Student Portfolios

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"Students React to Portfolio Assessment"

Article
Dutt-Doner, Karen, and David Alan Gilman
1998
Contemporary Education 69, no. 3 (1998): 159-165
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Student Portfolios

Additional Info:
Surveyed preservice teachers, following their final portfolio conference, to determine their views on the efficacy of using portfolio evaluation. The portfolio process helped students gain self-confidence, better relationships with instructors, organizational skills, professional attitudes, job interviewing skills, knowledge about teaching, and a knowledge base for teaching. Students expressed concerns about various aspects of portfolio evaluations.
Additional Info:
Surveyed preservice teachers, following their final portfolio conference, to determine their views on the efficacy of using portfolio evaluation. The portfolio process helped students gain self-confidence, better relationships with instructors, organizational skills, professional attitudes, job interviewing skills, knowledge about teaching, and a knowledge base for teaching. Students expressed concerns about various aspects of portfolio evaluations.
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Electronic Portfolios: Emerging Practices in Student, Faculty, and Institutional Learning

Book
Cambridge, Barbara L., ed.
2001
American Association for Higher Education, Washington, D.C.
LB1029.P67E45 2001
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Assessing Students   |   Student Portfolios   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The portfolio is a powerful tool for learning and assessment. Introducing the electronic into the mix increases its power, especially through the key feature of interactive hyperlinks and the potential to promote continuous reflection on, and updating of, learning. This introduction examines the potential of electronic portfolios by addressing: rationales for creating an electronic portfolio; possible features of the portfolio; examples of current practice; cautions; and recommendations. Chapters by nineteen ...
Additional Info:
The portfolio is a powerful tool for learning and assessment. Introducing the electronic into the mix increases its power, especially through the key feature of interactive hyperlinks and the potential to promote continuous reflection on, and updating of, learning. This introduction examines the potential of electronic portfolios by addressing: rationales for creating an electronic portfolio; possible features of the portfolio; examples of current practice; cautions; and recommendations. Chapters by nineteen portfolio practitioners from a range of disciplines and institutions describe the construction and use of electronic portfolios. They describe the uses:

* By students to display and reflect on work for a specific course or program

* By faculty to document and reflect on their classroom practice and allow comment by colleagues or others

* By institutions to demonstrate accountability to their stakeholders and as a vehicle for institution-wide reflection, learning, and improvement. The section on institutional portfolios includes chapters on the incorporation of institutional research and data, and the potential role for such portfolios in accreditation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Yolanda T. Moses)
Preface

ch. 1 Electronic Portfolios as Knowledge Builders (Barbara L. Cambridge)

ch. 2 Student Portfolios
Introduction: Digitized Student Portfolios (Kathleen Blake Yancey)
Reflective Webfolios in a Humanities Course (Donna Reiss)
Composing the Intranet-Based Electronic Portfolio Using ``Common'' Tools (Rich Rice)
Electronic Portfolios in a Management Major Curriculum (Katrina A. Zalatan)
A Major Redesign of the Kalamazoo Portfolio (Emily Springfield)
Using On-Line Portfolios to Assess English Majors at Utah State University (Christine Hult)
Development of Electronic Portfolios for Nursing Students (Peggy Jenkins)
Comparing Electronic and Paper Portfolios (Emily Springfield)
Conclusion: General Patterns and the Future (Kathleen Blake Yancey)

ch. 3 Faculty Portfolios
Introduction: Ambassadors With Portfolios: Electronic Portfolios and the Improvement of Teaching (Daniel P. Tompkins)
Teaching Great Books on the Web (Marc Stier)
Electronic Portfolios = Multimedia Development + Portfolio Development: The Electronic Portfolio Development Process (Helen Barrett)
From Bach to Tupac: Using an Electronic Course Portfolio to Analyze a Curricular Transformation (Elizabeth F. Barkley)
Wired for Trouble? Creating a Hypermedia Course Portfolio (T. Mills Kelly)
Conclusion: Ambassadors With Portfolios: Recommendations (Daniel P. Tompkins)

ch. 4 Institutional Portfolios
Linking Learning, Improvement, and Accountability: An Introduction to Electronic Institutional Portfolios (Susan Kahn)
Snake Pit in Cyberspace: The 1UPU1 Institutional Portfolio (Sharon J. Hamilton)
Portland State University's Electronic Institutional Portfolio: Strategy, Planning, and Assessment (Kathi A. Ketcheson)
The Role of Institutional Research and Data in Institutional Portfolios (Victor M.H. Borden)
Electronic Department Portfolios: A New Tool for Departmental Learning and Improvement (Dean S. Dorn)
The Role of Institutional Portfolios in the Revised WASC Accreditation Process (Judie Gaffin Wexler)

Conclusion: Recommendations (Susan Kahn)
Index
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Wabash tree

The Learning Portfolio: Reflective Practice for Improving Student Learning

Book
Zubizarreta, John
2004
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB1029.P67 Z82 2004
Topics: Student Portfolios

Additional Info:
The learning portfolio—grounded in a process of reflection, evidence, and collaboration—is a rich, flexible document that engages students in continuous, thoughtful analysis of their learning.

The portfolio may be paper, electronic, or another creative medium, but at its center, the power of writing and reflection combine in the portfolio with purposeful, selective collection and assessment of learning endeavors and outcomes to improve learning. Straightforward and easy ...
Additional Info:
The learning portfolio—grounded in a process of reflection, evidence, and collaboration—is a rich, flexible document that engages students in continuous, thoughtful analysis of their learning.

The portfolio may be paper, electronic, or another creative medium, but at its center, the power of writing and reflection combine in the portfolio with purposeful, selective collection and assessment of learning endeavors and outcomes to improve learning. Straightforward and easy to understand, this book offers readers both an academic understanding of and rationale for learning portfolios and practical information that can be custom tailored to suit many disciplinary, pedagogical, programmatic, and institutional needs.

The Learning Portfolio reflects the intellectual growth and excitement that both professors and students have experienced in developing learning portfolios.

Organized into four parts, this book includes:
• A foundation for and review of the value of reflective practice in student learning and how learning portfolios support reflection, sound assessment, and collaboration
• Diverse contributions by practitioners in two- and four-year institutions in the U.S. and Canada who implement portfolios in a variety of ways, including the use of digital technology
• Fourteen practical and adaptable examples of actual student learning portfolios
• A wealth of assignment sheets, guidelines, criteria, evaluation rubrics, and other materials used in developing print and electronic learning portfolios from across disciplines, programs, and types of institutions in higher education (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
About the Contributors
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I: About Student Learning Portfolios
1. An Overview of Student Learning Portfolios
2. Practical Questions and Issues About Student Learning Portfolios
3. Important Factors in Developing and Using Student Learning Portfolios
4. Electronic Learning Portfolios

Part II: Models of Successful Use of Learning Portfolios

Part III: Sample Learning Portfolio Selections

Part IV: Practical Materials

References
Index
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Portfolio Development and the Assessment of Prior Learning: Perspectives, Models and Practices

Book
Michelson, Elana; and Alan Mandell
2004
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1029.P67P665 2004
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Assessing Students   |   Student Portfolios

Additional Info:
For over thirty years, portfolios have been used to help adult learners gain recognition for their prior learning and take greater control of their educational experiences. The portfolio has become a distinctive means of assessing such learning, serving as a meaningful alternative to conventional papers and standardized testing.

Portfolio Development and the Assessment of Prior Learning: Perspectives, Models, and Practices provides a primer of flexible approaches to shaping ...
Additional Info:
For over thirty years, portfolios have been used to help adult learners gain recognition for their prior learning and take greater control of their educational experiences. The portfolio has become a distinctive means of assessing such learning, serving as a meaningful alternative to conventional papers and standardized testing.

Portfolio Development and the Assessment of Prior Learning: Perspectives, Models, and Practices provides a primer of flexible approaches to shaping and conducting portfolio-development courses. It offers practitioners in the field an extensive range of model assignments, readings, and classroom activities, each organized around a specific theme: Academic Orientation, The Meaning of Education, Personal Exploration, Learning from the Outsider Within, The World of Work and Careers, and Dimensions of Expertise. Twelve case studies by practitioners in the field then show how academics in the US and around the English-speaking world have adapted the portfolio to changing circumstances in order to deliver academically rich educational services for adults. These case studies highlight portfolio development in the context of web-based instruction, changing institutional imperatives, service to historically disenfranchised groups, partnerships with industry, and cross-institutional cooperation.

In addition to serving as a valuable hands-on resource for practitioners, Portfolio Development and the Assessment of Prior Learning locates portfolios and assessment in a broad social and intellectual context. Thus, the authors also offer an historical overview of the usefulness of portfolios in the assessment of prior learning and then consider their use inthe future, given current trends in higher education for adults. The book explores the implications of a changing educational landscape, in which new student populations, budgetary pressures, and understandings of knowledge both enrich and challenge student-centered approaches such as portfolios.

The approaches and case studies are not only valuable to adult educators but, equally, to faculty in higher education concerned with the development of competency- and outcomes-based assessment. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction : portfolio development in historic context
ch. 2 Approaches to portfolio development
Resources for portfolio development for chapter 2
ch. 3 Model studies in portfolio development : an introduction

Model 1 The offspring of doing : framing experience at Alverno College
Model 2 Learning from our experience : portfolio development at Sinclair Community College
Model 3 Love talk : educational planning at Empire State College, State University of New York
Model 4 I am a writer : writing from life at the Evergreen State College
Model 5 The wholeness of life : a Native North American approach to portfolio development at First Nations Technical Institute
Model 6 Cracking the code : the assessment of prior experiential learning at London Metropolitan University
Model 7 Building on the past, moving toward the future : prior learning assessment in a changing institution at Metropolitan State University
Model 8 All of who we are : foundations of learning at The School for New Learning, Depaul University
Model 9 Delineations on the Web : computer-mediated portfolio development at the University of Maryland University College
Model 10 Corporatizing knowledge : work-based learning at the University of Technology, Sydney
Model 11 After apartheid : the recognition of prior learning at the College of Education, University of the Witwatersrand
Model 12 The components of learning : statewide assessment of prior learning at the Vermont State Colleges
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Electronic Portfolios 2.0: Emergent Research on Implementation and Impact

Book
Darren Cambridge, Barbara Cambridge, and Kthleen Yancey, eds.
2009
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1029.P67E43 2009
Topics: Online Learning   |   Assessing Students   |   Student Portfolios   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Higher education institutions of all kinds—across the United States and around the world—have rapidly expanded the use of electronic portfolios in a broad range of applications including general education, the major, personal planning, freshman learning communities, advising, assessing, and career planning.

Widespread use creates an urgent need to evaluate the implementation and impact of eportfolios. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, the contributors to this book—all ...
Additional Info:
Higher education institutions of all kinds—across the United States and around the world—have rapidly expanded the use of electronic portfolios in a broad range of applications including general education, the major, personal planning, freshman learning communities, advising, assessing, and career planning.

Widespread use creates an urgent need to evaluate the implementation and impact of eportfolios. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, the contributors to this book—all of whom have been engaged with the Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research—have undertaken research on how eportfolios influence learning and the learning environment for students, faculty members, and institutions.

This book features emergent results of studies from 20 institutions that have examined effects on student reflection, integrative learning, establishing identity, organizational learning, and designs for learning supported by technology. It also describes how institutions have responded to multiple challenges in eportfolio development, from engaging faculty to going to scale.

These studies exemplify how eportfolios can spark disciplinary identity, increase retention, address accountability, improve writing, and contribute to accreditation. The chapters demonstrate the applications of eportfolios at community colleges, small private colleges, comprehensive universities, research universities, and a state system. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction: On Transitions: Past to Present

Section One - Introduction: Reflection In Electronic Portfolio Practice
ch. 1 Reflection and Electronic Portfolios: Inventing the Self and Reinventing the University (Kathleen Blake Yancey)
ch. 2 Studying Student Reflection in an Electronic Portfolio Environment: An Inquiry in the Context of Practice (W.H. Rickards and Lauralee Guilbault)
ch. 3 Using ePortfolios to Support Lifelong and Lifewide Learning (Helen L. Chen)

Section Two - Integrative Learning
ch. 4 Two Faces of Integrative Learning Online (Darren Cambridge)
ch. 5 Becoming ePortfolio Learners and Teachers (Julie Huges)
ch. 6 Making Connections: The LaGuardia ePortfolio (Bret Eynon)
ch. 7 Connecting Contexts and Competencies: Using ePortfolios for Integrative Learning (Tracy Penny Light, Bob Sproule and Katherine Lithgow)

Section Three - Establishing Indentities: Roles, Competencies, Values, and Outcomes
ch. 8 Influencing Learning Through Faculty- and Student-Generated Outcome Assessment Michael Day)
ch. 9 The Promise of E-Portfolios for Institutional Assessment (Thomas S. Ewards and Colleen Burnham)
ch. 10 Demonstrating Intellectual Growth and Development: The IUPUI ePort (Sharon Hamilton and Susan Kahn)
ch. 11 A Values-Driven ePortfolio Journey: Na Wa‘a (Judith Kirkpatrick)
ch. 12 E-Portfolios in an Undergraduate Psychology Research Experiences Program Benjamin R. Stephens)
ch. 13 Perceptions of Teacher Candidates on ePortfolio Use(Neil W. Topp and Robert L. Goeman)

Section Four - Organizational Learning
ch. 14 Diffusing ePortfolios in Organizational Settings (Stephen R. Acker)
ch. 15 A Catalyst Without a Mandate: Building an ePortfolio Culture at the University of Washington (Tom Lewis and Janice Fournier)
ch. 16 Documenting the Outcomes of Learning (Milton D. Hakel and Erin N. Smith)
ch. 17 Sustaining Change through Student, Departmental, and Institutional Portfolios (Kathi A. Ketcheson)

Section Five - Electronic Portfolio Technology and Design For Learning
ch. 18 Technology and Change (Cara Lane)
ch. 19 Re-visioning Revision with ePortfolios in the University of Georgia First-year Composition Program (Christy Desmet, June Griffin, Deborah Church Miller, Ron Balthazor, and Robert Cummings)
ch. 20 Moving eFolio Minnesota to the Next Generation: From Individual Portfolios to an Integrated Institutional Mode (Lynette Olson, Lori Schroeder, and Paul Wakso
ch. 21 Assessing the Learning Potential of E-Portfolio Through Thinking Sheets (Mary Zamon and Debra Sprague)
ch. 22 The Maed English Education Electronic Portfolio Experience: What Preservice English Teachers Have to Teach Us About Eps and Reflection (Carl Young)

Conclusion: Moving Into The Future (Barbara Cambridge, Darren Cambridge, and Kathleen Yancey)
Index
Additional Info:
A book excerpt discussing the development and use of electronic learning portfolios, including pros and cons, best practices, and lots of resources for further reading.
Additional Info:
A book excerpt discussing the development and use of electronic learning portfolios, including pros and cons, best practices, and lots of resources for further reading.
Additional Info:
The developer of the University of Mary (Washington) project "A Domain of One's Own," explains the program’s innovative and expansive understanding of student e-portfolios in a TEDx talk.
Additional Info:
The developer of the University of Mary (Washington) project "A Domain of One's Own," explains the program’s innovative and expansive understanding of student e-portfolios in a TEDx talk.
Additional Info:
Information, web links, and videos explaining "A Domain of One's Own," the University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating.
Additional Info:
Information, web links, and videos explaining "A Domain of One's Own," the University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating.
Additional Info:
Emory College of Arts and Sciences describes its rollout of its version of "A Domain of One's Own," a University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating. This ECAS page includes a description of the program, and links to extensive documentation for faculty, students, and support staff.
Additional Info:
Emory College of Arts and Sciences describes its rollout of its version of "A Domain of One's Own," a University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating. This ECAS page includes a description of the program, and links to extensive documentation for faculty, students, and support staff.
Additional Info:
Ideal for group projects. Similar to Googledocs. Members can work on a project and save to shared cloud space.
Additional Info:
Ideal for group projects. Similar to Googledocs. Members can work on a project and save to shared cloud space.
Additional Info:
Similar to Pinterest,but for teaching. This site helps you create a vVirtual "pinboard" for course projects Students can pin any form of multimedia content and create a digital learning portfolio.
Additional Info:
Similar to Pinterest,but for teaching. This site helps you create a vVirtual "pinboard" for course projects Students can pin any form of multimedia content and create a digital learning portfolio.
Additional Info:
Collect your resources, and organize them neatly and easily.
Additional Info:
Collect your resources, and organize them neatly and easily.
Tactics cover image

Option-Based Final Projects for Creative Online Learners

Tactic
Conley, Aaron D.
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 3 (2014): 222
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 3
Topics: Online Learning   |   Learning Designs   |   Student Portfolios

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: final projects for an online course.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: final projects for an online course.
Additional Info:
A spreadsheet Google Doc comparing a range of e-tools that support differentiation of instruction to support learner needs, created and maintained by education consultant John McCarthy.
Additional Info:
A spreadsheet Google Doc comparing a range of e-tools that support differentiation of instruction to support learner needs, created and maintained by education consultant John McCarthy.
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Portfolio to Go: 1000+ Reflective Writing Prompts and Provocations for Clinical Learners

Book
Peterkin, Allan D.
2016
University of Toronto Press, Toronto
R119.P48 2016
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Student Portfolios

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Preparing a learning portfolio has become a mandatory part of the course work in most clinical professions. Students and educators alike sometimes complain that these mandatory assignments become repetitive and uninspired. However, we all need to be able to speak and write clearly as we work with our colleagues, students and those we care for.

In Portfolio To Go, Allan D. ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Preparing a learning portfolio has become a mandatory part of the course work in most clinical professions. Students and educators alike sometimes complain that these mandatory assignments become repetitive and uninspired. However, we all need to be able to speak and write clearly as we work with our colleagues, students and those we care for.

In Portfolio To Go, Allan D. Peterkin insists that reflective capacity, critical thinking, creative expression, and narrative competence are attributes that should be developed in every health professional – regardless of the discipline or specialty. Trainees will find over 1000 prompts organized under themes highly relevant to students and educators, including those not formally addressed in class, such as coping with uncertainty and ambiguity, team conflict, and resilience through good self-care. Practical tips for writing effectively and for discussing and evaluating narratives in a helpful, respective manner are provided throughout. Peterkin is a pioneer in emphasizing patient-centred, humanistic care and Portfolio To Go will help to train and develop more reflective practitioners. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction - Some Background on Reflective Capacity

ch. 1 Why We Write (and How We Can Do It Better)
ch. 2 What Can My Reflective Portfolio Be?
ch. 3 Finding Optimal Conditions to Write and Reflect
ch. 4 Getting Started: Learning as a Journey - Writing Prompts
ch. 5 Using Writing Prompts and Storytelling to Maximize Growth and Reflection
ch. 6 Communication - Writing Prompts
ch. 7 Collaboration and Teamwork - Writing Prompts
ch. 8 Conflict - Writing Prompts
ch. 9 The Personal Narrative Reflection Tool – Steps for Enhancing Critical Reflection in your Portfolio Entries
ch. 10 The Patient or Client as Person - Writing Prompts
ch. 11 Diversity Culture Equity - Writing Prompts
ch. 12 Social Justice/ Advocacy - Writing Prompts
ch. 13 From Portfolio to Action: Practical Strategies for Practicing Narrative-Based Care
ch. 14 Well-Being and the Clinician as a Person - Writing Prompts
ch. 15 Ambiguity/ Uncertainty - Writing Prompts
ch. 16 Career Satisfaction - Writing Prompts
ch. 17 Battling the Inner Critic - How to Stay Open when you Reflect and Write
ch. 18 Personal Reflections - Writing Prompts
ch. 19 Elements of Critical Written Reflection
ch. 20 Sample Course Guidelines – USCF LEAP and Reflection on Action Rubric (UCSF)
ch. 21 The Body - Writing Prompts
ch. 22 Things to Consider when Forming a Reflective Writing Group
ch. 23 Professionalism and Ethics - Writing Prompts
ch. 24 Values, Beliefs and Assumptions - Writing Prompts
ch. 25 Toward a More In-depth Assessment of Reflective Writing Evaluation – How do Professors Grade Your Assignments?
ch. 26 Hidden Curriculum and Power - Writing Prompts
ch. 27 Am I a Good Group Member? Positive Characteristics
ch. 28 Dilemmas and Difficult Stories - Writing Prompts
  ch. 29 Sample Discussion Points when Working with Students
ch. 30 For Teachers and Student Leaders
ch. 31 A Sample Narrative Reflection Workshop Evaluation
ch. 32 Creativity - Writing Prompts
ch. 33 Graphic Medicine - Reflecting Without Words
ch. 34 Getting Published - Common Themes that Predict Success
  ch. 35 Guidelines for Narrative Accountability when Writing about Patients / Clients
ch. 36 Finding Publishing Opportunities
ch. 37 A Few Words on Blogging and Social Media
ch. 38 Other Writing and Healing References
ch. 39 Author Biography