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"Critical Insight: Enhancing Experiential Knowledge in Theological Education"

Article
Davies, Susan E.
1993
Union Seminary Quarterly Review 47, no. 3-4 (1993): 53-70
Topics: Theological Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Team Teaching and Learning in Adult Education

Book
Eisen, Mary-Jane and Elizabeth J. Tisdell, eds.
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1738.T43 2000
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Adult Learners   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
"This volume illustrates several successful applications of team teaching and learning in educational contexts ranging from the traditional classroom to the online classroom, to the workplace, to the community. The emphasis on practice is intentional; it is designed to vivify the inclusive nature of teaming relative to including different perspectives, different pedagogical methods, and both teachers and learners in the multidirectional process of adult learning. The authors provide in-depth discussions ...
Additional Info:
"This volume illustrates several successful applications of team teaching and learning in educational contexts ranging from the traditional classroom to the online classroom, to the workplace, to the community. The emphasis on practice is intentional; it is designed to vivify the inclusive nature of teaming relative to including different perspectives, different pedagogical methods, and both teachers and learners in the multidirectional process of adult learning. The authors provide in-depth discussions of theory on subjects including collaborative learning, action learning, and learning for social transformation and for professional development. Team teaching's challenges and demands are confronted with directness and ingenuity. This volume is a resource for educators in a variety of settings - both those wishing to explore the underpinnings of team teaching and learning, as well as those preparing to implement this promising teaching-learning alternative." (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 The Many Faces of Team Teaching and Learning: An Overview (Mary-Jane Eisen)
ch. 2 Creating and Maintaining Team-Taught Interdisciplinary General Education (Marcia Bundy Seabury and Karen A. Barret)
ch. 3 Team Teaching in Adult Higher Education Classrooms: Toward Collaborative Knowledge Construction (Candace Harris and Anne N.C. Harvey)
ch. 4 This Isn't Kansas Anymore, Toto: Team Teaching Online (Gabriele Strohschen and Tom Heaney)
ch. 5 Working as a Learning Coach Team in Action Learning (Judy O'Neil and Sharon L. Lamm)
ch. 6 Volunteer Trainer Development in Adult Literacy: Using a Team-Based Strategy to Negotiate National and Local Interests (D. Todd Evans and Jane M. Hugo)
ch. 7 Team Teaching and Learning in Diversity Training for National Service Programs (Viviana Aguilar and Ginlin Woo)
ch. 8 Co-Learning in the Community (Regina M. Curry and Phyllis Cunningham)
ch. 9 Team Teaching and Learning in Adult Education: From Negotiating (Elizabeth J. Tisdell and Mary-Jane Eisen)

Relationships to Implementing Learning Alternatives
Index
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Student-Assisted Teaching: A Guide to Faculty-Student Teamwork

Book
Miller, Judith, James E. Groccia and Marilyn S. Miller, eds.
2001
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB1031.5.S78 2001
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This innovative book provides a range of models for undergraduate student-assisted teaching partnerships to help faculty, faculty developers, and administrators make learning more student-centered, more effective, and more productive.

Each of the 31 models included in this volume is supported with practical details and focuses on four main aspects of a specific peer-assisted learning environment: 1) implementation, 2) evidence of effectiveness and learning benefits, 3) analysis of time and cost expenditures, and 4) ...
Additional Info:
This innovative book provides a range of models for undergraduate student-assisted teaching partnerships to help faculty, faculty developers, and administrators make learning more student-centered, more effective, and more productive.

Each of the 31 models included in this volume is supported with practical details and focuses on four main aspects of a specific peer-assisted learning environment: 1) implementation, 2) evidence of effectiveness and learning benefits, 3) analysis of time and cost expenditures, and 4) suggestions for replication.

The chapters present a range of approaches, applications, disciplines, institutions, and contexts, and demonstrate that student-faculty partnerships can be adapted to meet diverse needs in a variety of situations. Extensive appendices aid implementation by providing concrete examples of hiring documents, training syllabi, teaching materials, and evaluation methods. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the editors
Foreword
Preface
Introduction
Model Matrix

Part I. Undergraduate Students Assisting with Programs for First-Year Students
ch. 1 Establishing a Common Ground: A Cojoint Training Model for Instructors and Peer Educators. (Eve M. Adams, Susan C. Brown, and Terry L. Cook)
ch. 2 Lessons From Peers: The Design Exchange (Mark J. Chidister, Frank H. Bell, Jr., and Kurt M. Earnest)
ch. 3 Peer Teaching in the Experimental College (Robyn Gittleman and Howard Woolf)
ch. 4 Peer Facilitators as Lead Freshman Seminar Instructors Jean M. Henscheid)
ch. 5 The Teaching Teams Program: A Just-in-Time model for Peer Assistance (Harold P. Larson, Reed Mencke, Stacy J. Tollefson, Elizabeth Harrison, and Elena Berman)
ch. 6 The Teaching Teams Program: Transforming the Role of the Graduate Teaching Assistant (David A. Wood, Jr., Jennifer L. Hart, Stacy J. Tollefson, Dawn E. DeToro, and Julie Libarkin)
ch. 7 The Teaching Teams Program: Empowering Undergraduates in a Student-Centered Research University (Lacey A. Stover, Kristen A. Story, Amanda M. Skousen, Cynthia E. Jacks, Heather Logan, and Benjamin T. Bush)
ch. 8 Peer-Assisted Cooperative Learning: An Experiment in Educational Quality and Productivity (Judith E. Miller, david DiBiasio, John Minasian, and James S. Catterall)
ch. 9 Students: Managing to Learn; Teachers: Learning to Manage (Martin H. Murray)
ch. 10 Undergraduates Teaching in a Collaborative Learning Paradigm (Samuel B. Thompson, Sarah B. Westfall, and Christine Reimers)
ch. 11 Peers at Work: Tutors at Spelman College (Anne B. Warner and Christine K. Farris)
ch. 12 Students Mentoring Students in Portfolio Development (W. Alan Wright and Bruce Barton)

Part II. Undergraduate Students Assisting with Difficult Courses
ch. 13 The Experimental Study Group: An Alternative First-Year Program at MIT (David Custer and Peter Dourmashkin)
ch. 14 MASH (Math and Science Help): Supplemental Instruction at a Technological University (Ann garvin and Dale Snyder)
ch. 15 Undergraduate Peer Mentors in Mathematics (Miguel Paredes, Paul Pontius, Rene Torres, and Joseph Chance)
ch. 16 A Model for Integrating Technical Preceptors into the Classroom (Mary Poulton and John Kemeny)
ch. 17 Academic Excellence Workshops: Boosting Success in Technical Courses (Ruth A. Streveler)
ch. 18 Supplemental Instruction at an Urban Community College (Joyce Ship Zaritsky)

Part III. Undergraduate Students Assisting with Special Groups
ch. 19 Peer-Assisted Teaching and Learning in Distance education (Judith A. Couchman)
ch. 20 Using Structured Study Groups to Create Chemistry Honors Sections (Brian P. Coppola, Douglas S. Daniels, and Jason K. Pontrello)
ch. 21 Student Mentoring and Community in a University Honors Program (Ronald E. Mickel)
ch. 22 Where Undergraduates are the Experts: Peer-Based Instruction in the Writing Center (Dennis Paoli and Eric Hobson)

Part IV. Undergraduate Students Assisting in Courses and Programs for All Students
ch. 23 Peer Facilitators of In-Class Groups: Adapting Problem-Based Learning to the Undergraduate Setting (Deborah E. Allen and Harold B. White, III)
ch. 24 Student-Directed Instruction in an Undergraduate Psychopathology Course (Cheryl Golden and Calverta McMorris)
ch. 25 Peer Writing Tours (Lisa Lebduska)
ch. 26 The Workshop Project: Peer-Led team Learning in Chemistry (Jerry L. Sarquis. Linda J. Dixon, David K. Gosser, Jack A. Kampmeier, Vicki Roth, Victor S. Strozak, and Pratibha varma-Nelson)
ch. 27 An Introductory Psychology Laboratory designed and Taught by Undergraduate Teaching Interns (Stephen P. Stelzner, Michael G. Livingston, and Thomas Creed)
ch. 28 Undergraduate Teaching Assistants Bring Active Learning to Class (Melissa A. Thibodeau)

Part V. Undergraduate Students Assisting in Faculty Development
ch. 29 Student-Faculty Partnerships to develop Teaching and Enhance Learning (Milton D. Cox)
ch. 30 Educating the Critic: Student Driven Quality (Elizabeth Kinland, Lisa Firing Lenze, Lynn Melander Moore, and Larry D. Spence)
ch. 31 College Teachers and Student Consultants: Collaborating about Teaching and Learning (D. Lynn Sorenson)
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Visual Pedagogy: Media Cultures in and Beyond the Classroom

Book
Goldfard, Brian
2002
Duke University Press, Durham, NC
LB1043.G57 2002
Topics: Using Technology   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
In classrooms, museums, public health clinics and beyond, the educational uses of visual media have proliferated over the past fifty years. Film, video, television, and digital media have been integral to the development of new pedagogical theories and practices, globalization processes, and identity and community formation. Yet, Brian Goldfarb argues, the educational roles of visual technologies have not been fully understood or appreciated. He contends that in order to understand ...
Additional Info:
In classrooms, museums, public health clinics and beyond, the educational uses of visual media have proliferated over the past fifty years. Film, video, television, and digital media have been integral to the development of new pedagogical theories and practices, globalization processes, and identity and community formation. Yet, Brian Goldfarb argues, the educational roles of visual technologies have not been fully understood or appreciated. He contends that in order to understand the intersections of new media and learning, we need to recognize the sweeping scope of the technologically infused visual pedagogy both in and outside the classroom. From Samoa to the United States mainland to Africa and Brazil, from museums to city streets, Visual Pedagogy explores the educational applications of visual media in different institutional settings during the past half century. Looking beyond the popular media texts and mainstream classroom technologies that are the objects of most analyses of media and education, Goldfarb encourages readers to see a range of media subcultures as pedagogical tools. He illuminates the educational uses of visual technologies in schools and other venues. The projects he analyzes include media produced by AIDS/HIV advocacy groups and social services agencies for classroom use in the 90s; documentary and fictional cinemas of West Africa used by the French government and then by those resisting it; museum exhibitions; and TV Anhembi, a municipally sponsored collaboration between the television industry and community-based videographers in Sao Paolo, Brazil. Combining media studies, pedagogical theory, and art history, and including an appendix of visual media resources and ideas about the most productive ways to utilize visual technologies for educational purposes, Visual Pedagogy will be useful to educators, administrators, and activists. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: An Ethos of Visual Pedagogy

Pt. 1 Historicizing New Technologies in the Classroom
ch. 1 Media and Global Education: Television's Debut in Classrooms from Washington, D.C., to American Samoa
ch. 2 Students a Producers: Critical Video Production
ch. 3 Critical Pedagogy at the End of the Rainbow Curriculum: Media Activism in the Sphere of Sex Ed
ch. 4 Peer Education and Interactivity: Youth Cultures and New Media Technologies in Schools and Beyond

Pt. 2 Visual Pedagogy beyond Schools
ch. 5 Museum Pedagogy: The Blockbuster Exhibition as Educational Technology
ch. 6 A Pedagogical Cinema: Development Theory, Colonialism, and Postliberation African Film
ch. 7 Local Television and Community Politics in Brazil: Sao Paulo's TV Anhembi

App An Annotated List of Media Organizations, Distributors, and Resources
Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Knowing and Doing: Learning Through Experience

Book
Hutchings, Pat and Allen Wutzdorff, eds.
1988
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1026 .K66 1988
Topics: Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The seemingly subtle difference between asking "What should we teach?" and "How will students be different as a result?" can lead to changes that permeate all aspects of an institution. Decisions about classroom content and methods, as well as larger curricular issues, depend on a clear view of intended outcomes - what we want students to know and be able to do with what they know. It is ironic that ...
Additional Info:
The seemingly subtle difference between asking "What should we teach?" and "How will students be different as a result?" can lead to changes that permeate all aspects of an institution. Decisions about classroom content and methods, as well as larger curricular issues, depend on a clear view of intended outcomes - what we want students to know and be able to do with what they know. It is ironic that college catalogues include assurances that graduates will be prepared to participate in society as contributing citizens, make informed decisions, and take on leadership roles, and yet the abilities necessary for these contributions are not explicitly taught. In contrast, the programs set forth in this volume assist students to integrate what they know with what they can do. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Experiential learning across the curriculum : assumptions and principle (Pat Hutchings, Allen Wutzdorff)
ch. 2 Liberal learning in engineering education : the WPI experience (William R. Grogan, Lance E. Schachterle, Francis C. Lutz)
ch. 3 The teachable moment : the Washington Center Internship Program (Mary Ryan)
ch. 4 Self-assessment : essential skills for adult learners (David O. Justice, Catherine Marienau)
ch. 5 An integrating seminar : bringing knowledge and experience together (Allen Wutzdorff, Pat Hutchings)

Conclusion : a view of learning (Allen Wutzdorff, Pat Hutchings)
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Student Learning Outside the Classroom: Transcending Artificial Boundaries

Book
Kuh, George D.; Douglas, Katie Branch; Lund, Jon P.; and Ramin-Gyurnek, Jackie
1994
Graduate School of Education and Human Development, George Washington University, Washington, DC
LA229 .S748 1994
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Explores the issue of institutional productivity and student learning outside the classroom. Reviews the conditions that can foster a climate where out-of-classroom experiences can contribute to greater educational productivity. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Explores the issue of institutional productivity and student learning outside the classroom. Reviews the conditions that can foster a climate where out-of-classroom experiences can contribute to greater educational productivity. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Jonathan D. Fife)
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Warrant, Purpose, and Overview
Enhancing Institutional Productivity
Purpose
Overview and Scope

ch. 2 What the Literature Says about Life Outside the Classroom and Desired Outcomes of College
Guiding Frameworks
Educational Attainment
Outcomes Clusters
Summary

ch. 3 Conditions That Foster Involvement in Educationally Purposed Out-of-Class Activities
Clear, Coherent, and Consistently Expressed Educational Purposes
An Institutional Philosophy that Embraces a Holistic View of Talent Development
Complementary Institutional Policies and Practices Congruent with Students' Characteristics and Needs
High, Clear Expectations for Student Performance
Use of Effective Teaching Approaches
Systematic Assessment of Institutional Practices and Student Performance
Ample Opportunities for Student Involvement in Educationally Purposeful Out-of-Class Activities
Human Scale Settings Characterized by Ethics of Membership and Care
An Ethos of Learning that Pervades All Aspects of the Institution

ch. 4 Implications
General Recommendations
Recommendations for Various Groups
The Key Tasks
Need for Additional Research

Conclusion
References
Index
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"How to Be a Perfect Stranger: A Guide to Etiquette in Other People's Religious Ceremonies, Vol. 2"

Book
Magida, Arthur J., and Stuart M. Matlins eds.
1997
Jewish Lights Publishing, Woodstock, VT
No Call # Given
Topics: Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Foreword by Rev. Dr. Joan Brown Campbell, General Secretary, National Council of Churches

ch. 1 African American Methodist Churches
ch. 2 Baha’i
ch. 3 Christian and Missionary Alliance
ch. 4 The Christian Congregation
ch. 5 Church of the Brethren
ch. 6 Church of the Nazarene
ch. 7 Evangelical Free Church of America
ch. 8 International Church of the Foursquare Gospel
ch. 9 International Pentecostal Holiness Church
ch. 10 Mennonite/Amish
ch. 11 Native American
ch. 12 Orthodox Churches
ch. 13 Pentecostal Church of God
ch. 14 Reformed Church of America
ch. 15 Sikh
ch. 16 Unitarian Universalist
ch. 17 Wesleyan

Glossary
Calendar of Religious Holidays and Festivals
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Wabash tree

Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope

Book
hooks, bell
2003
Routledge, New York, NY
LC196.5.U6H66 2003
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Teaching can happen anywhere, at any time - not just in classrooms but in churches, in bookstores, in homes, anywhere people get together to share ideas that affect their daily life. In Teaching Community, bell hooks shows how complex ideas of cultural theory can be simplified and made relevant to the lives of working people, and how the values of shared knowledge and learning can be a catalyst for progressive ...
Additional Info:
Teaching can happen anywhere, at any time - not just in classrooms but in churches, in bookstores, in homes, anywhere people get together to share ideas that affect their daily life. In Teaching Community, bell hooks shows how complex ideas of cultural theory can be simplified and made relevant to the lives of working people, and how the values of shared knowledge and learning can be a catalyst for progressive social change. Teaching - so often undervalued in our society - can be a joyous and inclusive activity and, as hooks shows, can never be confined to the classroom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: Teaching and Living in Hope

Teach 1 The Will to Learn: The World as Classroom
Teach 2 Time Out: Classrooms without Boundaries
Teach 3 Talking Race and Racism
Teach 4 Democratic Education
Teach 5 What Happens When White People Change
Teach 6 Standards
Teach 7 How Can We Serve
Teach 8 Moving beyond Shame
Teach 9 Keepers of Hope: Teaching in Communities
Teach 10 Progressive Learning: A Family Value
Teach 11 Heart to Heart: Teaching with Love
Teach 12 Good Sex: Passionate Pedagogy
Teach 13 Spirituality in Education
Teach 14 This Is Our Life: Teaching toward Death
Teach 15 Spiritual Matters in the Classroom
Teach 16 Practical Wisdom

Index
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"Using Student Ethnography to Teach Sociology of Religion"

TTR
Hamilton, William T. and Kellen Gilbert
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 4 (2005): 239-244
BL41.T4
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Engaging students in a course in the Sociology of Religion can be a challenge, particularly when working with student populations in a homogeneous region of the country who have limited experience with religious diversity. We approached the course from a sociological/anthropological perspective, requiring each student to complete an in-depth participation/observation research experience and write an ethnographic account of a religion or belief system different from his or her ...
Additional Info:
Engaging students in a course in the Sociology of Religion can be a challenge, particularly when working with student populations in a homogeneous region of the country who have limited experience with religious diversity. We approached the course from a sociological/anthropological perspective, requiring each student to complete an in-depth participation/observation research experience and write an ethnographic account of a religion or belief system different from his or her own. While other instructors have used a similar pedagogy, using ethnography with our student population was generally successful as a learning and writing tool.
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"Using Student Consultants to Re-envision Teaching Christian History and Theology"

TTR
Brunner, Daniel L.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 3 (2005): 184-188
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
When it came time to reevaluate and restructure the introductory year in Christian history and theology, I decided to use a roundtable of student consultants to help me in that work. Our research and reflection focused on the impact of postmodern thinking and learning, feedback from pastors in ministry, a desire to bring appropriate praxis into academically focused courses, and a hope to make greater use of technology. This article ...
Additional Info:
When it came time to reevaluate and restructure the introductory year in Christian history and theology, I decided to use a roundtable of student consultants to help me in that work. Our research and reflection focused on the impact of postmodern thinking and learning, feedback from pastors in ministry, a desire to bring appropriate praxis into academically focused courses, and a hope to make greater use of technology. This article discusses the consultative process and sketches out key learnings from student research. Concluding reflections focus on technology, a topical, praxis-oriented approach to teaching, the process of utilizing student advisors, and personal, internal changes that resulted from the project.
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"Beyond the "Critical" Curtain: Community-based Service Learning in an African Context"

TTR
West, Gerald Oakley
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 2 (2004): 71-82
BL41.T4
Topics: Service Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A case of community-based service learning in the School of Theology at the University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa is analyzed for what it means to teach biblical studies in an African context where biblical scholarship is partially constituted by ordinary African readers of the Bible and where context is a central pedagogical concept. Reflecting on a series of experiments over the past ten years in two second-year University level ...
Additional Info:
A case of community-based service learning in the School of Theology at the University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa is analyzed for what it means to teach biblical studies in an African context where biblical scholarship is partially constituted by ordinary African readers of the Bible and where context is a central pedagogical concept. Reflecting on a series of experiments over the past ten years in two second-year University level modules, the article analyzes the contours of a partnership between the academy and local communities of the poor, working-class, and marginalized through community-based service learning. This partnership provides a form of contextualization that enables students to integrate the forms of engagement with the Bible they bring to their formal theological studies and the forms of critical distance that characterize the discipline of biblical studies.
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"Becoming Pilgrims: Engaging Theory Through Practice in the Introductory World Religions Course"

TTR
Hill, Susan E.
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 2 (2004): 108-114
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This paper explores the use of the educational pilgrimage as an active learning strategy in the introductory world religions course. As we study pilgrimages from different religious traditions throughout the semester using Victor Turner as our theoretical guide, students also plan their own campus pilgrimage, paying homage to sites that help them reach their educational goals. Using student comments and my own observations, I highlight the ways in which the ...
Additional Info:
This paper explores the use of the educational pilgrimage as an active learning strategy in the introductory world religions course. As we study pilgrimages from different religious traditions throughout the semester using Victor Turner as our theoretical guide, students also plan their own campus pilgrimage, paying homage to sites that help them reach their educational goals. Using student comments and my own observations, I highlight the ways in which the educational pilgrimage both affirms and raises critical questions about Turner's theory of pilgrimage. In this way, the educational pilgrimage is an opportunity for students to enhance and clarify their understanding of theory through practice.
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"Hospitable Kinship in Theological Education: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning as Gift Exchange"

TTR
Wimberly, Anne E. Streaty
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 1 (2004): 3-12
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Using an autobiographical approach for pedagogical reflection, the author raises questions about how to include "hospitable kinship" and "gift exchange" in teaching and learning. Her experience with a Zimbabwean community circle of hospitable kinship has prompted her to consider how this method of community formation might be employed in classroom situations. Definitions for hospitable kinship and gift exchange are woven throughout the narrative. Attention to the role of the teacher ...
Additional Info:
Using an autobiographical approach for pedagogical reflection, the author raises questions about how to include "hospitable kinship" and "gift exchange" in teaching and learning. Her experience with a Zimbabwean community circle of hospitable kinship has prompted her to consider how this method of community formation might be employed in classroom situations. Definitions for hospitable kinship and gift exchange are woven throughout the narrative. Attention to the role of the teacher as host is provided as well. The essay prompts readers to turn their attention toward specific strategies that will aid in the formation of classroom community.
Additional Info:
This essay discusses the process and findings of an experiment on the scholarship of teaching and learning conducted in a religious ethics classroom that utilized an experiential approach to teaching and learning about social justice. The first part lays out the focus of the investigation and the pedagogical principles drawn from experiential learning theory that provided the foundation for the experiment. The second part describes all of the components of ...
Additional Info:
This essay discusses the process and findings of an experiment on the scholarship of teaching and learning conducted in a religious ethics classroom that utilized an experiential approach to teaching and learning about social justice. The first part lays out the focus of the investigation and the pedagogical principles drawn from experiential learning theory that provided the foundation for the experiment. The second part describes all of the components of the pedagogical strategy used in the experiment, the social justice action project. The third part discusses the qualitative methodology used to gather evidence and the findings drawn from that evidence. What the evidence shows is that an experiential approach to teaching and learning about social justice can be quite effective. The essay concludes with discussions of areas for further study and the implications for the practice of others.
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"Transformational Travel for Seminarians: Reading James in Haiti"

TTR
Grieb, A. Katherine
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 151-158
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
How will we teach the Bible in the twenty-first century? This essay is intended to contribute to that larger discussion in three ways: after a brief introduction, I will, first, state some general working assumptions about the present situation of the church and about teaching the New Testament in the context of a seminary or divinity school; second, I will describe the course "Reading James in Haiti" which I designed ...
Additional Info:
How will we teach the Bible in the twenty-first century? This essay is intended to contribute to that larger discussion in three ways: after a brief introduction, I will, first, state some general working assumptions about the present situation of the church and about teaching the New Testament in the context of a seminary or divinity school; second, I will describe the course "Reading James in Haiti" which I designed and taught in the Spring of 2002; finally, and much more briefly, I will comment on the implications of transformational travel experiences like this one for the ability of seminarians to understand New Testament texts more deeply than the classroom setting allows.
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"Ethnography as Pedagogy: Learning and Teaching in a Religion Department Internship Class"

TTR
Patterson, Barbara A. B.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 1 (2003): 24-34
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Internships and other experiential education courses in Religious Studies departments particularly benefit from careful pedagogical preparation. In addition to the usual components of conceptual content and skills, these courses require knowledge about and understanding of human communication and interaction and organizational function. To be successfully collaborative in the classroom and with Community Partners for learning and service, students and teachers need tools for participant observation, integration of data and response, ...
Additional Info:
Internships and other experiential education courses in Religious Studies departments particularly benefit from careful pedagogical preparation. In addition to the usual components of conceptual content and skills, these courses require knowledge about and understanding of human communication and interaction and organizational function. To be successfully collaborative in the classroom and with Community Partners for learning and service, students and teachers need tools for participant observation, integration of data and response, and reflection. This article proposes and discusses using 10 strategies of ethnography as a pedagogical frame. Developed in an internship class, these ten tools are demonstrated through teacher discussion and reflection and students' written work. Specific connections to the field of Religious Studies are highlighted. The article is written in the hopes of stimulating additional conversations on how experiential learning and teaching, specifically the use of ethnography, can be effectively and appropriately used in Religious Studies courses.
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"Red Light Means Stop! Teaching Theology through Exposure Learning in Manila's Red Light District"

TTR
Mercer, Joyce Ann
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 2 (2002): 90-100
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This paper explores exposure learning as a strategy for teaching theology in a Christian seminary, by describing and analyzing one multicultural Asian class's exposure to the "Red Light Districts" of Manila (Philippines). Exposures consist of short-term experiential learning events through participation and immersion into a specific context, preceded and followed by a process of study and reflection. Exposure learning has the potential to minimize certain forms of student resistance around ...
Additional Info:
This paper explores exposure learning as a strategy for teaching theology in a Christian seminary, by describing and analyzing one multicultural Asian class's exposure to the "Red Light Districts" of Manila (Philippines). Exposures consist of short-term experiential learning events through participation and immersion into a specific context, preceded and followed by a process of study and reflection. Exposure learning has the potential to minimize certain forms of student resistance around emotionally-charged subjects, such as the integration of race, class, and gender into theological education, because it is the experience together with shared critical reflection on it and not the teacher's viewpoints per se that unsettle prior interpretive frameworks. Exposure learning also carries certain risks and ethical dilemmas, and its long-term effects on transformation remain unclear. In spite of these pedagogical issues which the paper explores in detail, the paper supports exposure learning as an alternative experiential form of education for transformation.
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"Teaching Pilgrims to Walk"

TTR
Webb-Mitchell, Brett
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 2 (2002): 105-112
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The creation and implementation of a Christian theological seminary course, "The Education of Christian Pilgrims," in which the purpose was to prepare students to teach members of a church to be and become a consciously "pilgrim Church." This article describes the genesis of the course, creating a syllabus, the actual pilgrimage undertaken by students and professor, and suggested modifications.
Additional Info:
The creation and implementation of a Christian theological seminary course, "The Education of Christian Pilgrims," in which the purpose was to prepare students to teach members of a church to be and become a consciously "pilgrim Church." This article describes the genesis of the course, creating a syllabus, the actual pilgrimage undertaken by students and professor, and suggested modifications.
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"Study Abroad: Teaching Christology in an Area of Conflict"

TTR
Barclift, Philip L.
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 3 (2001): 166-173
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Theological study abroad programs in countries like Israel can actually benefit from the political tensions in those countries when the tensions are treated with due caution and when the course is designed to account for them. Focusing on Israel as its test case, this article offers suggestions for ensuring safety in countries of conflict. At the same time, it lays the groundwork for assuring a balanced approach to studying the ...
Additional Info:
Theological study abroad programs in countries like Israel can actually benefit from the political tensions in those countries when the tensions are treated with due caution and when the course is designed to account for them. Focusing on Israel as its test case, this article offers suggestions for ensuring safety in countries of conflict. At the same time, it lays the groundwork for assuring a balanced approach to studying the present conflict in Israel within the framework of a course in christology while addressing the demands of Seattle University's Catholic Jesuit philosophy.
TTR cover image

"Adjusting the Religious Autobiography Course for the Postmodern Classroom"

TTR
Ray, Darby Kathleen
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 1 (2000): 42-46
BL41.T4
Topics: Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Religious autobiography as an introductory course is popular yet problematic. Often, it lacks methodological breadth and functions to ensconce Western notions of subjectivity which elide difference, locatedness, and the reality of multiple or shifting identifications. These problems can be addressed by incorporating into the course a community-based learning exercise in which each student is paired with a local senior citizen, conducts a series of interviews with the elder, and then ...
Additional Info:
Religious autobiography as an introductory course is popular yet problematic. Often, it lacks methodological breadth and functions to ensconce Western notions of subjectivity which elide difference, locatedness, and the reality of multiple or shifting identifications. These problems can be addressed by incorporating into the course a community-based learning exercise in which each student is paired with a local senior citizen, conducts a series of interviews with the elder, and then writes an (auto-)biography based on the interviews. Students are thus given a real-life situation in which to test the applicability of theories and definitions of religion, as well as a relationship to a subject whose locatedness and relatively unprivileged "I" allow for the problematization of autobiography as a genre as well as an appreciation for the contextual nature of religiosity. This exercise transforms the religious autobiography course into a pedagogically fruitful, intellectually defensible, and institutionally savvy introductory course.
TTR cover image

"From Site Unseen to Experiential Learning: Religious Studies in the "Discover Chicago" Model"

TTR
Carlson, Jeffrey
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 2 (1998): 120-127
BL41.T4
Topics: Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This paper examines David Kolb's theory of experiential learning and its usefulness in developing religious studies courses in a 'Discover Chicago' program, wherein students spend an intensive 'immersion' week before the start of the autumn quarter touring, researching, interviewing, discussing, and analyzing a variety of phenomena in the Chicago metropolitan area. Then, during the quarter, they critically revisit issues raised by the immersion week, probing more deeply and letting their ...
Additional Info:
This paper examines David Kolb's theory of experiential learning and its usefulness in developing religious studies courses in a 'Discover Chicago' program, wherein students spend an intensive 'immersion' week before the start of the autumn quarter touring, researching, interviewing, discussing, and analyzing a variety of phenomena in the Chicago metropolitan area. Then, during the quarter, they critically revisit issues raised by the immersion week, probing more deeply and letting their initial impressions take on more mature reflective forms by engaging in extensive reading and systematically relating text with experience. Finally, research projects are developed, being outgrowths of the activities of the summer week and the readings and discussions from the first part of the quarter.
Journal cover image

Action Training Centers' Challenge to Theological Education

Journal Issue
1970
Theological Education 6, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Why This Issue? (Robert H. Bonthius)
Action Training: What is it? (Robert H. Bonthius)
Getting into Social Action—and Staying with It (Robert H. Bonthius)
Theological Practice in Action Training (William R. Voelkel)
Action Training: Does it work? (Robert H. Bonthius)
Some Organizational Problems Facing Action Training Centers (J. Alan Winter)
Action Training: One More Technology for the Seminaries—or a New Life Style? (Robert H. Bonthius)
Action Training and the Seminaries: Four Possibilities W. Paul Jones)
Seminaries and the Social Project: Concluding Unsolicited Advice (Richard Henry Lueke)
Appendix: The Action Training Coalition
Journal cover image

Theological Education by Extension

Journal Issue
1974
Theological Education 10, no. 4 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
The Current Status of Theological Education by Extension (Wayne C. Weld)
Open Theological Education (F. Ross Kinsler)
Theological Education by Extension: Much More than a Fad (Ted Ward)
Theological Education by Extension: What Can It Offer Churches in North America? (David R. Cochran)
Seminaries Ought to be Asking Who as well as How (C. Peter Wagner)
In Defense of the Academic Seminary (Colin W. Williams)
Suggested Bibliography on Theological Education by Extension
Additional Info:
If we are all becoming global citizens, what then are our civic responsibilities? Colleges and universities across the United States have responded to this question by making the development of global citizens part of their core mission. A key strategy for realizing this goal is study abroad. After all, there may be no better way for students to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to become effective change-agents in ...
Additional Info:
If we are all becoming global citizens, what then are our civic responsibilities? Colleges and universities across the United States have responded to this question by making the development of global citizens part of their core mission. A key strategy for realizing this goal is study abroad. After all, there may be no better way for students to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to become effective change-agents in international contexts.

The Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad is a comprehensive survey of the field. Each chapter eloquently conveys an enthusiasm for study abroad alongside a critical assessment of the most up-to-date research, theory and practice. This contributed volume brings together expert academics, senior administrators, practitioners of study abroad, and policy makers from across the United States, Canada and other part of the world, who meticulously address the following questions:

What do we mean by global citizenship and global competence?

What are the philosophical, pedagogical and practical challenges facing institutions as they endeavor to create global citizens?

How is study abroad and global citizenship compatible with the role of the academy?

What are the institutional challenges to study abroad, including those related to ethics, infrastructure, finances, accessibility, and quality control?

Which study abroad programs can be called successful?

The Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad is an indispensable reference volume for scholars, higher education faculty, study abroad professionals, policy makers, and the academic libraries that serve these audiences. It is also appropriate for a wide range of courses in Higher Education Master’s and Ph.D. Programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part 1 Defining Global Citizenship in Study Abroad
ch. 1 Global Citizenship in Theory and Practice (Hans Schattle)
ch. 2 Fostering Engagement: The Role of International Education in the Development of Global Civil Society (James M. Skelly)
ch. 3 Global Learning and the Making of Citizen Diplomats (Rebecca Hovey and Adam Weinberg)
ch. 4 International Studies and Foreign Languages: A Critical American Priority (Charles Kolb)
ch. 5 Global Citizenship Education: Challenges and Possibilities (Ian Davies and Graham Pike)

Part 2 Aligning Global Citizenship and Study Abroad With the MIssion of the Academy
ch. 6 Study Abroad and Language: From Maximal to Realistic Models (Dieter Wanner)
ch. 7 Constructive Disequilibrium: Cognitive and Emotional Development through Dissonant Experiences in Less Familiar Destinations (S. Megan Che, Mindy Spearman, and Agida Manizade)
ch. 8 The Liberal Arts and Global Citizenship: Fostering Intercultural Engagement Through Integrative Experiences and Structured Reflection ((Joseph L. Brockington and Margarete D. Wiedenhoeft)
ch. 9 Study Abroad and Nursing: From Cultural to Global Competence (Connie Currier, et. al)
ch. 10 The Role of Study Abroad in Preparing Globally Responsible Teachers (Kenneth Cushner)
ch. 11 Democratizing Study Abroad: Challenges of Open Access, Local Commitments, and Global Competence in Community Colleges (Robert A. Frost and Rosalind Latiner Raby)
ch. 12 North of 49: Global Citizenship a la canadienne (Roopa Desai Trilokekar and Adrian Shubert)
ch. 13 Global Citizenship and Study Abroad: A European Comparative Perspective (Hans de Wit)
ch. 14 Strategy for the Development of a Global City: Study Abroad in Singapore (Peter Pang)

Part 3 Institutional Challenges and Strategies for Fostering Global Citizenship Study Abroad
ch. 15 It Takes an Entire Institution: A Blueprint for the Global University (William Brustein)
ch. 16 Turning Our Back on the World: Study Abroad and the Purpose of U.S. Higher Education (Riall W. Nolan)
ch. 17 Faculty Beliefs and Institutional Values: Identifying and Overcoming These Obstacles to Education Abroad Growth (Joan Elias Gore)
ch. 18 Selling the World: Study Abroad Marketing and the Privatization of Global Citizenship (Talya Zemach-Bersin)
ch. 19 Global Citizenship for All: Low Minority Study Participation in Study Abroad - Seeking Strategies for Success (Earl Picard, Farrah Bernardino, and Kike Ehigiator)
ch. 20 Understanding the Challenges of Assessing Global Citizenship (Darla K. Deardorff)
ch. 21 Here to Stay: Increasing Acceptance of Short-Term Study Abroad Programs (Lisa Chieffor and Lesa Grifiths)
ch. 22 Going Global in the Sciences: A Case Study at Emory University (Philip Wainwright, et al.)
ch. 23 Undergraduate Research During Study Abroad: Scope, Meaning, and Potential (Bernhard T. Streitwieser)

Part 4 Innovative Global Citizenship Study Abroad Program Models
ch. 24 Georgia Tech's Comprehensive and Integrated Approach to Developing Global Competence (Howard Rollins)
ch. 25 Holistic Student Learning and Development Abroad: The IES 3-D Program Model (Joan Gillespie, Larry Braskamp, and Mary Dwyer)
ch. 26 It Takes a Curriculum: Bringing Global Mindedness Home (Kevin Hovland)
ch. 27 Educating Globally Competent Citizens through International Service Learning (William M. Plater, et al.)
ch. 28 Creating Deep Partnerships with Institutions Abroad: Bard College as Global Citizen (Susan H. Gillespie, et al.)
ch. 29 Creating Study Abroad Opportunities for First-Generation College Students (Maria D. Martinez, Bidya Ranjeet, and Helen A. Marx)
ch. 30 It's Not about You: The UConn Social Entrepreneur Corps Global Commonwealth Study Abroad Model (Ross Lewin and Greg Van Kirk)

Contributors
Index
Cover image

The First Time Effect: The Impact of Study Abroad on College Student Intellectual Development

Book
McKeown, Joshua S.
2009
State University of New York, Albany
LB2375.M38 2009
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A fresh look at study abroad programs on American college and university campuses. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A fresh look at study abroad programs on American college and university campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables
Introduction

ch. 1 A New Look at Study Abroad
ch. 2 Student Development on Study Abroad
ch. 3 Focusing on Today's Students
ch. 4 The Experience of First Time Travelers
ch. 5 Challenge of a Lifetime

Appendix A.1 Schools Involved in the Study
Appendix A.2 Institutional Review Board Results
Appendix A.3 Script for Participating Schools
Appendix B Pilot Test and Follow-up Testing
Appendix C Questionnaire
Appendix D Pilot Research Project Results
Appendix E Study Limitations

References
Index
TTR cover image

"Sustained Experiential Learning: Modified Monasticism and Pilgrimage"

TTR
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 2 (2009): 109-122
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This article outlines a template for sustained experiential learning designed to provide a context for learning the affective and performative as well as intellectual power of religion. This approach was developed for a traditional academic framework, adapting pedagogies developed for experiential learning, aesthetic training, and study abroad, and draws on personal experiences of teaching East Asian religions. The approach integrates intellectual learning with out of class experience to stimulate and ...
Additional Info:
This article outlines a template for sustained experiential learning designed to provide a context for learning the affective and performative as well as intellectual power of religion. This approach was developed for a traditional academic framework, adapting pedagogies developed for experiential learning, aesthetic training, and study abroad, and draws on personal experiences of teaching East Asian religions. The approach integrates intellectual learning with out of class experience to stimulate and enrich the highly personal and often significant questions that may arise upon studying religion and encountering religious practices both in and out of the classroom.
TTR cover image

"Crossing Pedagogical Borders in the Yucatan Peninsula"

TTR
Willhauck, Susan
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 3 (2009): 222-232
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A challenging intercultural teaching experience provided an opportunity for engaging embodied pedagogies that facilitated border crossings of language, age, gender, and experience. Influenced by the work of Augusto Boal, the author describes how improvisation, role-play, music, and drawing led seminary students in Mexico into sacred time and space toward relevant learning. Drawing upon the critical pedagogy of several educators yields implications for teaching theology and religion. The essay also invites ...
Additional Info:
A challenging intercultural teaching experience provided an opportunity for engaging embodied pedagogies that facilitated border crossings of language, age, gender, and experience. Influenced by the work of Augusto Boal, the author describes how improvisation, role-play, music, and drawing led seminary students in Mexico into sacred time and space toward relevant learning. Drawing upon the critical pedagogy of several educators yields implications for teaching theology and religion. The essay also invites readers into dialogue about how such border crossings can benefit their own teaching.
Tactics cover image

"The Arts as a Lens for Understanding Spiritual Issues in Chronic Illness and Disability"

Tactic
Chase-Ziolek, Mary
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 349
BL41.T4
Topics: Religious Education   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: discussion of art objects in a one week intensive course.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: discussion of art objects in a one week intensive course.
Cover image

Radical Pedagogy: Identity, Generativity, and Social Transformation

Book
Mark Bracher
2006
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LC196.B73 2006
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Radical Pedagogy argues that longstanding pedagogical aims and practices are ineffective in promoting learning and social change and proposes a new strategy for achieving these ends. Drawing on recent research in psychoanalysis, social psychology, and cognitive science, Bracher argues that the most effective way to solve social problems such as violence, prejudice, and substance abuse on a mass scale, as well as impediments to learning and personal well being, is ...
Additional Info:
Radical Pedagogy argues that longstanding pedagogical aims and practices are ineffective in promoting learning and social change and proposes a new strategy for achieving these ends. Drawing on recent research in psychoanalysis, social psychology, and cognitive science, Bracher argues that the most effective way to solve social problems such as violence, prejudice, and substance abuse on a mass scale, as well as impediments to learning and personal well being, is through a pedagogy that addresses their common root cause: identity vulnerability.To this end, Bracher formulates psychoanalytically based practices to develop more resilient, secure, and prosocial identities for both teachers and students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface

Part One - Identity, Learning, Problems, and Social Problems
ch. 1 Identity, Motivation, and Recognition
ch. 2 Linguistic Identity
ch. 3 Affective and Imagistic Identity
ch. 4 Identity Integration and Defenses
ch. 5 Identity Structure

Part Two - Identity-Undermining Pedagogies
ch. 6 Teachers' Identities as Obstacles to Radical Pedagogy
ch. 7 Authoritarian and Establishment Pedagogies
ch. 8 Pedagogies of Resistance and Empowerment
ch. 9 Historicism as Impediment to Radical Pedgagogy

Part Three - Developing Teachers' Identities
ch. 10 Self Analysis for Teachers
ch. 11 Generative Identity and the Need to Teach

Part Four - Promoting Students' Identity Development
ch. 12 Supporting Prosocial Identity Contents
ch. 13 Promoting Identity Integration
ch. 14 Developing Identity Structures

Notes
Works Cited
Index
Cover image

Harnessing America's Wasted Talent: A New Ecology of Learning

Book
Smith, Peter
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB1028.3.S59 2010
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Praise for Harnessing America's Wasted Talent

President Obama offered America and the world renewed hope for a better tomorrow. With decades of experience in alternative forms of higher education, Peter Smith grabs that optimistic spirit and seizes the moment to reveal to us the exciting age of Web-based teaching and learning, which is opening access to untold numbers of learners while harnessing the previously wasted talents of millions ...
Additional Info:
Praise for Harnessing America's Wasted Talent

President Obama offered America and the world renewed hope for a better tomorrow. With decades of experience in alternative forms of higher education, Peter Smith grabs that optimistic spirit and seizes the moment to reveal to us the exciting age of Web-based teaching and learning, which is opening access to untold numbers of learners while harnessing the previously wasted talents of millions of people in America and billions around the world. Those seeking insights, a vision of the future, and a chance to join this educational revolution should look forward to Harnessing America's Wasted Talent.

Anyone who wants to understand where American higher education is headed should read Harnessing America's Wasted Talent. Peter Smith's vision of the future of higher education is based on several decades of experience—at the national, state, and international levels. He brings a rare perspective that will interest students, educators, politicians, and those American business leaders who are worried about the future of our workforce and the health of our democracy.

Harnessing America's Wasted Talent is a must-read for those of us concerned about the increasing economic and education gaps in our country. Peter Smith takes on an important American disconnect: the need for an educated workforce and the fact that most working Americans lack a college degree. Drawing upon his experience in higher education and politics, Smith dissects the problem and presents a contemporary, practical plan to enhance the learning capacity of our country. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

Part One: The Law of Thirds
ch. 1 Wasted Talent
ch. 2 Maxed Out: Why Colleges Can't Meet This Challenge
ch. 3 The Paradox of Personal Learning

Part Two: Dangerous Conceits
ch. 4 Different Strokes for Different Folks
ch. 5 Learning Is More Than “Strictly Academic”
ch. 6 You Can't Get There from Here

Part Three: From Access to Success: A New Ecology of Learning
ch. 7 The End of Scarcity: Education's Emerging Long Tail
ch. 8 Game Changers: New Media and the Open Education Resource Movement
ch. 9 Reaching the Middle Third: Talent-Friendly Colleges for the Twenty-First Century (C21Cs)

Conclusion: A New Ecology of Learning
Resources
References
Index
TTR cover image

Beyond the Classroom ("Taking it to the Streets"): Practicing the Art of Philosophical Conversation"

TTR
Schell, Hannah
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 266-267
BL41.T4
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
TTR cover image

"When the Cat's Away, the Mice Keep Learning"

TTR
Simmons, Laura K.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 268-269
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
TTR cover image

"We Learned So Much When You Weren't There!": Reflections on the Interteach Method and the Acephalous Classroom"

TTR
Zeller, Benjamin E.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 270-271
BL41.T4
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Tactics cover image

"Moving Student Research into the Community"

Tactic
Hequet, Suzanne
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 4 (2010): 372
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students learn about Lutheranism by doing historical research of local congregations.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students learn about Lutheranism by doing historical research of local congregations.
TTR cover image

"The Absent Professor: Taking the Residential Class Online"

TTR
Hansen, Gary Neal
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 4 (2010): 374-375
BL41.T4
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
TTR cover image

"Making Your Absence Count: Preparing Students for Small Group Discussions"

TTR
M'Mworia, Damaris
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 4 (2010): 376-377
BL41.T4
Topics: Discussion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Cover image

Pedagogy of Place: Seeing Space as Cultural Education

Book
Callejo-Perez, David M., Fain, Stephen M., Slater, Judith J., eds.
2003
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LC189.P39 2004
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
From the Pubisher

Pedagogy of Place focuses on the embodiment of purposefully created space resulting from the creation and enactment of its participants' cultural and social conditions. It is also about education, the purposeful creation of spaces that comprise learning environments, and the aesthetic dimensions of the created space called school. The essays present the concept of space - the place where learning happens and where the lives ...
Additional Info:
From the Pubisher

Pedagogy of Place focuses on the embodiment of purposefully created space resulting from the creation and enactment of its participants' cultural and social conditions. It is also about education, the purposeful creation of spaces that comprise learning environments, and the aesthetic dimensions of the created space called school. The essays present the concept of space - the place where learning happens and where the lives of student and teacher can thrive or wither - a place rich in human potential. In an attempt to address the diversity of what we define as space, Pedagogy of Place addresses issues around place and identity in three distinct strands: as social, as aesthetic, and as political and historical. As a collection, these essays are attempts to open conversations with persons interested in what counts as curriculum, teaching, and learning within the spaces and places that release human potential and nurture the human spirit.

Table Of Content:
Foreword: Reflections on the Place of Curriculum
Acknowledgements
Introduction: Understanding Place as a Social Aspect of Education

ch. 1 The Construction of Public Space (Stephen M. Fain)
ch. 2 The Erosion of the Public Space (Judith Slater)
ch. 3 The Fall of the Public Academic (Donna Adair)
ch. 4 Traces, Patterns, Texture: In Search of Aesthetic Teaching/Learning Encounters (Margaret Mcaintyre Latta)
ch. 5 An Environment for Developing Souls: The Ideas of Rudolph Steiner (Bruce Uhrmacher)
ch. 6 School as Parkland: The Re-invention of a "Story of School" (Cheryl Craig)
ch. 7 Away with All Teachers: The Cultural Politics of Home Schooling (Michael Apple)
ch. 8 Identity, Literature, Schools, and Race: Southern Writers and Literature as a Metaphor for Place (David M. Callejo)
ch. 9 Getting from Farmhouse to Schoolhouse: School Consolidation, Pupil Transportation, and the Limits of Educational Reform in Mississippi (Corey Lesseig)

Epilogue
List of Contributors
Cover image

Place-Based Education in the Global Age

Book
Gruenewald, David A., Smith, Gregory A., eds.
2008
Routledge, New York, NY
LC239.P527 2008
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
“Polished, clear, insightful, and meaningful.... This volume amounts to nothing less than a complete rethinking of what progressive education can be at its best and how education can be reconceptualized as one of the central practices of a genuinely democratic and sustainable society.... It is the kind of book that has the potential to be transformative.”

Stephen Preskill, University of New Mexico

“The ...
Additional Info:
“Polished, clear, insightful, and meaningful.... This volume amounts to nothing less than a complete rethinking of what progressive education can be at its best and how education can be reconceptualized as one of the central practices of a genuinely democratic and sustainable society.... It is the kind of book that has the potential to be transformative.”

Stephen Preskill, University of New Mexico

“The editors and contributors are pioneers in the field of educational theory, policy, and philosophy.... They are opening new areas of inquiry and educational reform in ways that promise to make this book in very short time into a classic.... The practical applications and experiments included reveal the richness of grassroots initiatives already underway to bring educational theory and policy down to earth. While spanning the richest and deepest intellectual ideas and concepts, the stories told are the types that practitioners and teachers will be able to relate to in their daily undertakings.”

Madhu Suri Prakash, The Pennsylvania State University

This volume — a landmark contribution to the burgeoning theory and practice of place-based education — enriches the field in three ways: First, it frames place-based pedagogy not just as an alternative teaching methodology or novel approach to environmental education but as part of a broader social movement known as the “Anew localism”, which aims toward reclaiming the significance of the local in the global age. Second, it links the development of ecological awareness and stewardship to concerns about equity and cultural diversity. Third, it presents examples of place-based education in action. The relationship between the new localism and place-based education is clarified and the process of making connections between learners and their wider communities is demonstrated. The book is organized around three themes:

• Reclaiming Broader Meanings of Education
• Models for Place-Based Learning
• Global Visions of the Local in Higher Education

This is a powerfully relevant volume for researchers, teacher educators, and students across the fields of curriculum theory, educational foundations, critical pedagogy, multicultural education, and environmental education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Contributor List
Introduction: Making Room for the Local

ch. 1 Models for Place-Based Learning
ch. 2 Place-Based Curricular and Pedagogical Models: My Adventures in Teaching Through Community Contexts (Clifford E. Knapp)
ch. 3 The Fringe of Nirvana: Aesthetic Places and the Art Classroom (Mark Graham)
ch. 4 Star: Service to All Relations (Mark Sorensen)
ch. 5 Youth as Resources in Revitalizing Communities (Julie Bartsch)
ch. 6 Environmental Justice in Egleston Square (Elaine Senechal)
ch. 7 Creating a Place for Indigenous Knowledge in Education: The Alaska Native Knowledge Network (Ray Barnhardt)
ch. 8 Reclaiming Broader Meanings of Education
ch. 9 Place-Based Education: Grounding Culturally Responsive Teaching in Geographical Diversity
ch. 10 No Child Left Inside: Nature Study as a Radical Act
ch. 11 Overlooked Opportunity: Students, Educators, and Education Advocates Contributing to Community and Economic Development
ch. 12 Place: Where Diversity and Community Can Converge
ch. 13 Global Visions of the Local in Higher Education
ch. 14 Place in Leadership Formation: The Institute for Educational and Community Leadership (IECL)
ch. 15 Multiculturalism, Conflict, and Struggle: Place as Meeting Ground in Israeli Education
ch. 16 Learning Country: A Case Study of Australian Place-Responsive Education
ch. 17 Place-Based Teacher Education

Afterword: Creating a Movement to Ground Learning in Place
Author Index
Index
Tactics cover image

"The Religious Experience Project: Bringing an Experiential Dimension to Teaching Religion"

Tactic
Loving, Gregory D.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 3 (2011): 249
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students reflect on a religious practice they have selected to experience.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: students reflect on a religious practice they have selected to experience.
Article cover image

"Experiential Learning: Theory and Challenges"

Article
Hedin, Norma
2010
Christian Education Journal: Series 3, Vol. 7, No. 1, (Spring 2010), pgs. 106-117
Topics: Religious Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Christian educators make use of the various approaches to experiential learning in their classrooms, in their institutions as a whole, and in their field-based assignments for students. This article introduces the reader to the foundational issues of experiential learning, including definitions, theoretical roots, experiential learning models, and unique processes related to experiential learning.
Additional Info:
Christian educators make use of the various approaches to experiential learning in their classrooms, in their institutions as a whole, and in their field-based assignments for students. This article introduces the reader to the foundational issues of experiential learning, including definitions, theoretical roots, experiential learning models, and unique processes related to experiential learning.
Cover image

A Guide to Building Education Partnerships: Navigating Diverse Cultural Contexts to Turn Challenge into Promise

Book
Hora, Matthew T., and Miller, Susan B.
2011
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB1775.2.H67 2011
Topics: Service Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Education partnerships are central to – and often a requirement of – most education reform initiatives promoted by state and local governments, by foundations, and by business funders. Many fail for failure to understand the dynamics of their complex relationships.

This book provides insights and guidance to enable prospective and existing education partners to develop answers to the questions that are critical to success: Why engage in this partnership? How ...
Additional Info:
Education partnerships are central to – and often a requirement of – most education reform initiatives promoted by state and local governments, by foundations, and by business funders. Many fail for failure to understand the dynamics of their complex relationships.

This book provides insights and guidance to enable prospective and existing education partners to develop answers to the questions that are critical to success: Why engage in this partnership? How can you communicate the potential benefits of partnership to motivate teachers, faculty, administrators, and community members? How do you select the best organizational structure and procedures for a partnership? How can you maintain open, deliberative discussion while respecting different histories and cultures? How can you produce compelling evidence that the partnership is worthwhile?

Based on their observation of a five-year-long publicly funded partnership, research data, and the literature, the authors identify the principles that they consider critical to answering these questions. The authors do not minimize the differences and complexities inherent in partnership work, because they believe that doing so would be to present coherence and homogeneity where none exists. Instead, they seek to make evident how these principles underlie many different partnership situations. Thus, rather than presenting a package of best practices, or a cookie-cutter approach, this book presents the organizational principles for planning and implementing education partnerships, along with sets of strategies for working through them.

The authors present the diagnostic tools for undertaking a deliberate and research-based approach to planning, designing, and managing a partnership. By surfacing participants’ often-differing motivations, and the practices and assumptions they bring to the table, the book provides the foundation for developing a constructive relationship. In scope, the book extends beyond school-university partnerships to include schools’ collaboration with state and local governments, nonprofit organizations, and the business sector. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: The Challenge and Promise of Education Partnerships

Part One: Getting Ready for Partnership
ch. 1 Shall We Dance? Convening a Pre-Partnership Planning Group
ch. 2 Sizing Up Organizational Aspirations and Attributes
ch. 3 Understanding Cultural Dynamics
ch. 4 Crossing Organizational and Cultural Boundaries

Part Two: Designing A Partnership
ch. 5 Types of Organizational Structures for Partnership
ch. 6 Administration and Leadership
ch. 7 Effective communication systems

Part Three Implementing Partnerships
ch. 8 Designing the work
ch. 9 Developing and Managing Working Groups
ch. 10 The Key Roles of Trust and Managing Conflict

Appendix A: Methodology
Journal cover image

Teaching for Civic Engagement: Background and Overview

Journal Issue
Posman, Ellen, and Locklin, Reid B., eds.
2010
Spotlight on Teaching 25, no. 4 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching for Civic Engagement: Background and Overview (Ellen Posman, and Reid B. Locklin)
ch. 2 Engaged Pedagogy and Civic Engagement (Swasti Bhattacharyya)
ch. 3 Site Visits and Civic Engagement (Marianne Delaporte, and Hans Wiersma)
ch. 4 Civic Engagement and International Service-Learning (Philip Wingeier-Rayo)
ch. 5 Civic Engagement and Civic Spaces (Rebekka King)
ch. 6 Reflections on Engaged Civic Learning and Teaching (Bobbi Patterson)
ch. 7 Teaching for Civic Engagement: Suggested Resources
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Creating Connections in Teaching and Learning

Book
Abawl, Lindy; Conway, Joan; Henderson, Robyn, eds.
2011
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB1060.C755 2011
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This book explores the wide range of contexts in which research into creating connections in learning and teaching may take place. Creating connections can encompass making links, crossing divides, forming relationships, building frameworks, and generating new knowledge. The cognitive, cultural, social, emotional and/or physical aspects of understanding, meaning-making, motivating, acting, researching, and evaluating are explored as constituent forms of creativity in relation to such connections.

From this ...
Additional Info:
This book explores the wide range of contexts in which research into creating connections in learning and teaching may take place. Creating connections can encompass making links, crossing divides, forming relationships, building frameworks, and generating new knowledge. The cognitive, cultural, social, emotional and/or physical aspects of understanding, meaning-making, motivating, acting, researching, and evaluating are explored as constituent forms of creativity in relation to such connections.

From this exploration the authors identify varied connective contexts and means which include the learner, the educator, the organisation, and the relevant community. The crossing of divides, forming learner-educator relationships, bringing together diverse groups of learners, establishing networks and partnerships among educators, and establishing links between organisations and communities are all considered as connections which can be created by and within the learning and teaching dynamic.

By examining the factors which help to facilitate and/or restrict the possibilities for creating connections in educational contexts, implications for and outcomes of learning and/or teaching arise from the connections created. The final chapter of this book will explicate the realisations that have emerged for educators and researchers working to create connections. These offer suggestions for future directions and enunciate what and how connections might contribute to both educational institutions and the broader society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Authors
Exposing Threads: Creating Connections in Teaching and Learning

Section I: Connecting Within School Contexts
ch. 1 Connecting Early Childhood Educators, Action Research, and Teaching for Social Justice (Karen Hawkins)
ch. 2 Inspire to Connect a Learning Desirec (Brad McLennan and Karen Peel)
ch. 3 Shared Values Connecting Parents, Teachers, and Students (J. Anne Casley)
ch. 4 Engaging Students Through Student Voice: Negotiating Pedagogy (Ian Fraser)
ch. 5 Relational Trust as a Core Resource for Building Capacity in Schools (Richard Scagliarini)
ch. 6 International Teachers Making Connections in Times of Change (Marie Davis)

Section II: Connecting Beyond School Contexts
ch. 7 Enhancing Relationships in Doctoral Student Supervision: Shibboleths, Signifiers, and Strategies (P. A. Danaher and Henriette van Rensburg)
ch. 8 Productive Partnerships: Cross-Departmental Connections in a Tertiary Context (Karen Noble and Robyn Henderson)
ch. 9 Addressing Offshore Disconnections Between Chinese and Western Business Academics and Students (Joe Peng Zhou and Cec Pedersen)
ch. 10 Curriculum Connections: Lessons from Post-Compulsory Vocational Education and Training (Lindsay Parry, R. E. (Bobby) Harreveld and P. A. Danaher)

Section III: Making Meaning From Lived Experiences
ch. 11 Look Who’s Listening: Using the Superaddressee for Understanding Connections in Dialogue (Warren Midgley)
ch. 12 Effective Cluster Collaborations: Transformation Through School and University Connections (Joan M. Conway and Lindy Abawi)
ch. 13 Linking Pedagogical Documentation to Phenomenological Research (Laurie Kocher)
ch. 14 Juggling Research with Teaching: Building Capacity in a University Research Team (Margaret Baguley and Helmut Geiblinger)
ch. 15 Sharing Japanese and Australian Culture: A Case Study in Second Language Learning (Junichi Hatai and Robert D. White)

Section IV: Making Virtual Connections
ch. 16 A New Zealand Tertiary Educator’s Online Journey (C. E. Haggerty)
ch. 17 Connecting Learners in Virtual Space: Forming Learning Communities (Lyn Brodie and Peter Gibbings)
ch. 18 Bridging a Discipline Divide Through the Lens of Community of Inquiry (Petrea Redmond and Christine McDonald)
ch. 19 Finding the Right Online Learning Connections: Comparing Models in Practice (Tina van Eyk)
ch. 20 Linking the Threads: Creating Clearer Connections (Lindy Abawi, Joan M. Conway, and Robyn Henderson)
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Wabash tree

Fostering Global Citizenship: Through Faculty-Led International Programs

Book
Mullens, Jo Beth, and Cuper, Pru
2012
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB2375.M85 2012
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
With awareness of both the opportunities and challenges presented by globalization, there is a growing trend among colleges and universities across the country to commit goals and resources to the concept of internationalizing their campuses. This can occur in a number of different ways but a common thread involves exploring the concept of global citizenship and finding ways to embed this concept in undergraduate curricula. For faculty, this may call ...
Additional Info:
With awareness of both the opportunities and challenges presented by globalization, there is a growing trend among colleges and universities across the country to commit goals and resources to the concept of internationalizing their campuses. This can occur in a number of different ways but a common thread involves exploring the concept of global citizenship and finding ways to embed this concept in undergraduate curricula. For faculty, this may call for moving out of a presumed comfort zone in the traditional classroom and determining new approaches to teaching a generation of students who will live and work in a more global context. A method for accomplishing this work that is growing in popularity involves offering short-term, faculty-led field courses to international settings. In fact, today more college students are participating in such short-term study abroad opportunities than the more traditional semester and/or yearlong programs.

Faculty and administrators who want to capitalize on short-term, study abroad programs as a means for internationalizing their campuses need practical resources to help them realize this challenging but important goal. They not only need support in developing the course curricula and logistics, but also in constructing authentic means for assessing the multi-faceted learning that occurs. Short-term international programs, when carefully planned and executed, engage the participants (both students and faculty) in unique learning experiences that can involve service, research, and critical analysis of what it truly means to be a global citizen. Such work helps define the somewhat nebulous but worthy goals of internationalizing campuses and fostering global citizenship.

The authors of this text are professional educators with deep experience in global education and curriculum development. They offer a valuable resource for the development, execution and assessment of faculty-led international field courses that is at once theoretical, practical and motivational. Whether readers are considering offering an international field program for the first time and need guidance; are veteran field course leaders who would like to take their work to the next level; or are administrators attempting to encourage and provide needed support for faculty-led international programs, this book will prove invaluable. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction.

Part I: Faculty-Led International Programs: Examining The Value
ch. 1 Trends That Drive The Need For Change
ch. 2 Experiential Learning And Student Engagement
ch. 3 Sense Of Self And Reflective Growth
ch. 4 Promoting Global Citizenship
ch. 5 Personal And Professional Faculty Development

Part II: International Program Organization: Undertaking The Tasks
ch. 6 The World Is Your Classroom: Selecting The Country And The Setting
ch. 7 Designing And Planning The Essentials
ch. 8 Passports, Liability And Dealing With The Unexpected
ch. 9 Filling The Roster

Part III: The Learning Realizing The Potential of Faculty-Led International Programs
ch. 10 Learning Objectives And Assessment: You Can’t Have One Without The Other
ch. 11 Predeparture Preparation: Setting The Stage For International Learning
ch. 12 Learning During The Journey
ch. 13 Reentry And Beyond: Sustaining And Forwarding What Has Been Gained

Conclusion
References
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The Engaged Campus: Certificates, Minors, and Majors as the New Community Engagement

Book
Butin, Dan W., and Seider, Scott, eds.
2012
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LC221.E52 2012
Topics: Service Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
The Engaged Campus offers a set of emerging best practices and articulation of critical issues for faculty and administrators committed to developing, strengthening, or expanding majors or minors in community engagement at their respective institutions. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The Engaged Campus offers a set of emerging best practices and articulation of critical issues for faculty and administrators committed to developing, strengthening, or expanding majors or minors in community engagement at their respective institutions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I Engagement in Action
ch. 1 Theory Matters: Articulating a Theoretical Framework for Civic Engagement (Tracey Burke, Tara Palmer Smith, and Diane Hirshberg)
ch. 2 Creating the Character, Culture, and Craft of Engagement (Sandra L. Enos)
ch. 3 Negotiating the Boundary between the Academy and the Community (Hollyce (Sherry) Giles)
ch. 4 Contending with Political and Cultural Campus Challenges ( Arthur S. Keene and John Reiff)
ch. 5 Process, Content, and Community Building (Keith Morton)
ch. 6 The Politics of Engagement (Mary Beth Pudup)
ch. 7 Measuring the Impact of Community Service Learning (Scott Seider and Sarah Novick)
ch. 8 Building in Place (Talmage A. Stanley)

Part II Reflecting on the Future of Community Engagement
ch. 9 A New Hull House? The Monumental Challenge of Service-Learning and Community Engagement (Peter Levine)
ch. 10 Disciplining Higher Education for Democratic Community Engagement (Ariane Hoy, Mathew Johnson, and Robert Hackett)
ch. 11 De Tocqueville Rediscovered: Community-Based Civic Engagement (Elizabeth L. Hollander)

List of Contributors
Index
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Flip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day

Book
Bergmann, Jonathan; and Sam, Aaron
2012
International Society for Technology
LB1044.75.B47 2012
Topics: Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   General Overviews   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
It started with a simple observation: Students need their teachers present to answer questions or to provide help if they get stuck on an assignment; they don’t need their teachers present to listen to a lecture or review content.From there, Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams began the flipped classroom: Students watched recorded lectures for homework and completed their assignments, labs, and tests in class with their teacher available. ...
Additional Info:
It started with a simple observation: Students need their teachers present to answer questions or to provide help if they get stuck on an assignment; they don’t need their teachers present to listen to a lecture or review content.From there, Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams began the flipped classroom: Students watched recorded lectures for homework and completed their assignments, labs, and tests in class with their teacher available. What Bergmann and Sams found was that their students demonstrated a deeper understanding of the material than ever before.This is the authors’ story, and they’re confident it can be yours too.

Learn what a flipped classroom is and why it works, and get the information you need to flip a classroom. You’ll also learn the flipped mastery model, where students learn at their own pace, furthering opportunities for personalized education. This simple concept is easily replicable in any classroom, doesn’t cost much to implement, and helps foster self-directed learning. Once you flip, you won’t want to go back!

Features - An argument for and overview of the flipped and flipped mastery classrooms; the logistics of conducting a flipped classroom, from the equipment needed to create videos to what to do during class to student assessment; a FAQ section that addresses important topics, including computer access, administrator buy in, and making sure your students are reliably accessing content on their own time (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

ch. 1 Our Story: Creating The Flipped Classroom
ch. 2 The Flipped Classroom
ch. 3 Why You Should Flip Your Classroom
ch. 4 How to Implement the Flipped Classroom.
ch. 5 The Flipped-Mastery Classroom
ch. 6 The Case for the Flipped-Mastery Model
ch. 7 How to Implement the Flipped-Mastery Model
ch. 8 Answering Your Questions (FAQs)
ch. 9 Conclusion
TTR cover image

From Civic Engagement to Circles of Grace: Mid-Range Reflection on Teaching for Global Citizenship

TTR
Corrie, Elizabeth W.
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 2 (2013): 165-181
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 2
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The course “Empowering Youth for Global Citizenship” seeks to equip students to teach global citizenship by engaging them in practices of ascetic withdrawal from consumer habits and active engagement in the public sphere. These goals underlie the design of the assignments, but should have also shaped the relationship between the assignments themselves. This article addresses the issue of course design in the service of empowering students for engagement in the ...
Additional Info:
The course “Empowering Youth for Global Citizenship” seeks to equip students to teach global citizenship by engaging them in practices of ascetic withdrawal from consumer habits and active engagement in the public sphere. These goals underlie the design of the assignments, but should have also shaped the relationship between the assignments themselves. This article addresses the issue of course design in the service of empowering students for engagement in the public sphere by reflecting upon the course assignments, with emphasis on a project that worked well, and the implications this has for its relationship to the other course assignments, including one that missed the mark. The exploration of this misalignment between the learning goals and actual outcomes of the different assignments brings to light the unique role of learning communities of accountability and acceptance in deepening the impact of assignments aimed at personal transformation, as well as the rich dynamic that can come from coordinating course assignments to bring “head, heart, and hands” together.
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Acts of Knowing: Critical Pedagogy in, Against and Beyond the University

Book
Cowden, Stephen; and Singh, Gurnam
2013
Bloomsbury Academic, New York, NY
LC196.A27 2013
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This provocative book's starting point is a deep and profound concern about the commodification of knowledge within the contemporary university.

Acts of Knowing aims to provide readers with a means of understanding the issues from the perspective of Critical Pedagogy; an educational philosophy which believes that 'knowing' must be freed from the constraints of the financial and managerialist logics which dominate ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This provocative book's starting point is a deep and profound concern about the commodification of knowledge within the contemporary university.

Acts of Knowing aims to provide readers with a means of understanding the issues from the perspective of Critical Pedagogy; an educational philosophy which believes that 'knowing' must be freed from the constraints of the financial and managerialist logics which dominate the contemporary university. Critical Pedagogy is important for three key reasons: it conceptualises pedagogy as a process of engagement between the teacher and taught; secondly that that engagement is based on an underlying humanistic view about human worth and value; and thirdly that the 'knowing' which can come out of this engagement needs to be understood essentially as exchange between people, rather than a financial exchange.

Cowden and Singh argue that the conception of education as simply a means for securing economic returns for the individual and for the society's positioning in a global marketplace, represents a fundamentally impoverished conception of education, which impoverishes not just individuals, but society as a whole. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction - Critical Pedagogy and the Crisis in the Contemporary University

Part 1 - Perspectives on the Crisis in Education
ch. 1 On the New Poverty of Student Life
ch. 2 Sat-Nav Education - A Means to an End or an End to Meaning
ch. 3 Critical Pedagogy, Public Sociology and Student Activism
ch. 4 The Practical Politics of 'Criticality' in Higher Education
ch. 5 Opening Spaces of Possibility in the University- Critical Pedagogy in the Teaching of Social Justice

Part 2 : Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education
ch. 6 Critical Pedagogy and the Uses of Freire and Bourdieu
ch. 7 The Neoliberal University, Critical Pedagogy and Popular Education
ch. 8 Indigenous Pedagogy
ch. 9 Popular Education and Higher Education
ch. 10 Critical Pedagogy, Critical Theory and Critical Hope
ch. 11 Autonomist Marxism, Social Movements and Popular Education

Index
Article cover image

"Q. What’s funny about teaching? A. Not enough! Arguing for a comic pedagogy"

Article
Decker, Elaine
2007
Educational Insights, Vol. 11, No. 3, 2007
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

Going Places: Travel Seminars as Opportunities for Interfaith Education

TTR
Mikoski, Gordon
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 4 (2013): 352-361
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 4
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Religious Diversity   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Many theological schools use short term travel as a way to foster interfaith education. Due to their experiential, holistic, and intense nature, travel seminars focused on the promotion of interfaith learning can shape a future religious leader's outlook on religious communities across the course of her entire career. In this article I explore the pedagogical dimensions of travel seminars as a tool for interfaith education through the lens of a ...
Additional Info:
Many theological schools use short term travel as a way to foster interfaith education. Due to their experiential, holistic, and intense nature, travel seminars focused on the promotion of interfaith learning can shape a future religious leader's outlook on religious communities across the course of her entire career. In this article I explore the pedagogical dimensions of travel seminars as a tool for interfaith education through the lens of a travel seminar to Israel and the occupied Palestinian Territories.
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

Relationship Building through Narrative Sharing: A Retreat for Muslim and Jewish Emerging Religious Leaders

TTR
Fuchs Kreimer, Nancy
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 4 (2013): 371-380
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 4
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Learning Designs   |   Religious Diversity   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The author and her colleagues planned and led three retreats to build relationships between rabbinical students and Muslim leaders of tomorrow. Narrative Pedagogy served to inform the creation of these immersive experiences. The retreats made use of the shared scriptural traditions around Joseph (Torah) and Yusuf (Qur'an) to build connections based on a common passion for text study. Parallel to the academic exploration of religious and cultural narratives, participants wove ...
Additional Info:
The author and her colleagues planned and led three retreats to build relationships between rabbinical students and Muslim leaders of tomorrow. Narrative Pedagogy served to inform the creation of these immersive experiences. The retreats made use of the shared scriptural traditions around Joseph (Torah) and Yusuf (Qur'an) to build connections based on a common passion for text study. Parallel to the academic exploration of religious and cultural narratives, participants wove connections based on an ethos of appreciative inquiry and the guided sharing of personal stories. Carefully structured exercises provided a container for the growth of understanding and connection.
TTR cover image

Staying Put: Local Context as Classroom for Multifaith Education

TTR
Yuskaev, Timur
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 4 (2013): 362-370
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 4
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Religious Diversity   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This essay argues that multifaith concerns must become central components of curricula across theological education. It outlines a methodology for such incorporation in a course and for an audience that, at first glance, appears not to lend itself to such an approach, a Hartford Seminary course on Muslim public speaking for Islamic Chaplaincy students. This methodology is based on the model of educational programs developed by the Interfaith Center of ...
Additional Info:
This essay argues that multifaith concerns must become central components of curricula across theological education. It outlines a methodology for such incorporation in a course and for an audience that, at first glance, appears not to lend itself to such an approach, a Hartford Seminary course on Muslim public speaking for Islamic Chaplaincy students. This methodology is based on the model of educational programs developed by the Interfaith Center of New York for local religious leaders and professionals who work with and within religiously diverse settings, such as school teachers, court officials, health care professionals, and social workers. This model of practical multifaith education is based on the local realities of religious diversity that constitutes the context for the work of graduates of theological schools.
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Approaches to Creativity: A Guide for Teachers

Book
Carlile, Orison; and Jordan, Anne
2012
Open University Press, Philadelphia, PA
LB1062.C37 2012
Topics: Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This book offers an accessible introduction and a comprehensive guide to a range of ideas on creativity in education. The book provides an overview of the major theories related to creativity and explores the implications for policy and practice.

The popular topic of creativity has given rise to a large number of theoretical positions, sometimes contradictory or contested. This book clarifies and organises these approaches so that teachers ...
Additional Info:
This book offers an accessible introduction and a comprehensive guide to a range of ideas on creativity in education. The book provides an overview of the major theories related to creativity and explores the implications for policy and practice.

The popular topic of creativity has given rise to a large number of theoretical positions, sometimes contradictory or contested. This book clarifies and organises these approaches so that teachers understand where particular pedagogical and curricular practices originate and can develop them coherently. Topics covered include:

Creativity in a social context
Creativity and technology
Creativity and curriculum planning
Assessment and creativity
Group creativity
Managing creativity
Tools of creativity
The creative learner
Creativity and cognition
Creativity as expression

Approaches to Creativity is an invaluable resource for those who wish to reflect on creativity and explore and engage in the modern discourse of education. It will be of value in teacher education, postgraduate studies, curriculum design and administration. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Constructs of creativity
ch. 3 Genealogy of creativity
ch. 4 Creativity in a social context
ch. 5 Creativity and the environment
ch. 6 Creativity and culture
ch. 7 Creativity and technology
ch. 8 Creative curriculum planning
ch. 9 Assessing creativity
ch. 10 Collaborative creativity
ch. 11 Creativity and the domains
ch. 12 Talent, expert performance and creativity
ch. 13 Creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship
ch. 14 The creative teacher
ch. 15 Managing creativity
ch. 16 Tools for creativity
ch. 17 The creative learner
ch. 18 Creativity and cognition
ch. 19 Creativity as expression
ch. 20 Developmental theories and creativity

Author Index
Subject Index
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The Art of Effective Facilitation: Reflections from Social Justice Educators

Book
Landreman, Lisa M., ed.
2013
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC192.2.A78 2013
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: How can I apply learning and social justice theory to become a better facilitator?
Should I prepare differently for workshops around specific identities?
How do I effectively respond when things aren’t going as planned?

This book is intended for the increasing number of faculty and student affairs administrators – at whatever their level of experience -- who are being ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: How can I apply learning and social justice theory to become a better facilitator?
Should I prepare differently for workshops around specific identities?
How do I effectively respond when things aren’t going as planned?

This book is intended for the increasing number of faculty and student affairs administrators – at whatever their level of experience -- who are being are asked to become social justice educators to prepare students to live successfully within, and contribute to, an equitable multicultural society.

It will enable facilitators to create programs that go beyond superficial discussion of the issues to fundamentally address the structural and cultural causes of inequity, and provide students with the knowledge and skills to work for a more just society. Beyond theory, design, techniques and advice on practice, the book concludes with a section on supporting student social action.

The authors illuminate the art and complexity of facilitation, describe multiple approaches, and discuss the necessary and ongoing reflection process. What sets this book apart is how the authors illustrate these practices through personal narratives of challenges encountered, and by admitting to their struggles and mistakes.

They emphasize the need to prepare by taking into account such considerations as the developmental readiness of the participants, and the particular issues and historical context of the campus, before designing and facilitating a social justice training or selecting specific exercises.

They pay particular attention to the struggle to teach the goals of social justice education in a language that can be embraced by the general public, and to connect its structural and contextual analyses to real issues inside and outside the classroom.

The book is informed by the recognition that “the magic is almost never in the exercise or the handout but, instead, is in the facilitation”; and by the authors’ commitment to help educators identify and analyze dehumanizing processes on their campuses and in society at large, reflect on their own socialization, and engage in proactive strategies to dismantle oppression. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface

Part I: Frameworks from Theory to Practice
ch. 1 The Evolution of Social Justice Education and Facilitation (Lisa M. Landreman, and Christopher MacDonald-Dennis)
ch. 2 Building a Framework for Social Justice Education: One Educator's Journey (Annematrie Vaccaro)
ch. 3 The Evolution of a Social Justice Educator’s Professional Identity: Impacts of Professional Maturation and Multiple Discourse Perspectives on Personal Practice (Kelly Carter Merrill)

Part II: Understanding Identities and Facilitation
ch. 4 Developing Gender Inclusive Facilitation: Understanding Genderism (Brent L. Bilodeau)
ch. 5 Engaging Whiteness in Higher Education (Rebecca Ropers-Huilman)
ch. 6 Developing & Sustaining Effective Co-Facilitation Across Identities (Tanya Williams, Elaine Brighan)
ch. 7 Understanding and Supporting Multiracial Students (Adam J. Ortiz)

Part III: Facilitation Design and Techniques
ch. 8 From Safe Spaces To Brave Spaces: A New Way to Frame Dialogue Around Diversity and Social Justice (Brian Arao, and Kristi Clemens)
ch. 9 Navigating Triggering Events: Critical Competencies for Social Justice Educators (Kathy Obear)
ch. 10 When Neutrality Is Not Enough (Wrestling With the Challenges of Multipartiality (Robbie Routenberg, Elizabeth Thompson, and Rhian Waterberg)
ch. 11 Facilitating Interactive Privilege Awareness Programs: Employing Intentionality From Design Through Implementation (Gregory I. Meyer, Karen Connors, Rebecca Haselmeyer, Dusty M. Krihau, Tracy L. Lanier, Matthew R. Lee, Chris D. Orem, and Nancy Trantham Poe)

Part IV: Supporting Student Social Action
ch. 12 Training and Supporting Peer Facilitators (Heather Wilhelm, and Robbie Routenberg)
ch. 13 Why is it so Hard to Take Action? A Reflective Dialogue about Preparing Students for Social Action Engagement (Andrea D. Domingue, and David S. Neely)

About the Editor and Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
Service-Learning is an engaged pedagogy, premised on experiential education as the foundation for intellectual, moral, and civic growth
Additional Info:
Service-Learning is an engaged pedagogy, premised on experiential education as the foundation for intellectual, moral, and civic growth
Additional Info:
This piece concerns "public work" in the sense of student assignments taking place outside the classroom or a closed Learning Management System. It is in the form of a Storify of a Twitter chat that took place March 26, 2012.
Additional Info:
This piece concerns "public work" in the sense of student assignments taking place outside the classroom or a closed Learning Management System. It is in the form of a Storify of a Twitter chat that took place March 26, 2012.
Additional Info:
Provides brief instructions on 13 different classroom discussion formats and activities. Examples include: circle of voices, critical debate, and jigsaw.
Additional Info:
Provides brief instructions on 13 different classroom discussion formats and activities. Examples include: circle of voices, critical debate, and jigsaw.
Additional Info:
Blog post that describes an alternative approach to classroom discussion/debate. Students are not asked to debate but to repeat back the position of their opponents. Then, students are asked to reach a consensus position together.
Additional Info:
Blog post that describes an alternative approach to classroom discussion/debate. Students are not asked to debate but to repeat back the position of their opponents. Then, students are asked to reach a consensus position together.
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50 Alternatives to Lecture

Web
Prusch, J.; and Pickett, M.
Topics: Alternative Classrooms

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Researched by J. Prusch and written and adapted by A.M. Pickett. Gives 50 alternatives to lecture for teaching online courses. Examples include: conduct an interview; invite a guest speaker; and student-led discussion. Alternatives could be adapted for face-to-face teaching.
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Researched by J. Prusch and written and adapted by A.M. Pickett. Gives 50 alternatives to lecture for teaching online courses. Examples include: conduct an interview; invite a guest speaker; and student-led discussion. Alternatives could be adapted for face-to-face teaching.
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Post by Marilla Svinicki of University of Texas at Austin for the National Teaching and Learning Forum. Discusses some of the benefits of flipped classrooms. Argues that the flipped classroom is not easy or new.
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Post by Marilla Svinicki of University of Texas at Austin for the National Teaching and Learning Forum. Discusses some of the benefits of flipped classrooms. Argues that the flipped classroom is not easy or new.
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Article by Cynthia J. Brame. Defines and describes the “flipped classroom.” Discusses the theoretical basis and provides additional resources on “flipping” the traditional classroom space.
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Article by Cynthia J. Brame. Defines and describes the “flipped classroom.” Discusses the theoretical basis and provides additional resources on “flipping” the traditional classroom space.
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Teaching Outside of the Classroom

Web
Claiborne, Lily; Morrell, John; Bandy, Joe; and Bruff, Derek
Topics: Alternative Classrooms

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Examines various ways to teach outside of a traditional classroom setting. Examples include: field trips, service learning and community engagement, and study abroad.
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Examines various ways to teach outside of a traditional classroom setting. Examples include: field trips, service learning and community engagement, and study abroad.
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Blog post by Derek Bruff from a meeting on designing learning spaces. Highlights the need for different types of spaces for different types of learning activities. Includes pictures with different classroom configurations
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Blog post by Derek Bruff from a meeting on designing learning spaces. Highlights the need for different types of spaces for different types of learning activities. Includes pictures with different classroom configurations
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Blog post by Julie Schell for Turn to Your Neighbor blog. Provides detailed instructions for educators on how to begin “flipping.” Includes PDF in multiple languages.
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Blog post by Julie Schell for Turn to Your Neighbor blog. Provides detailed instructions for educators on how to begin “flipping.” Includes PDF in multiple languages.
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Article by Kevin Makice for Wired. Discusses the development of flipped classrooms, including Khan Academy. Includes benefits and drawbacks of such instruction.
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Article by Kevin Makice for Wired. Discusses the development of flipped classrooms, including Khan Academy. Includes benefits and drawbacks of such instruction.
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Chronicle of Higher Education article by Jen Ebbeler. Describes the author’s experiences of flipping a history class. Highlights the significant challenges and potential rewards of flipping.
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Chronicle of Higher Education article by Jen Ebbeler. Describes the author’s experiences of flipping a history class. Highlights the significant challenges and potential rewards of flipping.
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Video. 4:27 minute YouTube video by John R. Sowash. Explains five need-to-know points for educators who are considering flipping classrooms.
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Video. 4:27 minute YouTube video by John R. Sowash. Explains five need-to-know points for educators who are considering flipping classrooms.
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Video. 20:28 minute TED talk video by Salman Khan, founder of the Khan Academy. Supports use of educational videos for teaching. Advocates letting students review videos at home in place of lecture and work with teacher in the classroom.
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Video. 20:28 minute TED talk video by Salman Khan, founder of the Khan Academy. Supports use of educational videos for teaching. Advocates letting students review videos at home in place of lecture and work with teacher in the classroom.
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Two-page PDF from Educause (February 2012). Explains flipping and potential benefits and drawbacks.
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Two-page PDF from Educause (February 2012). Explains flipping and potential benefits and drawbacks.
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Atlantic article by Ian Bogost. Regards the flipped classroom as an educational trend. Notes difficulties involved in flipping. Argues that flipping is a way of condensing and abstracting material.
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Atlantic article by Ian Bogost. Regards the flipped classroom as an educational trend. Notes difficulties involved in flipping. Argues that flipping is a way of condensing and abstracting material.
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Lengthy blog post by Jackie Gerstein on User Generated Education. Discusses the flipped classroom model. Reframes flipping as a cycle of learning model with use of technology.
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Lengthy blog post by Jackie Gerstein on User Generated Education. Discusses the flipped classroom model. Reframes flipping as a cycle of learning model with use of technology.
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Colorful infographic on the flipped classroom from Knewton.com. Explains: What is the flipped classroom; How it came to be; What’s driving it; and What it looks like.
Additional Info:
Colorful infographic on the flipped classroom from Knewton.com. Explains: What is the flipped classroom; How it came to be; What’s driving it; and What it looks like.
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The Place of Place-Based Pedagogy in Teaching Religion: Brooklyn and Its Religions

TTR
Estey, Ken
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 2 (2014): 122-137
BL41.T4 v.17 no.2
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Alternative Classrooms

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Place-based pedagogy offers students a distinctive way to be attentive to a particular expression of a given religion while enabling them to minimize generalizations on the basis of that experience. Place-based pedagogies decenter the traditional classroom as the sole locus of learning and emphasize the value of learning within varied spatial frameworks including undeveloped natural environments and built environments in rural, suburban, or urban communities. This article, set in Brooklyn, ...
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Place-based pedagogy offers students a distinctive way to be attentive to a particular expression of a given religion while enabling them to minimize generalizations on the basis of that experience. Place-based pedagogies decenter the traditional classroom as the sole locus of learning and emphasize the value of learning within varied spatial frameworks including undeveloped natural environments and built environments in rural, suburban, or urban communities. This article, set in Brooklyn, New York, is a case study of place-based teaching in an urban context. “Brooklyn and Its Religions” is a course that provides students with a place to explore diverse expressions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The article describes the course and analyzes students' field reports in two settings to demonstrate the value of place-based learning for studying religion in Brooklyn.
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This is a mobile app that allows the professor to award points "on the go" using their smartphone. Obviously aimed at K-12 teachers, but useful as well in higher education.
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This is a mobile app that allows the professor to award points "on the go" using their smartphone. Obviously aimed at K-12 teachers, but useful as well in higher education.
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Allows students or groups create their own graphic novel.
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Allows students or groups create their own graphic novel.
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This site would allow you to "flip your classroom" by sending students to these free online courses. The site includes religion courses from Harvard, MIT, Stanford.
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This site would allow you to "flip your classroom" by sending students to these free online courses. The site includes religion courses from Harvard, MIT, Stanford.
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Ideal for group projects. Members can bookmark and tab webpages and highlight important passages for each other.
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Ideal for group projects. Members can bookmark and tab webpages and highlight important passages for each other.
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A site to build interactive video teaching lessons. Ideal for online teaching. Build and share interactive video lessons. Time-link student activities as lecture progresses.
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A site to build interactive video teaching lessons. Ideal for online teaching. Build and share interactive video lessons. Time-link student activities as lecture progresses.
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Similar to Pinterest,but for teaching. This site helps you create a vVirtual "pinboard" for course projects Students can pin any form of multimedia content and create a digital learning portfolio.
Additional Info:
Similar to Pinterest,but for teaching. This site helps you create a vVirtual "pinboard" for course projects Students can pin any form of multimedia content and create a digital learning portfolio.
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This pdf is an entire 200 page book published by Parlor Press, Anderson, South Carolina 2014). It contains twenty-three chapters, by different authors, exploring the benefits and disadvantages of the recent educational phenomenon known as Massive Open Online Courses (acronym, MOOC). 
Additional Info:
This pdf is an entire 200 page book published by Parlor Press, Anderson, South Carolina 2014). It contains twenty-three chapters, by different authors, exploring the benefits and disadvantages of the recent educational phenomenon known as Massive Open Online Courses (acronym, MOOC). 

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Building on the Tradition of CCK08 (Charles Lowe)

ch. 1 MOOCology 1.0 (Glenna L. Decker)
ch. 2 Framing Questions about MOOCs and Writing Courses (James E. Porter)
ch. 3 A MOOC or Not a MOOC: ds106 - Questions the Form (Alan Levine)
ch. 4 Why We Are Thinking About MOOCs (Jeffrey T. Grabill)
ch. 5 The Hidden Costs of MOOCs (Karen Head)
ch. 6 Coursera: Fifty Ways to Fix the Software (with apologies to Paul Simon) (Laura Gibbs)
ch. 7 Being Present in a University Writing Course: A Case Against MOOCs (Bob Samuels)
ch. 8 Another Colonialist Tool? (Aaron Barlow)
ch. 9 MOOCversations: Commonplaces as Argument (Jeff Rice)
ch. 10 MOOC Feedback: Pleasing All the People? (Jeremy Knox, Jen Ross, Christine Sinclair, Hamish Macleod, and Siân Bayne)
ch. 11 More Questions than Answers: Scratching at the Surface of MOOCs in Higher Education (Jacqueline Kauza) ch. 12 Those Moot MOOCs: My MOOC Experience (Melissa Syapin)
ch. 13 MOOC Assigned (Steven D. Krause)
ch. 14 Learning How to Teach ... Differently: Extracts from a MOOC Instructor’s Journal (Denise K. Comer)
ch. 15 MOOC as Threat and Promise (Edward M. White)
ch. 16 A MOOC With a View: How MOOCs Encourage Us to Reexamine Pedagogical Doxa (Kay Halasek, Ben McCorkle, Cynthia L. Selfe, Scott Lloyd DeWitt, Susan Delagrange, Jennifer Michaels, and Kaitlin Clinnin)
ch. 17 Putting the U in MOOCs: The Importance of Usability in Course Design (Heather Noel Young)
ch. 18 “I open at the close”: A Post-MOOC Meta-Happening Reflection and What I’m Going to Do About That (Elizabeth D. Woodworth)
ch. 19 Here a MOOC, There a MOOC (Nick Carbone)
ch. 20 Writing and Learning with Feedback Machines (Alexander Reid)
ch. 21 Learning Many-to-Many: The Best Case for Writing in Digital Environments (Bill Hart-Davidson)
ch. 22 After the Invasion: What’s Next for MOOCs? (Steven D. Krause)

Contributors
Index
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Great for student group-work projects. Share docs, have virtual meetings, share calendar, send emails, and create websites all through this one site.
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Great for student group-work projects. Share docs, have virtual meetings, share calendar, send emails, and create websites all through this one site.
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Coursera is an education platform that partners with top universities and organizations worldwide, to offer courses online for anyone to take, for free. Religious topics are limited. Try searching specific religions like "Buddhism."
Additional Info:
Coursera is an education platform that partners with top universities and organizations worldwide, to offer courses online for anyone to take, for free. Religious topics are limited. Try searching specific religions like "Buddhism."
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Sign up for 200M free cloud space.Sync Documents in Real-time. Conveniently browse through and view all your content on any device. Edits made on one device, it simultaneously syncs to all your others.
Additional Info:
Sign up for 200M free cloud space.Sync Documents in Real-time. Conveniently browse through and view all your content on any device. Edits made on one device, it simultaneously syncs to all your others.
Additional Info:
Better option than texting for group communication. VoiceThread is a cloud application, so there is no software to install. It will work in any modern web browser and on almost any internet connection.Upload, share and discuss documents, presentations, images, audio files and videos. Over 50 different types of media can be used in a VoiceThread. Comment using microphone, webcam, text, phone, and audio-file upload.
Additional Info:
Better option than texting for group communication. VoiceThread is a cloud application, so there is no software to install. It will work in any modern web browser and on almost any internet connection.Upload, share and discuss documents, presentations, images, audio files and videos. Over 50 different types of media can be used in a VoiceThread. Comment using microphone, webcam, text, phone, and audio-file upload.
Additional Info:
The nation's largest multi-faith coalition dedicated to producing and distributing media that fosters understanding among people of different beliefs and perspectives and that enriches spiritual life. As a diverse multi-faith coalition with over 150 members, Odyssey represents many different traditions including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Baha'i, Sikh, and Hinduism. 
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The nation's largest multi-faith coalition dedicated to producing and distributing media that fosters understanding among people of different beliefs and perspectives and that enriches spiritual life. As a diverse multi-faith coalition with over 150 members, Odyssey represents many different traditions including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Baha'i, Sikh, and Hinduism. 
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Information, advice, examples of best practices, and inspiration to those using or thinking about using learning environments known as "Active Learning Classrooms" (ALCs). Produced by the University of Minnesota’s Center for Teaching and Learning. Both concrete and grounded in theory of active learning. Also has an annotated bibliography.
Additional Info:
Information, advice, examples of best practices, and inspiration to those using or thinking about using learning environments known as "Active Learning Classrooms" (ALCs). Produced by the University of Minnesota’s Center for Teaching and Learning. Both concrete and grounded in theory of active learning. Also has an annotated bibliography.
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Touch it! Touch it! Reframing Teaching and Learning through James Turrell's Acton

TTR
Cruz, Faustino M.
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 4 (2014): 348-349
BL41.T4. v.17 no. 4 2014
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “Compare the pedagogy of your classroom and a Wabash workshop"
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “Compare the pedagogy of your classroom and a Wabash workshop"
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Cultivating a Sense of Place in Religious Studies

TTR
Jensen, Molly Hadley
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 3-19
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This essay analyzes student learning through place-based pedagogies in an American Religions course. In the course, students analyzed cultural meanings and practices of regional religious communities and participated in sensory awareness and ecological learning in a campus garden. Embodied learning increased student understanding and appreciation of land-based religious practices and epistemologies, and promoted multiple student literacies. In Religious Studies, place-based learning is vital to the examination of the rich dimensions ...
Additional Info:
This essay analyzes student learning through place-based pedagogies in an American Religions course. In the course, students analyzed cultural meanings and practices of regional religious communities and participated in sensory awareness and ecological learning in a campus garden. Embodied learning increased student understanding and appreciation of land-based religious practices and epistemologies, and promoted multiple student literacies. In Religious Studies, place-based learning is vital to the examination of the rich dimensions and expressions of religious experience. Across disciplines, place-based pedagogies can expand and deepen text-based learning, cultivate recognition of various ways of knowing, foster affective connections to the local community, and develop critical skills for addressing patterns of displacement and ecological denigration.
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Working through the Problems of Study Abroad Using the Methodologies of Religious Studies

TTR
Siegler, Elijah
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 37-45
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religious Diversity   |   Alternative Classrooms

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After illustrating the joys of teaching religious studies abroad with an anecdote from my trip to China, I warn of some of its inherent pedagogical and ethical challenges. I argue that teaching some of the “new directions” in religious studies scholarship might address these challenges. These include a turning away from the abstract (texts, beliefs, theologies) and towards the concrete (bodies, places, rituals); moving away from teaching religions as unchanging, ...
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After illustrating the joys of teaching religious studies abroad with an anecdote from my trip to China, I warn of some of its inherent pedagogical and ethical challenges. I argue that teaching some of the “new directions” in religious studies scholarship might address these challenges. These include a turning away from the abstract (texts, beliefs, theologies) and towards the concrete (bodies, places, rituals); moving away from teaching religions as unchanging, ancient verities and instead emphasizing the impact that colonialism, modernization, and secularism have had; moving from searching for authenticity to questioning it; and emphasizing methodological self-consciousness. Keeping these new directions in mind will help ensure the study abroad experience is educationally successful. This essay serves as an introduction to a series of six additional essays comprising a special section of the journal (see Teaching Theology and Religion 18:1, January 2015).
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What Do We Compare When We Compare Religions? Philosophical Remarks on the Psychology of Studying Comparative Religion Abroad

TTR
Irvine, Andrew
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 46-55
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religious Diversity   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The issue of comparison is a vexing one in religious and theological studies, not least for teachers of comparative religion in study abroad settings. We try to make familiar ideas fresh and strange, in settings where students may find it hard not to take “fresh” and “strange” as signs of existential threat. The author explores this delicate pedagogical situation, drawing on several years' experience directing a study abroad program and ...
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The issue of comparison is a vexing one in religious and theological studies, not least for teachers of comparative religion in study abroad settings. We try to make familiar ideas fresh and strange, in settings where students may find it hard not to take “fresh” and “strange” as signs of existential threat. The author explores this delicate pedagogical situation, drawing on several years' experience directing a study abroad program and on the thought of figures from the Western existentialist tradition and Chinese Confucian philosophy. The article focuses particularly on “oh events” – defined as moments when one learns one has something to learn and something to unlearn. The author argues that the experience of shame that is typical of oh events can become a valuable resource for cross-cultural learning and personal transformation, if teachers assist students to reflect on the experience as a sign of differing, but potentially harmonizable, cultural expectations. This essay is published alongside of six other essays, including a response from John Barbour, comprising a special section of the journal (see Teaching Theology and Religion 18:1, January 2015).
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The Immersion Experience: Lessons from Study Abroad in Religion

TTR
Mitchell, Kerry
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 56-62
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religious Diversity   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This paper discusses strategies I employed during seven years of teaching within a study abroad program focusing on religion. This year-long program traveled to four Asian countries and included immersion experiences in monasteries, ashrams, and other religious institutions. I identify four principles and discuss accompanying exercises that guided my teaching: (1) Accept and observe anxiety. Inability to understand is a sign that direct and deep contact is taking place. (2) Educate about ...
Additional Info:
This paper discusses strategies I employed during seven years of teaching within a study abroad program focusing on religion. This year-long program traveled to four Asian countries and included immersion experiences in monasteries, ashrams, and other religious institutions. I identify four principles and discuss accompanying exercises that guided my teaching: (1) Accept and observe anxiety. Inability to understand is a sign that direct and deep contact is taking place. (2) Educate about education. Help students to see the aims, assumptions, and context of the teaching strategies religious practitioners employ. (3) Make it practical. Devise exercises that students can do and do well and that do not demand synthetic, systematic comprehension even as a goal. (4) Stop making sense. Build pauses and breaks into the train of reflection on the meaning of experience. These spaces give room for the shifts in the ways of learning that study abroad demands. This essay is published alongside of six other essays, including a response from John Barbour, comprising a special section of the journal (see Teaching Theology and Religion 18:1, January 2015).
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Inverting the Object of Study: Recalibrating the Frame of Reference in Study Abroad Experiences

TTR
Palmer, Norris W.
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 63-72
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religious Diversity   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This essay is concerned with study abroad experiences as opportunities for student cognitive development, using the interpretive lens of educational psychologist William G. Perry. A standard and often valuable assignment in courses on world religions is a site visit to a religious institution in one's local area. This may concretize otherwise abstract materials and help students reflect on ways in which the lived experience of religion differs from its presentation ...
Additional Info:
This essay is concerned with study abroad experiences as opportunities for student cognitive development, using the interpretive lens of educational psychologist William G. Perry. A standard and often valuable assignment in courses on world religions is a site visit to a religious institution in one's local area. This may concretize otherwise abstract materials and help students reflect on ways in which the lived experience of religion differs from its presentation in course texts and other academic materials. Increasingly, study abroad trips are being offered as extended and more intensive ways of bringing this material to life, offering students opportunity to see lived religion within another cultural framework. At the heart of this paper is the contention that such study abroad experiences function not simply as longer, more intense versions of site visits but, rather, as experiences that invert the subject and object of study. The worldview of the student becomes a primary object of study, which is examined, as it were, by the particulars of the religion(s) under investigation and the cultures of which said religion(s) are a part. Where site visits offer students an opportunity to visit the strange amidst the familiar, study abroad trips provide opportunities for students to become the strange within a recalibrated familiar. The subject becomes the object and is interrogated by the context of study. While local, stateside site visits can offer a degree of such dislocation, their brevity, together with some degree of assimilation to the larger culture flows on the part of the local religious institution being visited, most often mitigates any significant inversion. Students generally see such institutions as either mildly or wildly exotic, but always within their frame of reference, which constitutes the norm. When abroad, the normative experience of students is often subverted in ways that lay bare the assumptions behind such views and makes possible another world in which to live. Simply put, the subject and object of study change places. If this inversion is carefully attended to, it can provide rich insight into not only the topics nominally being studied but also occasion opportunity for real cognitive development on the part of the student. This essay is published alongside of six other essays, including a response from John Barbour, comprising a special section of the journal (see Teaching Theology and Religion 18:1, January 2015).
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The Politics of Teaching of Indigenous Traditions in Aotearoa/New Zealand

TTR
Wiseman, Wendy A.
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 73-80
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religious Diversity   |   Alternative Classrooms

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Reflecting on two study abroad trips to New Zealand in 2005 and 2007, I suggest in this essay that it is possible to mitigate the risk of (American or European) students recapitulating imperial attitudes through development of a rigorous curriculum focusing on the legacies of colonialism, institutional racism, and the somewhat dubious phenomenon of “post-colonialism.” Readings, I argue, should be in continual play during cultural and social activities, operating in a dialectal ...
Additional Info:
Reflecting on two study abroad trips to New Zealand in 2005 and 2007, I suggest in this essay that it is possible to mitigate the risk of (American or European) students recapitulating imperial attitudes through development of a rigorous curriculum focusing on the legacies of colonialism, institutional racism, and the somewhat dubious phenomenon of “post-colonialism.” Readings, I argue, should be in continual play during cultural and social activities, operating in a dialectal move toward an “ethics of respect.” Such an ethics remains aporetic, or uncertain, insofar as no code of behavior can render us immune to the political and polemical effects of past and present forms of imperialism. However, a cultivated respect for distance and difference, including regarding questions of “authenticity,” can help to actualize the transformative promise of studying (indigenous) religion abroad. This essay is published alongside of six other essays, including a response from John Barbour, comprising a special section of the journal (see Teaching Theology and Religion 18:1, January 2015).
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Finding Freedom Abroad: Working with Conservative Christian Students in Study Abroad Programs

TTR
Mercer, Calvin
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 81-87
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Religious Diversity   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Conservative (fundamentalist, evangelical) Christian students present a general theological worldview that often correlates with significant anxiety. In a foreign setting, the anxiety of conservative students, removed from their supportive infrastructure, can be considerably heightened. This structure of thinking and emotion presents distinctive challenges and opportunities. Drawing upon my work as a clinician and as a religion professor who conducted study abroad programs, I make suggestions for working effectively with conservative ...
Additional Info:
Conservative (fundamentalist, evangelical) Christian students present a general theological worldview that often correlates with significant anxiety. In a foreign setting, the anxiety of conservative students, removed from their supportive infrastructure, can be considerably heightened. This structure of thinking and emotion presents distinctive challenges and opportunities. Drawing upon my work as a clinician and as a religion professor who conducted study abroad programs, I make suggestions for working effectively with conservative Christian students in study abroad contexts. Suggestions include predeparture, in-country, and post-trip strategies. Specific examples of conversations with students are provided to illustrate the challenges and strategies. This essay is published alongside of seven other essays, including a response from John Barbour, comprising a special section of the journal (see Teaching Theology and Religion 18:1, January 2015).
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“Oh Events” for the Professor: Studies and Stories of Religious Studies Abroad

TTR
Barbour, John D.
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 88-96
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This response explains three ways in which the preceding essays are a significant contribution to the study of study abroad, explores three additional issues, and makes three suggestions for future work on religious studies and study abroad. This response is published alongside of six other essays, comprising a special section of the journal (see Teaching Theology and Religion 18:1, January 2015).
Additional Info:
This response explains three ways in which the preceding essays are a significant contribution to the study of study abroad, explores three additional issues, and makes three suggestions for future work on religious studies and study abroad. This response is published alongside of six other essays, comprising a special section of the journal (see Teaching Theology and Religion 18:1, January 2015).
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Wabash tree

Effective Social Learning: A Collaborative, Globally-Networked Pedagogy

Book
Loewen, Nathan R. B.
2014
Augsburg Fortress, Minneapolis, MN
LB1084.L6 2014
Topics: Using Technology   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The ground of higher education is shifting, but learning ecosystems around the world have much more space than MOOCs and trendy online platforms can fill, and Loewen shows how professors have an indisputable pedagogical edge that gives them a crucial role to play in higher education. By adopting the collaborative pedagogical process in this book, professors can create effective social learning experiences that connect students to peers and professional colleagues ...
Additional Info:
The ground of higher education is shifting, but learning ecosystems around the world have much more space than MOOCs and trendy online platforms can fill, and Loewen shows how professors have an indisputable pedagogical edge that gives them a crucial role to play in higher education. By adopting the collaborative pedagogical process in this book, professors can create effective social learning experiences that connect students to peers and professional colleagues in real time.
 
Loewen moves beyond surface questions about technology in the classroom to a problem best addressed by educators in bricks-and-mortar institutions: if students are social learners, how do we teach in a way that promotes actual dialogue for learning? Designing learning experiences that develop intercultural competencies puts the test to students’ social inclinations, and engagement with course material increases when it’s used to dig deeper into the specificities of their identity and social location. Loewen’s approach to interinstitutional collaborative teaching will be explored with examples and working templates for collaborative design of effective social learning experiences. This is done by collaborative dialogue with G. Brooke Lester and Christopher Duncanson-Hales. As a group, Loewen, Lester, and Duncanson-Hales create a text that extends pedagogical innovation in inspiring but practical ways. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
ch. 1 The Approach (Nathan Loewen)
Extend the Innovation 1.1 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 1.2 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innoovation 1.3 (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)
Chapter Response I: How Did We Get to Here? (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response II: Finding Your “Plan B”: Asynchronous and Synchronous Technology (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)

ch. 2 The Collaboration (Nathan Lowen)
Extend the Innovation 2.1 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 2.2 (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)
Chapter Response I: Facilitating Virtual Community (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response II: Finding the Courage to Teach Dialogically (Christopher J. Ducanson-Hales)

ch. 3 The Foundation (Nathan Lowen)
Extend the Innovation 3.1 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 3.2 (G Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 3.3 (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)
Chapter Response I: Preparing for a Cross-Cultural Classroom Experience (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response II: Considering Learning Disabilities in Collaborative Learning Environments (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)

ch. 4 The Content (Nathan Loewen)
Extend the Innovation 4.1 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 4.2 (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response I: Teaching Online: The Bad News, the Worse News, and What to Do about it (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response II: International Experiential Learning (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)

ch. 5 The Plan (Nathan Loewen)
Extend the Innovation 5.1 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 5.2 (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)
Extend the Innovation 5.3 (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response I: Assign “Fails” to Find Digital Learning Wins (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response II: Minding the Divides (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)

ch. 6 The Details (Nathan Loewen)
Extend the Innovation 6.1 (G. Brooke Lester)
Extend the Innovation 6.2 (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response I: Creating a Community of Practice (G. Brooke Lester)
Chapter Response II: Creating Communities of Scholars (Christopher J. Duncanson-Hales)

Selected Bibliography
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Lifelong Learning, The Arts and Community Cultural Engagement In The Contemporary University: International Perspectives

Book
Clover, Darlene E. and Sanford, Kathy, eds.
2013
Manchester University Press, Manchester, UK
LC5215.L54 2013
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Lifelong learning, the arts, and community cultural engagement in the contemporary university maps the work of adult educators, teachers, researchers and graduate students from North America, Europe and Africa who use the arts in their university classroom teaching, their research and in service. It is written specifically for graduate students, and educators working in higher education, communities, schools, and practitioners who want to ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Lifelong learning, the arts, and community cultural engagement in the contemporary university maps the work of adult educators, teachers, researchers and graduate students from North America, Europe and Africa who use the arts in their university classroom teaching, their research and in service. It is written specifically for graduate students, and educators working in higher education, communities, schools, and practitioners who want to learn how to better integrate the arts in their practice to critically and creativity communicate, teach, make meaning, uncover, and involve. The book contextualises the place and role of the arts in society, adult education, higher education and knowledge creation, outlines current arts-based theories and methodologies and provides examples of visual and performing arts practices to critically and creatively see, explore, represent, learn and discover the potential of the human aesthetic dimension in higher education teaching and research. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Darlene E. Clover and Kathy Sanford)

Section One: Arts-based teaching and learning
ch. 1 Embodied learning through story and dramatic play: Shifting values in university settings (Kathy Sanford and Kristin Mimick)
ch. 2 Dream, believe, lead: Learning citizenship playfully at the University of Cape Town (Astrid von Kotze and Janet Small)
ch. 3 Crossing a cultural divide: Transgressing the margins into public spaces fosters adult learning (Tara Hyland-Russell and Janet Groen)
ch. 4 University teacher education and the Pop-up Art School (Christine Jarvis and Sarah Williamson)
ch. 5 Fear of glue, fear of thread: Teaching arts-based practice in the adult education classroom (Shauna Butterwick and Darlene E. Clover)

Section Two: Arts-based Research and Enquiry
ch. 6 Mentoring arts-based research in the academy: A tale of two professors (Randee Lipson Lawrence and Patricia Cranton)
ch. 7 Collage-making for interdisciplinary research skills training in Northern Ireland (Shelley Tracey and Joe Allen)
ch. 8 Theatre-based action research for health in Denmark (Mia Husted and Ditte Tofteng)
ch. 9 Weaving tales of hope and challenge: Exploring diversity through Metissage (Catherine Etmanski, Will Weigler, and Grace Wong-Sneddon)
ch. 10 A new ‘Age of Enlightenment’: Challenges and opportunities for lifelong learning, museums and cultural engagement at the University of Glasgow (Maureen Park)
ch. 11 Empowering literary educators and learners in Northern Ireland: University-community engagements for peace (Rob Mark)
ch. 12 Creative pathways: Developing lifelong learning for community dance practitioners (Victoria Hunter)

Overlay: Messages, Tension and Threads (Darlene E. Clover and Kathy Sanford)
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Teaching and Learning in Faculty-Led, Short-Term Study Abroad Programs: Editor's Introduction

Journal Issue
Glennon, Frederick, ed.
2015
Spotlight on Teaching, May 29,
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/teaching/faculty-led-study-abroad/editor%E2%80%99s-introduction
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsn.aarweb.org/spotlight-on/teaching/faculty-led-study-abroad/editor%E2%80%99s-introduction

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching and Learning in Faculty-Led, Short-Term Study Abroad Programs: Editor's Introduction (Fred Glennon)
ch. 2 Theoretical Frameworks for Designing Study Abroad Courses in Religious Studies (David B. Howell)
ch. 3 How to Fall in Love with a Glacier: Teaching Environmental Humanities in Iceland (Shannon Grimes)
ch. 4 Through the Back Door: Interdisciplinary in Short-Term, Faculty-Led Study Abroad Programs (Dorina Miller Parmenter)
ch. 5 There and Back Again: Study Abroad and the Traditional Classroom (Alyssa Beall)
ch. 6 Study Abroad, Pedagogy, and "Expedient Means" (Alex Snow)
ch. 7 Theology, Filmmaking, and Social Justice Immersion (John J. O'Keefe)

Resources
Additional Info:
The Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement has collected examples of policies, programs, surveys, and other resources according to the six aspects of the CIGE Model for Comprehensive Internationalization, and are provided as models for other colleges and universities as they pursue their internationalization goals.
Additional Info:
The Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement has collected examples of policies, programs, surveys, and other resources according to the six aspects of the CIGE Model for Comprehensive Internationalization, and are provided as models for other colleges and universities as they pursue their internationalization goals.
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Demystifying Outcomes Assessment for International Educators: A Practical Approach

Book
Deardorff, Darla K.
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2822.75.D43 2015
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
For many in international education, assessment can seem daunting and overwhelming, especially given that such efforts need to involve much more than a pre/post survey. This book is a practical guide to learning-outcomes assessment in international education for practitioners who are starting to engage with the process, as well as for those who want to improve the quality and effectiveness of their assessment efforts.

Assuming no prior ...
Additional Info:
For many in international education, assessment can seem daunting and overwhelming, especially given that such efforts need to involve much more than a pre/post survey. This book is a practical guide to learning-outcomes assessment in international education for practitioners who are starting to engage with the process, as well as for those who want to improve the quality and effectiveness of their assessment efforts.

Assuming no prior knowledge, the book offers an accessible and clear road map to the application of assessment. Recognizing that a “one size fits all” approach cannot capture the diversity of goals and settings of international education, or the rich variety of programs and organizations involved in delivering it, author Darla Deardorff provides the reader with foundational principles and knowledge to develop appropriate assessment approaches for evaluating and improving student learning outcomes, which are the drivers of higher education internationalization.

She provides the background for assessment, highlights how the characteristics of international education pose unique challenges for assessment, considers the contexts to which assessment may be applied – whether in cross-border or “at home” institutional experiences, such as in curricular, co-curricular or extracurricular settings – and distills a seemingly convoluted process into a manageable approach. From the basics of getting started in assessment to highlighting pitfalls to avoid, this book offers a holistic and practical approach to assessment that moves beyond seeing assessment as a discrete activity to on-going process that is integrated into student learning. There is also a unique chapter for education leaders on assessment essentials from a leadership-perspective.

The appendices include worksheets for implementing assessment, creating an assessment team, and getting buy-in from stakeholders. Other appendices include a list of standards adapted to international education outcomes assessment, guidance on assessing intercultural competence, and resources.

This book reflects the author’s experience of over a decade of work with international education programs and higher education institutions around the world, and synthesizes what she has learned into an easy-to-use resource for anyone who wants to understand and utilize effective assessment in the field of international education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Trudy Banta)
Foreword (Hans de Wit)
Acknowledgements
Introduction

ch. 1 Framing International Education Assessment
ch. 2 Thirty Frequently Asked Questions on Assessment in International Practice
ch. 3 The Unique Assessment Context of International Education
ch. 4 Principles for Effective Assessment in International Education
ch. 5 Approaching International Education Assessment Holistically: The Logic Model
ch. 6 Getting Started
ch. 7 Developing an Assessment Strategy: The Assessment Process
ch. 8 Pitfalls to Avoid, Strategies, and Lessons Learned
ch. 9 The Leadership Role in International Education Assessment
ch. 10 The Future of International Education Assessment

Appendices
Appendix A: Handouts and Worksheets
Appendix B: Assessing Intercultural Competence as a Learning Outcome of International Education
Appendix C: Some Thoughts on Assessing Intercultural Competence
Appendix D: Checklist for Evaluating the Effectiveness of Outcomes Assessment in International Education
Appendix E: Some Assessment Tools for International Education Contexts
Appendix F: International Education Learning Outcomes Examples
Appendix G: Selected Assessment Resources for International Educators
References
Index
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Open-Space Learning: A Study in Transdisciplinary Pedagogy

Book
Monk, Nicholas; Rutter, Carol Chillington; Neelands, Jonothan; and Heron, Jonathan
2011
Bloomsbury Academic, New York, NY
LB1032.M628 2011
Topics: Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Reviewa>
Abstract: Open-space Learning offers a unique resource to educators wishing to develop a workshop model of teaching and learning. The authors propose an embodied, performative mode of learning that challenges the primacy of the lecture and seminar model in higher education. Drawing on the expertise of the CAPITAL Centre (Creativity and Performance in Teaching and Learning) at the University of Warwick, they show how ...
Article cover image

Contemplative Studies and the Liberal Arts

Article
Fort, Andrew O.
2013
Buddhist-Christian Studies, v33 n1: 23-32
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Contemplative Studies—meaning both standard “third-person” study of contemplative traditions in history and various cultures as well as actual “first-person” practice of contemplative exercises as part of coursework—is a new field in academia, and aspects have been controversial in some quarters, seen as not completely compatible with the rigorous “critical inquiry” of liberal arts study. While there are agendas within contemplative studies (CS) that go beyond the traditional questions ...
Additional Info:
Contemplative Studies—meaning both standard “third-person” study of contemplative traditions in history and various cultures as well as actual “first-person” practice of contemplative exercises as part of coursework—is a new field in academia, and aspects have been controversial in some quarters, seen as not completely compatible with the rigorous “critical inquiry” of liberal arts study. While there are agendas within contemplative studies (CS) that go beyond the traditional questions and issues of liberal education, I want to argue that CS has, for a number of reasons, a place right at the heart of such inquiry. CS can be approached from many disciplines, including psychology, medicine, and neuroscience, as well as literature and visual, fine, and performing arts, but here I will focus on its place in liberal arts generally, and in religious studies specifically.
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Mindful Teaching and Learning: Developing a Pedagogy of Well-Being

Book
Ragoonaden, Karen, ed.
2015
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LB1025.3.M57 2015
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Mindful Teaching and Learning: Developing a Pedagogy of Well-Being features a community of scholar-practitioners from across disciplines, methodologies, and ideological perspectives exploring and examining contexts that support mindful teaching, mindful learning, and a pedagogy of well-being. Collectively, these chapters document and analyze the opportunities and challenges within pedagogical sites and discuss how the disposition of mindfulness can be nurtured and sustained in educational ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Mindful Teaching and Learning: Developing a Pedagogy of Well-Being features a community of scholar-practitioners from across disciplines, methodologies, and ideological perspectives exploring and examining contexts that support mindful teaching, mindful learning, and a pedagogy of well-being. Collectively, these chapters document and analyze the opportunities and challenges within pedagogical sites and discuss how the disposition of mindfulness can be nurtured and sustained in educational practice and praxis. Bolstered by the positive evidence-based standards emanating from clinical settings, mindfulness based training has spread into a variety of other fields like psychology, healthcare, and more recently, education.

Within pedagogical environments, an emergent secular conception of mindfulness, under the auspices of educational psychologists like Langer (1987; 1997), Goleman, (2008), Lantieri (2008), Roeser, Skinner, Beers, and Jennings, (2012), and Schonert-Reichl and Lawlor (2010), is making headway. Consequently, Mindfulness Training (MT) resources have been applied to educational contexts in order to maximize the academic, emotional, physical, and psychological benefits provided by this mind-body approach to well-being.

Acknowledging the increasing evidence base for the efficacy of mindfulness interventions as well as the elevated stress levels reported by many educators and their students, this book discusses how mindful practices, praxis, and research can inform and support pedagogy, curriculum, and leadership initiatives in higher education in the twenty-first century. Alongside the multitude of recent studies in the area of Mindfulness, contributors discuss their own experiences using Self-study, Contemplative pedagogy, Living Educational Theory, and Curriculum Inquiry. The content of this book examines ways in which to develop habits of mind and courses of action, as well as a curriculum of study that can support educators as they cultivate competencies for thriving and coping with the modern demands of being a teacher. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Mindful Teaching and Learning: Developing a Pedagogy of Well-Being (Karen Ragoonaden)

ch. 1 Mindfulness Training: A Transdisciplinary Approach to Assessing Efficacy in Education (Elizabeth R. Mackenzie)
ch. 2 Mindful Education and Well-Being (Karen Ragoonaden)
ch. 3 Enhancing Learning through Contemplative Pedagogy (Kathryn Byrnes and Tom Bassarear)
ch. 4 Living Collaborative Leadership: Cultivating a Mindful Approach (Sabre Cherkowski, Kelly Hanson, and Jennifer Kelly)
ch. 5 Mindfulness-Based Wellness Education: Pedagogical Insights (Geoffrey Soloway)
ch. 6 Mindful Curricular Engagement: Preparing Prospective Educators to See/Act with Discernment and Deliberation (Margaret Macintyre Latta)

About the Contributors
Index
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Becoming an Embedded Librarian: Making Connections in the Classroom

Book
Reale, Michelle
2016
ALA American Library Association, Chicago, IL
Z675.U5 R44 2016
Topics: Librarians as Teachers   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Embedded librarianship is “not one size fits all,” yet many books on the subject treat it in a cold, objective manner that doesn’t adequately communicate how becoming an embedded librarian actually works in the real world. Here, Reale shares her own university classroom experiences to offer a step-by-step primer for those contemplating the practice. Demystifying what can sometimes feel intimidating to academic ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Embedded librarianship is “not one size fits all,” yet many books on the subject treat it in a cold, objective manner that doesn’t adequately communicate how becoming an embedded librarian actually works in the real world. Here, Reale shares her own university classroom experiences to offer a step-by-step primer for those contemplating the practice. Demystifying what can sometimes feel intimidating to academic librarians, this down to earth resource

- defines what embedded librarianship is, and isn’t;
- explains why being in the classroom is so important, and how it creates communities of learning;
- hows how to clarify the role of the librarian in a classroom by being a “facilitator of process”;
- offers strategies for relationship building, setting goals, and honing a teaching style; and
- discusses embedded librarianship and branding.

Readers will feel confident applying the lessons learned from Reale’s first-hand account to their own experiences both in and out of the classroom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword: A View from the Lectern (Sandra Crenshaw)
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 From the Beginning: Traditional Librarianship Takes a Different Path
ch. 2 Embedded Librarianship Defined
ch. 3 The Importance of Being There
ch. 4 The Importance of Relationship Building
ch. 5 Clarifying Your Role in the Embedded Classroom
ch. 6 Establishing a Teaching Style in the Classroom
ch. 7 Classroom Embedding Creates Communities of Practice and Possibilities
ch. 8 The Embedded Librarian as Facilitator of Process
ch. 9 Setting Personal Goals
ch. 10 Personal Branding in Embedded Librarianship
ch. 11 Being Embedded: An Odyssey
ch. 12 In Retrospect

Index
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Digital Didactical Designs: Teaching and Learning in CrossActionSpaces

Book
Jahnke, Isa
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1044.87.J33 2016
Topics: Using Technology   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: As web-enabled mobile technologies become increasingly integrated into formal learning environments, the fields of education and ICT (information and communication technology) are merging to create a new kind of classroom: CrossActionSpaces. Grounding its exploration of these co-located communication spaces in global empirical research, Digital Didactical Designs facilitates the development of teachers into collaborative designers and evaluators of technology-driven teaching and learning experiences—learning ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: As web-enabled mobile technologies become increasingly integrated into formal learning environments, the fields of education and ICT (information and communication technology) are merging to create a new kind of classroom: CrossActionSpaces. Grounding its exploration of these co-located communication spaces in global empirical research, Digital Didactical Designs facilitates the development of teachers into collaborative designers and evaluators of technology-driven teaching and learning experiences—learning through reflective making. The Digital Didactical Design model promotes deep learning expeditions with a framework that encourages teachers and researchers to study, explore, and analyze the applied designs-in-practice. The book presents critical views of contemporary education, theories of socio-technical systems and behavior patterns, and concludes with a look into the conceptual and practical prototypes that might emerge in schools and universities in the near future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction – the Internet in Our Pockets and Handbags; ICT is more than just a tool
ch. 2 From Socio-Technical Systems to CrossActionSpaces
ch. 3 Dynamics of Roles in CrossActionSpaces: Enabler and Hinder
ch. 4 Learning as Reflective CrossAction: the example of Learning Expeditions
ch. 5 Teaching Creates Conditions for Learning as Reflective CrossAction: Digital Didactical Design
ch. 6 Projects and Empirical Studies Towards Reflective CrossActionSpaces
ch. 7 Conclusion and Looking Forward . . .

Index
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Integrating Mindfulness into Anti-Oppression Pedagogy: Social Justice in Higher Education

Book
Berila, Beth
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LC192.2.B47 2016
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Drawing from mindfulness education and social justice teaching, this bookexplores an anti-oppressive pedagogy for university and college classrooms. Authentic classroom discussions about oppression and diversity can be difficult; a mindful approach allows students to explore their experiences with compassion and to engage in critical inquiry to confront their deeply held beliefs and value systems. This engaging book is full of practical tips for ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Drawing from mindfulness education and social justice teaching, this bookexplores an anti-oppressive pedagogy for university and college classrooms. Authentic classroom discussions about oppression and diversity can be difficult; a mindful approach allows students to explore their experiences with compassion and to engage in critical inquiry to confront their deeply held beliefs and value systems. This engaging book is full of practical tips for deepening learning, addressing challenging situations, and providing mindfulness practices in anti-oppression classrooms. Integrating Mindfulness into Anti-Oppression Pedagogy is for all higher education professionals interested in pedagogy that empowers and engages students in the complex unlearning of oppression. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements
Permissions

ch. 1 Mindful Anti-Oppression Pedagogy
ch. 2 Bringing the Body Back In
ch. 3 Recognizing and Unlearning Internalized Oppression
ch. 4 Dismantling Privilege with Mindful Listening
ch. 5 Reframing Student Resistance as Mindful Dissonance
ch. 6 Critiques and Challenges of Mindful Anti-Oppression Pedagogy
ch. 7 Building Empowered, Compassionate Communities

Index
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Is Digital Different?: How information creation, capture, preservation and discovery are being transformed

Book
Moss, Michael; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara; and Dupuis, Marc J.
2015
Facet Publishing, London
ZA4150.I8 2015
Topics: Librarians as Teachers   |   Using Technology   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This edited collection brings together global experts to explore the role of information professionals in the transition from an analogue to a digital environment.

The contributors, including David Nicholas, Valerie Johnson, Tim Gollins and Scott David, focus on the opportunities and challenges afforded by this new environment that is transforming the information landscape in ways that were scarcely imaginable a decade ago and is challenging the very existence ...
Additional Info:
This edited collection brings together global experts to explore the role of information professionals in the transition from an analogue to a digital environment.

The contributors, including David Nicholas, Valerie Johnson, Tim Gollins and Scott David, focus on the opportunities and challenges afforded by this new environment that is transforming the information landscape in ways that were scarcely imaginable a decade ago and is challenging the very existence of the traditional library and archive as more and more resources become available on line and as computers and supporting networks become more and more powerful.

By drawing on examples of the impact of other new and emerging technologies on the information sciences in the past, the book emphasises that information systems have always been shaped by available technologies that have transformed the creation, capture, preservation and discovery of content. 

Key topics covered include:
• Search in the digital environment
• RDF and the semantic web
• Crowd sourcing and engagement between institutions and individuals
• Development of information management systems
• Security: managing online risk
• Long term curation and preservation
• Rights and the Commons
• Finding archived records in the digital age.

Is Digital Different? illustrates the ways in which the digital environment has the potential to transform scholarship and break down barriers between the academy and the wider community, and draws out both the inherent challenges and the opportunities for information professionals globally. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Introduction and acknowledgements (Michael Moss and Barbara Endicott-Popovsky)

ch. 1 What is the same and what is different (Michael Moss)
ch. 2 Finding stuff (David Nicholas and David Clark)
ch. 3 RDF, the Semantic Web, Jordan, Jordan and Jordan (Norman Gray)
ch. 4 Crowd sourcing (Ylva Berglund Prytz)
ch. 5 Pathways to integrating technical, legal and economic considerations in the design, development and deployment of trusted IM systems (Scott David and Barbara Endicott Popovsky)
ch. 6 archived records in a digital age (Tim Gollins and Emma Bayne)
ch. 7 Security: managing online risk (Barbara Endicott-Popovsky)
ch. 8 Rights and the Commons: navigating the boundary between public and private knowledge spaces (Gavan McCarthy and Helen Morgan)
ch. 9 From the Library in Alexandria to the Google Campus: has the digital changed the way we do research? (David Thomas and Valeria Johnson)

Index
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Learning Cities for Adult Learners: New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, Number 145

Book
Scott, Leodis
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA, (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 145)
LC5219.L4 2015
Topics: Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Learning cities call for a connection of adult education to elementary, secondary, and postsecondary institutions along with vocational and corporate workspaces.

This volume considers how “learning cities for adult learners” could be created in America that promote lifelong learning and education. Encouraging a widespread approach to educate and learn across disciplines, within communities, and inside the minds of all people, topics ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Learning cities call for a connection of adult education to elementary, secondary, and postsecondary institutions along with vocational and corporate workspaces.

This volume considers how “learning cities for adult learners” could be created in America that promote lifelong learning and education. Encouraging a widespread approach to educate and learn across disciplines, within communities, and inside the minds of all people, topics covered include:

• workplace and organizational learning,
• community engagement and service learning,
• public libraries and cooperative extension, and
• leisure, recreation, and public health education.

This is the 145th volume of the Jossey Bass series New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. Noted for its depth of coverage, it explores issues of common interest to instructors, administrators, counselors, and policymakers in a broad range of education settings, such as colleges and universities, extension programs, businesses, libraries, and museums. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Leodis Scott)

ch. 1 Evolution and Reconstruction of Learning Cities for Sustainable Actions (Connie Watson, Aimee Tiu Wu)
A discussion of learning cities requires social sustainable change that traces its roots back to the idea of a “learning society,” which featured a lifelong education movement long before the common expression of lifelong learning.

ch. 2 Learning Cities, Systems Change, and Community Engagement Scholarship (Hiram E. Fitzgerald, Renee Zientek)
Community engagement scholarship describes the mutual relationship in higher education for civic, community, and public engagement that create systems for service learning in the context of a learning city/region.

ch. 3 Workplace, Organizational, and Societal: Three Domains of Learning for 21st-Century Cities (Lyle Yorks, Jody Barto)
Interconnections between workplace and organizational learning inform how learning cities and regions must function to promote learning for a larger society.

ch. 4 Public Libraries and Cooperative Extension as Community Partners for Lifelong Learning and Learning Cities (Alysia Peich, Cynthia Needles Fletcher)
Public libraries, land-grant institutions, and Cooperative Extension are just a few existing examples in America concerned with adult education serving the larger adult learner community.

ch. 5 A Connected History of Health and Education: Learning Together Toward a Better City (Joanne Howard, Diane Howard, Ebbin Dotson)
Health and education must be included in any strategic planning of learning cities; such implications must consider how to improve the social quality of life for children and adults.

ch. 6 Role of Leisure in Humanizing Learning Cities (Dan K. Hibbler, Leodis Scott)
Leisure shares a special connection with adult education from ancient times to significant events in history such as the Industrial Revolution; these connections play a part in the need for leisure education that is essential for social and human development.

ch. 7 Learning Cities for All: Directions to a New Adult Education and Learning Movement (Leodis Scott)
Through encouraging leadership from the adult and continuing education field, the idea of learning cities can be realized and implemented within existing communities across America.

Index
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The Grace of Playing: Pedagogies for Leaning into God's New Creation

Book
Goto, Courtney T.
2016
Wipf & Stock Publishers, Eugene, OR
BV1464.G68 2016
Topics: Religious Education   |   Adult Learners   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Believers and teachers of faith regularly know the in-breaking of God's Spirit in their midst, when revelatory experiencing unexpectedly shifts habits of thinking, feeling, and doing toward more life-giving ways of being and becoming. When the moment is right, Spirit breathes new life into dry bones. Though religious educators have much practical wisdom about facilitating learning that is creative and transformative, sharper concepts, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Believers and teachers of faith regularly know the in-breaking of God's Spirit in their midst, when revelatory experiencing unexpectedly shifts habits of thinking, feeling, and doing toward more life-giving ways of being and becoming. When the moment is right, Spirit breathes new life into dry bones. Though religious educators have much practical wisdom about facilitating learning that is creative and transformative, sharper concepts, cases, and theory can help them do it more critically and assist learners to practice openness to wonder, surprise, and authenticity. The Grace of Playing explains how we can create the conditions for revelatory experiencing by understanding it in light of playing. The notion of playing "as if" can be powerfully reclaimed from ecclesial ambivalence, casual speech, and commercial interests that often lead playing to be associated with childishness, frivolity, or entertainment. This book theorizes adults playing for the sake of faith, drawing on D. W. Winnicott's psychoanalytic theory, a revision of Jurgen Moltmann's theology of play, biblical texts, medieval devotional practices, as well as art and aesthetics that help local faith communities engage in theological reflection. Communal forms of playing in/at God's new creation provide insights into pedagogies in which learners are creating and are created anew. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword (Dean Blevins)
Editors’ Preface (Jack L. Seymour and Elizabeth Caldwell)
Author’s Preface

ch. 1 Introduction
From Revelation to Revelatory Experiencing
The Need for the Language of Playing
Seeking the Grace of Playing

ch. 2 Playing Social Scientifically: The Meanings of Playing
A Characterization of Playing
Many Approaches to Playing and Learning
Creativity and Playing as Form of Engagement
How Christians Play

ch. 3 Playing Theologically: Learning into God’s New Creation
Moltmann Misunderstood
Assessing and Deconstructing Moltmann’s Theology of Play
Moltmann Revised: Spirit and Playing for Love’s Sake
Hide-and-Seek with the Holy Spirit
Christians Playing to Seek, Find, and Be Found

ch. 4 Playing Historically: Medieval Practices
Playing with Devotional Dolls
Playing by Pretense: Holy Fools
A Psychoanalytic Perspective
A Theological Perspective
Insights from Historic Cases of Revelatory Experiencing

ch. 5 Playing Aesthetically: Rethinking Our Grounds for Playing
Creating a Pretend Garden at a Japanese American Church
A Psychoanalytic Perspective
A Theological Perspective
A Historical Perspective
Insights from an Aesthetic Case of Revelatory Experiencing
Re-tilling Grounds for Playing
Playing with Renditions
Developing Local Practical Theological Aesthetics
Doing Theology by Playing Aesthetically

ch. 6 Towards a New Creation
Playing in a Detention Center
Analysis from Four Perspectives on Playing
Using the Tools, Finding Inspiration for Teaching
Forming Learners for Decentering and Re-centering
The Grace of Playing in Worlds in Need
A Commitment to Playing for Love’s Sake

Bibliography
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The Sustainable Learning Community: One University's Journey to the Future

Book
Aber, John; Kelly, Tom; and Mallory, Bruce
2009
University of New Hampshire Press, Lebanon, NH
LD3779.N43 S87 2009
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
University communities have the potential to serve as models in the development and application of sustainability principles and practices, not only by what they teach and study, but also by how they operate facilities and engage with off-campus partners. With the oldest endowed campus-wide sustainability program in the country, established in 1997, the University of New Hampshire has become a leader in advancing a campus culture of sustainability. The UNH experience ...
Additional Info:
University communities have the potential to serve as models in the development and application of sustainability principles and practices, not only by what they teach and study, but also by how they operate facilities and engage with off-campus partners. With the oldest endowed campus-wide sustainability program in the country, established in 1997, the University of New Hampshire has become a leader in advancing a campus culture of sustainability. The UNH experience provides a unique window into the development of a new and integrated approach to teaching, learning, research, and operations. It is also a valuable guide for other institutions that aim to enhance the quality of campus life while reducing their environmental footprint. The book’s organization along four functional domains (curriculum, operations, research, and engagement) allows faculty, staff, students, and managers to focus on sections of particular relevance to their university roles. Each chapter develops standards of best practices and presents interesting case studies to humanize the larger effort. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Preface (John Aber)

Acknowledgments


ch. 1 Sustainability as an Organizing Principle for Higher Education (Tom Kelly)


ch. 2 Teaching and Learning Sustainability: Curriculum and Pedagogy (John Carroll, ed.)


Curriculum: Biodiversity and Ecosystems

Engaging Students in the Sciences (George Hurtt)

How Does a Local Master of Public Health Program Address Global Emerging Infectious Disease? (Rosemary Caron)

Sustainable Science and Engineering (Kevin Gardner and Nancy Kinner)

UNH-EcoQuest and Sustainability in New Zealand (Te Rarangahau Taiao, Ria Brejaart, Kim Babbitt and Donna Dowal)


Curriculum: Climate and Energy

ESCI 405: Global Environmental Change (Cameron Wake)

The Energy Waste Watch Challenge and Student Energy Captains (Michele Holt-Shannon and Sara Cleaves)

Organizing a Curriculum on the Environment—Inclusiveness or Security? (John Aber)

Science, Politics, and Policy from Global to Local in an Undergraduate Seminar (Stacy Van Deveer)


Curriculum: Food and Society

Dual Major in EcoGastronomy (Joanne Currancelentano)

Integrating Sustainability into the Professional Development of Dietetic Interns (Joanne Burke)

“The Real Dirt” (John E. Carroll)

UNH Cream (Drew Conroy and Peter Erickson)


Curriculum: Culture and Sustainability

The Promise of the Sun (Tom Kelly)

Artistic Engagement—Discovering and Developing a Theatrical Response to Sustainability (David Kaye)

The University Dialogue and a Sense of Place (Joanne Curran-Celentano)

How the Sustainable Living Minor Came to Be (Robert Eckert and Bert Cohen)


ch. 3 Practicing Sustainability: Campus Operations (Douglas Bencks, ed.)


Operations: Biodiversity and Ecosystems

Landscape Master Plan (Douglas Bencks)

Land Use Committee (Tom Lee)

The MUB Meadow (John L. Hart)


Operations: Climate and Energy

It’s Risky Business Doing the Right Thing—The Co-Gen Plant and EcoLine (Paul Chamberlin and Matt O’Keefe)

Transportation and Land Use (Steve Pesci)

The UNH Greenhouse Gas Inventory (Brett Pasinella)

The Energy Task Force—A Cross-Campus Collaboration to Address Climate Change (Sara Cleaves)


Operations: Food and Society

The UNH Compost Program—From Waste to Compost (Elisabeth Farrell and Rick MacDonald)

Acting Locally—The UNH Local Harvest Initiative (Elisabeth Farrell and Rick MacDonald)

Innovative Dining Hall Hours and Plate Waste (Rick MacDonald)


Operations: Culture and Sustainability

Developing Our Sense of Place—The Role of the Committee for Campus Aesthetics (Vicki C. Wright)

Sustainable Building Design (Douglas Bencks)

Moving the Kingsbury Mural (Douglas Bencks)

Sustainable Buildings—Do You Want Fries with Your Building? No Thank You! (Douglas Bencks)


ch. 4 Creating the Intellectual Basis for Sustainability Research and Scholarship (John Aber and Cameron Wake, ed.)


Research on Biodiversity and Ecosystems

Cooperative Institute for Coastal and Estuarine Environmental Technology (Rich Langan and Dolores Leonard)

The History of Marine Animal Populations (Andrew Rosenberg, Jeff Bolster, Karen Alexander, and Bill Leavenworth)

The Stormwater Research Center (Tom Ballestero)

Oyster Restoration—Planning, Research, and Implementation in New Hampshire (Ray Grizzle)


Research on Climate and Energy

The Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (David S. Bartlett)

The Environmental Research Group (Kevin Gardner and Taylor Eighmy)

Multidisciplinary Design Competition (Jenna Jambeck and Kevin Gardner)

Regional Climate Assessments—Supporting Informed Public Policy (Cameron Wake)


Research on Food and Society

The UNH Organic Dairy Research Farm (John E. Carroll and Tom Kelly)

The Atlantic Marine Aquaculture Center (Rich Langan and Dolores Leonard)

The UNH Community Food, Nutrition, and Wellness Profile (Joanne Burke)

From Campus Farm to Dining Hall (John McLean)


Research on Culture and Sustainability

The Undergraduate Research Conference—A Key Ingredient in the Sustainable Learning Community (Eleanor Abrams)

The Carsey Institute—Building Knowledge to Support Opportunity for Families in Sustainable Communities (Mil Duncan)

The Growing a Green Generation Project (John Nimmo)


ch. 5 Sustaining the Larger Community: Engagement (Jeffrey A. Schloss, ed.)


Engagement in Biodiversity and Ecosystems

The New Hampshire Lakes Lay Monitoring Program—A Sustainable Model for Engaging Citizens (Jeffrey A. Schloss)

Forest Watch—Enhancing Pre-College Understanding of Biodiversity and Ecosystems (Barry Rock)

The UNH Marine Docent Program (Mark Wiley)

Students Without Borders (Jenna Jambeck and Kevin Gardner)


Engagement in Climate and Energy

Collaboration for a Low-Carbon Society—Carbon Solutions New England (Cameron Wake)

The New Hampshire Carbon Challenge (Chris Skoglund, Denise Blaha, and Julia Dundorf)

WildCAP Discount Program (Brett Pasinella)

Informing Public Policy—Engagement on Climate with the State of New Hampshire (Cameron Wake)


Engagement in Food and Society

The New Hampshire Farm to School Program (Elisabeth Farrell and Lynda Brushett)

Cooperative Fisheries Research—The Innovative Fisherman (Ken LaValley)

The Organic Garden Club (Rebecca Grube)

New Hampshire Center for a Food Secure Future (Elisabeth Farrell)


Engagement in Culture and Sustainability

Deliberation in the Civic Sector—The Role of Higher Education in Sustaining Democracy (Bruce L. Mallory)

Building a Sustainable Community of Engaged Scholars—The UNH Outreach Scholars Academy (Julie E. Williams, Eleanor Abrams, and Christine Shea)

Portsmouth Black Heritage Trail (Valerie Cunningham)

Four Hands, One Heart—Ed and Mary Scheier Documentary and Exhibit (Tom Kelly)


ch. 6 How the Sustainability Ethic Developed at UNH and the Next Phase of our “Journey to the Future” (Sara Cleaves, Tom Kelly, and John Aber)


Contributors
Index
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Engaging with Living Religion: A Guide to Fieldwork in the Study of Religion

Book
Grett, Stephen E.; and Scholefield Lynne
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
BL41.G74 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Understanding living religion requires students to experience everyday religious practice in diverse environments and communities. This guide provides the ideal introduction to fieldwork and the study of religion outside the lecture theatre. Covering theoretical and practical dimensions of research, the book helps students learn to ‘read’ religious sites and communities, and to develop their understanding of planning, interaction, observation, participation and interviews. Students ...
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Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Understanding living religion requires students to experience everyday religious practice in diverse environments and communities. This guide provides the ideal introduction to fieldwork and the study of religion outside the lecture theatre. Covering theoretical and practical dimensions of research, the book helps students learn to ‘read’ religious sites and communities, and to develop their understanding of planning, interaction, observation, participation and interviews. Students are encouraged to explore their own expectations and sensitivities, and to develop a good understanding of ethical issues, group-learning and individual research. The chapters contain student testimonies, examples of student work and student-led questions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Why Study Religion Off Campus?
ch. 2 Ways of Studying Religion Off Campus
ch. 3 Where to Study Religion Off Campus
ch. 4 Individual Fieldwork
ch. 5 Group Fieldwork
ch. 6 Virtual Fieldwork
ch. 7 Developing Fieldwork
Cover image

Knowledge Games: How Playing Games Can Solve Problems, Create Insight, and Make Change

Book
Schrier, Karen
2016
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
GV1201.37.S37 2016
Topics: Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Alternative Classrooms

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Abstract: Imagine if new knowledge and insights came not just from research centers, think tanks, and universities but also from games, of all things. Video games have been viewed as causing social problems, but what if they actually helped solve them? This question drives Karen Schrier’s Knowledge Games, which seeks to uncover the potentials and pitfalls of using games to make discoveries, solve ...
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Abstract: Imagine if new knowledge and insights came not just from research centers, think tanks, and universities but also from games, of all things. Video games have been viewed as causing social problems, but what if they actually helped solve them? This question drives Karen Schrier’s Knowledge Games, which seeks to uncover the potentials and pitfalls of using games to make discoveries, solve real-world problems, and better understand our world. For example, so-called knowledge games --such as Foldit, a protein-folding puzzle game, SchoolLife, which crowdsources bullying interventions, and Reverse the Odds, in which mobile game players analyze breast cancer data ---are already being used by researchers to gain scientific, psychological, and humanistic insights.

Schrier argues that knowledge games are potentially powerful because of their ability to motivate a crowd of problem solvers within a dynamic system while also tapping into the innovative data processing and computational abilities of games. In the near future, Schrier asserts, knowledge games may be created to understand and predict voting behavior, climate concerns, historical perspectives, online harassment, susceptibility to depression, or optimal advertising strategies, among other things.

In addition to investigating the intersection of games, problem solving, and crowdsourcing, Schrier examines what happens when knowledge emerges from games and game players rather than scientists, professionals, and researchers. This accessible book also critiques the limits and implications of games and considers how they may redefine what it means to produce knowledge, to play, to educate, and to be a citizen. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I - What Are Knowledge Games?
ch. 1 Contribution
ch. 2 Design

Part II - Why Knowledge Games?
ch. 3 Problem Solving
ch. 4 Motivation
ch. 5 Social Interaction

Part III - Perspectives, Potentials, and Pitfalls
ch. 6 Amateurs
ch. 7 Participation
ch. 8 Data
ch. 9 Knowledge

Appendix A. Categories and Examples
Appendix B. Design Principles, Recommendations, Considerations, and Implications
Appendix C. Guiding Questions
Notes
Index
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Contemplative Studies in Higher Education

Book
Sanders, Linda A., ed.
2013
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 134)
LB2361.C59 2013
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The complexities of 21st-century life- personal, social, cultural, and environmental - demand thoughtful responses, responses fostered and enhanced through contemplative experience. Contemplative education includes studies of the history, psychology, and socialcultural context of such experience, as well as the development of experiential knowledge through one or more personal practices.

Contemplative education has recently emerged in the academy. Although there has been significant published discussion of postsecondary courses and ...
Additional Info:
The complexities of 21st-century life- personal, social, cultural, and environmental - demand thoughtful responses, responses fostered and enhanced through contemplative experience. Contemplative education includes studies of the history, psychology, and socialcultural context of such experience, as well as the development of experiential knowledge through one or more personal practices.

Contemplative education has recently emerged in the academy. Although there has been significant published discussion of postsecondary courses and programs that incorporate contemplative views and practices, there have been few studies of relevant curricula and pedagogy. This volume integrates research, theory, and practice through a fusion of perspectives and approaches, giving readers the opportunity to review contemplative educational concepts and applications in academic, social, and institutional domains.

This is the 134th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. New Directions for Teaching and Learning offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Linda A. Sanders)

ch. 1 Peak Oil, Peak Water, Peak Education (Thomas B. Coburn)
This chapter introduces contemplative education as a way of teaching and learning that is meaningful, relevant, and critical to the evolution of the 21st century academy. The essay also offers guidelines for contemplative practice in face-to-face and online class environments.

ch. 2 Contemplative Science: An Insider Prospectus (Willoughby B. Britton, Anne-Catharine Brown, Christopher T. Kaplan, Roberta E. Goldman, Marie DeLuca, Rahil Rojiani, Harry Reis, Mandy Xi, Jonathan C. Chou, Faye McKenna, Peter Hitchcock, Tomas A. Rocha, Josh Himmelfarb, David M. Margolis, Halsey F. Niles, Allison M. Eckert, Tana Frank)
Seventeen members of the Contemplative Studies Research Lab from Brown University envision a new kind of science that includes collaborative research and the integration of contemplative studies into scientific training. The chapter includes comprehensive discussion about the long-term consequences of contemplative pedagogies for the fields of science and medicine.

ch. 3 Contemplative Practices and the Renewal of Legal Education (Rhonda V. Magee)
This chapter discusses the contemplative law movement and its influence on the development of new courses and cocurricular sessions at the University of San Francisco School of Law and other law school programs. The contemplative approach to law is also presented as transformative and inclusive epistemology and methodology in response to multiple critiques that call for change in legal education.

ch. 4 Birthing Internal Images: Employing the Cajita Project as a Contemplative Activity in a College Classroom (Vijay Kanagala, Laura I. Rendón)
This chapter provides a step-by-step description of planning and implementing the cajita project, a contemplative exercise, designed to facilitate self-refl exivity, as well as personal and social responsibility in graduate students majoring in higher education leadership and student affairs at the University of Texas–San Antonio. The chapter also explains the cultural and pedagogical origins of the cajita project.

ch. 5 Integrating Contemplative Education and Contemporary Performance (Linda A. Sanders)
In this chapter, faculty and students characterize contemplative education, and students disclose their perspectives of how contemplative view and practice affect their personal and professional development in a graduate, interdisciplinary performing arts community. At Naropa University, traditional contemplative education is integrated with conservatory-level, contemporary performance training in its Master of Fine Arts in Theater: Contemporary Performance program.

ch. 6 The Formation and Development of the Mindful Campus (Margaret A. DuFon, Jennifer Christian)
This chapter recounts the efforts of faculty and students to cultivate contemplative pedagogies and mindfulness through curricular initiatives and extracurricular programs at California State University– Chico. The authors describe their campuswide programmatic and promotional work that captures the attention, support, and involvement of the greater Chico community.

ch. 7 Koru: Teaching Mindfulness to Emerging Adults(Holly B. Rogers)
This chapter reviews the developmental features of emerging adulthood and explores the ways in which mindfulness is a useful developmental aid for this age group. The specifi c strategies employed in Koru, a program designed at Duke University to make mindfulness accessible to college students, are described. Student responses to Koru are also briefly discussed.

ch. 8 Contemplative Pedagogy: A Quiet Revolution in Higher Education (Arthur Zajonc)
A contemplative pedagogy movement is quietly emerging around the world. This chapter offers a brief history of the movement, which has occurred during the last fi fteen years throughout postsecondary campuses, and describes the contemplative practices of mindfulness, concentration, open awareness, and sustaining contradictions. The author also voices such larger hopes for higher education as the cessation of ignorance and an “epistemology of love” and suggests that contemplative pedagogy can cultivate and form the capacities that are required for integrative, transformative teaching and learning in the 21st century academy.

Index
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Experiential Education: Making the Most of Learning Outside the Classroom

Book
Qualters, Donna M., ed.
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 124)
BF318.5.E973 2010
Topics: Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Donna M. Qualters)

ch. 1 Forms and Issues in Experiential Learning (David Thornton Moore)

This chapter identifies the major forms of experiential education in terms of their institutional settings, core educational practices, and constituencies, while addressing where experience fits in the academy's educational mission.

ch. 2 Community-Based Learning and Research (Elise Dallimore, David A. Rochefort, Kristen Simonelli)

Community-based learning and research enhances individual learning experiences, and the culture and curriculum of an institution. With a focus on administrative structure and classroom-based models, the authors address what is necessary to implement service-learning and community-based research.

ch. 3 Learning Abroad (Lori Gardinier, Dawn Colquitt-Anderson)

This chapter discusses the internationalization of higher education and the models for education abroad. The authors address the specific challenges these programs face and provide strategies for overcoming them.

ch. 4 Demystifying Experiential Learning in the Performing Arts (Nancy Kindelan)

This chapter discusses the intersection of performing arts, liberal arts, and experiential education through an exploration of operational and value-focused skills and active and intentional learning, as well as the application of these in a performing arts student’s capstone project.

ch. 5 Work-Based Learning: Valuing Practice as an Educational Event (Joseph A. Raelin)

This chapter explains work-based learning and offers practical guidelines to teach and assess learning of this nature. The author emphasizes the importance of and strategies for effective reflective practice.

ch. 6 Empowering Reflective Ethical Engagement in Field Settings (Perrin Cohen)

This chapter explores some of the ethical challenges faced by students in experiential education and provides strategies for teachers, supervisors, and administrators to assist students in gaining the skills and practices necessary to deal with such challenges.

ch. 7 Bringing the Outside In: Assessing Experiential Education (Donna M. Qualters)

This chapter challenges a negative view of assessment and explains the value of assessment to an experiential learning program. The author provides practical methods and models for involving faculty and measuring student learning.

ch. 8 Growing and Funding Experiential Learning Programs: A Recipe for Success (Monica R. Cowart)

This chapter outlines how a college or university with limited financial resources can best utilize internal and external resources to launch a new experiential learning program or enhance an existing one.

ch. 9 Campus Stories: Three Case Studies - In this chapter, three different sets of authors reflect on their experiences in creating or developing experiential learning programs.

Part A: Institutionalizing Pedagogical Change: A Case Study in Building a Learning Organization (Victoria A. Farrar-Myers, Dana Dunn)

This case study examines the lessons learned from the University of Texas at Arlington experience in developing and designing a strategic plan including active learning and experiential education.

Part B: The Odyssey Program at Hendrix College (Nancy P. Fleming, Mark S. Schantz)

The authors share the factors that contributed to the success of an experiential learning program at a small liberal arts college, and examine the consequences for students, faculty, staff, and the institution as a whole.

Part C: Putting Experiential Education into Practice: Using Kolb as a Learning Model for Implementing Organizational Change (James R. Johnson, Ronald J. Kovach, Patricia N. Roberson)

David A. Kolb's Experiential Learning Model provides the organizational change methodology for the implementation of innovative graduation requirements in experiential education at Purdue University Calumet.

ch. 10 Experiencing Success: Some Strategies for Planning the Program (Timothy Donovan, Richard Porter, James Stellar)

Drawing from their own experiential learning, the authors provide strategies for preparing an experiential education program and coping with the numerous challenges faced in developing this type of programming.

ch. 11 Making the Most of Learning Outside the Classroom (Donna M. Qualters)

This chapter describes the importance of developing the skill of deep reflection and calls for the establishment of a reflective curriculum strand to promote learning in the field.

Additional Resources
Index
Tactics cover image

Actively Listening to Testimonies About Rape Culture and Religion

Tactic
West, Traci C.
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 2 (2017): 151
Topics: Discussion   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: helping students to develop tools for countering violence, in a course taught in a women's prison
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: helping students to develop tools for countering violence, in a course taught in a women's prison