Collaborative Learning

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Collaborative Learning: Higher Education, Interdependence, and the Authority of Knowledge, 2d ed.

Book
Bruffee, Kenneth A.
1999
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB1032.B76 1999
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Critical Pedagogies

Additional Info:
The author argues for collaborative learning at the college and university level, a method which engenders interdependence among peers rather than cultivating passivity, authoritarianism, irresponsibility, and hyper-competitiveness. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The author argues for collaborative learning at the college and university level, a method which engenders interdependence among peers rather than cultivating passivity, authoritarianism, irresponsibility, and hyper-competitiveness. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Collaboration, Conversation, and Reacculturation
ch. 2 Consensus Groups: One Kind of Classroom Collaboration
ch. 3 Writing and Collaboration
ch. 4 Toward Reconstructing American Classrooms
ch. 5 Collaborative Learning and Cooperative Learning
ch. 6 Peer Tutoring and Institutional Change
ch. 7 Collaborative Learning and Computers
ch. 8 Education as Conversation
ch. 9 The Authority of College and University Professors
ch. 10 Science and Engineering in a Poststructural World
ch. 11 The Procrustean Bed of Cognitive Thought
ch. 12 A Plurality of Forces, Desires, and Not Wholly Commensurable Visions
ch. 13 Reading Literature as Common Property
ch. 14 A Nonfoundational Curriculum
ch. 15 Collaborative Learning and the Collaboratively Learned: A Postscript on Graduate Education

App. A Classroom and Laboratory Design
App. B Research on Collaborative Learning
App. C Some Notes on Nesting

Notes
Glossary
Works Cited
Index
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Learning in Groups: Exploring Fundamental Principles, New Uses and Emerging Opportunities

Book
Imel, Susan
1997
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1032.L43 1996
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
Learning in groups has deep historical roots in adult education, and adult educators use groups frequently in structuring learning experiences. Also, groups form the basis for mauch informal adult learning, both within and outside institutional boundaries. Although many adult educators espouse the value of learning in groups, the topic has been a relatively minor theme in the field's recent literature. The purpose of this volume of New Directions for Adult ...
Additional Info:
Learning in groups has deep historical roots in adult education, and adult educators use groups frequently in structuring learning experiences. Also, groups form the basis for mauch informal adult learning, both within and outside institutional boundaries. Although many adult educators espouse the value of learning in groups, the topic has been a relatively minor theme in the field's recent literature. The purpose of this volume of New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education is to examine selected aspects of learning in groups, including both theoretical concepts and actual practice. The chapter authors assess the status of group learning in adult education; the volume should be helpful to adult educators as they reflect on their use of groups. This is the 71st issue in the journal series New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes
Issues and Trends to Take Us into the Twenty-First Century
Competence in Teaching at a Distance
Interactivity: From Agents to Outcomes
Visual Thinking: Let Them See What You Are Saying
Student-Centered Instruction for the Design of Telecourses
Learner Development: Beyond the Technology
Teaching by Television
Teaching by Telephone
The Internet: A Learning Environment
Networked Learning Environments
Evaluating Teaching and Learning at a Distance
Copyright: Opportunities and Restrictions for the Teleinstructor
Distance Learning and the Digital Library: Transforming the Library into an Information Centerave Article
Managing Information Resources and Services in a Distance Environment
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Joining Together: Group Theory and Group Skills

Book
Johnson, David and Frank P. Johnson
1996
Allyn & Bacon, Boston, MA
HM131.J613 1997
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This best-selling book is a broad integrative overview of group dynamics. It introduces readers to the theory and research findings needed to understand how to make groups effective and to the skills required to apply that knowledge in practical situations. Joining Together illustrates how this knowledge and mastery of skills creates choices, opportunities, and successes for each individual. No other book offers the scope of coverage and the range of ...
Additional Info:
This best-selling book is a broad integrative overview of group dynamics. It introduces readers to the theory and research findings needed to understand how to make groups effective and to the skills required to apply that knowledge in practical situations. Joining Together illustrates how this knowledge and mastery of skills creates choices, opportunities, and successes for each individual. No other book offers the scope of coverage and the range of experiential exercises of Joining Together. Bridges the gap between theory and practice by combining theoretical and empirical knowledge with practical ways to apply it to the groups in which readers belong. For anyone interested in group dynamics in business, psychology, and social work. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface.
ch. 1. Group Dynamics..
ch. 2. Experiential Learning..
ch. 3. Group Goals, Social Interdependence, and Trust..
ch. 4. Communication Within Groups..
ch. 5. Leadership..
ch. 6. Using Power..
ch. 7. Decision Making..
ch. 8. Controversy and Creativity.
ch. 9. Managing Conflict of Interests..
ch. 10. Valuing Diversity..
ch. 11. Cooperative Learning in the Classroom..
ch. 12. Leading Growth and Counseling Groups..
ch. 13. Team Development, Team Training..
ch. 14. Epilogue..
Appendix: Answers..
Glossary..
References..
Index.
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Cooperative Learning for Higher Education Faculty

Book
Millis, Barbara J. and Philip G. Cottell, Jr.
1998
Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LB2331.M4816 1998
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
This definitive "how-to" book on cooperative learning at the postsecondary level is designed to serve as a vital resource for faculty who use a collaborative approach to education. It offers an overview of the cooperative learning process, including its rationale, research base, value, and practical implementation. The authors also describe a variety of approaches to cooperative learning drawn from complementary movements such as classroom research, writing across the curriculum, computer ...
Additional Info:
This definitive "how-to" book on cooperative learning at the postsecondary level is designed to serve as a vital resource for faculty who use a collaborative approach to education. It offers an overview of the cooperative learning process, including its rationale, research base, value, and practical implementation. The authors also describe a variety of approaches to cooperative learning drawn from complementary movements such as classroom research, writing across the curriculum, computer technology, and critical thinking. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part 1 Overviews of Cooperative Learning and Teaching and Learning
ch. 1 An Overview of Cooperative Learning in Higher Education
ch. 2 Why Change?

Part 2 Classroom Management
ch. 3 Planning a Cooperative Course
ch. 4 Managing the Cooperative Classroom

Part 3 Structuring the Cooperative Classroom
ch. 5 Beginning Structures
ch. 6 Structures for Problem Solving in Teams
ch. 7 Basic Paired Teaching
ch. 8 Reciprocal Teaching
ch. 9 Specialized Uses of Cooperative-Learning Principles
ch. 10 Using Cooperative Technology to Enhance Learning

Part 4 Assessing the Cooperative Classroom
ch. 11 Promoting Learning through Responsible Assessment
ch. 12 Using Teacher-Collected Assessment Data to Strengthen Cooperative Courses
ch. 13 Colleague-Assisted Assessment Procedures

Part 5 Supporting Cooperative Efforts
ch. 14 Supporting Faculty's Cooperative Efforts

Bibliography
Index
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Building Learning Communities in Cyberspace: Effective Strategies for the Online Classroom

Book
Palloff, Rena M., and Keith Pratt
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5805.P35 1999
Topics: Course Design   |   Collaborative Learning   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Written for faculty, instructors, and trainers in any distance learning environment, Building Learning Communities in Cyberspace shows how to create a virtual classroom environment that helps students excel academically, while fostering a sense of community. This practical, hands-on guide is filled with illustrative case studies, vignettes, and examples from a wide variety of successful online courses. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Written for faculty, instructors, and trainers in any distance learning environment, Building Learning Communities in Cyberspace shows how to create a virtual classroom environment that helps students excel academically, while fostering a sense of community. This practical, hands-on guide is filled with illustrative case studies, vignettes, and examples from a wide variety of successful online courses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures, Tables, and Exhibits
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Authors

Pt. 1 The Learning Community in Cyberspace
ch. 1 When Teaching and Learning Leave the Classroom
ch. 2 Defining and Redefining Community
ch. 3 What We Know About Electronic Learning
ch. 4 Time and Group Size
ch. 5 Managing the Technology

Pt. 2 Building an Electronic Learning Community
ch. 6 Making the Conversion from the Classroom to Cyberspace
ch. 7 Building Foundations
ch. 8 Promoting Collaborative Learning
ch. 9 Transformative Learning
ch. 10 Evaluation
ch. 11 Lessons Learned and a Look Ahead

Resource A Examples of Course Syllabi
Resource B Glossary of Terms Used in Computer-Mediated Distance Education
Resource C Internet Resources for Distance Education

Bibliography
Index
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Small Group Teaching: A Trouble-Shooting Guide

Book
Tiberius, Richard G.
1989
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, Toronto
LB2331.T47 1990
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Discussion

Additional Info:
"If I'm putting them to sleep, at least it's mutual. They're killing me."
If your class is ever bored, hostile, aggressive, or just not quite right, if you are open to suggestion and want to fix it yourself, this teaching improvement manual is for you. Organized for easy reference, Small Group Teaching will provide a lift for lagging classroom morale and interaction. So if your students were silent today, ...
Additional Info:
"If I'm putting them to sleep, at least it's mutual. They're killing me."
If your class is ever bored, hostile, aggressive, or just not quite right, if you are open to suggestion and want to fix it yourself, this teaching improvement manual is for you. Organized for easy reference, Small Group Teaching will provide a lift for lagging classroom morale and interaction. So if your students were silent today, don't blame them or yourself, look up the solutions in this do-it-yourself guide.
Professor Richard G. Tiberius based Small Group Teaching on his experiences as a teaching consultant at the Centre for Studies in Medical Education at the University of Toronto, and on his meetings, seminars, and workshops with individuals and groups of community college and university faculty in virtually every discipline. His previous teaching has included high school in Los Angeles and the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania; he is now conducting a graduate course in faculty development at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. He first airs his evolving ideas with his two daughters and hi wife, all of whom are at the University of Toronto, his daughters as students and Joyce as a cancer researcher. A third daughter will join the conversations in 2005 when she too is at university. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface
Introduction

Part One: Group Goals
Troubleshooting Guide
ch. 1 Goals are Unclear
ch. 2 Goals are Unattainable
ch. 3 Goals are Unacceptable
References for Part One

Part Two: Group Interaction
Troubleshooting Guide
ch. 4 Lack of Interaction
ch. 5 Teacher Dominates Interaction
ch. 6 Students Participate Unequally
References for Part Two

Part Three: Group Motivation and Emotion
Troubleshooting Guide
ch. 7 Students are Tuned Out
ch. 8 Teacher is Tuned Out
ch. 9 Students Don't Co-operate

References for Part Three
Beyond Troubleshooting

ch. 10 Using Outside Help

Index of Names
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Collaborative Learning: Underlying Processes and Effective Techniques

Book
Bosworth, Kris and Sharon J. Hamilton
1994
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 59)
LB1032.C586 1994
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
The demographic makeup of the student population in higher education has changed in dramatic ways over the past decade. These changes have motivated questions about what constitutes knowledge and about how we learn and understand new concepts, processes, and skills. Working from the premise that knowledge is not a quantifiable mass of information to be transmitted but rather a socially constituted process of making meaning within constantly changing and interacting ...
Additional Info:
The demographic makeup of the student population in higher education has changed in dramatic ways over the past decade. These changes have motivated questions about what constitutes knowledge and about how we learn and understand new concepts, processes, and skills. Working from the premise that knowledge is not a quantifiable mass of information to be transmitted but rather a socially constituted process of making meaning within constantly changing and interacting contexts, the authors of this volume seek to define and extend current understanding of collaborative learning in higher education. Each chapter blends theory and practice as it explores a particular aspect of the processes underlying collaborative learning. Case studies from three universities demonstrate collaborative learning in action, its potential and its challenges. This volume uses information about current developments in collaborative learning across the country to extend our understanding of its possibilities and offer guidance to faculty who wish to establish effective collaborative learning classrooms. This is the 59th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. For more information on the series, please see the Journals and Periodicals page. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Is This Collaboration?(Jeanne Marcum Gerlach)
ch. 2 Teacher as Co-conspirator: Knowledge and Authority in Collaborative Learning (James L. Flannery)
ch. 3 Developing Collaborative Skills in College Students (Kris Bosworth)
ch. 4 Group Dynamics: Understanding Group Success and Failure in Collaborative Learning (Judith E. Miller, John Trimbur, and John M. Wilkes)
ch. 5 Critical Thinking and Collaborative Learning (Craig E. Nelson)
ch. 6 Computer Technology and Collaborative Learning (Patricia Sullivan)
ch. 7 Assessing Effectiveness in the Collaborative Classroom (Sharon Farago Cramer)
ch. 8 Case Studies (Allen Emerson ... et al.)
ch. 9 Freedom Transformed: Toward a Developmental Model for the Construction of Collaborative Learning Environments (Sharon J. Hamilton)

Index
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40 Ways to Teach in Groups

Book
Leypoldt, Martha M.
1992
Judson Press, Valley Forge, PA
LC6519.L45 1992
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Discussion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Leypoldt provides forty distinct ways to teach young people and adults, with diagrams to illustrate each method. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Leypoldt provides forty distinct ways to teach young people and adults, with diagrams to illustrate each method. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching In Groups
ch. 2 Which Way is Best For Me?
ch. 3 The Forty Ways to Teach
ch. 4 Book Report
ch. 5 Brainstorming
ch. 6 Buzz Groups
ch. 7 Case study
ch. 8 Chain-Reaction Forum
ch. 9 Circle Response
ch. 10 Colloquy
ch. 11 Couple Buzzers
ch. 12 Debate Forum
ch. 13 Demonstration- Work Group
ch. 14 Depth Bible Encounter
ch. 15 Expanding Panel
ch. 16 Field Trip
ch. 17 Film Talk-Back
ch. 18 Gallery Conversations
ch. 19 Group Discussion
ch. 20 Group Drawing
ch. 21 Group Response Team
ch. 22 Group Writing
ch. 23 Inductive Bible Study
ch. 24 Interview Forum
ch. 25 Lecture
ch. 26 Lecture Forum
ch. 27 Listening Teams
ch. 28 Music Forum
ch. 29 Panel
ch. 30 Panel Forum
ch. 31 Play-Reading Talk-Back
ch. 32 Questions and Answers
ch. 33 Reaction Panel
ch. 34 Research and Report
ch. 35 Role-Playing
ch. 36 Screened Speech
ch. 37 Seminar
ch. 38 Sermon Forum
ch. 39 Symposium
ch. 40 Symposium Dialogue
ch. 41 Symposium Forum
ch. 42 Work Groups
ch. 43 Workshop
ch. 44 Evaluation
ch. 45 Bibliography
ch. 46 Appendix
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"Collaborative Learning: Notes from the Field"

Article
Sheridan, Jean, Ann C. Byrne, and Kathryn Quina
College Teaching 37, no. 2 (1989): 49-53
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Cooperative Controversies in the Classroom"

Article
Bredehoft, David J.
College Teaching 39, no. 3 (1991): 122-125
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Classroom Management

Additional Info:
In the cooperative controversy technique, two opposing sides are clearly drawn over a single issue, and learners on both sides cooperate to understand both sides and arrive at a personal position. Students respond enthusiastically to the exercise, are helped in exploring emotional responses to issues, and learn how, not what, to think. (MSE)
Additional Info:
In the cooperative controversy technique, two opposing sides are clearly drawn over a single issue, and learners on both sides cooperate to understand both sides and arrive at a personal position. Students respond enthusiastically to the exercise, are helped in exploring emotional responses to issues, and learn how, not what, to think. (MSE)
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"Collaborative Learning: Reframing the Classroom"

Article
MacGregor, Jean
1990
Teaching Excellence 2, no. 3 (1990)
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
There have always been social dimensions to the learning process, but only in recent decades have specially designed collaborative learning experiences been regarded as an innovative alternative to the lecture-centered and teacher-as-single-authority approaches typical to most college classrooms. With increasing frequency, students are working with each other, and alongside their teachers, to grasp subject matter or deepen their understanding of it. In the process, they are developing their social skills ...
Additional Info:
There have always been social dimensions to the learning process, but only in recent decades have specially designed collaborative learning experiences been regarded as an innovative alternative to the lecture-centered and teacher-as-single-authority approaches typical to most college classrooms. With increasing frequency, students are working with each other, and alongside their teachers, to grasp subject matter or deepen their understanding of it. In the process, they are developing their social skills as well as their intellectual ones. Students and their teachers are involved in a common enterprise, that of mutual seeking of understanding. Because many minds are grappling with the material at once while working toward a common goal, collaborative learning unleashes a unique intellectual and social synergy.
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"Designing Effective Group Activities: Lessons for Classroom Teaching and Faculty Development"

Article
Michaelsen, Larry, L. Dee Fink and Arletta Knight
1997
To Improve the Academy 16 (1997): 373-397
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
The primary objective of this article is to provide readers with guidance for designing effective group assignments and activities for classes and workshops. In doing so, we examine the forces that foster social loafing (uneven participation) in learning groups and identify four key variables that must be managed in order to create a group environment that is conducive for broad-based member participation and learning. We then discuss the impact of ...
Additional Info:
The primary objective of this article is to provide readers with guidance for designing effective group assignments and activities for classes and workshops. In doing so, we examine the forces that foster social loafing (uneven participation) in learning groups and identify four key variables that must be managed in order to create a group environment that is conducive for broad-based member participation and learning. We then discuss the impact of various types of activities and assignments on learning and group cohesiveness. Finally, we present a checklist that has been designed to evaluate the effectiveness group assignments in a wide variety of instructional settings and subject areas.
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"Cooperative Learning Returns To College: What Evidence Is There That It Works?" (pdf)

Article
Johnson, David, Roger Johnson and Karl Smith
1998
Change July/Aug (1998): 27-35
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Discusses cooperative learning in colleges. Definition of cooperative learning; Theoretical roots of cooperative learning; Difference among theories of cooperative learning; Information on the internal dynamics that make up cooperative learning; Ways to use cooperative learning.
Additional Info:
Discusses cooperative learning in colleges. Definition of cooperative learning; Theoretical roots of cooperative learning; Difference among theories of cooperative learning; Information on the internal dynamics that make up cooperative learning; Ways to use cooperative learning.
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"Navigating the Bumpy Road to Student-Centered Instruction"

Article
Felder, Richard M., and Rebecca Brent
1996
College Teaching 44, 43-47
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Classroom Management   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Common faculty concerns about implementing student-centered learning are discussed, and useful techniques for addressing them are offered. Issues include budgeting in-class activity time, losing control of the class, uncompleted assignments, student understanding of open-ended problems, student dislike or abuse of group work, and helping at-risk students become involved.
Additional Info:
Common faculty concerns about implementing student-centered learning are discussed, and useful techniques for addressing them are offered. Issues include budgeting in-class activity time, losing control of the class, uncompleted assignments, student understanding of open-ended problems, student dislike or abuse of group work, and helping at-risk students become involved.
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Using Student Teams in the Classroom: A Faculty Guide

Book
Stein, Ruth Federman and Sandra Hurd
2000
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB1032.F34 2000
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
Teamwork builds cooperation, problem solving, active learning, and responsibility; such skills are increasingly important in both the classroom and in the workplace. For faculty who want to actively engage students with both the material and one another by using teamwork, this book answers many questions including:
• What happens when one student dominates the group?
• What do we do about students who sit back and are passive or resistant?<...
Additional Info:
Teamwork builds cooperation, problem solving, active learning, and responsibility; such skills are increasingly important in both the classroom and in the workplace. For faculty who want to actively engage students with both the material and one another by using teamwork, this book answers many questions including:
• What happens when one student dominates the group?
• What do we do about students who sit back and are passive or resistant?
• How can tasks be designed to elicit full participation and engagement of every student in the group?
• How do we evaluate group work?

The examples in this book are drawn from a wide variety of fields, including architecture, biology, ceramics, engineering, and English. The range of imaginative strategies—all of which include students working in groups—is evidence of the wealth of ways in which cooperative learning can be incorporated in college classrooms. The authors marry diverse examples and practical applications with solid explanations of the caveats of cooperative learning and a deep respect for how such pedagogical changes will challenge long-held beliefs and practices. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1 and Part 2:
ch. 1 "Teamwork Theory and Discussion"
ch. 2 "Technology and Teamwork"
ch. 3 "Exercise for Students: How Do I Learn Bet?"
ch. 4 "Guidelines for Student Teams"
ch. 5 "Group Exercises"
ch. 6 "Managing Conflict"
ch. 7 "Team Evaluation"
ch. 8 "Top-Notch Tips for Team Learning"
ch. 9 "Enhancing Performance in Small Groups"
ch. 10 "Spectators and Gladiators"
ch. 11 "Betty Miles's Worst Nightmare: A Cooperative Learning Dilemma."

Part 3 contains 28 activities from Syracuse University
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500 Tips on Group Learning

Book
Brown, Sally, author; and Race, Phil, ed.
2000
Kogan Page, London
LB1032.A15 2000
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
With an ever increasing emphasis on continuing professional development, in-service training, plus widening participation in further and higher education, the importance of group learning has never been higher. Collaborative and co-operative learning is a crucial method for helping people get the most out learning, and because it offers the possibility to teach higher numbers, or diverse groups of people successfully, it has become an important technique for educators and trainers ...
Additional Info:
With an ever increasing emphasis on continuing professional development, in-service training, plus widening participation in further and higher education, the importance of group learning has never been higher. Collaborative and co-operative learning is a crucial method for helping people get the most out learning, and because it offers the possibility to teach higher numbers, or diverse groups of people successfully, it has become an important technique for educators and trainers to call upon. Using the well-known, tried and tested 500 Tips format, this book provides practical, user friendly, easy-to-use advice and support which will enhance learning and training. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Foreword

ch. 1 Learning with others
ch. 2 Getting groups going
ch. 3 Particular group learning contexts
ch. 4 Exercises and processes for groups
ch. 5 Groups behaving badly?
ch. 6 Assessing group learning

Further Reading
Index
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"Managing--and Motivating!--Distance Learning Group Activities"

Article
Mills, Barbara J.
The Teaching, Learning and Technology Group, http://www.tltgroup.org/gilbert/millis.htm
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Online Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Ask yourself key questions about the proposed group activity, be certain that the activity furthers course objects, allow for team building, encourage students to monitor group processing, promote individual accountability, etc.
Additional Info:
Ask yourself key questions about the proposed group activity, be certain that the activity furthers course objects, allow for team building, encourage students to monitor group processing, promote individual accountability, etc.
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Team Teaching and Learning in Adult Education

Book
Eisen, Mary-Jane and Elizabeth J. Tisdell, eds.
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1738.T43 2000
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Adult Learners   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
"This volume illustrates several successful applications of team teaching and learning in educational contexts ranging from the traditional classroom to the online classroom, to the workplace, to the community. The emphasis on practice is intentional; it is designed to vivify the inclusive nature of teaming relative to including different perspectives, different pedagogical methods, and both teachers and learners in the multidirectional process of adult learning. The authors provide in-depth discussions ...
Additional Info:
"This volume illustrates several successful applications of team teaching and learning in educational contexts ranging from the traditional classroom to the online classroom, to the workplace, to the community. The emphasis on practice is intentional; it is designed to vivify the inclusive nature of teaming relative to including different perspectives, different pedagogical methods, and both teachers and learners in the multidirectional process of adult learning. The authors provide in-depth discussions of theory on subjects including collaborative learning, action learning, and learning for social transformation and for professional development. Team teaching's challenges and demands are confronted with directness and ingenuity. This volume is a resource for educators in a variety of settings - both those wishing to explore the underpinnings of team teaching and learning, as well as those preparing to implement this promising teaching-learning alternative." (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 The Many Faces of Team Teaching and Learning: An Overview (Mary-Jane Eisen)
ch. 2 Creating and Maintaining Team-Taught Interdisciplinary General Education (Marcia Bundy Seabury and Karen A. Barret)
ch. 3 Team Teaching in Adult Higher Education Classrooms: Toward Collaborative Knowledge Construction (Candace Harris and Anne N.C. Harvey)
ch. 4 This Isn't Kansas Anymore, Toto: Team Teaching Online (Gabriele Strohschen and Tom Heaney)
ch. 5 Working as a Learning Coach Team in Action Learning (Judy O'Neil and Sharon L. Lamm)
ch. 6 Volunteer Trainer Development in Adult Literacy: Using a Team-Based Strategy to Negotiate National and Local Interests (D. Todd Evans and Jane M. Hugo)
ch. 7 Team Teaching and Learning in Diversity Training for National Service Programs (Viviana Aguilar and Ginlin Woo)
ch. 8 Co-Learning in the Community (Regina M. Curry and Phyllis Cunningham)
ch. 9 Team Teaching and Learning in Adult Education: From Negotiating (Elizabeth J. Tisdell and Mary-Jane Eisen)

Relationships to Implementing Learning Alternatives
Index
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Peer Learning in Higher Education

Book
Boud, David, Ruth Cohen and Jane Sampson, eds.
2001
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1031.5.P445 2001
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Peer learning, where students support each others learning, is for many one of the most effective and natural forms of learning. It can form one of the most essential and satisfying parts of a student's higher education experience. As a key developing technique in higher education this book will meet the needs of many who are interested in developing a more formal approach to peer learning in their own work. ...
Additional Info:
Peer learning, where students support each others learning, is for many one of the most effective and natural forms of learning. It can form one of the most essential and satisfying parts of a student's higher education experience. As a key developing technique in higher education this book will meet the needs of many who are interested in developing a more formal approach to peer learning in their own work. The book discusses practical methods of developing more effective learning through the systematic implementation of peer learning approaches. It draws on the direct experience of the authors in their own classes across a range of disciplines. While the emphasis is on higher education, many of the ideas can be applied more widely to further education and professional learning.

Key issues addressed include:
What is peer learning and what is it good for?
What are the design and class management issues that need addressing?
How best can peer learning be introduced and fostered?
What issues need to be considered by teachers and students?
What are the implications for assessment?
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction: making the move to peer learning (David Boud)
ch. 2 Designing peer learning (Jane Sampson and Ruth Cohen)
ch. 3 Strategies for peer learning: some examples (Jane Sampson and Ruth Cohen)
ch. 4 Implementing and managing peer learning (Ruth Cohen and Jane Sampson)
ch. 5 Peer learning and assessment (David Boud)
ch. 6 Team-based learning in management education (Ray Gordon) and Robert Connor)
ch. 7 Project management teams: a model of best practice in design (Jenny Toynbee Wilson)
ch. 8 Peer learning in law: using a group journal (James Cooper)
ch. 9 Autonomy, uncertainty and peer learning in IT project work (Brian Lederer and Richard Raban)
ch. 10 Peer learning using computer supported roleplay-simulations (Robert McLaughlan and Denise Kirkpatrick)
ch. 11 Aligning peer assessment with peer learning for large classes: the case for an online self and peer assessment system (Mark Freeman and Jo McKenzie)
ch. 12 Conclusion: challenges and new directions (David Boud)
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Organizing to Collaborate: A Taxonomy of Higher Education Practices for Promoting Interdependence Within the Classroom, Across the Campus, and Beyond the College

Book
Cuseo, Joseph B.
2002
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB1032.C872 2002
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This book focuses on the terms "collaborative learning," "cooperative learning," and "learning community" in which they have been bandied about in American higher education with great frequency and enthusiasm. One primary purpose of this monograph is to provide a more precise delineation of postsecondary practices that are subsumed or assumed to be embraced by the umbrella terms, collaborative learning, cooperative learning, and learning community, and organize these practices into a ...
Additional Info:
This book focuses on the terms "collaborative learning," "cooperative learning," and "learning community" in which they have been bandied about in American higher education with great frequency and enthusiasm. One primary purpose of this monograph is to provide a more precise delineation of postsecondary practices that are subsumed or assumed to be embraced by the umbrella terms, collaborative learning, cooperative learning, and learning community, and organize these practices into a coherent classification system or taxonomy. Other major objectives of the taxonomy are to: (a) create a common language for improving the clarity of communication and discourse about diverse forms of collaboration in higher education; (b) articulate a strong, research-based rationale for greater use of collaboration practices in postsecondary education, (c) provide a panoramic overview of, and a convenient catalogue for, the wide range of collaborative initiatives that have been imp! lemented at colleges and universities; and (d) serve as a stimulus for triggering wider use of collaborative practices in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Section I: Introduction to the Taxonomy
ch. 1 Purposes and Organization of the Taxonomy
ch. 2 Organization of Taxonomy
ch. 3 Limitations of Taxonomy
ch. 4 Rationale of Taxonomy
Conclusion

Section II: A Taxonomy of Collaborative Practices in Higher Education
Introduction
ch. 5 Collaboration between Students
ch. 6 Collaboration between Faculty
ch. 7 Faculty-Student Collaboration
ch. 8 Cross-Functional Teams
ch. 9 Inter-Institutional Collaboration
ch. 10 Inter-Segmental Collaboration
ch. 11 College-Community Collaboration

Conclusion
Cover image

Igniting Student Involvement, Peer Interaction, and Teamwork: A Taxonomy of Specific Cooperative Learning Structures and Collaborative Learning Strategies

Book
Cuseo, Joseph B.
2002
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB1065.C87 2002
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
The student-centered pedagogical practices of cooperative learning, collaborative learning, and team learning can be united and defined inclusively as two or more learners who work interdependently toward a common goal, on a common task, that culminates with a consensual decision or creation of a common product. The purpose of this monograph is to provide a description and rationale for a taxonomy designed to delineate and categorize itself is included as ...
Additional Info:
The student-centered pedagogical practices of cooperative learning, collaborative learning, and team learning can be united and defined inclusively as two or more learners who work interdependently toward a common goal, on a common task, that culminates with a consensual decision or creation of a common product. The purpose of this monograph is to provide a description and rationale for a taxonomy designed to delineate and categorize itself is included as a separate unit, with the intention that it may serve as a stand-alone "user’s manual" or "procedural index file" containing specific, step-by-step practices that can be accessed conveniently and implemented expeditiously. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Section 1 Introduction to the Taxonomy
ch. 1 Purposes of the Taxonomy
ch. 2 Organization of the Taxonomy
ch. 3 Names for Structures
ch. 4 Number of Structures
ch. 5 Rationale for Structures

Section 2 A Taxonomy of Collaborative Learning Strategies and Cooperative Learning Structures
ch. 6 Pairing (Dyadic) Structures
ch. 7 Small-Group Structures
ch. 8 Structures for Promoting Positive Interdependence
ch. 9 Structures for Promoting Individual Accountability
ch. 10 Structures for Facilitating Team Formation
ch. 11 Structures Designed for Teamwork Outside the Classroom
ch. 12 Structures for Promoting Between Team Interaction & Whole Class Synergy
Conclusion

References
Article cover image

"Emerging Models of Online Collaborative Learning: Can Distance Enhance Quality?"

Article
Ehrmann, Stephen C., and Collins, Mauri
2001
The Teaching, Learning and Technology Group (2001) http://www.tltgroup.org/resources/Collab_Distance.html
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
Argues that online collaboration among students does not need to follow the same forms as traditional interaction in face-to-face classrooms. Reviews pioneering and imaginative ways of helping students learn with one another in virtual space – ways that multiply the advantages of extended access with the strengths of enriched learning environments.
Additional Info:
Argues that online collaboration among students does not need to follow the same forms as traditional interaction in face-to-face classrooms. Reviews pioneering and imaginative ways of helping students learn with one another in virtual space – ways that multiply the advantages of extended access with the strengths of enriched learning environments.
Cover image

Team-Based Learning

Book
Hills, Howard
2001
Gower Publishing Company, Burlington, VT
LB1032.H56 2001
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
Howard Hills' Team-Based Learning shows how the ability to learn lies at the heart of effective working in teams. His book identifies the ingredients that turn good teams into teams that improve. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Howard Hills' Team-Based Learning shows how the ability to learn lies at the heart of effective working in teams. His book identifies the ingredients that turn good teams into teams that improve. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: why write a book about Team-Based Learning?

Part One The Foundation for Team-Based Learning
ch. 1 Why do we work in terms so much?
ch. 2 Teams
ch. 3 Personality and its effects on learning together
ch. 4 Team culture

Part Two The Building Blocks and Tools for Team-Based Learning What Team-Based
ch. 5 Learning looks like
ch. 6 Understanding effective learning
ch. 7 Internal communication

Part Three The Roles of Those Involved in Team-Based Learning The role of the leader
ch. 8 The role of the individual
ch. 9 The role of the training department

References and further reading
Index
Cover image

Student-Assisted Teaching: A Guide to Faculty-Student Teamwork

Book
Miller, Judith, James E. Groccia and Marilyn S. Miller, eds.
2001
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB1031.5.S78 2001
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This innovative book provides a range of models for undergraduate student-assisted teaching partnerships to help faculty, faculty developers, and administrators make learning more student-centered, more effective, and more productive.

Each of the 31 models included in this volume is supported with practical details and focuses on four main aspects of a specific peer-assisted learning environment: 1) implementation, 2) evidence of effectiveness and learning benefits, 3) analysis of time and cost expenditures, and 4) ...
Additional Info:
This innovative book provides a range of models for undergraduate student-assisted teaching partnerships to help faculty, faculty developers, and administrators make learning more student-centered, more effective, and more productive.

Each of the 31 models included in this volume is supported with practical details and focuses on four main aspects of a specific peer-assisted learning environment: 1) implementation, 2) evidence of effectiveness and learning benefits, 3) analysis of time and cost expenditures, and 4) suggestions for replication.

The chapters present a range of approaches, applications, disciplines, institutions, and contexts, and demonstrate that student-faculty partnerships can be adapted to meet diverse needs in a variety of situations. Extensive appendices aid implementation by providing concrete examples of hiring documents, training syllabi, teaching materials, and evaluation methods. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the editors
Foreword
Preface
Introduction
Model Matrix

Part I. Undergraduate Students Assisting with Programs for First-Year Students
ch. 1 Establishing a Common Ground: A Cojoint Training Model for Instructors and Peer Educators. (Eve M. Adams, Susan C. Brown, and Terry L. Cook)
ch. 2 Lessons From Peers: The Design Exchange (Mark J. Chidister, Frank H. Bell, Jr., and Kurt M. Earnest)
ch. 3 Peer Teaching in the Experimental College (Robyn Gittleman and Howard Woolf)
ch. 4 Peer Facilitators as Lead Freshman Seminar Instructors Jean M. Henscheid)
ch. 5 The Teaching Teams Program: A Just-in-Time model for Peer Assistance (Harold P. Larson, Reed Mencke, Stacy J. Tollefson, Elizabeth Harrison, and Elena Berman)
ch. 6 The Teaching Teams Program: Transforming the Role of the Graduate Teaching Assistant (David A. Wood, Jr., Jennifer L. Hart, Stacy J. Tollefson, Dawn E. DeToro, and Julie Libarkin)
ch. 7 The Teaching Teams Program: Empowering Undergraduates in a Student-Centered Research University (Lacey A. Stover, Kristen A. Story, Amanda M. Skousen, Cynthia E. Jacks, Heather Logan, and Benjamin T. Bush)
ch. 8 Peer-Assisted Cooperative Learning: An Experiment in Educational Quality and Productivity (Judith E. Miller, david DiBiasio, John Minasian, and James S. Catterall)
ch. 9 Students: Managing to Learn; Teachers: Learning to Manage (Martin H. Murray)
ch. 10 Undergraduates Teaching in a Collaborative Learning Paradigm (Samuel B. Thompson, Sarah B. Westfall, and Christine Reimers)
ch. 11 Peers at Work: Tutors at Spelman College (Anne B. Warner and Christine K. Farris)
ch. 12 Students Mentoring Students in Portfolio Development (W. Alan Wright and Bruce Barton)

Part II. Undergraduate Students Assisting with Difficult Courses
ch. 13 The Experimental Study Group: An Alternative First-Year Program at MIT (David Custer and Peter Dourmashkin)
ch. 14 MASH (Math and Science Help): Supplemental Instruction at a Technological University (Ann garvin and Dale Snyder)
ch. 15 Undergraduate Peer Mentors in Mathematics (Miguel Paredes, Paul Pontius, Rene Torres, and Joseph Chance)
ch. 16 A Model for Integrating Technical Preceptors into the Classroom (Mary Poulton and John Kemeny)
ch. 17 Academic Excellence Workshops: Boosting Success in Technical Courses (Ruth A. Streveler)
ch. 18 Supplemental Instruction at an Urban Community College (Joyce Ship Zaritsky)

Part III. Undergraduate Students Assisting with Special Groups
ch. 19 Peer-Assisted Teaching and Learning in Distance education (Judith A. Couchman)
ch. 20 Using Structured Study Groups to Create Chemistry Honors Sections (Brian P. Coppola, Douglas S. Daniels, and Jason K. Pontrello)
ch. 21 Student Mentoring and Community in a University Honors Program (Ronald E. Mickel)
ch. 22 Where Undergraduates are the Experts: Peer-Based Instruction in the Writing Center (Dennis Paoli and Eric Hobson)

Part IV. Undergraduate Students Assisting in Courses and Programs for All Students
ch. 23 Peer Facilitators of In-Class Groups: Adapting Problem-Based Learning to the Undergraduate Setting (Deborah E. Allen and Harold B. White, III)
ch. 24 Student-Directed Instruction in an Undergraduate Psychopathology Course (Cheryl Golden and Calverta McMorris)
ch. 25 Peer Writing Tours (Lisa Lebduska)
ch. 26 The Workshop Project: Peer-Led team Learning in Chemistry (Jerry L. Sarquis. Linda J. Dixon, David K. Gosser, Jack A. Kampmeier, Vicki Roth, Victor S. Strozak, and Pratibha varma-Nelson)
ch. 27 An Introductory Psychology Laboratory designed and Taught by Undergraduate Teaching Interns (Stephen P. Stelzner, Michael G. Livingston, and Thomas Creed)
ch. 28 Undergraduate Teaching Assistants Bring Active Learning to Class (Melissa A. Thibodeau)

Part V. Undergraduate Students Assisting in Faculty Development
ch. 29 Student-Faculty Partnerships to develop Teaching and Enhance Learning (Milton D. Cox)
ch. 30 Educating the Critic: Student Driven Quality (Elizabeth Kinland, Lisa Firing Lenze, Lynn Melander Moore, and Larry D. Spence)
ch. 31 College Teachers and Student Consultants: Collaborating about Teaching and Learning (D. Lynn Sorenson)
Cover image

Facilitating Students' Collaborative Writing

Book
Speck, Bruce W.
2002
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
PN181.S64 2002
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Collaboration is interwoven in the writing process in both obvious and subtle ways--from a writer using the language that he or she inherited, to referring to the works of other writers both explicitly and implicitly, to writing together with a colleague. In this book, the author explains that collaborative writing can be a useful pedagogical tool professors can use to help students actively learn about the subject matter and about ...
Additional Info:
Collaboration is interwoven in the writing process in both obvious and subtle ways--from a writer using the language that he or she inherited, to referring to the works of other writers both explicitly and implicitly, to writing together with a colleague. In this book, the author explains that collaborative writing can be a useful pedagogical tool professors can use to help students actively learn about the subject matter and about themselves. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Pedagogical Support for Classroom Collaborative Writing Assignments
The Collaborative Nature of Writing
Collaborative Writing and Pedagogical Theory
Challenges to Integrating Collaborative Writing in the Classroom
The Role of the Professor in Classroom Collaborative Writing Assignments
Practical Benefits of Using Collaborative Writing in the Classroom
Conclusion
The Range of Collaborative Writing Opportunities
Brief In-class Collaborative Writing Assignments
Larger Collaborative Writing Projects
Conclusion
Constructing Collaborative Writing Assignments
The Writing Process
The Writing Assignment
The Collaborative Writing Assignment
Forming Groups, Training Students to Be Effective Collaborators, and Managing Collaborative Groups
Forming Groups
Training Students to Be Effective Collaborators
Managing Collaborative Groups
Conclusion
Collaborative Writing and Computers
Why Use Computer Technology to Teach Collaborative Writing?
What Problems Might Arise in Using Computer Technology to Teach Collaborative Writing?
Conclusion
Grading Students' Collaborative Writing Projects
Fairness
The Problem of Cheating
Rubrics
Methods of Assigning Grades
Conclusion
Conclusions and Recommendations
References
Index
Cover image

147 Practical Tips for Teaching Online Groups

Book
Hanna, Donald E., Michelle Glowacki-Dudka and Simone Conceicao-Runlee
2000
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB1044.87.H35 2000
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Online Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
From experienced distance educators comes this comprehensive collection of strategies for teaching effectively online.
Beginning with pre-instruction preparation and progressing through actual online teaching, 147 Practical Tips for Teaching Online Groups will help you feel more comfortable and competent heading into an online course, whether you're a new instructor or an experienced professor. The authors dispel popular myths in online education and anticipate the potential problems you might face teaching ...
Additional Info:
From experienced distance educators comes this comprehensive collection of strategies for teaching effectively online.
Beginning with pre-instruction preparation and progressing through actual online teaching, 147 Practical Tips for Teaching Online Groups will help you feel more comfortable and competent heading into an online course, whether you're a new instructor or an experienced professor. The authors dispel popular myths in online education and anticipate the potential problems you might face teaching in the online medium. They also advise you on how to set up and implement your online course, and make the course discussions as interactive as those you have in the traditional face-to-face classroom setting.

If you're involved in web-based education — or if you're about to be — 147 Practical Tips for Teaching Online Groups will become one of your most trusted resources. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword by Parker J. Palmer
Preface
A Unique Look at the Authors
Why This Book?
The Web-based Environment
Synchronous and Asynchronous Learning
The Addition of Technology to the Teacher, Learner, and Content of the Classroom
The Context of This Book

ch. 1 Before You Begin
ch. 2 Myths and Constraints of Online Teaching and Learning Myths of Online Teaching and Learning
ch. 3 Organizing the Online Course
ch. 4 Beginning Instruction in the Online Course: Implementing the Course
Design
Postscript
Some Final Words

Appendix A
Online Classroom Software
Appendix B
References and Bibliography
Appendix C
Online Resources
Cover image
Wabash tree

Collaborative Learning Techniques: A Handbook for College Faculty

Book
Barkely, Elizabeth F., K. Patricia Cross, and Claire Howell Major
2005
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1032.B318 2005
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Engaging students in active learning is a predominant theme in today's classrooms. To promote active learning, teachers across the disciplines and in all kinds of colleges are incorporating collaborative learning into their teaching. Collaborative Learning Techniques is a scholarly and well-written handbook that guides teachers through all aspects of group work, providing solid information on what to do, how to do it, and why it is important to student learning. ...
Additional Info:
Engaging students in active learning is a predominant theme in today's classrooms. To promote active learning, teachers across the disciplines and in all kinds of colleges are incorporating collaborative learning into their teaching. Collaborative Learning Techniques is a scholarly and well-written handbook that guides teachers through all aspects of group work, providing solid information on what to do, how to do it, and why it is important to student learning. Synthesizing the relevant research and good practice literature, the authors present detailed procedures for thirty collaborative learning techniques (CoLTs) and offer practical suggestions on a wide range of topics, including how to form groups, assign roles, build team spirit, solve problems, and evaluate and grade student participation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1 Introduction
ch. 1 The case for collaborative learning

Part 2 Implementing collaborative learning
ch. 2 Orienting students
ch. 3 Forming groups
ch. 4 Structuring the learning task
ch. 5 Facilitating student collaboration
ch. 6 Grading and evaluating collaborative learning

Part 3 Collaborative learning techniques (CoLTS)
ch. 7 Techniques for discussion
ch. 8 Techniques for reciprocal teaching
ch. 9 Techniques for problem solving
ch. 10 Techniques using graphic information organizers
ch. 11 Techniques focusing on writing

App. A Key to professor names in CoLT examples
App. B Additional ideas for integrating the learning task into a curricular framework
Cover image

Learning Communities: Reforming Undergraduate Education

Book
Smith, Barbara Leigh, Jean MacGregor, Roberta Matthews and Faith Gabelnick
2004
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.L392 2004
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Learning Communities is a groundbreaking book that shows how learning communities (LCs) can be a flexible and effective approach to enhancing student learning, promoting curricular coherence, and revitalizing faculty. Written by Barbara Leigh Smith, Jean MacGregor, Roberta S. Matthews, and Faith Gabelnick¾acclaimed national leaders in the learning communities movement¾this important book provides the historical, conceptual, and philosophical context for LCs and clearly demonstrates that they can be a ...
Additional Info:
Learning Communities is a groundbreaking book that shows how learning communities (LCs) can be a flexible and effective approach to enhancing student learning, promoting curricular coherence, and revitalizing faculty. Written by Barbara Leigh Smith, Jean MacGregor, Roberta S. Matthews, and Faith Gabelnick¾acclaimed national leaders in the learning communities movement¾this important book provides the historical, conceptual, and philosophical context for LCs and clearly demonstrates that they can be a key element in institutional transformation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Learning communities and undergraduate education reform
ch. 2 Learning community history : education for what? : education for whom
ch. 3 Learning community curricular structures
ch. 4 Core practices in learning communities
ch. 5 General education, the first year of college, and learning communities
ch. 6 Success for all : learning communities in basic skills and English as a second language settings
ch. 7 Information and feedback : using assessment to strengthen and sustain learning communities
ch. 8 Recruiting and supporting learning community teachers
ch. 9 Initiating and sustaining learning communities
ch. 10 The future of learning communities
Cover image
Wabash tree

Sustaining & Improving Learning Communities

Book
Laufgraben, Jodi Levine, Nancy S. Shapiro and Associates
2004
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2341.L245 2004
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In this new book, the authors of Creating Learning Communities advance the exploration of this important innovation in undergraduate education. They address issues involved in enhancing, sustaining and expanding learning communities, such as campus culture, curriculum, pedagogies, and faculty development. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
In this new book, the authors of Creating Learning Communities advance the exploration of this important innovation in undergraduate education. They address issues involved in enhancing, sustaining and expanding learning communities, such as campus culture, curriculum, pedagogies, and faculty development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction : the what and why of learning communities
ch. 2 A campus culture for sustaining learning communities
ch. 3 Planning and assessing the curriculum
ch. 4 Pedagogy that builds community
ch. 5 Faculty development
ch. 6 Developing purposeful and focused assessment
ch. 7 Approaching diversity through learning communities
ch. 8 Sustaining living-learning programs
ch. 9 Next steps : expanding our understanding of communities of learning
Additional Info:
This book records the story of how one professor at a research university used a form of active learning to change the way he taught— from traditional lecture and examinations to cooperative learning and student projects.

Drawn from teaching notes, conversations with students, student evaluations, and annual reports, readers will learn the kinds of risks, assumptions, and decisions they will face as they change their teaching to emphasize ...
Additional Info:
This book records the story of how one professor at a research university used a form of active learning to change the way he taught— from traditional lecture and examinations to cooperative learning and student projects.

Drawn from teaching notes, conversations with students, student evaluations, and annual reports, readers will learn the kinds of risks, assumptions, and decisions they will face as they change their teaching to emphasize student learning, particularly during the critical first days of change.

Engagingly written, Leaving the Lectern offers an honest and insightful look at the challenges and rewards of achieving change in the classroom.

This book:

* Motivates faculty and graduate students to visualize what changing their teaching to enhance student learning will be like by illustrating through narration how a professor much like them made the change
* Provides reflective questions at the end of each chapter to help readers use the information in the chapter
* Enhances the readers' preparation for the change by citing references to pedagogical precepts, strategies, and tools
* Summarizes the seven themes found in the book to help bring about the change (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Before the Change
ch. 2 Change Involves Taking Risks
ch. 3 Change Can Be Piecemeal
ch. 4 Change Is Finding and Sharing Answers to Questions About Student Learning
ch. 5 Change Alters What You Put Into the Course
ch. 6 Change Emphasizes What Students Take Away From the Course
ch. 7 Change Must Be Assessed for Student Learning
ch. 8 Change Must Be Assessed for Teaching
ch. 9 Change Is Hard in Isolation but Facilitated by Connections
ch. 10 Change Means Changing Your Concepts About Education
ch. 11 Change Means Changing Your Concepts About Yourself

Conclusion
Appendix: A Sketch of the National Reform of Undergraduate Education
Bibliography
Index
TTR cover image

"Teaching Students by Having Students Teach: Dealing with the 'Problem' Sections of a Course"

TTR
Bohmbach, Karla G.
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 3 (2000): 170-176
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
The author describes a positive turnaround that occurred in working with both the Prophets unit of her Hebrew Bible course and the Paul unit in her New Testament course. She initiated this turnaround by challenging the students to take over the teaching of those units through small group presentations. The emphasis on length and creativity in these presentations prompted some exemplary work on the part of students. And students now ...
Additional Info:
The author describes a positive turnaround that occurred in working with both the Prophets unit of her Hebrew Bible course and the Paul unit in her New Testament course. She initiated this turnaround by challenging the students to take over the teaching of those units through small group presentations. The emphasis on length and creativity in these presentations prompted some exemplary work on the part of students. And students now identify these units as both the most memorable of the course and where their most effective learning takes place.
TTR cover image

"Experiencing Shared Inquiry Through the Process of Collaborative Learning"

TTR
Lee, Moira
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 2 (2000): 108-116
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
This article is based on an analysis of a qualitative research case study involving three British adult educational-theological sites which were experimenting with collaborative learning. The focus of this practice-based research was listening to and observing adults engaged in collaborative learning in order to elucidate what they perceived to be some integral values inherent in this learning approach. 'Experiencing Shared Inquiry' emerged as one of the hallmarks of collaborative learning. ...
Additional Info:
This article is based on an analysis of a qualitative research case study involving three British adult educational-theological sites which were experimenting with collaborative learning. The focus of this practice-based research was listening to and observing adults engaged in collaborative learning in order to elucidate what they perceived to be some integral values inherent in this learning approach. 'Experiencing Shared Inquiry' emerged as one of the hallmarks of collaborative learning. The dynamic engagement of hearts and minds in collaborative learning harnesses the collective wisdom of God's people. Two movements are enfolded within 'Experiencing Shared Inquiry': stimulating thinking through dialogue process and drawing upon the resources of the learning community.
Journal cover image

Pastor and Parish as Co-learners in the Doctor of Ministry Program: An Experiment in Theological Education

Journal Issue
1980
Theological Education 16, no. 2, spec. issue (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Theological Education

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
I. Background, Goals, and Underlying Assumption of the Hartford Seminary D.Min. Program
A. Background
B. Purpose and Goals
C. Underlying Assumptions
II. Implementing the Assumption: Program Components and Design
A. Design of the Core Program
B. Design of the Parish Option
III. Research and Evaluation Design
IV. Who Came and Why: Clergy and Congregations in the Hartford D.Min. Class of 1977
A. Motivation for Pastors Entering the Program
B. Characteristics of Entering Clergy
C. Characteristics of the Parishes
D. Comparisons between Pastors and Parishes in the Two Options
V. A Lesson in Innovation: How the Program Components Worked
A. The Core Program in Operation
B. The Parish Option in Operation
C. More than Sugar Pills for the Control Group
D. Hidden Assumptions Jump Out
VI. Did It Make a Difference? Change in Clergy and Congregation
A. Parish Change
B. Factors Related to Parish Change
C. Factors Related to Pastor Change
VII. The Bottom Line: Program Changes, Cost/Benefits, and Implications for Theological Education
A. Doctoring and Redesigning
B. Costs and Benefits for the Seminary
C. Implications for Theological Education
D. Postscript
Commentary (Loren B. Mead, J. Randall Nichols, and Perry LeFevre)
Cover image

Teacher Teams That Get Results: 61 Strategies for Sustaining and Renewing Professional Learning Communities

Book
Gregory, Gayle H. and Kuzmich, Lin
2007
Corwin Press, A SAGE Publications Company, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1029.T4G74 2007
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Adult Learners

Additional Info:
Successful professional learning communities achieve their positive results through team efforts, and each strategy in this illustrated collection of team and group process skills offers readers ready-to-use tools for success. Best-selling authors Gayle Gregory and Lin Kuzmich focus on the where, what, why, how, and when to use each strategy in order to deepen understanding, solve real problems, plan steps for transfer, develop complex solutions, and sustain positive results and ...
Additional Info:
Successful professional learning communities achieve their positive results through team efforts, and each strategy in this illustrated collection of team and group process skills offers readers ready-to-use tools for success. Best-selling authors Gayle Gregory and Lin Kuzmich focus on the where, what, why, how, and when to use each strategy in order to deepen understanding, solve real problems, plan steps for transfer, develop complex solutions, and sustain positive results and successes. These skills and strategies can be used by teachers, teacher leaders, school administrators whenever faculty or staff need a boost toward new and creative solutions aimed at achieving results. With tools supporting the quality of staff dialogue and student learning, this resource is perfect for staff meetings, professional development workshops, and parent advisory meetings. It also can be used by school and district staff to train trainers and facilitate workshops. Sustaining results-oriented team efforts is hard work. This one stop shopping guide gives educators a collection of tools, graphic organizers, and examples of strategies in action, all to support the momentum and success of their team efforts and learning communities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
About the Authors
Introduction: Tools That Get Results

ch. 1 Creating a Growth-Oriented Culture
ch. 2 Sharing Knowledge and Skills
ch. 3 Building Resilience and Creating Solutions
ch. 4 Determining Priorities and Creating Excellence
ch. 5 Putting It All Together

References
Index
Cover image

Promoting Active Learning: Strategies for the College Classroom

Book
Meyers, Chet and Thomas B. Jones
1993
Jossey-Bass Publishers, San Francisco
LB1027.23.M49 1993
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Case Study Method   |   Role-Playing   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Gives an abundance of practical advice on how active learning techniques can be used by teachers across the disciplines. Using real-life examples, the authors discuss how various small-group exercises, simulations, and case studies can be blAnded with the technological and human resources available outside the classroom. The book is engagingly written for all classroom teachers. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Gives an abundance of practical advice on how active learning techniques can be used by teachers across the disciplines. Using real-life examples, the authors discuss how various small-group exercises, simulations, and case studies can be blAnded with the technological and human resources available outside the classroom. The book is engagingly written for all classroom teachers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Understanding Active Learning
ch. 1 The Case for Active Learning
ch. 2 What Active-Learning Is and How It Works
ch. 3 Creating an Active Learning Environment

Strategies and Techniques
ch. 4 Informal Small Groups
ch. 5 Cooperative Student Projects
ch. 6 Simulations
ch. 7 Case Studies

Resources That Encourage Active Learning
ch. 8 Integrating Reading Materials and Guest Speakers
ch. 9 Using Technology Effectively
ch. 10 Developing and Assessing Instructional Expertise
Cover image

The Kolb Team Learning Experience: Improving Team Effectiveness Through Structured Learning Experiences

Book
Kolb, David A., Alice Kolb, Anna Adams, and D. Christopher Kayes
2004
The Hay Group, Philadelphia, PA
HF5549.5.G73K64 2004
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
The Kolb Team Learning Experience (TLE) will guide a team through a cycle of learning - providing the team with opportunities to experience, reflect and do. Each module provides the team with:
* an introduction to an important team-related concept
* an opportunity to reflect on what the concept means for them as an individual team member
* time to discuss what it means for them as a team
* ...
Additional Info:
The Kolb Team Learning Experience (TLE) will guide a team through a cycle of learning - providing the team with opportunities to experience, reflect and do. Each module provides the team with:
* an introduction to an important team-related concept
* an opportunity to reflect on what the concept means for them as an individual team member
* time to discuss what it means for them as a team
* the chance for the team to experiment with what they have learned (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Team Learning Overview
ch. 2 Team Purpose
ch. 3 Team Membership
ch. 4 Team Roles
ch. 5 Team Context
ch. 6 Team Process
ch. 7 Team Action
Tactics cover image

"Finding the Treasure of God's Attributes"

Tactic
Long, Jude
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 249
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a treasure hunt by which students learn about the attributes of God.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a treasure hunt by which students learn about the attributes of God.
TTR cover image

"Learning Through Shared Christian Praxis: Reflective Practice in the Classroom"

TTR
Wong, Arch Chee Keen; McAlpine, Bill; Moore, Tim; Brotherton, Dave; Charter, Ian R.; Emgard, Emma, and Buszowski, Fern
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 305-320
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
The cultivation of reflective practice has become a commonly accepted goal of theological education. However, theological educators must face the challenge of teaching and assessing reflective practice. Hypothesizing that this concern is best addressed in community, the authors of this article devised a collaborative action-research project using Thomas Groome's "shared Christian praxis" model. They describe the ways in which they have, over the course of the project, modified their pedagogy ...
Additional Info:
The cultivation of reflective practice has become a commonly accepted goal of theological education. However, theological educators must face the challenge of teaching and assessing reflective practice. Hypothesizing that this concern is best addressed in community, the authors of this article devised a collaborative action-research project using Thomas Groome's "shared Christian praxis" model. They describe the ways in which they have, over the course of the project, modified their pedagogy to improve their students' reflection on practice.
Tactics cover image

"Theological Dialogue Partners (or Study Buddies for Graduate Students)"

Tactic
Coleman, Monica A.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 351
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students learn theology by working in pairs through the semester.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students learn theology by working in pairs through the semester.
TTR cover image

"Making List of What You Know About . . . "

TTR
Miller, Charles William
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 1 (2010): 53
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Using Wikis for Online Collaboration: The Power of the Read-Write Web

Book
James A. West and Margaret L. west
2009
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB1028.5.W398 2009
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
How can online instructors and course designers' instruction harness the popular Web 2.0 tool, the wiki, for successful collaboration and learning outcomes? This book focuses on using wikis in the active learning processes that are the hallmark of collaborative learning and constructivism. It provides both the pedagogical background and practical guidelines, tools, and processes for accomplishing these goals with special emphasis on wikis and other collaborative design tools. This book supports ...
Additional Info:
How can online instructors and course designers' instruction harness the popular Web 2.0 tool, the wiki, for successful collaboration and learning outcomes? This book focuses on using wikis in the active learning processes that are the hallmark of collaborative learning and constructivism. It provides both the pedagogical background and practical guidelines, tools, and processes for accomplishing these goals with special emphasis on wikis and other collaborative design tools. This book supports the effective design and delivery of online courses through the integration of collaborative writing and design activities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Authors

ch. 1 Getting Ready to Wiki
Opportunities for Online Learning
What Is a Wiki?
Types of Wikis
Choosing the Right Wiki
Features of Wikis
Setting Up the Wiki
Summary

ch. 2 Designing Wiki Projects for Collaborative Learning
Teaching and Learning Through Wikis
Laying the Foundation-Preparing Students for Wiki Work
Building the Framework-Designing the Wiki Project
Monitoring Construction-Managing the Wiki Process
Summary

ch. 3 Wiki Projects for Knowledge Construction
Resource Bank
Frequently Asked Questions
Error Finding and Correcting
Historical Time Line
Annotated Bibliography
Online Dialogue
Group Summary
Class Encyclopedia
Summary

ch. 4 Wiki Projects for Critical Thinking
What If...? Scenarios
Case Studies
Debates
Collaborative Research Papers
Evaluation or Research Study
Frame-Based Writing
Nominal Group Technique
Structured Online Critiques
Summary

ch. 5 Wiki Projects for Contextual Application
Event Plan
Process Map
Virtual Science Lab
Field Research Project
Story Creation
Team Challenge
Media Design Project
Service Learning Project
Summary

ch. 6 Wikis Today and Tomorrow
The Value of Collaborative Writing
Integrating Wikis with Other Technologies
What the Future Holds
An Invitation to Collaborate
Additional Resources
Wikis for Educators
Web 2.0
Collaborative Writing
Scaffolding
Bloom's Taxonomy

References
Index
Cover image

Networked Collaborative Learning: Social Interaction and Active Learning

Book
Trentin, Guglielmo
2010
Chandos Publishing, Oxford
LB2395.7.T74 2010
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Online Learning

Additional Info:
The sustainability of Networked Collaborative Learning (NCL) is a key topic of discussion amongst the institutions where it has been or may potentially be introduced. In order to determine the extent of NCL's sustainability, the added value university education may yield by adopting collaborative learning strategies must be quantified. In turn, an understanding of the implications NCL produces in terms of design and management is gained. After comparing NCL with ...
Additional Info:
The sustainability of Networked Collaborative Learning (NCL) is a key topic of discussion amongst the institutions where it has been or may potentially be introduced. In order to determine the extent of NCL's sustainability, the added value university education may yield by adopting collaborative learning strategies must be quantified. In turn, an understanding of the implications NCL produces in terms of design and management is gained. After comparing NCL with other Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) approaches and discussing the possible reasons for adopting it, a multidimensional model for the sustainability of NCL is proposed. The model is characterized by four dimensions: pedagogical approaches, e-teacher professional development, instructional design models and valuation/assessment approaches. Each of these dimensions is examined on the basis of the authors direct experience gained through applying NCL to his university teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of tables and figures
About the author
List of acronyms
Preface

ch. 1 Technology-enhanced learning and networked collaborative learning
ch. 2 The Pedagogical dimension
ch. 3 The e-teacher professional dimension
ch. 4 The Instructional design dimension
ch. 5 The evaluation and assessment dimension
ch. 6 Conclusions

Appendix - eduction design support grid
References
Index
Tactics cover image

"Bursts of Imagination: A Teaching Strategy for Interfaith Ritual Planning"

Tactic
Walton, Janet
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 245-247
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: a group process to design an interfaith ritual in which every religion is respected and no religion is privileged.
Additional Info:
TTR Teaching Tactic: a group process to design an interfaith ritual in which every religion is respected and no religion is privileged.
TTR cover image

"When the Cat's Away, the Mice Keep Learning"

TTR
Simmons, Laura K.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 268-269
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
TTR cover image

"We Learned So Much When You Weren't There!": Reflections on the Interteach Method and the Acephalous Classroom"

TTR
Zeller, Benjamin E.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 270-271
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Cover image

Learning Communities and Imagined Social Capital: Learning to Belong

Book
Quinn, Jocey
2010
Continuum International Publishing Group, New York
LC5256.G7 Q56 2010
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Adult Learners

Additional Info:
This volume critically explores themes of belonging, learning and community, drawing on a range of research studies conducted with adult learners in formal and informal contexts and employing interdisciplinary theory from education, feminist theory, cultural studies and human geography. Dominant but simplistic and regulatory ideas and practices of learning community in higher education and lifelong learning are critiqued. Instead, Jocey Quinn argues that learners gain most benefit from creating their ...
Additional Info:
This volume critically explores themes of belonging, learning and community, drawing on a range of research studies conducted with adult learners in formal and informal contexts and employing interdisciplinary theory from education, feminist theory, cultural studies and human geography. Dominant but simplistic and regulatory ideas and practices of learning community in higher education and lifelong learning are critiqued. Instead, Jocey Quinn argues that learners gain most benefit from creating their own symbolic communities and networks, which help to produce imagined social capital. A rich variety of empirical data is used to explore and demonstrate how such imagined social capital works. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Learning to Belong
ch. 2 Critiquing Learning Communities
ch. 3 Conceptualizing Imagined Social Capital
ch. 4 Re-imagining Educational Spaces
ch. 5 The Joy of Knowledge

Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Tactics cover image

"Using Small Groups, Prepared Questions, and Key Terms in an Introductory Course"

Tactic
Coppins, Wayne M.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 1 (2011): 21
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Discussion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: establishing a predictable structure with discussion questions at the start of each class.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: establishing a predictable structure with discussion questions at the start of each class.
Tactics cover image

"Netnography and the Study of Religion"

Tactic
Love, Velma
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 3 (2011): 247
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students work in groups to study on line presence of African-American religious groups.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students work in groups to study on line presence of African-American religious groups.
Tactics cover image

"A Tournament of Definitions"

Tactic
Hall, Airen
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 3 (2011): 248
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students work collaboratively to define religion.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students work collaboratively to define religion.
Tactics cover image

"Make a List of What You Know About . . . "

Tactic
Miller, Charles William
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 1 (2010): 53-53
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Discussion   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: to introduce and discuss course content on the first day of class, students work in groups to list what they know about the topic.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: to introduce and discuss course content on the first day of class, students work in groups to list what they know about the topic.
Tactics cover image

"Convince the Professor – Classroom Debate with a Twist"

Tactic
Nichols, Michael D.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 1 (2012): 41
BL41.T4 v.15 no. 1 2012
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using debate to introduce a topic.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: using debate to introduce a topic.
TTR cover image

"Narratives or Sources? Active Learning and the Teaching of Ancient Jewish History and Texts"

TTR
Satlow, Michael L.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 1 (2012): 48-60
BL41.T4 v.15 no. 1 2012
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
During my career, I have regularly taught a survey course on the history of Jews and Judaism in the Persian, Greek, and early Roman periods (ca. 520 BCE – 70 CE). Student performance in the course has long concerned and puzzled me. By the end of the course students demonstrated familiarity with the narratives and concepts we covered, but most did not really “think historically.” They had great difficulties using and applying the ...
Additional Info:
During my career, I have regularly taught a survey course on the history of Jews and Judaism in the Persian, Greek, and early Roman periods (ca. 520 BCE – 70 CE). Student performance in the course has long concerned and puzzled me. By the end of the course students demonstrated familiarity with the narratives and concepts we covered, but most did not really “think historically.” They had great difficulties using and applying the historical tools they learned to new situations and evidence. In 2006 and again in 2010 I overhauled the course not only to improve it, but also to figure out how my students learned history. Using a wiki exercise, I traced how students learned and then applied these insights the next time I taught the course. In this essay I report on what I learned.
Cover image

Small Group Learning in Higher Education: Research and Practice

Book
Cooper, James L.,author; and Robinson, Pamela, ed.
2011
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB 1060.C776
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This volume contains material on research based teaching techniques for use in higher education. The focus is on small group learning procedures. None of this material has previously appeared in book form. Twenty of the articles first appeared in the Cooperative Learning and College Teaching newsletter that Jim Cooper and Pamela Robinson edited from 1990 to 1999. These articles address applications of small group learning within a variety of academic disciplines. (From ...
Additional Info:
This volume contains material on research based teaching techniques for use in higher education. The focus is on small group learning procedures. None of this material has previously appeared in book form. Twenty of the articles first appeared in the Cooperative Learning and College Teaching newsletter that Jim Cooper and Pamela Robinson edited from 1990 to 1999. These articles address applications of small group learning within a variety of academic disciplines. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
A Note from Jim Cooper and Pamela Robinson

Part I: Making the Case for Small Group Learning
ch. 1 Preparing Students for an Interdependent World: The Role of Cooperation and Social Interdependence Theory (Karl A. Smith)
ch. 2 Cooperative Learning: Relationships Among Theory, Research and Practice (David W. Johnson, and Roger T. Johnson)
ch. 3 An Instructional Revolution for Higher Education: Rationale and Proposed Methods (Spencer Kagan)
ch. 4 Promoting Deep Learning Through Cooperative Learning (Barbara J. Millis)
ch. 5 The Case and Context for Cooperative Learning (Joe Cuseo)

Part II: Implementation of Small Group Techniques
ch. 6 Lectures: Their Place and Purpose (Joseph Cuseo)
ch. 7 Problems with Lecturing (David W. Johnson, Roger T. Johnson, and Karl A. Smith)
ch. 8 Lecturing with Informal Cooperative-learning Groups (David W. Johnson, Roger T. Johnson and Karl A. Smith)
ch. 9 Using Assessment to Improve: Cooperative Learning (Thomas A. Angelo)
ch. 10 Practice Activities and Your Textbook (Susan Prescott Johnston)
ch. 11 Trouble-Shooting (Susan Prescott Johnston)
ch. 12 Cooperative Poster Presentations (Rose Ann Swartz)
ch. 13 Teams of Four are Magic! (Spencer Kagan)
ch. 14 Increasing Thinking: Through Cooperative Writing (Barbara J. Millis)
ch. 15 Using Group Investigation to Enhance Arab-Jewish Relationships (Rachel Hertz-Lazarowitz)

Part III: Small Group Learning Within the Disciplines
ch. 16 Cooperative Learning and American History (Deborah Dentler)
ch. 17 Cooperative Learning Structures to Foster Student Involvement (Elaine M. Aschettino)
ch. 18 How Chemistry Concep Tests Are Used (Jim Cooper)
ch. 19 ESL Students and the Cooperative College Classroom (Kate Kinsella, and Kathy Sherak)
ch. 20 Learning Techniques and the Basic Writer (Wendy Slobodnik)
ch. 21 College Writing and Cooperative Learning: Implications for Writing Across the Curriculum (Joseph B. Cuseo)
ch. 22 Cooperative Learning in a Sequence of Engineering Courses: A Success Story (Richard M. Fedler)
ch. 23 Jeopardy 305: A Cooperative Learning Method for Teaching History and Systems of Psychology (Lisa Gray-Shelberg)
ch. 24 Classroom-Tested Collaborative Learning Tasks (Edwina Stoll, Barbara Illowsky, Jim Lutto, John Swensson, and Sally Wood)
ch. 25 Cooperative-learning Teams to Establish "International Connections" (Rose Ann Swartz)

Part IV: Applications of Small Group Work and a Look to the Future
ch. 26 Five Must-Know Kagan Structures for Higher Education (Spencer Kagan, and Miguel Kagan)
ch. 27 Constructive Controversy: Energizing Learning (David W. Johnson, and Roger T. Johnson)
ch. 28 The Missing Link: Planning for Student Engagement (Susan Johnston)
ch. 29 Faculty Learning Communities as Catalysts for Implementing Successful Small Group Learning (Cynthia G. Desrochers)
ch. 30 Cooperative Learning and Discipline-Based Pedagogical Innovations: Taking Advantage of Complementarities (Mark Maier, KimMarie McGoldrick, and Scott Simkins)
ch. 31 The Value of Interaction Treatment in Distance and Online Learning (Rana M. Tamim, Robert M. Bernard, Eugene Borokhovski, and Philip C. Abrami)
ch. 32 Intellectual Exploration Together (Donald Bligh)
Cover image

The International Handbook of Collaborative Learning

Book
Hmelo-Silver, Cindy; Chinn, Clark; Chan, Carol; and O’Donnell, Angela, eds.
2013
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1032.I524 2013
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Collaborative learning has become an increasingly important part of education, but the research supporting it is distributed across a wide variety of fields including social, cognitive, developmental, and educational psychology, instructional design, the learning sciences, educational technology, socio-cultural studies, and computer-supported collaborative learning. The goal of this book is to integrate theory and research across these diverse fields of study and, thereby, to forward our understanding of collaborative learning and ...
Additional Info:
Collaborative learning has become an increasingly important part of education, but the research supporting it is distributed across a wide variety of fields including social, cognitive, developmental, and educational psychology, instructional design, the learning sciences, educational technology, socio-cultural studies, and computer-supported collaborative learning. The goal of this book is to integrate theory and research across these diverse fields of study and, thereby, to forward our understanding of collaborative learning and its instructional applications. The book is structured into the following 4 sections: 1) Theoretical Foundations 2) Research Methodologies 3) Instructional Approaches and Issues and 4) Technology. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Contributors
Foreword
Introduction: What is Collaborative Learning?: An Overview

Part I. Theoretical Approaches
ch. 1 Information processing approaches to collaborative learning (Noreen M. Webb)
ch. 2 Developmental approaches to collaborative learning (Susan L. Golbeck, Hebbah El-Mostlimany)
ch. 3 Sociocultural Perspectives on collaborative learning:Towards Collaborative Knowledge Creation( Kai Hakkaraimen, Sami Paavoal, Kaiju Kangas, Pirita Seitamaa-Hakkarinen)
ch. 4 Theories of Cognition in Collaborative Learning (Gerry Stahl)

Part II. Studying Collaborative Learning
ch. 5 Quantitative methods for studying small groups (Ulrike Cress, Fredrich Wilhelm Hesse)
ch. 6 Multilevel analysis for the analysis of collaborative learning (Jeroen Janessenm Ulrike Cress, Gijsbert Erkens, Paul A. Kirchner)
ch. 7 Qualitative methodologies for studying small groups (R. Keith Sawyer)
ch. 8 Conversation Analysis and Collaborative Learning (Timothy Koschmann)
ch. 9 Verbal data analysis for understanding interactions
ch. 10 Linguistic Analysis Methods for Studying Small Groups (Iris Howley, Elijah Mayfield, Carolyn Penstein Rose)
ch. 11 Advancing understanding of collaborative learning with data derived from video records (Brigid J.S. Barron, Roy Pea, Randi A. Engle)
ch. 12 Mixed methods for analyzing collaborative learning (Sadhana Puntambekar)

Part III. Instructional Issues and Approaches to Collaborative Learning
ch. 13 Cultivating a Community of Learners in K-12 Classrooms ( Katerine Bielacyc, Manu Kapur, Allan Collins)
ch. 14 Motivation in Collaborative Groups (Toni Kempler Rogat, Lisa Linnenbrink-Garcia, Nicole DiDonato)
ch. 15 Child Leaders in Collaborative Groups (Brian Miller, Jingjing Sun, Xiaoying Wu, Richard C. Anderson)
ch. 16 Assessment in collaborative learning (Jan van Aalst)
ch. 17 Collaborative learning for diverse learners (Adrian F. Ashman, Robyn M. Gillies)
ch. 18 Learning Through Collaborative Argumentation (Clark A. Chinn, Douglas B. Clark)
ch. 19 Organizing Collaborative Learning Experiences Around Subject Matter Domains: The Importance of Aligning Social and Intellectual Structures in Instruction (Lindsay L. Cornelius, LEslie R. Herrenkohl, Jenna Wolfstone-Hay)
ch. 20 The Group Investigation Approach to Cooperative Learning (Shlomo sharan, Yael Sharan, Ivy Geok-chin Tan)
ch. 21 Problem-based learning: An instructional model of collaborative learning (Cindy E. Hmelo-Silver, Christina DeSimone)

Part IV. Technology and Collaborative Learning
ch. 22 Designing Collaborative Learning through Computer Support ( Vanessa P. Dennen)
ch. 23 Collaboration Scripts in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning ( Frank Fisher, Ingo Kollar, Karasten Stegmann , Christof Weeker, Jan Zottmann, Armin Weinberger)
ch. 24 Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (Chee-Kit Looi, Lung-Hslang Wong, Yanjie Song)
ch. 25 Collaborative Knowledge Building: Towards a Knowledge Creation Perspective (Carol K.K. Chan)
ch. 26 Metacognition and Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (Philip H. Winne, Allyson F. Hadwin, Nancy E. Perry)
ch. 27 Collaboration in Informal Learning Environments: Access and Participation in Youth Virtual Communities (Yasmin B. Kafai, Deborah A. Fields)
ch. 28 Collaboration, Technology and Culture (Jianwei Zhang)
Tactics cover image

"Imaginary Decision Making: A Key Tactic in Helping Students to Relate to Christian History"

Tactic
McAnulty-Radice, Lindsy
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 2 (2013): 151
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 2
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students work collaboratively and in role play, to understand historical agents.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students work collaboratively and in role play, to understand historical agents.
Tactics cover image

"Demystifying and Disentangling the Aims of Religious Education"

Tactic
Mogra, Imran
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 3 (2013): 246
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 3
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Religious Education   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students work in groups to reflect on the learning goals of the course.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students work in groups to reflect on the learning goals of the course.
Article cover image

The Educational Meaning of Communal Laughter: On the Experience of Corporeal Democracy

Article
Vlieghe, Joris; Maarten Simons; and Jan Masschelein
2010
Educational Theory 60.6: 719-34
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Walks faculty through a comprehensive process to design and implement in-class group learning techniques
Additional Info:
Walks faculty through a comprehensive process to design and implement in-class group learning techniques
Additional Info:
Case study by a professor who transformed his lecture class into a cooperative learning class.
Additional Info:
Case study by a professor who transformed his lecture class into a cooperative learning class.
Additional Info:
Numerous teaching techniques for collaborative and cooperative learning (apparently aimed at K-12, but useful for higher education as well).
Additional Info:
Numerous teaching techniques for collaborative and cooperative learning (apparently aimed at K-12, but useful for higher education as well).
Additional Info:
How to use team-based learning strategies in class. Lots of links.
Additional Info:
How to use team-based learning strategies in class. Lots of links.
Additional Info:
Helpful, brief overview of cooperative learning – what it is and why to do it.
Additional Info:
Helpful, brief overview of cooperative learning – what it is and why to do it.
Additional Info:
Ask yourself key questions about the proposed group activity, be certain that the activity furthers course objects, allow for team building, encourage students to monitor group processing, promote individual accountability, etc.
Additional Info:
Ask yourself key questions about the proposed group activity, be certain that the activity furthers course objects, allow for team building, encourage students to monitor group processing, promote individual accountability, etc.
Additional Info:
This page links to a Word document with a rubric to guide students when peer-reviewing each other’s written work.
Additional Info:
This page links to a Word document with a rubric to guide students when peer-reviewing each other’s written work.
Additional Info:
 An overview of using peer review in the classroom, including: planning for peer review, helping students make effective comments, helping students handle divergent advice, sample worksheet and additional information.
Additional Info:
 An overview of using peer review in the classroom, including: planning for peer review, helping students make effective comments, helping students handle divergent advice, sample worksheet and additional information.
Additional Info:
A wealth of resources and interconnected websites suggesting ways to prepare students for peer review. Includes sample forms and grading grids.
Additional Info:
A wealth of resources and interconnected websites suggesting ways to prepare students for peer review. Includes sample forms and grading grids.
Additional Info:
A brief 4 page essay providing theory and research, strategies, and “how-to” for designing collaborative learning experiences in small groups, in order to enhance students’ critical thinking, self esteem and the acceptance of others, and improve interpersonal effectiveness. IDEA Paper no. 38, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
A brief 4 page essay providing theory and research, strategies, and “how-to” for designing collaborative learning experiences in small groups, in order to enhance students’ critical thinking, self esteem and the acceptance of others, and improve interpersonal effectiveness. IDEA Paper no. 38, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
A clearinghouse with a wealth of publications dealing with undergraduate research and related areas: curriculum, pedagogy, mentoring, program development, and more.
Additional Info:
A clearinghouse with a wealth of publications dealing with undergraduate research and related areas: curriculum, pedagogy, mentoring, program development, and more.
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, examining student-created video projects in several academic disciplines. Such projects engage and challenge students with storyboarding, interviewing, collaborative problem-solving, recording, audio commentary, video-editing and documentary creation.
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, examining student-created video projects in several academic disciplines. Such projects engage and challenge students with storyboarding, interviewing, collaborative problem-solving, recording, audio commentary, video-editing and documentary creation.
Additional Info:
A thorough, multi-link, description by a teacher who "flipped" her community college art history classroom. Includes links to additional resources, videos with excerpts of many of the learning activities and overviews of student surveys.
Additional Info:
A thorough, multi-link, description by a teacher who "flipped" her community college art history classroom. Includes links to additional resources, videos with excerpts of many of the learning activities and overviews of student surveys.
Additional Info:
A short essay that compares the collaborative and cooperative learning to clarify the underlying nature of interactive learning
Additional Info:
A short essay that compares the collaborative and cooperative learning to clarify the underlying nature of interactive learning
Cover image

The Power of the Social Brain: Teaching, Learning, and Interdependent Thinking

Book
Costa, Arthur L.; and O’Leary, Pat Wilson, eds.
2013
Teachers College Press, New York
LB1060.2.P6792 2013
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Research has demonstrated that cooperative learning is one of the most highly effective teaching strategies, while new findings from neuroscience confirm the brain’s natural inclination to think socially. But simply putting students in a group is not enough. The authors of The Power of the Social Brain see “interdependent thinking” as the missing piece of the collaborative puzzle. This authoritative book provides ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Research has demonstrated that cooperative learning is one of the most highly effective teaching strategies, while new findings from neuroscience confirm the brain’s natural inclination to think socially. But simply putting students in a group is not enough. The authors of The Power of the Social Brain see “interdependent thinking” as the missing piece of the collaborative puzzle. This authoritative book provides practical strategies, informed by research from neuroscience and education, to help groups function more effectively and thoughtfully. By adding the “cognitive dimension” to cooperative learning, this book will help readers apply new protocols and strategies for more successful, affirming, and productive group work in classrooms and professional educational learning communities.

Book Features:

Fresh parallel insights on interdependent thinking from the arts, architecture, business, the community, and sports.

Approaches for leveraging cooperative learning to improve thinking, problem solving, performance, and mutual support across a wide range of settings, including classrooms, teams, and professional learning communities.

Instructional strategies from experienced classroom teachers for teaching young people to think and work interdependently at home and at school.

Reflective questions at the end of each section to help guide thinking, stimulate conversation, and catalyze change within a learning community or classroom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreward
Preface: Interdependent Thinking
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Thinking Interdependently – A Human Survival Mechanism

Part I – Interdependent Thinking In Life Settings
ch. 1 Creating and Influencing Momentum: The Challenges and Power of Adults Thinking Interdependently (Jerry Jennings)
ch. 2 Efficient Thinking with Architectural Teams (Peter Saucerman)
ch. 3 Thinking Together in Industry (James Heath)
ch. 4 Knowing the Score: Thinking Interdependently in the Orchestra(Virginia V. Baker, Elizabeth Baker, William Baker)
ch. 5 Thinking as a Team (Mark Jones)

Part II – Facilitation Strategies For Interdependent Thinking
ch. 6 A Virtual Continuum for Thinking Interdependently (Bena Kallick, Marie Alcock)
ch. 7 Creating Communities of Thought: Skills, Tasks, and Practices (Laura Lipton, Bruce Wellman)
ch. 8 Creating Interdependent Thinking Among School Staff (William A. Sommers, Shirley M. Hord)
ch. 9 Developing Smart Groups (Robert J. Garmston)
ch. 10 Working Smarter, Not Harder: Building Interdependent Communities of Practice Building Interdependent Communities of Practice (Diane P. Zimmerman)
ch. 11 In the Company of School Leaders (Patricia Reeves)
ch. 12 Thinking Maps for Meetings of the Mind (David Hyerle, Larry Alper)

Part III – Fostering Dispositions of Interdependent Thought
ch. 13 Cooperative Learning: Accessing Our Highest Human Potential (Judy Willis)
ch. 14 We Instead of Me: The Teacher’s Role in Engendering Interdependent Student Thinking (Patricia A. Roy)
ch. 15 We Think Better Together: Classroom Strategies for Interdependent Learning (Jill Barton, Mary Burke, Sabrina French)
ch. 16 Theater: Celebrating Interdependent Thinking (Sandra Brace)
ch. 17 Thinking Interdependently: The Family as a Team< (Lauren A. Carner, Angela Iadavaia-Cox) br> ch. 18 The Seven Habits of Highly Interdependent Teachers (Jeremy Little)
ch. 19 Teaching the Dispositions of Interdependent Thought (Arthur L. Costa, Pat Wilson O'Leary)

Reflecting on Part III
About the Editors and Contributors
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty

Book
Lang, James M.
2013
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB3609.L275 2013
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Classroom Management   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Nearly three-quarters of college students cheat during their undergraduate careers, a startling number attributed variously to the laziness of today’s students, their lack of a moral compass, or the demands of a hypercompetitive society. For James Lang, cultural or sociological explanations like these are red herrings. His provocative new research indicates that students often cheat because their learning environments give them ample ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Nearly three-quarters of college students cheat during their undergraduate careers, a startling number attributed variously to the laziness of today’s students, their lack of a moral compass, or the demands of a hypercompetitive society. For James Lang, cultural or sociological explanations like these are red herrings. His provocative new research indicates that students often cheat because their learning environments give them ample incentives to try—and that strategies which make cheating less worthwhile also improve student learning. Cheating Lessons is a practical guide to tackling academic dishonesty at its roots.

Drawing on an array of findings from cognitive theory, Lang analyzes the specific, often hidden features of course design and daily classroom practice that create opportunities for cheating. Courses that set the stakes of performance very high, that rely on single assessment mechanisms like multiple-choice tests, that have arbitrary grading criteria: these are the kinds of conditions that breed cheating. Lang seeks to empower teachers to create more effective learning environments that foster intrinsic motivation, promote mastery, and instill the sense of self-efficacy that students need for deep learning.

Although cheating is a persistent problem, the prognosis is not dire. The good news is that strategies which reduce cheating also improve student performance overall. Instructors who learn to curb academic dishonesty will have done more than solve a course management problem—they will have become better educators all around. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part One - Building A Theory of Cheating
ch. 1 Who Cheats - and How Much?
ch. 2 Case Studies in (the History of) Cheating
ch. 3 "Fudging" Learning Environments

Part Two - The (Nearly) Cheating-Free Classroom
ch. 4 Fostering Intrinsic Motivation
ch. 5 Learning for Mastery
ch. 6 Lowering Stakes
ch. 7 Instilling Self-Efficacy

Part Three - Speaking About Cheating
ch. 8 Cheating on Campus
ch. 9 On Original Work
ch. 10 Responding to Cheating
ch. 11 Cheating in Your Classroom

Conclusion: The Future of Cheating
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
Web cover image
Wabash tree

Avoiding the Mid-semester Doldrums

Web
Duffy, D.; and Jones, J.
Topics: Course Design   |   Collaborative Learning   |   Problem-Based Learning   |   Case Study Method

Additional Info:
What do you do when things get sluggish and everyone just wishes the course were over? Do something different
Additional Info:
What do you do when things get sluggish and everyone just wishes the course were over? Do something different
Additional Info:
Consider “flipping” the class—moving the content coverage to outside the class in order to devote precious, in-class time to practice of important course skills.This brief note gives a helpful overview of this emerging concept in higher education (with links).
Additional Info:
Consider “flipping” the class—moving the content coverage to outside the class in order to devote precious, in-class time to practice of important course skills.This brief note gives a helpful overview of this emerging concept in higher education (with links).
Additional Info:
Games help people develop a disposition toward collaboration, problem-solving, communication, experimentation, and exploration of identities, all attributes that promote success in a rapidly-changing, information-based culture
Additional Info:
Games help people develop a disposition toward collaboration, problem-solving, communication, experimentation, and exploration of identities, all attributes that promote success in a rapidly-changing, information-based culture
Additional Info:
Having students work in groups lets them practice the skills they are learning.
Additional Info:
Having students work in groups lets them practice the skills they are learning.
Additional Info:
How can instructors ensure that students come to class with course assignments prepared and readings completed?
Additional Info:
How can instructors ensure that students come to class with course assignments prepared and readings completed?
Additional Info:
Incorporating Wikipedia into the curriculum as a collaborative environment or primary source affords students with the opportunity to develop their media literacy, improve their writing skills, and learn appropriate ways to use Wikipedia as an academic resource.
Additional Info:
Incorporating Wikipedia into the curriculum as a collaborative environment or primary source affords students with the opportunity to develop their media literacy, improve their writing skills, and learn appropriate ways to use Wikipedia as an academic resource.
Additional Info:
The two-stage exam is a relatively simple way to introduce collaborative learning and formative assessment into an exam.
Additional Info:
The two-stage exam is a relatively simple way to introduce collaborative learning and formative assessment into an exam.
Additional Info:
Several techniques to try when stimulating conversation in student group work.
Additional Info:
Several techniques to try when stimulating conversation in student group work.
Additional Info:
Google+ Hangouts is a great video-conferencing tool that can help faculty hold office hours, bring in guest speakers, and collaborate with ease on a variety of projects with TA’s and other faculty.
Additional Info:
Google+ Hangouts is a great video-conferencing tool that can help faculty hold office hours, bring in guest speakers, and collaborate with ease on a variety of projects with TA’s and other faculty.
Additional Info:
There are many options available to professors who want to streamline the process of setting up and having appointments with students. Hopefully, with these resources at your disposal, you’ll be able to reach more students more easily.
Additional Info:
There are many options available to professors who want to streamline the process of setting up and having appointments with students. Hopefully, with these resources at your disposal, you’ll be able to reach more students more easily.
Additional Info:
Ways to explain the importance of group work to students.
Additional Info:
Ways to explain the importance of group work to students.
Additional Info:
Instructions for students on how to participate in small groups
Additional Info:
Instructions for students on how to participate in small groups
Additional Info:
In order to expect students to work effectively, we need to plan purposeful activities that will enable students to build community and rapport with each other.
Additional Info:
In order to expect students to work effectively, we need to plan purposeful activities that will enable students to build community and rapport with each other.
Web cover image

Cash Cab Activity

Web
Sanborn, Fred W.
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
An activity called Cash Cab (based on the TV series) to promote student engagement in class and encourage homework completion outside the classroom.
Additional Info:
An activity called Cash Cab (based on the TV series) to promote student engagement in class and encourage homework completion outside the classroom.
Additional Info:
Collaborative learning can be beneficial for your students. However, it isn't always as easy as it sounds. This tip provides some simple advice for making collaborative learning work in your class.
Additional Info:
Collaborative learning can be beneficial for your students. However, it isn't always as easy as it sounds. This tip provides some simple advice for making collaborative learning work in your class.
Additional Info:
Forming and participating in study groups can increase both the breadth and the depth of your students' learning, create structure for more productive study time, and give students an opportunity for meaningful service.
Additional Info:
Forming and participating in study groups can increase both the breadth and the depth of your students' learning, create structure for more productive study time, and give students an opportunity for meaningful service.
Additional Info:
Collaborative learning is a powerful tool for helping students understand and retain information. Discussed in this post are many effective ways that BYU faculty members are using collaborative learning strategies.
Additional Info:
Collaborative learning is a powerful tool for helping students understand and retain information. Discussed in this post are many effective ways that BYU faculty members are using collaborative learning strategies.
Additional Info:
Students learn better and retain more when they are directly involved in their learning, not just sitting back and being lectured. Usually, they also prefer active learning. Discover ways to help students learn in a more hands-on environment.
Additional Info:
Students learn better and retain more when they are directly involved in their learning, not just sitting back and being lectured. Usually, they also prefer active learning. Discover ways to help students learn in a more hands-on environment.
Additional Info:
Using the tool on this site, students can create group projects that interface music, blogs, documents, photos, video and more.
Additional Info:
Using the tool on this site, students can create group projects that interface music, blogs, documents, photos, video and more.
Additional Info:
Ideal for group projects. Members can bookmark and tab webpages and highlight important passages for each other.
Additional Info:
Ideal for group projects. Members can bookmark and tab webpages and highlight important passages for each other.
Additional Info:
Ideal for group projects. Similar to Googledocs. Members can work on a project and save to shared cloud space.
Additional Info:
Ideal for group projects. Similar to Googledocs. Members can work on a project and save to shared cloud space.
Additional Info:
Similar to Pinterest,but for teaching. This site helps you create a vVirtual "pinboard" for course projects Students can pin any form of multimedia content and create a digital learning portfolio.
Additional Info:
Similar to Pinterest,but for teaching. This site helps you create a vVirtual "pinboard" for course projects Students can pin any form of multimedia content and create a digital learning portfolio.
Additional Info:
This pdf is an entire 200 page book published by Parlor Press, Anderson, South Carolina 2014). It contains twenty-three chapters, by different authors, exploring the benefits and disadvantages of the recent educational phenomenon known as Massive Open Online Courses (acronym, MOOC). 
Additional Info:
This pdf is an entire 200 page book published by Parlor Press, Anderson, South Carolina 2014). It contains twenty-three chapters, by different authors, exploring the benefits and disadvantages of the recent educational phenomenon known as Massive Open Online Courses (acronym, MOOC). 

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Building on the Tradition of CCK08 (Charles Lowe)

ch. 1 MOOCology 1.0 (Glenna L. Decker)
ch. 2 Framing Questions about MOOCs and Writing Courses (James E. Porter)
ch. 3 A MOOC or Not a MOOC: ds106 - Questions the Form (Alan Levine)
ch. 4 Why We Are Thinking About MOOCs (Jeffrey T. Grabill)
ch. 5 The Hidden Costs of MOOCs (Karen Head)
ch. 6 Coursera: Fifty Ways to Fix the Software (with apologies to Paul Simon) (Laura Gibbs)
ch. 7 Being Present in a University Writing Course: A Case Against MOOCs (Bob Samuels)
ch. 8 Another Colonialist Tool? (Aaron Barlow)
ch. 9 MOOCversations: Commonplaces as Argument (Jeff Rice)
ch. 10 MOOC Feedback: Pleasing All the People? (Jeremy Knox, Jen Ross, Christine Sinclair, Hamish Macleod, and Siân Bayne)
ch. 11 More Questions than Answers: Scratching at the Surface of MOOCs in Higher Education (Jacqueline Kauza) ch. 12 Those Moot MOOCs: My MOOC Experience (Melissa Syapin)
ch. 13 MOOC Assigned (Steven D. Krause)
ch. 14 Learning How to Teach ... Differently: Extracts from a MOOC Instructor’s Journal (Denise K. Comer)
ch. 15 MOOC as Threat and Promise (Edward M. White)
ch. 16 A MOOC With a View: How MOOCs Encourage Us to Reexamine Pedagogical Doxa (Kay Halasek, Ben McCorkle, Cynthia L. Selfe, Scott Lloyd DeWitt, Susan Delagrange, Jennifer Michaels, and Kaitlin Clinnin)
ch. 17 Putting the U in MOOCs: The Importance of Usability in Course Design (Heather Noel Young)
ch. 18 “I open at the close”: A Post-MOOC Meta-Happening Reflection and What I’m Going to Do About That (Elizabeth D. Woodworth)
ch. 19 Here a MOOC, There a MOOC (Nick Carbone)
ch. 20 Writing and Learning with Feedback Machines (Alexander Reid)
ch. 21 Learning Many-to-Many: The Best Case for Writing in Digital Environments (Bill Hart-Davidson)
ch. 22 After the Invasion: What’s Next for MOOCs? (Steven D. Krause)

Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
An early You Tube mix of submissions for "The Visions of Students Today," a project by cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch. Learners express apathy and discouragement concerning their education, but also strong desire for empowering experiences of learning as creating, exploring, risking.
Additional Info:
An early You Tube mix of submissions for "The Visions of Students Today," a project by cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch. Learners express apathy and discouragement concerning their education, but also strong desire for empowering experiences of learning as creating, exploring, risking.
Additional Info:
Video. A lengthy You Tube video (1 hour), and dated 2008, but still relevant. Cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch discusses "media literacy" as a site of ongoing struggle and professional development for an instructor in higher education. If our students come to us unprepared for school, does that mean they are unprepared for learning? Is the problem with them, or with school? Have we taught learners the wrong things about learning?
Additional Info:
Video. A lengthy You Tube video (1 hour), and dated 2008, but still relevant. Cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch discusses "media literacy" as a site of ongoing struggle and professional development for an instructor in higher education. If our students come to us unprepared for school, does that mean they are unprepared for learning? Is the problem with them, or with school? Have we taught learners the wrong things about learning?
Tactics cover image

Creating Knowledge in Hybrid Format

Tactic
Withrow, Lisa
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 3 (2014): 225
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 3
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Online Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: student preparation of reading material to increase comprehension and engagement with each other and the topic.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: student preparation of reading material to increase comprehension and engagement with each other and the topic.
Article cover image

"Turning Student Groups into Effective Teams" (pdf)

Article
Oakley, Barbara; Felder, Richard M.; Brent, Rebecca; and Elhajj, Imad
2004
Student Centered Learning, 2 (1), 9-34
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Discussion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This paper is a guide to the effective design and management of team assignments in a college classroom where little class time is available for instruction on teaming skills. Topics discussed include forming teams, helping them become effective, and using peer ratings to adjust team grades for individual performance. A Frequently Asked Questions section offers suggestions for dealing with several problems that commonly arise with student teams, and forms and ...
Additional Info:
This paper is a guide to the effective design and management of team assignments in a college classroom where little class time is available for instruction on teaming skills. Topics discussed include forming teams, helping them become effective, and using peer ratings to adjust team grades for individual performance. A Frequently Asked Questions section offers suggestions for dealing with several problems that commonly arise with student teams, and forms and handouts are provided to assist in team formation and management. 
TTR cover image

The Council of Newton: A Pedagogical Exercise for Understanding Conceptual and Historical Difference with Respect to Intra-Religious Notions of Divinity

TTR
Karapangiotis, Nicole
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 2 (2015): 149-158
BL41.T4 v.18 no.2 2015
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
In this essay, I examine the following pedagogical question: how can we unlock students' mistaken notions that religious “traditions” are monoliths, and instead help them to recognize, puzzle over, and appreciate the complex multiplicity and vibrant set of doctrinal and ritual conversations that characterize religious traditions? More specifically, how can we teach students to recognize these differences with respect to a religion's notions of god? And how can we do ...
Additional Info:
In this essay, I examine the following pedagogical question: how can we unlock students' mistaken notions that religious “traditions” are monoliths, and instead help them to recognize, puzzle over, and appreciate the complex multiplicity and vibrant set of doctrinal and ritual conversations that characterize religious traditions? More specifically, how can we teach students to recognize these differences with respect to a religion's notions of god? And how can we do so even when students are particularly stuck on, invested in, or trained to see homogeneity? In answer to these questions, I present an exercise that I have used in my World Religions courses. This exercise – which I call the “Council of Newton” (named for the building in which I first taught it) – is particularly effective because it helps students uncover and wrestle with this diversity at two levels: conceptually and historically.
Tactics cover image

Book Learning: Raising Questions and Becoming an Expert

Tactic
Reese, Ruth Anne
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 2 (2015): 188
BL41.T4 v.18 no.2 2015
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: dividing up students into separate "expert groups" helps them master difficult reading assignments.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: dividing up students into separate "expert groups" helps them master difficult reading assignments.
Article cover image

One for the Team: Goal Orientation and Gender-Correlated Task Division

Article
Linder, Benjamin; Somerville, Mark; Eris, Özgür; and Tatar, Nick
2010
40th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Assessments of student behavior in first- semester design experiences suggest that early team- based design projects can promote a team performance goal orientation that undermines students’ learning goals. In particular, we find that gender-correlated division of work can easily and unconsciously occur in these teams and that performance-oriented teams may be more likely to undermine womens’ learning goals then mens’ learning goals. We propose mechanisms to explain the effect and ...
Additional Info:
Assessments of student behavior in first- semester design experiences suggest that early team- based design projects can promote a team performance goal orientation that undermines students’ learning goals. In particular, we find that gender-correlated division of work can easily and unconsciously occur in these teams and that performance-oriented teams may be more likely to undermine womens’ learning goals then mens’ learning goals. We propose mechanisms to explain the effect and present results of promising interventions. 
Additional Info:
Tools to prepare students to function effectively in teams. And support for faculty as they manage their students’ team experiences.
Additional Info:
Tools to prepare students to function effectively in teams. And support for faculty as they manage their students’ team experiences.
Additional Info:
The companion web site for the book “Team Writing,” including video of students doing group projects to illustrate advice in the book. The emphasis is on a group writing project, but it’s insights about group dynamics and how to organize are widely applicable. Available for free, with registration. 
Additional Info:
The companion web site for the book “Team Writing,” including video of students doing group projects to illustrate advice in the book. The emphasis is on a group writing project, but it’s insights about group dynamics and how to organize are widely applicable. Available for free, with registration. 
Cover image

Getting Started With Team-Based Learning

Book
Sibley, Jim; and Ostafichuk, Peter
2014
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1032.S485 2014
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Learning Designs   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book is written for anyone who has been inspired by the idea of Team-Based Learning (TBL) through his or her reading, a workshop, or a colleague’s enthusiasm, and then asks the inevitable question: how do I start? Written by five authors who use TBL in their teaching and who are internationally recognized as mentors and trainers of faculty making the switch ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book is written for anyone who has been inspired by the idea of Team-Based Learning (TBL) through his or her reading, a workshop, or a colleague’s enthusiasm, and then asks the inevitable question: how do I start? Written by five authors who use TBL in their teaching and who are internationally recognized as mentors and trainers of faculty making the switch to TBL, the book also presents the tips and insights of 46 faculty members from around the world who have adopted this teaching method. TBL is a uniquely powerful form of small group learning. It harnesses the power of teams and social learning with accountability structures and instructional sequences. This book provides the guidance, from first principles to examples of practice, together with concrete advice, suggestions, and tips to help you succeed in the TBL classroom. This book will help you understand what TBL is and why it is so powerful. You will find what you need to plan, build, implement, and use TBL effectively. This book will appeal to both the novice and the expert TBL teacher. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Larry K. Michaelsen)
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part One: Overview of TBL ch. 1 Introduction ago Team-Based Learning
ch. 2 Getting Your Course Ready for Team-Based Learning (Bill Roberson and Billie Franchini)
ch. 3 The Whole Course ExperienceH
ch. 4 The Evidence, Please (Karla A. Kubitz)

Part Two: Essential Elements of TBL
ch. 5 Using Teams Effectively
ch. 6 Readiness Assurance Process
ch. 7 Application Activities
ch. 8 The Importance of Accountability

Part Three: Getting Yourself Ready
ch. 9 The Emotional Journey to Team-Based Learning (Bill Roberson and Billie Franchini)
ch. 10 The Last Word

Appendices
Appendix A Additional Resources
Appendix B More Simultaneous Reporting Options
Appendix C Lessons Learned in Faculty Preparation - A Retrospective (Bill Roberson and Billie Franchini)
Appendix D List of Interviewees

References
About the Authors and Contributors
Index
Cover image

From the Confucian Way to Collaborative Knowledge Co-Construction

Book
Schalkwyk, Gertina J.; and D'Amato, Rik Carol, eds.
2015
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 142)
LB2331.V36 2015
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Sharing and engaging in interactions and discussion as required for collaborative teaching and learning can be a foreign concept to students coming from Asia or growing up in an Asian family. As such, this first volume in a two-volume edition helps lecturers, educators, and teachers create collaborative teaching and learning experiences with multicultural adult learners in higher education. Topics include:

- ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Sharing and engaging in interactions and discussion as required for collaborative teaching and learning can be a foreign concept to students coming from Asia or growing up in an Asian family. As such, this first volume in a two-volume edition helps lecturers, educators, and teachers create collaborative teaching and learning experiences with multicultural adult learners in higher education. Topics include:

- assessment and evaluation techniques that focus on collaborative teaching and learning with diverse students
- students’ cultural beliefs and strategies for outcomes-based collaborative teaching and learning in Asia, and
- an understanding of the unique learning motivations of contemporary Asian students.

This is the 142nd volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Prologue (Gertina J. van Schalkwyk, Rik Carl D’Amato)

ch. 1 Learning the Confucian Way (Tieyuan Guo)
ch. 2 Outcomes-Based Collaborative Teaching and Learning in Asian Higher Education (Gertina J. van Schalkwyk)
ch. 3 Doing Outcomes-Based Collaborative Teaching and Learning in Asia (Gertina J. van Schalkwyk)
ch. 4 Authentic Assessment of Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes (Brenda C. Litchfield, John V. Dempsey)
ch. 5 Connectivism and the Use of Technology/Media in Collaborative Teaching and Learning (Neena Thota)

Index
Article cover image

The Power of the Learning Community Model for the Development of Supervisor/Mentor

Article
Floding, Matthew; Fuller Thomas; Huffaker, Lucinda; Parker, Rhonda; Rodriguez, Jennie Lee; and St. Louis, Allison
2015
Reflective Practice: Formation and Supervision in Ministry, Volume 35
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Field Education supervisors from 6 schools report on different learning community opportunities they facilitated among a selected group of supervisors, regarding each as a “community of practice.”
Additional Info:
Field Education supervisors from 6 schools report on different learning community opportunities they facilitated among a selected group of supervisors, regarding each as a “community of practice.”
Web cover image
Wabash tree

Successful Strategies for Teams - Student Handbook

Web
Kennedy, Frances with Nilson, Linda B.
2008
Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation, Clemson University
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
A guide for students to help them work more effectively in groups, developed by Clemson University’s Office of Teaching Effectiveness and innovation.
Additional Info:
A guide for students to help them work more effectively in groups, developed by Clemson University’s Office of Teaching Effectiveness and innovation.
Additional Info:
A site with resources for teachers to coach students when providing peer feedback and revision, to promote critical thinking and better writing.
Additional Info:
A site with resources for teachers to coach students when providing peer feedback and revision, to promote critical thinking and better writing.
Additional Info:
A website developed by the University of Minnesota that a faculty member might send students to in order to improve students’ experience and learning in group projects.
Additional Info:
A website developed by the University of Minnesota that a faculty member might send students to in order to improve students’ experience and learning in group projects.
Additional Info:
A spreadsheet Google Doc comparing a range of e-tools that support differentiation of instruction to support learner needs, created and maintained by education consultant John McCarthy.
Additional Info:
A spreadsheet Google Doc comparing a range of e-tools that support differentiation of instruction to support learner needs, created and maintained by education consultant John McCarthy.
Cover image

Facilitative Collaborative Knowledge Co-Construction

Book
van Schalkwyk, Gertina J.; and D'Amato, Rich Carl, eds.
2015
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 143)
LB1032.F33 2015
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Collaborative teaching and learning has been a focus of research recently, yet it can sometimes be a challenge for multicultural students in an educational setting. This second volume of a two-volume edition helps lecturers, educators, and teachers create collaborative teaching and learning experiences with multicultural adult learners in higher education.

The authors of this volume provide:

- outlines of ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Collaborative teaching and learning has been a focus of research recently, yet it can sometimes be a challenge for multicultural students in an educational setting. This second volume of a two-volume edition helps lecturers, educators, and teachers create collaborative teaching and learning experiences with multicultural adult learners in higher education.

The authors of this volume provide:

- outlines of some of the positive relationships that can be developed among students and educators when the process of gaining knowledge is seen as a co-constructed process,
- approaches to relational intelligence and collaborative learning,
- research from neuropsychology and practical applications to teaching, and
- characterizations of emotional intelligence and sociocognitive skills needed in collaborative learning environments.

Though focused on Asian students and their experiences, this volume includes information for all students and educators who are engaged in the collaborative search for knowledge.

This is the 143rd volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Prologue (Gertina J. van Schalkwyk, Rik Carl D’Amato)

ch. 1 Knowledge Construction: A Paradigm Shift (Hugh Gash)
This chapter explores the move toward a constructivist paradigm and collaborative knowledge construction in the broader institutional context of education.

ch. 2 Relational Intelligence and Collaborative Learning (Sheila McNamee, Murilo Moscheta)
This chapter explores the ways in which a relational understanding of the educational process might inform and transform university teaching.

ch. 3 Using a Brain-Based Approach to Collaborative Teaching and Learning with Asians (Rik Carl D’Amato, Yuan Yuan Wang)
This chapter advocates for a more contemporary ecological neuropsychology approach, where brain-learner-environmental interactions are the focus of study, assessment, and evidence-based intervention.

ch. 4 Emotional Intelligence and Sociocognitive Skills in Collaborative Teaching and Learning (Helen Y. Sung)
This chapter explores emotional intelligence as the glue that binds people together regardless of cultural differences.

ch. 5 Reading and Writing for Critical Reflective Thinking (Mary M. Chittooran)
This chapter examines the use of reading and writing activities to promote critical reflection among Asian students in higher education settings.

Index
Cover image

Teaching the Moral Traditions of Others: Editor’s Introduction

Journal Issue
Glennon, Frederick, ed.
2015
Spotlight on Teaching, October 28,
BL41.S72
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Case Study Method   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/teaching/moral-traditions/teaching-moral-traditions-others-editor%E2%80%99s-introduction
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/teaching/moral-traditions/teaching-moral-traditions-others-editor%E2%80%99s-introduction

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching the Moral Traditions of Others: Editor's Introduction (Fred Glennon)
ch. 2 Educating Students as Immanent Critics of Religious-Moral Traditions (Rosemary B. Kellison)
ch. 3 Marriage and Moral Traditions of Others: Teaching Religious Ethics and World Religions (Irene Oh)
ch. 4 Using Group Work and Case Study to Teach about Islamic Law (Nahed Artoul Zehr)
ch. 5 Critical Thinking and Teaching the Religious Traditions of Others (Steven Benko)
ch. 6 Wider Moral Communities: A Framework for Teaching Comparative Religious Ethics (Mark Larrimore)
ch. 7 The Personal is Pedagogical: Embracing Moral Debate in the Religious Studies Classroom (Elizabeth Barre)

Resources
Cover image

Moving Beyond Icebreakers: An Innovative Approach to Group Facilitation, Learning, and Action 1st Edition

Book
Pollack, Stanley; and Fusion, Mary
2005
Center for Teen Empowerment, Boston, MA
HM751.P65 2005
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Classroom Management   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This book captures TE's approach to successful group facilitation, which works in many different environments with both youth and adult groups of all kinds. Contains more than 300 interactive exercises and explains how to use them within a meeting structure that's bound to get the results your group needs! Find out more at MovingBeyondIcebreakers.org: See excerpts from the book, see what people have said about it, and order online.
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Additional Info:
This book captures TE's approach to successful group facilitation, which works in many different environments with both youth and adult groups of all kinds. Contains more than 300 interactive exercises and explains how to use them within a meeting structure that's bound to get the results your group needs! Find out more at MovingBeyondIcebreakers.org: See excerpts from the book, see what people have said about it, and order online.

TE has 10 short videos posted on YouTube that illustrate how we work interactively to engage groups of youth and adults. See exercises in action from Moving Beyond Icebreakers!

- Concentric Circles
- Make It Up: Paper Chase
- Wordstorm
- Evaluation
- The Human Knot
- Name Wave
- Warm-up Questions
- Bag Toss
- Zip Zap Zup with Foot-Stamp
- Wind Blows with Word
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part I: A Methodology for Interactive Meetings
Introduction
Who Is This Book for?
Beyond Icebreakers: The Interactive Meeting Format
Does This Work with Adults?

ch. 1 Why Use Interactive Methods?
Building Relationships and Bringing a Group to Life
Increasing the Group's Understanding of and Investment in its Mission
Scenario 1: Connecting to the Mission
Surfacing Dissension & Building Strong Agreement for Effective Action
Surfacing and Resolving Dysfunctional Group Dynamics
Scenario 2: Interaction Surfaces Group Issues

ch. 2 Working into Interaction
The Bare Minimum for Meetings
Steps toward Interaction

ch. 3 Coping with Resistance and Fear of Failure
From the Group
From Yourself
From the Top
Scenario 3: Resistance from an Authority Figure
The Resistance Diagram
Scenario 4: Resistance Breeds Resistance
Resistance is Forever

ch. 4 The Interactive Meeting Format
A Note about Processing
Preparation
Format Overview
Table 1: The Six-part Interactive Meeting Format
The Sections in Detail
The Introduction
The Names/Warm-up Section
Table 2: Guidelines for Designing the Names/Warm-up Section
Scenario 5: Processing a Warm-up Question
The Springboard Section
Scenario 6: Balancing Tasks and Group Issues
The Work Section
The Summation
The Evaluation

ch. 5 Interactive Meetings: Making Them Work
Arranging the Setting
The Ideal Setting
The Less-than-Ideal Setting
Designing the Agenda
Clearly Identify the Purposes of the Meeting
Be Aware of Individual and Group Dynamics
Choose Appropriate Exercises
Be Aware of Risk
Be Subtle
Keep Your Designs Fresh
Scenario 7: A Small Change Creates a Fresh Experience
Create Your Own Exercises
Scenario 8: Using a Familiar Experience
Take It Slow
Keep It Simple
Be Inclusive
Facilitating the Meeting
Remain Aware of Your Purpose
Give Good Instructions
Observe the Group's Dynamics
Know When to Participate and When to Observe
Enjoy Yourself
Don't Panic if What You Planned Doesn't Work
Processing the Exercises
Format for Processing
Be Aware of Resistance
How Much Processing Is Enough?
Scenario 9: Three Ways to Process Pair Tag
Use Subtlety in Processing
Scenario 10: Subtle Processing of a Warm-up Question
Making It Work for the Long Term
Be Consistent
Evaluate Your Work
Some Final Thoughts about Facilitation
Template for Planning an Interactive Agenda

ch. 6 Putting It Together
The Super Exercises
Exercises with Movement
The Agendas
Agenda 1. A Meeting to Begin Taking Action
Scenario 11: First Meeting of an Action-Oriented, Ongoing Group
Agenda 2: A Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Workshop
Agenda 3: Evaluating an Event
Agenda 4: A Workshop on Personal Goal-Setting
Agenda 5: A Routine Staff Meeting
Agenda 6: Freshman Orientation: Small Group Agenda
Agenda 7: High School Senior Class Meeting

ch. 7 The Engaged Learner: Interactive Methods in the Classroom
Achieving Important Goals through Interaction
Preparing to Create an Interactive Lesson Plan
The Setting
Components of the Interactive Lesson Plan
Introduction
Name Exercises
Warm-up Questions
Table 3: Warm-up Questions for Specific Learning Goals
Springboard Exercises
Work Section
Summation
Evaluation
Frequently Asked Question
Interactive Lesson Plan: Themes in George Orwellas Animal Farm
Interactive Lesson Plan: Introducing Percentages
Creating Springboard or Work Exercises
There, Their, They're Tag (Homonym Tag)
Pop It Into Place
Scenario 12: A Lesson Plan for Dealing with Test Anxiety
Template for Interactive Lesson Plans

ch. 8 Choosing Exercises to Serve Your Goals - Exercises listed according to the goals they can help your group to meet:
Interconnection
Focus
Introspection
Communication
Trust
Surfacing Group Dynamics
Group Problem Solving
Personal Problem Solving
Leadership
Organizing
Planning
Different Perspectives
Cultural Awareness
Creativity
Visual Arts
Acting
Reinforcing Information
Learning Names
Reinforcing Names

Part II: Interactive Exercises
ch. 9 Name Exercises - Seventeen exercises to help people learn each other's names

ch. 10 Warm-up Questions - More than 180 questions in 21 categories: Beyond "Let's go around and introduce ourselves."
All-Purpose Questions
Time
Personal and Work Goals
Remembering Your Life
Relationships
Self-Analysis
Food
Entertainment
Seasons/Holidays
Community/School
This Group/Program/Organization
Ending the Group/Reflecting on Time Together
Event Planning
Event Outreach or Marketing
Theme/Message
Hypothetical
Envisioning the Future
Drugs
Stereotypes/Prejudice/Racism
Social Class
Miscellaneous

ch. 11 Five-Minute Springboard Exercises - Thirty-five exercises that a group can do in five minutes or less

ch. 12 Fifteen-Minutes-Plus Springboard Exercises - Twenty-six exercises that go more in depth

ch. 13 In-Your-Chair Springboard Exercises - Forty-three exercises the group can do without much physical movement

ch. 14 Tag-Style Springboard Exercises - Twenty-eight exercises that wake people up and generate energy

ch. 15 Springboard Exercises for Groups both Large and Small - Fifteen exercises that work with large groups, as well as small ones

ch. 16 The Rest of the Springboard Exercises - One hundred and two exercises that take between 5 and 15 minutes, require some movement (but not tagging), and work with groups of moderate size

ch. 17 Work-Section Exercises- Thirty-five exercises that provide interactive ways to do the work of your meeting or class

ch. 18 Evaluation Exercises- Seven exercises to structure the group's evaluation of its experience

Appendices
A Written Evaluation Form
B Adapting Interactive Exercises for Physical Limitations
C Words for Word Association
D Creating Visualizations
Cover image

Games for Actors and Non-Actors, 2nd Edition

Book
Boal, Augusto
2002
Routledge, New York, NY
PN2061.B49413 2002
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Classroom Management   |   Learning Designs   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Games for Actors and Non-Actors is the classic and best selling book by the founder of Theatre of the Oppressed, Augusto Boal. It sets out the principles and practice of Boal's revolutionary Method, showing how theatre can be used to transform and liberate everyone – actors and non-actors alike!

This thoroughly updated and substantially revised second edition includes:
- two new essays by Boal on major recent projects ...
Additional Info:
Games for Actors and Non-Actors is the classic and best selling book by the founder of Theatre of the Oppressed, Augusto Boal. It sets out the principles and practice of Boal's revolutionary Method, showing how theatre can be used to transform and liberate everyone – actors and non-actors alike!

This thoroughly updated and substantially revised second edition includes:
- two new essays by Boal on major recent projects in Brazil
- Boal's description of his work with the Royal Shakespeare Company
- a revised introduction and translator's preface
- a collection of photographs taken during Boal's workshops, commissioned for this edition
- new reflections on Forum Theatre. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures
Translator’s introduction to the first edition
Translator’s postscript to the second edition
Preface to the second edition: The Royal Shakespeare Company, theatre in prisons and landless peasants
Postscript – with pride in our hearts
Preface to the first edition: the fable of Xua-Xua, the prehuman woman who discovered theatre
Postscript: actors and non-actors

ch. 1 Theatre of the Oppressed in Europe

ch. 2 The Structure of the Actor’s Work

ch. 3 The Arsenal of Theatre of the Oppressed
Feeling What We Touch (Restructuring Muscular Relations)
Listening To What We Hear
Dynamising Several Senses
Seeing What We Look At
The Memory of The Senses

ch. 4 The Early Forms of the Forum Theatre

ch. 5 Forum Theatre: Doubts and Certainties: Incorporating a New Method of Rehearsing and Devising a Forum Theatre Model

ch. 6 First Experiences With Invisible Theatre

ch. 7 Artistic Creation and Divine Madness: A Meditation on Art and the Miraculous

Postscript: The Pedagogy of Fear - Theatre and the Twin Towers: An Essay After 11 September, 2001
Cover image

Theatre for Community Conflict and Dialogue: The Hope Is Vital Training Manual 1st Edition

Book
Rohd, Michael
1998
Heinemann Publishing, Portsmouth, NH
RJ505.P89R64 1998
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Classroom Management   |   Learning Designs   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
The first step forward in working with today's youth is to create a dialogue, and that is exactly what this exciting new book does. It helps you provide opportunities for young people to open up and explore their feelings through theatre, offering a safe place for them to air their views with dignity, respect, and freedom.

The purpose of this manual is to provide a clear look at ...
Additional Info:
The first step forward in working with today's youth is to create a dialogue, and that is exactly what this exciting new book does. It helps you provide opportunities for young people to open up and explore their feelings through theatre, offering a safe place for them to air their views with dignity, respect, and freedom.

The purpose of this manual is to provide a clear look at the process and specifics involved in the Hope Is Vital interactive theatre techniques. The organization is sequential, providing a blueprint for creating a workable plan. Beginning with warm-up exercises and bridging activities, the process moves forward to improvisational scenework, where students actually replace characters in the stories. It is at this point that young people engage in their own mini-theatre and look at choices, strategies, and communication.

Teachers will want to read this book. Counselors will want to read this book. Community leaders will want to read this book. It is useful in any group setting or as a tool for outreach. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward (Doug Paterson)
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Warm-ups
Energy and Focus Work
Circle Dash
Cover the Space
Tilt
Defender
Blind Handshakes
Minefield
Zip Zap Zop
Donkey
Machine

ch. 2 Trust Work
Trust Circle
Trust Falls
Blind (No Contact)
Find Your Mother Like a Little Penguin
Glass Cobra
Circle Height
Falling
Storytelling
Tour of a Place

ch. 3 Bridge Work
Environment
Values Clarification
Two Revelations
Complete the Image
Sculpting
Machine
Monologue Work

ch. 4 Improvisation
Activity/Urgency
Relationship Wheel
Russel's Soup (A/B)
Line Improvs
Exit
Entrance
Image Alive
Line/Location/Theme

ch. 5 Activating Material
Monologues
Sculpting
Machine
Small Groups

ch. 6 Facilitation

ch. 7 Peer Education

ch. 8 One Last Story

Appendix A: Performance Workshop Feedback Sheet
Appendix B: Sample Plans
Appendix C: Resources: Books
Appendix D: Resources: Contacts
Cover image

Enhancing Teaching and Learning Through Collaborative Structures

Book
Bernstein, Jeffrey L., and Flinders, Brooke A., eds.
2016
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 148)
LB2331.E64 2016
Topics: Collaborative Learning

Additional Info:
In this volume, the authors contend that teaching and learning must be viewed as communal work, whether conducted in one classroom, with colleagues at a programmatic level, or when tackled on a university-wide scale. When educators partner with faculty colleagues or students in teaching and learning, it becomes possible to:

- improve the educational experiences of all students,
- model professional behaviors that students will soon be ...
Additional Info:
In this volume, the authors contend that teaching and learning must be viewed as communal work, whether conducted in one classroom, with colleagues at a programmatic level, or when tackled on a university-wide scale. When educators partner with faculty colleagues or students in teaching and learning, it becomes possible to:

- improve the educational experiences of all students,
- model professional behaviors that students will soon be expected to embrace, and
- positively impact graduates, peers, campuses, and even communities at large.

By intentionally creating collaborative structures for communal work to occur, educators can broaden access to opportunities for students, improve engagement experiences within the community, and improve faculty support and scholarship.

Exploring multiple perspectives on collaborative structures in teaching and learning, this volume discusses ways to consider the collaborative structures within education that allow for shared contributions to teaching and learning. It discusses the need for practitioners to view teaching and learning as truly communal work, regardless of the type of setting.

This is the 148th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Jeffrey L. Bernstein, Brooke A. Flinders)

ch. 1 Learning in the Company of Others: Students and Teachers Collaborating to Support Wonder, Unease, and Understanding (Richard A. Gale)
Embracing a shared vision of truly collaborative learning and teaching practice provides students and faculty alike with a richer understanding of the value and potential of working together. Refining roles and expectations allows students to build confidence through disequilibrium and discourse, if we are willing to embrace the risk inherent in these revised collaborative roles.

ch. 2 How Students, Collaborating as Peer Mentors, Enabled an Audacious Group-Based Project (Jeffrey L. Bernstein, Andrew P. Abad, Benjamin C. Bower, Sara E. Box, Hailey L. Huckestein, Steven M. Mikulic, Brian F. Walsh)
The presence of peer mentors enabled a complex project to be implemented in a Campaigns and Elections class, and helped the professor develop a sustainable model that could be used in future iterations of the course.

ch. 3 The Development of a High-Impact Structure: Collaboration in a Service-Learning Program (Brooke A. Flinders, Matthew Dameron, Katherine Kava)
The high-impact educational practices, recommended by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, are embedded in an undergraduate service-learning program and leadership team design.

ch. 4 Collaborative Structures in a Graduate Program (Robyn Otty, Lauren Milton)
Collaboration that extends beyond an individual course creates community, continuity, and leadership opportunities for students in a graduate program.

ch. 5 Exploring Academia: Professionalization and Undergraduate Collaboration (Ellen G. Galantucci, Erin Marie-Sergison Krcatovich)
An undergraduate experience working on a scholarship of teaching and learning project with a professor can have a positive impact on the career development of graduate students and future faculty.

ch. 6 Collaborating in Dialogue for an Optimal Leadership Education (Carmen Werder, Joseph Garcia, Jamie Bush, Caroline Dallstream)
Leadership education at Western Washington University is examined through four different lenses, each revealing important lessons for how leaders are made or revealed, and the role they play in facilitating dialogue around teaching and learning.

ch. 7 Four Positions of Leadership in Planning, Implementing, and Sustaining Faculty Learning Community Programs (Milton D. Cox)
Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs) provide meaningful opportunities for engagement, collaboration, and development of the scholarship of teaching and learning. This chapter describes new positions of leadership that serve to implement and sustain FLCs.

ch. 8 Concluding Comments (Jeffrey L. Bernstein, Brooke A. Flinders)
Taking stock of the lessons learned in this volume and considering next steps to facilitate future collaboration in the service of teaching and learning incite yet further conversation.

Index