of technology in several different disciplines (however, NOT in religion or theology), illustrating effective instructional practices culminating in improved engagement.
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, analyzing faculty use of technology in several different disciplines (however, NOT in religion or theology), illustrating effective instructional practices culminating in improved engagement.
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, examining student-created video projects in several academic disciplines. Such projects engage and challenge students with storyboarding, interviewing, collaborative problem-solving, recording, audio commentary, video-editing and documentary creation.
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, examining student-created video projects in several academic disciplines. Such projects engage and challenge students with storyboarding, interviewing, collaborative problem-solving, recording, audio commentary, video-editing and documentary creation.
Additional Info:
Information and reviews on digital technologies used for teaching, research, and productivity in a liberal arts context.
Additional Info:
Information and reviews on digital technologies used for teaching, research, and productivity in a liberal arts context.
Additional Info:
Video. A collection of short videos analyzing effective use of clickers (student personal response systems) in science classrooms.
Additional Info:
Video. A collection of short videos analyzing effective use of clickers (student personal response systems) in science classrooms.
Additional Info:
A thorough, multi-link, description by a teacher who "flipped" her community college art history classroom. Includes links to additional resources, videos with excerpts of many of the learning activities and overviews of student surveys.
Additional Info:
A thorough, multi-link, description by a teacher who "flipped" her community college art history classroom. Includes links to additional resources, videos with excerpts of many of the learning activities and overviews of student surveys.
Additional Info:
This online journal and website combines the strands of critical pedagogy and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses for technology and new media in education. It is a networked, participant-driven, and open peer reviewed journal that is both academic and collective.
Additional Info:
This online journal and website combines the strands of critical pedagogy and digital pedagogy to arrive at the best social and civil uses for technology and new media in education. It is a networked, participant-driven, and open peer reviewed journal that is both academic and collective.
Cover image

The Plugged-In Professor: Tips and Techniques For Teaching With Social Media

Book
Ferris, Sharmila Pixy; and Wilder, Hilary Anne, eds.
2013
Chandos Publishing, Oxford
LB1028.3.P58 2013
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Provides a cutting-edge resource for academics and practitioners in effective ways of reaching today’s students through the use of their favorite tool, social media

Outlines a range of strategies taking advantage of the unique learning styles and habits of net generation learners

Exposes students to ways in which these technologies can be used in their professional and personal ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Provides a cutting-edge resource for academics and practitioners in effective ways of reaching today’s students through the use of their favorite tool, social media

Outlines a range of strategies taking advantage of the unique learning styles and habits of net generation learners

Exposes students to ways in which these technologies can be used in their professional and personal lives

Reinforces students' growth as productive, reflective, and involved twenty-first century citizens

New technologies are transforming the way students work. The Plugged in Professor provides a timely and exceptional resource for using social media and other new technologies to help college students meet both general and discipline-specific objectives. The title covers techniques built around well-known social networking technologies, as well as other emerging technologies such as mobile phone and tablet apps. With a practical focus and reader-friendly format, this book shows educators how to apply techniques in each technology, and includes clear student learning objectives, step-by-step directions, observations and advice, and supplemental readings and resources. Twenty-five chapters by leading contributors cover key aspects of new technologies in education, in four parts: Writing, research and information fluency; Communication and collaboration; Critical thinking and creativity; and Integrative learning.

Readership: Educators in higher education, academics, teachers, and all those who wish to develop their techniques to more effectively reach the Net Generation will find this book useful. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of tables and figure
List of abbreviations
Acknowledgments Preface
About the editors
About the contributors

Part 1: Writing, Research, and Information Fluency
ch. 1 Writing for Wikipedia: co-constructing knowledge and writing for a public audience (Lori L. Britt)
ch. 2 Organizing with Pinterest and Delicious (Melanie L. Bufington)
ch. 3 Students' inadequate exposure to learning technology: overcoming the pedagogical challenge using wikis (Linzi J. Kemp)
ch. 4 Collecting and analyzing primary sources (Lisa M. Lane)
ch. 5 Unraveling the research process: social bookmarking and collaborative learning (Caroline Sinkinson, and Alison Hicks)

Part 2: Communication and Collaboration
ch. 6 Using Wimba Voice Board to facilitate foreign language conversation courses (Silvia U. Baage)
ch. 7 Web conferencing and peer feedback (Kevin Garrison)
ch. 8 Learning through YouTube (J. Jacob Jenkins, and Patrick J. Dillon)
ch. 9 Wiki-workshopping: using Wikispaces for peer writing workshops (Hans C. Schmidt)
ch. 10 Using persistent wikis as a pedagogical resource (Evan D. Bradley)
ch. 11 Social media and public speaking: student-produced multimedia informative presentations (Paul E. Mabrey III, and Juhong "Christie" Liu)
ch. 12 Collaborative presentations using Google Docs (Michael S. Mills)
ch. 13 Cooperative study blog (Amanda Evelyn Waldo)

Part 3: Critical Thinking and Creativity
ch. 14 Using Facebook to apply social learning theory (Michelle Kilbum)
ch. 15 Technology as a tool to develop problem-solving skills in general chemistry (Madhu Mahalingam, and Elisabeth Morlino)
ch. 16 Communicating experimental learning through an online portfolio in Tumblr (Aaron J. Moore)
ch. 17 The Biology Taboo Wiktionary: a tool for improving student comprehension of key terminology in introductory biology courses (Jeffrey T. Olimpo, and Patricia A. Shields)
ch. 18 Mobile digital storytelling in the second language classroom (Apostolos Koutropoulos, David Hattem, and Ronda Zelezny-Green)
ch. 19 Creating a video dialogue with streaming video clips (Sandra L. Miller)
ch. 20 Remix as an educational activity (Christopher Shamburg, Kate Mazzetti-Shamburg, and John Shamburg)
ch. 21 Using Twitter to assist students in writing a concise nut graph (Tia C. M. Tyree)

Part 4: Integrative Learning
ch. 22 Using simulation, video sharing, and discussion threads for practice-based skills (Lindsay B. Curtin, and Laura A. Finn)
ch. 23 Using Facebook Mobile as a tool to create a virtual learning community for pre-service teachers (Erkkie Haipinge)
ch. 24 Using social software tools to facilitate peer e-mentoring and self-reflection among students on practicum
ch. 25 Using opinion leaders on Twitter to amplify PR and marketing messages (Sarah H. VanSlette)

Index
Cover image

Going Beyond Google Again: Strategies for Using and Teaching the Invisible Web

Book
Devine, Jane; and Egger-Sider, Francine
2009
ALA Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc., Chicago, IL
ZA4237.D4 2009
Topics: Librarians as Teachers   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The Invisible Web, also known as the Deep Web, is a huge repository of underutilized resources that can be richly rewarding to searchers who make the effort to find them. Since Jane Devine and Francine Egger-Sider explored the educational potentials of this realm in Going Beyond Google: The Invisible Web in Learning and Teaching, the information world has grown even more complex, with ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The Invisible Web, also known as the Deep Web, is a huge repository of underutilized resources that can be richly rewarding to searchers who make the effort to find them. Since Jane Devine and Francine Egger-Sider explored the educational potentials of this realm in Going Beyond Google: The Invisible Web in Learning and Teaching, the information world has grown even more complex, with more participants, more content, more formats, and more means of access. Demonstrating why teaching the Invisible Web should be a requirement for information literacy education in the 21st century, here the authors expand on the teaching foundation provided in the first book and persuasively argue that the Invisible Web is still relevant not only to student research but also to everyday life. Intended for anyone who conducts research on the web, including students, teachers, information professionals, and general users, their book

- Defines the characteristics of the Invisible Web, both technologically and cognitively
- Provides a literature review of students’ information-seeking habits, concentrating on recent research
- Surveys the theory and practice of teaching the Invisible Web
- Shows ways to transform students into  better researchers
- Highlights teaching resources such as graphics, videos, and tutorials
- Offers an assortment of tools, both public and proprietary, for trawling the Invisible Web
- Looks at the future of the Invisible Web, with thoughts on how changes in search technology will affect users, particularly students learning to conduct research (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Preface

Part I - What Is the Invisible Web Now? 
ch. 1 The Invisible Web Today
ch. 2 Studies of Information-Seeking Behavior

Part II - How Will the Invisible Web Make Students Better Researchers?
ch. 3 Teaching the Invisible Web: A Survey of Theory and Practice
ch. 4 How to Make Students Better Researchers: The Invisible Web in Teaching
ch. 5 Teaching Resources

Part III - Tools for Mining the Invisible Web and a Look into Its Future
ch. 6 Looking inside the Invisible Web: A Sampler
ch. 7 The Future of the Invisible Web and Its Implications for Teaching

Appendix: SurveyMonkey Survey
Selected Additional Readings
Index
Cover image

Using Technology to Support Learning and Teaching (Key Guides for Effective Teaching in Higher Education)

Book
Fisher, Andy; Exle, Kate; and Ciobanu, Dragos
2013
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2395.7.F57 2013
Topics: Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The climate of Higher Education is changing rapidly. The students are more likely to see themselves as consumers and have increasingly high expectations regarding teaching and learning. Universities are in part aiming to meet this need by increasing the use of technology; for example, whether to increase access to teaching materials outside the classroom or to make lectures more interactive. Although there is ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The climate of Higher Education is changing rapidly. The students are more likely to see themselves as consumers and have increasingly high expectations regarding teaching and learning. Universities are in part aiming to meet this need by increasing the use of technology; for example, whether to increase access to teaching materials outside the classroom or to make lectures more interactive. Although there is no illusion amongst Higher Education intuitions that technology is a panacea, it is clear that technology is a vital tool in meeting expectations and one that will be used more and more. Consequently the context of this book is one in which technology needs to be understood as part of an overall teaching practice.

Technology continues to move on a pace and is used increasingly within Higher Education to support and enhance teaching and learning. There are books which are steeped in technical detail and books which are steeped in theoretical pedagogy with little discussion about the impact on learning and student/teacher behaviour. Using Technology to Support Learning and Teaching fills a gap in the market by providing a jargon free (but pedagogically informed) set of guidance for teaching practitioners who wish to consider a variety of ways in which technology can enrich their practice and the learning of their students. It integrates a wide range of example cases from different kinds of HE institutions and different academic disciplines, illustrating practicable pedagogies to a wide range of readers. It is full of advice, hints and tips for practitioners wanting to use technology to support a style of teaching and learning that is also built on sound pedagogical principles. It will provide a quick user-friendly reference for practitioners wanting to incorporate technology into Higher Education in a way that adheres to their learning principles and values .

This book is primarily for teaching practitioners, particularly those who are new to the industry.This book would also prove useful on training courses for practitioners; such as the Postgraduate Certificate for Higher Education. The authors also intend that the book be of value to newer teachers (perhaps taking teacher training programmes) who wish to see where recommended approaches link to pedagogy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Preface
Note on reading this book

ch. 1 Some Theory
ch. 2 Inclusive Practice: Disability and Diversity
ch. 3 Collaboration and Networking – The use of Social Media
ch. 4 Technology for Interaction
ch. 5 Technology for Assessment and Feedback
ch. 6 Podcasting and Vodcasting
ch. 7 Virtual Learning Environments
ch. 8 Free resources
ch. 9 Immersive Environments
ch. 10 New Developments

References
Index
Cover image

Essentials for Blended Learning: A Standards-Based Guide

Book
Stein, Jared; and Graham, Charles R.
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LB 1028.5.S715 2014
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Essentials for Blended Learning: A Standards-Based Guide provides a practical, streamlined approach for creating effective learning experiences by blending online activities and the best of face-to-face teaching.

This guide is:

Easy to use: Clear, jargon-free writing; illustrations; and references to online resources help readers understand concepts.

Streamlined: A simple but effective design process focuses on creating manageable activities for the right environment.

...
Additional Info:
Essentials for Blended Learning: A Standards-Based Guide provides a practical, streamlined approach for creating effective learning experiences by blending online activities and the best of face-to-face teaching.

This guide is:

Easy to use: Clear, jargon-free writing; illustrations; and references to online resources help readers understand concepts.

Streamlined: A simple but effective design process focuses on creating manageable activities for the right environment.

Practical: Real-world examples from different subject areas help teachers understand principles in context.

Contemporary: The variety of modern, connected technologies covered in the guide addresses a range of teaching challenges.

Forward-Looking: The approach bridges the gap between formal classroom learning and informal lifelong learning.

Standards-based: Guidelines and standards are based on current research in the field, relevant learning theories, and practitioner experiences.

Effective blended learning requires significant rethinking of teaching practices and a fundamental redesign of course structure. Essentials for Blended Learning: A Standards-Based Guide simplifies these difficult challenges without neglecting important opportunities to transform teaching. This guide is suitable for teachers in any content area. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Orientation to Blended Teaching and Learning
ch. 2 Elements of Blended Courses: A Tour
ch. 3 Engaging Learners in a Blended Course
ch. 4 Designing Blended Courses
ch. 5 Planning Your Course from Goals and Outcomes
ch. 6 Blending Assessment and Feedback for Learning
ch. 7 Blending Content-Driven Learning Activities
ch. 8 Blending Community-Driven Learning Activities
Additional Info:
Full-length videos and video clips can be very useful in teaching. However, it is important to consider ahead of time what you hope your students will learn from the videos.
Additional Info:
Full-length videos and video clips can be very useful in teaching. However, it is important to consider ahead of time what you hope your students will learn from the videos.
Additional Info:
Learning technologies encompass a huge array of devices, software, web sites, campus-wide computing services, and cloud services, many of which can be accessed anytime/anywhere.
Additional Info:
Learning technologies encompass a huge array of devices, software, web sites, campus-wide computing services, and cloud services, many of which can be accessed anytime/anywhere.
Additional Info:
Podcasting is a digital technology that allows listeners to download course audio and video files, including both instructor-created and student-created content, through the RSS-based subscription mode and listen to them anywhere, anytime.
Additional Info:
Podcasting is a digital technology that allows listeners to download course audio and video files, including both instructor-created and student-created content, through the RSS-based subscription mode and listen to them anywhere, anytime.
Additional Info:
Clickers can be used to increase student-student and student-instructor interactions, to assess student preparation and learning, and to probe students' opinions or attitudes.
Additional Info:
Clickers can be used to increase student-student and student-instructor interactions, to assess student preparation and learning, and to probe students' opinions or attitudes.
Additional Info:
Incorporating Wikipedia into the curriculum as a collaborative environment or primary source affords students with the opportunity to develop their media literacy, improve their writing skills, and learn appropriate ways to use Wikipedia as an academic resource.
Additional Info:
Incorporating Wikipedia into the curriculum as a collaborative environment or primary source affords students with the opportunity to develop their media literacy, improve their writing skills, and learn appropriate ways to use Wikipedia as an academic resource.
Additional Info:
Many faculty are beginning to experiment with social media, incorporating Facebook, Twitter, and other services into their classes. What are the legal implications of the use of social media in teaching? What should faculty know before trying them out?
Additional Info:
Many faculty are beginning to experiment with social media, incorporating Facebook, Twitter, and other services into their classes. What are the legal implications of the use of social media in teaching? What should faculty know before trying them out?
Additional Info:
Integrate digital tools into the humanities classroom in ways that will improve the undergraduate learning experience
Additional Info:
Integrate digital tools into the humanities classroom in ways that will improve the undergraduate learning experience
Additional Info:
The research discussed in this article looked at the impact of students having laptops in class that were being used for non-course related tasks, such as surfing the web.
Additional Info:
The research discussed in this article looked at the impact of students having laptops in class that were being used for non-course related tasks, such as surfing the web.
Additional Info:
Overall, there are a number of reasons why using clicker questions in a large lecture class makes sense. When used effectively, clickers can help the students become actively engaged in the lecture and help them learn the material better. Click it to stick it!
Additional Info:
Overall, there are a number of reasons why using clicker questions in a large lecture class makes sense. When used effectively, clickers can help the students become actively engaged in the lecture and help them learn the material better. Click it to stick it!
Cover image

Interactive Open Educational Resources: A Guide to Finding, Choosing, and Using What's Out There to Transform College Teaching

Book
Shank, John D.
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
ZA4228.S53 2014
Topics: Course Design   |   Librarians as Teachers   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Sponsored by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), this one-of-a-kind book demonstrates the best tools, resources, and techniques for discovering, selecting, and integrating interactive open educational resources (OERs) into the teaching and learning process. The author examines many of the best repositories and digital library websites for finding high quality materials, explaining in depth the best practices for effectively searching these ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Sponsored by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), this one-of-a-kind book demonstrates the best tools, resources, and techniques for discovering, selecting, and integrating interactive open educational resources (OERs) into the teaching and learning process. The author examines many of the best repositories and digital library websites for finding high quality materials, explaining in depth the best practices for effectively searching these repositories and the various methods for evaluating, selecting, and integrating the resources into the instructor’s curriculum and course assignments, as well as the institution’s learning management system. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: Transforming the Learning Experience through New Forms of Instructional Materials in the Digital Information Age
About the Author

Part One Interactive Learning Materials: Setting the Stage
ch. 1 Interactive Learning Materials: Engaging Learners in the Emerging Digital World
ch. 2 Defining an Emergent Class of Educational Resources: Interactive Multimedia Modules, Simulations, and Games

Part Two Finding ILMs: A Digital Exploration
ch. 3 The Discovery Process: The Art of Discovering ILMs
ch. 4 The Pioneers: Searching Online Educational Repositories in North America and the United Kingdom
ch. 5 The Educators: Searching College and University Educational Repositories
ch. 6 The Entrepreneurs: Textbook Publishers, Entertainment Media, and Educational Software Companies
ch. 7 The Exhibitors: Museums, Professional Organizations, and Governmental Organizations

Part Three Choosing and Using ILMs
ch. 8 The Selection Process: How to Choose and Evaluate ILMs
ch. 9 The Implementation Process: How to Instruct and Engage Students through ILMsv ch. 10 The Assessment Process: The Impact of ILMs on Student Learning

Epilogue: HowFaculty, Librarians, and Instructional Support Staff Transform Learning with ILMs in the Future
References
Index
Additional Info:
What technology should you include in your teaching, and how should it be incorporated into the rest of the course structure?
Additional Info:
What technology should you include in your teaching, and how should it be incorporated into the rest of the course structure?
Additional Info:
A Personal Response System (PRS, or "clicker") is a way to introduce interactivity into your large lecture courses.
Additional Info:
A Personal Response System (PRS, or "clicker") is a way to introduce interactivity into your large lecture courses.
Additional Info:
Google+ Hangouts is a great video-conferencing tool that can help faculty hold office hours, bring in guest speakers, and collaborate with ease on a variety of projects with TA’s and other faculty.
Additional Info:
Google+ Hangouts is a great video-conferencing tool that can help faculty hold office hours, bring in guest speakers, and collaborate with ease on a variety of projects with TA’s and other faculty.
Additional Info:
There are many options available to professors who want to streamline the process of setting up and having appointments with students. Hopefully, with these resources at your disposal, you’ll be able to reach more students more easily.
Additional Info:
There are many options available to professors who want to streamline the process of setting up and having appointments with students. Hopefully, with these resources at your disposal, you’ll be able to reach more students more easily.
Additional Info:
Prezi is a free online presentation tool that allows you to create and share dynamic presentations. Without slides and bullet points, you are able to explore relationships among ideas through movement, allowing the form of your presentation to support its content.
Additional Info:
Prezi is a free online presentation tool that allows you to create and share dynamic presentations. Without slides and bullet points, you are able to explore relationships among ideas through movement, allowing the form of your presentation to support its content.
Additional Info:
These methods of non-sequential navigation in PowerPoint can help you add flexibility to your class sessions and better respond to the needs of your students.
Additional Info:
These methods of non-sequential navigation in PowerPoint can help you add flexibility to your class sessions and better respond to the needs of your students.
Additional Info:
Adobe Connect makes it possible for students and professionals from all over the world to share, discuss, and learn together.
Additional Info:
Adobe Connect makes it possible for students and professionals from all over the world to share, discuss, and learn together.
Additional Info:
Video. Connecting to YouTube can be inconvenient in the middle of a PowerPoint slideshow. These step-by-step instructions will help you to embed a YouTube video right into one of your slides
Additional Info:
Video. Connecting to YouTube can be inconvenient in the middle of a PowerPoint slideshow. These step-by-step instructions will help you to embed a YouTube video right into one of your slides
Additional Info:
Sending students a link to a YouTube video can be risky because of all the additional content displayed that you can’t control. Using Quietube will allow you to link to a window that will display the video only.
Additional Info:
Sending students a link to a YouTube video can be risky because of all the additional content displayed that you can’t control. Using Quietube will allow you to link to a window that will display the video only.
Additional Info:
Video. Many are unaware that YouTube videos can be used without an available internet connection if downloaded ahead of time. This post gives step-by-step instructions for saving YouTube clips and videos to your computer for later use.
Additional Info:
Video. Many are unaware that YouTube videos can be used without an available internet connection if downloaded ahead of time. This post gives step-by-step instructions for saving YouTube clips and videos to your computer for later use.
Additional Info:
Concept mapping is a great way to build upon previous knowledge by connecting new information back to it. This post explores the uses of concept mapping and provides tools for creating concept maps on the computer.
Additional Info:
Concept mapping is a great way to build upon previous knowledge by connecting new information back to it. This post explores the uses of concept mapping and provides tools for creating concept maps on the computer.
Additional Info:
The i>clicker allows a class to respond to multiple-choice questions and see immediate results for either class discussion or to record in Blackboard. There are many ways that professors at BYU are using it.
Additional Info:
The i>clicker allows a class to respond to multiple-choice questions and see immediate results for either class discussion or to record in Blackboard. There are many ways that professors at BYU are using it.
Additional Info:
Advice from students on how faculty can best reach them through email.
Additional Info:
Advice from students on how faculty can best reach them through email.
Additional Info:
A concept map is a way to visualize knowledge or graphically represent an idea.
Additional Info:
A concept map is a way to visualize knowledge or graphically represent an idea.
Cover image

Producing Video For Teaching and Learning: Planning and Collaboration

Book
O'Donoghue, Michael
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LB 1044.7.034 2014
Topics: Using Technology

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Producing Video for Teaching and Learning: Planning and Collaboration provides lecturers, researchers, professors, and technical staff in educational settings with a framework for producing video resources for teaching and learning purposes. This highly useful guide brings together the literature from the field into a constructive, developmental framework, prompting users to reflect on their own ideas at each stage of the production process.
<...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Producing Video for Teaching and Learning: Planning and Collaboration provides lecturers, researchers, professors, and technical staff in educational settings with a framework for producing video resources for teaching and learning purposes. This highly useful guide brings together the literature from the field into a constructive, developmental framework, prompting users to reflect on their own ideas at each stage of the production process.

O’Donoghue makes clear distinctions between related aspects of video production, and offers working definitions where appropriate in order to address the academic and tertiary support technical audience. Interviews with established professionals in the field illustrate the possibilities—and limitations—of video for teaching and learning. Producing Video for Teaching and Learning gives readers the power to enhance the learning capacity of their own video materials. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
Preface
Acknowledgements
Executive Summary
Introduction

ch. 1 Video's digital coming of age
ch. 2 An Educator's Guide to Video Production
ch. 3 A Video Producer's Guide to Teaching and Learning
ch. 4 A framework for Educational Video Preproduction
ch. 5 Six of the best
ch. 6 Student Video Production

Further Reading
Appendices
Index
Additional Info:
The developer of the University of Mary (Washington) project "A Domain of One's Own," explains the program’s innovative and expansive understanding of student e-portfolios in a TEDx talk.
Additional Info:
The developer of the University of Mary (Washington) project "A Domain of One's Own," explains the program’s innovative and expansive understanding of student e-portfolios in a TEDx talk.
Additional Info:
Information, web links, and videos explaining "A Domain of One's Own," the University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating.
Additional Info:
Information, web links, and videos explaining "A Domain of One's Own," the University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating.
Additional Info:
Emory College of Arts and Sciences describes its rollout of its version of "A Domain of One's Own," a University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating. This ECAS page includes a description of the program, and links to extensive documentation for faculty, students, and support staff.
Additional Info:
Emory College of Arts and Sciences describes its rollout of its version of "A Domain of One's Own," a University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating. This ECAS page includes a description of the program, and links to extensive documentation for faculty, students, and support staff.
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Ed offers a time line, with links, of the controversial resignation and reinstatement of University of Virginia's president Teresa Sullivan. At the heart of the controversy is disagreement between the school's Board of Visitors and President Sullivan regarding the pace and manner of adopting online learning.
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Ed offers a time line, with links, of the controversial resignation and reinstatement of University of Virginia's president Teresa Sullivan. At the heart of the controversy is disagreement between the school's Board of Visitors and President Sullivan regarding the pace and manner of adopting online learning.
Additional Info:
Suggestions for using role-play with adult learners in online learning environments, both synchronous and asynchronous. Includes three models, student reactions, integration with Bloom's taxonomy, and assessment considerations.
Additional Info:
Suggestions for using role-play with adult learners in online learning environments, both synchronous and asynchronous. Includes three models, student reactions, integration with Bloom's taxonomy, and assessment considerations.
Web cover image

Role Playing with Social Media

Web
Brumley, Mark
Topics: Using Technology   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
A short, practical introduction to using online social media tools (like Twitter) to facilitate role-playing in courses involving literature or history.
Additional Info:
A short, practical introduction to using online social media tools (like Twitter) to facilitate role-playing in courses involving literature or history.
Additional Info:
This University of Illinois resource provides all an instructor needs to get started with role-playing as an online (synchronous or asynchronous) learning activity: description, examples, goals & objectives, lesson outline and procedures, and guidelines for assessment and managing accessibility/accommodations.
Additional Info:
This University of Illinois resource provides all an instructor needs to get started with role-playing as an online (synchronous or asynchronous) learning activity: description, examples, goals & objectives, lesson outline and procedures, and guidelines for assessment and managing accessibility/accommodations.
Additional Info:
Contends that in order to attract “traditional” and “non-traditional” students, higher education institutions will need to invest in the use of technology. Stresses the importance of technology in creating community and in fostering collaboration.
Additional Info:
Contends that in order to attract “traditional” and “non-traditional” students, higher education institutions will need to invest in the use of technology. Stresses the importance of technology in creating community and in fostering collaboration.
Additional Info:
Using the tool on this site, students can create group projects that interface music, blogs, documents, photos, video and more.
Additional Info:
Using the tool on this site, students can create group projects that interface music, blogs, documents, photos, video and more.
Additional Info:
This site teaches you how to download a video in three easy steps.
Additional Info:
This site teaches you how to download a video in three easy steps.
Additional Info:
This site helps you add subtitles to any video.
Additional Info:
This site helps you add subtitles to any video.
Additional Info:
Site allows you to share, use (and alter) thousands of slide presentations, pdfs, documents and videos.
Additional Info:
Site allows you to share, use (and alter) thousands of slide presentations, pdfs, documents and videos.
Additional Info:
Video. 10-15 minute creative videos on popular subjects such as history, religion and literature. Produced at a fast pace and use multimedia. Very popular site--some videos have over 1,000,000 hits.
Additional Info:
Video. 10-15 minute creative videos on popular subjects such as history, religion and literature. Produced at a fast pace and use multimedia. Very popular site--some videos have over 1,000,000 hits.
Additional Info:
Audacity is free, open source, cross-platform software for recording and editing sounds. Use it to create podcasts, edit MP3, WAV or AIFF sounds files, or mix sounds.
Additional Info:
Audacity is free, open source, cross-platform software for recording and editing sounds. Use it to create podcasts, edit MP3, WAV or AIFF sounds files, or mix sounds.
Additional Info:
Share and browse other's PowerPoints
Additional Info:
Share and browse other's PowerPoints
Additional Info:
The fully automatic bibliography maker that auto-fills. Easy and free way to build a works cited page.
Additional Info:
The fully automatic bibliography maker that auto-fills. Easy and free way to build a works cited page.
Additional Info:
Panelists discuss: What does it mean to teach or research religious studies digitally? Does religious “data” make digital religious studies distinct within the digital humanities? How can departments and the field better support digital methods and pedagogies?
Additional Info:
Panelists discuss: What does it mean to teach or research religious studies digitally? Does religious “data” make digital religious studies distinct within the digital humanities? How can departments and the field better support digital methods and pedagogies?
Additional Info:
Create complex narratives and share rich collections, adhering to Dublin Core standards with Omeka on your server, designed for scholars, museums, libraries, archives, and enthusiasts.
Additional Info:
Create complex narratives and share rich collections, adhering to Dublin Core standards with Omeka on your server, designed for scholars, museums, libraries, archives, and enthusiasts.
Additional Info:
Do you have favorite religion blogs you like to follow? This tool lets you create a dashboard of favorite blogs.
Additional Info:
Do you have favorite religion blogs you like to follow? This tool lets you create a dashboard of favorite blogs.
Additional Info:
A website that allows you to create mindmaps: pictures of concepts or a map of a process.
Additional Info:
A website that allows you to create mindmaps: pictures of concepts or a map of a process.
Additional Info:
This is a mobile app that allows the professor to award points "on the go" using their smartphone. Obviously aimed at K-12 teachers, but useful as well in higher education.
Additional Info:
This is a mobile app that allows the professor to award points "on the go" using their smartphone. Obviously aimed at K-12 teachers, but useful as well in higher education.
Additional Info:
Allows students or groups create their own graphic novel.
Additional Info:
Allows students or groups create their own graphic novel.
Additional Info:
CuePrompter is a free teleprompter/autocue service. Your browser works like a teleprompter -no extra software needed.
Additional Info:
CuePrompter is a free teleprompter/autocue service. Your browser works like a teleprompter -no extra software needed.
Additional Info:
Ideal for group projects. Similar to Googledocs. Members can work on a project and save to shared cloud space.
Additional Info:
Ideal for group projects. Similar to Googledocs. Members can work on a project and save to shared cloud space.
Additional Info:
A site to build interactive video teaching lessons. Ideal for online teaching. Build and share interactive video lessons. Time-link student activities as lecture progresses.
Additional Info:
A site to build interactive video teaching lessons. Ideal for online teaching. Build and share interactive video lessons. Time-link student activities as lecture progresses.
Additional Info:
Virtual visits to 3D religious sites and buildings.
Additional Info:
Virtual visits to 3D religious sites and buildings.
Web cover image

HippoCampus.org

Web
Monterey Institute for Technology and Education
Topics: Using Technology

Additional Info:
Video. Collection of videos covering such topics as Religions of the World, Church History, and interviews with religious scholars.
Additional Info:
Video. Collection of videos covering such topics as Religions of the World, Church History, and interviews with religious scholars.
Additional Info:
Frost and Stommel capture a 14-minute YouTubevideo of a collaborative writing session on Google Docs (now Google Drive). In the accompanying blog post, they offer suggestions for assigning collaborative writing to students, along with persuasive arguments about the pedagogical goods of collaborative writing.
Additional Info:
Frost and Stommel capture a 14-minute YouTubevideo of a collaborative writing session on Google Docs (now Google Drive). In the accompanying blog post, they offer suggestions for assigning collaborative writing to students, along with persuasive arguments about the pedagogical goods of collaborative writing.
Additional Info:
Downes links to, and comments on, two articles, each offering tips on choosing among educational technologies. One list is focused on desirable outcomes (e.g., that the technology is scalable, or promotes lifelong learning, etc). The other list (his own) focuses on the properties that lead to such outcomes (e.g., good technology is always on, or doesn't require parts, etc).
Additional Info:
Downes links to, and comments on, two articles, each offering tips on choosing among educational technologies. One list is focused on desirable outcomes (e.g., that the technology is scalable, or promotes lifelong learning, etc). The other list (his own) focuses on the properties that lead to such outcomes (e.g., good technology is always on, or doesn't require parts, etc).
Additional Info:
In this Chronicle of Higher Education (ProfHacker) piece, the author describes the discoveries arising from "Center for Teaching Excellence" workshop: specifically, regarding active learning (even with lectures), possibilities for in-class use of social media, Twitter as a means of extending collaborative learning beyond session hours, and issues of vocational training and assessment.
Additional Info:
In this Chronicle of Higher Education (ProfHacker) piece, the author describes the discoveries arising from "Center for Teaching Excellence" workshop: specifically, regarding active learning (even with lectures), possibilities for in-class use of social media, Twitter as a means of extending collaborative learning beyond session hours, and issues of vocational training and assessment.
Additional Info:
For this piece, at least half of the action is in the comments section. The author, a long advocate of online student collaborative writing, finds himself "sick of student blogging." He carefully describes the several kinds of student blogging he has assigned in the past, and turns the question over to his commenters: What might he do to "reignite [his] sense of discovery and excitement about student blogging"?
Additional Info:
For this piece, at least half of the action is in the comments section. The author, a long advocate of online student collaborative writing, finds himself "sick of student blogging." He carefully describes the several kinds of student blogging he has assigned in the past, and turns the question over to his commenters: What might he do to "reignite [his] sense of discovery and excitement about student blogging"?
Cover image

Focus on Teaching: Using Video for High-Impact Instruction

Book
Knight, Jim
2014
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB 1027.K55 2014
Topics: Using Technology

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: To improve our teaching methods, we must understand what our current teaching methods are. And this is impossible to do this based only on our own perceptions or even feedback from observers. A classroom is a dynamic environment and there is always a lot going on that can be missed in the moment.

The solution, according to renowned professional development expert ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: To improve our teaching methods, we must understand what our current teaching methods are. And this is impossible to do this based only on our own perceptions or even feedback from observers. A classroom is a dynamic environment and there is always a lot going on that can be missed in the moment.

The solution, according to renowned professional development expert Jim Knight, is video. In Focus on Teaching, Knight turns to the vast and disruptive potential of video recording to reach new levels of excellence in schools. This book builds on Knight’s prior bestsellers to show how every classroom can easily benefit from setting up a camera and hitting “record”.  The book includes

• Strategies that teachers, instructional coaches, teams, and administrators can use to get the most out of using video
• Tips for ensuring that video recordings are used in accordance with ethical standards and teacher/student comfort levels
• Protocols, data gathering forms, and many other tools to get the most out of watching video

With Jim Knight’s expertise and the latest in video technology, positive change in your classroom will be immediate and long-lasting.

Table Of Content:
List of Companion Website Resources
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

ch. 1 The Power of Video
ch. 2 Getting Started With Video-Enhanced Professional Development
ch. 3 Instructional Coaches
ch. 4 Teachers Using Cameras to Coach Themselves
ch. 5 Video Learning Teams (VLTs)
ch. 6 Principals

References and Further Readings
Index
Additional Info:
In this series (click through to parts one and two), Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
Additional Info:
In this series (click through to parts one and two), Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
Additional Info:
In this series, Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
Additional Info:
In this series, Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
Additional Info:
In this series, Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
Additional Info:
In this series, Williams provides annotated links to resources for building Web and other digital resources that are appropriately accessible to learners with physical or cognitive disabilities.
Additional Info:
This free, online tutorial contains 10 modules, each explaining how to better design course materials for learners with physical and cognitive disabilities. Tutorials include: accessibility issues on online learning, and making more accessible PowerPoint presentations, videos, Word and Excel documents, PDFs, Web pages, and Web scripts.
Additional Info:
This free, online tutorial contains 10 modules, each explaining how to better design course materials for learners with physical and cognitive disabilities. Tutorials include: accessibility issues on online learning, and making more accessible PowerPoint presentations, videos, Word and Excel documents, PDFs, Web pages, and Web scripts.
Additional Info:
This "help" document by Microsoft drills down into the details of making documents that are better accessible to users with physical and cognitive disabilities. Excellent organization and detail. Calls attention also to MS Word's "Accessibility Checker."
Additional Info:
This "help" document by Microsoft drills down into the details of making documents that are better accessible to users with physical and cognitive disabilities. Excellent organization and detail. Calls attention also to MS Word's "Accessibility Checker."
Additional Info:
Many instructors would like to make voice-recording (or audio-visual recordings) for their students, but either don't know how, or aren't sure how to make the recordings available to learners. This piece proposes one simple solution, while linking to others. Commenters also offer their own proposals.
Additional Info:
Many instructors would like to make voice-recording (or audio-visual recordings) for their students, but either don't know how, or aren't sure how to make the recordings available to learners. This piece proposes one simple solution, while linking to others. Commenters also offer their own proposals.
Additional Info:
An instructor reports, from the benefit of hindsight, on the mistakes he made when assigning students a multimedia project (podcasting, in this case). Commenters offer their own insights on pedagogically sound multimedia assignments.
Additional Info:
An instructor reports, from the benefit of hindsight, on the mistakes he made when assigning students a multimedia project (podcasting, in this case). Commenters offer their own insights on pedagogically sound multimedia assignments.
Additional Info:
We used to worry that an online presence would be perceived in academia as unprofessional. Increasingly, it's not "whether" to have an online profile, but how to manage one's online footprint professionally. The piece offers many annotated links with a variety of perspectives, advice, and how-to's. Comments also lend their own views.
Additional Info:
We used to worry that an online presence would be perceived in academia as unprofessional. Increasingly, it's not "whether" to have an online profile, but how to manage one's online footprint professionally. The piece offers many annotated links with a variety of perspectives, advice, and how-to's. Comments also lend their own views.
Additional Info:
Having attended her first "unconference," the writer shares five ideas she brought to the event about "Teaching teachers technology," and five ideas she returned with. Also includes reflection on the "unconference" as a model for better faculty pedagogy workshops.
Additional Info:
Having attended her first "unconference," the writer shares five ideas she brought to the event about "Teaching teachers technology," and five ideas she returned with. Also includes reflection on the "unconference" as a model for better faculty pedagogy workshops.
Additional Info:
Learning "technology" can feel overwhelming: so much so, that it's easier just not to get started. Mullen offers three easy ways to start small with big payoffs…and how to take them to the next level when you're ready. Covers back-up, writing in plain text, and organizing computer files.
Additional Info:
Learning "technology" can feel overwhelming: so much so, that it's easier just not to get started. Mullen offers three easy ways to start small with big payoffs…and how to take them to the next level when you're ready. Covers back-up, writing in plain text, and organizing computer files.
Additional Info:
Course management software through iTunes.
Additional Info:
Course management software through iTunes.
Web cover image

Jing

Web
Topics: Using Technology

Additional Info:
Simple and free, Jing allows you to capture what is on your computer screen and save it, send it or add it to a video. Easy tool to use to help you flip your classroom.
Additional Info:
Simple and free, Jing allows you to capture what is on your computer screen and save it, send it or add it to a video. Easy tool to use to help you flip your classroom.
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Knovio

Web
Topics: Using Technology

Additional Info:
Create interactive online video presentations with just a webcam and PowerPoint slides.
Additional Info:
Create interactive online video presentations with just a webcam and PowerPoint slides.
Additional Info:
Citation Machine automatically generates citations in MLA, APA, Chicago, and Turabian. Helps students avoid plagiarism.
Additional Info:
Citation Machine automatically generates citations in MLA, APA, Chicago, and Turabian. Helps students avoid plagiarism.
Additional Info:
Video. Use this to insert YouTube videos into a PowerPoint slide. All you need to do is to provide the YouTube video URL that appears in the browser address bar, the rest is taken care of by the YTV Wizard.
Additional Info:
Video. Use this to insert YouTube videos into a PowerPoint slide. All you need to do is to provide the YouTube video URL that appears in the browser address bar, the rest is taken care of by the YTV Wizard.
Additional Info:
Collect your resources, and organize them neatly and easily.
Additional Info:
Collect your resources, and organize them neatly and easily.
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Moodle

Web
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Course Management System (CMS) that helps you create an on-line learning site.
Additional Info:
Course Management System (CMS) that helps you create an on-line learning site.
Additional Info:
Classroom polling system. Similar to Clickers but cheaper. Each student gets a unique barcode – a paper clicker. Students answer questions by showing their barcodes to the teacher's smartphone. The teacher gets a real-time bar graph and the data is stored individually by student.
Additional Info:
Classroom polling system. Similar to Clickers but cheaper. Each student gets a unique barcode – a paper clicker. Students answer questions by showing their barcodes to the teacher's smartphone. The teacher gets a real-time bar graph and the data is stored individually by student.
Additional Info:
Simple way to gather polling information in the classroom. Works with Twitter, text, or web.
Additional Info:
Simple way to gather polling information in the classroom. Works with Twitter, text, or web.
Additional Info:
Easy way to create surveys. Use for personalized midterm evaluations.
Additional Info:
Easy way to create surveys. Use for personalized midterm evaluations.
Additional Info:
TodaysMeet helps you embrace the backchannel and connect with your audience in realtime. Encourage the room to use the live stream to make comments, ask questions, and use that feedback to tailor your presentation, sharpen your points, and address audience needs.
Additional Info:
TodaysMeet helps you embrace the backchannel and connect with your audience in realtime. Encourage the room to use the live stream to make comments, ask questions, and use that feedback to tailor your presentation, sharpen your points, and address audience needs.
Web cover image

Weebly

Web
Topics: Using Technology

Additional Info:
One of the best sites to help you create your own website. Free to educators.
Additional Info:
One of the best sites to help you create your own website. Free to educators.
Additional Info:
Podcast overview of issues related to studying religion on the web.
Additional Info:
Podcast overview of issues related to studying religion on the web.
Additional Info:
Video. A lengthy You Tube video (1 hour), and dated 2008, but still relevant. Cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch discusses "media literacy" as a site of ongoing struggle and professional development for an instructor in higher education. If our students come to us unprepared for school, does that mean they are unprepared for learning? Is the problem with them, or with school? Have we taught learners the wrong things about learning?
Additional Info:
Video. A lengthy You Tube video (1 hour), and dated 2008, but still relevant. Cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch discusses "media literacy" as a site of ongoing struggle and professional development for an instructor in higher education. If our students come to us unprepared for school, does that mean they are unprepared for learning? Is the problem with them, or with school? Have we taught learners the wrong things about learning?
Article cover image

Still Desperately Seeking Citations: Undergraduate Research in the Age of Web-Scale Discovery

Article
Rose-Wiles, Lisa; and Hofmann, Melissa M.
2013
Journal of Library Administration, 53:147–166, 2013
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Librarians as Teachers   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Web-scale discovery services promise fast, easy searching from a single Google-like box, pleasing users and making library resources more discoverable. Some librarians embrace the concept of giving users what they have come to expect from Google, while others are concerned that this will “dumb down” searching and undermine information literacy. In this article we explore the potential impact of Web-scale discovery tools on information literacy, focusing particularly on undergraduate research ...
Additional Info:
Web-scale discovery services promise fast, easy searching from a single Google-like box, pleasing users and making library resources more discoverable. Some librarians embrace the concept of giving users what they have come to expect from Google, while others are concerned that this will “dumb down” searching and undermine information literacy. In this article we explore the potential impact of Web-scale discovery tools on information literacy, focusing particularly on undergraduate research skills. We review the existing literature and present findings and experiences from two mid-sized academic libraries that have adopted EBSCO Discovery Service as their library home page portal.Web-scale discovery services promise fast, easy searching from a single Google-like box, pleasing users and making library resources more discoverable. Some librarians embrace the concept of giving users what they have come to expect from Google, while others are concerned that this will “dumb down” searching and undermine information literacy. In this article we explore the potential impact of Web-scale discovery tools on information literacy, focusing particularly on undergraduate research skills. We review the existing literature and present findings and experiences from two mid-sized academic libraries that have adopted EBSCO Discovery Service as their library home page portal.
Additional Info:
Coursera is an education platform that partners with top universities and organizations worldwide, to offer courses online for anyone to take, for free. Religious topics are limited. Try searching specific religions like "Buddhism."
Additional Info:
Coursera is an education platform that partners with top universities and organizations worldwide, to offer courses online for anyone to take, for free. Religious topics are limited. Try searching specific religions like "Buddhism."
Additional Info:
Facilitating campus-wide academic and career success through online courses for faculty, staff, and students on the effective application of technology. Tutorials on all things technology from Blackboard to Word.
Additional Info:
Facilitating campus-wide academic and career success through online courses for faculty, staff, and students on the effective application of technology. Tutorials on all things technology from Blackboard to Word.
Additional Info:
From distraction-free apps that take up your whole screen to feature-packed mainstays like Microsoft Word, we've put together a guide to help you choose the writing software that's right for you. With a concentration on long-form writing apps.
Additional Info:
From distraction-free apps that take up your whole screen to feature-packed mainstays like Microsoft Word, we've put together a guide to help you choose the writing software that's right for you. With a concentration on long-form writing apps.
Additional Info:
Collect information from anywhere into a single place. From text notes to web pages to files to snapshots, everything is always at your fingertips. Share your notes and collaborate on projects with friends, colleagues and classmates.
Additional Info:
Collect information from anywhere into a single place. From text notes to web pages to files to snapshots, everything is always at your fingertips. Share your notes and collaborate on projects with friends, colleagues and classmates.
Additional Info:
Sign up for 200M free cloud space.Sync Documents in Real-time. Conveniently browse through and view all your content on any device. Edits made on one device, it simultaneously syncs to all your others.
Additional Info:
Sign up for 200M free cloud space.Sync Documents in Real-time. Conveniently browse through and view all your content on any device. Edits made on one device, it simultaneously syncs to all your others.
Additional Info:
Better option than texting for group communication. VoiceThread is a cloud application, so there is no software to install. It will work in any modern web browser and on almost any internet connection.Upload, share and discuss documents, presentations, images, audio files and videos. Over 50 different types of media can be used in a VoiceThread. Comment using microphone, webcam, text, phone, and audio-file upload.
Additional Info:
Better option than texting for group communication. VoiceThread is a cloud application, so there is no software to install. It will work in any modern web browser and on almost any internet connection.Upload, share and discuss documents, presentations, images, audio files and videos. Over 50 different types of media can be used in a VoiceThread. Comment using microphone, webcam, text, phone, and audio-file upload.
Cover image

Proleptic Pedagogy: Theological Education Anticipating the Future

Book
Matthaei, Sondra Higgins; and Howell, Nancy R., eds.
2014
Wipf & Stock Publishers, Eugene, OR
BV4020.P76 2014
Topics: Theological Education   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Using Technology   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Could we have imagined how much theological education would change in the new millennium? Shifting needs of students, classrooms, and churches have demanded constant revisions of the curriculum, course design, classroom technology, and pedagogical strategies.

Saint Paul School of Theology felt the tide of change within our own walls and designed a project called "Proleptic Pedagogy" to address three distinct pedagogical ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Could we have imagined how much theological education would change in the new millennium? Shifting needs of students, classrooms, and churches have demanded constant revisions of the curriculum, course design, classroom technology, and pedagogical strategies.

Saint Paul School of Theology felt the tide of change within our own walls and designed a project called "Proleptic Pedagogy" to address three distinct pedagogical challenges for the future of theological education. First, instead of fitting new technologies into old pedagogies, how are teaching and learning transformed by shifting needs of students who are "digital natives," "digital immigrants," or distance learners? Second, instead of reactive strategies, what pedagogy proactively eliminates "accommodations" because courses are designed with flexibility and openness to diverse learning styles, disabilities, and needs? Third, instead of engaging student diversity with the tools of the 1960s, what new teaching and learning strategies anticipate future student racial and ethnic demographics and interracial educational experiences?

This volume of essays narrates our classroom stories, teases out pedagogical issues, examines pedagogical literature, reflects on theology of pedagogy, and constructs pedagogical proposals—with an open invitation for other theological educators to join our conversation about the future of theological education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Contributors

ch. 1 Proleptic Pedagogy, Transition, and Teaching toward the Future: An Introduction (Nancy R. Howell)
ch. 2 Proleptic Pedagogy, Pluralism, and Pedagogical Agility (Nancy R. Howell)
ch. 3 From Objectifying to Contemplating the Other: An Incarnational Approach to Pedagogy in Theological Education (Robert Martin)
ch. 4 Student Formation through Experiential and Transformative Learning: Pedagogical Insights from/for Contextual Education (James M. Brandt)
ch. 5 Immediacy: The Intersection of Technological and Face-to-face Modalities in Educating a Younger Generation (Claire Annelise Smith)
ch. 6 Teaching Integrative Theological Reflection as a Way of Life (Nancy R. Howell, and F. Douglas Powe Jr.)
ch. 7 Pedagogical Issues ion Theological Education for Diverse Peoples and Divergent Thinkers (Sondra Higgins Matthaei with Jami Moss)
ch. 8 Hip-Hop in the Classroom (F. Douglas Powe, Jr.)

Bibliography
Index
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Graphesis: Visual Forms of Knowledge Production

Book
Drucker, Johanna
2014
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
P93.5.D78 2014
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
In our current screen-saturated culture, we take in more information through visual means than at any point in history. The computers and smart phones that constantly flood us with images do more than simply convey information. They structure our relationship to information through graphical formats. Learning to interpret how visual forms not only present but produce knowledge, says Johanna Drucker, has become an essential contemporary skill.

Graphesis provides ...
Additional Info:
In our current screen-saturated culture, we take in more information through visual means than at any point in history. The computers and smart phones that constantly flood us with images do more than simply convey information. They structure our relationship to information through graphical formats. Learning to interpret how visual forms not only present but produce knowledge, says Johanna Drucker, has become an essential contemporary skill.

Graphesis provides a descriptive critical language for the analysis of graphical knowledge. In an interdisciplinary study fusing digital humanities with media studies and graphic design history, Drucker outlines the principles by which visual formats organize meaningful content. Among the most significant of these formats is the graphical user interface (GUI)—the dominant feature of the screens of nearly all consumer electronic devices. Because so much of our personal and professional lives is mediated through visual interfaces, it is important to start thinking critically about how they shape knowledge, our behavior, and even our identity.

Information graphics bear tell-tale signs of the disciplines in which they originated: statistics, business, and the empirical sciences. Drucker makes the case for studying visuality from a humanistic perspective, exploring how graphic languages can serve fields where qualitative judgments take priority over quantitative statements of fact. Graphesis offers a new epistemology of the ways we process information, embracing the full potential of visual forms and formats of knowledge production. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Overview

ch. 1 Image, Interpretation, and Interface
ch. 2 Windows
Walter Crane’s tree
Gestalt diagrams
Graphic variables
Making connections
Modelling vision
Information visualizations
Interface design
The “book” of the future
ch. 3 Interpreting Visualization :: Visualizing Interpretation
ch. 4 Interface and Interpretation
ch. 5 Designing Graphic Interpretation

Afterword
Endnotes
Image sources
Cover image

The War on Learning: Gaining Ground in the Digital University

Book
Losh, Elizabeth
2014
MIT Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2395.7.L67 2014
Topics: Using Technology   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Behind the lectern stands the professor, deploying course management systems, online quizzes, wireless clickers, PowerPoint slides, podcasts, and plagiarism-detection software. In the seats are the students, armed with smartphones, laptops, tablets, music players, and social networking. Although these two forces seem poised to do battle with each other, they are really both taking part in a war on learning itself. In this book, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Behind the lectern stands the professor, deploying course management systems, online quizzes, wireless clickers, PowerPoint slides, podcasts, and plagiarism-detection software. In the seats are the students, armed with smartphones, laptops, tablets, music players, and social networking. Although these two forces seem poised to do battle with each other, they are really both taking part in a war on learning itself. In this book, Elizabeth Losh examines current efforts to “reform" higher education by applying technological solutions to problems in teaching and learning. She finds that many of these initiatives fail because they treat education as a product rather than a process. Highly touted schemes—video games for the classroom, for example, or the distribution of iPads—let students down because they promote consumption rather than intellectual development.

Losh analyzes recent trends in postsecondary education and the rhetoric around them, often drawing on first-person accounts. In an effort to identify educational technologies that might actually work, she looks at strategies including MOOCs (massive open online courses), the gamification of subject matter, remix pedagogy, video lectures (from Randy Pausch to “the Baked Professor"), and educational virtual worlds. Finally, Losh outlines six basic principles of digital learning and describes several successful university-based initiatives. Her book will be essential reading for campus decision makers—and for anyone who cares about education and technology. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 What They Learn in College
ch. 2 The War on Learning
ch. 3 On Camera: The Baked Professor Makes His Debut
ch. 4 From Reality TV to the Research University: Coursecasting and Pedagogical Drama
ch. 5 The Rhetoric of the Open Courseware Movement
ch. 6 Honor Coding: Plaglarism Software and Educational Opportunities
ch. 7 Toy Problems: Education as Product
ch. 8 The Play's the Thing: Games and Virtual Worlds in Higher Education
ch. 9 Gaining Ground in Digital University

Notes
Index
Article cover image

"The Creation of the Wabash Center Internet Guide"

Article
Bellinger, Charles K.
2001
Journal of Religious & Theological Information, Volume 3, Numbers 3/4 2001
Topics: Librarians as Teachers   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
This article describes the process through which the Wabash Center Guide to Internet resources in religion was conceived and developed. The resulting structure of the Guide is described, and comments are made concerning possible ways in which the Internet can contribute to the learning process in theology and religious studies. A vision for the future of this Guide or other similar efforts is also outlined.
Additional Info:
This article describes the process through which the Wabash Center Guide to Internet resources in religion was conceived and developed. The resulting structure of the Guide is described, and comments are made concerning possible ways in which the Internet can contribute to the learning process in theology and religious studies. A vision for the future of this Guide or other similar efforts is also outlined.
Tactics cover image

Using Twitter to Practice Christian Ethics: Technology and Accompaniment

Tactic
Clark, Meghan J.
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 3 (2014): 223
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 3
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using, and critiquing, social media to learn about and learn to interpret current events and the role of technology.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using, and critiquing, social media to learn about and learn to interpret current events and the role of technology.
Tactics cover image

“Essential Questions” Twitter Chats

Tactic
Lester, G. Brooke
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 3 (2014): 224
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 3
Topics: Discussion   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using twitter as a tool for class discussion.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using twitter as a tool for class discussion.
Cover image

Postsecondary Play: The Role of Games and Social Media in Higher Education

Book
Tierney, William G.; Corwin, Zoë; Fullerton, Tracy; Ragusa, Giesele, eds.
2014
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2395.7.P68 2014
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
The college application process—which entails multiple forms, essays, test scores, and deadlines—can be intimidating. For students without substantial school and family support, the complexity of this process can become a barrier to access. William G. Tierney and his team at the University of Southern California approach this challenge innovatively. Using the tools of online games and social media, they have developed ways to make applying for college much ...
Additional Info:
The college application process—which entails multiple forms, essays, test scores, and deadlines—can be intimidating. For students without substantial school and family support, the complexity of this process can become a barrier to access. William G. Tierney and his team at the University of Southern California approach this challenge innovatively. Using the tools of online games and social media, they have developed ways to make applying for college much less intimidating.

While the vast majority of college students use social media and gaming in their everyday lives, colleges and universities have been slow to recognize and harness the power of either. Postsecondary Play explores the significance of games and social media in higher education, and particularly how they can be used to attract, retain, educate, and socialize students.

Tierney, a past president of the American Educational Research Association, has gathered some of the best research on the emerging role of multiplayer games in the classroom and how these tools can boost student confidence and increase college access. Scholars writing from a wide variety of disciplines—college access, social media, game studies, and learning sciences—provide concrete examples to illustrate the new and complex ways in which students learn in response to social media and games. Tierney and the contributors find that, although games can be powerful tools for encouraging underserved students, quality game design and mastering the concept of play—the ability to develop skills while engaging in the game—are essential in the effective use of serious games in teaching and learning.

Summarizing a decade of research in game design and learning, Postsecondary Play will appeal to higher education scholars and students of learning, online gaming, education, and the media. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction, Why Games and Social Media? (Zoë B. Corwin, William G. Tierney, Tracy Fullerton, and Gisele Ragusa)

Part I - What is the Current Landscape of Higher Education?
ch. 1 The Disruptive Future of Higher Education (William G. Tierney)
ch. 2 The Need to Increase College Enrollment and Completion (Laura W. Perna)
ch. 3 Transition Readiness: Making the Shift from High School to College in Social Media World (David Conley and Mary Seburn)
ch. 4 From Communication to Community: How Games and Social Media Affect Postsecondary Stakeholders (Zoë B. Corwin)

Part II - What’s in a Game?
ch. 5 What Games Do Well: Mastering Concepts in Play (Tracy Fullerton)
ch. 6 The Open Laptop Exam: Reflections and Speculations (Henry Jenkins and Adam S. Kahn)
ch. 7 Games, Passion, and “Higher” Education (James Paul Gee)
ch. 8 Game-Like Learning: Leveraging the Qualities of Game Design and Play (Katie Salen)

Part III - What Do We Know about Games and What Do We Need to Learn?
ch. 9 Assessing Learning in Video Games (Valerie Shute, Matthew Ventura, Yoon Jeon Kim, and Lubin Wang)
ch. 10 Implications and Applications of Sociable Gaming for Higher Education (Nicole B. Ellison, Donghee Yvette Wohn, and Carrie Heeter)
ch. 11 Gender, Social Media, Games, and the College Landscape (Gisele Ragusa)
ch. 12 How Much Technology Is Enough? (Steven Weiland)

Conclusion - The Shape of Things to Come (William G. Tierney and Zoë B. Corwin)
Glossary
Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
Annual list of software, online learning tools, apps, and other technology used in teaching. Compiled by Jane Hart from the votes of learning professionals worldwide. Some are obvious. Some are obscure. Includes brief overviews of each tool.
Additional Info:
Annual list of software, online learning tools, apps, and other technology used in teaching. Compiled by Jane Hart from the votes of learning professionals worldwide. Some are obvious. Some are obscure. Includes brief overviews of each tool.
Cover image

Leveraging the ePortfolio for Integrative Learning: A Faculty Guide to Classroom Practices for Transforming Student Learning

Book
Reynolds, Candyce; and Patton, Judith
2014
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1029.P67 R46 2014
Topics: Using Technology   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
The fruit of the authors’ more than 15 years of using and writing about ePortfolios in general education and disciplinary programs and courses, this book is a comprehensive and practical guide to the use of the ePortfolio as a pedagogy that facilitates the integrative learning that is a central goal of higher education.

Faculty and administrators of programs using ePortfolios can use this guide to help their students work ...
Additional Info:
The fruit of the authors’ more than 15 years of using and writing about ePortfolios in general education and disciplinary programs and courses, this book is a comprehensive and practical guide to the use of the ePortfolio as a pedagogy that facilitates the integrative learning that is a central goal of higher education.

Faculty and administrators of programs using ePortfolios can use this guide to help their students work individually on an ePortfolio or as part of a class or program requirement. Readers will discover through examples of student portfolios and targeted exercises how to assist students in making their learning visible to themselves, their peers, their instructors and their future employers.

While interest in ePortfolios has exploded—because they provide an easier and more comprehensive ways to assess student learning than traditional portfolios, and because they have the potential to transformatively develop students’ ability to connect and apply their knowledge—faculty and administrators all too often are disappointed by the lackluster ePortfolios that students submit. Reynolds and Patton demonstrate how systematically embedding practices in the classroom that engage students in integrative learning practices dramatically improves outcomes. The authors describe easy to use and practical strategies for faculty to incorporate integrative ePortfolios in their courses and curricula, and create the scaffolding to develop students’ skills and metacognition.

The book opens by outlining the underlying learning theory and the key concepts of integrative learning and by describing the purpose, structure and implementation of ePortfolios. Subsequent sections cover classroom practices and assignments to help students understand themselves as learners; make connections between course content, their personal lives, and to the curriculum; bridge theory to practice; and consider issues of audience and communication and presentation in developing their portfolios. The book goes on to cover technological issues and assessment, with a particular emphasis on the use of rubrics; and concludes with explicated examples of ePortfolios created in a first-year program, ePortfolios created by graduating students, career-oriented ePortfolios, and lifelong ePortfolios.

For both experienced faculty and administrators, and readers just beginning to use ePortfolios, this book provides a framework and guidance to implement them to their fullest potential. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Terry Rhodes)
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One: Key Concepts
ch. 1 ePortfolios as a Tool for Integrative Learning
ch. 2 Integrating Knowledge: The Crux of an Education
ch. 3 Retooling Your Syllabus and Teaching: Integrating Integrative Learning and ePortfolios Into Your Course

Part Two: Teaching for Integrative Learning
ch. 4 Fostering Reflective Practice
ch. 5 Making Connections or Integrating Knowledge
ch. 6 Making Connections for Lifelong Learning
ch. 7 Communicating Effectively in ePortfolios: A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words

Part Three: Creating the ePortfolio
ch. 8 Designing an ePortfolio System
ch. 9 Making an ePortfolio Using Free Web-Based Software

Part Four: At the End
ch. 10 Assessment of ePortfolios: Using Rubrics to Assess
ch. 11 Parting Thoughts

References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

A New Culture of Learning: Cultivating the Imagination for a World of Constant Change

Book
Thomas, Douglas; and Brown, John Seely
2011
CreateSpace Independent Publishing
LB1051.T46 2011
Topics: Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
The twenty-first century is a world in constant change. In A New Culture of Learning, Doug Thomas and John Seely Brown pursue an understanding of how the forces of change, and emerging waves of interest associated with these forces, inspire and invite us to imagine a future of learning that is as powerful as it is optimistic.

Typically, when we think of culture, we think of an existing, ...
Additional Info:
The twenty-first century is a world in constant change. In A New Culture of Learning, Doug Thomas and John Seely Brown pursue an understanding of how the forces of change, and emerging waves of interest associated with these forces, inspire and invite us to imagine a future of learning that is as powerful as it is optimistic.

Typically, when we think of culture, we think of an existing, stable entity that changes and evolves over long periods of time. In A New Culture, Thomas and Brown explore a second sense of culture, one that responds to its surroundings organically. It not only adapts, it integrates change into its process as one of its environmental variables. By exploring play, innovation, and the cultivation of the imagination as cornerstones of learning, the authors create a vision of learning for the future that is achievable, scalable and one that grows along with the technology that fosters it and the people who engage with it. The result is a new form of culture in which knowledge is seen as fluid and evolving, the personal is both enhanced and refined in relation to the collective, and the ability to manage, negotiate and participate in the world is governed by the play of the imagination.

Replete with stories, this is a book that looks at the challenges that our education and learning environments face in a fresh way. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Arc-of-Life Learning
Sam’s Story
Teaching in a Galaxy, Far Away
Googling the Error
Gaming Across Generations
Click Here to Start Learning
The Moral of the Stories

ch. 2 A Tale of Two Cultures
A Mechanistic View
Learning Environments
A Special Type of Culture
The New Culture of Learning

ch. 3 Embracing Change
Education
Technology
Learning to Embrace Change
Making Change Visible
Learning Through Play and Imagination

ch. 4 Learning In The Collective
Peer-to-Peer Learning
The Emergence of the Collective
Learning in the Collective

ch. 5 The Personal With The Collective
The New Collective
Seeing in the Dark
Collective and Education
The Birth of the Blog
Why He Blogs
Taking the Easy Way Out
Concerted Cultivation
Collectives in the Arch of Life

ch. 6 We Know More Than We Can Say
Tacit Learning
From Teaching to Learning
Inquiry
Questions and Answers
Learning as Inquiry
Indwelling
Dispositions and the New Culture of Learning
Collective Indwelling

ch. 7 Knowing, Making, and Playing
Knowing
Making
Playing

ch. 8 Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out
Hanging Out
Messing Around
Geeking Out

ch. 9 The New Culture of Learning For A World of Constant Change
Understanding the New Context
The Virtual Space of Collective Indwelling
Shared Imagination
What Really Counts
Playing to Learn

Notes
References
Acknowledgements
Authors
Cover image

Using Technology to Gather, Store and Report Evidence of Learning: Digital Learning Guides

Book
Loane, Terry
2014
National Institute of Adult Continuing Education NIACE (England and Wales)
LB1029.P67 L63 2014
Topics: Using Technology   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
The use of digital technology to capture evidence of learning has been an area of rapid development recently, both in terms of the devices (such as smartphones and tablet computers) and the range of e-portfolios that has become available. Such a rapid pace of change is a major challenge to established practice in assessing learning, which can be daunting for tutors and assessors, even those who have sought to embrace ...
Additional Info:
The use of digital technology to capture evidence of learning has been an area of rapid development recently, both in terms of the devices (such as smartphones and tablet computers) and the range of e-portfolios that has become available. Such a rapid pace of change is a major challenge to established practice in assessing learning, which can be daunting for tutors and assessors, even those who have sought to embrace technology in their practice.

This book provides lots of straightforward, practical advice on how to use digital technology confidently and effectively to gather, store and report evidence of learning. It will be highly valuable to any adult learning practitioner or manager involved in collecting evidence either for accredited programmes (such as apprenticeships) or for non-accredited programmes. Terry Loane explains how to use both the latest hardware and online systems such as e-portfolios. He also describes how technology is now helping adult educators to move away from the ‘tick-box culture’ towards broader and more holistic methods of recording learners’ achievements. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Author’s introductory Notes

ch. 1 A Revolution Whose Time Has Come
ch. 2 What Do We Mean By Assessing?
ch. 3 Different Types of Evidence and How To Gather It
ch. 4 The Digital Toolkit
ch. 5 E-portfolios
ch. 6 Three Important Issues: Confidentiality, Authenticity and Motivation
ch. 7 Beyond the Ticked Box

Glossary
References
Cover image
Wabash tree

Effective Social Learning: A Collaborative, Globally-Networked Pedagogy

Book
Loewen, Nathan R. B.
2014
Augsburg Fortress, Minneapolis, MN
LB1084.L6 2014
Topics: Using Technology   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The ground of higher education is shifting, but learning ecosystems around the world have much more space than MOOCs and trendy online platforms can fill, and Loewen shows how professors have an indisputable pedagogical edge that gives them a crucial role to play in higher education. By adopting the collaborative pedagogical process in this book, professors can create effective social learning experiences that connect students to peers and professional colleagues ...
Additional Info:
The ground of higher education is shifting, but learning ecosystems around the world have much more space than MOOCs and trendy online platforms can fill, and Loewen shows how professors have an indisputable pedagogical edge that gives them a crucial role to play in higher education. By adopting the collaborative pedagogical process in this book, professors can create effective social learning experiences that connect students to peers and professional colleagues in real time.
 
Loewen moves beyond surface questions about technology in the classroom to a problem best addressed by educators in bricks-and-mortar institutions: if students are social learners, how do we teach in a way that promotes actual dialogue for learning? Designing learning experiences that develop intercultural competencies puts the test to students’ social inclinations, and engagement with course material increases when it’s used to dig deeper into the specificities of their identity and social location. Loewen’s approach to interinstitutional collaborative teaching will be explored with examples and working templates for collaborative design of effective social learning experiences. This is done by collaborative dialogue with G. Brooke Lester and Christopher Duncanson-Hales. As a group, Loewen, Lester, and Duncanson-Hales create a text that extends pedagogical innovation in inspiring but practical ways. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
ch. 1 The Approach (Nathan Loewen)
Extend the Innovation 1.1 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 1.2 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innoovation 1.3 (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)
Chapter Response I: How Did We Get to Here? (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response II: Finding Your “Plan B”: Asynchronous and Synchronous Technology (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)

ch. 2 The Collaboration (Nathan Lowen)
Extend the Innovation 2.1 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 2.2 (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)
Chapter Response I: Facilitating Virtual Community (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response II: Finding the Courage to Teach Dialogically (Christopher J. Ducanson-Hales)

ch. 3 The Foundation (Nathan Lowen)
Extend the Innovation 3.1 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 3.2 (G Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 3.3 (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)
Chapter Response I: Preparing for a Cross-Cultural Classroom Experience (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response II: Considering Learning Disabilities in Collaborative Learning Environments (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)

ch. 4 The Content (Nathan Loewen)
Extend the Innovation 4.1 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 4.2 (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response I: Teaching Online: The Bad News, the Worse News, and What to Do about it (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response II: International Experiential Learning (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)

ch. 5 The Plan (Nathan Loewen)
Extend the Innovation 5.1 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 5.2 (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)
Extend the Innovation 5.3 (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response I: Assign “Fails” to Find Digital Learning Wins (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response II: Minding the Divides (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)

ch. 6 The Details (Nathan Loewen)
Extend the Innovation 6.1 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 6.2 (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response I: Creating a Community of Practice (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response II: Creating Communities of Scholars (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)

Selected Bibliography
Journal cover image

Teaching With And About Games

Journal Issue
2015
Vol. 4, No. 1
Topics: Course Design   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Special issue of “Syllabus,” an online journal that posts annotated syllabi and short-article course descriptions submitted by college and university professors. 
Additional Info:
Special issue of “Syllabus,” an online journal that posts annotated syllabi and short-article course descriptions submitted by college and university professors. 

Table Of Content:
Editorial
Special Issue: Teaching with and about Games (Jennifer deWinter, Carly A. Kocurek)

Syllabi
Video Game Studies (Judd Ethan Ruggill)
How to Play Games of Truth: An Introduction to Video Studies (Bryan Geoffrey Behrenshausen)
Novel Interfaces for Interactive Environments (Robert W. Linderman)
Educational and Serious Game Design: Case Study in Collaboration (Jon A. Preston)
Introduction to Games Design (Nia Wearn)
Representing the Past: (Video Games Challenge to the Historical Narrative (Stephen Ortega)
Learning Through Making: Notes on Teaching Interactive Narrative (Anastasia Salter)
Video Games as a New Form of Interactive Literature (Anne Winchell)
Writing In and Around Games (Wendi Sierra)
Hints, Advice, and Maybe Cheat Codes: An English Topics Course About Computer Games (Kevin Moberly)

Tool Box
Teaching Network Game Programming with the Dragonfly Game Engine (Mark Claypool)
Root of play - Game design for digital humanists (Andy Keenan, Matt Bouchard)
Alternative Reality Games to Teach Game-Based Storytelling (Dean O’Donnell, Jennifer deWinter)
“Continue West and Ascent the Stairs”: Game Walkthroughs in Professional and Technical Communication (Stephanie Vie)
Annotated Bibliography for Game Studies: Modeling Scholarly Research in a Popular Culture Field (Cathlena Martin)
Additional Info:
This portion of the website of a UK “registered charity” and promoter of digital technologies in UK education and research, showcases 50 short case studies Investigating students' expectations of the digital environment and enhancing the student digital experience in higher education, organized according to the main challenges they address. 
Additional Info:
This portion of the website of a UK “registered charity” and promoter of digital technologies in UK education and research, showcases 50 short case studies Investigating students' expectations of the digital environment and enhancing the student digital experience in higher education, organized according to the main challenges they address. 
Cover image

The Instructional Value of Digital Storytelling: Higher Education, Professional, and Adult Learning Settings

Book
McGee, Patricia
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1042.M34 2015
Topics: Using Technology

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Although storytelling has been recognized as an effective instructional strategy for some time, most educators are not informed about how to communicate a story that supports learning—particularly when using digital media. The Instructional Value of Digital Storytelling provides a broad overview of the concepts and traditions of storytelling and prepares professors, workplace trainers, and instructional designers to tell stories through 21st century ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Although storytelling has been recognized as an effective instructional strategy for some time, most educators are not informed about how to communicate a story that supports learning—particularly when using digital media. The Instructional Value of Digital Storytelling provides a broad overview of the concepts and traditions of storytelling and prepares professors, workplace trainers, and instructional designers to tell stories through 21st century media platforms, providing the skills critical to communication, lifelong learning, and professional success.

Using clear and concise language, The Instructional Value of Digital Storytelling explains how and why storytelling can be used as a contemporary instructional method, particularly through social media, mobile technologies, and knowledge-based systems. Examples from different sectors and disciplines illustrate how and why effective digital stories are designed with learning theory in mind. Applications of storytelling in context are provided for diverse settings within higher education as well as both formal and informal adult learning contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Introduction

Section I: Foundations
ch. 1 Storytelling’s Value Then and Now
ch. 2 Traditions of Oral Storytelling in Digital Stories
ch. 3 Culture, Learning and Digital Storytelling

Section II: Instructional Frameworks of Digital Storytelling
ch. 4 The Learner as Audience and Maker
ch. 5 Storytelling that Supports Learning
ch. 6 Story as Curriculum

Section III: Applications of Digital Storytelling in Context
ch. 7 Disciplinary Applications of Digital Storytelling
ch. 8 Applications in formal, non-formal, and informal learning
ch. 9 Conclusions: Implications for Instruction

Glossary
References
Index
Cover image

Teaching Machines: Learning from the Intersection of Education and Technology

Book
Ferster, Bill
2014
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB1028.3.F49 2014
Topics: Using Technology

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The allure of educational technology is easy to understand. Classroom instruction is an expensive and time-consuming process fraught with contradictory theories and frustratingly uneven results. Educators, inspired by machines’ contributions to modern life, have been using technology to facilitate teaching for centuries.

In Teaching Machines, Bill Ferster examines past attempts to automate instruction from the earliest use of the postal service ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The allure of educational technology is easy to understand. Classroom instruction is an expensive and time-consuming process fraught with contradictory theories and frustratingly uneven results. Educators, inspired by machines’ contributions to modern life, have been using technology to facilitate teaching for centuries.

In Teaching Machines, Bill Ferster examines past attempts to automate instruction from the earliest use of the postal service for distance education to the current maelstrom surrounding Massive Open Online Courses. He tells the stories of the entrepreneurs and visionaries who, beginning in the colonial era, developed and promoted various instructional technologies. Ferster touches on a wide range of attempts to enhance the classroom experience with machines, from hornbooks, the Chautauqua movement, and correspondence courses to B. F. Skinner’s teaching machine, intelligent tutoring systems, and eLearning.

The famed progressive teachers, researchers, and administrators that the book highlights often overcame substantial hurdles to implement their ideas, but not all of them succeeded in improving the quality of education. Teaching Machines provides invaluable new insight into our current debate over the efficacy of educational technology. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Sage on the Stage
ch. 3 Step by Step
ch. 4 Byte by Byte
ch. 5 From the Cloud
ch. 6 Making Sense of Teaching Machines

Notes
Index
Additional Info:
Podcast Series. A podcast exploring conversations of Critical Digital Pedagogy, listening for ways to empower students and champion learning. It’s hosted by Chris Friend from Saint Leo University. It’s the aural side of Hybrid Pedagogy—a digital journal of learning, teaching, and technology.
Additional Info:
Podcast Series. A podcast exploring conversations of Critical Digital Pedagogy, listening for ways to empower students and champion learning. It’s hosted by Chris Friend from Saint Leo University. It’s the aural side of Hybrid Pedagogy—a digital journal of learning, teaching, and technology.
Cover image

Motivating Teaching in Higher Education with Technology

Book
Wilson, Jay R.; and Ralph, Edwin G.
2014
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2331.W54 2014
Topics: Using Technology   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The authors created this manual particularly for beginning instructors at the post-secondary level who have never had formal teacher training. They not only present the essentials of effective instruction that incorporates technology, but in doing so, review key principles and practices that have been shown to enhance students’ motivation to learn. The manual is a distillation of core information derived from both the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The authors created this manual particularly for beginning instructors at the post-secondary level who have never had formal teacher training. They not only present the essentials of effective instruction that incorporates technology, but in doing so, review key principles and practices that have been shown to enhance students’ motivation to learn. The manual is a distillation of core information derived from both the authors’ own professional experience and the body of literature on teaching effectiveness, learning motivation, and the infusion of technology in post-secondary settings. They draw on their respective educational and research backgrounds that range from the elementary through to the college and university levels. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Essential Motivational Principles
Key Ideas
Learning Motivation
Teaching and Learning
Learning Styles
Motivational Teaching
Motivating Teaching: A Conceptual Framework
Summary
Footnotes

ch. 2 Conditions of Conductive to Learning: Climate and Management
Key Ideas
Creating a Positive Teaching/Learning Climate
Ethical and Professional Considerations
The Managerial Process: Organizational Routines and Strategies
Summary
Footnotes

ch. 3 Instructional Practice
Key Ideas
Planning for Instruction
Implementing Instruction
Summary
Footnotes

ch. 4 Motivating Methods and Technologies
Key Ideas
Part I: Teacher-Centered Approaches
Part II: Student-Centered Approaches
Summary
Footnotes

ch. 5 Practical Technology Applications to Enhance Motivation
Key Ideas
Overview
What Is Your Motivation?
What Technology Will Not Do for You
Considerations Before Getting Started
Moving Forward
Impact of Technology on You
Technology Tools
Critical Questions
Levels of Technology Integration
What about the Students?
Technology and Teaching Using the Internet
Ensuring the Success of Your Online Learners
You Made It. Now What?
Summary
Concluding Thoughts: Inspiring Students
Footnotes

References
About the Authors
Article cover image

The Phenomenology of Participation: Derrida and the Future of Pedagogy

Article
Chernik, Aria F.
2014
Hybrid Pedagogy: A Digital Journal of Learning, Teaching, and Technology, May 13,
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Hospitality in the classroom and digital pedagogical practices encourage participatory pedagogy and collective action. This model of learning and teaching emphasizes the shared responsibility between all members to contribute to and actively further the intellectual exchange and critical inquiry of the course; indeed, this model of learning can frame how we understand subjectivity itself.
Additional Info:
Hospitality in the classroom and digital pedagogical practices encourage participatory pedagogy and collective action. This model of learning and teaching emphasizes the shared responsibility between all members to contribute to and actively further the intellectual exchange and critical inquiry of the course; indeed, this model of learning can frame how we understand subjectivity itself.
Tactics cover image

Collaborative Timeline of Historical Events in Religion

Tactic
Finnell, Joshua and Moore, Jonathan
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 234
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: active learning strategy in which students use e-tools to research and represent how historic religious events have been portrayed.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: active learning strategy in which students use e-tools to research and represent how historic religious events have been portrayed.
Cover image

Integrating Pedagogy and Technology: Improving Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Book
Bernauer, James A.; and Tomei, Lawrence A.
2015
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LB2395.7.B465 2015
Topics: Using Technology

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Integrating Teaching and Technology: A Matrix for Professional Faculty Development provides college faculty and administrators with the foundations for a new model for integrating the two most critical dimensions of teaching and learning, pedagogy and technology: the Integrated Readiness Matrix (IRM). Integrating Teaching and Technology began as dialogue among the authors and their university peers focusing on how best to integrate technology into ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Integrating Teaching and Technology: A Matrix for Professional Faculty Development provides college faculty and administrators with the foundations for a new model for integrating the two most critical dimensions of teaching and learning, pedagogy and technology: the Integrated Readiness Matrix (IRM). Integrating Teaching and Technology began as dialogue among the authors and their university peers focusing on how best to integrate technology into instruction. Achieving this goal requires all faculty to be conversant with the theories of learning, the taxonomies and domains of learning, and a new methodology for preparing and developing college faculty for a career of classroom teaching. Only by building on a foundation of educational theories can we “meet students where they are” while designing instruction that fosters student growth and achievement. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part One: Foundations of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
ch. 1 Teaching and Learning in Higher Education
ch. 2 An Overview of the Five Schools of Educational Psychology

Part Two: Taxonomies of the Domains of Learning
ch. 3 Taxonomies as Frameworks for Teaching and Learning
ch. 4 The Pedagogical Y Axis
ch. 5 The Technological X Axis

Part Three: The Integrated Readiness Matrix
ch. 6 Introducing the IRM Matrix
ch. 7 Determining Location on the IRM
ch. 8 Pedagogical Skills and Competencies
ch. 9 Technological Skills and Competencies

Part Four: Putting It All Together and Capacity Building
ch. 10 Looking Both Backward and Forward!

Index
About the Authors
Additional Info:
ProfHacker is a regular blog spot on the Chronicle of Higher Education Website. This link opens a page displaying all its blog posts tagged with the term “twiiter.”
Additional Info:
ProfHacker is a regular blog spot on the Chronicle of Higher Education Website. This link opens a page displaying all its blog posts tagged with the term “twiiter.”
Article cover image

Social Media in Higher Education: A Literature Review and Research Directions

Article
Davis, III, Charles H. F.; Deil-Amen, Regina; Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; and Canche, Manuel Sacramento Gonzalez
2014
The Center for the Study of Higher Education at The University of Arizona AND Claremont Graduate University
Topics: Using Technology

Additional Info:
Faculty and Graduate Students at the University of Arizona published a Literature review on Social Media in Higher Education in 2014. This document includes a good summary and an extensive bibliography.
Additional Info:
Faculty and Graduate Students at the University of Arizona published a Literature review on Social Media in Higher Education in 2014. This document includes a good summary and an extensive bibliography.
Additional Info:
A spreadsheet Google Doc comparing a range of e-tools that support differentiation of instruction to support learner needs, created and maintained by education consultant John McCarthy.
Additional Info:
A spreadsheet Google Doc comparing a range of e-tools that support differentiation of instruction to support learner needs, created and maintained by education consultant John McCarthy.
Cover image
Wabash tree

Assessing Students' Digital Writing: Protocols for Looking Closely

Book
Hicks, Troy
2015
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LB1576.7.A77 2015
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In this book, Troy Hicks - a leader in the teaching of digital writing - collaborates with seven National Writing Project teacher consultants to provide a protocol for assessing students’ digital writing. This collection highlights six case studies centered on evidence the authors have uncovered through teacher inquiry and structured conversations about students’ digital writing. Beginning with a digital writing sample, each teacher ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In this book, Troy Hicks - a leader in the teaching of digital writing - collaborates with seven National Writing Project teacher consultants to provide a protocol for assessing students’ digital writing. This collection highlights six case studies centered on evidence the authors have uncovered through teacher inquiry and structured conversations about students’ digital writing. Beginning with a digital writing sample, each teacher offers an analysis of a student’s work and a reflection on how collaborative assessment affected his or her teaching. Because the authors include teachers from kindergarten to college, this book provides opportunities for vertical discussions of digital writing development, as well as grade-level conversations about high-quality digital writing. The collection also includes an introduction and conclusion, written by Hicks, that provides context for the inquiry group’s work and recommendations for assessment of digital writing.

Book Features:

An adaptation of the Collaborative Assessment Conference protocol to help professional learning communities examine students’ digital work.

Detailed descriptions of students’ digital writing, including the assessment process and implications for instruction.

Links to the samples of student digital writing available online for further review and to be used as digital mentor texts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword: An Introduction to the National Writing Project’s “Digital Is” Website (Christina Cantril)
Foreword
Acknowledgments

Introduction: An Invitation to Look Closely at Students’ Work
Looking Closely at Student Work: Employing Protocols for Teacher Inquiry
Changing Assessment Practices with Digital Writing
A Brief Description of Our Teacher Inquiry Group’s Process
Outline of the Book

ch. 1 Extending Writing through Augmented Reality
Context for the Project
Looking Closely at Aaron’s Work
Implications for Instruction and Assessment

ch. 2 Wondering in Room 114
Our Writing Workshop
Digital Mentor Texts
Wonderopolis as a Digital Mentor Text
The “Wonder” Project
Looking Closely at Carson’s Project
What Do You Notice?
Questions Invite Deeper Thinking
Reflection on the Process

ch. 3 Nurturing Middle School Readers Through Reviews and Book Trailers
The Project: Using Animoto for a Multimodal Response
Insights from the Collaborative Assessment Conference Protocol
Implications for Future Instruction and Assessment

ch. 4 “Seize the Day”: Finding Voice by Creating Public Service Announcements
Katie as a Digital Learner
Implications for Instruction and Assessment
Epilogue

ch. 5 Chocolate and Change: Gaming for Social Justice
Describing the Project: The Teach-in
Insights from the Protocol Review Process

ch. 6 Remix and Remediate: Social Composing for More than Just the Web
Narrating a Story of Forgiveness
Asking Critical Questions About Digital Composing
Holding Onto Syncretic Tensions in Community and Composition

Conclusion
Broadening Our Vision of Assessment
Next Directions for Digital Writing Assessment

References
Index
About the Contributors
Cover image

Digital Didactical Designs: Teaching and Learning in CrossActionSpaces

Book
Jahnke, Isa
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1044.87.J33 2016
Topics: Using Technology   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: As web-enabled mobile technologies become increasingly integrated into formal learning environments, the fields of education and ICT (information and communication technology) are merging to create a new kind of classroom: CrossActionSpaces. Grounding its exploration of these co-located communication spaces in global empirical research, Digital Didactical Designs facilitates the development of teachers into collaborative designers and evaluators of technology-driven teaching and learning experiences—learning ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: As web-enabled mobile technologies become increasingly integrated into formal learning environments, the fields of education and ICT (information and communication technology) are merging to create a new kind of classroom: CrossActionSpaces. Grounding its exploration of these co-located communication spaces in global empirical research, Digital Didactical Designs facilitates the development of teachers into collaborative designers and evaluators of technology-driven teaching and learning experiences—learning through reflective making. The Digital Didactical Design model promotes deep learning expeditions with a framework that encourages teachers and researchers to study, explore, and analyze the applied designs-in-practice. The book presents critical views of contemporary education, theories of socio-technical systems and behavior patterns, and concludes with a look into the conceptual and practical prototypes that might emerge in schools and universities in the near future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction – the Internet in Our Pockets and Handbags; ICT is more than just a tool
ch. 2 From Socio-Technical Systems to CrossActionSpaces
ch. 3 Dynamics of Roles in CrossActionSpaces: Enabler and Hinder
ch. 4 Learning as Reflective CrossAction: the example of Learning Expeditions
ch. 5 Teaching Creates Conditions for Learning as Reflective CrossAction: Digital Didactical Design
ch. 6 Projects and Empirical Studies Towards Reflective CrossActionSpaces
ch. 7 Conclusion and Looking Forward . . .

Index
Cover image

Is Digital Different?: How information creation, capture, preservation and discovery are being transformed

Book
Moss, Michael; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara; and Dupuis, Marc J.
2015
Facet Publishing, London
ZA4150.I8 2015
Topics: Librarians as Teachers   |   Using Technology   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This edited collection brings together global experts to explore the role of information professionals in the transition from an analogue to a digital environment.

The contributors, including David Nicholas, Valerie Johnson, Tim Gollins and Scott David, focus on the opportunities and challenges afforded by this new environment that is transforming the information landscape in ways that were scarcely imaginable a decade ago and is challenging the very existence ...
Additional Info:
This edited collection brings together global experts to explore the role of information professionals in the transition from an analogue to a digital environment.

The contributors, including David Nicholas, Valerie Johnson, Tim Gollins and Scott David, focus on the opportunities and challenges afforded by this new environment that is transforming the information landscape in ways that were scarcely imaginable a decade ago and is challenging the very existence of the traditional library and archive as more and more resources become available on line and as computers and supporting networks become more and more powerful.

By drawing on examples of the impact of other new and emerging technologies on the information sciences in the past, the book emphasises that information systems have always been shaped by available technologies that have transformed the creation, capture, preservation and discovery of content. 

Key topics covered include:
• Search in the digital environment
• RDF and the semantic web
• Crowd sourcing and engagement between institutions and individuals
• Development of information management systems
• Security: managing online risk
• Long term curation and preservation
• Rights and the Commons
• Finding archived records in the digital age.

Is Digital Different? illustrates the ways in which the digital environment has the potential to transform scholarship and break down barriers between the academy and the wider community, and draws out both the inherent challenges and the opportunities for information professionals globally. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Introduction and acknowledgements (Michael Moss and Barbara Endicott-Popovsky)

ch. 1 What is the same and what is different (Michael Moss)
ch. 2 Finding stuff (David Nicholas and David Clark)
ch. 3 RDF, the Semantic Web, Jordan, Jordan and Jordan (Norman Gray)
ch. 4 Crowd sourcing (Ylva Berglund Prytz)
ch. 5 Pathways to integrating technical, legal and economic considerations in the design, development and deployment of trusted IM systems (Scott David and Barbara Endicott Popovsky)
ch. 6 archived records in a digital age (Tim Gollins and Emma Bayne)
ch. 7 Security: managing online risk (Barbara Endicott-Popovsky)
ch. 8 Rights and the Commons: navigating the boundary between public and private knowledge spaces (Gavan McCarthy and Helen Morgan)
ch. 9 From the Library in Alexandria to the Google Campus: has the digital changed the way we do research? (David Thomas and Valeria Johnson)

Index
TTR cover image

Whose Place is This Anyway? Reflecting upon Hospitality and Higher Education

TTR
Loewen, Nathan
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 1 (2016): 4-19
BL41.T4 v.19 no.1
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
In this essay I propose that using online tools to connect geographically-separated classrooms for real-time collaborative learning experiences may effectively develop intercultural competency in the religious studies classroom. I explore personal examples from several international and inter-institutional collaborations with Jacques Derrida's reflections on hospitality to explain how using online tools in this way productively puts into question conventions about place, host, and guest. This engagement of students in collaboration with ...
Additional Info:
In this essay I propose that using online tools to connect geographically-separated classrooms for real-time collaborative learning experiences may effectively develop intercultural competency in the religious studies classroom. I explore personal examples from several international and inter-institutional collaborations with Jacques Derrida's reflections on hospitality to explain how using online tools in this way productively puts into question conventions about place, host, and guest. This engagement of students in collaboration with others beyond their classroom is effective because it takes the focus of learning past facts students might learn towards how they are communicating to learn.
Cover image

Teaching and Digital Technologies: Big Issues and Critical Questions

Book
Henderson, Michael; and Romeo, Geoff
2015
Cambridge University Press, New York, NY
LB1028.3.T37 2015
Topics: Using Technology

Additional Info:
Teaching and Digital Technologies: Big Issues and Critical Questions helps both pre-service and in-service teachers to critically question and evaluate the reasons for using digital technology in the classroom. Unlike other resources that show how to use specific technologies – and quickly become outdated, this text empowers the reader to understand why they should, or should not, use digital technologies, when it is appropriate (or not), and the implications arising from ...
Additional Info:
Teaching and Digital Technologies: Big Issues and Critical Questions helps both pre-service and in-service teachers to critically question and evaluate the reasons for using digital technology in the classroom. Unlike other resources that show how to use specific technologies – and quickly become outdated, this text empowers the reader to understand why they should, or should not, use digital technologies, when it is appropriate (or not), and the implications arising from these decisions. The text directly engages with policy, the Australian Curriculum, pedagogy, learning and wider issues of equity, access, generational stereotypes and professional learning. The contributors to the book are notable figures from across a broad range of Australian universities, giving the text a unique relevance to Australian education while retaining its universal appeal. Teaching and Digital Technologies is an essential contemporary resource for early childhood, primary and secondary pre-service and in-service teachers in both local and international education environments.

Empowers pre-service and in-service teachers to understand why they should or should not use digital technologies
Notable team of contributors from across a broad range of Australian universities
Companion website is kept up-to-date with any major technological changes as well as emerging ideas, debates, policy and other relevant information
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward
Preface for Teacher Educators and Professional Learning Leaders
Contributors
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Why focus on big issues and critical questions? (Michael Henderson an Geoff Romeo)

Section 1 - Being Critical of Our Assumptions: Learners, Learning and Digital Technologies
ch. 2 Digital Natives and Other Myths (Nichola F. Johnson)
ch. 3 Learning, Teaching, Technology: Confusing, Complicated and Contested! (Geoff Romeo)
ch. 4 Balancing Risks and Growth in a Digital World (Jennifer Masters)
ch. 5 Digital Technologies and Equity: Gender, Digital Divide and Rurality (Neil Anderson)
ch. 6 Using Digital Technologies with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students (Glenn Auld and Lena Djabibba)

Section 2 - Technology Affordances: What’s So Special About Digital Technologies?
ch. 7 Computational Thinking: Philosophy and Practice (Andrew Fluck and Matt Bower)
ch. 8 Creativity, Visualisation, Collaboration and Communication (Glenn Finger)
ch. 9 Breaking Boundaries (Chris Campbell)
ch. 10 Using Social Media: Assumptions, Challenges and Risks (Michael Henderson)
ch. 11 Gamification and Digital Games-Based Learning in the Classroom (Sue Gregory, Torsten Reiners, Lincoln C. Wood, Hanna Teräs, Marko Teräs and Michael Henderson)
ch. 12 Mobile Learning: What Is It and What Are It’s Possibilities? (Mark Pegrum)

Section 3 - Policy: Curriculum, Values and Agendas
ch. 13 Considering the History of Digital Technologies in Education (Sarah K. Howard and Adrian Mozejko)
ch. 14 Digital Technologies in the Curriculum: National and International (Jason Zagami)
ch. 15 Never Believe The Hype: Questioning Digital ‘Disruption’ and Other Big Ideas (Neil Selwyn)

Section 4 - Student Learning
ch. 16 When Does Technology Improve Learning? (C. Paul Newhouse)
ch. 17 Making Learning Visible Through Digital Forms of Assessment (C. Paul Newhouse)
ch. 18 Learning With Digital Technologies (Peter Albion)
ch. 19 Project, Problem, and Inquiry Based Learning (Peter Albion)
ch. 20 Numeracy and Technology (Donna Gronn and Ann Downton)
ch. 21 Digital Literacy in Theory, Policy and Practice: Old Concerns, New Opportunities (Scott Bulfin and Kellie McGraw)
ch. 22 Digital Technologies in Early Childhood Education (Susan Edwards)

Section 5 - Professional Learning
ch. 23 National and International Frameworks for Teacher Competency (Margaret Lloyd)
ch. 24 Teachers: Technology, Change and Resistance (Sarah K. Howard and Adrian Mozejko)
ch. 25 Digital Technology Integration (Michael Phillips)
ch. 26 Ongoing Professional Learning (Kathryn Holmes and Nicole Mocker)

Index
Tactics cover image

Learning an Academic Language: An Exercise in Vocabulary

Tactic
O'Lynn, Rob
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 3 (2016): 298
BL41.T4 v.19 no. 3 2016
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: an online platform that helps students master vocabulary terms .
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: an online platform that helps students master vocabulary terms .
TTR cover image

Teaching with Technology: Using Digital Humanities to Engage Student Learning

TTR
Warren, Meredith J. C.
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 3 (2016): 309-319
BL41.T4 v.19 no. 3 2016
Topics: Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
In this article, I address the challenge of fostering better student engagement with ancient material, and discuss my experience with designing a course around creative use of technology. In my recent course, “The Ancient Christian Church: 54–604 CE,” I employed several tactics to encourage student engagement with ancient and modern sources, which also promoted active participation at the level of pedagogy. By designing the classroom experience to allow for student-centered technology ...
Additional Info:
In this article, I address the challenge of fostering better student engagement with ancient material, and discuss my experience with designing a course around creative use of technology. In my recent course, “The Ancient Christian Church: 54–604 CE,” I employed several tactics to encourage student engagement with ancient and modern sources, which also promoted active participation at the level of pedagogy. By designing the classroom experience to allow for student-centered technology use, students were enabled to explore the ancient world in creative ways. In the end, I noticed greater student participation and higher-quality understanding of the ancient church when compared with lecture- or seminar-focused classroom experiences.
Tactics cover image

Isolating Central Arguments with Tweet-Length Summaries

Tactic
Vacek, Heather
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 4 (2016): 385
BL41.T4 v.19 no. 4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students write tweet 140 character summaries of the week’s reading.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students write tweet 140 character summaries of the week’s reading.
Tactics cover image

Twitter Essays and Reviews

Tactic
Petersen, Kristian
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 1 (2017): 67
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 1
Topics: Using Technology   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using Twitter for student discussions of films outside of class, teaches them to write thoughtful and critical comments in a succinct but expressive manner.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using Twitter for student discussions of films outside of class, teaches them to write thoughtful and critical comments in a succinct but expressive manner.
Cover image

Constructivism Reconsidered in the Age of Social Media

Book
Stabile, Chris, and Ershler, Jeff, eds.
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 144)
LB2395.7.C66 2015
Topics: Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
No longer relegated to just the classroom, learning has become universal through the use of social media. Social media embodies constructivism itself as the users engage in the development of their own meaning. And, constructivism is relevant to education, and learning theory and technological advance can be better understood in the light of one another.
This volume explores:

- particular areas influenced by constructivist thinking and social ...
Additional Info:
No longer relegated to just the classroom, learning has become universal through the use of social media. Social media embodies constructivism itself as the users engage in the development of their own meaning. And, constructivism is relevant to education, and learning theory and technological advance can be better understood in the light of one another.
This volume explores:

- particular areas influenced by constructivist thinking and social media, such as student learning, faculty development, and pedagogical practices,
- practical and useful ways to engage in social media, and
- dialogue and discussions regarding the nature of learning in relation to the technology that has changed how both faculty and students experience their educational landscape.

This is the 144th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors’ Notes (Chris Stabile, Jeff Ershler)

ch. 1 The Learning Virus: An Affective, Constructivist Movement Shaped by Ultrasociality in the Age of Social Media (Jeff Ershler, Chris Stabile)
Redefining the discourse toward a “better fit” cultural framework of beliefs, thought, language, and action through ultrasociality, a constructivist meme can help nurture an epistemological break (or rupture) from the traditional objectivist paradigm in education.

ch. 2 Constructivism and Learning in the Age of Social Media: Changing Minds and Learning Communities (Dawn E. Schrader)
Social media provide new means and opportunities for learning that are consistent with major tenets of both social and cognitive constructivism, and extend the process of learning and meaning construction to more diverse communities and universally accessible shared activities that are jointly and concurrently engaged in by both peers and experts.

ch. 3 Leveraging Social Media for Instructional Goals: Status, Possibilities, and Concerns (Mark Taylor)
This chapter addresses issues faculty should consider when exploring the possible use of social media in instruction with today’s learners.

ch. 4 Teaching Students to Think Critically About Social Media (Stephen D. Brookfield)
Instructors can incorporate social media and the immediacy and accessibility to information these offer in ways that support student learning, while simultaneously encouraging students to be critical of these same media systems and platforms.

ch. 5 Learner-Centered Online Instruction (Barbara McCombs)
This chapter offers a theoretical rationale and an explanation of evidence for using research-validated, learner-centered principles and practices in online course development, highlighting the evidence based practices that have been used successfully to develop online courses that engage and retain students.

ch. 6 Implications of Graphic Organizers in an Age of Social Media (Michael Record)
This chapter deconstructs the definition of graphic organizer, reimagining it for a social media age, leading to a more mindful use of the concept as an entire approach to teaching and learning rather than one specific set of tools.

ch. 7 How Critical Reflection Benefits Faculty as They Implement Learner-Centered Teaching (Phyllis Blumberg)
Critical reflection assists faculty as they transition to using learner centered approaches. When this reflection occurs within the context of social media, they can obtain reinforcing feedback and support.

ch. 8 Learner-Centered Faculty Development (Kevin Yee)
To maximize their effectiveness, faculty developers should not merely advocate for an active learning approach but also enact it in their own workshops and service-oriented interactions with faculty, even extending to their use of outreach and social media.

ch. 9 Toward Education 3.0: Pedagogical Affordances and Implications of Social Software and the Semantic Web (Mark Allison, Lynn Marie Kendrick)
This chapter explores the implications of this new educational paradigm from a technical standpoint and proposes a constructivist aware approach to best leverage its significance.

Index
Cover image

Hybrid Teaching and Learning: New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 149

Book
Linder, Kathryn E
2017
Anker/Wiley Publishing Company
LB2395.7.H9 2017
Topics: Using Technology

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Hybrid, or blended, classrooms are expanding on campuses across the United States (and internationally). Intentionally combining in-class instruction with online activities not only aids student learning, it also provides more self-directed, technology-mediated learning experiences for students who will incorporate technology into their professional lives post-college.

In addition to explaining and defining the phenomenon of hybrid teaching and learning, this volume answers:
• ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Hybrid, or blended, classrooms are expanding on campuses across the United States (and internationally). Intentionally combining in-class instruction with online activities not only aids student learning, it also provides more self-directed, technology-mediated learning experiences for students who will incorporate technology into their professional lives post-college.

In addition to explaining and defining the phenomenon of hybrid teaching and learning, this volume answers:
• What is hybrid teaching and learning?
• How does it promote student learning?
• Why should faculty and administrators consider it?
• How are its components different from traditional classrooms?
• What are the best practices of hybrid course design?
• How can instructors incorporate accessibility into their hybrid courses?
• What models can be used to train faculty as hybrid teachers?
• Where is it being practiced?
• How can institutions best prepare students for and promote their success in hybrid courses?
• Who should be involved in implementing and supporting these initiatives at the institutional level?

This is the 149th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
EDITOR’S NOTE Kathryn E. Linder

ch 1. Fundamentals of Hybrid Teaching and Learning (Kathryn E. Linder)
ch 2. Evaluating the Outcomes and Impact of Hybrid Courses (Patsy D. Moskal)
ch 3. Hybrid Platforms, Tools, and Resources (Kathryn E. Linder, Linda S. Bruenjes, Sarah A. Smith)
ch 4. Assessing Student Learning in Hybrid Courses (Traci Stromie, Josie G. Baudier)
ch 5. Training Faculty to Teach in Hybrid Settings (Kathryn E. Linder)
ch 6. Hybrid Learning at the Community College (Jason Snart)
ch 7. Collaborations Among Diverse Support Areas for Hybrid Success (Faye Haggar, Bruce Kelley, Weichao Chen)
ch 8. Preparing Students for Success in Hybrid Learning Environments with Academic Resource Centers (Daniel Newman, Michael Dickinson)
ch 9. Accessibility Considerations for Hybrid Courses (Kirsten Behling)
ch 10. Creating an Online Presence for Hybrid Support (Darin Jerke, Eric Mosterd)
ch 11. Supporting Institutional Hybrid Implementations (Thomas B. Cavanagh, Kelvin Thompson, Linda Futch)

INDEX