Problem-Based Learning

Scholarship On Teaching - Topic: Problem-Based Learning - 32 results

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Bringing Problem-Based Learning to Higher Education: Theory and Practice

Book
Wilkerson, Luann and Wim Gijselares
1996
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 68)
LB1027.42 .B74 1996
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Problem-based learning has become a widespread teaching methodology in disciplines where students must learn to apply knowledge, not just acquire it. This volume describes the basics of the method, along with the variables that affect its success. The chapters provide examples of its application in a wide range of disciplines, including medicine, business, education, engineering, mathematics, and the sciences. The authors make a persuasive argument that professional fields as well ...
Additional Info:
Problem-based learning has become a widespread teaching methodology in disciplines where students must learn to apply knowledge, not just acquire it. This volume describes the basics of the method, along with the variables that affect its success. The chapters provide examples of its application in a wide range of disciplines, including medicine, business, education, engineering, mathematics, and the sciences. The authors make a persuasive argument that professional fields as well as academic fields would find much to recommend PBL as a standard teaching method. This is the 68th issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Problem-Based Learning in Medicine and Beyond: A Brief Overview
ch. 2 Connecting Problem-Based Practices with Educational Theory
ch. 3 Tutors and Small Groups in Problem-Based Learning: Lessons from the Literature
ch. 4 Problem-Based Learning in Business Education: Curriculum Design and Implementation Issues
ch. 5 The Power of Problem-Based Learning in Teaching Introductory Science Courses
ch. 6 Problem-Based Learning in Leadership Education
ch. 7 Twenty-Up: Problem-Based Learning with a Large Group
ch. 8 Time Expenditure, Workload, and Student Satisfaction in Problem-Based Learning
ch. 9 An Active Approach to Calculus
ch. 10 Problem-Based Learning for Large Classes in Chemical Engineering
ch. 11 Concluding Comments

Index
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"Spectators and Gladiators: Reconnecting the Students with the Problem"

Article
Boehrer, John
1990
Teaching Excellence 2, no. 7 (1990)
Topics: Problem-Based Learning

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Teaching Learners to be Self-Directed"

Article
Grow, Gerald
Adult Education Quarterly 41, no. 3 (1991): 125-149
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Based on the Situational Leadership model of Hersey and Blanchard, the Staged Self-Directed Learning Model proposes that learners advance through stages of increasing self-direction and that teachers can help or hinder that development. Good teaching matches the learner's stage of self-direction and helps the learner advance toward greater self-direction. Specific methods are proposed for teaching students at each stage, although many different teaching styles are good when appropriately applied. Several ...
Additional Info:
Based on the Situational Leadership model of Hersey and Blanchard, the Staged Self-Directed Learning Model proposes that learners advance through stages of increasing self-direction and that teachers can help or hinder that development. Good teaching matches the learner's stage of self-direction and helps the learner advance toward greater self-direction. Specific methods are proposed for teaching students at each stage, although many different teaching styles are good when appropriately applied. Several pedagogical difficulties are explained as mismatches between teacher style and learner stage, especially the mismatch between a student needing direction and a non-directive teacher. The model is applied to a course, a single class, and the overall curriculum.
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Problem-based Learning in the Information Age

Book
Knowlton, Dave S., and David C Shart, eds.
2003
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1027.42.P763 2003
Topics: Problem-Based Learning

Additional Info:
This volume provides information about theories and practices associated with Problem-based learning (PBL). Partially because of changes in the Information Age that are transforming the nature of knowledge and the types of problems that people face, professors are adopting PBL in order to facilitate a broader and more up-to-date role of what it means "to learn." Professors will encounter, however, their own set of problems when designing and implementing a ...
Additional Info:
This volume provides information about theories and practices associated with Problem-based learning (PBL). Partially because of changes in the Information Age that are transforming the nature of knowledge and the types of problems that people face, professors are adopting PBL in order to facilitate a broader and more up-to-date role of what it means "to learn." Professors will encounter, however, their own set of problems when designing and implementing a problem-based curriculum. Not unlike PBL assignments to their students, the issues and obstacles professors will encounter require practical solutions.

The authors of this volume have practical experience in the design and implementation of PBL. Based on their experiences, they offer insightful commentaries and useful guidelines about various aspects of PBL. These guidelines include ideas for designing useful problems that can serve as the basis of PBL activities, creating environments conducive to problem solving, facilitating students' problem solving activities, and assessing students' efforts in problem solving. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Preparing Students for Educated Living: Virtues of Problem-Based Learning Across the Higher Education Curriculum (Dave S. Knowlton)
ch. 2 Exploring the Tensions of Problem-Based Learning: Insights from Research (Woei Hung, Jessica Harpole Bailey, David H. Jonassen)
ch. 3 Designing Problems to Promote Higher-Order Thinking (Renée E. Weiss)
ch. 4 Integrating Computers into the Problem-Solving Process (Deborah L. Lowther, Gary R. Morrison)
ch. 5 Problem Solving Through Design (Wayne A. Nelson)
ch. 6 Problem-Based Learning in an MBA Economics Course: Confessions of a First-Time User (David C. Sharp)
ch. 7 Heuristics and Problem Solving (Charles F. Abel)
ch. 8 Fostering Collaboration Among Students in Problem-Based Learning (Bruce W. Speck)
ch. 9 Guiding Students Toward Solutions in Field Experiences (Julia Beckett, Nancy K. Grant)
ch. 10 Not All Metacognition Is Created Equal (Douglas J. Hacker, John Dunlosky)
ch. 11 Assessing Students' Problem-Solving Assignments (Rebecca S. Anderson, Jane B. Puckett)

Index
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The Power of Problem-Based Learning

Book
Duch, Barbara J., Susan E. Groh and Deborah Allen, eds.
2001
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1027.42.P69 2001
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Problem-based learning is a powerful classroom process, which uses real world problems to motivate students to identify and apply research concepts and information, work collaboratively and communicate effectively. It is a strategy that promotes life-long habits of learning.

The University of Delaware is recognized internationally as a center of excellence in the use and development of PBL. This book presents the cumulative knowledge and practical experience acquired over ...
Additional Info:
Problem-based learning is a powerful classroom process, which uses real world problems to motivate students to identify and apply research concepts and information, work collaboratively and communicate effectively. It is a strategy that promotes life-long habits of learning.

The University of Delaware is recognized internationally as a center of excellence in the use and development of PBL. This book presents the cumulative knowledge and practical experience acquired over nearly a decade of integrating PBL in courses in a wide range of disciplines.

This "how to" book for college and university faculty. It focuses on the practical questions which anyone wishing to embark on PBL will want to know: "Where do I start?" – "How do you find problems?" – "What do I need to know about managing groups?" – "How do you grade in a PBL course?"

The book opens by outlining how the PBL program was developed at the University of Delaware -- covering such issues as faculty mentoring and institutional support -- to offer a model for implementation for other institutions.

The authors then address the practical questions involved in course transformation and planning for effective problem-based instruction, including writing problems, using the Internet, strategies for using groups, the use of peer tutors and assessment. They conclude with case studies from a variety of disciplines, including biochemistry, pre-law, physics, nursing, chemistry, political science and teacher education.

This introduction for faculty, department chairs and faculty developers will assist them to successfully harness this powerful process to improve learning outcomes. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Why Problem-Based Learning? A Case Study of Institutional Change in Undergraduate Education (Barbara J. Duch, Susan E. Groh and Deborah E. Allen)
ch. 2 Faculty Mentoring Faculty: The Institute for Transforming Undergraduate Education (George H. Watson, Susan E. Groh)
ch. 3 Make it So: Administrative Support for Problem-Based Learning (John C. Cavanaugh)
ch. 4 Models for Problem-Based Instruction in Undergraduate Courses (Barbara J. Duch)
ch. 5 Writing Problems for Deeper Understanding (Barbara J. Duch)
ch. 6 Strategies for Using Groups (Deborah E. Allen, Barbara J. Duch and Susan E. Groh)
ch. 7 Getting Started in Problem-Based Learning (Harold B. White III)
ch. 8 Undergraduate Group Facilitators to Meet the Challenges of Multiple Classroom Groups (Deborah E. Allen and Harold B. Wright III)
ch. 9 Assessment Strategies in a Problem-Based Learning Course (Barbara J. Duch and Susan E. Groh)
ch. 10 Problem-Based Learning and the Three Cs of Technology (George H. Watson)
ch. 11 The Evolution of Problem-Based Learning in a Biotechnology Course (Sherry L. Kitto and Lesa G. Griffiths)
ch. 12 A PBL Course that Uses Research Articles as Problems (Harold B. White III)
ch. 13 Integrating Active Learning and the Use of Technology in Legal Studies Courses (Valerie P. Hans)
ch. 14 Problem-Based Learning in Large and Very Large Classes (Harry L. Shipman and Barbara J. Duch)
ch. 15 Problem-Based Learning: Preparing Nurses for Practice (Christine A. Cannon and Kathleen A. Schell)
ch. 16 The Large and the Small of It: A Case Study of Introductory Biology Courses (Richard S. Donham, Florence I. Schmieg and Deborah E. Allen)
ch. 17 PBL, Politics, and Democracy (Kurt Burch)
ch. 18 Using Problem-Based Learning in General Chemistry (Susan E. Groh)
ch. 19 A Skeptic's Look at PBL (Elizabeth M. Lieux
ch. 20 PBL in Preservice Teacher Education (Eugene Matusov, John St. Julien and James A. Whitson)
ch. 21 Introductory Physics: A Problem-Based Model (Barbara A. Williams)

Index
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Teaching the Art of Inquiry

Book
Hudspith, Bob and Herb Jenkins
2001
STLHE
LB2395.35.H83 2001
Topics: Problem-Based Learning

Additional Info:
In this guide, Bob Hudspith and Herb Jenkins describe an approach to teaching that has been used successfully for many years at McMaster University, and which will be of wide interest to university teachers who wish to encourage critical thinking and self-directed research into their courses. The guide thoroughly documents the philosophy and rationale of inquiry-based learning, describes how the approach works in practice, and offers advice and numerous examples ...
Additional Info:
In this guide, Bob Hudspith and Herb Jenkins describe an approach to teaching that has been used successfully for many years at McMaster University, and which will be of wide interest to university teachers who wish to encourage critical thinking and self-directed research into their courses. The guide thoroughly documents the philosophy and rationale of inquiry-based learning, describes how the approach works in practice, and offers advice and numerous examples on adapting the technique for a wide range of situations and disciplines.

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction
An Example of Inquiry
Central Questions an the Process of Inquiry
Ideas for Teaching Inquiry
How and Where Inquiry Can Be Used
Communicating the Findings of Inquiry
Assessment
Common Difficulties
References
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"Problem-based Learning in Biblical Studies: Reflections from Classroom Experience"

TTR
Harding, James E.
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 2 (2001): 89-97
BL41.T4
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This article reflects critically on the introduction of a form of problem-based learning into a first-year Hebrew course. It begins by outlining the problems inherent in the way this course had previously been taught, and proceeds to consider the factors that needed to be taken into account in developing a solution. In particular, the need to develop a course that promotes deep rather than surface learning is emphasized. A description ...
Additional Info:
This article reflects critically on the introduction of a form of problem-based learning into a first-year Hebrew course. It begins by outlining the problems inherent in the way this course had previously been taught, and proceeds to consider the factors that needed to be taken into account in developing a solution. In particular, the need to develop a course that promotes deep rather than surface learning is emphasized. A description is then given of problem-based learning and the advantages it offers. An account of problem-based learning in the context of the Hebrew course is given, followed by critical reflections based on comments put forward by students involved with the course and the teacher's reflective partners. Without ignoring the problems presented by problem-based learning, this article defends this educative strategy on the basis that it stimulates student motivation and promotes deep learning on a number of levels.
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The Practice of Problem-Based Learning: A Guide to Implementing PBL in the College Classroom

Book
Amador, Jose A., Libby Miles and C. B. Peters
2006
Anker Publishing Company, Inc., Bolton, MA
LB1027.42.A76 2006
Topics: Course Design   |   Problem-Based Learning

Additional Info:
This book is a guide for the development and implementation of problem-based learning (PBL) in college-level courses. It provides practical advice from real professors, includes examples of PBL in action through every stage from problem development to implementation, and integrates cross-disciplinary experiences into the practice of PBL in the college classroom.
Its nuts-and-bolts approach makes it valuable to faculty, graduate teaching assistants, and faculty development professionals interested in learning ...
Additional Info:
This book is a guide for the development and implementation of problem-based learning (PBL) in college-level courses. It provides practical advice from real professors, includes examples of PBL in action through every stage from problem development to implementation, and integrates cross-disciplinary experiences into the practice of PBL in the college classroom.
Its nuts-and-bolts approach makes it valuable to faculty, graduate teaching assistants, and faculty development professionals interested in learning how to do PBL, as well as to those already using PBL who would like to learn more about what other practitioners do in their classrooms.
Readers will learn what really is and isn’t PBL and why some choose to use it, what is its effect on the learning landscape, and how to overcome tricky issues such as class size, student resistance, controlling classroom chaos, conservative colleagues, assessment, and student evaluations. Extensive examples and resources for further study are included, making it a concise, yet comprehensive guide to launching a successful problem-based learning course on your own. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Foreword
Preface
Why (We) Use PBL
Why We Switched
What Is PBL?
Issues
Changing the Landscape
Changing Ourselves
Changing Our Courses
Changing Our Students
No Problems? No Problem
The Basics
Sources for Problems
Designing a Successful Problem
Controlling Chaos in PBL: The Messy Middle
Conducting Class
Our Role
Student Contribution
What Now? Evaluation, Revision, and Reflection
The Students
What Worked-and What Didn't
The Sustainability of PBL
Epilogue
Bibliography
Index
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Beyond the Classroom ("Taking it to the Streets"): Practicing the Art of Philosophical Conversation"

TTR
Schell, Hannah
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 266-267
BL41.T4
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay in response to a Call for Papers: “What do you have your students do during a class session when you cannot be present?"
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New Approaches to Problem-based Learning: Revitalising Your Practice in Higher Education

Book
Barrett, Terry, and Moore, Sarah
2011
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2361.N49 2011
Topics: Problem-Based Learning

Additional Info:
Problem-based learning (PBL) is a pedagogical approach that has the capacity to create vibrant and active learning environments in higher education. However, both experienced PBL practitioners and those new to PBL often find themselves looking for guidance on how to engage and energise a PBL curriculum. New Approaches to Problem-based Learning: Revitalising your Practice in Higher Education provides that guidance from a range of different, complementary perspectives.

Leading ...
Additional Info:
Problem-based learning (PBL) is a pedagogical approach that has the capacity to create vibrant and active learning environments in higher education. However, both experienced PBL practitioners and those new to PBL often find themselves looking for guidance on how to engage and energise a PBL curriculum. New Approaches to Problem-based Learning: Revitalising your Practice in Higher Education provides that guidance from a range of different, complementary perspectives.

Leading practitioners in the field as well as new voices in PBL teaching and learning have collaborated to produce this text. Each chapter provides practical and experienced accounts of issues and ideas for PBL, as well as a strong theoretical and evidence base. Whether you are an experienced PBL practitioner, or new to the processes and principles of PBL, this book will help you to find ways of revitalising and enriching your practice and of enhancing the learning experience in a range of higher education contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Illustrations
Editors' Preface
Acknowledgements

Part I Stakeholders Designing Problem-based Learning Initiatives
ch. 1 An Introduction to Problem-based Learning
ch. 2 Designing Problems and Triggers in Different Media: Challenging All Students
ch. 3 Designing Authentic PBL Problems in Multidisciplinary Groups
ch. 4 Students as Essential Partners
ch. 5 Making Strong Learning Connections: Students' Involvement in Improving the Interconnections of Concepts in a PBL Module
ch. 6 Bringing Problems to Life Using Video, Compare/Contrast, and Role-play: Applying Experience from Medical Education to Your PBL Context
ch. 7 Employers' Perspectives on Problem-based Learning Initiatives
ch. 8 Evaluating Problem-based Learning Initiatives

Part II Students Using Problem-based Learning to Enhance Capabilities
ch. 9 Students Maximising the Potential of the Problem-based Learning Tutorial: Generating Dialogic Knowing
ch. 10 Shining a Spotlight on Students' Information Literacy in the PBL Process
ch. 11 Developing Reflective Practitioners through PBL in Academic and Practice Environments
ch. 12 Enriching Problem-based Learning through Design Thinking
ch. 13 Using Assessment to Promote Student Capabilities
ch. 14 The Triple Jump Assessment: Aligning Learning and Assessment

Part III Sustainability and Building Capacity in Problem-based Learning Initiatives
ch. 15 Planning and Building Capacity for a Major PBL Initiative
ch. 16 Empowering Tutors: Strategies for Inspired and Effective Facilitation of PBL Learning
ch. 17 PBL Challenges Both Curriculum and Teaching
ch. 18 A PBL Response to the Digital Native Dilemma
ch. 19 Rethinking Supervision of PhD Work Processes: ProBell Research Group Walking the PBL Talk
ch. 20 How We Wrote This Book: A PBL Approach to Collaborative Writing

Notes on Editors and Contributors
Index
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The Learning Garden: Ecology, Teaching, and Transformation

Book
Gaylie, Veronica
2009
Peter Lang, New York, NY
SB55.G39 2009
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This book tells the story of building a campus “Learning Garden” over a series of cohorts of student teachers and environmental education students. The garden began with high ideals, no funding, and a strong desire to “do something” about the environment. The result was a transformation in attitude toward nature, community and toward the learning process itself. Described through three metaphors (garden as environment, garden as ...
Additional Info:
This book tells the story of building a campus “Learning Garden” over a series of cohorts of student teachers and environmental education students. The garden began with high ideals, no funding, and a strong desire to “do something” about the environment. The result was a transformation in attitude toward nature, community and toward the learning process itself. Described through three metaphors (garden as environment, garden as community, garden as transformation) this book provides a bridge of theory and practice for ecology-centred teaching and learning. As new teachers and teacher educators decide how to include “the environment” and principles of “sustainability” into their lessons, this groundbreaking text provides a bridge between theory and practice and guides the reader into the ways that teaching in the natural world changes how people learn, and, how they teach. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Learning Garden: Introduction
ch. 2 Learning in School Gardens: Historical and Theoretical Overview
ch. 3 Garden as Environment
ch. 4 Garden as Community
ch. 5 Garden as Transformation
ch. 6 Practical Matters, A Simple Plan, Activities, Teaching Resources
ch. 7 Environment, Community, Transformation: Photo Essay
ch. 8 Conclusion: At the Hear of Teaching and Learning

Notes
Bibliography
Additional Info:
Inquiry-driven learners anticipate, embrace, and adapt to disruptive change. Clifton Conrad and Laura Dunek advance a transformative purpose of a college education. They invite stakeholders from across higher education to engage in vigorous dialogue about the aims of a college education—and how to realize those aims.

Increasingly influenced by market forces, many universities employ a default purpose of a college education: preparing students for entry into the ...
Additional Info:
Inquiry-driven learners anticipate, embrace, and adapt to disruptive change. Clifton Conrad and Laura Dunek advance a transformative purpose of a college education. They invite stakeholders from across higher education to engage in vigorous dialogue about the aims of a college education—and how to realize those aims.

Increasingly influenced by market forces, many universities employ a default purpose of a college education: preparing students for entry into the workforce. As a result, students remain unprepared for a world in which much of the knowledge they acquire will have a shelf life of only a few years.

Cultivating Inquiry-Driven Learners charts a new way forward. It proposes that a college education prepare students to be innovative and adaptable by developing four signature capabilities: core qualities of mind, critical thinking skills, expertise in divergent modes of inquiry, and the capacity to express and communicate ideas. In concert, these capabilities empower students to explore and foster ideas that will prepare them to successfully navigate constant change, capitalize on career opportunities, enrich their personal lives, and thoughtfully engage in public life.

This innovative book also explores a wide range of initiatives and practices for educating inquiry-driven learners. Examples illustrate possibilities for developing inquiry-driven learners across the curriculum and are drawn from institutions with remarkably different missions and identities—from research universities to liberal arts colleges.

"This book revitalizes the notion of a 'well-rounded' education by describing how inquiry-driven learning is critically important for these times. It is the sort of foundational text that invites discussion and debate and describes with clarity and economy of prose the pressures facing colleges and universities and how they ought to respond."—Matthew Hartley, University of Pennsylvania. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part I - What Is The Purpose of A College Education?
ch. 1 Contemporary Discourse on the Purpose of a College Education
The Dominate Discourse: Eclipse of the Legacy of Liberal Education
Contemporary Ideas on the Purpose of a College Education
The Absence of a Fundamental Purpose of a College Education

Part II - Approaching Obsolete: Higher Learning In The Twenty-First Century
ch. 2 A Rapidly Changing World and the Need for a Response
The Rapidly Shifting U.S. Economy: From Industrial Production to Knowledge and Innovation
Four Trends Affecting Higher Education, All Driven by Monetary Incentives
Lessons from Other Sectors of Society, All Reshaped by the Same Market Forces Buffeting Higher Education
Proactively Directing External Forces and Preparing Students for a New World

ch. 3 Hurtling toward Obsolescence: The Default Purpose of a College Education
Shortcomings of the Default Purpose: Knowledge-Inundated, Workplace Commodities
The Need for a Fundamental Purpose of a College Education

Part III - Becoming An Inquiry-Driven Learner
ch. 4 Portrayal of an Inquiry-Driven Learner
Definition of an Inquiry-Driven Learner
Core Qualities of Mind
Critical Thinking Skills
Expertise in Divergent Models of Inquiry
The Capacity to Express and Communicate Ideas
Building upon a Legacy of Ideas

Part IV - Developing Inquiry-Driven Learners
ch. 5 Ideas for Developing Inquiry-Driven Learners
Initiatives at Eight Institutions
Institutional Practices for Educating Inquiry-Driven Learners
A Concluding Note

Notes
References
Index
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Teaching Research Processes: The faculty role in the development of skilled student researchers

Book
Badke, William
2012
Chandos Publishing, Oxford
LB2369.B234 2012
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Teaching Writing

Additional Info:
- engages the domain of teaching faculty rather than librarians only
 - analyzes the reasons why the research processes concept represents a gap in academia
 - focuses on research ability as a process that can be taught within disciplines
 -  provides concrete examples to help faculty teach research processes while meeting existing academic goals

Information literacy may be defined as the ability to identify a ...
Additional Info:
- engages the domain of teaching faculty rather than librarians only
 - analyzes the reasons why the research processes concept represents a gap in academia
 - focuses on research ability as a process that can be taught within disciplines
 -  provides concrete examples to help faculty teach research processes while meeting existing academic goals

Information literacy may be defined as the ability to identify a research problem, decide the kinds of information needed to tackle it, find the information efficiently, evaluate the information, and apply it to the problem at hand. Teaching Research Processes suggests a novel way in which information literacy can come within the remit of teaching faculty, supported by librarians, and reconceived as ‘research processes’. The aim is to transform education from what some see as a primarily one-way knowledge communication practice, to an interactive practice involving the core research tasks of subject disciplines.

This title is structured into nine chapters, covering: Defining research processes; Research ability inadequacies in higher education; Research processes and faculty understanding; Current initiatives in research processes; The role of disciplinary thinking in research processes; Research processes in the classroom; Tentative case studies in disciplinary research process instruction; Research processes transforming education; and Resourcing the enterprise. The book concludes by encouraging the reader to implement the teaching of research processes.

Readership: This book is intended for university professors, academic administrators, academic librarians, and students in library and Information Studies programs (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: my journey into research processes
Acknowledgements
About the author

ch. 1 Defining research processes
 - Average faculty expectations
 - Common definitions
 - The capabilities actually required by students
 - Keeping the goal consistent with higher education’s mission
 - What are we looking for?
 - The idea of research processes

ch. 2 Research ability inadequacies in higher education
 - Where the problem starts
 - University students and information skills – an overview
 - Information literacy of senior undergraduate/graduate students
 - The information literacy of faculty members
 - The bottom line: information illiteracy in academia
 - Notes

ch. 3 Research processes and faculty understanding
 - The understanding gap
 - The university administration gap
 - The silo problem
 - The perpetuated experience (osmosis) gap
 - Faulty assumptions about students and technology
 - Faculty culture
 - Faculty perception of librarians
 - The hesitation of accrediting bodies
 - Conclusion
 - Note

ch. 4 Current initiatives in research processes
 - Development of standards among academic librarians
 - Remedial instruction
 - Credit-based courses
 - Instruction through the curriculum
 - The essential failure of all such initiatives

ch. 5 The role of disciplinary thinking in research processes
 - The development of scholarly ability within a discipline – content and process
 - Learning about versus doing
 - The difference between disciplinary experts and undergraduates
 - The radical shift in thinking demanded for effective research processes instruction to university students

ch. 6 Research processes in the classroom
 - Essential goals
 - Congruence with active learning and constructivism
 - Required thinking and process skills
 - Required changes in teaching patterns
 - The new classroom
 - What about content?

ch. 7 Tentative case studies in disciplinary research process instruction
 - The humanities
 - The social sciences
 - The sciences
 - Professional programs
 - Conclusion

ch. 8 Research processes transforming education
 - The educational task of the professor
 - Departmental planning for teaching research processes
 - University planning for teaching research processes

ch. 9 Resourcing the enterprise
 - The question of priorities
 - Realigning academic librarians
 - Taking a grassroots approach
 - Buy-in at the top
 - What resources do we need?

ch. 10 Conclusion

References
Index
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Wabash tree

What did you learn in the real world today?: The case of practicum in university educations

Book
Henriksen, Lars Bo, ed.
2013
Aalborg University Press, Denmark
LC1072.P73 W49 2013
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Service Learning   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Practice, praxis, traineeship, internship, or practicum - these are all names for the specific arrangements where students from universities engage in real life experiences; in arrangements where they leave the secure tranquility of the university and enter into the chaotic world of work. Practicum is a very good way of learning, and it can be very interesting for all parties involved. The students ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Practice, praxis, traineeship, internship, or practicum - these are all names for the specific arrangements where students from universities engage in real life experiences; in arrangements where they leave the secure tranquility of the university and enter into the chaotic world of work. Practicum is a very good way of learning, and it can be very interesting for all parties involved. The students appreciate it, even if it is cumbersome, frustrating, and requires a lot of work - work that is different from what they know in their previous encounters with the education system. This book asks a simple question in relation to practicum, paraphrasing Tom Paxton's song: What Did You Learn in the Real World Today? The question is asked without the irony of Paxton's original one, in order to find out what is learned in the practicum. The chapters in this book shed some light on this simple question. The question is confronted from philosophical and pedagogical perspectives, while investigating a number of cases of students' learning experiences in the real world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 "What did you learn in the real world today?" (Lars Bo Henriksen, David O'Donnell)
ch. 2 Epistemology and learning in practice (Mogens Pahuus)
ch. 3 About the logic of practice (Jörg Zeller)
ch. 4 Praxis, PBL and the application of knowledge (Lars Bo Henriksen)
ch. 5 Embodiment as the existential soil of practice. Philosophical reflections on the concept of practice as "doing" (Ulla Thøgersen)
ch. 6 PBL and stories of body in the hospital world (Lars Botin)
ch. 7 Inquiry in the swampy lowland (Merete Wiberg)
ch. 8 Engineering students in the real world - on-campus PBL (Lars Bo Henriksen, Johan Askehave)
ch. 9 The Aalborg PBL model and employability (Lone Krogh)
ch. 10 Lessons from the Euronet-PBL project (Pekka Kämääinen, Ludger Deitmer)
ch. 11 About the authors
Additional Info:
A collection of peer-reviewed problems, teaching notes, supplemental materials, and articles to assist educators in using problem-based learning in the classroom. Requires free online registration.
Additional Info:
A collection of peer-reviewed problems, teaching notes, supplemental materials, and articles to assist educators in using problem-based learning in the classroom. Requires free online registration.
Additional Info:
Mostly geared toward the sciences - but sample problems and curricula can be mined for information about the process of designing similar resources for religion/theology. Lots of links to additional resources.
Additional Info:
Mostly geared toward the sciences - but sample problems and curricula can be mined for information about the process of designing similar resources for religion/theology. Lots of links to additional resources.
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Simple orientation to Problem Based Learning with helpful how-to PDF files to download.
Additional Info:
Simple orientation to Problem Based Learning with helpful how-to PDF files to download.
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RubiStar is an online generator of assessment rubrics for student projects of all kinds: writing, oral, reading, multimedia, etc.
Additional Info:
RubiStar is an online generator of assessment rubrics for student projects of all kinds: writing, oral, reading, multimedia, etc.
Additional Info:
Samford University website provides administrators, faculty, students, and parents with detailed information on the components, implementation, assessment, and documentation of PBL. Websites are specifically separated into PBL's background, process, evaluation, and resources. These pages also contain a guide to relevant workshops and conferences, materials, and links to other institutions that are using PBL in their undergraduate and/or graduate programs.
Additional Info:
Samford University website provides administrators, faculty, students, and parents with detailed information on the components, implementation, assessment, and documentation of PBL. Websites are specifically separated into PBL's background, process, evaluation, and resources. These pages also contain a guide to relevant workshops and conferences, materials, and links to other institutions that are using PBL in their undergraduate and/or graduate programs.
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Series of web pages providing an overview of Elon College's robust program in undergraduate research.
Additional Info:
Series of web pages providing an overview of Elon College's robust program in undergraduate research.
Additional Info:
A collection of peer-reviewed problems, teaching notes, supplemental materials, and articles to assist educators in using problem-based learning in the classroom. Requires free online registration.
Additional Info:
A collection of peer-reviewed problems, teaching notes, supplemental materials, and articles to assist educators in using problem-based learning in the classroom. Requires free online registration.
Web cover image
Wabash tree

Avoiding the Mid-semester Doldrums

Web
Duffy, D.; and Jones, J.
Topics: Course Design   |   Collaborative Learning   |   Problem-Based Learning   |   Case Study Method

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What do you do when things get sluggish and everyone just wishes the course were over? Do something different
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What do you do when things get sluggish and everyone just wishes the course were over? Do something different
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Consider “flipping” the class—moving the content coverage to outside the class in order to devote precious, in-class time to practice of important course skills.This brief note gives a helpful overview of this emerging concept in higher education (with links).
Additional Info:
Consider “flipping” the class—moving the content coverage to outside the class in order to devote precious, in-class time to practice of important course skills.This brief note gives a helpful overview of this emerging concept in higher education (with links).
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Games help people develop a disposition toward collaboration, problem-solving, communication, experimentation, and exploration of identities, all attributes that promote success in a rapidly-changing, information-based culture
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Games help people develop a disposition toward collaboration, problem-solving, communication, experimentation, and exploration of identities, all attributes that promote success in a rapidly-changing, information-based culture
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Having students work in groups lets them practice the skills they are learning.
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Having students work in groups lets them practice the skills they are learning.
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How can instructors ensure that students come to class with course assignments prepared and readings completed?
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How can instructors ensure that students come to class with course assignments prepared and readings completed?
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A meaningful, achievable challenge will get students excited about learning and prepare them to apply their knowledge in the future
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A meaningful, achievable challenge will get students excited about learning and prepare them to apply their knowledge in the future
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This Times Higher Education piece introduces the "case study" as a learning activity. A bit choppy in its prose, the piece nonetheless offers a solid introduction to case studies. Includes reasons why they are valuable, a framework for the activity (motivation, exploration, analysis toward deeper understanding), instructions for preparation, and the attention to the use of case studies in examinations.
Additional Info:
This Times Higher Education piece introduces the "case study" as a learning activity. A bit choppy in its prose, the piece nonetheless offers a solid introduction to case studies. Includes reasons why they are valuable, a framework for the activity (motivation, exploration, analysis toward deeper understanding), instructions for preparation, and the attention to the use of case studies in examinations.
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This Boston University Center for Excellence & Innovation in Teaching article describes the elements of a proper case study, its advantages for learning, guidelines for using case studies in class, and select additional online resources.
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This Boston University Center for Excellence & Innovation in Teaching article describes the elements of a proper case study, its advantages for learning, guidelines for using case studies in class, and select additional online resources.
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From the Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching comes this deceptively brief help on case studies. The features of a good case study are described, then a series of bullets serve as an exceedingly practical "check list" for the instructor generating her first case studies for class use.
Additional Info:
From the Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching comes this deceptively brief help on case studies. The features of a good case study are described, then a series of bullets serve as an exceedingly practical "check list" for the instructor generating her first case studies for class use.
Cover image

Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty

Book
Cook-Sather, Alison; Bovill, Catherine; and Felten, Peter
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.C647 2014
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Mentoring Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
A guide to developing productive student-faculty partnerships in higher education
Student-faculty partnerships is an innovation that is gaining traction on campuses across the country. There are few established models in this new endeavor, however. Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty offers administrators, faculty, and students both the theoretical grounding and practical guidelines needed to develop student-faculty partnerships that affirm and improve teaching and ...
Additional Info:
A guide to developing productive student-faculty partnerships in higher education
Student-faculty partnerships is an innovation that is gaining traction on campuses across the country. There are few established models in this new endeavor, however. Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty offers administrators, faculty, and students both the theoretical grounding and practical guidelines needed to develop student-faculty partnerships that affirm and improve teaching and learning in higher education.

• Provides theory and evidence to support new efforts in student-faculty partnerships
• Describes various models for creating and supporting such partnerships
• Helps faculty overcome some of the perceived barriers to student-faculty partnerships
• Suggests a range of possible levels of partnership that might be appropriate in different circumstances
• Includes helpful responses to a range of questions as well as advice from faculty, students, and administrators who have hands-on experience with partnership programs

Balancing theory, step-by-step guidelines, expert advice, and practitioner experience, this book is a comprehensive why- and how-to handbook for developing a successful student-faculty partnership program. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Authors

ch. 1 What Are Student-Faculty Partnerships? Our Guiding Principles and Definition
ch. 2 Preliminary Questions about Student-Faculty Partnerships
ch. 3 Partnerships with Students Examples from Individual Faculty
ch. 4 Program-Level Approaches to Student-Faculty Partnerships
ch. 5 Outcomes of Student-Faculty Partnerships Support from Research Literature and Outcomes for Faculty and Students
ch. 6 The Challenges of Student-Faculty Partnerships
ch. 7 Practical Strategies for Developing Student-Faculty Partnerships
ch. 8 Further Questions about Student-Faculty Partnerships
ch. 9 Assessing Processes and Outcomes of Student-Faculty Partnerships
ch. 10 Next Steps . . . Toward a Partnership Movement?

Appendix I: The Ladder of Active Student Participation in Curriculum Design
Appendix II: Guidelines for the Students as Learners and Teachers (SaLT) Program at Bryn Mawr College (Modified for This Volume)
Appendix III: Practical Strategies for Developing Student-led Research Projects From the Students as Change Agents Program, University of Exeter, United Kingdom
References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Essential Questions: Opening Doors to Student Understanding

Book
McTighe, Jay, and Wiggins, Grant
2013
ASCD, Alexandria, VA
LB1027.44.M38 2013
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
What are “essential questions,” and how do they differ from other kinds of questions? What’s so great about them? Why should you design and use essential questions in your classroom?

Essential questions (EQs) help target standards as you organize curriculum content into coherent units that yield focused and thoughtful learning. In the classroom, EQs are used to stimulate students’ discussions and promote a deeper understanding of the ...
Additional Info:
What are “essential questions,” and how do they differ from other kinds of questions? What’s so great about them? Why should you design and use essential questions in your classroom?

Essential questions (EQs) help target standards as you organize curriculum content into coherent units that yield focused and thoughtful learning. In the classroom, EQs are used to stimulate students’ discussions and promote a deeper understanding of the content.

Whether you are an Understanding by Design (UbD) devotee or are searching for ways to address standards—local or Common Core State Standards—in an engaging way, Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins provide practical guidance on how to design, initiate, and embed inquiry-based teaching and learning in your classroom. Offering dozens of examples, the authors explore the usefulness of EQs in all K–12 content areas, including skill-based areas such as math, PE, language instruction, and arts education. As an important element of their backward design approach to designing curriculum, instruction, and assessment, the authors

- Give a comprehensive explanation of why EQs are so important;
- Explore seven defining characteristics of EQs;
- Distinguish between topical and overarching questions and their uses;
- Outline the rationale for using EQs as the focal point in creating units of study; and
- Show how to create effective EQs, working from sources including standards, desired understandings, and student misconceptions.

Using essential questions can be challenging—for both teachers and students—and this book provides guidance through practical and proven processes, as well as suggested “response strategies” to encourage student engagement. Finally, you will learn how to create a culture of inquiry so that all members of the educational community—students, teachers, and administrators—benefit from the increased rigor and deepened understanding that emerge when essential questions become a guiding force for learners of all ages. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

ch. 1 What Makes a Question Essential?
ch. 2 Why Use Essential Questions?
ch. 3 How Do We Design Essential Questions?
ch. 4 How Do We Use Essential Questions?
ch. 5 How Do We Address Implementation Challenges and Special Cases?
ch. 6 How Do We Establish a Culture of Inquiry in Classrooms?
ch. 7 How Do We Use Essential Questions Beyond the Classroom?

Appendix: Annotated Bibliography
References
About the Authors
Related ASCD Resources
Copyright