18-22 Year Olds

Scholarship On Teaching - Topic: 18-22 Year Olds - 152 results

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Virtual Faith: The Irreverent Spiritual Quest of Generation X

Book
Beaudoin, Tom
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
BV4529.2.B43 1998
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Reveals the deep and pervasive search for meaning that haunts Generation X. This book is must reading for anyone who would understand the spirituality of young people at the turn of a new millennium.—Robert A. Ludwig, author of Reconstructing Catholicism for a New Generation In Virtual Faith, Beaudoin explores fashion, music videos, and cyberspace concluding that his generation has fashioned a theology radically different from, but no less potent ...
Additional Info:
Reveals the deep and pervasive search for meaning that haunts Generation X. This book is must reading for anyone who would understand the spirituality of young people at the turn of a new millennium.—Robert A. Ludwig, author of Reconstructing Catholicism for a New Generation In Virtual Faith, Beaudoin explores fashion, music videos, and cyberspace concluding that his generation has fashioned a theology radically different from, but no less potent or valid than, that of their elders. Beaudoin's investigation of popular culture uncovers four themes that underpin his generation's theology. First, all institutions are suspect — especially organized religion. Second, personal experience is everything, and every form of intense personal experience is potentially spiritual. Third, suffering is also spiritual. Finally, this generation sees ambiguity as a central element of faith. This book opens a long overdue conversation about where and how we find meaning, and how we all can encourage each other in this central human searching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part One: Why Religion Still Matters: GenX, Pop Culture, and the Search for God
ch. 1 A GenX Journey: Living on the Boundary Between Religion and Culture
ch. 2 Formed by Pop Culture: The Shared Immersion That Makes Us a Generation
ch. 3 Being Virtually Religious: Appreciating GenX Irreverence

Part Two: How Religion Still Matters: Four Central Themes in GenX Religiosity
ch. 4 Institutions Are Suspect
ch. 5 Experience Is Key
ch. 6 Suffering Has a Religious Dimension
ch. 7 Ambiguity Is Central to Faith

Part Three: Being Religious Now: A New Understanding
ch. 8 Making the Virtual Lead Somewhere: A Spiritual Challenge to Generation X
ch. 9 Rediscovering Humility in Ministry: A Spiritual Challenge from Generation X

Conclusion: Giving Irreverence Its Due
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Wabash tree

Thinking About Teaching and Learning: Developing Habits of Learning with First Year College and University Students

Book
Leamnson, Robert
1999
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2331.L39 1999
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Here is a compelling read for every teacher in higher education who wants to refresh or reexamine his or her classroom practice.

Building on the insights offered by recent discoveries about the biological basis of learning, and on his own thought-provoking definitions of teaching, learning and education, the author proceeds to the practical details of instruction that teachers are most interested in — the things that make or break ...
Additional Info:
Here is a compelling read for every teacher in higher education who wants to refresh or reexamine his or her classroom practice.

Building on the insights offered by recent discoveries about the biological basis of learning, and on his own thought-provoking definitions of teaching, learning and education, the author proceeds to the practical details of instruction that teachers are most interested in — the things that make or break teaching.

Practical and thoughtful, and based on forty years of teaching, wide reading and much reflection, Robert Leamnson provides teachers with a map to develop their own teaching philosophy, and effective nuts-and-bolts advice.

His approach is particularly useful for those facing a cohort of first year students less prepared for college and university. He is concerned to develop in his students habits and skills that will equip them for a lifetime of learning.

He is especially alert to the psychology of students. He also understands, and has experienced, the typical frustration and exasperation teachers feel when students ingeniously elude their teachers' loftiest goals and strategies. Most important, he has good advice about how to cope with the challenge.

This guide will appeal to college teachers in all disciplines. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Thinking About Thinking About Teaching: How a philosophy of teaching develops and why it is important to have one
ch. 2 The Biological Basis of Learning: Learning as brain change, rather than brain use
ch. 3 Language: On the questionable utility of unexpressed ideas
ch. 4 Today's First-Year Students: Culture, motivation and preparation
ch. 5 Teaching and Pedagogy: How the way we teach affects the way students learn
ch. 6 The Classroom: The classroom as dynamic arena - What students are really doing
ch. 7 Writing and other Technologies: Technology, old, and new, and as a means to an end
ch. 8 Final Thoughts: Reflections and ruminations

App Two sample assignment sheets
References
Annotated Bibliography
Index
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Forms of Intellectual and Ethical Development in the College Years

Book
Perry, William G., Jr.
1970
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Orlando, FL
LB3609.P4 1970
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Since its original publication in 1970, this landmark book by William Perry has remained the cornerstone of much of the student development research that followed. Using research conducted with Harvard undergraduates over a fifteen-year period, Perry derived an enduring framework for characterizing student development - a scheme so accurate that it still informs and advances investigations into student development across genders and cultures. Drawing from firsthand accounts, Perry traces a path ...
Additional Info:
Since its original publication in 1970, this landmark book by William Perry has remained the cornerstone of much of the student development research that followed. Using research conducted with Harvard undergraduates over a fifteen-year period, Perry derived an enduring framework for characterizing student development - a scheme so accurate that it still informs and advances investigations into student development across genders and cultures. Drawing from firsthand accounts, Perry traces a path from students' adolescence into adulthood. His nine-stage model describes the steps that move students from a simplistic, categorical view of knowledge to a more complex, contextual view of the world and of themselves. Throughout this journey of cognitive development, Perry reveals, the most significant changes occur in forms in which people perceive their world rather than in the particulars of their attitudes and concerns. He shows ultimately that the nature of intellectual development is such that we should pay as much attention to the processes we use as to the content. In a new introduction to this classic work, Lee Knefelkamp - a close colleague of Perry's and a leading expert on college student development - evaluates the book's place in the literature of higher education. Knefelkamp explains how the Perry scheme has shaped current thinking about student development and discusses the most significant research that has since evolved from Perry's groundbreaking effort. Forms of Ethical and Intellectual Development in the College Years is a work that every current and future student services professional must have in their library. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction and Resume
Context of Students' Reports
The Students' Experience
Concepts of the Scheme
The Development Scheme
Critique
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Wabash tree

When Students Have Power: Negotiating Authority in a Critical Pedagogy

Book
Shor, Ira
1996
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LC196.5.U6S566 1996
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Adult Learners   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
What happens when teachers share power with students? In this profound book, Ira Shor--the inventor of critical pedagogy in the United States-- relates the story of an experiment that nearly went out of control.

Shor provides the reader with a reenactment of one semester that shows what really can happen when one applies the theory and democratizes the classroom. This is the story of one class in which ...
Additional Info:
What happens when teachers share power with students? In this profound book, Ira Shor--the inventor of critical pedagogy in the United States-- relates the story of an experiment that nearly went out of control.

Shor provides the reader with a reenactment of one semester that shows what really can happen when one applies the theory and democratizes the classroom. This is the story of one class in which Shor tried to fully share with his students control of the curriculum and of the classroom. After twenty years of practicing critical teaching, he unexpectedly found himself faced with a student uprising that threatened the very possibility of learning. How Shor resolves these problems, while remaining true to his commitment to power-sharing and radical pedagogy, is the crux of the book. Unconventional in both form and substance, this deeply personal work weaves together student voices and thick descriptions of classroom experience with pedagogical theory to illuminate the power relations that must be negotiated if true learning is to take place. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface and Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Siberian Syndrome: Students as Exiles in the Culture War of the Classroom
ch. 2 Sharing Power, Democratizing Authority, and Mediating Resistance
ch. 3 Escaping Siberia: Students Ask, "Why Come to Class?"
ch. 4 Power-Sharing and the Birth of the "After-Class Group"
ch. 5 The "After-Class Group" Constructs the Unknown
ch. 6 Power Is Knowledge - "Positive Resistance" and "Ultra-Expectations"
ch. 7 Can Siberia Become a Critical Territory?
ch. 8 Siberian Harvest: Measuring the Yield of Power-Sharing

Afterword
Bibliography
Index
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The Critical Years: Young Adults & The Search for Meaning, Faith & Commitment

Book
Parks, Sharon
1986
Harper & Row, New York, NY
BV4529.2.P37 1991
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
A key study for understanding the transformation of meaning in young adults. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A key study for understanding the transformation of meaning in young adults. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Elusiveness of Adulthood
ch. 2 Meaning-Making: An Activity of Faith
ch. 3 Developmental Theories: Insights into the Motion of Faith
ch. 4 The Journey Toward Mature Faith: A Model
ch. 5 Young Adult Faith: Promise and Vulnerability
ch. 6 Imagination: The Power of Adult Faith
ch. 7 Higher Education: A Community of Imagination
ch. 8 Culture as Mentor

Appendices
Notes
Index
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"On the Uses of a Liberal Education as Lite Entertainment for Bored College Students"

Article
Edmundson, Mark
1997
Harper's Magazine (Sept. 1997): 39-49
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
A college student getting a liberal arts education ponders filling out a questionnaire that includes an opportunity for him to evaluate his instructor. At times it appears that the purpose of his education is just to entertain him.
Additional Info:
A college student getting a liberal arts education ponders filling out a questionnaire that includes an opportunity for him to evaluate his instructor. At times it appears that the purpose of his education is just to entertain him.
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"Motivating Students" (pdf)

Article
Cashin, William E.
1979
Idea Paper No. 1, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1979)
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Reviews research and explains several concrete best practices on how to motivate students. Idea Paper no. 1, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Reviews research and explains several concrete best practices on how to motivate students. Idea Paper no. 1, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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"Trust is Not Enough: Classroom Self-disclosure and the Loss of Private Lives"

Article
Bishop, Nicole
1996
Journal of the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain 30, no. 3 (1996): 429-439
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Adult Learners   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
The paper presents and critiques some important philosophical and educational arguments that are used to support the practice of personal self-disclosure in the classroom, both in group settings and in the form of autobiographical journals. It argues that there are important reasons for valuing privacy even when self-disclosures occur in an environment of perfect trust and caring; that to understand the importance of privacy primarily in terms of trust, or ...
Additional Info:
The paper presents and critiques some important philosophical and educational arguments that are used to support the practice of personal self-disclosure in the classroom, both in group settings and in the form of autobiographical journals. It argues that there are important reasons for valuing privacy even when self-disclosures occur in an environment of perfect trust and caring; that to understand the importance of privacy primarily in terms of trust, or the absence of trust, is to risk overlooking the less apparent, yet more subtle, threats which ‘sympathy’ and ‘caring’ can pose to self-disclosers.
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"Growing Up Digital: How the Web Changes Work, Education, and the Ways People Learn"

Article
Brown, John Seely
2000
Change Mar/Apr (2000): 10-19
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Discusses the World Wide Web as a transformative medium and considers future possibilities. Highlights include ideas that 15-year-olds had for future working and learning environments; how youth learn having grown up in a digital environments; lifelong learning; multitasking; new ideas of literacy relating to information and navigation; sharing knowledge assets; and regional learning.
Additional Info:
Discusses the World Wide Web as a transformative medium and considers future possibilities. Highlights include ideas that 15-year-olds had for future working and learning environments; how youth learn having grown up in a digital environments; lifelong learning; multitasking; new ideas of literacy relating to information and navigation; sharing knowledge assets; and regional learning.
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Inspiring Students: Case Studies in Motivating the Learner

Book
Fallows, Stephen and Kemal Ahmet, eds.
1999
Stylus (Kogan Page), London, UK
LB1065.I57 1999
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
This book looks specifically at the problems of teaching students in higher education taking courses outside their main area of interest. This book brings together an international collection of case studies from North America, Australia, New Zealand and the UK in which practicing university teachers describe strategies which they have adopted to inspire their students. Each case study is presented in a way which enables the transfer of the key ...
Additional Info:
This book looks specifically at the problems of teaching students in higher education taking courses outside their main area of interest. This book brings together an international collection of case studies from North America, Australia, New Zealand and the UK in which practicing university teachers describe strategies which they have adopted to inspire their students. Each case study is presented in a way which enables the transfer of the key ideas to other teachers, regardless of their subject discipline. The editors provide an introduction to the book and review the key lessons to be learnt from the case studies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Notes on Contributors
Editors' Introductory Remarks

ch. 1 Inspiring Students: An Introduction (Stephen Fallows and Kemal Ahmet)
ch. 2 Experiential Learning Through Practicals (Kehmal Ahmet and Stephen Fallows)
ch. 3 Teaching Science to Non-science Students Using a Student-centred Classroom (Calvin S. Kalman)
ch. 4 Problem-based Learning (Peter Ommundsen)
ch. 5 Enhancing Motivation and Learning Through Collaboration and the Use of Problems (John R. Savery)
ch. 6 Simulation in Management Education (Mark W. Teale)
ch. 7 Inspiring Students in a Health Studies Programme (Andréa Riesch Toepell)
ch. 8 Introducing Computing and Information Systems (Johnathan Lean, Terry Mangles, and Johnathan Moizer)
ch. 9 Introducing Communication Skills (Susan Nichols)
ch. 10 Library and Information Skills for the Reluctant Student (Carol Primrose)
ch. 11 Communications Skills Using Legal, Ethical and Professional Issues (AC Lynn Zelmer)
ch. 12 Mathematics Appreciation (Josefina Alvarez)
ch. 13 Working With Students to Enhance an Unpopular Course (Anne Arnold and John Truran)
ch. 14 Student-led Investigations to Introduce Statistics (Graham Clarke)
ch. 15 Work-based Assessments to Improve Learning (John Flynn)
ch. 16 The Biology of Numbers (Philip Hammond, Jim Aiton, Gareth Hughes and Ian Nimmo)
ch. 17 Introducing an Interdisciplinary Course (Balasubramanyam Chandramohan)
ch. 18 The 'Art' in Introducing Technology to Non-technologists (Ian McPherson)
ch. 19 Editors' Concluding Comments (Stephen Fallows)

Contact Details
Index
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"A Model for Student Success: Critical Thinking and 'At Risk' Students" (pdf)

Article
Osborne, Randall E.
2000
The Journal of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 1, no. 1 (2000): 1-7
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
There appears to be a significant gap between faculty expectations for incoming college students and these same students perceptions of their abilities. Incoming college students are not very confident of their critical thinking abilities, yet faculty expect students to enter college already being able to critically evaluate information and to reach conclusions based on a critical analysis of the data. The current study challenges the preconception that critical thinking cannot ...
Additional Info:
There appears to be a significant gap between faculty expectations for incoming college students and these same students perceptions of their abilities. Incoming college students are not very confident of their critical thinking abilities, yet faculty expect students to enter college already being able to critically evaluate information and to reach conclusions based on a critical analysis of the data. The current study challenges the preconception that critical thinking cannot be taught and delineates a model for critical thinking that can be employed regardless of one’s discipline. Outcome data strongly suggests critical thinking can lead to both proximal and distal increases in student success.
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Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation

Book
Howe, Neil and William Strauss
2000
Vintage Books, New York, NY
HQ796.H74 2000
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
By the authors of the bestselling 13th Gen, the first in-depth examination of the Millennials—the generation born after 1982.

In this remarkable account, certain to stir the interest of educators, counselors, parents, and people in all types of business as well as young people themselves, Neil Howe and William Strauss introduce the nation to a powerful new generation: the Millennials. They will also explain:

Why today's ...
Additional Info:
By the authors of the bestselling 13th Gen, the first in-depth examination of the Millennials—the generation born after 1982.

In this remarkable account, certain to stir the interest of educators, counselors, parents, and people in all types of business as well as young people themselves, Neil Howe and William Strauss introduce the nation to a powerful new generation: the Millennials. They will also explain:

Why today's teens are smart, well-behaved, and optimisitc, and why you won't hear older people say that.

Why they get along so well with their Boomer and Xer parents.

Why Millennial collegians will bring a new youth revolution to America's campuses.

Why names like "Generation Y" and "Echo Boom" just don't work for today's kids.

Having looked at oceans of data, taken their own polls, and talked to hundreds of kids, parents, and teachers, Howe and Strauss explain how Millennials are turning out to be so dramatically different from Xers and boomers and how, in time, they will become the next great generation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part One - where They come From
ch. 1 The Next Great Generation
ch. 2 From Babies on Board to Power Teens
ch. 3 The Coming Millennial Revolution

Part Two - who They are
ch. 4 The Baby Boomlet (demography)
ch. 5 Kinderpolitics (political economy)
ch. 6 Ground Zero of the Culture Wars (family)
ch. 7 Raising Standards for Regular Kids (school)
ch. 8 Jiggy with It (pace of life)
ch. 9 Zero Tolerance (conduct)
ch. 10 Junior Citizens (community)
ch. 11 The Happiness Business (culture)
ch. 12 Rocket Cash (commerce)
ch. 13 Planet Pokemon (world)

Part Three - where They're going
ch. 14 The Clock Is Tickin'
ch. 15 Hero Generations in History
ch. 16 A Capacity for Greatness

Millennials Rising
Afterword
Notes
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Making Sense of the Institutional Mission: Student Cultures at an Evangelical University: A Dissertation

Book
Mayer, Lanney
1997
University of California Press, Los Angeles, CA
BV4030.B45.2 1997
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introducing the issues: seeking coherence in undergraduate education
ch. 2 The Biola university saga: as integrationist orientation
ch. 3 Biola since 1981: The University
ch. 4 Student cultures: enhancing the institutional mission
ch. 5 Student Cultures: Non- Conformists, Outsiders, and Rebels
ch. 6 Making Sense of the Institutional Mission
ch. 7 Epilogue

Appendices
Bibliography
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The Life of the Mind: A Christian Perspective

Book
Williams, Clifford
2002
Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI
BT50.W475 2002
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
From the Publisher
"Those who ponder these pages will be renewed to love God with all their minds, to pursue truth, and to live faithfully."--David S. Dockery, Union University

What purpose do purely intellectual pursuits have in the lives of Christians? Why should Christians study subjects that have little bearing on their future careers and ministry? In a style reminiscent of the work of Arthur Holmes ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher
"Those who ponder these pages will be renewed to love God with all their minds, to pursue truth, and to live faithfully."--David S. Dockery, Union University

What purpose do purely intellectual pursuits have in the lives of Christians? Why should Christians study subjects that have little bearing on their future careers and ministry? In a style reminiscent of the work of Arthur Holmes and Harry Blamires, veteran professor of philosophy Clifford Williams addresses these issues and more in this succinct and accessible examination of the life of the mind.

Christians cultivating the life of the mind actively pursue situations and discussions that require experimentation, reflection, and perseverance. They are interested in the acquisition of knowledge that is both unrelated and directly related to their faith. Williams answers common Christian objections to such activities, describes the virtues of the person who engages in the life of the mind, and asserts that the life of the mind is justifiably a Christian calling.

The Life of the Mind, the newest addition to the RenewedMinds imprint, is directed toward students contemplating the importance of college and intellectual activity in general, but it will be enjoyed by all committed to developing a Christian mind.


Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Why Do We Like to Think?
ch. 2 Is Thinking Good for Its Own Sake?
ch. 3 The Effects of Thinking
ch. 4 Tensions between the Life of the Mind and Christian Faith
ch. 5 Is the Life of the Mind at Odds with Culture?
ch. 6 The Crowd and the Community
ch. 7 The Hermit and the Explorer

Appendix
Questions for Reflection
Notes
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When Hope and Fear Collide: A Portrait of Today's College Student

Book
Levine, Arthur and Jeanette S. Cureton
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LA229.L423 1998
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
In his 1980 book When Dreams and Heroes Died, Arthur Levine presented a portrait of a generation of college students without heroes - a generation optimistic about their own futures, but pessimistic about the future of the country and the world. These students turned inward, away from activism and community and toward individual and material gain, a trend that continued throughout the 80s and showed little sign of changing. But when ...
Additional Info:
In his 1980 book When Dreams and Heroes Died, Arthur Levine presented a portrait of a generation of college students without heroes - a generation optimistic about their own futures, but pessimistic about the future of the country and the world. These students turned inward, away from activism and community and toward individual and material gain, a trend that continued throughout the 80s and showed little sign of changing. But when Levine returned to campuses in the 1990s, he discovered a startling and encouraging shift in the attitudes of the new generation of students. When Hope and Fear Collide examines a generation motivated by a conflicting sense of hope and fear. While today's students fear a great many things both on a global level and on a local level, they are less pessimistic than the previous generation, as they look for ways to make a difference in their world. Levine and Jeanette Cureton explore what shaped this change and how those who deal with students on a daily basis can use the change to enrich the college experience. The book examines how students come to grips with the challenges of politics, academics, and personal relationships on campus and draws implications for their futures. Levine and Cureton base their findings on research carried out in the same manner as in Levine's landmark study. The data they present give those who deal with students on a daily basis the information and tools they need to help those students chart a meaningful course through college. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Authors

ch. 1 Generation Without a Name
ch. 2 Flaws, Problems, and Decline: The New Localism
ch. 3 Campus Politics: Let the Buyer Beware!
ch. 4 Multiculturalism: The Campus Divided
ch. 5 Personal Life: Retreat from Intimacy
ch. 6 Academics: Search for an Insurance Policy
ch. 7 The Future: Doing Well or Doing Good
ch. 8 Conclusion: A Transitional Generation

App. A Studies Used in This Report
App. B Campus Contacts
References
Index
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Millennials Go to College

Book
Howe, Neil and William Strauss
2003
LifeCourse Associates, Great Falls, VA
LA229.H63 2003b
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
In their fascinating study of this generation, Millennials Go To College, Howe & Strauss examine how these ‘kids' will re-shape our world, and it's an optimistic new world if their prediction holds true. Despite the facts that Millennials have not experienced many of the events that we older folks have, they are a determined bunch and, if they're successful, will re-energize much of our roller-coaster economy. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
In their fascinating study of this generation, Millennials Go To College, Howe & Strauss examine how these ‘kids' will re-shape our world, and it's an optimistic new world if their prediction holds true. Despite the facts that Millennials have not experienced many of the events that we older folks have, they are a determined bunch and, if they're successful, will re-energize much of our roller-coaster economy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 A new generation goes to college
ch. 2 Meet the millennials
ch. 3 Life before college
ch. 4 Millennials by the numbers
ch. 5 Seven core traits
Special
Sheltered
Confident
Team-oriented
Conventional
Pressured
Achieving
ch. 6 Graduation and beyond
ch. 7 The next great collegiate generation
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"Models of the College Students' Epistemological Development" (pdf)

Article
Pugh, Sharon
2005
Indiana University, http://www.indiana.edu/~l506/theoryframe/506Model.htm January 5,
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Reviews theories of how notions of what constitutes knowledge and how one gets it change as individuals mature –"epistemological development," or development of ways of knowing.
Additional Info:
Reviews theories of how notions of what constitutes knowledge and how one gets it change as individuals mature –"epistemological development," or development of ways of knowing.
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Young Adult Catholics: Religion in the Culture of Choice

Book
Hoge, Dean R., William D. Dinges, Mary Johnson, Juan L. Gonzales, Jr.
2001
University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, IN
BX1406.2.Y68 2001
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
"Leaders of the American Catholic community want to and need to reach out to young adults. But effective ministry to young adults depends on an understanding of the attitudes and the needs of the current generation of Catholics in their 20s and 30s. This is why Dean Hoge, William Dinges, Mary Johnson, and Juan Gonzales began their study of young adult Catholics. How do they actually live their Catholicism? Are ...
Additional Info:
"Leaders of the American Catholic community want to and need to reach out to young adults. But effective ministry to young adults depends on an understanding of the attitudes and the needs of the current generation of Catholics in their 20s and 30s. This is why Dean Hoge, William Dinges, Mary Johnson, and Juan Gonzales began their study of young adult Catholics. How do they actually live their Catholicism? Are they alienated from the church? Are they cynical about the church's moral teachings? Do they take the pope's statements seriously? Do they attend Mass? Have significant numbers left for other churches? Do they want Catholic education for their children?" Seeking answers to these and other questions, the authors conducted a national survey in 1997, supplemented by a telephone survey and then by personal interviews with over 800 men and women across the country. The interviews put a human face on the information provided, and they form a compelling part of this timely narrative. Of special interest is the focus on Latino Catholics. The authors underscore observations that include the strength and tenacity of Catholic identity in spite of many challenges, the high level of personal decision making among those interviewed and surveyed, and the readiness of young Catholics for institutional reforms. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Catholicism in American Culture
ch. 2 Past Research on Young Catholics
ch. 3 Young Adult Catholics: Survey Results
ch. 4 Five Types of Catholic Involvement
ch. 5 Latino Young Adults
ch. 6 Experiences with Religious Education
ch. 7 Young Adult Catholic Spirituality
ch. 8 Catholic Identity of Young Adults
ch. 9 Catholic Identity and Tradition
ch. 10 Conclusion

App. A
App. B

Notes
References
Index
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Motivating Students

Web
Teaching Effectiveness Program, University of Oregon (2000)
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Short insightful responses to a series of questions, including how do I: deal with apathetic students? deal with groups who are not functioning well together? get my students to prepare for class? create assignments that are challenging but not overwhelming? And: Should class be fun?
Additional Info:
Short insightful responses to a series of questions, including how do I: deal with apathetic students? deal with groups who are not functioning well together? get my students to prepare for class? create assignments that are challenging but not overwhelming? And: Should class be fun?
Article cover image

"Strategies For Engaging Students"

Article
Farmer-Dougan, Val; and Kathleen McKinney
2000
Center for Teaching, Learning & Technology, Illionois State University, Normal IL (2000)
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Religion in Southern Culture: Classroom Notes"

Article
Lippy, Charles
2002
Journal of Southern Religion 5 (2002)
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Generation X Goes to College: An Eye-Opening Account of Teaching in Postmodern America

Book
Sacks, Peter
1996
Open Court, Chicago, IL
LB2331.S17 1996
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
This is an incredible, amusing, horrifying, yet true story, in which all names have been changed to protect the guilty. It tells how the author, a journalist turned college professor, came face to face with Generation X: jaded, un-achieving, highly demanding yet lacking any respect for standards or intelligence. These insouciant scholars wore bored looks, ample attitudes, and reversed baseball caps. They expected to earn top grades by just showing ...
Additional Info:
This is an incredible, amusing, horrifying, yet true story, in which all names have been changed to protect the guilty. It tells how the author, a journalist turned college professor, came face to face with Generation X: jaded, un-achieving, highly demanding yet lacking any respect for standards or intelligence. These insouciant scholars wore bored looks, ample attitudes, and reversed baseball caps. They expected to earn top grades by just showing up in class, which they interrupted with their portable TVs, cellular phones, or personal pagers. For his own survival as a teacher, Sacks decided to play a bizarre, cynical game: The Sandbox Experiment, in which he catered to the whims of his students as though they were kindergartners. It worked: Sacks became a great success as a 'teacher', got tenure, and now continues to 'teach' at the strange, appalling institution he calls 'The College'. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

pt. 1 The Sandbox Experiment
ch. 1 Coming into Teaching
ch. 2 Culture Shock
ch. 3 The Castle, with Apologies to Franz Kafka
ch. 4 Reflections on the Worth of Teachers
ch. 5 "We Are Grownups Now"
ch. 6 Where All the Kids ARe (Way) Above Average
ch. 7 Hooked on Hand-holding
ch. 8 "Hey Dad, Put It on Pause!"
ch. 9 The Sandbox Experiment

pt. 2 Education in Postmodern America
ch. 10 The Postmodern Revolt
ch. 11 The Balkanization of Knowledge and Power
ch. 12 The Postmodern Spectacle and Generation X
ch. 13 Postmodernity and the Entitlement Society
ch. 14 Adapting to a Postmodern World

Epilogue
Notes
Index
Cover image

Making the Most of College: Students Speak Their Minds

Book
Light, Richard J.
2001
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LD2160.L54 2001
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Why Do Some Students make the most of college, while others struggle and look back on years of missed deadlines and missed opportunities? What choices can students make, and what can teachers and university leaders do, to improve more students' experiences and help them achieve the most from their time and money? Most important, how is the increasing diversity on campus -- cultural, racial, and religious -- affecting education? What ...
Additional Info:
Why Do Some Students make the most of college, while others struggle and look back on years of missed deadlines and missed opportunities? What choices can students make, and what can teachers and university leaders do, to improve more students' experiences and help them achieve the most from their time and money? Most important, how is the increasing diversity on campus -- cultural, racial, and religious -- affecting education? What can students and faculty do to benefit from differences, and even learn from the inevitable moments of misunderstanding and awkwardness?

From his ten years of interviews with Harvard seniors, Richard Light distills encouraging -- and surprisingly practical -- answers to fundamental questions. How can you choose classes wisely? What's the best way to study? Why do some professors inspire and others leave you cold? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Powerful Connections
ch. 3 Suggestions from Students
ch. 4 The Most Effective Classes
ch. 5 Good Mentoring and Advising
ch. 6 Faculty Who Make a Difference
ch. 7 Diversity on Campus
ch. 8 Learning from Differences
ch. 9 What College Leaders Can Do

The Assessment Project
References
Acknowledgments
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Learning and Motivation in the Postsecondary Classroom

Book
Svinicki, Marilla
2004
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB1065.S84 2004
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Adult Learners   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
While there is much available research and theory about learning and motivation, until now there has been no resource that translates esoteric findings into everyday language and examples that can be readily applied in college classrooms. This book brings the findings and theories of educational psychology to classroom faculty, helping them to adopt a scholarly approach to understanding their students' learning problems. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
While there is much available research and theory about learning and motivation, until now there has been no resource that translates esoteric findings into everyday language and examples that can be readily applied in college classrooms. This book brings the findings and theories of educational psychology to classroom faculty, helping them to adopt a scholarly approach to understanding their students' learning problems. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 My Attempt to Motivate You to Learn About Learning.
ch. 2 Helping Students Learn the Content.
ch. 3 Helping Students Understand.
ch. 4 Helping Students Develop Skills, Including Intellectual Skills.
ch. 5 Helping Students Retain and Use What They've Learned in Other Settings.
ch. 6 Helping Students Help Themselves.
ch. 7 Motivating Students to Learn.
ch. 8 What to Do About Individual Differences in Learning.
ch. 9 Putting It All Together.

Appendix: The Theories in a Nutshell.
Bibliography.
Index.
Cover image

Challenging & Supporting The First-Year Student: A Handbook for Improving The First Year of College

Book
Upcraft, M. Lee, John N. Gardner, Betsy O. Barefoot & Associates, eds.
2005
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2343.3.U63 2004
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
An authoritative, comprehensive guide to the first year of college, Challenging and Supporting the First-Year Student includes the most current information about the policies, strategies, programs, and services designed to help first-year students make a successful transition to college and fulfill their educational and personal goals. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
An authoritative, comprehensive guide to the first year of college, Challenging and Supporting the First-Year Student includes the most current information about the policies, strategies, programs, and services designed to help first-year students make a successful transition to college and fulfill their educational and personal goals. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface and Acknowledgments
Authors and Contributors
Introduction: The First Year of College Revisited

Part 1 What We Know about Today's First-Year Students and Institutional Efforts to Help Them Succeed
ch. 1 Today's First-Year Students (Jennifer L. Crissman Ishler)
ch. 2 The Keys to First-Year Student Persistence (Jennifer L. Crissman Ishler and M. Lee Upcraft)
ch. 3 Current Institutional Practice in the First College Year (Betsy O. Barefoot)

Part 2 Recruiting and Challenging First-Year Students
ch. 4 The Enrollment Management Process (Don Hossler and Douglas K. Anderson)
ch. 5 Student Engagement in the First Year of College (George D. Kuh)
ch. 6 Expectations and Performance (Karen Maitland Schilling and Karl L. Schilling)

Part 3 Creating Campus Cultures for First-Year Student Success
ch. 7 Fostering First-Year Success of Underrepresented Minorities (Freeman A. Hrabowski III)
ch. 8 The Realities of Diversity and the Campus Climate for First-Year Students (W. Terrell Jones)
ch. 9 Building the Foundation for First-Year Student Success in Public, Urban Universities: A Case Study (Diana S. Natalicio and Maggy Smith)
ch. 10 Inviting First-Year Student Success: A President's Perspective (Betty L. Siegel)
ch. 11 Advocating for First-Year Students (Jay Chaskes and Ralph G. Anttonen)
ch. 12 Collaborative Partnerships Between Academic and Student Affairs (Charles C. Schroeder)
ch. 13 Technology and Today's First-Year Students (Reynol Junco)

Part 4 Challenging and Supporting First-Year Students in the Classroom
ch. 14 Inside the First-Year Classroom: Challenges and Constraints (Bette LaSere Erickson and Diane W. Strommer)
ch. 15 Faculty Development and the First Year (Scott E. Evenbeck)
ch. 16 First-Year Seminars (Mary Stuart Hunter and Carrie W. Linder)
ch. 17 Developmental Education (Jeanne L. Higbee)
ch. 18 Supplemental Instruction (Deanna C. Martin and Maureen Hurley)
ch. 19 Academic Advising (Margaret C. King and Thomas J. Kerr)
ch. 20 The Place of the Library Versus the Library as Place (Margit Misangy Watts)
ch. 21 Service-Learning and the First-Year Student (Edward Zlotkowski)
ch. 22 Learning Communities (Jodi Levine Laufgraben)

Part 5 Challenging and Supporting First-Year Students Outside the Classroom
ch. 23 Designing Orientation Programs (Richard H. Mullendore and Leslie A Banahan)
ch. 24 First-Year Student Living Environments (William J. Zeller)
ch. 25 Student Support Services (John H. Schuh)
ch. 26 The First-Year Experience and Alcohol Use (Philip W. Meilman and Cheryl A. Presley)

Part 6 Assessing the First College Year
ch. 27 Assessing the First Year of College (M. Lee Upcraft)
ch. 28 A Beginner's Guide for Assessing the First College Year(M. Lee Upcraft, Jennifer L. Crissman Ishler and Randy L. Swing)
ch. 29 Choosing and Using Assessment Instruments (Randy L. Swing and M. Lee Upcraft)

Conclusion: Principles of Good Practice for the First College Year and Summary of Recommendations
References (John N. Gardner, M. Lee Upcraft and Betsy O. Barefoot)
Name Index
Subject Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Making Their Own Way: Narratives for Transforming Higher Education to Promote Self-Development

Book
Magolda, Marcia B. Baxter
2001
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2424.B39 2004
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
What impact does a college education have on students' careers and personal lives after they graduate? Do they consider themselves well prepared for the complexities, demands and ambiguities of contemporary society? What can we learn from their stories to improve the college learning experience?

This ground-breaking book extends a unique longitudinal study of 101 male and female college students started by the author in 1986, and reported in her highly ...
Additional Info:
What impact does a college education have on students' careers and personal lives after they graduate? Do they consider themselves well prepared for the complexities, demands and ambiguities of contemporary society? What can we learn from their stories to improve the college learning experience?

This ground-breaking book extends a unique longitudinal study of 101 male and female college students started by the author in 1986, and reported in her highly successful and influential book, Knowing and Reasoning in College (1992). This book follows the journeys of the young adults remaining in the study -- drawing on over 300 new interviews -- from graduation to their early thirties.

Through the students' own stories, Marcia Baxter Magolda allows us to follow their journeys to an internally-authored sense of identity and belief systems, and in many cases to witness the development of the complex ways of making meaning that are needed for fulfilling participation in modern society.

From her observation and analysis, she derives a new framework for higher education to achieve better stewarding and fostering of its students' crucial journeys of transformation. She develops the concept of providing "good company" -- through the shaping of curriculum and co-curriculum, advising, leadership opportunities, campus work settings, collaboration, diversity and community building -- that young adults need along the way to finding and to taking their place as citizens and leaders in the twenty-first century.

This is an important book for all teachers and leaders in higher education who are concerned with the holistic development of students, and with higher education's responsibility to foster critical thinking, citizenship and leadership. It has particular relevance for student affairs educators and professionals; as well as for graduate, professional school and continuing education faculty who seek insight into young adult development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Table of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Preface

Part 1 The Journey Toward Self-Authorship
ch. 1 Complex Lives
ch. 2 Pathways Into Young Adulthood
ch. 3 Following External Formulas
ch. 4 The Crossroads
ch. 5 Becoming The Author of One's Life
ch. 6 The Internal Foundation

Part 2 Promoting Self-Authorship in Higher Education
ch. 7 Creating Contexts for Self-Authorship in Academic Affairs
ch. 8 Creating Contexts for Self-Authorship in Campus Work Settings
ch. 9 Creating Contexts for Self-Authorship in the Cocurriculum

Epilogue
References
Longitudinal Study Methodology and Methods
Index
Cover image

Promoting Reasonable Expectations: Aligning Student and Institutional Views of the College Experience

Book
Miller, Thomas E., Barbara E. Bender, John H. Schuh, and Associates
2005
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2343.4.M55 2005
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In this important resource, leading figures in the field of student affairs examine the key issue of student expectations of college, then contrast them with the real experiences of students. The book identifies strategies for addressing the disjunctions between expectation and experience. Sponsored by the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, the book is intended as the starting point for campus discussions and will undoubtedly spark similar conversations across higher ...
Additional Info:
In this important resource, leading figures in the field of student affairs examine the key issue of student expectations of college, then contrast them with the real experiences of students. The book identifies strategies for addressing the disjunctions between expectation and experience. Sponsored by the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, the book is intended as the starting point for campus discussions and will undoubtedly spark similar conversations across higher education leadership, and perhaps even among parents and students as well. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Why should we care about student expectations?
ch. 3 What students expect from college and what they get
ch. 4 When expectations and realities collide : environmental influences on student expectations and student experiences
ch. 5 Campus services : what do students expect?
ch. 6 Student expectations about paying for college : are they reasonable
ch. 7 Student persistence and degree attainment
ch. 8 Life after college
ch. 9 The influence of selected students; characteristics on their expectations of college
ch. 10 Institutional type and students' expectations
ch. 11 Expectations of multiple publics
ch. 12 Perspectives from the field
ch. 13 Conclusion
Article cover image

"Understanding the Study of Religion in Undergraduate Programs of Religious Studies as Religious Education"

Article
Bowman, Lorna
2006
Religious Education 101, no. 2 (2006): 143-146
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Putting Students First: How Colleges Develop Students Purposefully

Book
Braskamp, Larry M., Lois Calian Trautvetter and Kelly Ward
2006
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LC990.B73 2006
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Society is calling for higher education to take more responsibility for helping students find purpose and meaning in life. In this book, the authors argue that colleges should purposefully invest in students in ways that will foster their holistic development by recognizing and building on students' purpose in life, intellectually, spiritually, and morally. By using the "4C framework"— culture, curriculum, cocurriculum, and community— faculty, student affairs staff, and academic administrators ...
Additional Info:
Society is calling for higher education to take more responsibility for helping students find purpose and meaning in life. In this book, the authors argue that colleges should purposefully invest in students in ways that will foster their holistic development by recognizing and building on students' purpose in life, intellectually, spiritually, and morally. By using the "4C framework"— culture, curriculum, cocurriculum, and community— faculty, student affairs staff, and academic administrators will be able to discuss, plan, and create a college environment that effectively supports the learning and development of students. The book contains a set of themes and calls for consideration and action based on the findings of site visits at 10 colleges and a set of questions to help readers think about and plan how to develop students holistically on their own campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Introduction

ch. 1 Putting Students First
Introduction
Why Is It Important to Put Students and Their Development First?
Who Are Today's College Students?
Who Develops These Students?
In What Context Is Holistic Development Occurring?
Why Study Church-Related Colleges and Universities?
Summary

ch. 2 Conceptual Framework and Design of the Project
Introduction
Theoretical Bases for Holistic Student Development
Faith, Spirituality, and Student Development
Student Development and the Church-Related Context
Conceptual Framework: Personal Investment Theory
Project Design
Summary

ch. 3 Culture
Introduction
Discerning and Acting on Institutional Mission
Building on a Legacy
Communicating Institutional Mission and Identity
Leadership
College Location
Campus Facilities
Expectations and Contributions of Faculty
Faculty as Role Models
Using a Career Perspective on Faculty Development
Faculty Evaluation as a Reflection of Culture
Support and Challenge
Summary
Questions for Campus Conversations

ch. 4 Curriculum
Introduction
Philosophical Foundations of the Curriculum
Centrality of Liberal Arts Education
Integrating Faith and Learning
Worldviews
Pedagogy
Developmentally Tailored Experiences for Students
Pedagogy of Engagement: Field-Based and Community-Based Learning
Summary
Questions for Campus Conversations

ch. 5 Cocurriculum
Introduction
Mutual Reinforcement of Learning
Campus Rituals
Residence Life
Student Leadership
Relationships With Coaches, Professional Staff, and Campus Ministry
Faculty Interactions
Immersion Experiences
Summary
Questions for Campus Conversations

ch. 6 Community
Introduction
Shared Governance
Defining Community
Maintaining Community Amidst Change
Diversity Within Community
Communities Beyond the Campus
Dealing With Difference and External Communities
Summary
Questions for Campus Conversations

ch. 7 Creating Communities That Put Students First
Introduction
Chapter Overview
Mission Is Reality, Not Rhetoric
Learning and Development Are Integrated
The Campus Community Fosters Support and Challenge
Summary

Bibliography
Index
TTR cover image

"Handling Doubt in Teaching Religion: A Turkish Case Study"

TTR
Ok, Uzeyir
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 4 (2004): 201-212
BL41.T4
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
This study ventures to sketch the dimensions of stress in religious thinking among young Muslims studying theology in Turkish universities and the ways in which these tensions are handled in educational institutions. As a result of a review of related literature, together with the use of a questionnaire with 382 respondents and interviews with 15 participants, the extent of experienced intense religious stress, the source, the content, the ways of resolution, the ...
Additional Info:
This study ventures to sketch the dimensions of stress in religious thinking among young Muslims studying theology in Turkish universities and the ways in which these tensions are handled in educational institutions. As a result of a review of related literature, together with the use of a questionnaire with 382 respondents and interviews with 15 participants, the extent of experienced intense religious stress, the source, the content, the ways of resolution, the duration, and the period of religious stress were identified. Finally, the cognitive, educational, theological, and socio-cultural challenges to which young Muslims were exposed were delineated and possible ways to overcome these problems were outlined, with some suggestions for educational settings.
TTR cover image

"Teaching Religion in Its Contemporary Contexts: A Case Study"

TTR
Gravett, Sandra L.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 4 (2003): 198-201
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
After the disheartening results of an informal investigation of content knowledge and reading comprehension among her students, the author ponders the implications for her teaching objectives. What are we, as educators in religious studies, really teaching and how are we doing it? How are we accommodating students with less traditionally honed academic skills without diminishing content? She describes her experiments with several new teaching strategies for enhancing student learning by ...
Additional Info:
After the disheartening results of an informal investigation of content knowledge and reading comprehension among her students, the author ponders the implications for her teaching objectives. What are we, as educators in religious studies, really teaching and how are we doing it? How are we accommodating students with less traditionally honed academic skills without diminishing content? She describes her experiments with several new teaching strategies for enhancing student learning by helping them improve basic skills, develop cultural literacy, and relate course content to their personal experience.
TTR cover image

"As If Religion Matters: Teaching the Introductory Course as if it Does"

TTR
Thompson, Deanna A.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 85-92
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This essay chronicles the academic odyssey of a young professor who sets out to revise the department's Introduction to Religion course only to realize that she must first clarify her vocational commitments before she can create a teachable course. She is convinced through working with many students who express disdain or even hostility toward the subject matter that she wants to model a relationship to the subject matter that says ...
Additional Info:
This essay chronicles the academic odyssey of a young professor who sets out to revise the department's Introduction to Religion course only to realize that she must first clarify her vocational commitments before she can create a teachable course. She is convinced through working with many students who express disdain or even hostility toward the subject matter that she wants to model a relationship to the subject matter that says religion matters, but is uncertain how to do this. After an autobiographical foray into her academic upbringing in active learning, the author articulates four values to model in her teaching: personal relevance, academic responsibility, ethics, and community. The author then engages current scholarship in active learning, and narrates the process of translating those four values into concrete course goals and particular assignments. The essay concludes with an assessment of teaching the revised course.
TTR cover image

"Using the Wesleyan Quadrilateral to Teach Biblical Studies in Christian Liberal Arts Colleges"

TTR
Cosby, Michael R.
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 2 (2001): 71-80
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Biblical studies professors in Christian liberal arts colleges typically face greater hostility from students nurtured in fundamentalist churches than they do from those who attend mainline churches. Guiding them through their first academic study of the Bible poses many challenges. To avoid the course becoming a battlefield, and to facilitate integration on a higher level, the Wesleyan Quadrilateral provides a middle way between right-wing and left-wing extremes. This approach gives ...
Additional Info:
Biblical studies professors in Christian liberal arts colleges typically face greater hostility from students nurtured in fundamentalist churches than they do from those who attend mainline churches. Guiding them through their first academic study of the Bible poses many challenges. To avoid the course becoming a battlefield, and to facilitate integration on a higher level, the Wesleyan Quadrilateral provides a middle way between right-wing and left-wing extremes. This approach gives priority to the Bible as the primary source for determining theology and practice, but relies heavily on tradition, reason, and experience as well. It also promotes interaction with the spiritual, moral, and ethical concerns expressed in the biblical texts. To adopt the Quadrilateral involves active concern for character formation, inspiring students to become better people. If we merely dispense historical-critical or literary information without considering contemporary relevance, we bore students and fail in our duties as educators.
Cover image

How College Affects Students, Volume 2, A Third Decade of Research

Book
Pascarella, Ernest T. and Patrick T. Terenzini
2005
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LA229.P34 2005
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
How College Affects Students, Volume 2 is the long awaited sequel to the landmark work that was first published in 1991. Offers the most comprehensive resource available on what is known about the effect of college on students. In this book, Pascarella and Terenzini provide current information and empirical research from the decade since their first book was published which distills what is know about how students change and benefit as a ...
Additional Info:
How College Affects Students, Volume 2 is the long awaited sequel to the landmark work that was first published in 1991. Offers the most comprehensive resource available on what is known about the effect of college on students. In this book, Pascarella and Terenzini provide current information and empirical research from the decade since their first book was published which distills what is know about how students change and benefit as a consequence of attending college. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Studying college outcomes in the 1990s : overview and organization of the research
ch. 2 Theories and models of student change in college
ch. 3 Development of verbal, quantitative, and subject matter competence
ch. 4 Cognitive skills and intellectual growth
ch. 5 Psychosocial change
ch. 6 Attitudes and values
ch. 7 Moral development
ch. 8 Educational attainment and persistence
ch. 9 Career and economic impacts of college
ch. 10 Quality of life after college
ch. 11 How college affects students : a summary
ch. 12 Implications for research, practice, and policy
Article cover image

"Turning Water into Wine: Giving Remote Texts Full Flavor for the Audience of Friends"

Article
Gregory, Marshall
2005
College Teaching 53, no. 3 (2005): 95-98
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
This essay argues that teachers would be more effective at promoting students' willingness to work hard at course content that seems to them remote and abstract if teachers explicitly presented that content to students more as a means to their education rather than as the aim of their education. Teachers should confront the fact that most of the content they teach will be forgotten by students. Once this fact is ...
Additional Info:
This essay argues that teachers would be more effective at promoting students' willingness to work hard at course content that seems to them remote and abstract if teachers explicitly presented that content to students more as a means to their education rather than as the aim of their education. Teachers should confront the fact that most of the content they teach will be forgotten by students. Once this fact is accepted, then it follows that teaching content that teachers know will be forgotten as if it should never be forgotten is myopic and perhaps dysfunctional. An alternative teaching model is to use course content to stimulate the flourishing of developmental human skills--rationality, language, aesthetic responsiveness, imagination, introspection, moral and ethical deliberation, sociability, and physicality--in the service of a developmental notion of liberal education that can never go out of date and can never be forgotten because its effects become absorbed as developmentally advanced orientations of life, not crammed into short-term memory for the sake of passing tests.
Journal cover image

Pre-Seminary Education

Journal Issue
1965
Theological Education 1, no. 3 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
The Bridston-Culver Report—Pre-Seminary Education (Liston Pope)
Pre-Seminary Education and the Theological School (Robert E. Cushman)
Pre-Seminary Education and the Undergraduate Department of Religion(A. Roy Eckardt)
Pre-Seminary Education and Undergraduate Arts and Sciences (Frederick Sontag)
Pre-Seminary Education: A Canadian View (A. B. B. Moore)
Continuing Education Looks at Pre-Seminary Education (Theodore O. Wedel)
Pre-Seminary Education: From the View of the Bible College (Terrel B. Crum)
Implications of the Seminary Population Data: A Sociologist’s View (Thomas C. Campbell)
Implications of the Seminary Population Data: A Psychologist’s View (John M. Vayhinger)
Notes to:
Administrators (Arthur R. McKay)
Trustees (Hermann N. Morse)
Seminary Staff Officers (Bill L. Barnes)
Librarians (Robert F. Beach)
Professors (Jesse H. Ziegler)
Cover image

Speaking The Lower Frequencies: Students and Media Literacy

Book
Jacobs, Walter R.
2005
State University of New York Press, Albany
P96.M42U585 2005
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Speaking the Lower Frequencies demonstrates how students can be critical consumers of media while retaining the pleasure they derive from it. In Walter R. Jacobs's classes on media and society, students use the instructor's experiences as a model for investigating their own histories. By creating new social contexts and meanings, the students learn to "speak the lower frequencies. Jacobs looks at the students' reception and critique of pop culture texts ...
Additional Info:
Speaking the Lower Frequencies demonstrates how students can be critical consumers of media while retaining the pleasure they derive from it. In Walter R. Jacobs's classes on media and society, students use the instructor's experiences as a model for investigating their own histories. By creating new social contexts and meanings, the students learn to "speak the lower frequencies. Jacobs looks at the students' reception and critique of pop culture texts like the movie I Like It Like That and the television show The XFiles to provide evidence for the effects of alternative pedagogy on critical literacy. He shows that when students are encouraged to be more than just passive receptors of the media they learn to develop active, critical voices that they use both inside and outside the classroom. Jacobs also explains how students can become more aware and active in attempts to create democratic possibilities for themselves and others. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Entering the Pensieve
ch. 2 Autoethnography of teachers, texts, and space
ch. 3 Fragments of the sociological imagination
ch. 4 Strange texts in postmodern space
ch. 5 Breaking and making frames as context
ch. 6 Conjuring the future
ch. 7 Evoking the lower frequencies
Cover image

Leading Lives That Matter: What We Should Do and Who We Should Be

Book
Schwehn, Mark R. and Bass, Dorothy C. eds.
2006
William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, MI
BT 738.5.L43 2006
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Leading Lives That Matter draws together a wide range of texts---including fiction, autobiography, and philosophy---offering challenge and insight if you're thinking about what to do with your life. Instead of prescribing advice, Schwehn and Bass approach the vocational process as an ongoing conversation. They include in this conversation some of Western tradition's best writings on human life---its meaning, purpose, and significance---ranging from ancient Greek poetry to contemporary American fiction. Including ...
Additional Info:
Leading Lives That Matter draws together a wide range of texts---including fiction, autobiography, and philosophy---offering challenge and insight if you're thinking about what to do with your life. Instead of prescribing advice, Schwehn and Bass approach the vocational process as an ongoing conversation. They include in this conversation some of Western tradition's best writings on human life---its meaning, purpose, and significance---ranging from ancient Greek poetry to contemporary American fiction. Including Tolstoy's novella The Death of Ivan Illych as an extended epilogue, Leading Lives That Matter will help you clarify and deepen how you think about your own life. Includes works by Aristotle, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Frederick Buechner, Willa Cather, Dorothy Day, Annie Dillard, Robert Frost, Abraham Heschel, Thomas Lynch, John Milton, Martha Nussbaum, Theodore Roosevelt, Dorothy Sayers, Amy Tan, William Butler Yeats, and many more. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
"What makes a life significant?" (William James)
I resolve to become a jungle doctor (Albert Schweitzer)
From The ethics of authenticity (Charles Taylor)
Solitude of self (Elizabeth Cady Stanton)
From Nicomachean ethics (Aristotle)
The vigor of life (Theodore Roosevelt)
20:20-28 (Matthew)
Making the match : career choice (Lee Hardy)
Choosing (Gary D. Badcock)
The place of responsibility (Dietrich Bonheoffer)
Vocation (Frederick Buechner)
Vocation as grace (Will Campbell)
Learning in war-time (C.S. Lewis)
From Nicomachean ethics (Aristotle)
From The Iliad (Homer)
The martyrdom of Perpetua
From Therese (Dorothy Day)
Three biographical sketches (Ray Kroc)
Three biographical sketches (Iris Chang)
Three biographical sketches (Joseph "Smiley" Landrum)
Elegy written in a country churchyard (Thomas Gray)
From Just work (Russell Muirhead)
Why work? (Dorothy L. Sayers)
Two tramps in mud time (Robert Frost)
To be of use (Margaret Piercy)
The door in the wall (H.G. Wells)
From The sabbath (Abraham Joshua Heschel)
The world is too much with us and "lines composed a few miles above Tintern Abbey" (WIlliam Wordsworth)
Friendship and vocation (Gilbert Meilaender)
The changing nature of work in the United States : implications for vocation, ethics, and faith (Robert Wuthnow)
Generativity crises of my own (Bonnie Miller-McLemore)
There's no place like work (Arlie Russel Hochschild)
Defining a doctor (Abigail Zuger, M.D.)
The village blacksmith (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow)
An invisible web (Wendell Berry)
Two eulogies for Yitzhak Rabin (King Hussein and Noa Ben Artzi-Pelossof)
Living like weasels (Annie Dillard)
The choice (William Butler Yeats)
Filial relations (Jane Addams)
Interviewed by Bill Moyers (Marth Nussbaum)
25:14-30 the parable of the talents (Matthew)
On his blindness (John Milton)
From Grounding for the metaphysics of morals (Immanuel Kant)
From The life of Charlotte Bronte (Elizabeth Gaskell)
From the screenplay of Good Will Hunting (Matt Damon and Ben Affleck)
Sonny's blues (James Baldwin)
The undeclared major (Will Weaver)
Two kinds (Amy Tan)
From The autobiography of Malcolm X (Malcolm X with Alex Haley)
From The giver (Lois Lowry)
I hear them ... calling (Vincent Harding)
The ancient people (Willa Cather)
From A dresser of sycamore trees (Garret Keizer)
Invictus (William Ernest Henley)
Passed on (Thomas Lynch)
The last hours (Stephen Dunn)
The book of Jonah
A letter to his wife, 1861 (Sullivan Ballou)
Weddings (Yevgeny Yevtushenko)
From Thoughts in solitude (Thomas Merton)
The road not taken (Robert Frost)
Composing a life story (Mary Catherine Bateson)
From Jayber Crow (Wendell Berry)
From East of Eden (John Steinbeck)
An American life story (Dan McAdams)
Robert McG. Thomas, 60, chronicler of unsung lives (Michael T. Kaufman)
The death of Ivan Ilych (Leo Tolstoy)
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Student Success in College: Creating Conditions That Matter

Book
Kuh, George D., Jillian Kinzie, John H. Schuh, Elizabeth J. Whitt, and associates
2005
Jossey-Bass Publisheing
LB2343.32.S79 2005
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This book describes policies, programs, and practices that a diverse set of schools have used to promote student success, and shows how other schools can use them to improve student success in their context. Based on the Project DEEP (Documenting Effective Educational Practices) study, this book will provide concrete examples of what different types of institutions can do to help different types of students succeed in college at higher rates. ...
Additional Info:
This book describes policies, programs, and practices that a diverse set of schools have used to promote student success, and shows how other schools can use them to improve student success in their context. Based on the Project DEEP (Documenting Effective Educational Practices) study, this book will provide concrete examples of what different types of institutions can do to help different types of students succeed in college at higher rates. The broad spectrum of schools make the book applicable across institutional type, showing readers how to encourage a variety of desired outcomes including student satisfaction, persistence, learning and personal development. Coordinated by the NSSE Institute for Effective Educational Practice a the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research, the project was co-sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, the Pew Forum on Undergraduate Learning, and supported by grants from the Lumina Foundation and the Center for Inquiry in the Liberal Arts at Wabash College. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Pt. 1 Introduction
ch. 1 Student engagement : a key to student success

Pt. 2 Properties and conditions common to educationally effective colleges
ch. 2 "Living" mission and "lived" educational philosophy
ch. 3 An unshakeable focus on student learning
ch. 4 Environments adapted for educational enrichment
ch. 5 Clear pathways to student success
ch. 6 An improvement-oriented ethos
ch. 7 Shared responsibility for educational quality and student success

Pt. 3 Effective practices used at DEEP colleges and universities
ch. 8 Academic challenge
ch. 9 Active and collaborative learning
ch. 10 Student-faculty interaction
ch. 11 Enriching educational experiences
ch. 12 Supportive campus environment

Pt. 4 summary and recommendations
ch. 13 Principles for promoting student success
ch. 14 Recommendations

App. A Research methods
App. B Project DEEP research team
App. C National survey of student engagement
TTR cover image

"Critiquing Borders: Teaching About Religions in a Postcolonial World"

TTR
Ramey, Steven W.
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 4 (2006): 211-220
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
In a postcolonial environment, our students will encounter multiple representations and diverse followers of various religions outside the classroom. Students need to think critically about the representations of all religions and recognize the humanity of all people. Too often, students leave courses discussing one or more world religions with an idealized view of other religions that draws strict boundaries around the components of each religion. Bringing postcolonial thought into introductory ...
Additional Info:
In a postcolonial environment, our students will encounter multiple representations and diverse followers of various religions outside the classroom. Students need to think critically about the representations of all religions and recognize the humanity of all people. Too often, students leave courses discussing one or more world religions with an idealized view of other religions that draws strict boundaries around the components of each religion. Bringing postcolonial thought into introductory and survey courses highlights the diversity within each lived religion and encourages students to critique those strict borders and all representation of religions. Based on continuing experiments with critical theory in undergraduate classes, the six strategies presented here use the diversity of lived religions to promote critical analysis of representations of religions. These strategies move beyond the rejection of common representations by introducing set theory as an alternative framework that students can use to theorize about the complexity within religions.
TTR cover image

"Transforming to Teach: Teaching Religion to Today's Black College Student"

TTR
Coleman, Monica A.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 2 (2007): 95-100
BL41.T4
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Emerging from the particular experiences of the marginalized, postmodern pedagogies (bell hooks, Paolo Freire, feminist pedagogies) argue that education is more than conveying information from teacher to student. Rather education should encompass the transformative process of shaping character, values, and politics through the dynamic interaction among the teacher, the students' experiences, and the content of the instructional material. These perspectives argue that educators should reject "the banking model" of education, ...
Additional Info:
Emerging from the particular experiences of the marginalized, postmodern pedagogies (bell hooks, Paolo Freire, feminist pedagogies) argue that education is more than conveying information from teacher to student. Rather education should encompass the transformative process of shaping character, values, and politics through the dynamic interaction among the teacher, the students' experiences, and the content of the instructional material. These perspectives argue that educators should reject "the banking model" of education, and teach to transform. However, religious studies with today's black college student tests the mettle of these approaches. On the one hand, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have long practiced transformative education through a commitment to shaping both the minds and characters of their students. On the other hand, many of today's black college students are less receptive to transformation, particularly in the academic study of religion. This resistance to transformation is a reflection of (1) the socio-economic reality of the current student, and (2) a new black religiosity that portrays the world in binary terms. These economic and religious realities present a teaching context for which few religious scholars are prepared. This essay discusses the particularities of teaching religion to today's black college student by sharing the challenges, failures, successes, and joys of teaching religion at a small church-related, historically black women's college in the south. I will discuss the techniques that fail, and the way in which this unique context causes me to transform the way I teach religion. In the midst of a commitment to postmodern pedagogies, I feel a need to return to the banking model's establishment of authority and emphasis on content. As I negotiate with this method, I find ways to stealthily infuse transformative pedagogical techniques. I also discuss the way such a dramatic shift in pedagogy has transformed me, the teacher.
TTR cover image

"Power and Caution: The Ethics of Self-Disclosure"

TTR
Esjing, Anette
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 4 (2007): 235-243
BL41.T4
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Good teaching is both powerful and cautious. It is powerful insofar as it creates engaged students. Because an engaged mind is particularly receptive, however, good teaching is also cautious insofar as it provides students with focused guidance through the process of appropriating the learning material. This article reflects critically on expressionist pedagogy by evaluating a classroom situation in which students reacted in unexpected ways to the professor's disclosure of a ...
Additional Info:
Good teaching is both powerful and cautious. It is powerful insofar as it creates engaged students. Because an engaged mind is particularly receptive, however, good teaching is also cautious insofar as it provides students with focused guidance through the process of appropriating the learning material. This article reflects critically on expressionist pedagogy by evaluating a classroom situation in which students reacted in unexpected ways to the professor's disclosure of a personal story. It concludes that effective teaching exceeds the goal of merely facilitating student engagement. That is, the use of self-disclosure has the power to create engaged students, but it also requires cautious content consideration when facilitating post-disclosure learning. If, by using the powerful expressionist pedagogy of self-disclosure, we engage students but fail to cautiously guide them through the learning material, we have not taken seriously the ethical responsibility that teaching also implies.
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Generation Me: Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled-and More Miserable Than Ever Before

Book
Twenge, Jean M.
2006
Free Press, New York
HQ799.7.T94 2006
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Called "The Entitlement Generation" or Gen Y, they are storming into schools, colleges, and businesses all over the country. In this provocative new book, headline-making psychologist and social commentator Dr. Jean Twenge explores why the young people she calls "Generation Me" -- those born in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s -- are tolerant, confident, open-minded, and ambitious but also cynical, depressed, lonely, and anxious.
Herself a member of Generation ...
Additional Info:
Called "The Entitlement Generation" or Gen Y, they are storming into schools, colleges, and businesses all over the country. In this provocative new book, headline-making psychologist and social commentator Dr. Jean Twenge explores why the young people she calls "Generation Me" -- those born in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s -- are tolerant, confident, open-minded, and ambitious but also cynical, depressed, lonely, and anxious.
Herself a member of Generation Me, Dr. Twenge uses findings from the largest intergenerational research study ever conducted -- with data from 1.3 million respondents spanning six decades -- to reveal how profoundly different today's young adults are. Here are the often shocking truths about this generation, including dramatic differences in sexual behavior, as well as controversial predictions about what the future holds for them and society as a whole. Her often humorous, eyebrow-raising stories about real people vividly bring to life the hopes and dreams, disappointments and challenges of Generation Me.
GenMe has created a profound shift in the American character, changing what it means to be an individual in today's society. The collision of this generation's entitled self-focus and today's competitive marketplace will create one of the most daunting challenges of the new century. Engaging, controversial, prescriptive, funny, Generation Me will give Boomers new insight into their offspring, and help those in their teens, 20s, and 30s finally make sense of themselves and their goals and find their road to happiness. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 You Don't Need Their Approval: The Decline of Social Rules
ch. 2 An Army of One: Me
ch. 3 You Can Be Anything You Want to Be
ch. 4 The Age of Anxiety (and Depression, and Loneliness): Generation Stressed
ch. 5 Yeah, Right: The Belief That There's No Point in Trying
ch. 6 Sex: Generation Prude Meets Generation Crude
ch. 7 The Equality Revolution: Minorities, Women, and Gays and Lesbians
ch. 8 Applying Our Knowledge: The Future of Business and the Future of the Young

Appendix
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
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Inside the Undergraduate Experience: The University of Washington's Study of Undergraduate Learning

Book
Beyer, Catharine Hoffman, Gerald M. Gillmore and Andrew T. Fisher
2007
Anker Publishing Company, Inc., now part of Jossey-Bass, an imprint of Wiley, San Francisco, CA
LD5753.B49 2007
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The University of Washington’s Study of Undergraduate Learning (UW SOUL) tracked 304 entering freshmen and transfer students as they moved through their college experience from fall 1999 to spring 2003. Unparalleled in its scope, this longitudinal study focused on six areas of learning: writing, critical thinking/problem solving, quantitative reasoning, information literacy, understanding and appreciating diversity, and personal growth. This book provides faculty, staff, and administrators at two- and four-year institutions with ...
Additional Info:
The University of Washington’s Study of Undergraduate Learning (UW SOUL) tracked 304 entering freshmen and transfer students as they moved through their college experience from fall 1999 to spring 2003. Unparalleled in its scope, this longitudinal study focused on six areas of learning: writing, critical thinking/problem solving, quantitative reasoning, information literacy, understanding and appreciating diversity, and personal growth. This book provides faculty, staff, and administrators at two- and four-year institutions with a model of assessment that both captures the complexity of the undergraduate experience and offers practical information about how to improve teaching and learning. Data from surveys, open-ended email questions, interviews, focus groups, and portfolios make it possible for the authors to create case studies of individual learning paths over time, as well as to report the group’s aggregate experience. Honoring the authenticity of student voices, this book illuminates the central roles played by the academic disciplines and by faculty in undergraduate learning, offering powerful evidence for the argument that assessment of student learning is most complete and most useful when conducted at the department level. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword.
Acknowledgments.

ch. 1 Introduction.
ch. 2 Reserach Process.
ch. 3 Personal Growth.
ch. 4 Understanding and Appreciating Diversity.
ch. 5 Critical Thinking and Problem Solving.
ch. 6 Writing.
ch. 7 Quantitative Reasoning.
ch. 8 Information Technology and Literacy.
ch. 9 General Learning.
ch. 10 Summary and Last Words.

Bibliography.
Index.
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Understanding Students in Transition: Trends and Issues

Book
Laanan, Frankie Santos, ed.
2006
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2343.4.U63 2006
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
This volume provides the latest recommendations on how to address the needs of students in transition at the collegiate level. Understanding Students in Transition covers transitions affecting recent high school graduates, community college transfer students, older adults returning to education, and students displaced by natural disasters.
Addressing the needs of students in the midst of change, particularly those who are part of the "millennial generation" (those born between 1982 and 2003), ...
Additional Info:
This volume provides the latest recommendations on how to address the needs of students in transition at the collegiate level. Understanding Students in Transition covers transitions affecting recent high school graduates, community college transfer students, older adults returning to education, and students displaced by natural disasters.
Addressing the needs of students in the midst of change, particularly those who are part of the "millennial generation" (those born between 1982 and 2003), requires a full understanding of today's students and what they bring to their new college experience. Understanding Students in Transition is designed for practitioners looking to understand the changing landscape of today's college students. Articles present a mix of research and practical issues that will be relevant and useful to various stakeholders on a college or university campus. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes

ch. 1 Lessons Learned: Achieving Institutional Change in Support of Students in Transition (Mary Stuart Hunter)
ch. 2 Beyond Demographics: Understanding the College Experience Through Television (Barbara F. Tobolowsky)
ch. 3 Promoting New-Student Success: Assessing Academic Development and Achievement Among First-Year Students (Jennifer R. Keup)
ch. 4 Who Will We Serve in the Future? The New Student in Transition (Jaime Lester)
ch. 5 International Students in Transition: Changes in Access to U.S. Higher Education (Soko S. Starobin)
ch. 6 Adult Learners in Transition (Jonathan I. Compton, Elizabeth Cox, Frankie Santos Laanan)
ch. 7 Increasing Retention and Success of Students of Color at Research-Extensive Universities (Steven R. Aragon, Mario Rios Perez)
ch. 8 Forced Transitions: The Impact of Natural Disasters and Other Events on College Students (John H. Schuh, Frankie Santos Laanan)

Index
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Most College Students Are Women: Implications for Teaching, Learning, and Policy

Book
Allen, Jeanie K., Diane R. Dean, and Susan J. Bracken, eds.
2008
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC1756.M67 2008
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
* Reveals continuing barriers to success for women students
* Offers remedies that will benefit all students
What are the realities behind recent press reports suggesting that women students have taken over higher education, both outnumbering males and academically outperforming them? Does women's development during college diverge from the commonly accepted model of cognitive growth? Does pedagogy in higher education take into account their different ways of knowing? Are there ...
Additional Info:
* Reveals continuing barriers to success for women students
* Offers remedies that will benefit all students
What are the realities behind recent press reports suggesting that women students have taken over higher education, both outnumbering males and academically outperforming them? Does women's development during college diverge from the commonly accepted model of cognitive growth? Does pedagogy in higher education take into account their different ways of knowing? Are there still barriers to women's educational achievement?
In answering these questions, this book's overarching message is that the application of research on women's college experiences has enriched teaching and learning for all students. It describes the broad benefits of new pedagogical models, and how feminist education aligns with the new call for civic education for all students.
The book also examines conditions and disciplines that remain barriers for women's educational success, particularly in quantitative and scientific fields. It explores problems that arise at the intersection of race and gender and offers some transformative approaches. It considers the impact of the campus environment—such as the rise of binge drinking, sexual assault, and homophobic behaviors—on women students' progress, and suggests means for improving the peer culture for all students. It concludes with an auto-narrative analysis of teaching women's studies to undergraduates that offers insights into the practicalities and joys of teaching.
At a time when women constitute the majority of students on most campuses, this book offers insights for all teachers, male and female, into how tohelp them to excel; and at the same time how to engage all their students, in all their diversity, through the application of feminist pedagogy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Women Learners on Campus: What Do We Know and What Have We Done?

ch. 1 Feminist and Civic Education: Bridging Parallel Approaches to Teaching and Learning (Becky Ropers-Huilman, Betsy Palmer)
ch. 2 Learning Partnerships: A Gender-Inclusive Model for Undergraduate Teaching (Baxter Magolda)
ch. 3 Effective Practices in Fostering Developmental Growth In Women Learners: A View from Neurophysiology (Kathleen Taylor, Catherine Marienau)
ch. 4 Women in Technology Careers (Teri Sosa)
ch. 5 Helping Women Improve Statistics Learning Online Through Authentic Learning And Emotional Intelligence (Marilyn K. Simon)
ch. 6 Examining The Baggage: First Steps Toward Transforming Habits of Mind Around Race in Higher Education (Crystal Gafford Muhammad, Adrienne Dixson)
ch. 7 Is Mona Lisa Still Smiling?: Women and the Out-of-Class Experience (Jeanie K. Allen)
ch. 8 Submerged Feminism(s)?: Perceptions of Adult Education Student Experiences With Women's Studies Scholarship (Susan J. Bracken)
Conclusion: Back(lash) To The Future (Jeanie K. Allen, Diane R. Dean, Susan J. Bracken)

Index
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Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives

Book
Palfrey, John, and Urs Gasser
2008
Basic Books, New York
HM851.P34 2008
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
The first generation of “digital natives” – children who were born into and raised in the digital world – are coming of age, and soon our world will be reshaped in their image. Our economy, our cultural life, even the shape of our family life will be forever transformed.
But who are these digital natives? How are they different from older generations – or “digital immigrants” – and what is the world they’...
Additional Info:
The first generation of “digital natives” – children who were born into and raised in the digital world – are coming of age, and soon our world will be reshaped in their image. Our economy, our cultural life, even the shape of our family life will be forever transformed.
But who are these digital natives? How are they different from older generations – or “digital immigrants” – and what is the world they’re creating going to look like? In Born Digital, leading internet and technology experts John Palfrey and Urs Gasser offer a sociological portrait of this exotic tribe of young people who can seem, even to those merely a generation older, both extraordinarily sophisticated and strangely narrow.
Based on original research, Born Digital explores a broad range of issues, from the highly philosophical to the purely practical: What does identity mean for young people who have dozens of online profiles and avatars? Should we worry about privacy issues – or is privacy even a relevant concern for digital natives? How does the concept of safety translate into an increasingly virtual world? Is “stranger-danger” a real problem, or a red herring? What lies ahead – socially, professionally, and psychologically – for this generation?
A smart, practical guide to a brave new world and its complex inhabitants, Born Digital will be essential reading for parents, teachers, and the myriad of confused adults who want to understand the digital present – and shape the digital future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Identities
ch. 2 Dossiers
ch. 3 Privacy
ch. 4 Safety
ch. 5 Creators
ch. 6 Pirates
ch. 7 Quality
ch. 8 Overload
ch. 9 Aggressors
ch. 10 Innovators
ch. 11 Learners
ch. 12 Activists
ch. 13 Synthesis

Acknowledgments
Notes
Glossary
Selected Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Teaching Religion and Film

Book
Watkins, Gregory J., ed.
2008
Oxford University Press, Oxford
PN1995.9.T37 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
In a culture increasingly focused on visual media, students have learned not only to embrace multimedia presentations in the classroom, but to expect them. Such expectations are perhaps more prevalent in a field as dynamic and cross-disciplinary as religious studies, but the practice nevertheless poses some difficult educational issues — the use of movies in academic coursework has far outpaced the scholarship on teaching religion and film. What does it mean ...
Additional Info:
In a culture increasingly focused on visual media, students have learned not only to embrace multimedia presentations in the classroom, but to expect them. Such expectations are perhaps more prevalent in a field as dynamic and cross-disciplinary as religious studies, but the practice nevertheless poses some difficult educational issues — the use of movies in academic coursework has far outpaced the scholarship on teaching religion and film. What does it mean to utilize film in religious studies, and what are the best ways to do it?
In Teaching Religion and Film, an interdisciplinary team of scholars thinks about the theoretical and pedagogical concerns involved with the intersection of film and religion in the classroom. They examine the use of film to teach specific religious traditions, religious theories, and perspectives on fundamental human values. Some instructors already teach some version of a film-and-religion course, and many have integrated film as an ancillary to achieving central course goals. This collection of essays helps them understand the field better and draws the sharp distinction between merely "watching movies" in the classroom and comprehending film in an informed and critical way. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction Teaching Religion and Film Gregory J. Watkins

Part I Establishing Shot: Viewing the Field of Religion and Film
ch. 1 What Are We Teaching When We Teach "Religion and Film"? (William L. Blizek and Michele Desmarais)
ch. 2 Teaching Religion and Film: A Fourth Approach (Conrad Ostwalt)

Part II Film and the Teaching of Religious Traditions
ch. 3 Teaching Biblical Tourism: How Sword-and-Sandal Films Clouded My Vision (Alice Bach)
ch. 4 Designing a Course on Religion and Cinema in India (Gayatri Chatterjeee)
ch. 5 Buddhism, Film, and Religious Knowing: Challenging the Literary Approach to Film (Francisca Cho)
ch. 6 The Pedagogical Challenges of Finding Christ Figures in Film (Christopher Deacy)
ch. 7 Film and the Introduction to Islam Course (Amir Hussain)
ch. 8 Is It All about Love Actually? Sentimentality as Problem and Opportunity in the Use of Film for Teaching Theology and Religion (Clive Marsh)
ch. 9 Women, Theology, and Film: Approaching the Challenge of Interdisciplinary Teaching (Gaye Williams Ortiz)

Part III The Religious Studies Approach
ch. 10 Seeing Is Believing, but Touching's the Truth: Religion, Film, and the Anthropology of the Senses (Richard M. Carp)
ch. 11 There Is No Spoon? Teaching The Matrix, Postperennialism, and the Spiritual Logic of Late Capitalism (Gregory Grieve)
ch. 12 Teaching Film as Religion (John Lyden)
ch. 13 Filmmaking and World Making: Re-Creating Time and Space in Myth and Film (S. Brent Plate)
ch. 14 Introducing Theories of Religion through Film: A Sample Syllabus (Greg Watkins)

Part IV The Values Approach
ch. 15 Touching Evil, Touching Good (Irena S. M. Makarushka)
ch. 16 Teaching Ethics with Film: A Course on the Moral Agency of Women (Ellen Ott Marshall)
ch. 17 Searching for Peace in Films about Genocide (Jolyon Mitchell)

Index
Cover image

It's All About Jesus! Faith as an Oppositional Collegiate Subculture

Book
Peter Magolda and Kelsey Ebben Gross
2009
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC383.M324 2009
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
What it is like to be a collegian involved in a Christian organization on a public college campus? What roles do Christian organizations play in the lives of college students enrolled in a public college? What are evangelical student organizations’ political agendas, and how do they mobilize members to advance these agendas? What is the optimal equilibrium between the secular and the sacred within public higher education? What constitutes safe ...
Additional Info:
What it is like to be a collegian involved in a Christian organization on a public college campus? What roles do Christian organizations play in the lives of college students enrolled in a public college? What are evangelical student organizations’ political agendas, and how do they mobilize members to advance these agendas? What is the optimal equilibrium between the secular and the sacred within public higher education? What constitutes safe space for evangelical students, and who should provide this space?

This book presents a two-year ethnographic study of a collegiate evangelical student organization on a public university, authored by two “non-evangelicals.” The authors provide a glimpse into the lives of college students who join evangelical student organizations and who subscribe to an evangelical way of life during their college years. They offer empirically derived insights as to how students’ participation in a homogeneous evangelical student organization enhances their satisfaction of their collegiate experience and helps them develop important life lessons and skills. Ironically, while Christian students represent the religious majority on the campus under study, Christian organizations on this campus mobilize members by capitalizing on members’ shared sense of marginalization, and position themselves as cultural outsiders. This evangelical student organization serves as a safe space for students to express their faith within the larger secular university setting.

The narratives and interpretations aim not only to enrich understanding of a particular student organization but more importantly to spark intellectual discourse about the valueof faith-based organizations within public higher education. The role of religion in public higher education, student involvement in the co-curriculum, and peer education are three examples of critical issues in higher education for which this idiosyncratic case study offers broad understanding.

It’s All About Jesus! targets multiple audiences – both sacred and secular. For readers unfamiliar with evangelical collegiate organizations and the students they serve, the authors hope the narratives make the unfamiliar familiar and the dubious obvious. For evangelicals, the authors hope that the thickly described narratives not only make the familiar, familiar and the obvious, obvious, but also uncover the tacit meaning embedded in these familiar, but seldom examined subculture rituals.

The authors hope this book spurs discussion on topics such as campus power and politics, how organizations interact with the secular world around them, and how members can improve their organizations. Additionally, this text urges secular readers in student affairs to consider the many benefits, as well as liabilities, of “parachurches” as co-curricular learning sites on campus.

Lastly, given that the authors lay bare their methodology, their use of theory, and the tensions between their perspectives and those of the participants, this book will serve as a compelling case study for courses on qualitative research within religion studies, anthropology, sociology, and cultural studies fields. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword

ch. 1 Jesus and Higher Education Rituals of Faith
ch. 2 Research Processes Rituals of Inquiry
ch. 3 Researchers' Tales Rituals of Disclosure
ch. 4 Evolving Christians Precollege Evangelical Rituals
ch. 5 God's Squad Rituals of Recruitment
ch. 6 Praise Jesus Rituals of Difference
ch. 7 Getting To Really Know Jesus Teaching and Learning Rituals
ch. 8 Bridging the Gap between Evangelicals and Nonbelievers Outreach Rituals
ch. 9 Leading by Following Jesus Servant Leadership Rituals
ch. 10 From College Seniors to Real-World Evangelicals Transition Rituals
ch. 11 The Chosen Rituals of Vocation
ch. 12 SSC Revelations and Reconciliations Rituals of Understanding
ch. 13 Capstone Principles Exit Rituals
ch. 14 It's all about Jesus The Last Word

Notes
References
Index
Additional Info:
A media expert explains how and why the digital migration is transforming youth culture, identity, and everyday life
 
For the first time in over fifty years, television is no longer our dominant medium: young people are now spending an average of six to eight hours a day online. Watkins contends that most teens and twenty-somethings migrate online to share their lives with friends—something television simply cannot offer—...
Additional Info:
A media expert explains how and why the digital migration is transforming youth culture, identity, and everyday life
 
For the first time in over fifty years, television is no longer our dominant medium: young people are now spending an average of six to eight hours a day online. Watkins contends that most teens and twenty-somethings migrate online to share their lives with friends—something television simply cannot offer—and the ubiquitous presence of cell phones, laptops, and iPods places them at the center of our evolving digital landscape.
In The Young and the Digital, Watkins skillfully draws from more than five hundred surveys and three hundred and fifty in-depth interviews with young people, parents, and educators to understand how a digital lifestyle is affecting the ways youth learn, play, bond, and communicate. Timely and deeply relevant, the book covers the influence of MySpace and Facebook, the growing appetite for “anytime, anywhere” media and “fast entertainment,” how online “digital gates” reinforce race and class divisions, and how technology is transforming America’s classrooms. Watkins also debunks popular myths surrounding cyberpredators, Internet addiction, and social isolation. The result is a fascinating portrait, both celebratory and wary, about the coming of age of the first fully wired generation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Digital Migration: Young People's Historic Move to the Online World
ch. 2 Social Media 101: What Schools are Learning about Themselves and Young Technology Users
ch. 3 The Very Well Connected: Friending, Bonding, and Community in the Digital Age
ch. 4 Digital Gates: How Race and Class Distinctions Are Shaping the Digital World
ch. 5 We Play: The Allure of Social Games, Synthetic Worlds, and Second Lives
ch. 6 Hooked: Rethinking the Internet Addiction Debate
ch. 7 Now! Fast Entertainment and Multitasking in an Always-On World
ch. 8 "May I have your attention?": The Consequences of Anytime, Anywhere Technology

Conclusion A Message from Barack: What the Young and the Digital Means for Our Political Future
The Making of This Book: Research, Methods, and Acknowledgments
Notes
Index
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Wabash tree

"Obstacles To Open Discussion and Critical Thinking The Grinnell College Study"

Article
Trosset, Carol
1998
Change (Washington, DC, September/October 1998)
Topics: Discussion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
A Grinnell College (Iowa) study investigated whether students (n=200) felt that balanced discussion of racial/diversity issues was possible and why they did or did not want to discuss the issues. Most thought balanced discussion was impossible, feared a single viewpoint would dominate, and feared reprisal for speaking against the dominant perspective. Further findings and implications are discussed.
Additional Info:
A Grinnell College (Iowa) study investigated whether students (n=200) felt that balanced discussion of racial/diversity issues was possible and why they did or did not want to discuss the issues. Most thought balanced discussion was impossible, feared a single viewpoint would dominate, and feared reprisal for speaking against the dominant perspective. Further findings and implications are discussed.
TTR cover image

"Promoting Freedom, Responsibility, and Learning in the Classroom: The Learning Covenant a Decade Later"

TTR
Glennon, Fred
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 1 (2008): 32-41
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This essay discusses an approach to teaching religious studies in a general education or core curriculum that I have experimented with for the last decade, which I call the "Learning Covenant." The Learning Covenant brings together various pedagogical theories, including transformational, experiential, contract, and cooperative learning, in an attempt to address diverse learning styles, multiple intelligences, and student learning assessment. It has advantages over more traditional teacher-directed approaches to teaching, ...
Additional Info:
This essay discusses an approach to teaching religious studies in a general education or core curriculum that I have experimented with for the last decade, which I call the "Learning Covenant." The Learning Covenant brings together various pedagogical theories, including transformational, experiential, contract, and cooperative learning, in an attempt to address diverse learning styles, multiple intelligences, and student learning assessment. It has advantages over more traditional teacher-directed approaches to teaching, including meeting student resistance to "required" courses head-on by inviting them to identify learning needs regardless of chosen vocation and meeting them in the context of a religious studies course, recognizing the multiple ways in which students learn and providing a variety of opportunities for students to express their learning, and allowing students opportunity to take increased responsibility for their own learning. The essay will focus on the Learning Covenant's development, components, strengths, and drawbacks.
TTR cover image

"The Sage and the South: Teaching Confucianism in Dixie"

TTR
Richey, Jeffrey L.
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 2 (2008): 82-86
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
White and African-American students in the American South are able to meet and learn from Confucianism on its own terms much more readily than their peers elsewhere. This is because of their tendency to respect authority, participate in intergenerational ritual performances (especially those concerned with manners, meals, and mortuary practices), and judge the present in terms of the past (especially the U.S. Civil War). This is true despite the ...
Additional Info:
White and African-American students in the American South are able to meet and learn from Confucianism on its own terms much more readily than their peers elsewhere. This is because of their tendency to respect authority, participate in intergenerational ritual performances (especially those concerned with manners, meals, and mortuary practices), and judge the present in terms of the past (especially the U.S. Civil War). This is true despite the incompatibility that many southern students sense between Confucianism and their own religious doctrines. Instead, southern students' grasp of Confucianism rests on the grounds of lived religious experience. When southern students learn to see in Confucianism a set of beliefs, practices, and experiences that, in some ways, mirror their own, they are empowered to identify the tradition as "religious" in a way that renders "religion" a descriptive category of comparison rather than a limiting category of unique identity.
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

"The Ethics of Effective Teaching: Challenges from the Religious Right and Critical Pedagogy"

TTR
Trelstad, Marit
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 4 (2008): 191-202
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
This essay asks: What are the ethics of engaging self-identified "conservative" students in topics and processes of learning that may unravel their world-view and possibly their personal lives? We should take their concerns, fear, and distrust seriously and not simply dismiss them as ignorant. We should strive to be "trustworthy" educators, guiding students through the consequences of transformative education. This paper argues that conservative students are critically examining and reacting ...
Additional Info:
This essay asks: What are the ethics of engaging self-identified "conservative" students in topics and processes of learning that may unravel their world-view and possibly their personal lives? We should take their concerns, fear, and distrust seriously and not simply dismiss them as ignorant. We should strive to be "trustworthy" educators, guiding students through the consequences of transformative education. This paper argues that conservative students are critically examining and reacting to the liberal academy by leveling critiques similar to those found within feminist, post-colonial and post modern pedagogies. This essay reviews contemporary postmodern, postcolonial, and feminist pedagogies, which analyze bias and power in the classroom and have sought to represent marginalized voices in the classroom in order to challenge the way education often simply serves and protects the interests of the privileged. Pedagogies centered on subject or disciplinary method cannot secure a trustworthy pedagogy since method, thinking skills, and subjects are themselves bias-laden. But critical pedagogy offers insights to help us achieve the goal of becoming trustworthy educators for students coming from a wide spectrum of religious perspectives.
TTR cover image

"Role-Playing and Religion: Using Games to Educate Millennials"

TTR
Porter, Adam L.
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 4 (2008): 230-235
BL41.T4
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs   |   Role-Playing

Additional Info:
I have been experimenting with using role-playing and games in my religion classes for several years and have found that students respond well to these pedagogical tools and methods. After reviewing my experiences, I explore the reasons for students' positive response. I argue that role-playing games capitalize on our students' educational expectations and fondness for game-play, by drawing them into exploring significant texts and ideas. Of particular interest for religion ...
Additional Info:
I have been experimenting with using role-playing and games in my religion classes for several years and have found that students respond well to these pedagogical tools and methods. After reviewing my experiences, I explore the reasons for students' positive response. I argue that role-playing games capitalize on our students' educational expectations and fondness for game-play, by drawing them into exploring significant texts and ideas. Of particular interest for religion and theology professors, these sorts of games also encourage empathy towards other viewpoints.
TTR cover image

"Yes, I Use a Textbook (Now)"

TTR
Cloutier, David
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 354-355
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
TTR cover image

"How to Learn from World Religion Textbooks"

TTR
Derris, Karen
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 356-357
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
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The College Fear Factor: How Students and Professors Misunderstand One Another

Book
Rebecca D. Cox
2009
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2328.C77 2009
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
They’re not the students strolling across the bucolic liberal arts campuses where their grandfathers played football. They are first-generation college students—children of immigrants and blue-collar workers—who know that their hopes for success hinge on a degree.

But college is expensive, unfamiliar, and intimidating. Inexperienced students expect tough classes and demanding, remote faculty. They may not know what an assignment means, what a score indicates, or ...
Additional Info:
They’re not the students strolling across the bucolic liberal arts campuses where their grandfathers played football. They are first-generation college students—children of immigrants and blue-collar workers—who know that their hopes for success hinge on a degree.

But college is expensive, unfamiliar, and intimidating. Inexperienced students expect tough classes and demanding, remote faculty. They may not know what an assignment means, what a score indicates, or that a single grade is not a definitive measure of ability. And they certainly don’t feel entitled to be there. They do not presume success, and if they have a problem, they don’t expect to receive help or even a second chance.

Rebecca D. Cox draws on five years of interviews and observations at community colleges. She shows how students and their instructors misunderstand and ultimately fail one another, despite good intentions. Most memorably, she describes how easily students can feel defeated—by their real-world responsibilities and by the demands of college—and come to conclude that they just don’t belong there after all.

Eye-opening even for experienced faculty and administrators, The College Fear Factor reveals how the traditional college culture can actually pose obstacles to students’ success, and suggests strategies for effectively explaining academic expectations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Today's College Students

Part 1: Students
ch. 2 The Student Fear Factor
ch. 3 Student Aspirations: Getting the Biggest Bang for the Buck
ch. 4 "How Is That Helping Us?"

Part 2: Classroom Dynamics
ch. 5 College Teaching
ch. 6 Professors Who "Come Down to Our Level"

Part 3: Gatekeeping
ch. 7 Academic Literacies
ch. 8 Reimagining College from the Inside Out

Appendix: The Research Studies
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
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Student Engagement Techniques: A Handbook for College Faculty

Book
Elizabeth F. Barkely
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2331.B34 2010
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Keeping students involved, motivated, and actively learning is challenging educators across the country,yet good advice on how to accomplish this has not been readily available. Student Engagement Techniques is a comprehensive resource that offers college teachers a dynamic model for engaging students and includes over one hundred tips, strategies, and techniques that have been proven to help teachers from a wide variety of disciplines and institutions motivate and connect ...
Additional Info:
Keeping students involved, motivated, and actively learning is challenging educators across the country,yet good advice on how to accomplish this has not been readily available. Student Engagement Techniques is a comprehensive resource that offers college teachers a dynamic model for engaging students and includes over one hundred tips, strategies, and techniques that have been proven to help teachers from a wide variety of disciplines and institutions motivate and connect with their students. The ready-to-use format shows how to apply each of the book's techniques in the classroom and includes purpose, preparation, procedures, examples, online implementation, variations and extensions, observations and advice, and key resources.

"Given the current and welcome surge of interest in improving student learning and success, this guide is a timely and important tool, sharply focused on practical strategies that can really matter." Kay McClenney, director, Center for Community College Student Engagement, Community College Leadership Program, the University of Texas at Austin

"This book is a 'must' for every new faculty orientation program; it not only emphasizes the importance of concentrating on what students learn but provides clear steps to prepare and execute an engagement technique. Faculty looking for ideas to heighten student engagement in their courses will find usefultechniques that can be adopted, adapted, extended, or modified."Bob Smallwood, cocreator of CLASSE (Classroom Survey of Student Engagement) and assistant to the provost for assessment, Office of Institutional Effectiveness, University of Alabama

"Elizabeth Barkley'sencyclopedia of active learning techniques (here called SETs) combines both a solid discussion of the research on learning that supports the concept of engagement and real-life examples of these approaches to teaching in action." James Rhem, executive editor, The National Teaching & Learning Forum (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author

Part One: A Conceptual Framework for Understanding Student Engagement

ch. 1 What Does Student Engagement Mean?
ch. 2 Student Engagement and Motivation.
ch. 3 Student Engagement and Active Learning
ch. 4 Promoting Synergy Between Engagement and Active Learning
ch. 5 Additional Facets to Consider
ch. 6 From Theory to Practice: Teachers Talk About Student Engagement

Part Two: Tips and Strategies

ch. 7 Tips and Strategies for Fostering Motivation

T/S 1 Expect engagement
T/S 2 Develop and display the qualities of engaging teachers
T/S 3 Use behaviorist-based strategies to reward learning rather than behavior
T/S 4 Use praise and criticism effectively
T/S 5 Attend to students' basic needs so that they can focus on the higher-level needs required for learning
T/S 6 Promote student autonomy
T/S 7 Teach things worth learning
T/S 8 Integrate goals, activities, and assessment
T/S 9 Craft engaging learning tasks
T/S 10 Incorporate competition appropriately
T/S 11 Expect students to succeed
T/S 12 Help students expect to succeed
T/S 13 Try to rebuild the confidence of discouraged and disengaged students

ch. 8 Tips and Strategies for Promoting Active Learning

T/S 14 Be clear on your learning goals
T/S 15 Clarify your role
T/S 16 Orient students to their new roles
T/S 17 Help students develop learning strategies
T/S 18 Activate prior learning
T/S 19 Teach in ways that promote effective transfer
T/S 20 Teach for retention
T/S 21 Limit and chunk information
T/S 22 Provide opportunities for guided practice and rehearsal
T/S 23 Organize lectures in ways that promote active learning
T/S 24 Use reverse or inverted classroom organization
T/S 25 Use rubrics to give learners frequent and useful feedback

ch. 9 Tips and Strategies for Building Community

T/S 26 Move away from an authoritarian role
T/S 27 Promote class civility
T/S 28 Create a physical or online course environment that supports community
T/S 29 Reduce anonymity: Learn students' names and help students learn each other’s names
T/S 30 Use icebreakers to warm up the class
T/S 31 Use technology to extend or reinforce community
T/S 32 Be consciously inclusive
T/S 33 Subdivide large classes into smaller groupings
T/S 34 Involve all students in discussion
T/S 35 Use group work effectively
T/S 36 Revisit icebreaker kinds of activities later in the term
T/S 37 Celebrate community

ch. 10 Tips and Strategies for Ensuring Students Are Appropriately Challenged

T/S 38 Assess students' starting points
T/S 39 Monitor class pacing
T/S 40 Help students learn to self-assess
T/S 41 Differentiate course elements to meet individual student needs
T/S 42 Use scaffolding to provide assistance for complex learning

ch. 11 Tips and Strategies for Teaching for Holistic Learning

T/S 43 Pick up the pace to hold attention
T/S 44 Offer options for non-linear learning
T/S 45 Use principles of universal design
T/S 46 Incorporate games
T/S 47 Teach so that students use multiple processing modes
T/S 48 Incorporate multiple domains when identifying learning goals
T/S 49 Include learning activities that involve physical movement
T/S 50 Consider creating a “graphic syllabus”

Part Three: Student Engagement Techniques (SETs)

Category I. Techniques to Engage Students in Learning Course-Related Knowledge and Skills

ch. 12 Knowledge, Skills, Recall, and Understanding

SET 1 Background Knowledge Probe
SET 2 Artifacts
SET 3 Focused Reading Notes
SET 4 Quotes
SET 5 Stations
SET 6 Team Jeopardy
SET 7 Seminar

ch. 13 Analysis and Critical Thinking

SET 8 Classify
SET 9 Frames
SET 10 Believing and Doubting
SET 11 Academic Controversy
SET 12 Split-Room Debate
SET 13 Analytic Teams
SET 14 Book Club
SET 15 Small Group Tutorials

ch. 14 Synthesis and Creative Thinking

SET 16 Team Concept Maps
SET 17 Variations
SET 18 Letters
SET 19 Role Play
SET 20 Poster Sessions
SET 21 Class Book
SET 22 WebQuests

ch. 15 Problem Solving

SET 23 What's the Problem?
SET 24 Think Again
SET 25 Think-Aloud-Pair-Problem Solving (TAPPS)
SET 26 Proclamations
SET 27 Send-a-Problem
SET 28 Case Studies

ch. 16 Application and Performance

SET 29 Contemporary Issues Journals
SET 30 Hearing the Subject
SET 31 Directed Paraphrase
SET 32 Insights-Resources-Application (IRAs)
SET 33 Jigsaw
SET 34 Field Trips

Category II. Techniques for Developing Learner Attitudes, Values, and Self-Awareness

ch. 17 Attitudes and Values

SET 35 Autobiographical Reflections
SET 36 Dyadic Interviews
SET 37 Circular Response
SET 38 Ethical Dilemmas
SET 39 Connected Communities
SET 40 Stand Where You Stand

ch. 18 Self-Awareness as Learners

SET 41 Learning Logs
SET 42 Critical Incident Questionnaire (CIQ)
SET 43 Go for the Goal
SET 4 Post-test Analysis

ch. 19 Learning and Study Skills

SET 4 In-class Portfolio
SET 46 Resource Scavenger Hunt
SET 47 Formative Quiz
SET 48 Crib Cards
SET 49 Student-Generated Rubrics
SET 50 Triad Listening

Appendix A: Key to Courses and Professors in SET Examples
Appendix B: NSSE/SET Crosswalk Tables

References
Index
Cover image

Designing Courses for Significant Learning: Voices of Experience

Book
L. Dee Fink, Arletta Knight Fink, eds.
2009
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 119)
LB2361.D47 2009
Topics: Course Design   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Higher education today is being called on to deliver a new and more powerful kind of education, one that prepares students to be more engaged citizens, better equipped to solve complex problems at work and better prepared to lead meaningful lives individually.

To respond to this call, teachers in colleges and universities need to learn how to design more powerful kinds of learning into their courses. In 2003, Dee ...
Additional Info:
Higher education today is being called on to deliver a new and more powerful kind of education, one that prepares students to be more engaged citizens, better equipped to solve complex problems at work and better prepared to lead meaningful lives individually.

To respond to this call, teachers in colleges and universities need to learn how to design more powerful kinds of learning into their courses. In 2003, Dee Fink published a seminal book, Creating Significant Learning Experiences, that offered teachers two major tools for meeting this need: the Taxonomy of Significant Learning and the model of Integrated Course Design. Since that time, educators around the world have found Finks ideas both visionary and inspiring.

This issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning contains multiple stories of how college-level teachers have used these ideas in a variety of teaching situations, with subject matter ranging from the sciences to the humanities. Their conclusion? The ideas in Finks book truly make a difference. When used properly, they lead to major improvements in the level of student engagement and the quality of student learning! This is the 119th volume of the Jossey-Bass higher education quarterly report series New Directions for Teaching and Learning, which offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Shoeboxes and Taxes: Integrated Course Design Unleashes New Creativity for a Veteran Teacher (Marsha M. Huber)
ch. 2 Bringing Language to Life in Second-Year Spanish (Debra Dimon Davis)
ch. 3 More Significant and Intentional Learning in the Economics Classroom (Laurence Miners, Kathryn Nantz)
ch. 4 Inspiration and Intellect: Significant Learning in Musical Forms and Analysis (Bruce C. Kelly)
ch. 5 Using Fink's Integrated Course Design: How a Book Changed Our Students' Learning, Our University, and Ourselves (Carolyn R. Fallahi, Laura E. Levine, Joan M. Nicoll-Senft, Jack T. Tessier , Cheryl L. Watson, Rebecca M. Wood)
ch. 6 Using Integrated Course Design to Build Student Communities of Practice in a Hybrid Course (Harriet R. Fayne)
ch. 7 Integrating Big Questions with Real-World Applications: Gradual Redesign in Philosophy and Art History (Marice Rose, Roben Torosyan)
ch. 8 Integrated Design of a Virology Course Develops Lifelong Learners (Joseph C. Mester)
ch. 9 An "Extreme Makeover" of a Course in Special Education (Joan M. Nicoll-Senft)
ch. 10 Sooner City: Reflections on a Curriculum Reform Project (Randall L . Kolar, David A. Sabatini, K.K. Muraleetharan)
ch. 11 Still Learning (L. Dee Fink)
ch. 12 Lessons We Can Learn from the Voices of Experience (Arletta Knight Fink, L. Dee Fink)

Index
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Helping College Students Find Purpose: The Campus Guide to Meaning-Making

Book
Nash,Robert J. and Michele C. Murray
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LA227.4.N36 2010
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Praise for Helping College Students Find Purpose

A generous and inspiring book! In the spirit of 'convocation,' Nash and Murray call together both university faculty and student affairs professionals to provide them new means for helping more college students realize the highest purpose of higher education—that, in pursuing the means to make a living, one comes to make a meaning worth living for.

Educators ...
Additional Info:
Praise for Helping College Students Find Purpose

A generous and inspiring book! In the spirit of 'convocation,' Nash and Murray call together both university faculty and student affairs professionals to provide them new means for helping more college students realize the highest purpose of higher education—that, in pursuing the means to make a living, one comes to make a meaning worth living for.

Educators across campuses—faculty and administrators alike—will find in this book not only the importance of helping their students construct meaning upon which to base their academic and life ambitions, but also practical suggestions for doing so. Ultimately, those who will benefit most from this book are students whose education inside and outside the classroom is informed by the type of cross-campus, interdisciplinary approach to meaning-making put forth by the authors.

This comprehensive compendium is a must-read for any higher education professional interested in responding to students' ubiquitous concerns about existential issues concerning purpose and meaning. It brings together classical and contemporary thought, conceptual depth, and concrete suggestions for practice. This scholarship is enriched and enlivened by the authors' personal perspectives and experiences, and by student voices and vignettes. Buy it and keep it handy as a source of wisdom and good counsel.

A thoughtful, provocative, moving, yet practical guide for any teacher seeking to make the college classroom a space for inspiration and hope. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
About the Authors

Part I: Making Meaning in the Quarterlife
ch. 1 Is the Quarterlife Generation Ready for Meaning-Making?
ch. 2 Exploring the Meaning of Meaning: Existentialism and Postmodernism
ch. 3 Finding Meaning in Religion and Spirituality: Why Can’t My Faith Be Cool?

Part II: Putting Meaning-Making to Work: Tools of the Trade
ch. 4 A Pedagogy of Constructivism: Deep-Meaning Learning
ch. 5 Make Room for Meaning: Practical Advice
ch. 6 The Ethics of Meaning-Making
ch. 7 Meaning Maxims for Both Inside and Outside the Classroom

Part III: Our Own Attempts to Make Meaning
ch. 8 Two Personal Reflections for Our Readers

Resources for Meaning-Making Educators
Resource A: Four Therapeutic Approaches to Meaning-Making
Resource B: Crossover Pedagogy

References
Index
Cover image

Souls in Transition: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of Emerging Adults

Book
Smith, Christian, Snell, Patricia
2009
Oxford University Press
BV4529.2.S64 2009
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
How important is religion for young people in America today? What are the major influences on their developing spiritual lives? How do their religious beliefs and practices change as young people enter into adulthood?

Christian Smith's Souls in Transition explores these questions and many others as it tells the definitive story of the religious and spiritual lives of emerging adults, ages 18 to 24, in the U.S. today. This ...
Additional Info:
How important is religion for young people in America today? What are the major influences on their developing spiritual lives? How do their religious beliefs and practices change as young people enter into adulthood?

Christian Smith's Souls in Transition explores these questions and many others as it tells the definitive story of the religious and spiritual lives of emerging adults, ages 18 to 24, in the U.S. today. This is the much-anticipated follow-up study to the landmark book, Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers. Based on candid interviews with thousands of young people tracked over a five-year period, Souls in Transition reveals how the religious practices of the teenagers portrayed in Soul Searching have been strengthened, challenged, and often changed as they have moved into adulthood. The book vividly describes as well the broader cultural world of today's emerging adults, how that culture shapes their religious outlooks, and what the consequences are for religious faith and practice in America more generally. Some of Smith's findings are surprising. Parents turn out to be the single most important influence on the religious outcomes in the lives of young adults. On the other hand, teenage participation in evangelization missions and youth groups does not predict a high level of religiosity just a few years later. Moreover, the common wisdom that religiosity declines sharply during the young adult years is shown to be greatly exaggerated.
Painstakingly researched and filled with remarkable findings, Souls in Transition will be essential reading for youth ministers, pastors, parents, teachers and students at church-relatedschools, and anyone who wishes to know how religious practice is affected by the transition into adulthood in America today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Brad, June, and Amanda
ch. 2 The Cultural Worlds of Emerging Adults
ch. 3 Emergency Adult Religion in Life Course and Historical Perspective
ch. 4 Religious Affiliations, Practices, Beliefs, Experiences, and More
ch. 5 The Cultural Structures of Emerging Adult Religion
ch. 6 Six Major Religious Types
ch. 7 The Teenagers of Soul Searching
ch. 8 Religious Trajectories from the Teenage Years
ch. 9 Religious Faith and Emerging Adult Life Outcomes
ch. 10 Making Some Sense of It All

Appendix A. Additional Tables and Figures
Appendix B. Research Methodology
Notes

Index
Cover image

Student Development in College: Theory, Research, and Practice, Second Edition

Book
Evans, Nancy J., Deanna S. Forney, Florence M. Guide, Lori D. Patton, and Kristen A. Renn
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2343.4.S78 2010
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
The second edition of Student Development in College offers higher education professionals a clear understanding of the developmental challenges facing today's college students. Thoroughly revised and updated, this edition includes new integrative theories of student development, expanded coverage of social identity theories, a targeted focus on higher education-related research, a current review of student development research and application, and reconceptualization of typology theories as a way to understand individual differences.<...
Additional Info:
The second edition of Student Development in College offers higher education professionals a clear understanding of the developmental challenges facing today's college students. Thoroughly revised and updated, this edition includes new integrative theories of student development, expanded coverage of social identity theories, a targeted focus on higher education-related research, a current review of student development research and application, and reconceptualization of typology theories as a way to understand individual differences.

Praise for the Second Edition of Student Development in College

Student Development in College is a rich, comprehensive exploration of the major theoretical perspectives that inform development. The authors' attention to nuances and complexities results in a substantive history of theory development and a careful story about how various perspectives evolved yielding contemporary theorizing. The book is a masterful blend of theoretical lenses and their use in designing developmentally appropriate practice for diverse populations of contemporary college students. It is an excellent resource for all educators who work on college campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Figures and Exhibit
The Authors
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part One: Understanding and Using Student Development Theory
ch. 1 Definitions and Historical Roots of Student Development
ch. 2 Using Student Development Theory

Part Two: Foundational Theories
ch. 3 Psychosocial Identity Development
ch. 4 Chickering's Theory of Identity Development
ch. 5 Perry's Theory of Intellectual and Ethical Development
ch. 6 Moral Development Theory
ch. 7 Later Cognitive Structural Theories
ch. 8 Kolb's Theory of Experiential Learning

Part Three: Integrative Theories
ch. 9 Ecological Approaches to College Student Development
ch. 10 Development of Self-Authorship
ch. 11 Development of Faith and Spirituality
ch. 12 Schlossberg's Transition Theory

Part Four: Social Identity Development
ch. 13 Social Identity: Concepts and Overview
ch. 14 Racial Identity Development
ch. 15 Ethnic Identity Development and Acculturation
ch. 16 Multiracial Identity Development
ch. 17 Sexual Identity Development
ch. 18 Gender and Gender Identity Development

Part Five: Concluding Reflections
ch. 19 Using Theories in Combination
ch. 20 Final Thoughts and Future Directions

References
Index
Cover image

Improving Learning in College: Rethinking Literacies Across the Curriculum

Book
Ivanic, Roz; Miller,Kate; Edward, Richard; Barton, David; and Martin-Jones, Marilyn
2009
Taylor & Francis, Inc, New York, NY
LB2331.2.I55 2009
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
What's the problem with literacy at college? How might everyday literacy be harnessed for educational ends?

Based on the first major study of literacy practices in colleges in the UK, this book explores the reading and writing associated with learning subjects across the college curriculum. It investigates literacy practices in which students engage outside of college, and teaching and learning strategies through which these can help support the ...
Additional Info:
What's the problem with literacy at college? How might everyday literacy be harnessed for educational ends?

Based on the first major study of literacy practices in colleges in the UK, this book explores the reading and writing associated with learning subjects across the college curriculum. It investigates literacy practices in which students engage outside of college, and teaching and learning strategies through which these can help support the curriculum. With insightful analyses of innovative practices, it considers ways of changing teaching practices to enable students to draw upon their full potential.

Recent research work has challenged the myth of individual student deficit, arguing cogently that people have ‘funds of knowledge’ from diverse and vibrant cultural roots, and that these have been misguidedly disqualified by the education system. It has claimed that different ‘ways with words’ can provide valuable resources for learning. However, the empirical exploration of this claim has lagged far behind the theoretical debate. Improving Learning in College resolves this by showing the integrity and richness of the literacy practices of a significant population, not previously the focus of such research: those who take vocational and academic college courses in colleges. It addresses an issue which has not until now been developed within this research tradition: that of how these practices can not only be valued and validated, but mobilised and harnessed to enhance learning in educational settings.

This book will interest all teachers, teacher-educators and researchers concerned with post-compulsory education and vocational education in compulsory schooling. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part I What are the issues?
ch. 1 Literacies as a resource for learning in college

Part II What does the research tell us?
ch. 2 What students do with reading and writing in their everyday lives
ch. 3 Ways of understanding literacy practices
ch. 4 Literacies across the college curriculum
ch. 5 Comparisons across contexts: the textual mediation of learning on Childcare courses

Part III What are the implications?
ch. 6 Making a difference: the conception, implementation and analysis of changes in practice
ch. 7 Recontextualising the research: bilingual literacies for learning in Wales
ch. 8 Conceptualising the interface between everyday and curriculum literacy practices
ch. 9 Implications for learning in college and beyond

Appendix: researching literacies for learning
Bibliography
Index
TTR cover image

"Teaching the Material and Teaching the Students: Reflections on Introductory Courses for Non-Majors"

TTR
Kirkpatrick, Shane
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 125-136
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Teaching a required introductory Bible course to non-majors at a church-related college presents a number of pedagogical challenges. When considering how to teach such a course in the context of concerns common to the liberal arts, I find myself reflecting on authority. My thoughts on the teaching of this course in my own context are organized around authority understood as a developmental issue, an educational issue, and a religious issue. ...
Additional Info:
Teaching a required introductory Bible course to non-majors at a church-related college presents a number of pedagogical challenges. When considering how to teach such a course in the context of concerns common to the liberal arts, I find myself reflecting on authority. My thoughts on the teaching of this course in my own context are organized around authority understood as a developmental issue, an educational issue, and a religious issue. In each case, I seek to use my discipline and the primary and secondary materials of the course as occasions for the development of capacities that will contribute to the life of students as critical thinkers, creative problem-solvers, and responsible global citizens.
TTR cover image

"Between Guru and Deceiver? Responding to Unchosen Metaphors in the Religious Studies Classroom"

TTR
Carr, Amy, and Simmons, John K.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 156-168
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Two troublesome portraits of religious studies professors often exist in the minds of some students at any given time: the Guru, or wise spiritual teacher, and the Deceiver. These metaphors capture student perceptions of us that may be ill-informed and beyond our control. We will examine and compare how our own chosen metaphors for teaching – theological typologist and neutral enthusiast – respond creatively to the unchosen metaphors of guru or deceiver. ...
Additional Info:
Two troublesome portraits of religious studies professors often exist in the minds of some students at any given time: the Guru, or wise spiritual teacher, and the Deceiver. These metaphors capture student perceptions of us that may be ill-informed and beyond our control. We will examine and compare how our own chosen metaphors for teaching – theological typologist and neutral enthusiast – respond creatively to the unchosen metaphors of guru or deceiver. We cannot avoid being cast as gurus/deceivers, but we can discern how our own metaphors for teaching engage "unchosen" student metaphors for us. This exercise can enhance our self-awareness about our own normative agendas in the classroom, and help to sharpen colleagues' conversations about our sometimes differing assumptions regarding the discipline and teaching of religious studies.
Article cover image

"Spirituality in Higher Education: A National Study of Spirituality in Higher Education: Student's Search for Meaning and Purpose"

Article
Astin, Alexander W., Astin, Helen S., and Linholm, Jennifer A. Higher Education Research Institute Graduate School of Education & Information Studies University of California, Los Angeles
2003
Higher Education Research Institute (HERI), UCLA
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Key Findings from the First National Longitudinal Study of Undergraduates' Spiritual Growth, conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) at UCLA
www.spirtuality.ucla.edu
Additional Info:
Key Findings from the First National Longitudinal Study of Undergraduates' Spiritual Growth, conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) at UCLA
www.spirtuality.ucla.edu
Article cover image

"The Millennials: Confident. Connected. Open to Change"

Article
Pew Research Center
2010
Pew Research Center Publications
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Part of a Pew Research Center series of reports exploring the behaviors, values and opinions of the teens and twenty-somethings that make up the Millennial Generation
Additional Info:
Part of a Pew Research Center series of reports exploring the behaviors, values and opinions of the teens and twenty-somethings that make up the Millennial Generation
Cover image

Transitions and Learning through the Lifecourse

Book
Ecclestone, Kathryn, Biesta, Gert, and Hughes, Martin, eds.
2010
Routledge, New York, NY
LC5256.G7 T73 2010
Topics: Adult Learners   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Like many ideas that inform policy, practice and research, ‘transition’ has many meanings. Children make a transition to adulthood, pupils move from primary to secondary school, and there is then a movement from school to work, training or further education. Transitions can lead to profound and positive change and be an impetus for new learning for some individuals and be unsettling, difficult and unproductive for others. Transitions have become a ...
Additional Info:
Like many ideas that inform policy, practice and research, ‘transition’ has many meanings. Children make a transition to adulthood, pupils move from primary to secondary school, and there is then a movement from school to work, training or further education. Transitions can lead to profound and positive change and be an impetus for new learning for some individuals and be unsettling, difficult and unproductive for others. Transitions have become a key concern for policy makers and the subject of numerous policy changes over the past ten years. They are also of interest to researchers and professionals working with different groups.

Transitions and Learning Through the Lifecourse examines transitions across a range of education, life and work settings. It explores the claim that successful transitions are essential for educational inclusion, social achievement, and economic prosperity and that individuals and institutions need to manage them more effectively.

Aimed primarily at academic researchers and students at all levels of study across a range of disciplines, including education, careers studies, sociology, feminist and cultural studies, this book is the first systematic attempt to bring together and evaluate insights about educational, life and work transitions from a range of different fields of research. Contributions include:

The transition between home and school

The effects of gender, class and age

Transitions to further and higher education

Transitions for students with disabilities

Transitions into the workplace

Learning within the workplace

Approaches to managing transitions
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
List of Tables
List of Contributors
Acknowledgments
Preface

ch. 1 Transitions In The LIfecourse: The Role of Identity, Agency and Structure (Kathryn Ecclestone, Gert Biesta and Martin Hughes)
ch. 2 The Daily Transition Between Home and School (Martin Hughes, Pamela Greenhough, Wan Ching Yee and Jane Andrews)
ch. 3 Transgression For Transition? What Urban Middle-Class Families aking and Managing 'Against The Grain' School Choices (David James and Phoebe Beedell)
ch. 4 Reading and Writing The Self As A College Student: Fluidity and Ambivalence Across Contexts (Candice Satchwell and Roz Ivanic)
ch. 5 Managing Transitions In Skills For Life (Mary Hamilton)
ch. 6 The Transition From Vocational Education and Training To Higher Education: A Successful Pathway? (Michael Hoelscher, Geoff Hayward, Hubert Ertl and Harriet Dunbar-Goddet)
ch. 7 Disabled Students and Transitions In Higher Education (Elisabet Weedon and Sheila Riddell)
ch. 8 Rethinking 'Failed Transitions' To Higher Education (Jocey Quinn)
ch. 9 Time In Learning Transitions Through The LIfecourse A Feminist Perspective (Helen Colley)
ch. 10 Working As Belonging: The Management of Personal and Collective Identities (Alan Felstead, Dan Bishop, Alison Fuller, Nick Jewson, Lorna Unwin and Kostantinos Kakavelakis)
ch. 11 Adults Learning In and Through The Workplace (Karen Evans and Edmund Waite)
ch. 12 Older Workers' Transitions In Work-Related Learning, Careers and Identities (Jenny Bimrose and Alan Brown)
ch. 13 Managing and Supporting The Vulnerable Self (Kathryn Ecclestone)

Index
Article cover image

"The Spiritual Life of College Students: A National Study of College Students' Search for Meaning and Purpose"

Article
Astin, Alexander W., et al.
2005
Higher Education Research Institute Graduate School of Education & Information Studies University of California, Los Angeles
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Results of the second phase in an ongoing major study of the spiritual lives of college students was released in a report called "The Spiritual Life of College Students." The study was conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI), a research center of higher education based in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies (GSE&IS) at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). It is a groundbreaking attempt ...
Additional Info:
Results of the second phase in an ongoing major study of the spiritual lives of college students was released in a report called "The Spiritual Life of College Students." The study was conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI), a research center of higher education based in the Graduate School of Education & Information Studies (GSE&IS) at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). It is a groundbreaking attempt to gain insight into the spiritual lives and concerns of students and improve how faculties and administrators at US colleges and universities address this part of their students' lives.
Article cover image

"The Spiritual Struggles of College Students: Illuminating a Critical Development Phenonmenon"

Article
Bryant, Alyssa N.
2008
Spirituality in Higher Education Newsletter 4, no. 4 (2008): 1-8
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Spirituality, Liberal Learning, and College Student Engagement"

Article
Kuh, George D., and Gonyea, Robert M.
2006
Liberal Education 92, no. 1 (2006): 40-47
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Explores the correlation between religion and liberal education in the U.S. Influence of spiritual or religious practices on student learning; Effect of spirituality on liberal learning; Ways in which religious practices affect learning. INSET: MEASURES OF STUDENT ENGAGEMENT.
Additional Info:
Explores the correlation between religion and liberal education in the U.S. Influence of spiritual or religious practices on student learning; Effect of spirituality on liberal learning; Ways in which religious practices affect learning. INSET: MEASURES OF STUDENT ENGAGEMENT.
Cover image

Learning to Learn with Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT): A Practical Guide for Academic Success

Book
Kitsantas, Anastasia, and Dabbagh, Nada
2009
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB2395.7.K57 2009
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Using Technology

Additional Info:
The purpose of this practical guide is to facilitate college students' academic success by fostering self-regulated learning skills or learning to learn through the use of Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT). It enables the college instructor, online instructor, instructional developer, or educator to envision, plan for, and implement customized instructional and curricular designs that foster learning to learn and motivate students to take ownership of their own learning. Specifically, this book ...
Additional Info:
The purpose of this practical guide is to facilitate college students' academic success by fostering self-regulated learning skills or learning to learn through the use of Integrative Learning Technologies (ILT). It enables the college instructor, online instructor, instructional developer, or educator to envision, plan for, and implement customized instructional and curricular designs that foster learning to learn and motivate students to take ownership of their own learning. Specifically, this book demonstrates how college faculty who use Learning Management Systems (LMS) as well as emerging technologies such as Web 2.0 applications and social software can design learning tasks and course assignments that support and promote student: goal setting use of effective task strategies self-monitoring and self-evaluation time management help seeking motivation and affect Given the emphasis on retention of freshmen as a measure of institutional effectiveness, the focus on student success, and the increasing use of ILT in higher education, this book fulfills a dire need in the literature on the integration of technology and self-regulated learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction to Learning How to Learn
ch. 2 Defining Integrative Learning Technologies
ch. 3 Self-Regulatory Training with Integrative Learning Technologies: A Theory-Based Model
ch. 4 Goal Setting
ch. 5 Task Strategies
ch. 6 Self-Monitoring and Self-Evaluation
ch. 7 Time Management
ch. 8 Help Seeking
ch. 9 Motivation, Affect, and Learning Communities
ch. 10 New Approaches to Integrative Learning Technologies
Additional Info:
Our goal in writing this book was to validate teachers for strong efforts in their life's work. We often observe teachers' frustrations with what they perceive to be a multitude of different hot topics in education that they must attend to now, but which they expect to come and go, like the last hot topics. So, we wanted to help readers see similarities between many of these hot topics-differentiation, multiple ...
Additional Info:
Our goal in writing this book was to validate teachers for strong efforts in their life's work. We often observe teachers' frustrations with what they perceive to be a multitude of different hot topics in education that they must attend to now, but which they expect to come and go, like the last hot topics. So, we wanted to help readers see similarities between many of these hot topics-differentiation, multiple intelligences, culturally responsive teaching, brain-friendly strategies, authentic assessment, and ethical classroom management which we feel are not flashes in the pan. And we trust that serious practitioners will not oversimplify the findings of neuroscientists and their application to education. Reading studies and books by scientists, a number of which are user-friendly, can help ensure that teachers separate the hype from credible information. We have seen this professionally judicious approach in the work of graduate students (Kolinski, 2007) in adopting brain-friendly strategies.

We have intentionally packed both theoretical/research-based and practical information in this book because professional educators want to know why they should use certain approaches, models, and strategies. In turn, as professionals, we should be able to explain why we teach the way we do-not to justify, but to educate others about our knowledge-based, reflective, decision-making processes and the impact on student learning. Thus, it is important to read Chapter 1 because it lays a foundation.

Each succeeding chapter (2-6) has unique and compelling twists and turns-chock full of ideas to use or to adapt. It is possible to gain lots of ideas, processes, and strategies from reading and implementing (or adapting) even one of the unit chapters, or a part of it. While some of the units are explicitly about literacy, others focus on content using reading, writing, speaking, and listening as critical in the learning process. Thus, literacy skills are reinforced and strengthened. Additionally, some of our colleagues and public school partners have given us feedback that they wanted to implement some of the units and activities themselves. So, feel free to use this book for self-exploration and professional development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Foreword
Preface

ch. 1 A Case for Differentiation and Much More
ch. 2 The Fabric of My Life: Using Poetry, Prose, and Graphic Novels to Help Students Reflect Upon Their Identities
ch. 3 Choices That Change Our Lives: Using Realistic Fiction and Nonfiction to Help Students Reflect on Difficult Decisions
ch. 4 Community and Culture: Understanding Ourselves and Others in the Global Community
ch. 5 A Journey from Innocence to Experience: A Course in Young Adult Literature for Future Teachers
ch. 6 Convince Me: A Syllabus for a Freshman Composition Course Focused on Writing Arguments

About the Authors
Index
TTR cover image

"Learning to Drink Deeply from Books: Using Experiential Assignments to Teach Concepts"

TTR
Burlein, Ann M.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 2 (2011): 137-155
BL41.T4
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
This article explores how to teach students to drink deeply from books. Drawing on the work of Peter Elbow, the article argues for incorporating experiential assignments that are structured to create a mediating realm between abstract concepts and concrete experiences. The bulk of the article explores in detail the author's use of such assignments first in a course on sexuality and religion and, second, in the standard Introduction to Religion ...
Additional Info:
This article explores how to teach students to drink deeply from books. Drawing on the work of Peter Elbow, the article argues for incorporating experiential assignments that are structured to create a mediating realm between abstract concepts and concrete experiences. The bulk of the article explores in detail the author's use of such assignments first in a course on sexuality and religion and, second, in the standard Introduction to Religion course.
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Heart of Higher Education: A Call to Renewal

Book
Palmer, Parker J., Zajonc, Arthur, Scribner, Megan and Nepo, Mark
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2322.2.P35 2010
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Praise for The Heart of Higher Education

Palmer and Zajonc have issued a compelling call for change and renewal in higher education. They show us how colleges and universities can be transformed by taking a more integrated approach to teaching and learning that focuses on the inner lives of their students and faculty.

At a moment when many are dreaming of an integrative form of higher ...
Additional Info:
Praise for The Heart of Higher Education

Palmer and Zajonc have issued a compelling call for change and renewal in higher education. They show us how colleges and universities can be transformed by taking a more integrated approach to teaching and learning that focuses on the inner lives of their students and faculty.

At a moment when many are dreaming of an integrative form of higher education that unites intellectual rigor with compassion and love, Palmer and Zajonc invite us to engage in conversations designed to infuse the academy with meaning, purpose, and soul. For those who yearn to transform colleges and universities from sterile, vacuous spaces to places of hope, possibility, and respect for everything human, this is the book you have been waiting for.

Parker Palmer and Arthur Zajonc call for a renewal of our commitment to inspiring deeper thinking and educating the whole person. This book should and will inspire debate about our larger purpose, about how we can go beyond the traditional silos in which we work for the sake of individual and institutional transformation.

What should be at the center of our teaching and our students' learning? Palmer and Zajonc take up this simple but daunting question and provide the most solid ground yet on which to hold a conversation about the heart of our enterprise. They reimagine higher education in a way commensurate with the magnitude of our problems and offer us practical paths toward implementation. Integrative education is the most important reformation of higher learning since the rise of the modern university. This book can help us achieve it. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Gratitudes
The Authors
Introduction

ch. 1 Toward a Philosophy of Integrative Education
ch. 2 When Philosophy Is Put into Practice
ch. 3 Beyond the Divided Academic Life
ch. 4 Attending to Interconnection, Living the Lesson
ch. 5 Experience, Contemplation, and Transformation
ch. 6 Transformative Conversations on Campus

Afterword

About the Appendices: Experiments in Integrative Education
Appendix A In the Classroom
Appendix B Beyond the Classroom
Appendix C Administrative and Campuswide Initiatives

Notes
Index
Cover image

The First Year Out: Understanding American Teens after High School (Morality and Society Series)

Book
Clydesdale, Tim
2007
University of Chicago Press
LB1695.6.C58 2007
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Wild parties, late nights, and lots of sex, drugs, and alcohol. Many assume these are the things that define an American teenager’s first year after high school. But the reality is really quite different. As Tim Clydesdale reports in The First Year Out, teenagers generally manage the increased responsibilities of everyday life immediately after graduation effectively. But, like many good things, this comes at a cost.

Tracking ...
Additional Info:
Wild parties, late nights, and lots of sex, drugs, and alcohol. Many assume these are the things that define an American teenager’s first year after high school. But the reality is really quite different. As Tim Clydesdale reports in The First Year Out, teenagers generally manage the increased responsibilities of everyday life immediately after graduation effectively. But, like many good things, this comes at a cost.

Tracking the daily lives of fifty young people making the transition to life after high school, Clydesdale reveals how teens settle into manageable patterns of substance use and sexual activity; how they meet the requirements of postsecondary education; and how they cope with new financial expectations. Most of them, we learn, handle the changes well because they make a priority of everyday life. But Clydesdale finds that teens also stow away their identities—religious, racial, political, or otherwise—during this period in exchange for acceptance into mainstream culture. This results in the absence of a long-range purpose for their lives and imposes limits on their desire to understand national politics and global issues, sometimes even affecting the ability to reconstruct their lives when tragedies occur.

The First Year Out is an invaluable resource for anyone caught up in the storm and stress of working with these young adults. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction: An Unexpected Journey

ch. 1 Four Teens
ch. 2 Starting Points
ch. 3 Navigating Relationships, Managing Gratifications
ch. 4 Working for Money, Spending for Fun
ch. 5 Cognitively Sharper, Intellectually Immune
ch. 6 Narrowed Perspectives, Broader Implications
ch. 7 Methodological Appendix

Notes
Selected Bibliography
Index
TTR cover image

“Big Questions” in the Introductory Religion Classroom: Expanding the Integrative Approach"

TTR
Deffenbaugh, Daniel G.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 4 (2011): 307-322
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
Recent research by Barbara Walvoord suggests a perceived disparity between faculty learning objectives and students' desire to engage “big questions” in the introductory religion classroom. Faculty opinions of such questions are varied, ranging from a refusal to employ any approach that diverts attention away from critical thinking, to a willingness to integrate personal questions of meaning and purpose into the introductory religion course. This essay argues that, in light of ...
Additional Info:
Recent research by Barbara Walvoord suggests a perceived disparity between faculty learning objectives and students' desire to engage “big questions” in the introductory religion classroom. Faculty opinions of such questions are varied, ranging from a refusal to employ any approach that diverts attention away from critical thinking, to a willingness to integrate personal questions of meaning and purpose into the introductory religion course. This essay argues that, in light of work currently being done by such developmental theorists as Sharon Daloz Parks and Marcia Baxter Magolda, the integrative approach has much to commend it. It concludes with suggestions for how religion faculty can expand this approach through learning covenants, service learning, and seeing the religion classroom as a gateway to various mentoring communities on campus.
TTR cover image

Teaching World Religions without Teaching “World Religions”

TTR
Locklin, Reid B., Tiemeier, Tracy, and Vento,, Johann M.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 159-181
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of “religion” and “world religions” and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach world religions without teaching “world religions.” That is, we attempt to promote student engagement with the empirical study of a plurality ...
Additional Info:
Tomoko Masuzawa and a number of other contemporary scholars have recently problematized the categories of “religion” and “world religions” and, in some cases, called for its abandonment altogether as a discipline of scholarly study. In this collaborative essay, we respond to this critique by highlighting three attempts to teach world religions without teaching “world religions.” That is, we attempt to promote student engagement with the empirical study of a plurality of religious traditions without engaging in the rhetoric of pluralism or the reification of the category “religion.” The first two essays focus on topical courses taught at the undergraduate level in self-consciously Christian settings: the online course “Women and Religion” at Georgian Court University and the service-learning course “Interreligious Dialogue and Practice” at St. Michael's College, in the University of Toronto. The final essay discusses the integration of texts and traditions from diverse traditions into the graduate theology curriculum more broadly, in this case at Loyola Marymount University. Such confessional settings can, we suggest, offer particularly suitable – if somewhat counter-intuitive – contexts for bringing the otherwise covert agendas of the world religions discourse to light and subjecting them to a searching inquiry in the religion classroom.
TTR cover image

"An 8-Week Online Capstone Experience"

TTR
Spencer, James
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 184-185
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Liberal Arts   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
Article cover image

Who Are The Undergraduates?

Article
The Chronicle of Higher Education, December 17, 2010
2010
The Chronicle of Higher Education, December 17, 2010
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Several charts and graphs are presented regarding undergraduate education in the U.S. including a graph on marital status of students, a pie chart on part-time student enrollment, and a table which lists percentages for students attending community, public, and private colleges.
Additional Info:
Several charts and graphs are presented regarding undergraduate education in the U.S. including a graph on marital status of students, a pie chart on part-time student enrollment, and a table which lists percentages for students attending community, public, and private colleges.
Tactics cover image
Wabash tree

"Reading at Its Best"

Tactic
Bassett, Molly
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 3 (2012): 259
BL.T4 v.15 no. 3 2012
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: helping students to reflect on their reading practices.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: helping students to reflect on their reading practices.
Cover image

Interpersonal Boundaries in Teaching and Learning

Book
Schwartz, Harriet L., ed.
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 131)
LB1033.I584 2012
Topics: Adult Learners   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
New Directions for Teaching & Learning, Number 131 While issues of interpersonal boundaries between faculty and students is not new, more recent influences such as evolving technology and current generational differences have created a new set of dilemmas. How do we set appropriate expectations regarding e-mail response time in a twenty-four-hour, seven-day-a-week Internet-connected culture? How do we maintain our authority with a generation that views the syllabus as negotiable? Complex questions about ...
Additional Info:
New Directions for Teaching & Learning, Number 131 While issues of interpersonal boundaries between faculty and students is not new, more recent influences such as evolving technology and current generational differences have created a new set of dilemmas. How do we set appropriate expectations regarding e-mail response time in a twenty-four-hour, seven-day-a-week Internet-connected culture? How do we maintain our authority with a generation that views the syllabus as negotiable? Complex questions about power, positionality, connection, distance, and privacy underlie these decision points. This sourcebook provides an in-depth look at interpersonal boundaries between faculty and students, giving consideration to the deeper contextual factors and power dynamics that inform how we set, adjust, and maintain boundaries as educators. This is the 131st volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. New Directions for Teaching and Learning offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. From the Publisher

Table Of Content:
Editor's Note

ch. 1 Boundaries and Student Self-Disclosure in Authentic, Integrated Learning Activities and Assignments (Melanie Booth)
ch. 2 Managing Boundaries in the Web 2.0 Classroom (Bree McEwan)
ch. 3 Millennial Values and Boundaries in the Classroom (Chip Espinoza)
ch. 4 We're All Adults Here: Clarifying and Maintaining Boundaries with Adult Learners (Melanie Booth, Harriet L. Schwartz)
ch. 5 The Coconut and the Peach: Understanding, Establishing, and Maintaining Interpersonal Boundaries with International Students (Miki Yamashita, Harriet L. Schwartz)
ch. 6 Complicity or Multiplicity? Defining Boundaries for Graduate Teaching Assistant Success (Karen Dunn-Haley, Anne Zanzucchi)
ch. 7 Crossing Boundaries in Doctoral Education: Relational Learning, Cohort Communities, and Dissertation Committees (Elizabeth L. Holloway, Laurien Alexandre)
ch. 8 Reflections and Intention: Interpersonal Boundaries in Teaching and Learning (Harriet L. Schwartz)

Index
Cover image

Cheating in College: Why Students Do It and What Educators Can Do about It

Book
McCabe, Donald L., Butterfield, Kenneth D., and Trevino, Linda K.
2012
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB3609.M27 2012
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Today's students are tomorrow's leaders, and the college years are a critical period for their development of ethical standards. Cheating in College explores how and why students cheat and what policies, practices, and participation may be useful in promoting academic integrity and reducing cheating.

The authors investigate trends over time, including internet-based cheating. They consider personal and situational explanations, such as the culture of groups in which dishonesty ...
Additional Info:
Today's students are tomorrow's leaders, and the college years are a critical period for their development of ethical standards. Cheating in College explores how and why students cheat and what policies, practices, and participation may be useful in promoting academic integrity and reducing cheating.

The authors investigate trends over time, including internet-based cheating. They consider personal and situational explanations, such as the culture of groups in which dishonesty is more common (such as business majors) and social settings that support cheating (such as fraternities and sororities).

Faculty and administrators are increasing their efforts to promote academic honesty among students. Orientation and training sessions, information on college and university websites, student handbooks that describe codes of conduct, honor codes, and course syllabi all define cheating and establish the consequences.

Based on the authors' multiyear, multisite surveys, Cheating in College quantifies and analyzes student cheating to demonstrate why academic integrity is important and to describe the cultural efforts that are effective in restoring it. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 A Journey and a Commitment to Action
ch. 2 Where to Begin: Academic Dishonesty among High School Students
ch. 3 Prevalence, Types, and Methods of Cheating in College
ch. 4 Individual Student Characteristics That Influence Cheating
ch. 5 Institutional Factors That Influence Academic Integrity: The Role of Honor Codes
ch. 6 Institutional Factors That Influence Academic Integrity: Other Contextual Influences
ch. 7 The Faculty Role in Creating a Strong Environment of Academic Integrity
ch. 8 Academic Integrity in Business and Professional Schools
ch. 9 Creating a Culture of Integrity: Practical Advice for Faculty and Administrators

References
Index
Cover image

Understanding Undergraduates: Challenging our preconceptions of student success

Book
Popovic, Celia, and Green, David A.
2012
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2331.P58 2012
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Most university teachers have ideas about the typical good or not-so-good student in their classes, but rarely do they share these thoughts with others. By keeping quiet about the preconceptions – or stereotypes – they harbour, teachers put themselves at risk of missing key evidence to help them revise their beliefs; more importantly, they may fail to notice students in real need of their support and encouragement.

In this unique ...
Additional Info:
Most university teachers have ideas about the typical good or not-so-good student in their classes, but rarely do they share these thoughts with others. By keeping quiet about the preconceptions – or stereotypes – they harbour, teachers put themselves at risk of missing key evidence to help them revise their beliefs; more importantly, they may fail to notice students in real need of their support and encouragement.

In this unique work, the authors explore UK and US university teachers’ beliefs about their students’ performance and reveal which beliefs are well-founded, which are mistaken, which mask other underlying factors, and what they can do about them. So is it true, for instance, that British Asian students find medicine more difficult than their white counterparts, or that American students with sports scholarships take their studies less seriously? Is it the case that students who sit at the front of the lecture hall get better grades than those who sit at the back?

By comparing students’ demographic data and their actual performance with their teachers’ expectations, the authors expose a complex picture of multiple factors affecting performance. They also contrast students’ comments about their own study habits with their views on what makes a good learner. For each preconception, they offer clear advice on how university teachers can redesign their courses, introduce new activities and assignments and communicate effective learning strategies that students will be able to put into practice. Finally, the authors explore the ramifications of teachers’ beliefs and suggest actions that can be taken at the level of the institution, department or programme and in educational development events, designed to level the playing field so that students have a more equitable chance of success.

Ideal for both educational developers and university teachers, this book:

• reveals general tendencies and findings that will inform developers’ own work with university teachers,
• provides practical guidance and solutions for university teachers to be able to identify and address students’ actual – rather than assumed – needs,
• explores means of addressing and challenging people’s natural tendency to rely on preconceived ideas and stereotypes, and
• explains an action research method that educational developers can use on their own campuses to unravel some of the local preconceptions that may be hampering student success. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 The research context
ch. 3 Higher Education in the UK and USA
ch. 4 Understanding beliefs shared by teachers in the UK and USA
ch. 5 Understanding UK teachers’ beliefs
ch. 6 Understanding US teachers’ beliefs
ch. 7 Understanding students’ beliefs
ch. 8 Challenging our preconceptions
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My Freshman Year: What a Professor Learned by Becoming a Student

Book
Nathan, Rebekah
2006
Penguin Group, London, England
LB3605.N34 2006
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
A revealing look at the college freshman experience, from an insider's point of view.

After fifteen years of teaching anthropology at a large university, Rebekah Nathan had become baffled by her own students. Their strange behavior—eating meals at their desks, not completing reading assignments, remaining silent through class discussions—made her feel as if she were dealing with a completely foreign culture. So Nathan decided to do ...
Additional Info:
A revealing look at the college freshman experience, from an insider's point of view.

After fifteen years of teaching anthropology at a large university, Rebekah Nathan had become baffled by her own students. Their strange behavior—eating meals at their desks, not completing reading assignments, remaining silent through class discussions—made her feel as if she were dealing with a completely foreign culture. So Nathan decided to do what anthropologists do when confused by a different culture: Go live with them. She enrolled as a freshman, moved into the dorm, ate in the dining hall, and took a full load of courses. And she came to understand that being a student is a pretty difficult job, too. Her discoveries about contemporary undergraduate culture are surprising and her observations are invaluable, making My Freshman Year essential reading for students, parents, faculty, and anyone interested in educational policy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Welcome to "AnyU"
ch. 2 Life in the Dorms
ch. 3 Community and Diversity
ch. 4 As Other See Us
ch. 5 Academically Speaking. . .
ch. 6 The Are of College Management
ch. 7 Lessons from My Year as a Freshman

Afterword: Ethics and Ethnography
Notes
References
Index
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Understanding and Engaging Under-Resourced College Students

Book
Becker, Karen A.; Krodel, Karla M.; Tucker, Bethanie H.; Shenk, Dan; and Contrad, Jesse
2009
aha! Process, Inc
LC4069.6.B43 2009
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The degree to which your post-secondary school understands and supports students from poverty makes all the difference in meeting your recruitment, retention, and graduation goals. Understanding your students starts with better information about their personal experience of poverty, and about the skills and strengths they bring with them to college. Supporting your students involves creating opportunities to access a variety of resources, remedial education relevant to their lives, and fully ...
Additional Info:
The degree to which your post-secondary school understands and supports students from poverty makes all the difference in meeting your recruitment, retention, and graduation goals. Understanding your students starts with better information about their personal experience of poverty, and about the skills and strengths they bring with them to college. Supporting your students involves creating opportunities to access a variety of resources, remedial education relevant to their lives, and fully engaged relationships inside of school and out.

You'll learn to:
Recognize the impact of economic class on student preparedness and educational success

Build on students' existing resources, experiences, and abilities

Encourage student success through curriculum design and programming

Partner with communities and businesses to support academic progress

Help students look beyond the classroom through service learning and civic engagement (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

Section I - What Is Poverty?
ch. 1 Colleges, Resources, and Economic Class
ch. 2 What Are the Causes of Poverty?
ch. 3 Internal Resources
ch. 4 External Resources

Section II - The Why and the How of Addressing Low Resources
ch. 5 In Action—the Why and the How of Learning Strategies
ch. 6 In Action—the Why and the How of Instructional Design

Section III - How to Shift to the Additive Model
ch. 7 Paradigm Shifts in Higher Education
ch. 8 In Action—Facilitating the Getting Ahead, College Edition Curriculum

Section IV - How to Shift Institutions and Communities
ch. 9 Building Synergy Among Stakeholders
ch. 10 Resources and the College Campus
ch. 11 Developing Human and Social Capital on the Campus and in the Community
ch. 12 Beyond the Classroom—Fostering Student Engagement with Sociopolitical and Economic Structures
ch. 13 Developing Community Partnerships

Appendices
References
Index
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Discipline-Centered Learning Communities: Creating Connections Among Students, Faculty, and Curricula

Book
Buch, Kimberly; and Barron, Kenneth E., eds.
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 132)
LB2343.4.D57 2012
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Take an in depth look at discipline-centered learning communities. Using psychology as an example, this issue provides prescriptive advice for those interested in developing a learning community in any academic discipline or program. Learning communities are a powerful vehicle for creating and sustaining connections among students, faculty, and the curriculum, but creating one can be a challenge. By providing resources, practical case studies, and theoretical grounding, this volume can both ...
Additional Info:
Take an in depth look at discipline-centered learning communities. Using psychology as an example, this issue provides prescriptive advice for those interested in developing a learning community in any academic discipline or program. Learning communities are a powerful vehicle for creating and sustaining connections among students, faculty, and the curriculum, but creating one can be a challenge. By providing resources, practical case studies, and theoretical grounding, this volume can both inspire and guide faculty, staff, and administrators in meeting their pedagogical and curricular goals.

Learn how the five types of learning communities—based curricularly, residentially, in the classroom, on the students themselves, and even virtually—can be used to enhance student engagement and learning. Illustrating the versatility of the practice across a wide range of settings, student populations, and institutional types, this issue also contains an extensive listing of resources that go beyond disciplinary boundaries and open possibilities for all in higher education. 

This is the 132nd volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. New Directions for Teaching and Learning offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes

ch. 1 The Growth and Current State of Learning Communities in Higher Education - Learning communities carry on a tradition of educational reform, resulting in improved student learning outcomes. (Anne Goodsell Love)

ch. 2 Curriculum-Based Learning Communities Centered Within a Discipline - Curriculum-based learning communities centered within a discipline can take on many forms. Through the use of specific institutional examples, this chapter examines three models requiring minimal to more complex coordination. (Mark C. Zrull, Courtney A. Rocheleau, M. Corinne Smith, Shawn M. Bergman)

ch. 3 Transitioning Students Out of College: The Senior LC in Psychology at Wagner College - This chapter describes the senior learning community in psychology at Wagner College, which is an example of a discipline-specifi c curriculum- based learning community (LC). This LC acts both as a capstone to the undergraduate experience and as a transition for students from college to career. We describe the components of the LC, their development, our attempts to integrate them, and how they might be applied in other intradisciplinary LCs. (Laurence J. Nolan, Steve M. Jenkins)

ch. 4 Residential Learning Communities Centered Within a Discipline: The Psychology Early Awareness Program - This chapter describes the Psychology Early Awareness Program (PEAP) at Loyola Marymount University, a residential learning community centered within a discipline. We discuss the theory that supports the value of living-learning communities, describe how this guided the development of PEAP, and summarize the benefi ts of this approach. (Cheryl N. Grills, Adam W. Fingerhut, Vandana Thadani, Ricardo Arturo Machon)

ch. 5 Creating Learning Communities in the Classroom - This chapter describes three approaches to creating classroom-based learning communities: interteaching; team-based learning; and cooperative learning in large, lecture-based courses. (Bryan K. Saville, Natalie Kerr Larence, Krisztina V. Jakobsen)

ch. 6 Using Student-Based Organizations Within a Discipline as a Vehicle to Create Learning Communities - Student-based organizations offer another approach to promote learning communities above and beyond particular curricular or classroom approaches. Not only can they create connections among students with shared disciplinary or professional interests on a single campus, but they also offer the possibility for creating connections to larger communities beyond an institution. (Michael D. Hall)

ch. 7 Virtual Learning Communities Centered Within a Discipline: Future Directions - Virtual learning communities (VLCs) provide a new vehicle for creating connections among stakeholders within academic disciplines and departments. This chapter describes the innovative use of information and computer technology (ICT) to create VLCs that can extend and enhance the impact of the traditional face-to-face learning communities described in preceding chapters. ( Anita L. Blanchard, James R. Cook)

ch. 8 The Evolution of Learning Communities: A Retrospective - In 1990, the current authors with Faith Gabelnick authored their first book about learning community initiatives, which has gone on to become one of the most widely cited volumes in the New Directions for Teaching and Learning series. In this chapter, they refl ect on the developments and evolution of learning communities since that time, including their reflections on each chapter from the present volume. (Roberta S. Matthews, Barbara Leigh Smith, Jean MacGregor)

Index
Appendix
Article cover image

"Q. What’s funny about teaching? A. Not enough! Arguing for a comic pedagogy"

Article
Decker, Elaine
2007
Educational Insights, Vol. 11, No. 3, 2007
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Alternative Classrooms

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A brief discussion of recent research and literature on students’ reading habits and a few tips on structuring classroom activities and assignments to improve students’ performance.
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A brief discussion of recent research and literature on students’ reading habits and a few tips on structuring classroom activities and assignments to improve students’ performance.
Additional Info:
Data and analysis-rich article (2003) in “Educause,” an education journal, focused especially on the “millennial generation” and computer technology. The author discusses how the learning styles, attitudes, and aptitudes of today's "new students" vary depending on age, experience, and preferences, requiring colleges and universities to find a variety of ways to meet students' expectations.
Additional Info:
Data and analysis-rich article (2003) in “Educause,” an education journal, focused especially on the “millennial generation” and computer technology. The author discusses how the learning styles, attitudes, and aptitudes of today's "new students" vary depending on age, experience, and preferences, requiring colleges and universities to find a variety of ways to meet students' expectations.
Additional Info:
A report from the Social Science Research Council (SSRS) that extends findings reported in the 2010 book "Academically Adrift" to document practices associated with improved student performance, as well as differences across individuals and institutions in the level of learning.
Additional Info:
A report from the Social Science Research Council (SSRS) that extends findings reported in the 2010 book "Academically Adrift" to document practices associated with improved student performance, as well as differences across individuals and institutions in the level of learning.
Additional Info:
Video. A short video summarizing some of the most important characteristics of students today - how they learn, what they need to learn, their goals, hopes, dreams, what their lives will be like, and what kinds of changes they will experience in their lifetime. Created by Michael Wesch in collaboration with 200 students at Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Video. A short video summarizing some of the most important characteristics of students today - how they learn, what they need to learn, their goals, hopes, dreams, what their lives will be like, and what kinds of changes they will experience in their lifetime. Created by Michael Wesch in collaboration with 200 students at Kansas State University.
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Executive Summary of the HERI (UCLA) study of the Spiritual Life of College Students.
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Executive Summary of the HERI (UCLA) study of the Spiritual Life of College Students.
Additional Info:
Video. Four extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, showing faculty in various disciplines (NOT in religion or theology) addressing the issue of how to foster students’ abilities to integrate learning–over time, across courses, and between academic, personal, and community life.
Additional Info:
Video. Four extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, showing faculty in various disciplines (NOT in religion or theology) addressing the issue of how to foster students’ abilities to integrate learning–over time, across courses, and between academic, personal, and community life.
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, analyzing faculty use of technology in several different disciplines (however, NOT in religion or theology), illustrating effective instructional practices culminating in improved engagement.
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, analyzing faculty use of technology in several different disciplines (however, NOT in religion or theology), illustrating effective instructional practices culminating in improved engagement.
Additional Info:
A web page full of reliable  analysis and strategies, supported by publications. "On the Cutting Edge" is a professional development non-profit aimed at geoscience faculty, but the issues analyzed here are applicable across high education. 
Additional Info:
A web page full of reliable  analysis and strategies, supported by publications. "On the Cutting Edge" is a professional development non-profit aimed at geoscience faculty, but the issues analyzed here are applicable across high education. 
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

Let Me Entertain You: The Exciting Perks and Perils of Teaching American Religion as a Vaudeville (or Burlesque?) Performer

TTR
Shrout, Katy E.
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 371-378
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
While teaching a course on religion and consumer culture in the United States, the author was intensely preoccupied with holding the interest of her undergraduate students during class sessions. Inspired in part by the subject matter of the course, she reflects here upon the extent that her courses on American religion drew upon the semiotics of commercial entertainment. While acknowledging the limitations and distortions possible in thinking of the teacher ...
Additional Info:
While teaching a course on religion and consumer culture in the United States, the author was intensely preoccupied with holding the interest of her undergraduate students during class sessions. Inspired in part by the subject matter of the course, she reflects here upon the extent that her courses on American religion drew upon the semiotics of commercial entertainment. While acknowledging the limitations and distortions possible in thinking of the teacher as an entertainer, this paper explores the teaching metaphor of the Vaudevillian Performer, arguing that if put in context with the work on reception in cultural studies, it can be a helpful model in the classroom.
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Religion, Education, Dialogue and Conflict: Perspectives on Religious Education Research

Book
Jackson, Robert, ed.
2012
Routledge, New York, NY
BV1471.3.R45 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Religion, Education, Dialogue and Conflict analyses the European Commission-funded REDCo project, which addressed the question of how religions might contribute to dialogue or conflict in Europe. Researchers in education from eight countries – the UK, Estonia, France, Germany, the Netherlands, the Russian Federation, Norway and Spain – studied how young Europeans of different religious, cultural and political backgrounds could engage in dialogue in the context ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Religion, Education, Dialogue and Conflict analyses the European Commission-funded REDCo project, which addressed the question of how religions might contribute to dialogue or conflict in Europe. Researchers in education from eight countries – the UK, Estonia, France, Germany, the Netherlands, the Russian Federation, Norway and Spain – studied how young Europeans of different religious, cultural and political backgrounds could engage in dialogue in the context of the school.

Empirical studies conducted with 14-16 year old students included them offering their own perspectives and analyses of teaching and learning in both dialogue and conflict situations. Although there were some different national patterns and trends, most students wished for peaceful coexistence across differences, andbelieved this to be possible. The majority agreed that peaceful coexistence depended on knowledge about each other’s religions and worldviews, sharing common interests and doing things together. The project found that students who learn about religious diversity in school are more willing to discuss religions and beliefs with students of other backgrounds than those who do not.

The international range of expert contributors to this book evaluate the results of the REDCo project, providing examples of its qualitative and quantitative studies and reflecting on the methods and theory used in the project as a whole.

This book was originally published as a special issue of the British Journal of Religious Education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Notes on contributors

ch. 1 Preface (Bruce Grelle)
ch. 2 Religion, education, dialogue and conflict: an introduction (Robert Jackson)
ch. 3 Reflections on the Redco project (Wolfram Weisse)
ch. 4 Young people’s talk about religion and diversity: a qualitative study of Norwegian students aged 13-15 (Marie von der Lippe)
ch. 5 Under the shadow of Al-Andalus? Spanish teenagers’ attitudes and experiences with religious diversity at school (Aurora Alvarez Veinguer, F. Javier Rosón Lorente, and Gunther Dietz)
ch. 6 Laïcité in practice: the representations of French teenagers (Bérengére Massignon)
ch. 7 Religion and religious education: comparing and contrasting pupils’ and teachers’ views in an English school (Joyce Miller, and Ursula McKenna)
ch. 8 The interpretive approach as a research tool: inside the Redco project (Robert Jackson)
ch. 9 The ‘contextual setting approach’: a contribution to understanding how young people view and experience religion and education in Europe (Thorsten Knauth, and Anna Körs)
ch. 10 Influences on students’ views on religions and education in England and Estonia (Sean Neill, and Olga Schihalejev)
ch. 11 European religious education teachers’ perceptions of and responses to classroom diversity and their relationship to personal and professional biographies (Judith Everington, Ina ter Avest, Cok Bakker, and Anna van der Want)
ch. 12 Russian Redco findings in support of dialogue and hermeneutics (Fedor Kozyrev)
ch. 13 Investigating the impact of religious diversity in schools for secondary education: a challenging but necessary exercise (Gerdien D. Bertram-Troost)

Index
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Religion, Education and Society

Book
Arwek, Elisabeth; and Jackson, Robert, eds.
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
BL42.5.G7 2014
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This volume presents findings from recent research focusing on young people and the way they relate to religion in their education and upbringing. The essays are diverse and multidisciplinary - in terms of the religions they discuss (including Christianity, Islam and Sikhism); the settings where young people reflect on religion (the classroom, youth club, peer group, families, respective religious communities and wider society); ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This volume presents findings from recent research focusing on young people and the way they relate to religion in their education and upbringing. The essays are diverse and multidisciplinary - in terms of the religions they discuss (including Christianity, Islam and Sikhism); the settings where young people reflect on religion (the classroom, youth club, peer group, families, respective religious communities and wider society); the different perspectives which relate to religious education and socialisation (the teaching of RE, the role of teachers in pupils’ lives, the way teachers’ personal lives shape their approach to teaching, school ethos and social context, and the place and rationale of RE); the contexts within which the authors work (different national settings and various academic disciplines); and the methodology used (qualitative, quantitative and mixed-method approaches).

The authors make important contributions to the debate about the role of religious education in the curriculum. They demonstrate the crucially important formative influence of religious education in young people’s lives which reaches well into their adulthood, shaping religious and other identities, and attitudes towards the ‘other’ - whatever that ‘other’ may be.

This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Beliefs & Values. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Citation Information
Notes on Contributors
Preface
Introduction: Religion in education: findings from the Religion and Society Programme

ch. 1 Relationships between local patterns of religious practice and young people’s attitudes to the religiosity of their peers (Julia Ipgrave)
ch. 2 Contextuality of young people’s attitudes and its implications for research on religion: A response to Julia Ipgrave (Olga Schihalejev)
ch. 3 Young people’s attitudes to religious diversity: quantitative approaches from social and empirical theology (Leslie J. Francis, S. Croft, Alice Pyke, Mandy Robbins)
ch. 4 Religious diversity, empathy, and God images: perspectives from the psychology of religion shaping a study among adolescents in the UK (Leslie J. Francis, Jennifer S. Croft and Alice Pyke)
ch. 5 Failures of meaning in religious education (James C. Conroy, David Lundie and Vivienne Baumfield)
ch. 6 More purpose than meaning in RE: a response to James Conroy, David Lundie, and Vivienne Baumfield (Christina Osbeck)
ch. 7 Seeing and seeing through: Forum theatre approaches to ethnographic evidence (David Lundie and James C. Conroy)
ch. 8 ‘We’re all in this together, the kids and me’: beginning teachers’ use of their personal life knowledge in the Religious Education classroom (Judith Everington)
ch. 9 Teachers only stand behind parents and God in the eyes of Muslim pupils (Jenny Berglund)
ch. 10 Keeping the faith: reflections on religious nurture among young British Sikhs (Jasjit Singh)
ch. 11 Christian youth work: teaching faith, filling churches or response to social need? (Naomi Stanton)
ch. 12 Religious young adults recounting the past: narrating sexual and religious cultures in school (Sarah-Jane Page and Andrew Kam-Tuck Yip)

Index
Additional Info:
This tip suggests ways to both promote academic inteagrity and help those struggling to avoid cheating in the wake of 21st century attitudes more accepting of cheating and technologies that can facilitate it.
Additional Info:
This tip suggests ways to both promote academic inteagrity and help those struggling to avoid cheating in the wake of 21st century attitudes more accepting of cheating and technologies that can facilitate it.
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From Entitlement to Engagement: Affirming Millennial Students' Egos in the Higher Education Classroom

Book
Knowlton, Dave S.; and Hagopian, Kevin Jack, eds.
2013
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 135)
LB1027.23.F76 2013
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This volume addresses theories and practices surrounding the entitled, self-absorbed students called Millennials. Stereotypical Millennials are often addicted to gadgets, demand service more than education, and hold narrow perspectives about themselves and those around them; when seen through this lens, Millennial students can understandably frustrate the most dedicated of professors.

The contributors show how new and better educational outcomes can emerge ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This volume addresses theories and practices surrounding the entitled, self-absorbed students called Millennials. Stereotypical Millennials are often addicted to gadgets, demand service more than education, and hold narrow perspectives about themselves and those around them; when seen through this lens, Millennial students can understandably frustrate the most dedicated of professors.

The contributors show how new and better educational outcomes can emerge if professors reconsider Millennials. First and foremost, many of these students simply don’t fit their stereotype. Beyond that, the authors urge faculty to question commonly held assumptions, showing them how to reevaluate their pedagogical practices, relationships with students, and the norms of college classrooms. Contributors focus on practical means to achieve new and more evocative outcomes by treating Millennial students as serious collaborators in the learning process, thereby helping those students to more closely identify with their own education. The assignments that professors give, the treatment of topics that they broach, and the digital tools that they ask students to employ can shift students’ concerns away from a narrow focus on impersonal, technical mastery of content and toward seeing themselves as Millennial thinkers who fuse their lives with their learning.


This is the 135th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. New Directions for Teaching and Learning offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes

ch. 1 Rethinking the Structural Architecture of the College Classroom (Kevin Jack Hagopian)
For the college classroom to be effective in affirming Millennial students’ egos, professors must reconsider its psychological and structural architecture. By adhering to a checklist of practical advice, professors can promote engagement over entitlement.

ch. 2 Navigating the Paradox of Student Ego
Student ego is multidimensional and paradoxical. Professors must understand the sense of entitlement that is born of ego, but professors also must appreciate opportunities for meaningful engagement that are made possible by the ego. Professors can help students leverage the positive benefits of ego engagement. (Dave S. Knowlton)

ch. 3 What Students Say about Their Own Sense of Entitlement (Darren S. Fullerton)
Students have a customer service mentality, believing that they deserve to be treated as consumers. The results of a focus group indicate that Millennial students have specific beliefs about classroom norms, their own role as college students, and professors’ expectations.

ch. 4 The Syllabus: A Place to Engage Students’ Egos
The course syllabus need not be a utilitarian bore for students. Professors can craft a syllabus that has a tone, style, and conceptual unity that promote intrigue and interest. Furthermore, professors can do much early in the semester to create student engagement with the syllabus. (Mark Canada)



ch. 5 Facilitating Class Sessions for Ego-Piercing Engagement (Stephen Lippmann)
Strategies used during class can affirm students’ egos. By requiring participation, learning students’ names, and injecting class activities with ideas that elicit reactions from students, professors can help the college classroom appeal more strongly to Millennial students.

ch. 6 Immersion in Political Action: Creating Disciplinary Thinking and Student Commitment
Assignments that immerse students in discipline-specifi c activities can impact Millennial students’ thinking. This chapter provides a case of engaging nursing students in health policy and politics. The chapter also offers implications of the case. Those implications can help all professors effectively implement discipline-specific immersive assignments. ( Karen Kelly)

ch. 7 Selves, Lives, and Videotape: Leveraging Self-Revelation through Narrative Pedagogy
Narrative pedagogy can provide opportunities for Millennial students to meaningfully engage with course content. A digital storytelling case provides an evocative example of narrative pedagogy engagement. Across higher education, professors can follow guidelines in this chapter to meaningfully implement narrative pedagogy. (Alison G. Reeves)

ch. 8 Activating Ego Engagement through Social Media Integration in the Large Lecture Hall
Because social media are ubiquitous in the lives of many Millennial students, professors must rethink the ways that those media are utilized to promote engagement both within and outside of the classroom. Possible drawbacks of integrating social media should be considered and put in their proper perspective relative to the benefits of integrating social media into the classroom. (C. Michael Elavsky)

ch. 9 Affirming Ego through Out-of-Class Interactions: A Practitioner’s View
Professors can engage Millennial students at an ego level by interacting with them outside of class. Through various out-of-class strategies for promoting more meaningful communication, professors can enhance students’ opportunities for understanding course content, themselves,
and their own rights and obligations. (Heather M. Knowlton)

ch. 10 Engaging Millennial Students in Social Justice from Initial Class Meetings to Service Learning
Millennial students must learn to recognize inequalities and develop skills that will help them work toward eliminating disparities and promoting equitability. Professors can enhance a social justice agenda within their courses through their teaching approach and assignments. Service-learning projects, in particular, can build cultural awareness and foster attitudes of helpfulness to those who are in need. (Jonathan J. CAvallero)

ch. 11 From Consumers to Citizens: Student-Directed Goal Setting and Assessment
Assessment and evaluations can motivate self-directed learning among Millennial students. For this motivation to occur, professors must view students as citizens of the classroom. As citizens, students can establish their own learning goals, recognize opportunities for higher levels of achievement, accept feedback from external stakeholders, and participate in course critiques. These activities add meaning to assessment. (DAvid R. Coon, Ingrid Walker)

ch. 12 The Bruised Ego Syndrome: Its Etiology and Cure
When professors depend on their formal authority, as opposed to their pedagogical authority, they likely will fall victim to the bruised ego syndrome. When professors align themselves with current realities and respond to the call for a new form of classroom management, they will align themselves better with the needs of Millennial students. (Bruce W. Speck)

Index
Additional Info:
Identifies key changes in values and behaviors that are changing higher education. Discusses technological changes, the ways in which people engage each other and technology; and the implications of these changes for higher education.
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Identifies key changes in values and behaviors that are changing higher education. Discusses technological changes, the ways in which people engage each other and technology; and the implications of these changes for higher education.
Additional Info:
Focusing on “Millennial culture,” identifies some of the key issues relating to teaching millennial learners. Summarizes need for relevant information; rationale for policies; relaxed environment; personal rapport; and research-based methods.
Additional Info:
Focusing on “Millennial culture,” identifies some of the key issues relating to teaching millennial learners. Summarizes need for relevant information; rationale for policies; relaxed environment; personal rapport; and research-based methods.
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Contends that in order to attract “traditional” and “non-traditional” students, higher education institutions will need to invest in the use of technology. Stresses the importance of technology in creating community and in fostering collaboration.
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Contends that in order to attract “traditional” and “non-traditional” students, higher education institutions will need to invest in the use of technology. Stresses the importance of technology in creating community and in fostering collaboration.
Web cover image

Instructing Multi-Generational Students

Web
McCraw, Mary Anne; and Martindale, Trey
Topics: Adult Learners   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Describes different generational groupings of adult learners and different learning preferences. Provides suggestions on effective course design and highlights characteristics of excellent instructors across generational lines.
Additional Info:
Describes different generational groupings of adult learners and different learning preferences. Provides suggestions on effective course design and highlights characteristics of excellent instructors across generational lines.
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Outlines seven traits of Millennials and provides strategies on preparing and delivering effective instruction with these students. Acknowledges difficulties in addressing issues of race/ethnicity and class in generational theory.
Additional Info:
Outlines seven traits of Millennials and provides strategies on preparing and delivering effective instruction with these students. Acknowledges difficulties in addressing issues of race/ethnicity and class in generational theory.
Additional Info:
An early You Tube mix of submissions for "The Visions of Students Today," a project by cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch. Learners express apathy and discouragement concerning their education, but also strong desire for empowering experiences of learning as creating, exploring, risking.
Additional Info:
An early You Tube mix of submissions for "The Visions of Students Today," a project by cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch. Learners express apathy and discouragement concerning their education, but also strong desire for empowering experiences of learning as creating, exploring, risking.
Additional Info:
Video. A lengthy You Tube video (1 hour), and dated 2008, but still relevant. Cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch discusses "media literacy" as a site of ongoing struggle and professional development for an instructor in higher education. If our students come to us unprepared for school, does that mean they are unprepared for learning? Is the problem with them, or with school? Have we taught learners the wrong things about learning?
Additional Info:
Video. A lengthy You Tube video (1 hour), and dated 2008, but still relevant. Cultural anthropologist Michael Wesch discusses "media literacy" as a site of ongoing struggle and professional development for an instructor in higher education. If our students come to us unprepared for school, does that mean they are unprepared for learning? Is the problem with them, or with school? Have we taught learners the wrong things about learning?
Cover image
Wabash tree

Beyond Reason and Tolerance: The Purpose and Practice of Higher Education

Book
Thompson, Jr., Robert J.
2014
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
LB2322.2.T46 2014
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Provides a developmental science basis to inform necessary transformations in undergraduate educational practices
Argues that emerging adulthood is an especially dynamic time of reorganization and development of the brain that both influences, and is influenced by, the undergraduate experience
Synthesizes advances in our understanding of human development and learning
Has direct implications for undergraduate education practices

The major ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Provides a developmental science basis to inform necessary transformations in undergraduate educational practices
Argues that emerging adulthood is an especially dynamic time of reorganization and development of the brain that both influences, and is influenced by, the undergraduate experience
Synthesizes advances in our understanding of human development and learning
Has direct implications for undergraduate education practices

The major challenges facing higher education are often framed in terms of preparing students for life-long learning. Society's 21st century needs require civic-minded individuals who have the intellectual and personal capabilities to constructively engage political, ethnic, and religious differences, work effectively, and live together with many different kinds of people in a more global society. In this volume, Robert J. Thompson aims to influence the current conversation about the purposes and practices of higher education. Beyond Reason and Tolerance adopts a developmental science basis to inform the transformations in undergraduate educational practices that are necessary to empower students to act globally and constructively engage difference. It synthesizes current scholarship regarding the nature and development of three core capacities deemed essential: A personal epistemology that reflects a sophisticated understanding of knowledge, beliefs, and ways of thinking; empathy and the capacity to understand the mental states of others; and an integrated identity that includes values, commitments, and a sense of agency for civic and social responsibility.

Beyond Reason and Tolerance argues that to foster the development of these capabilities, colleges and universities must recommit to providing a formative liberal education and adopt a developmental model of undergraduate education as a process of intellectual and personal growth, involving empathy as well as reasoning, values as well as knowledge, and identity as well as competencies. Thompson focuses on emerging adulthood as an especially dynamic time of reorganization and development of the brain that both influences, and is influenced by, the undergraduate experience. Advances in our understanding of human development and learning are synthesized with regard to the direct implications for undergraduate education practices.

Readership: Faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students in psychology, human development, and education who have an interest in intergroup relations and cognitive and social development during the period of emerging adulthood. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface


ch. 1 American Higher Education in the 21st Century

ch. 2 Emerging Adulthood: A Developmental Science Perspective

ch. 3 Personal Epistemology

ch. 4 Empathy

ch. 5 Identity and the Process of Self-Authorship

ch. 6 Campus Culture: Developing the Capacities to Constructively Engage Difference

ch. 7 Providing a Formative Undergraduate Liberal Education


References
Index
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Postsecondary Play: The Role of Games and Social Media in Higher Education

Book
Tierney, William G.; Corwin, Zoë; Fullerton, Tracy; Ragusa, Giesele, eds.
2014
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2395.7.P68 2014
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
The college application process—which entails multiple forms, essays, test scores, and deadlines—can be intimidating. For students without substantial school and family support, the complexity of this process can become a barrier to access. William G. Tierney and his team at the University of Southern California approach this challenge innovatively. Using the tools of online games and social media, they have developed ways to make applying for college much ...
Additional Info:
The college application process—which entails multiple forms, essays, test scores, and deadlines—can be intimidating. For students without substantial school and family support, the complexity of this process can become a barrier to access. William G. Tierney and his team at the University of Southern California approach this challenge innovatively. Using the tools of online games and social media, they have developed ways to make applying for college much less intimidating.

While the vast majority of college students use social media and gaming in their everyday lives, colleges and universities have been slow to recognize and harness the power of either. Postsecondary Play explores the significance of games and social media in higher education, and particularly how they can be used to attract, retain, educate, and socialize students.

Tierney, a past president of the American Educational Research Association, has gathered some of the best research on the emerging role of multiplayer games in the classroom and how these tools can boost student confidence and increase college access. Scholars writing from a wide variety of disciplines—college access, social media, game studies, and learning sciences—provide concrete examples to illustrate the new and complex ways in which students learn in response to social media and games. Tierney and the contributors find that, although games can be powerful tools for encouraging underserved students, quality game design and mastering the concept of play—the ability to develop skills while engaging in the game—are essential in the effective use of serious games in teaching and learning.

Summarizing a decade of research in game design and learning, Postsecondary Play will appeal to higher education scholars and students of learning, online gaming, education, and the media. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction, Why Games and Social Media? (Zoë B. Corwin, William G. Tierney, Tracy Fullerton, and Gisele Ragusa)

Part I - What is the Current Landscape of Higher Education?
ch. 1 The Disruptive Future of Higher Education (William G. Tierney)
ch. 2 The Need to Increase College Enrollment and Completion (Laura W. Perna)
ch. 3 Transition Readiness: Making the Shift from High School to College in Social Media World (David Conley and Mary Seburn)
ch. 4 From Communication to Community: How Games and Social Media Affect Postsecondary Stakeholders (Zoë B. Corwin)

Part II - What’s in a Game?
ch. 5 What Games Do Well: Mastering Concepts in Play (Tracy Fullerton)
ch. 6 The Open Laptop Exam: Reflections and Speculations (Henry Jenkins and Adam S. Kahn)
ch. 7 Games, Passion, and “Higher” Education (James Paul Gee)
ch. 8 Game-Like Learning: Leveraging the Qualities of Game Design and Play (Katie Salen)

Part III - What Do We Know about Games and What Do We Need to Learn?
ch. 9 Assessing Learning in Video Games (Valerie Shute, Matthew Ventura, Yoon Jeon Kim, and Lubin Wang)
ch. 10 Implications and Applications of Sociable Gaming for Higher Education (Nicole B. Ellison, Donghee Yvette Wohn, and Carrie Heeter)
ch. 11 Gender, Social Media, Games, and the College Landscape (Gisele Ragusa)
ch. 12 How Much Technology Is Enough? (Steven Weiland)

Conclusion - The Shape of Things to Come (William G. Tierney and Zoë B. Corwin)
Glossary
Contributors
Index
TTR cover image

Teaching the Millennial Generation in the Religious and Theological Studies Classroom

TTR
Bauman, Whitney; Marchal, Joseph A.; McLain, Karline; O'Connell, Maureen; and Patterson, Sara M.
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 4 (2014): 301-322
BL41.T4. v.17 no. 4 2014
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
This essay provides an overview of the distinctive challenges presented to teaching and learning in religious and theological studies by the conditions and characteristics of “millennial” students. While the emerging literature on this generation is far from consistent, it is still instructive and important to engage, as students that are immersed in technology and social networking have different facilities and difficulties that educators would do well to carefully address and ...
Additional Info:
This essay provides an overview of the distinctive challenges presented to teaching and learning in religious and theological studies by the conditions and characteristics of “millennial” students. While the emerging literature on this generation is far from consistent, it is still instructive and important to engage, as students that are immersed in technology and social networking have different facilities and difficulties that educators would do well to carefully address and critically employ. Teachers in theological and religious studies are distinctly positioned to grapple with such conditions, particularly around the practices of identity formation, media literacy, and embodiment. Attention to the development of such practices engages key issues for both the millennial students and the religious and theological studies teacher: virtual reality, spiritual identity, globalization and violence, critical consumption and ethical creativity, focused and contemplative thinking, and intercultural and interpersonal respect.
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Aspiring Adults Adrift: Tentative Transitions of College Graduates

Book
Arum, Richard; and Roska, Josipa
2014
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LC191.94.A78 2014
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Few books have ever made their presence felt on college campuses—and newspaper opinion pages—as quickly and thoroughly as Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa’s 2011 landmark study of undergraduates’ learning, socialization, and study habits, Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses. From the moment it was published, one thing was clear: no university could afford to ignore its well-documented and disturbing findings ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Few books have ever made their presence felt on college campuses—and newspaper opinion pages—as quickly and thoroughly as Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa’s 2011 landmark study of undergraduates’ learning, socialization, and study habits, Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses. From the moment it was published, one thing was clear: no university could afford to ignore its well-documented and disturbing findings about the failings of undergraduate education.

Now Arum and Roksa are back, and their new book follows the same cohort of undergraduates through the rest of their college careers and out into the working world. Built on interviews and detailed surveys of almost a thousand recent college graduates from a diverse range of colleges and universities, Aspiring Adults Adrift reveals a generation facing a difficult transition to adulthood. Recent graduates report trouble finding decent jobs and developing stable romantic relationships, as well as assuming civic and financial responsibility—yet at the same time, they remain surprisingly hopeful and upbeat about their prospects.

Analyzing these findings in light of students’ performance on standardized tests of general collegiate skills, selectivity of institutions attended, and choice of major, Arum and Roksa not only map out the current state of a generation too often adrift, but enable us to examine the relationship between college experiences and tentative transitions to adulthood. Sure to be widely discussed, Aspiring Adults Adrift will compel us once again to re-examine the aims, approaches, and achievements of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 College and Emerging Adults
ch. 2 Social and Academic Learning in College
ch. 3 Making It in the Labor Market
ch. 4 Parents, Partners, and Optimism about the Future
ch. 5 A Way Forward

Appendix A: Data, Methods, and Statistical Analyses
Appendix B: Survey Instrument and Interview Protocol
Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Religion & Education Volume 41, no.3

Journal Issue
2014
Taylor & Francis, Inc., Philadelphia, PA
LC405.R45 2014 Sept.-Dec.
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial
Religious Freedom and the Eye of the Beholder (Michael D. Waggoner)

Articles, Essays
ch. 1 Cultivating Commitment and Openness in the Christian College Context: A Study of the Institutional Predictors of Fallibilist Christian Spirituality (P. Jesse Rine)
ch. 2 African American Homeschoolers: The Force of Faith and the Reality of Race in the Homeschooling experience (Ama Mazama and Garvey Lundy)
ch. 3 When Yoga is Kosher but Kabbalah is Not: Spirituality and Cultural Appropriation in Jewish Education (Stuart Z. Charmé)
ch. 4 Not What Every Other Girl Wants: American Indian Women's Educational Aspirations (Maureen Snow Andrade)
ch. 5 Religious Issues in English Education: An Examination of the Filed (Robert Todd Bruce and Beatrice Bailey)
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Wabash tree

Minds on Fire: How Role-Immersion Games Transform College

Book
Carnes, Mark C.
2014
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2395.7.C38 2014
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs   |   Role-Playing   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Why are so many students intellectually disengaged? Faculty, administrators, and tuition-paying parents have been asking this question for nearly two centuries. And the answer is always more or less the same: students are so deeply absorbed in competitive social play (fraternities, sports, beer pong, World of Warcraft, social media) that they neglect academics.

In Minds on Fire, Mark Carnes shows how ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Why are so many students intellectually disengaged? Faculty, administrators, and tuition-paying parents have been asking this question for nearly two centuries. And the answer is always more or less the same: students are so deeply absorbed in competitive social play (fraternities, sports, beer pong, World of Warcraft, social media) that they neglect academics.

In Minds on Fire, Mark Carnes shows how role-immersion games channel students’ competitive (and sometimes mischievous) impulses into transformative learning experiences. His discussion is based on interviews with scores of students and faculty who have used a pedagogy called Reacting to the Past, which features month-long games set during the French revolution, Galileo’s trial, the partition of India, and dozens of other epochal moments in disciplines ranging from art history to the sciences. These games have spread to over three hundred campuses around the world, where many of their benefits defy expectations. Students think more critically by internalizing alternative selves, and they understand the past better by filtering it through their present. Fierce competition between opposing sides leads to strong community bonds among teammates and develops speaking, writing, leadership, and problem-solving skills.

Minds on Fire is a provocative critique of educational reformers who deplored role-playing pedagogies, from Plato to Dewey to Erikson. Carnes also makes an impassioned appeal for pedagogical innovation. At a time when cost-cutting legislators and trustees are increasingly drawn to online learning, Carnes focuses on how bricks-and-mortar institutions of higher education can set young minds on fire. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Debate at Dawn

ch. 1 “All Classes Are Sorta Boring”
ch. 2 Subversive Play: The Bane of Higher Education
ch. 3 Creating an Academic Subversive Play World
ch. 4 Critical Thinking and Our Selves
ch. 5 Overcoming the Silence of the Students
ch. 6 Learning by Failing
ch. 7 Building Community and Global Citizenship
ch. 8 Inculcating Morality and Empathy (!)
ch. 9 Teaching Leadership through Teamwork
ch. 10 Teaching the Past by Getting It Wrong?
ch. 11 The Strange World outside the Box

Socrates at Sunset
Appendix: List of Reacting Games
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
TTR cover image

Finding Freedom Abroad: Working with Conservative Christian Students in Study Abroad Programs

TTR
Mercer, Calvin
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 81-87
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Religious Diversity   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Conservative (fundamentalist, evangelical) Christian students present a general theological worldview that often correlates with significant anxiety. In a foreign setting, the anxiety of conservative students, removed from their supportive infrastructure, can be considerably heightened. This structure of thinking and emotion presents distinctive challenges and opportunities. Drawing upon my work as a clinician and as a religion professor who conducted study abroad programs, I make suggestions for working effectively with conservative ...
Additional Info:
Conservative (fundamentalist, evangelical) Christian students present a general theological worldview that often correlates with significant anxiety. In a foreign setting, the anxiety of conservative students, removed from their supportive infrastructure, can be considerably heightened. This structure of thinking and emotion presents distinctive challenges and opportunities. Drawing upon my work as a clinician and as a religion professor who conducted study abroad programs, I make suggestions for working effectively with conservative Christian students in study abroad contexts. Suggestions include predeparture, in-country, and post-trip strategies. Specific examples of conversations with students are provided to illustrate the challenges and strategies. This essay is published alongside of seven other essays, including a response from John Barbour, comprising a special section of the journal (see Teaching Theology and Religion 18:1, January 2015).
Article cover image

The Scholarship of Teaching: What's the Problem?

Article
Bass, Randy
1999
Creative Thinking About Learning and Teaching, Vol. 1, No. 1
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Assessing Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
An early demonstration of the value to teachers (and students) of writing the scholarship of teaching (SoTL) by defining a challenge to classroom learning, a “problem” to be investigated (much as we define a problem for our guild research to address) – in this case: learning goals and student pre-knowledge.
Additional Info:
An early demonstration of the value to teachers (and students) of writing the scholarship of teaching (SoTL) by defining a challenge to classroom learning, a “problem” to be investigated (much as we define a problem for our guild research to address) – in this case: learning goals and student pre-knowledge.
Additional Info:
This portion of the website of a UK “registered charity” and promoter of digital technologies in UK education and research, showcases 50 short case studies Investigating students' expectations of the digital environment and enhancing the student digital experience in higher education, organized according to the main challenges they address. 
Additional Info:
This portion of the website of a UK “registered charity” and promoter of digital technologies in UK education and research, showcases 50 short case studies Investigating students' expectations of the digital environment and enhancing the student digital experience in higher education, organized according to the main challenges they address. 
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Student Learning in College Residence Halls: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why

Book
Blimling, Gregory S.
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB3227.B53 2015
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Grounded in current research and practical experience, Student Learning in College Residence Halls: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why shows how to structure the peer environment in residence halls to advance student learning. Focusing on the application of student learning principles, the book examines how neurobiological and psychosocial development influences how students learn in residence halls. The book is filled with examples, useful ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Grounded in current research and practical experience, Student Learning in College Residence Halls: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why shows how to structure the peer environment in residence halls to advance student learning. Focusing on the application of student learning principles, the book examines how neurobiological and psychosocial development influences how students learn in residence halls. The book is filled with examples, useful strategies, practical advice, and best practices for building community and shaping residential environments that produce measureable learning outcomes. Readers will find models for a curriculum-based approach to programming and for developing student staff competencies, as well as an analysis of what types of residential experiences influence student learning. An examination of how to assess student learning in residence halls and of the challenges residence halls face provide readers with insight into how to strategically plan for the future of residence halls as learning centers.

The lack of recent literature on student learning in college residence halls belies the changes that have taken place. More traditional-age students are enrolled in college than ever before, and universities are building more residence halls to meet the increased demand for student housing. This book addresses these developments, reviews contemporary research, and provides up-to-date advice for creating residence hall environments that achieve educationally purposeful outcomes.

• Discover which educational benefits are associated with living in residence halls
• Learn how residential environments influence student behavior
• Create residence hall environments that produce measureable learning outcomes
• Monitor effectiveness with a process of systematic assessment

Residence halls are an integral part of the college experience; with the right programs in place they can become dynamic centers of student learning. Student Learning in College Residence Halls is a comprehensive resource for residence hall professionals and others interested in improving students' learning experience. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

ch. 1 The Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Student Learning in Residence Halls
ch. 2 How Biological and Psychological Development Influence Student Learning and Behavior
ch. 3 How Students Learn in Residence Halls
ch. 4 How to Create Learning Environments in Residence Halls
ch. 5 Selecting and Developing Residence Life Staff to Advance Student Learning
ch. 6 How Residential Environments Influence Student Learning
ch. 7 How to Shape the Peer Environment in Residence Halls to Advance Student Learning
ch. 8 Managing Student Life in Residence Halls to Support Student Learning
ch. 9 Assessing and Improving Residence Life Programs
ch. 10 The Future of Residence Halls

References
Name Index
Subject Index
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Student Motivation and Quality of Life in Higher Education

Book
Hennin, Marcus A.; Krägeloh, Christian U.; and Wong-Toi, Glenis, eds.
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2397.S78 2015
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Higher education is a high stakes process involving engagement with curricula and often entails coping with the onslaught of assessments and examinations. This process creates a level of intensity that impacts on the student experience in higher education. It is, therefore, important to consider not only the motivational aspects of learning but also quality of life issues, as they have profound effects on ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Higher education is a high stakes process involving engagement with curricula and often entails coping with the onslaught of assessments and examinations. This process creates a level of intensity that impacts on the student experience in higher education. It is, therefore, important to consider not only the motivational aspects of learning but also quality of life issues, as they have profound effects on students. Quality of life affects the way students interact with their formal education, and has wide-reaching effects on future careers and their ability to coordinate everyday events. Integrating these two concepts, student motivation and quality of life, brings together the explicit elements that underpin learning in the higher education context, creating links between the affective and social aspects of the student life. This synthesis is integral to improving student retention and quality of life and has important ramifications for educationalists, administrators, pastoral care and academic support service personnel, and students themselves. Some highlights of the book include:

- Applied Positive Psychology in Higher Education
- Internationalisation and Quality of Life: A Taiwanese Perspective
- The Computer Assisted Learning for the Mind (CALM) Website: Teaching Skills to Increase Resilience
- The Oxford University Peer Support Programme: Addressing the Wellbeing of Students
- Higher Education and Student Stress: Reclaiming Light, Liberty and Learning
- Improving academic quality of life through attribution- and motivation-focused counselling (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures
List of tables
List of contributors
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I - Student perspectives
ch. 1 Motivation to learn and quality of life: an undergraduate student’s perspective (Chen Eileen Zhou)
ch. 2 In pursuit of the PhD: quality of life and motivation to learn (Erin M. Hill)

Part II - Theoretical perspectives
ch. 3 Motivation to learn (Marcus A. Henning and Emmanuel Manalo)
ch. 4 Quality of life and higher education (Rex Billington and Christian Krägeloh)
ch. 5 Applied positive psychology in higher education (Aaron Jarden and Rebecca Jarden)

Part III - Diversity Pperspectives on motivation to learn and quality of life
ch. 6 International students’ wellbeing, relationships, and quality of life (Nancy Arthur and Natalee Popadiuk)
ch. 7 Internationalisation and quality of life: a Taiwanese perspective (Li-chuan Chiang)
ch. 8 Higher education in Thailand: factors influencing students’ motivation to study (Prachyapan Petchuay)
ch. 9 Health-related quality of life in youth: definition, dimensions, and research difficulties (Marta Gil-Lacruz)
ch. 10 Health-related quality of life in a sample of young people in Spain (Marta Gil-Lacruz and Ana Isabel Gil-Lacruz)
ch. 11 Effects of optimism and positive orientation on subjective wellbeing of Japanese university students (Kyoko Hashimoto and Masuo Koyasu)
ch. 12 Quality of life and motivation to learn in medical students from different cultures (Mataroria Lyndon and Andrew Hill)
ch. 13 Culture, motivation, and sport: developing cultural competence of health and physical education pre-service teachers (Matthew Winslade)
ch. 14 Pasifika relational space and its connection with motivation to learn and quality of life (Mona O’Shea, I’u Tuagalu and Marcus Henning)
ch. 15 Motivation to learn and quality of life issues in higher education students with a disability (Rachel Dryer, Graham Tyson and Rosemary Shaw)

Part IV - Promotion of motivation to learn and quality of life in higher education
ch. 16 Improving academic quality of life through attribution- and motivation-focused counselling (Glenn Hirsch)
ch. 17 The Computer Assisted Learning for the Mind (CALM) website: teaching skills to increase resilience (Fiona Moir and Antonio Fernando)
ch. 18 Mental health and perceived self-efficacy of medical students: research findings and implications for eLearning support (Iain Doherty and Julie Chen)
ch. 19 Oxford University Peer Support Programme: addressing the wellbeing of students (Anne Ford)
ch. 20 Resilience in tertiary students (Stephen Wealthall)
ch. 21 Quality of life, motivation, and professionalism, in higher education: implications for medical curriculum (Ralph Pinnock and Wayne Hazell)
ch. 22 Higher education and student stress: reclaiming light, liberty and learning (Colin Gibbs)

Part V - Conclusion and model
ch. 23 Synthesis of motivation to learn and quality of life (Marcus Henning, Christian Krägeloh, Glenis Wong-Toi, Emmanuel Manalo, Rex, Billington, Colin Gibbs, Susan J Hawken)

Index
Tactics cover image

Speed Dating in the Religious Studies Classroom

Tactic
Tilford, Nicole L.
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 2 (2015): 187
BL41.T4 v.18 no.2 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a series of student pairings discuss questions about religious identity in a World Religions Course.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a series of student pairings discuss questions about religious identity in a World Religions Course.
Cover image

Teaching the College Nones: Christian Privilege and the Religion Professor

TTR
Riswold, Caryn D.
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 2 (2015): 133-148
BL41.T4 v.18 no.2 2015
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Working with undergraduate students invites teachers into relationship and conversation with young people at a time when they are emerging as adults and forming their identities. Faith is one area of identity formation often attended to by scholars, college professors, and their institutions. But within that, little attention has been paid to those who do not identify as religious. Additionally, “the overwhelming presence of Christianity at American institutions maintains it ...
Additional Info:
Working with undergraduate students invites teachers into relationship and conversation with young people at a time when they are emerging as adults and forming their identities. Faith is one area of identity formation often attended to by scholars, college professors, and their institutions. But within that, little attention has been paid to those who do not identify as religious. Additionally, “the overwhelming presence of Christianity at American institutions maintains it as the spiritual norm on campus. … Those within the spiritual norm gain a level of privilege that is often unconscious” (Seifert 2007, 11). This has an effect not only on nonreligious students but on any student who identifies as anything other than Christian; and it has a unique effect on teaching and learning in the religion classroom. In this article, I will explain what Christian privilege is, why it is a unique problem in the undergraduate religion classroom, and what teachers of religion might do in response to it. In the end, I argue that educators need to better understand the effects of Christian privilege in our classrooms and become allies to the nonreligious in particular by using pedagogies that include and support all students, in their many religious affiliations and unaffiliations.
Cover image

An Empty Seat in Class: Teaching and Learning After the Death of a Student

Book
Ayers, Rick
2015
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LB1027.5.A96 2015
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Adult Learners   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The death of a student, especially to gun violence, is a life-changing experience that occurs with more and more frequency in America’s schools. For each of these tragedies, there is a classroom and there is a teacher. Yet student death is often a forbidden subject, removed from teacher education and professional development classes where the curriculum is focused instead on learning about ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The death of a student, especially to gun violence, is a life-changing experience that occurs with more and more frequency in America’s schools. For each of these tragedies, there is a classroom and there is a teacher. Yet student death is often a forbidden subject, removed from teacher education and professional development classes where the curriculum is focused instead on learning about standards, lesson plans, and pedagogy. What can and should teachers do when the unbearable happens? An Empty Seat in Class illuminates the tragedy of student death and suggests ways of dealing and healing within the classroom community. This book weaves the story of the author’s very personal experience of a student’s fatal shooting with short pieces by other educators who have worked through equally terrible events and also includes contributions from counselors, therapists, and school principals. Through accumulated wisdom, educators are given the means and the resources to find their own path to healing their students, their communities, and themselves. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Prologue: A Teacher Holds on to a Dying Student

Introduction

ch. 1 Improvising
ch. 2 The Mystery - The Literacy of Loss: Youth Creation of RIP T-Shirts (Lanette Jimerson)
ch. 3 Taking Care of the Caregivers - 1/30. Bloodroot. After Tupac (Molly Raynor)
ch. 4 Wrong Steps - Notes on a Classroom Responding to the Death of a Student (Jaimie Stevenson)
ch. 5 White Teacher
ch. 6 Good Guys, Bad Guys - On Losing Students (Crystal Laura) A Letter (David Stovall)
ch. 7 Our Worst Nightmare - Instinctually, Teachers Are Eternal Optimists (Lee Keylock)
ch. 8 Mortality in Its Many Forms - Losing Kyle—Automobile Accident (Hasmig Minassian) Remembering Angél (Godhuli Bose)
ch. 9 Teacher Education - Addressing the Issue in the Academy (Leora Wolf-Prusan) Youth Poetry Teacher: Losing a Student and a Friend (Donte Clark)
ch. 10 What Schools Can Do

Afterword: From the Counselor and Therapist (Cori Bussolari)
References
Index
About the Author
Additional Info:
A short essay written by a student in the 1990s who regards herself as extrovert, describing the particular qualities and experiences associated with her personal style. Posted on Mark Unno’s website, who teaches Buddhism at the University of Oregon.
Additional Info:
A short essay written by a student in the 1990s who regards herself as extrovert, describing the particular qualities and experiences associated with her personal style. Posted on Mark Unno’s website, who teaches Buddhism at the University of Oregon.
Additional Info:
A short essay written by a student in the 1990s who regards herself as introverted, describing the particular qualities and experiences associated with her personal style. Posted on Mark Unno’s website, who teaches Buddhism at the University of Oregon.
Additional Info:
A short essay written by a student in the 1990s who regards herself as introverted, describing the particular qualities and experiences associated with her personal style. Posted on Mark Unno’s website, who teaches Buddhism at the University of Oregon.
Article cover image

"What if students revolt?" - Considering Student Resistance: Origins, Options, and Opportunities for Investigation

Article
Seidel, Shannon B. and Tanner, Kimberly D.
2013
CBE Life Sciences Education, vol. 12 no. 4, 586-595
Topics: Classroom Management   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Focused on a biology classroom, but provides a helpful overview of the types of student resistance as well as hypotheses from other disciplines about the potential origins of student resistance. Also includes classroom strategies for preventing or addressing student resistance after it occurs. 
Additional Info:
Focused on a biology classroom, but provides a helpful overview of the types of student resistance as well as hypotheses from other disciplines about the potential origins of student resistance. Also includes classroom strategies for preventing or addressing student resistance after it occurs. 
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Meeting the Transitional Needs of Young Adult Learners

Book
Davis, C. Amelia; and Olson, Joann S., eds.
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, Number 143)
HQ799.5.M448 2014
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This is the first New Directions volume related to young adult learners since 1984. Then, as now, young adults are an important segment of the adult population but have received scant attention in the adult education literature.

Increasingly, youths and young adults are enrolling in adult education programs and in doing so are changing the meaning of adulthood. Given the significant demographic, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This is the first New Directions volume related to young adult learners since 1984. Then, as now, young adults are an important segment of the adult population but have received scant attention in the adult education literature.

Increasingly, youths and young adults are enrolling in adult education programs and in doing so are changing the meaning of adulthood. Given the significant demographic, technological, and cultural shifts during the past 30 years, there is an increasing need for practitioners and program planners to reconsider what constitutes “adult” and “adult education.” An understanding of the changing meaning of adulthood is fundamental to developing programs and policies that will address the needs of younger learners, and we believe it is time for an updated discussion among adult educators and scholars in other disciplines.

This sourcebook is designed to reignite the discussion related to meeting the educational needs of young adults along with a timely and interdisciplinary discussion that highlights the transitional needs of young adult learners.

This is the 143rd volume of the Jossey Bass series New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. Noted for its depth of coverage, it explores issues of common interest to instructors, administrators, counselors, and policymakers in a broad range of education settings, such as colleges and universities, extension programs, businesses, libraries, and museums. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Note (C. Amelia Davis, Joann S. Olson)

ch. 1 Conceptualizing Transitions to Adulthood (Johanna Wyn)

ch. 2 Culture, Conditions, and the Transition to Adulthood (Brendaly Drayton)

ch. 3 Vulnerable Youth and Transitions to Adulthood (Rongbing Xie, Bisakha (Pia) Sen, E. Michael Foster)

ch. 4 Young Adulthood, Transitions, and Dis/ability (Jessica Nina Lester)

ch. 5 Becoming an Adult in a Community of Faith (Steven B. Frye)

ch. 6 Youths Transitioning as Adult Learners (C. Amelia Davis)

ch. 7 Transitions From Formal Education to the Workplace (Joann S. Olson)

ch. 8 Themes and Issues in Programming for Young Adults (Joann S. Olson, C. Amelia Davis)

Index
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

Learning as Leaving Home: Fear, Empathy and Hospitality in the Theology and Religion Classroom

TTR
Fleming, Daniel and Lovat, Terence
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 207-223
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
The article is a response to this journal's call for papers on metaphors for teaching, and also draws from a previous publication in which Kent Eilers developed a methodology for teaching global theologies. In this methodology, the ultimate goal was the development of “hermeneutical dispositions of empathy, hospitality, and receptivity toward culturally diverse voices” (2014, 165). This article considers the goals of Eilers' methodology, and others like his, and how it is ...
Additional Info:
The article is a response to this journal's call for papers on metaphors for teaching, and also draws from a previous publication in which Kent Eilers developed a methodology for teaching global theologies. In this methodology, the ultimate goal was the development of “hermeneutical dispositions of empathy, hospitality, and receptivity toward culturally diverse voices” (2014, 165). This article considers the goals of Eilers' methodology, and others like his, and how it is that the metaphors of “leaving home” and “communal imagination” highlight the importance of the ambient and interpersonal features of a classroom and their effect on the attainment of the above goals. In so doing, it extends the conversation beyond content and methodology in teaching theology and religion into the realms of philosophy of education, as well as the fields of moral and values education. It is contended that the metaphors informed by these areas of study facilitate the attainment of such goals, and similar ones, by demonstrating that the cultivation of an ambience of care, trust, and compassion within the classroom constitutes an essential foundation for learning in which students “leave home” and cultivate “communal imagination.” The article finishes with practical suggestions for educators in theology and religion.
TTR cover image

Transformations: The World Religions Survey through an Adjunct Feminist Lens

TTR
Downie, Alison
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 193-206
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This essay describes a transformation in my experience as an adjunct teaching underprepared students from one of shame toward a desire to assert the value of this work. Insights from my feminist theological training helped me to affirm the importance of encouraging transformative learning in teaching the academically marginalized and prompted my analysis of student writing in an introductory World Religions course, in order to determine whether or not the ...
Additional Info:
This essay describes a transformation in my experience as an adjunct teaching underprepared students from one of shame toward a desire to assert the value of this work. Insights from my feminist theological training helped me to affirm the importance of encouraging transformative learning in teaching the academically marginalized and prompted my analysis of student writing in an introductory World Religions course, in order to determine whether or not the course was a site of transformative learning. I argue that despite many contextual limitations, the movement toward deepening self-awareness and increasing openness to religious diversity seen in student writing demonstrates that transformative learning began in this course, and that is valuable for students' lives whether or not they are academically successful.
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Working With Students in Community Colleges: Contemporary Strategies for Bridging Theory, Research, and Practice

Book
Kelsay, Lisa S.; and Zamani-Gallaher, Eboni M., eds.
2014
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2328.15.U6 W67 2014
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This timely volume addresses the urgent need for new strategies and better ways to serve community colleges’ present and future students at a time of rapid diversification, not just racially and ethnically, but including such groups as the undocumented, international students, older adult learners and veterans, all of whom come with varied levels of academic and technical skills.

The contributing researchers, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This timely volume addresses the urgent need for new strategies and better ways to serve community colleges’ present and future students at a time of rapid diversification, not just racially and ethnically, but including such groups as the undocumented, international students, older adult learners and veterans, all of whom come with varied levels of academic and technical skills.

The contributing researchers, higher education faculty, college presidents, and community college administrators provide thorough understanding of student groups who have received scant attention in the higher education literature. They address the often unconscious barriers to access our institutions have erected and describe emerging strategies, frameworks, and pilot projects that can ease students’ transition into college and through the maze of the college experience to completion.

They offer advice on organizational culture, on defining institutional outcomes, on aligning shifting demographics with the multiple missions of the community college, on strengthening the collaboration of student and academic affairs to leverage their respective roles and resources, and on engaging with the opportunities afforded by technology.

Divided into three parts – understanding today’s community college campuses; supporting today’s community college learners; and specialized populations and communities – this book offers a vision and solutions that should inform the work of faculty, administrators, presidents, and board members. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Foreword (Susan Salvador)
Preface

Part 1 - Understanding Today’s Community College Campuses
ch. 1 Junior Grows Up: A Brief History of Community Colleges (Lisa S. Kelsay and Betsy Oudenhoven)
ch. 2 Community College Economic Climate, Policy Landscape, and the American Graduation Initiative (John L. Jamrogowicz)
ch. 3 College Readiness and the Open Door Mission (Patricia Munsch, Tania Velazquez, and Corinne Kowpak)
ch. 4 Technology: The New Core Competency (Susan J. Procter and Julie Uranis)

Part 2 - Welcome to Campus! Supporting Today’s Community College Learners
ch. 5 Who Are Our Students? (Patricia Munsch and Lisa S. Kelsay)
ch. 6 Academic and Student Affairs Collaboration: A Value for Student Success Within the Community College Environment (Cara McFadden and Martha Mazeika)
ch. 7 Student Orientation at Community Colleges (Jessica Hale)
ch. 8 Residence Life at Community Colleges: Building New Opportunities for Student Learning (Carin W. Barber and Daniel J. Phelan)

Part 3 - A Closer Look: Specialized Populations and Communities on Two-Year Campuses
ch. 9 Older Adult Learning in Community Colleges: A New Wave of Adult Learners (Ramona Meraz Lewis, Eboni M. Zamani-Gallaher, and Christopher Bonapace)
ch. 10 Two- and Four-Year College Contexts for Student Veterans (Tara Fagan and Shaftone Dunklin)
ch. 11 Women Community College Student Leaders of Color: An Examination of Student Involvement Theory (Dimpal Jain)
ch. 12 Looking Across the Research: Social and Cultural Capital’s Interplay with Marginalized Student Communities (Jesse S. Watson and Elizabeth Cox Brand)

Afterword (Stephanie R. Bulger)
Additional Resources (Tamara N. Stevenson)
Editors and Contributors
Index
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The Urgency of Now: Equity and Excellence

Book
Kolb; Marcus M.; Cargile, Samuel D.; Wood, Jason; Ebrahimi, Nassim; Priddy, Lynne; and Dodge, Lauren, eds.
2015
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LB2328.U73 2015
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: With the student body evolving quickly, and the looming challenge of the “completion agenda,” community colleges are facing circumstances like never before in serving all students and propelling them to fulfilling their education aspirations. The Urgency of Now suggests a way forward, with students and their learning at the center of what community colleges, and all of higher education, must do to generate ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: With the student body evolving quickly, and the looming challenge of the “completion agenda,” community colleges are facing circumstances like never before in serving all students and propelling them to fulfilling their education aspirations. The Urgency of Now suggests a way forward, with students and their learning at the center of what community colleges, and all of higher education, must do to generate graduates in possession of high quality degrees and credentials. Through considering comprehensive assessment, new roles for accreditation, faculty engagement strategies, and competency-based education, The Urgency of Now describes our current challenges and the ways we might meet those challenges for the 21st century institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Urgency of Now: Equity and Excellence (Samuel Cargile)

ch. 1 Making the Case (Jason Wood)
ch. 2 The Accountable Institution from Compliance to Learning (Lynn E. Priddy)
ch. 3 Competency-Based Education (Laurie Dodge)
ch. 4 Integrated Outcomes Assessment (Nassim Ebrahimi)
ch. 5 Engaging Faculty (Marcus M. Kolb)

Epilogue (Marcus M. Kolb and Samuel D. Cargile)
Index
About the Authors
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Bullying Among University Students: Cross-national perspectives

Book
Cowie, Helen; and Myers, Carrie Anne, eds.
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2345.3.B85 B85 2016
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Bullying Amongst University Students is a pioneering collection of knowledge and evidence exploring the under-researched phenomenon of bullying in universities. Abusive behaviour amongst young people is a serious and pervasive problem that is exacerbated by the rapid advances in electronic communication, and in this book the authors highlight the problem and proceed to facilitate new practices and policies to address it.

...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Bullying Amongst University Students is a pioneering collection of knowledge and evidence exploring the under-researched phenomenon of bullying in universities. Abusive behaviour amongst young people is a serious and pervasive problem that is exacerbated by the rapid advances in electronic communication, and in this book the authors highlight the problem and proceed to facilitate new practices and policies to address it.

This book brings together an international team of authors from a range of disciplines, encompassing education, psychology, criminology, law and counselling, who have carried out research in the area of university bullying. Addressing critical dialogues and debates, the authors explore peer on peer violence, intimidation and social exclusion before considering its effects on students and making recommendations for action and further research. Key topics include:

• Cyberbullying and cyber aggression
• Rape culture across the university
• Homophobic and transphobic bullying
• The impact of bullying on mental health
• The role of bully and victim across the lifespan
• Policies and procedures to address bullying

International in authorship and scope, this book will be an invaluable resource for students and researchers in fields such as education, psychology, sociology, health studies and criminology. It is also essential reading for university policy-makers and union representatives responsible for the emotional and physical well-being of students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Overview
ch. 1 What we know to date about bullying and cyberbullying among university students (Helen Cowie and Carrie-Anne Myers)

The Student Experience
ch. 2 The student voice (Toni Pearce)
ch. 3 The postgraduate student experience (Rashid Aziz)
The Nature of Bullying at Univeristy
ch. 4 Do the roles of bully and victim remain stable from school to university? Theoretical considerations (Maili Pörhölä)
ch. 5 Homophobic and transphobic bullying in universities (Ian Rivers)
ch. 6 Stalking and violence among university students (Katja Björklund)
ch. 7 The relationship between mental health and bullying (Osman Tolga Arıcak)

The Social Context of Bullying at University
ch. 8 Cyberaggression among members of college fraternities and sororities in the United States (Jessica Simmons, Sheri Bauman, and Johanne Ives)
ch. 9 Bullying at Greek universities: an empirical study (Theodoros Giovazolias and Maria Malikiosi-Loizos)
ch. 10 Cross-cultural comparisons of bullying among university students: perspectives from Argentina, Estonia, Finland and United States (Maili Pörhölä, Kristen Cvancara, Esta Kaal, Kaja Tampere and Beatriz Torres)

Interventions and Policies
ch. 11 The role of the therapist in helping university students who have been bullied (Maria Luca)
ch. 12 Policies and procedures to address bullying at Australian universities (Marilyn Campbell)
ch. 13 Cyberbullying and rape culture in universities: defining the legal lines between fun and intentional harm (Shaheen Shariff and Ashley DeMartini)

Reflections
ch. 14 Commentary: Bullying among university students: awakening and harnessing the sleeping dragon of student power (Keith Sullivan)
ch. 15 Commentary: what universities can learn from workplace bullying research (Iain Coyne)
ch. 16 Epilogue: what can be done? (Helen Cowie and Carrie-Anne Myers)

Index
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Fragile Learning: The Influence of Anxiety

Book
Mathew, David
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1088.M38 2015
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: What are the barriers and obstacles to adults learning? What makes the process of adult learning so fragile? And what exactly do we mean by fragile learning? This book addresses these questions in two ways. In Part One, it looks at challenges to learning, examining issues such as language invention in a maximum security prison, geography and bad technology, and pedagogic fragility in ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: What are the barriers and obstacles to adults learning? What makes the process of adult learning so fragile? And what exactly do we mean by fragile learning? This book addresses these questions in two ways. In Part One, it looks at challenges to learning, examining issues such as language invention in a maximum security prison, geography and bad technology, and pedagogic fragility in Higher Education. Through a psychoanalytic lens, Fragile Learning examines authorial illness and the process of slow recovery as a tool for reflective learning, and explores ethical issues in problem-based learning.

The second part of the book deals specifically with the problem of online anxiety. From cyberbullying to Internet boredom, the book asks what the implications for educational design in our contemporary world might be. It compares education programs that insist on the Internet and those that completely ban it, while exploring conflict, virtual weapons and the role of the online personal tutor. The book also examines the issue of time as a barrier to learning and its links to unconscious thinking, as well as defining fragility in a summative essay. Using real-life examples, originality and wit, Fragile Learning is an important contribution to the field of psychoanalysis and pedagogy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
About the Author and Contributor
Introduction

Part I—Challenges to Learning
ch. 1 Prison language
ch. 2 Disease and distance: an anxious diptych (Susan Sapsed)
ch. 3 The Stable group
ch. 4 Ethical issues in problem-based learning (Susan Sapsed)
ch. 5 On empty spaces: an afterword
ch. 6 Steps forward, steps back (Susan Sapsed)
ch. 7 Ghosting

Part II—Online Anxiety
Introduction to Part II
ch. 8 Cyberbullying: a workplace virus
ch. 9 From fatigue to anxiety
ch. 10 The absence of E
ch. 11 Cyber tools and virtual weapons
ch. 12 E-learning, time, and unconscious thinking
ch. 13 The role of the online learning personal tutor
ch. 14 Conflict in online learning
ch. 15 The Internet is unwell . . . and will not be at school today

Notes
References
Index
TTR cover image

From My Place, Teaching the Holocaust and Judaism at the University of Mississippi Fifty-Three Years After James Meredith

TTR
Johnson, Willa M.
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 1 (2016): 57-75
BL41.T4 v.19 no.1
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This essay explores classroom dynamics when students identify and connect their own painful experiences to structural racism or ethnocentrism exhibited in the Holocaust or parts of Jewish history. The intrusion of this proximal knowledge can be an obstacle to student learning. If engaged by professors, however, I argue that proximal knowledge can be a catalyst that promotes learning. Social scientific theory provides a useful lens for helping students to better ...
Additional Info:
This essay explores classroom dynamics when students identify and connect their own painful experiences to structural racism or ethnocentrism exhibited in the Holocaust or parts of Jewish history. The intrusion of this proximal knowledge can be an obstacle to student learning. If engaged by professors, however, I argue that proximal knowledge can be a catalyst that promotes learning. Social scientific theory provides a useful lens for helping students to better grasp and contextualize both their old experiences and the new materials that are being taught in the course within the larger structural frames of race, religion, and ethnicity that they have selected, but may not fully appreciate. Reflective guided journaling is an essential part of the learning experience.
Cover image

Making Sense in Religious Studies A Student's Guide to Research and Writing, 2nd Edition

Book
Northey, Margot; Anderson, Bradford A.; and Lohr, Joel N.
2015
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
BL41.N67 2015
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Features an overview of research and writing for students in religious studies, for a reasonable price, and can be used as a resource for a student's entire academic career.

Uses straightforward language to discuss the basics of research and writing. Instructors agree that as an overview, the Making Sense series is much easier to digest than heavier writing style guides, and ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Features an overview of research and writing for students in religious studies, for a reasonable price, and can be used as a resource for a student's entire academic career.

Uses straightforward language to discuss the basics of research and writing. Instructors agree that as an overview, the Making Sense series is much easier to digest than heavier writing style guides, and they appreciate the discipline-specific content.

Features up-to-date guidelines for documentation and referencing and provides the most current guidelines for documentation in religious studies, including coverage of MLA, APA, and Chicago styles and referencing.

Along with including the most up-to-date citation styles, the Making Sense series also features current examples, and useful information on using the internet as a research tool.

More Accessible. This edition contains more bulleted points and summaries to make the content easier to reference and absorb.

New to this Edition:
Chapters are reordered to better match the writing and learning process

Includes comprehensive coverage of new developments in technology-based research and writing

Sections on MLA, APA, and Chicago style have been revised to be completely up to date (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
A Note to the Student
A Note to the Instructor

ch. 1 Making the Most of Your Time in Higher Education
ch. 2 Getting to Know Religious Studies
ch. 3 Writing and Thinking
ch. 4 Finding and Using Academic Resources
ch. 5 Writing Essays
ch. 6 Writing Book Reviews and Book Reports
ch. 7 Writing Short Assignments: Chapter Summaries and Article Reviews
ch. 8 Reading Religious Texts and Writing Interpretive Essays
ch. 9 Learning Languages
ch. 10 Writing Comparative Essays
ch. 11 Writing with Style
ch. 12 Tests and Examinations
ch. 13 Giving an Oral Presentation
ch. 14 Receiving Feedback and Reflecting on Your Studies
ch. 15 Documenting Your Sources
ch. 16 Common Errors in Grammar and Usage
ch. 17 Punctuation
ch. 18 Misused Words and Phrases
ch. 19 Afterword

Appendix 1: Sample Book Review
Appendix 2: Sample Chapter Summary and Evaluation
Glossary
Bibliography Index
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Sex and the Soul: Juggling Sexuality, Spirituality, Romance, and Religion on America's College Campuses

Book
Freitas, Donna
2010
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
BL625.9.C64 F74 2008
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Based on dozens of face-to-face interviews, Sex and the Soul explores the sexual and spiritual lives of today's college students. Donna Freitas crisscrossed the country, visiting a range of America's colleges and universities--from public to private, Catholic to evangelical--to find out what students had to say about these highly personal subjects. Their stories will not only engage readers, but, in many cases, move them with the painful struggles these candid ...
Additional Info:
Based on dozens of face-to-face interviews, Sex and the Soul explores the sexual and spiritual lives of today's college students. Donna Freitas crisscrossed the country, visiting a range of America's colleges and universities--from public to private, Catholic to evangelical--to find out what students had to say about these highly personal subjects. Their stories will not only engage readers, but, in many cases, move them with the painful struggles these candid young women and men face. Indeed, the book uncovers aspects of college life that may unsettle some readers, especially parents. Many campuses, for instance, are dominated by the pervasiveness of hook-up culture. Moreover, many students see little connection between sex and religion, even as they seek one between sex and spirituality. Indeed, these observations hold true even at Catholic schools. Only at evangelical colleges is religion an important factor when deciding whether or not to engage in sex. But Freitas's research also reveals that, even at secular schools, students are not comfortable with a culture of casual sex, and that they do want spirituality, at least, if not also religion, to speak about what they should do and who they should try to be--not just what they should avoid doing.

Sex and the Soul will offer readers the chance to hear college students speaking honestly about extremely sensitive topics, in a book that will be of great interest to students, parents, clergy, teachers, and anyone who wants to know what's happening on today's college campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Lauren Winner)
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Welcome to College. Meet Amy Stone: Tour Guide, Fashion Model, Straight-A Student

Section 1: The Varieties of College Religious Experience
ch. 1 The Spiritual Colleges: Souls Adrift
ch. 2 Why Catholic Schools (and Their Students) Are "Spiritual but Not Religious"
ch. 3 Evangelical Extroverts: Faithful and Diverse

Section 2: The Romantic Ideal
ch. 4 Evangelical Purity Culture: Its Princesses and Warriors
ch. 5 Wanted: A Little Romance

Section 3: The Truth About Sex On Campus
ch. 6 Where Dating=Marriage and a Kiss Means Everything
ch. 7 Hookups, Ho's, and Losing It

Section 4: Reconciling Sex and the Soul (or Not) on Campus
ch. 8 God vs. My Boyfriend
ch. 9 Dividing Sex from the Soul: Why Religion Doesn't Matter When It Comes to Sex

Section 5: Conclusions and Practical Implications
ch. 10 Seeking a Sexy Spirituality for Students on Campus

A Practical Guide to Sex and the Soul: Three Musts for Your College To-Do List, What to Say to Your Child, Student, Parishioner, Friend

Appendix: On Methodology
Notes
Index
Cover image

Finding the Why: Personalizing Learning in Higher Education: New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 145

Book
Watts, Margit Misangyi
2016
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LA227.4.F56 2016
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This volume addresses how we might help students find the “why” of their educational endeavors. The ideas found in this volume range from:

- changing the perceptions and attitudes of whole communities toward education,
- retuning the first year experience to give students more opportunities to find meaning in their learning,
- suggesting new ways of integrating students’ experiences ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This volume addresses how we might help students find the “why” of their educational endeavors. The ideas found in this volume range from:

- changing the perceptions and attitudes of whole communities toward education,
- retuning the first year experience to give students more opportunities to find meaning in their learning,
- suggesting new ways of integrating students’ experiences with their learning in core courses, and
- connecting major initiatives already in place to demonstrate how we might restructure undergraduate education through the content of the curriculum, the way we teach, and our curricular learning experiences.

This is the 145th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (margit misangyi watts)
Foreword (John N. Gardner)

ch. 1 Personalizing Learning (margit misangyi watts)
The editor offers a personal account of how she came to embrace the “why” as being important to address, as well as giving an overview of changes that have not occurred yet should.

ch. 2 Educational Success and Surrounding Culture (Garrison Walters)
Highlighting the need for a change in attitudes toward education, this author finds that students’ perceptions about their ability to learn matters a lot, and that often this perception is a response to other influences.

ch. 3 Integrative Learning: Making Liberal Education Purposeful, Personal, and Practical (Ann S. Ferren, Chad B. Anderson)
This chapter focuses on learning as a way to construct personal meaning. The authors argue for teaching in such a manner that students receive a holistic perspective on their education.

ch. 4 Project-Based Learning in Colleges of Business: Is it Enough to Develop Educated Graduates? (Penny Pence Smith, Lindsey A. Gibson)
Though project-based learning is heralded as an excellent way to engage students in learning, this chapter suggests that perhaps new ways might be better suited to at least some business students.

ch. 5 Making Learning Meaningful: Engaging Students in Ways That Matter to Them (George D. Kuh)
In order to raise our national retention rates, this author is convinced that students need to connect what they are learning to their lives. He suggests focusing on what he calls “goal realization” as a way to help students find their studies to be personally meaningful.

ch. 6 Challenging the First Year of College: Old Models and New Imperatives (Shala A. Mills, George L. Mehaffy)
This chapter describes how the AASCU is experimenting with new blended courses in which the content transcends the typical general education courses and invites students to create solutions to global challenges.

ch. 7 After the Doors Opened: Asking Why at a New Community College (Scott Evenbeck, Linda E. Merians)
These authors detail the founding of Guttman Community College and how the programs put in place were focused on helping students discover the “why” of their educational pursuits.

ch. 8 The Undergraduate Learning Community: A Bridge to Understanding Why (Stephen J. Romanoff)
This chapter describes the Russell Scholars Program and how well it has accomplished meaning for students who participate. The foundation of the program is clearly personalizing education.

ch. 9 Why Higher Education: Lessons Learned in a Learner-Centered College (Sandford C. Shugart)
Valencia College is a national leader in showing successful outcomes for students. This author shares key lessons learned that could extend beyond the world of community colleges.

ch. 10 Concluding Remarks (margit misangyi watts)

Index
TTR cover image

A Book for None? Teaching Biblical Studies to Millennial Nones

TTR
Reed, Randall
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 2 (2016): 154-174
BL41.T4 v.19 no. 2
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
The millennial generation is distinctive for several reasons, not the least is its growing religious disaffiliation. Given a growing disinterest in religion in general and the Bible in particular especially among the fast growing group of millennial “nones” how can biblical studies classes still be seen as appealing and relevant? This article seeks to answer this question by examining the identity and concomitant values of millennials. As a result of ...
Additional Info:
The millennial generation is distinctive for several reasons, not the least is its growing religious disaffiliation. Given a growing disinterest in religion in general and the Bible in particular especially among the fast growing group of millennial “nones” how can biblical studies classes still be seen as appealing and relevant? This article seeks to answer this question by examining the identity and concomitant values of millennials. As a result of this analysis I argue that while the Bible as inherent authority may be quickly losing its appeal, the Bible as an example of human creativity, group reflection, political rhetoric, and social discourse makes the study of the Bible particularly relevant for millennials contemplating careers in the global marketplace even if the importance of the Bible itself is waning for this generation. I show how in my introductory New Testament class I attempt to implement these ideas.
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"The Climate for Underrepresented Groups and Diversity on Campus"

Article
Hurtado, Sylvia and Ruiz, Adriana
The Higher Education Research Institute (HERI)
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Race continues to be a significant issue on campus. Underrepresented college students at low-diversity institutions reported more incidents of stereotyping, discrimination and harassment on campus. Data indicate more hospitable racial climates on the most diverse campuses and suggest that campuses must continue to work to improve intergroup relations even as enrollments begin to change. 
Additional Info:
Race continues to be a significant issue on campus. Underrepresented college students at low-diversity institutions reported more incidents of stereotyping, discrimination and harassment on campus. Data indicate more hospitable racial climates on the most diverse campuses and suggest that campuses must continue to work to improve intergroup relations even as enrollments begin to change. 
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Why Students Resist Learning: A Practical Model for Understanding and Helping Students

Book
Tolman, Anton O. and Kremling, Janine, eds.
2017
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2343.4.W555 2017
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
However personally committed faculty may be to helping students learn, their students are not always as eager to participate in this endeavor, and may react with both active and passive resistant behaviors, including poor faculty evaluations.

The purpose of this book is to help faculty develop a coherent and integrated understanding of the various causes of student resistance to learning, providing them ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
However personally committed faculty may be to helping students learn, their students are not always as eager to participate in this endeavor, and may react with both active and passive resistant behaviors, including poor faculty evaluations.

The purpose of this book is to help faculty develop a coherent and integrated understanding of the various causes of student resistance to learning, providing them with a rationale for responding constructively, and enabling them to create conditions conducive to implementing effective learning strategies.

In this book readers will discover an innovative integrated model that accounts for student behaviors and creates a foundation for intentional and informed discussion, evaluation, and the development of effective counter strategies. The model takes into account institutional context, environmental forces, students’ prior negative classroom experiences, their cognitive development, readiness to change, and metacognition. The various chapters take the reader through the model’s elements, exploring their practical implications for teaching, whether relating to course design, assessments, assignments, or interactions with students.

The book includes a chapter written entirely by students, offering their insights into the causes of resistance, and their reflections on how participating on this project has affected them.

While of great value for faculty, this book is also useful to faculty developers advising future and current faculty, as well as to administrators, offering insight into how institutional values impact teaching practice and student attitudes. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (John Tagg)
Acknowledgments
Preface: What Makes This Book Unique (Anton O. Tolman)

ch. 1 Defining and Understanding Student Resistance (Anton O. Tolman, Andy Sechler, and Shea Smart)
ch. 2 Student Voices: Discovering Resistance (Averie Hamilton, Andy Sechler, Colt Rothlisberger, Shea Smart, Anton O. Tolman, Matthew Anderson, Rob Blair, and Amy Lindstrom)
ch. 3 Obstacles, Biases, and the Urgent Need to Understand the Social Cost of Resistance (Anton O. Tolman, Andy Sechler, and Shea Smart)
ch. 4 The Impact of Institutional Culture on Student Disengagement and Resistance to Learning (Janine Kremling and Erikca DeAnn Brown)
ch. 5 Societal and Environmental Influences That Shape Student Motivation (Christopher Lee and Amy Lindstrom)
ch. 6 Through the Students’ Eyes: Internalized Forces That Shape Student Motivation (Christopher Lee, Andy Sechler, and Shea Smart)
ch. 7 Negative Classroom Experiences (Janine Kremling, Colt Rothlisberger, and Shea Smart)
ch. 8 Seeing the Invisible: How Cognitive and Developmental Influences Shape Student Resistance (Trevor Morris, Rob Blair, and Colt Rothlisberger)
ch. 9 How Promoting Student Metacognition Can Reduce Resistance (Rob Blair, Anton O. Tolman, Janine Kremling, and Trevor Morris)
ch.10 Creating a Campus Climate to Reduce Resistance (Anton O. Tolman, Janine Kremling, and Ryan Radmall)

Epilogue: Final Thoughts (Anton O. Tolman, Janine Kremling, and Trevor Morris)
Appendix
TTM Learning Survey
Learning Strategies and Self-Awareness Assessment #1 (LSSA)
Learning Strategies and Self-Awareness Assessment #3
Becoming Aware of Your Learning Approach
Interpreting the TTM Survey
About the Editors and Contributors
Index
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Principles for Effective Asynchronous Online Instruction in Religious Studies

TTR
McGuire, Beverley
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 1 (2017): 28-45
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 1
Topics: Online Learning   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Asynchronous online instruction has become increasingly popular in the field of religious studies. However, despite voluminous research on online learning in general and numerous articles on online theological instruction, there has been little discussion of how to effectively design and deliver online undergraduate courses in religious studies. Drawing on recent research, experiences teaching and learning online, and interviews with colleagues, this paper discusses key principles of effective online instruction. It ...
Additional Info:
Asynchronous online instruction has become increasingly popular in the field of religious studies. However, despite voluminous research on online learning in general and numerous articles on online theological instruction, there has been little discussion of how to effectively design and deliver online undergraduate courses in religious studies. Drawing on recent research, experiences teaching and learning online, and interviews with colleagues, this paper discusses key principles of effective online instruction. It recommends instructors focus on humanizing their course website, “chunking” their course content, making their approach to the study of religion clear, structuring and monitoring online discussions, prioritizing prompt and constructive feedback, and making course material relevant to learners.
Additional Info:
In this article, I explore an ethical and pedagogical dilemma that I encounter each semester in my world religions courses: namely, that a great number of students enroll in the courses as part of their missionary training programs, and come to class understanding successful learning to mean gathering enough information about the world's religious “traditions” so as to effectively seduce people out of them. How should we teach world religions – ...
Additional Info:
In this article, I explore an ethical and pedagogical dilemma that I encounter each semester in my world religions courses: namely, that a great number of students enroll in the courses as part of their missionary training programs, and come to class understanding successful learning to mean gathering enough information about the world's religious “traditions” so as to effectively seduce people out of them. How should we teach world religions – in public university religious studies courses – with this student constituency? What are/ought to be our student learning goals? What can and should we expect to accomplish? How can we maximize student learning, while also maintaining our disciplinary integrity? In response to these questions, I propose a world religions course module, the goal of which is for students to examine – as objects of inquiry – the lenses through which they understand religion(s). With a recognition of their own lenses, I argue, missionary students become more aware of the biases and presumptions about others that they bring to the table, and they learn to see the ways in which these presumptions inform what they see and know about others, and also what they do not so easily see.
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Sexual Violence in and around the Classroom

TTR
Raybill, Rhiannon; Minister, Meredith; and Lawrence, Beatrice
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 1 (2017): 70-88
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 1
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Sexual violence on campus is a major issue facing students, faculty, and administrators, and institutions of higher education are struggling to respond. This forum brings together three responses to the problem, with a focus on the religious studies classroom. The responses move from the institution to the faculty to the classroom, exploring three separate but linked spaces for responding to sexual violence. The first contribution (Graybill) critiques common institutional responses ...
Additional Info:
Sexual violence on campus is a major issue facing students, faculty, and administrators, and institutions of higher education are struggling to respond. This forum brings together three responses to the problem, with a focus on the religious studies classroom. The responses move from the institution to the faculty to the classroom, exploring three separate but linked spaces for responding to sexual violence. The first contribution (Graybill) critiques common institutional responses to sexual violence. The second contribution (Minister) advocates for long-term, classroom-based responses to sexual violence and describes a faculty/staff workshop response. The third contribution (Lawrence) emphasizes the classroom, examining the issues that arise when perpetrators of sexual assault are part of the student body. Read together, the pieces offer a comprehensive view of the complicated intersections of sexual violence, the university, and pedagogical issues in religious studies.
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Faculty and First-Generation College Students: Bridging the Classroom Gap Together

Book
Harvey, Vickie L.; and Housel, Teresa Heinz, eds.
2011
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 127)
LC4069.6.F14 2011
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Gain a greater understanding of the academic, cultural, and social experiences of first-generation college students (FGS). Fascinating, heart-touching, and important, the research and the stories presented here enlighten what FGS often have to overcome to successfully complete their degrees.

With an emphasis on improving FGS' college success, retention, and graduation rates, this volume first covers common obstacles and the trend of FGS continuing on for graduate degrees. Section ...
Additional Info:
Gain a greater understanding of the academic, cultural, and social experiences of first-generation college students (FGS). Fascinating, heart-touching, and important, the research and the stories presented here enlighten what FGS often have to overcome to successfully complete their degrees.

With an emphasis on improving FGS' college success, retention, and graduation rates, this volume first covers common obstacles and the trend of FGS continuing on for graduate degrees. Section Two discusses the complex interplay of social, academic, emotional, and financial influences on academic performance. The chapters collectively affirm that the commitment of university resources is critical to college success.

This is the 127th volume of the Jossey-Bass higher education quarterly report New Directions for Teaching and Learning, which offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Janice Wiggins) - A first-generation college student and director of Indiana University-Bloomington's Groups Program, Janice Wiggins introduces the volume by advocating for the need to effectively serve first-generation college students. The Groups Program is one of the nation's foremost higher education programs that holistically assists first-generation and low income college students with adjusting to campus culture.

ch. 1 Introduction: Shall We Gather in the Classroom? (Teresa Heinz Housel, Vickie L. Harvey)

The volume's coeditors discuss the increasing number of first generation college students at higher-education institutions today. However, academic personnel do not always understand why FGS struggle academically, socially, and emotionally on campus; thus, this volume extends the existing FGS-related literature and offers ways to help FGS achieve college success.

Section One: The New Pattern: First-Generation College Students As Graduate Students
ch. 2 When First-Generation Students Go to Graduate School (Brett Lunceford)

FGS often navigate through higher education using a system of trial and error. Reflecting on his errors in applying to graduate schools, Lunceford offers practical step-by-step advice for other FGS who wish to pursue graduate study.

ch. 3 First-Generation Latina Graduate Students: Balancing Professional Identity Development with Traditional Family Roles (Valerie Lester Leyva)

Like many FGS, Leyva was unprepared for the stratified social structure and expectations of campus culture; this lack of preparation is often compounded for ethnic minorities. Leyva uses ethnographic interviews to examine how Latina women in her university's department manage gender and familial roles with college demands.

ch. 4 Learning a New World: Reflections on Being a First-Generation College Student and the Influence of TRIO Programs (LaKresha Graham)

Graham emphasizes the TRIO programs' important role in supporting FGS as they navigate unfamiliar academic culture. The chapter asserts that Upward Bound, Student Educational Support Services, and the McNair Scholars Program are increasingly important as more FGS pursue graduate studies.

Section Two: First-Generation Studies Join The Undergraduate Ranks
ch. 5 Faculty Perceptions of the First-Generation Student Experience and Programs at Tribal Colleges (Jacqueline J. Schmidt, Yemi Akande)

The authors examine barriers to success that Native-American FGS face at tribal colleges, and offer specific recommendations for improved student services based on the authors’ interviews with faculty at five tribal colleges.

ch. 6 Understanding the First-Generation Student Experience in Higher Education Through a Relational Dialectic Perspective (Russell Lowery-Hart, George Pacheco Jr.)

Russell Lowery-Hart and George Pacheco Jr. use interviews and focus groups with FGS to examine the tensions they often experience due to lack of family support, financial worries, poor academic preparation, and other barriers. Because support programs often isolate and further marginalize FGS, Lowery-Hart and Pacheco argue that college personnel must realize that the failure to "fit in" can lead to students’ incapacity for positive relationships with the college and peers.

ch. 7 First-Generation Issues: Learning Outcomes of the Dismissal Testimonial for Academically Dismissed Students in the Arts & Sciences (Jennifer Brost, Kelly Payne)

Studies indicate that FGS drop out of college at higher rates than non-FGS. To extend the existing research, Brost and Payne conducted surveys with FGS who are on academic dismissal to examine what specific issues led the students to fail academically.

ch. 8 A Social Constructionist View of Issues Confronting First-Generation College Students (Stephen Coffman)

Coffman uses interviews with FGS to argue that race and class are two areas in which students experience tension when transitioning into campus culture. When college personnel understand the social influences on FGS' college experiences, they can better assist the students through appropriate support programs.

ch. 9 Critical Compassionate Pedagogy and the Teacher's Role in First-Generation Student Success (Richie Neil Hao)

Hao asserts that critical compassionate pedagogy allows him to better meet the pedagogical needs of FGS. He advocates for this pedagogical perspective, arguing that many instructors do not consider the different pedagogical needs of underserved student populations such as FGS.

ch. 10 Gathering Ourselves and Our Students: Concluding Remarks (Vickie L. Harvey, Teresa Heinz Housel)

In this concluding chapter, Harvey and Heinz Housel reflect on the book’s contribution to the research on FGS, discuss common questions that FGS have about attending college, and assert the need for effective campus support programs.
Index
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Breakthrough Strategies: Classroom-Based Practices to Support New Majority College Students

Book
Ross, Kathleen A.
2016
Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, MA
LC3731.R68 2016
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Breakthrough Strategies identifies effective strategies that faculty have used to help New Majority students—those from minority, immigrant, or disadvantaged backgrounds—build the necessary skills to succeed in college. As the proportion of New Majority students rises, there is increased attention to helping them gain access to college. Once enrolled, however, these students often face significant challenges of adjustment, with few resources for support. ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Breakthrough Strategies identifies effective strategies that faculty have used to help New Majority students—those from minority, immigrant, or disadvantaged backgrounds—build the necessary skills to succeed in college. As the proportion of New Majority students rises, there is increased attention to helping them gain access to college. Once enrolled, however, these students often face significant challenges of adjustment, with few resources for support. Specifically, there is little attention to students’ experiences within their college classrooms and their relationships with professors. At the same time, faculty who work with these students have little guidance on how to help them adjust to new expectations and identities as they engage with college-level work.

Sister Kathleen A. Ross, a MacArthur fellow and president emerita of Heritage University, has devoted three decades to helping New Majority students get college degrees. Based on an action-research project undertaken at Heritage University and Yakima Valley Community College in Washington State, the book highlights eleven strategies to encourage student success, including: asking questions in class; navigating the syllabus; and developing an academic identity. Written in a warm, down-to-earth voice, Breakthrough Strategies is infused with the belief that faculty can become a powerful resource for students, and that classroom instruction can be an important vehicle for supporting these students’ development and success. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Michelle Asha Cooper)

ch. 1 The Breakthrough Strategies Project
ch. 2 Welcome to Heritage University
ch. 3 Communication, Culture, and the New Majority

Part One - Strategies For Engagement
ch. 4 Engaging Students Through Effective Feedback
ch. 5 Helping Students Ask Questions
ch. 6 Engaging Students with Analogies

Part Two - Strategies To Promote A Sense of Belonging
ch. 7 Welcoming Students with First-Day Activities
ch. 8 Relating to Students’ Life Situations
ch. 9 Reframing the Classroom as Community

Part Three - Strategies to Engender Confidence
ch. 10 Creating Confidence: A Professor’s Role
ch. 11 Journaling for Confidence and Deeper Thinking
ch. 12 Developing Students’ Own Academic Ideas

Part Four - Strategies To Build A Vision For The Future
ch. 13 Envisioning an Academic Identity: How Professors Can Help
ch. 14 Building Professional Identities to Counter Stereotypes

Notes
Acknowledgements
About the Author
Index
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Unforgettable: Enabling Deep and Durable Learning

Book
Gray, W. Michael
2016
Wipf & Stock Publishers, Eugene, OR
LB2331.G669 2016
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
We have an uneasy relationship with the relentless deluge of information gushing out of academia and our media outlets. To turn it off is escapist, but to attempt to cognitively grapple with it is overwhelming.

In Unforgettable: Enabling Deep and Durable Learning, a nationally recognized master teacher gives professors and their students the means to chart a clear path through this information explosion. Humans crave explanatory patterns, and ...
Additional Info:
We have an uneasy relationship with the relentless deluge of information gushing out of academia and our media outlets. To turn it off is escapist, but to attempt to cognitively grapple with it is overwhelming.

In Unforgettable: Enabling Deep and Durable Learning, a nationally recognized master teacher gives professors and their students the means to chart a clear path through this information explosion. Humans crave explanatory patterns, and this book enables teachers to think deeply about their academic disciplines to find and articulate their core explanatory principles and to engage their students in a compelling way of thinking. An alternative title for this book could be Why the Best College Teachers Do What They Do because the author articulates a compelling rationale that will equip faculty to create and deliver transformative courses. Students in transformative courses grapple with essential questions and gain mental muscle that equips them for real world challenges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction

ch. 1 Teaching for Transformation
ch. 2 Becoming a Clear-Thinking Teacher
ch. 3 Thinking Like an Expert
ch. 4 Developing and Clarifying Your Ideas
ch. 5 Explanatory Power
ch. 6 This Is The Way: Designing the Optimal Learning Path
ch. 7 Student Flourishing
ch. 8 Ask, Don’t Tell
ch. 9 Speaking Truth in Love: Assessment as Communication
ch. 10 Averting Disaster

Appendix 1 - Logic of a Chief
Appendix 2 - Richard Paul’s eight elements of thought compared with my approach
Appendix 3 - Gowin’s Knowledge Vee
Appendix 4 - Socratic GPS
Appendix 5 - Assessment is Course Design
Bibliography
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New REcord

TTR
Title
publisher
call number
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
additional info 1234
Additional Info:
additional info 1234

Table Of Content:
table of contents 456
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How Higher Education Feels: Commentaries on Poems That Illuminate Emotions in Learning and Teaching

Book
Quinlan, Kathleen M.
2016
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LB2324.Q56 2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development   |   Faculty Well-Being

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Teaching and learning in higher education can evoke strong feelings, including confusion, anxiety, boredom, curiosity, surprise and exhilaration. These emotions affect students’ learning, progress and overall success. Teachers’ emotions affect how they teach and their relationships and communication with students. Yet the emotional dimensions of teachers’ and students’ experiences are rarely discussed in the context of improving higher education.

This book addresses ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Teaching and learning in higher education can evoke strong feelings, including confusion, anxiety, boredom, curiosity, surprise and exhilaration. These emotions affect students’ learning, progress and overall success. Teachers’ emotions affect how they teach and their relationships and communication with students. Yet the emotional dimensions of teachers’ and students’ experiences are rarely discussed in the context of improving higher education.

This book addresses that gap, offering short, evocative case studies to spark conversation among university teachers. It challenges readers to reflect on how higher education feels, to explore the emotional landscape of courses and programmes they create and consider the emotional effects of messages embedded in various policies and practices.

Following the student lifecycle from enrollment to reunion, each of the main chapters contains 10 to 15 accessible, emotionally-engaging poems that serve as succinct case studies highlighting how some aspect of learning, teaching or development in higher education feels. Each chapter also contains an expert scholarly commentary that identifies emergent themes across the cases and establishes connections to theory and practice in higher education. The poems-as-case-studies are ideal for use in faculty or educational development workshops or for individual reflection. A variety of theoretical perspectives and associated reflection prompts provide lenses for variously interpreting the poems. An appendix offers suggestions for structuring case discussions as part of educational development activities.

The book promotes a person-centered discourse, giving voice to previously neglected aspects of higher education and reminding us that education is essentially a human endeavor. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
ch 1. Introduction
ch 2. Seven Stances on Emotion in Education
ch 3. Transition to Higher Education–In Search of Belonging(Expert Commentary by Terrell Strayhorn)
ch 4. Remaking Self-in-World 53 (Expert Commentary by Marcia B. Baxter Magolda)
ch 5. Taking Care of Students and Ourselves (Expert Commentary by Celia Hunt)
ch 6. Teaching in the Real World 107 (Expert Commentary by Michalinos Zembylas)
ch 7. For Love of People, Culture and Society (Expert Commentary by Monica McLean with Sarah LeFanu and Susan Bruce)
ch 8. For Love of Humanities and Arts (Expert Commentary by David Keplinger)
ch 9. For Love of Science (Expert Commentary by John Bowden and Pamela Green)
ch 10. Success and Failure – Achievement-Related Emotions (Expert Commentary by Reinhard Pekrun)
ch 11. Where We’ve Been, Where We’re Going
ch 12. Conclusion
Appendix 1: Using the Cases as Discussion Prompts – A Sample Discussion Guide
Index by Contributor
Index by Poem Title
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The Best Teacher Is Like a Famous Mage Everyone Knows – Just Not Any of Your Favorites

TTR
Paffenroth, Kim
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 3 (2017): 257-262
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 3
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   18-22 Year Olds

Additional Info:
An extended metaphor for teaching. This essay draws out the useful parallels between the best kind of teacher and the Good Witch of the North, Glinda, from The Wizard of Oz. Unappealing to many viewers or readers of the classic children's story, Glinda offers an inspiring reminder of four important pedagogical points: (1) the master teacher always treats her student as a peer; (2) the master teacher acknowledges and encourages her student's ...
Additional Info:
An extended metaphor for teaching. This essay draws out the useful parallels between the best kind of teacher and the Good Witch of the North, Glinda, from The Wizard of Oz. Unappealing to many viewers or readers of the classic children's story, Glinda offers an inspiring reminder of four important pedagogical points: (1) the master teacher always treats her student as a peer; (2) the master teacher acknowledges and encourages her student's abilities but lets her learn how to exercise them on her own; (3) the master teacher is often not equivalent or even similar to anyone the student has encountered before; and (4) the master teacher is not a surrogate parent but a more distant figure.
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Teaching the Whole Student - Engaged Learning With Heart, Mind, and Spirit

Book
Schoem, David; Modey, Christine; St. John, Edward P., eds.
2017
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC995.T427 2017
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Teaching the Whole Student is a compendium of engaged teaching approaches by faculty across disciplines. These inspiring authors offer models for instructors who care deeply about their students, respect and recognize students’ social identities and lived experiences, and are interested in creating community and environments of openness and trust to foster deep-learning, academic success, and meaning-making.

The authors in this volume stretch ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Teaching the Whole Student is a compendium of engaged teaching approaches by faculty across disciplines. These inspiring authors offer models for instructors who care deeply about their students, respect and recognize students’ social identities and lived experiences, and are interested in creating community and environments of openness and trust to foster deep-learning, academic success, and meaning-making.

The authors in this volume stretch the boundaries of academic learning and the classroom experience by seeking to identify the space between subject matter and a student's core values and prior knowledge. They work to find the interconnectedness of knowledge, understanding, meaning, inquiry and truth. They appreciate that students bring their full lives and experiences—their heart and spirit—into the classroom just as they bring their minds and intellectual inquiry.

These approaches contribute to student learning and the core academic purposes of higher education, help students find meaning and purpose in their lives, and help strengthen our diverse democracy through students’ active participation and leadership in civic life. They also have a demonstrated impact on critical and analytical thinking, student retention and academic success, personal well-being, commitments to civic engagement, diversity, and social justice.

Topics discussed:
• Teacher-student relationships and community building

• How teaching the whole student increases persistence and completion rates

• How an open learning environment fosters critical understanding

• Strategies for developing deep social and personal reflection in experiential education and service learning

The authors of this book remind us in poignant and empirical ways of the importance of teaching the whole student, as the book's title reflects. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward
Preface
Introduction

PART ONE: WHOLE STUDENT LEARNING APPROACHES
ch. 1. The Whole Student Approach as a Retention Model (Jerry A. Pattengale)
ch. 2. Incorporating Social Justice into Teaching - An Integrative Pedagogy Approach (Kathleen Manning)
PART TWO: ENGAGED LEARNING AND TEACHING IN PRACTICE
ch. 3. Learning Community Classrooms and Educating For Critical Hope (Gillies Malnarich)
ch. 4. Relational Teaching and Learning - The Classroom as Community and the Community as Classroom (David Schoem)
ch. 5. Toward a New Pedagogy to Help Create a Sustainable Future (James Crowfoot)
ch. 6. Experiential and Dialogic Pedagogy in a Religious and Ethnic Conflict Course (Adrienne B. Dessel)
ch. 7. Service Learning and Integrative Pedagogy for Engaging the Whole Student (Joseph A Galura)
PART THREE: INTEGRATIVE PEDAGOGY
ch. 8. Teaching and Learning that make a Difference (James L. Heft)
ch. 9. Integrative Approaches for Sustained Diversity Engagement in the Early Years of College (Angela M. Locks)
ch. 10. Assessment - Rethinking the Role of Integrative Pedagogies (Kimberly A. Kline; Edward P. St. John; Annie E. Connors)
ch. 11. Teaching the Whole Student (Christine Modey; David Schoem; Edward P. St. John)

Editors and Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
Students increasingly appear anxious, risk‐averse, and worried about getting things “wrong.” They may appear to lack intellectual curiosity, and be unwilling to engage in independent study. This essay explores how teaching and assessment in theology and religious studies might help students learn to take intellectual risks, and increase their resilience. One approach is to encourage students to experiment and “fail safely,” to increase their confidence that they understand what ...
Additional Info:
Students increasingly appear anxious, risk‐averse, and worried about getting things “wrong.” They may appear to lack intellectual curiosity, and be unwilling to engage in independent study. This essay explores how teaching and assessment in theology and religious studies might help students learn to take intellectual risks, and increase their resilience. One approach is to encourage students to experiment and “fail safely,” to increase their confidence that they understand what is expected of them, and to help them begin to understand learning as more broadly formational, not always directed toward a grade. I suggest three strategies: more formative assessment; a stronger narrative about the purpose of formative assessment; and an appeal to values, virtue, and the cultivation of character. Via these approaches, students might be encouraged to understand assessment in less utilitarian terms and increase their resilience for a world characterized by volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity, prepared both critically and dispositionally to thrive and contribute positively to society.
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Teaching for the Recovery of Meaning: An Imagination‐Centered Pedagogical Approach for Today's College Students

TTR
Manning, Patrick R.
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 4 (2017): 327-339
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
In the face of a mounting mental health crisis among college students, professors have an opportunity and responsibility to respond to their students’ psychological distress. Psychological and historical scholarship suggests that the proliferation of modern media and breakdown in traditional sources of existential meaning like religion are significant factors in young adults’ declining mental health. In response to this crisis, this article examines the crucial role of the imagination in ...
Additional Info:
In the face of a mounting mental health crisis among college students, professors have an opportunity and responsibility to respond to their students’ psychological distress. Psychological and historical scholarship suggests that the proliferation of modern media and breakdown in traditional sources of existential meaning like religion are significant factors in young adults’ declining mental health. In response to this crisis, this article examines the crucial role of the imagination in constructing meaning and proposes an imagination‐centered pedagogical process by means of which teachers can assist students in recovering meaning and integration in their lives.