Ministerial Formation

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Ministerial Formation in a Multifaith Milieu: Implications of Interfaith Dialogue for Theological Education

Book
Amirtham, Sam and S. Wesley Ariarajah, eds.
1986
World Council of Churches, Geneva
BV4020.M55 1986
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
It is generally accepted that theological education and ministerial formation must both take place "in context". The context, in most parts of the world today, is one of religious pluralism where Christians must live in dialogue and grow in commmunity with neighbours of other faiths. Ministers have a crucial role in shaping the attitudes of church people, especially in the area of interfaith relations. How may they be equipped to ...
Additional Info:
It is generally accepted that theological education and ministerial formation must both take place "in context". The context, in most parts of the world today, is one of religious pluralism where Christians must live in dialogue and grow in commmunity with neighbours of other faiths. Ministers have a crucial role in shaping the attitudes of church people, especially in the area of interfaith relations. How may they be equipped to play this positive role? What, in other words, are the implications of interfaith dialogue for theological education?
That was the question discussed by a group of theological teachers when they met in Malaysia in June 1985, called together by the World Council of Churches' Programme on Theological Education (PTE) and the Dialogue Sub-unit. Ministerial Formation in a Multifaith Milieu presents an informal report of that meeting. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
ch. 1 A Step Forward (T.K. Thomas)
ch. 2 A Reflective Report ( S. Wesley Ariarajah)
ch. 3 Introducing the Concern (Samuel Amirtham)
ch. 4 Teaching Theology in a MultiFaith Context (M. Thomas Thangaraj)
ch. 5 A Response from Another Context
ch. 6 The Perspective of Pluralism in Theological Education (Diana Eck)
ch. 7 A Response
ch. 8 Implications of Interfaith Dialogue for the Teaching of Mission and Evangelism (Elizabeth G. Dominguez)
ch. 9 A Group Response
ch. 10 Ministerial Formation in a Multifaith Parish (Rienzie Perera)
ch. 11 A Response
ch. 12 Theological Education in a Pluralistic Context: An Overall Assessment (J. Paul Rajashekar)

Appendix
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Theological Perspectives on Christian Formation: A reader on theology and Christian education

Book
Astley, Jeff, Leslie J. Francis, and Colin Crowder, eds.
1996
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
BV1464.T48 1996
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Twenty-nine articles from international journals that 'will provide the reader with both a comprehensive map of how contemporary Christian theologians approach the tasks of Christian education, and also skillfully selected excursions in the complex terrain. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Twenty-nine articles from international journals that 'will provide the reader with both a comprehensive map of how contemporary Christian theologians approach the tasks of Christian education, and also skillfully selected excursions in the complex terrain. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Foreword(Stephen W. Sykes)

ch. 1 Theology and Christian education theory (Jeff Astley, Colin Crowder)
1.1 Contemporary approaches to Christian education (Jack L. Seymour)
1.2 Theological and educational concepts: problems of integration and differentiation (Karl Ernst Farley)
1.3 Can church education be theological education? (Edward Farley)
1.4 Religious education and theology (James Michale Lee)

ch. 2 Theological foundations: the bible
2.1 Passion and perspective: two dimensions of education in the bible (Walter Brueggemann)
2.2 The reaction against classical education in the New Testament (E.A. Judge)
2.3 'Tell it slant'(John Tinsley)

ch. 3 Theological foundations: the church
3.1 The gesture of a truthful story (Stanley Hauerwas)
3.2 No longer strangers: the church and its educational ministry (Craig R. Dykstra)
3.3 Educating in the Spirit (Carol Lakey Hess)

ch. 4 Theological approaches: postliberal theology
4.1 The significance of postliberalism for religious education (Gregory C. Higgins)
4.2 Theology and belonging: Christian identity and the doing of theology (Lucien Richard)

ch. 5 Theological approaches: liberation theology
5.1 Education, liberation and the church (Paulo Freire)
5.2 Liberation theology and Christian education theory (Frank Marangos)

ch. 6 Theological approaches: feminist theology
6.1 The unity of the sacred and the public possibilities from feminist theology(Mary Elizabeth Moore)
6.2 Feminist images of redemption in education (Mary C. Grey)

ch. 7 Spiritual formation and the worshipping community
7.1 Christian affections and the catechumenate (John A. Berntsen)
7.2 The role of worship in Christian learning (Jeff Astley)
7.3 The formative power of the congregation (Craig R. Dykstra)

ch. 8 Spiritual formation and minesterial education
8.1 Transformation in Christian education (James E. Loder)
8.2 Spiritual formation and theological education (George Lindbeck)
8.3 Theological education and education for church leadership (Charles M. Wood)

ch. 9 The theological education debate
9.1 Thinking theologically about theological education (Francis Schussler Fiorenza)
9.2 Theological inquiry and theological education (Charles M. Wood)
9.3 Emerging issues and theological education (Rebecca S. Chopp)
9.4 Can virtue be taught? Education, character and the soul (David Tracy)

ch. 10 Theology, education and the university
10.1 Theology in the context of the university (Stephen Toulmin)
10.2 The place of theology in the study of religion (Edward Farley)
10.3 Theology: university and church. Is a synergism possible?(Claude Welch)

Select bibliography
Acknowledgements
Index of subjects
Index of names
Additional Info:
Banks enters the debate on contemporary theological education with a comprehensive and refreshingly practical call to a missional model for theological education. He strives to root this model in a greater appreciation for biblical perspectives on formation for ministry.... Banks provides an extensive review of historical and contemporary issues and models of theological education. His review is critical, and while his missional model is ambitious, he does not avoid facing ...
Additional Info:
Banks enters the debate on contemporary theological education with a comprehensive and refreshingly practical call to a missional model for theological education. He strives to root this model in a greater appreciation for biblical perspectives on formation for ministry.... Banks provides an extensive review of historical and contemporary issues and models of theological education. His review is critical, and while his missional model is ambitious, he does not avoid facing the practical consequences and challenges faced by those who would move toward what he considers a more authentic approach to the formation of persons called to theological education as teachers and students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part One - Reassessing Theological Education: The Present Stage of Debate
ch. 1 Retrieving Aspects of the "Classical" Model
ch. 2 Revising Aspects of the "Vocational" Model
ch. 3 Developing a More "Synthetic" Model
ch. 4 Some Final Responses to the Debate

Part Two - Backing Into the Future: A Biblical Angle of Vision
ch. 1 The Relevance of a Biblical Starting Point
ch. 2 Ministry Formation Before Christ
ch. 3 Ministry Formation by Christ
ch. 4 Ministry Formation After Christ

Part Three - Developing A Missional Model: From the Margins to the Center
ch. 1 Beyond Mission-Oriented and Missiological Education
ch. 2 Recasting Major Issues in the Debate
ch. 3 The Nature of Learning in a Missional Model
ch. 4 Reconceiving Teaching as a Missional Practice

Part Four - Bringing About Systemic Change: Some Guideposts To Reform
ch. 1 Reconfiguring the Student Profile
ch. 2 Rethinking Personal and Communal Formation
ch. 3 Refashioning Key Institutional Cultures
ch. 4 Reshaping the Theological Curriculum

Conclusion
ch. 1 Further Barriers to Institutional Reform
ch. 2 Other Avenues for Change

Index
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Sharing Faith: A Comprehensive Approach to Religious Education and Pastoral Ministry

Book
Groome, Thomas H.
1991
Harper & Row, San Francisco, CA
BV1471.2.G688 1991
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Education

Additional Info:
The long-awaited masterwork from the author of Christian Religious Education in which he applies the "shared praxis" approach to the whole of religious education and pastoral ministry. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The long-awaited masterwork from the author of Christian Religious Education in which he applies the "shared praxis" approach to the whole of religious education and pastoral ministry. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part 1 Foundations
Prologue
ch. 1 Educating for Conation in Christian Faith
ch. 2 Epistemology Re-visioned: In Search of Conation
ch. 3 The Dimensions and Dynamics of "Being" Engaged for Conation in Christian Faith

Part 2 An Approach: Shared Christian Praxis
ch. 4 An Overview of Shared Christian Praxis
ch. 5 The Focusing Activity in Shared Praxis
ch. 6 Movement 1: Naming/Expressing "Present Action"
ch. 7 Movement 2: Critical Reflection on Present Action
ch. 8 Movement 3: Making Accessible Christian Story and Vision
ch. 9 Movement 4: Dialectical Hermeneutics to Appropriate Story/Vision to Participants’ Stories and Visions
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Caretakers of Our Common House: Women's Development in Communities of Faith

Book
Hess, Carol Lakey
1997
Abingdon Press, Nashville, TN
BV639.W7H47 1997
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
The author provides a provocative description of ways society's institutions have colluded to undermine the full development of women and girls. Relies on Gilligan and Kegan's theories of development; critiques Neibuhr's theology of sacrifice. Weaves biblical stories of women and personal stories into the data and suggests ways that parents, families -- and communities of faith can create environments in which girls and women may find their own voices as ...
Additional Info:
The author provides a provocative description of ways society's institutions have colluded to undermine the full development of women and girls. Relies on Gilligan and Kegan's theories of development; critiques Neibuhr's theology of sacrifice. Weaves biblical stories of women and personal stories into the data and suggests ways that parents, families -- and communities of faith can create environments in which girls and women may find their own voices as expressions of authentic selves. This book is being used by a women's discussion group in an Episcopal parish. Participants find it very provocative and insightful. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction
ch. 1 Theology and Women: Giving Our Selves Away
ch. 2 The Dance of Human Development: In Celebration of "Sheila"
ch. 3 Rebuilding Our Mothers' House: Caretaking and Being in Genuine Relation
ch. 4 Your Daughters Shall Prophesy: "Safe-Houses" for Raising Girls in Families and Communities of Faith
ch. 5 Wrestling with Our Sisters: Together Building Our Households of Faith
ch. 6 Women and Conversational Education: Hard Dialogue and Deep Connections in Communities of Faith
ch. 7 Caretaking Leadership: Women of Fire and Mothers of Israel
Notes
Selective Bibliography
Index
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Beyond Clericalism: The Congregation as a Focus for Theological Education

Book
Hough, Joseph C. Jr. and Barbara G. Wheeler, eds.
1988
Scholars Press, Atlanta, GA
BV4022.B48 1988
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
Foreword

Part One:
A Congregational Paradigm for Theological Education (James F. Hopewell )
On the Christian Congregation (David H. Kelsey)
Ministry of the World: A New Professional Paradigm (John B. Cobb)
Which Congregations? A Mission Focus for Theological Education (Letty Russell)
A Theological Curriculum About and Against the Church (David H. Kelsey)
Friends in the Family: Church, Seminary, and Theological Education (Marjorie Hewitt Suchocki)

Part Two:
Disciplinary Perspectives on the Study of the Congregation
Historical Studies
A Study of the Congregation in History (Jane Dempsey Douglass)
The Congregation and New Testament Studies (Carl Holladay)
The Historian and the Congregation (E. Brooks Holifield)
Practical Studies
Pastoral Care and the Study of the Congregation (Don S. Browning)
The Ministry of a Congregation: Rethinking Christian Ethics for a Chuch-Centered Seminary (Stanley Hauerwas)
Toward A Christian Feminist Liberation Hermeneutic for Demystifying Class Reality in Local Congregations (Beverly W. Harrison)
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Discerning the Call: Advancing the Quality of Ordained Leadership

Book
Imbler, John M. and Linda K. Plengemeier, eds.
1992
Chalice Press, St. Louis, MO
BX7326.D49 1992
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
In 1986, 43 percent of Disciples clergy were between fifty and sixty. Where will their replacements come from, and how can we help them recognize and respond to their call? (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
In 1986, 43 percent of Disciples clergy were between fifty and sixty. Where will their replacements come from, and how can we help them recognize and respond to their call? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
(individual authors not identified)
Introduction

ch. 1 Practical, spiritual, and intellectual criteria for ministry
ch. 2 Ecclesiastical linkages
ch. 3 Congregational enlistment
ch. 4 Faith development
ch. 5 Changing North American demographics
ch. 6 Disciples women in ministry
ch. 7 Characteristics for success

Afterword
Notes
Bibliography
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Crisis in the Church: The Plight of Theological Education

Book
Leith, John H.
1997
Westminster John Knox, Louisville, KY
BX8969.6.L45 1997
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Drawing on his wealth of experience as both a seminary professor and minister, John Leith identifies and confronts the contemporary crisis in theological education. He argues that the crisis in the seminaries is interwoven with the crisis in the church, and that the secularization of educational institutions has led seminaries to move away from their primary responsibility - preparing pastors for ministry. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Drawing on his wealth of experience as both a seminary professor and minister, John Leith identifies and confronts the contemporary crisis in theological education. He argues that the crisis in the seminaries is interwoven with the crisis in the church, and that the secularization of educational institutions has led seminaries to move away from their primary responsibility - preparing pastors for ministry. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 The Crisis
ch. 2 The Boundaries of Christian Faith
ch. 3 Teaching the Church's Faith
ch. 4 Teaching Church Practice
ch. 5 On Choosing a Seminary Professor
ch. 6 The Moral Use of Endowments
ch. 7 Seminary Constituencies and Boards
ch. 8 The Recruitment of Students

Epilogue
Notes
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Wabash tree

Educating the Reflective Practitioner: Toward a New Design for Teaching and Learning in the Professions

Book
Schon, Donald A.
1987
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC1059.S45 1987
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Doctors, architects, lawyers and engineers are all trained in schools that emphasize technique but neglect the key element of artistry that distinguishes the true professional. Today's professional is a drudge, mechanically applying privileged knowledge to rote tasks. That is Schon's diagnosis of higher education, and as a remedy he recommends learning by doing. To teach skills of improvisation and problem-framing, he feels our universities should borrow the methods used in ...
Additional Info:
Doctors, architects, lawyers and engineers are all trained in schools that emphasize technique but neglect the key element of artistry that distinguishes the true professional. Today's professional is a drudge, mechanically applying privileged knowledge to rote tasks. That is Schon's diagnosis of higher education, and as a remedy he recommends learning by doing. To teach skills of improvisation and problem-framing, he feels our universities should borrow the methods used in art studios, dance conservatories, athletics coaching, craft appenticeships and psychoanalytic training. In all these settings, a dialogue between student and coach in a low-risk atmosphere encourages creativity. Despite its academic prose, this primer by an MIT urban studies professor will enlighten students, teachers and professionals. Schon concludes the book (a sequel to The Reflective Practitioner with a description of his attempt to create a ``studiolike'' curriculum for MIT's city planning courses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The Roles of Artistry in Professional Education.
The Architectural Studio: A Prototype of Education for Reflection-in-Action.
Examples and Experiments.
Implications for Professional Education.
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Ecumenical Formation: A Methodology for a Pluralistic Age The Case of the Ecumenical Institute at Bossey (pdf)

Journal Issue
1997
Theological Education 34, supp. (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T48v.34suppl.
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
The U.S. Bossey Assessment Project: An Introduction (John B. Lindner and Linda-Marie Delloff)
Ecumenical Formation: A Methodology for a Pluralistic Age (John B. Lindner)
Embracing Estrangement (Linda-Marie Delloff)
Worship and Prayer in Ecumenical Formation (John H. Erickson and Eileen W. Lindner)
Learning a Religious Tradition: Identity by Contrast (Bertice Y. Wood)
Does What Is Taught at Bossey Equal What Is Learned? (Michael Gilligan)
Two Agendas for Ecumenical Formation (Heidi Hadsell)
Ecumenical Formation: Ecumenical Reflections and Suggestions (Alan C. Clark and Metropolitan Elias Audi)
Supplementary Reading
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Theological Education and the Practice of Ministry (pdf)

Journal Issue
1997
Theological Education 33, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.33no.2
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1997-theological-education-v33-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Elizabeth C. Nordbeck)
Conversion of Mind and Heart in Theological Education (Kathleen Hughes, RSCJ)
Integrating Ministry and Theology: One Seminary’s Story (Bruce E. Shields)
Dialogue and Advocacy: A Case Study of a Course on Human Sexuality (Susanne Johnson and Patricia H. Davis)
Theological Education as Pastoral Care (J. Earl Thompson, Jr.)
Writing Practice and Pedagogy Across the Curriculum: Teaching Writing in a Theological Context (Lucretia Bailey Yaghjian)
Renewing the Practices of Ministry (Malcolm L. Warford)
Teaching Research Skills in Clinical Pastoral Education (Margot Hover)
Congregations and Theological Education and Research (Thomas Edward Frank)
Congregational Studies and Critical Pedagogy in Theological Perspective (Robert K. Martin)
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Beyond Theological Tourism: Mentoring as a Grassroots Approach to Theological Education

Book
Thistlethwaite, Susan B. and George F. Cairns
1994
Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY
BV4070.C489B48 1994
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Since the early days of liberation theology, Northern Hemisphere theological education has used the phrase "solidarity with the oppressed" to denote the religiously and morally appropriate response to situations of violence and oppression. Yet efforts to inculcate solidarity of heart and mind often devolve into a kind of "theological tourism" wherein professors and students visit oppressed communities without truly participating as subjects in the subjectivity of the marginalized. Beyond Theological ...
Additional Info:
Since the early days of liberation theology, Northern Hemisphere theological education has used the phrase "solidarity with the oppressed" to denote the religiously and morally appropriate response to situations of violence and oppression. Yet efforts to inculcate solidarity of heart and mind often devolve into a kind of "theological tourism" wherein professors and students visit oppressed communities without truly participating as subjects in the subjectivity of the marginalized. Beyond Theological Tourism shows how one group of theological teacher-mentors and students attempt to overcome the limits of visits as "tourists of the revolution" to exotic locations. Starting from the challenge of Robert Evans of the Plowshares Institute, a group of Chicago-based Christians struggled with new modes of education for prospective ministers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

ch. 1 Beyond Theological Tourism
ch. 2 Stand by Me
ch. 3 Globalization in the Hyde Park Seminaries: A History in Process
ch. 4 Education for Ministry in an Urbanized World: The Chicago Connection
ch. 5 The Theory and Practice of Transformative Education: The Chicago Mentoring Model
ch. 6 Ministry on the Boundaries: Cooperation without Exploitation
ch. 7 Ministry with Persons in Female Prostitution
ch. 8 A Matter of Homelessness
ch. 9 Theological Reflection in the Community Based Model
ch. 10 Mentoring for Transformation
ch. 11 Individual and Social Transformation

Appendixes
Notes
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Education for Reflective Ministry

Book
van der Ven, Johannes A.
1998
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
BV4011.V46 1998
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Written by one of today’s leading theorists in the field of pastoral theology, Volume 24 in the Louvain Theological & Pastoral Monographs series critically evaluates the diverse educational models available for ministry in today’s societal and ecclesial context in the West.
Johannes van der Ven also proposes his own "reflective ministry" model designed to teach pastors to make self-reliant—yet foundationally sound—choices when working in their own unique ...
Additional Info:
Written by one of today’s leading theorists in the field of pastoral theology, Volume 24 in the Louvain Theological & Pastoral Monographs series critically evaluates the diverse educational models available for ministry in today’s societal and ecclesial context in the West.
Johannes van der Ven also proposes his own "reflective ministry" model designed to teach pastors to make self-reliant—yet foundationally sound—choices when working in their own unique ministry settings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Complexity and Dynamics of Religion
ch. 2 The Need for a New Educational Perspective for Ministry
ch. 3 Reflective Ministry in Context
ch. 4 Educational Conditions for Reflective Ministry
ch. 5 General Summary and Conclusions
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Education for Ministry: Reform and Renewal in Theological Education

Book
Schner, George
1993
Sheed & Ward, Kansas City, MO
BX905.S375 1993
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Questions about education for Christian ministry are currently the subject of lively debate in both Church and society. Major constructive proposals have been made from within several church traditions. Though Catholics have been a part of those ecumenical discussions, they are only beginning to contribute from their rich resources. This work is a dialogue with the questions and issues already raised in other traditions, with special attention to the contribution ...
Additional Info:
Questions about education for Christian ministry are currently the subject of lively debate in both Church and society. Major constructive proposals have been made from within several church traditions. Though Catholics have been a part of those ecumenical discussions, they are only beginning to contribute from their rich resources. This work is a dialogue with the questions and issues already raised in other traditions, with special attention to the contribution a Catholic perspective can offer. Education for Ministry asks questions about the whole range of ministerial activities that are coming to life in the Roman tradition in North America. It provides students with an opportunity to reflect on their preparation for a life of ministry. (From the Publisher)
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"Theological Education and Ministerial Formation: Coming to Terms with the Hidden Curriculum"

Article
Guider, Margaret E.
1994
Journal of Supervision and Training in Ministry 15 (1994): 133-143
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
In this article, I take Anderson and Scanlon's observation about clergy malaise and pastoral vulnerability as the starting point for my own reflection on supervision and formation in the context of theological education and ministerial formation. Using a number of insights derived from the recent work of Robert Kegan, In Over Our Heads: The Mental Demands of Modern Life, I offer an alternative attribution theory for understanding clergy malaise and ...
Additional Info:
In this article, I take Anderson and Scanlon's observation about clergy malaise and pastoral vulnerability as the starting point for my own reflection on supervision and formation in the context of theological education and ministerial formation. Using a number of insights derived from the recent work of Robert Kegan, In Over Our Heads: The Mental Demands of Modern Life, I offer an alternative attribution theory for understanding clergy malaise and go on to explore the implications of this theory for those of us involved in theological education and the formation of candidates for ministry. In accord with Anderson and Scanlon, I agree that clergy malaise is a symptom of a heightened sense of vulnerability. I am somewhat hesitant, however, to identify the cause of such vulnerability as an inadequate formation for ministry. Thought I readily acknowledge that an inadequate formation may exacerbate the phenomenon, I believe Kegan's analysis alerts us to a more probable cause, namely: the limited capacity of the individual minister to meet the mental demands of modern life.
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"Formed for Ministry: A Program in Spiritual Formation"

Article
Jones, L. Gregory, and Willie James Jennings
2000
Christian Century (Feb 2-9, 2000): 124-128
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Stresses that the knowledge and the love of God should be central to theological education. Information on the program of spiritual formation developed by Duke Divinity School; How the program works.
Additional Info:
Stresses that the knowledge and the love of God should be central to theological education. Information on the program of spiritual formation developed by Duke Divinity School; How the program works.
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Wabash tree

Let Ministry Teach: A Guide to Theological Reflection

Book
Kinast, Robert L.
1996
Liturgical Press, Collegeville, MN
BV4164.5.K56 1996
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Drawing upon 17 years of experience in theology, Dr. Kinast describes a step-by-step approach to help students and experienced ministers learn what their ministers teaches. Through examples, practical suggestions, and principles grounded in process theology, readers of this book explore the full range of resources needed for meaningful theological reflection. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Drawing upon 17 years of experience in theology, Dr. Kinast describes a step-by-step approach to help students and experienced ministers learn what their ministers teaches. Through examples, practical suggestions, and principles grounded in process theology, readers of this book explore the full range of resources needed for meaningful theological reflection. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Where's the Theology? Ministerial Experience and Theological Reflection
ch. 2 What Am I Looking For? Describing Experiences for Theological Reflection
ch. 3 How Did I Get Here? Entering and Experience
ch. 4 That Reminds Me: Theological Reflection as Illustration
ch. 5 Now I Begin to See: Theological Reflection as Application
ch. 6 Is That What You Mean? Theological Reflection as Interpretation
ch. 7 Now What Do I Do? Enacting the Learning

Bibliography
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The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think in Action

Book
Schon, Donald A.
1983
Basic Books, New York, NY
HD8038.A1S35 1983
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
A leading MIT social scientist and consultant examines five professions—engineering, architecture, management, psychotherapy, and town planning—to show how professionals really go about solving problems. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A leading MIT social scientist and consultant examines five professions—engineering, architecture, management, psychotherapy, and town planning—to show how professionals really go about solving problems. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
ch. 1 The Crisis of Confidence in Professional Knowledge
ch. 2 From Technical Rationality to Reflection-in-Action
ch. 3 Design as a Reflective Conversation with the Situation
ch. 4 Psychotherapy: The Patient as a Universe of One
ch. 5 The Structure of Reflection-in-Action
ch. 6 Reflective Practice in the Science-Based Professions
ch. 7 Town Planning: Limits to Reflection-in-Action
ch. 8 The Art of Managing: Reflection-in-Action Within an Organizational Learning System
ch. 9 Patterns and Limits of Reflection-in-Action Across the Professions
ch. 10 Implications for the Professions and Their Place in Society
Notes
Index
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Transforming the City: Reframing Education for Urban Ministry

Book
Villafane, Eldin, Bruce W. Jackson, Robert A. Evans, and Alice Frazer Evans
2002
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
BV637.5.R44 2002
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Experience teaches that traditional approaches to ministry education do not work well in the ever-changing climate of the city. The dynamic, complex nature of inner-city life demands that we begin to think differently about urban ministry and how we develop leaders. Transforming the City offers a new way to look at ministry training and presents a number of informative case studies that can help in equipping people to minister effectively ...
Additional Info:
Experience teaches that traditional approaches to ministry education do not work well in the ever-changing climate of the city. The dynamic, complex nature of inner-city life demands that we begin to think differently about urban ministry and how we develop leaders. Transforming the City offers a new way to look at ministry training and presents a number of informative case studies that can help in equipping people to minister effectively in the urban context.

The book is built around six case studies that chronicle very different examples of urban theological education and that highlight both the challenge and the promise of creative approaches to education for ministry in multicultural urban locales. Commentaries by noted urban educators and church leaders point to the pitfalls and opportunities of urban ministry. Also included are helpful background notes and suggestions for how to teach each case study. Purposely designed for a variety of educational settings, Transforming the City is the best resource now available for exploring the task of urban ministry. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction
Invitation to Dialogue
How Did We Get Here? A Survey of Important Historical, Social, and Theological Issues That Occasioned the Rise of Urban Theological Education
Using Case Studies in Urban Theological Education
Cases Studies and Commentaries on Critical Issues Facing Urban Theological Education<
Case Study: Another World
Case Study: Setting the Captives Free
Case Study: Service and Survival
Case Study: A Shifting of Paradigms
Case Study: Whose Program Is It?
Case Study: A Metro Strategy

Paradigms for Urban Transformation
Authors and Contributors
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"Collegiality as a Moral and Ethical Practice"

Article
Copeland, M. Shawn
1999
in Practice What You Preach (Franklin, WI: Sheed & Ward, 1999): 315-333
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Calling for accountability, Practice What You Preach discusses ethical questions that arise in congregations and pastoral leadership. Formation of pastors, empowering leaders, resolving power struggles between clergy and laity--these and other critical pastoral issues are addressed by an ecumenical group of contributors. Divided into four parts: the way the churches train their pastors; the way their pastors live; the way communities worship; and the way communities behave, this collection identifies ...
Additional Info:
Calling for accountability, Practice What You Preach discusses ethical questions that arise in congregations and pastoral leadership. Formation of pastors, empowering leaders, resolving power struggles between clergy and laity--these and other critical pastoral issues are addressed by an ecumenical group of contributors. Divided into four parts: the way the churches train their pastors; the way their pastors live; the way communities worship; and the way communities behave, this collection identifies and offers positive solutions to areas where churches are often slow to change. Each essay begins with a case describing a typical problem--from wages to in-fighting--and then discusses what virtues or character traits might be developed to resolve the problem effectively. An eye-opener of a book . . . it will involve you from page one as it invites intelligent people everywhere to reckon with its courageous, timely content. (From the Publisher)
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Context as Text: Field Education's Contribution to Theological Education (pdf)

Journal Issue
2001
Theological Education 37, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.37no.2
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2001-theological-education-v37-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Teaching from a Community Context: The Role of the Field Educator in Theological Education (Robert T. O’Gorman, Kathleen Talvacchia, and W. Michael Smith)
Publications by Members of the Association for Theological Field Education: Survey Results (Charlotte McDaniel)

Open Forum
From “Talking Shop” to “Setting an Agenda”: Leadership Education Toward 2005 (Jack L. Seymour, Edward L. Wheeler, and William R. Myers)
A Womanist Perspective on Spirituality in Leadership (Emilie M. Townes)
Issues and Challenges in Theological Education: Three Reflections (Joseph C. Hough, Jr., Richard J. Mouw, and Robert M. Franklin)
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Public Character in Action: Patterns and Possibilities (pdf)

Journal Issue
2001
Theological Education 38, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47V.38no.1
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2001-theological-education-v38-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Theme Introduction (Robin W. Lovin and Richard J. Mouw)
Spirituality and Public Character: A Qualitative Cross-Sectional Study of Master of Divinity Students in Toronto (Jeffrey P. Greenman and Yau Man Siew)
Educating for Public Ministry: Models and Strategies for Mainline Seminaries (Elizabeth Nordbeck and Douglas Ottati)
From the Margins to the Center: Exploring the Seminary’s Leadership Role in Developing the Public Presence of Pentecostalism (Cheryl Bridges Johns)
A Public Voice: Preaching on Justice Issues (Ray John Marek, OMI, and Daniel E. Harris, CM)
Making Connections: Faith in the Public Square (Daniel McLellan, OFM)
Connecting Faith and Vocational Discipleship at Covenant Theological Seminary (Donald C. Guthrie and James A. Meek)
Responsibility, Repentance, and Right Relations (Phyllis D. Airhart and Roger C. Hutchinson)
Geographies of Memory: Theological Reflections on Racial Reconciliation in South Africa and the United States (L. Gregory Jones and Willie James Jennings)

OPEN FORUM
The Seminary Chapel Building as Spiritual Formation (James F. White)
Technology and Educational Practices (Louis Charles Willard)
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The Advancement of Theological Education

Book
Niebuhr, H. Richard
1957
Harper & Brothers Publishers, New York, NY
BV4030.N5 1957
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
A study of the work which theological schools do in the preparation of persons for the parish ministry. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A study of the work which theological schools do in the preparation of persons for the parish ministry. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

ch. 1 Some recent trends in theological education
ch. 2 Trends in the economics of theological education
ch. 3 Problems of government
ch. 4 Theological Faculties
ch. 5 The course of study
ch. 6 Theological teaching in classroom, field, and library
ch. 7 Theological students: Varieties of types and experience
ch. 8 The school as community
ch. 9 The line of advance
ch. 10 The Theological education of negro ministers

Index
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The Public Character of Theological Education (pdf)

Journal Issue
2000
Theological Education 37, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.37no.1
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2000-theological-education-v37-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Theme Introduction (Robin W. Lovin and Richard J. Mouw)
The Public Character of Theological Education: An Evangelical Perspective (David Jones, Jeffrey Greenman, Christine Pohl)
The Public Character of Theological Education: A Perspective from Roman Catholic Schools of Theology and Seminaries (Jeremiah J. McCarthy, William Morell, O.M.I., William McGrattan, Daniel McLellan, O.F.M., Kevin O’Neil, C.Ss.R.)
The Public Character of Mainline Theological Education (Elizabeth C. Nordbeck, Douglas F. Ottati)
The Public Character of the University-Related Divinity School (Bonnie J. Miller-McLemore, Robin W. Lovin, Richard J. Wood)

Open Forum
A Contextual Theology of Leadership (Diane Kennedy, O.P.)
A Womanist Perspective on Spirituality in Leadership (Emilie M. Townes)
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Teaching Preaching: Isaac Rufus Clark and Black Sacred Rhetoric

Book
Cannon, Katie Geneva
2002
Continuum, New York, NY
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
In Teaching Preaching, Katie Cannon, one of Clark's myriad preaching proteges, conceives her role as purely "presentational": "to bring Clark face to face with a reading audience, allow him to explain the formal elements of preaching from the inside out, and let each lecture mediate its own message." She also allows Clark to speak in his own expressive vernacular, with its double negatives, deliberate redundancy, signifying wordplay, and colloquially coined ...
Additional Info:
In Teaching Preaching, Katie Cannon, one of Clark's myriad preaching proteges, conceives her role as purely "presentational": "to bring Clark face to face with a reading audience, allow him to explain the formal elements of preaching from the inside out, and let each lecture mediate its own message." She also allows Clark to speak in his own expressive vernacular, with its double negatives, deliberate redundancy, signifying wordplay, and colloquially coined cussedness. While Clark lucidly explicates all the elements of sermon preparation and delivery, he never tires of stressing the development of a "theoethical consciousness": "a transformative vision that focuses on Jesus as the chief cornerstone of the preaching person as well as of the preaching subject." This book will be an invaluable resource for ministers who struggle from Sunday to Sunday to find their ethical voice in the preparation of each and every sermon. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Ch. 1 Taking the Holiness of Preaching Seriously
Ch. 2 Bearing the Cross in This Holy Course
Ch. 3 A - Not The, but A - Theological Definition of Preaching
Ch. 4 A Critique of Contemporary Preaching
Ch. 5 The Sermonic Text
Ch. 6 Creative Textual Selections
Ch. 7 Three Textual Testers
Ch. 8 Sermonic Title, Introduction, and Proposition
Ch. 9 Definition, Elaboration, and Exemplification of the Sermonic Body
Ch. 10 Sermonic Clarification
Ch. 11 Justification
Ch. 12 Transitions
Ch. 13 Substance and Form in Proclaiming a Relevant Gospel
Ch. 14 Procedures in the Conclusion of the Sermon
Ch. 15 Anatomy of the Idea
Ch. 16 Four Bitter Pills for Black Revolutionary Religion
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The Character and Assessment of Learning for Religious Vocation (pdf)

Journal Issue
2003
Theological Education 39, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v.39 no.1 2003
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2003-theological-education-v39-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
The Character and Assessment of Learning for Religious Vocation: M.Div. Education and Numbering the Levites (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Learning Goals and the Assessment of Learning in Theological Schools: A Preliminary Survey (Gordon T. Smith and Charles M. Wood)
Knowing and Caring (Charles M. Wood)
Getting to the Question: Assessment and the Professional Character of Ministry (Victor J. Klimoski)
What is the Literature Saying about Learning and Assessment in Higher Education? (Carolyn M. Jurkowitz)
Exploring the Process of Learning and Assessment: Report on the ATS Workshop on Assessing Theological Learning (Eleanor A. Daniel)
Assessing Assessment: An Accreditation Visitor’s View of ATS Outcome-Oriented Standards (Loyde H. Hartley)

OPEN FORUM
Worship and Learning, E. Byron Anderson
Infusing the Graduate Theological Curriculum with Education about Disability (Robert C. Anderson)
Judicatory-Based Theological Education (Lance R. Barker and B. Edmon Martin)
Article cover image

"The Pastoral Imagination"

Article
Dykstra, Craig
2001
The Presbyterian Outlook (September 17, 2001): 14-15
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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A Many Colored Kingdom: Multicultural Dynamics for Spiritual Formation

Book
Conde-Frazier, Elizabeth, S. Steve Kang , Gary A. Parrett
2004
Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI
BV1471.3.C66 2004
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
A Many Colored Kingdom explores Christian formation and teaching in the church, with a particular focus on intercultural and interethnic relationships.

Well qualified to speak on issues of diversity, the authors describe relevant aspects of their own personal journeys, presented in compelling narrative form. They go on to identify key issues emerging from their Scripture studies and teaching experiences. A final chapter contains a conversation among the authors ...
Additional Info:
A Many Colored Kingdom explores Christian formation and teaching in the church, with a particular focus on intercultural and interethnic relationships.

Well qualified to speak on issues of diversity, the authors describe relevant aspects of their own personal journeys, presented in compelling narrative form. They go on to identify key issues emerging from their Scripture studies and teaching experiences. A final chapter contains a conversation among the authors as they respond to one another's insights and concerns.

This book will be required reading for those engaged in as well as those preparing for a life of teaching and ministry in our increasingly multicultural world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction : An exploration and an experiment / Elizabeth Conde-Frazier, S. Steve Kang, and Gary A. Parrett

ch. 1 Three stories / Elizabeth Conde-Frazier, S. Steve Kang, and Gary A. Parrett
ch. 2 Lord of the nations / Gary A. Parrett and S. Steve Kang
ch. 3 The wondrous cross and the broken wall / Gary A. Parrett
ch. 4 Salient theoretical frameworks for forming kingdom citizens / S. Steve Kang
Prejudice and conversion / Elizabeth Conde-Frazier
ch. 5 Becoming a culturally sensitive minister / Gary A. Parrett
ch. 6 The formation process in a learning community / S. Steve Kang
ch. 7 From hospitality to Shalom / Elizabeth Conde-Frazier

Conclusion : Living the biblical vision / Elizabeth Conde-Frazier, S. Steve Kang, and Gary A. Parrett
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Perspectivas: Occasional Papers, Fall 2003

Journal Issue
Perspectivas
2003
Hispanic Theological Initiative, Atlanta, GA
BR563.H57P47 2003
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 the impact of pluralism on trends in Latin American and U.S. Latino Religions and Society, (Gaston Espinosa)
ch. 2 A spirituality for a multicultural ministry (Elizabeth Conde-Frazier)
ch. 3 Response to Elizabeth Conde-Frazier, (Gabriel salguero)
ch. 4 U.S. Hispanic/ Latino Identity and Protestant, experience: a brief introduction for the seminarian, (Zaida maldonado perez)
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Reconstructing the Sacred Tower: Challenge and Promise of Latino/a Theological Education

Book
Davis, Kenneth, OFM and Edwin I. Hernandez
2003
University of Scranton Press, Scranton, PA
BV4030.D38 2003
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
The Hispanic community in the United States is growing by leaps and bounds. The most important institution in Hispanic barrios is the church. Government programs come and go, but the churches remain. So what could be more important than good Hispanic theological leadership? This book is unblinking about the problems involved. Lacking are financial and intellectual resources in otherwise excellent seminaries and other educational institutions. At the same time the ...
Additional Info:
The Hispanic community in the United States is growing by leaps and bounds. The most important institution in Hispanic barrios is the church. Government programs come and go, but the churches remain. So what could be more important than good Hispanic theological leadership? This book is unblinking about the problems involved. Lacking are financial and intellectual resources in otherwise excellent seminaries and other educational institutions. At the same time the book offers a vision of hope. It uses solid data to describe the willingness of many young people to get involved in religious leadership. It shows their eagerness to learn and to serve. The book concludes with a number of well examined and down to earth recommendations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword
ch. 1 The Context: Hispanic Communities Confronting Change
ch. 2 The Leaders: Hispanic Religious Leaders and Future Leaders
ch. 3 Educational Realities and Promises: Hispanic Perspectives and Experience in Advanced Theological Education
ch. 4 The Future: Moving From Implications to Actions
ch. 5 A New Kind of Leadership for a Diverse Theological Community
Conclusion: Reconstructing the Sacred Tower
Bibliography
Index
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Practical Wisdom on Theological Teaching and Learning

Book
Warford, Malcolm L., ed.
2004
Peter Lang, New York, NY
BV4022.P73 2004
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Contemporary theological education is facing profound changes. Fundamental shifts in both church and society have established a volatile context for theological teaching and learning. Seminaries are struggling with the growing diversity of their students, faculties, and institutional commitments. This book addresses these issues both contextually and historically, engages the nature of theological teaching and learning, and offers educational practices that strengthen the vocation of teaching and enhance the school as ...
Additional Info:
Contemporary theological education is facing profound changes. Fundamental shifts in both church and society have established a volatile context for theological teaching and learning. Seminaries are struggling with the growing diversity of their students, faculties, and institutional commitments. This book addresses these issues both contextually and historically, engages the nature of theological teaching and learning, and offers educational practices that strengthen the vocation of teaching and enhance the school as a place of conversation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Malcolm L. Warford)

ch. 1 The vocation of teaching : beyond the conspiracy of mediocrity (Raymond Brady Williams)
ch. 2 Evolving dynamics of formation (Victor Klimoski)
ch. 3 Faculty life and seminary culture : it's about time and money (Gretchen E. Ziegenhals)
ch. 4 From cordiality to candor : an ethnographic study of a faculty forming its life together (Stephen Ellingson)
ch. 5 The seminary dispersed : theological teaching in a changing world (Jane Shaw)
ch. 6 Historical influences on seminary culture (Glenn T. Miller
ch. 7 Do not be conformed to this age : biblical understandings of ministerial leadership (Jerry L. Sumney)
ch. 8 What is the ministry toward which we teach?(Samuel Escobar)
ch. 9 Formative learning in the classroom (Mary-Ann Winkelmes)
ch. 10 Engaging issues in course development (Garth M. Rosell)
ch. 11 Online education : an asset in a period of educational change (Richard W. Nysse)
ch. 12 Rehabilitating prejudice : framing issues of diversity in theological education (Diamond Cephus)
ch. 13 Faculties that listen, schools that learn : assessment in theological education (Gordon T. Smith)
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Educating Leaders for Ministry: Issues and Responses

Book
Klimoski, Victor J., Kevin J. O'Neil and Katarina M. Schuth
2005
Liturgical Press, Collegeville, MN
BV4020.K55 2005
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Educating Leaders for Ministry names four overarching challenges that students, faculty, and administrators face in theological education: theological differences, learning differences, integration, and assessment. The six-year program, known popularly as the Keystone Conferences (1996-2001), tapped the experience of nearly 150 educators and administrators as it identified and proposed responses to the particularly problematic issues that surface in the teaching and learning endeavor in Roman Catholic theological education in the United States. (...
Additional Info:
Educating Leaders for Ministry names four overarching challenges that students, faculty, and administrators face in theological education: theological differences, learning differences, integration, and assessment. The six-year program, known popularly as the Keystone Conferences (1996-2001), tapped the experience of nearly 150 educators and administrators as it identified and proposed responses to the particularly problematic issues that surface in the teaching and learning endeavor in Roman Catholic theological education in the United States. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

ch. 1 Diversity and the formation for ministry : understanding the challenge
ch. 2 Diversity and the formation for ministry : principles and practices
ch. 3 Seeing things whole : a reflection on integration
ch. 4 Assessment and good teaching
ch. 5 Building communities of wisdom
ch. 6 Responding to challenges in theological education as a community of wisdom : processes for faculty development
ch. 7 What technology can teach about theological pedagogy
ch. 8 Leading change : a reflection on context, principles, and virtues
ch. 9 Reflections from the wider church
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Wabash tree

Educating Clergy: Teaching Practices and Pastoral Imagination

Book
Foster, Charles R., Lisa E. Dahill, Lawrence A. Golemon, and Barbara Wang Tolentino
2006
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
BV4020.E38 2006
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
This book emerges from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teachings study of the most pressing concerns involved in preparation of clergy across all faiths and denominations. Working with accrediting bodies and professional associations as well as the educational institutions themselves, the findings reported in this book can be used to improve the quality of education for future ministers, priests and rabbis. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book emerges from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teachings study of the most pressing concerns involved in preparation of clergy across all faiths and denominations. Working with accrediting bodies and professional associations as well as the educational institutions themselves, the findings reported in this book can be used to improve the quality of education for future ministers, priests and rabbis. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction

ch. 1 Educating clergy : a distinctive challenge
ch. 2 Common profession, diverse practices
ch. 3 Pedagogies of interpretation
ch. 4 Pedagogies of formation
ch. 5 Pedagogies of contextualization
ch. 6 Pedagogies of performance
ch. 7 Traditions of seminary education and the pastoral imagination
ch. 8 Continuity and change in the traditions of seminary education
ch. 9 Cultivating spiritual practices for clergy leadership
ch. 10 Cultivating professional practices : field education
ch. 11 Teaching toward integration : cultivating the pastoral, priestly, or rabbinic imagination
ch. 12 An invitation to conversation
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"For What Should Theological Colleges Educate? A Systematic Investigation of Ministry Education Perceptions and Priorities"

Article
Dowson, Martin and Dennis M. McInerney
2005
Review of Religious Research 46, no. 4 (2005): 403-421
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
The present study sought to investigate the perceptions of 300 ministers, 85 recent graduates from theological colleges, and 954 church members regarding (a) the effectiveness of ministry education, (b) priorities for ministry education, and (c) the acquired competencies of ministers. Participants were surveyed using the Inventory of Ministry Education Perceptions and Priorities (IMEPP), which displayed good validity and reliability in the study. Results of the study indicate that participants were largely satisfied with ...
Additional Info:
The present study sought to investigate the perceptions of 300 ministers, 85 recent graduates from theological colleges, and 954 church members regarding (a) the effectiveness of ministry education, (b) priorities for ministry education, and (c) the acquired competencies of ministers. Participants were surveyed using the Inventory of Ministry Education Perceptions and Priorities (IMEPP), which displayed good validity and reliability in the study. Results of the study indicate that participants were largely satisfied with the effectiveness of ministry education and the acquired competence of ministers. However, on the whole, ministers and recent graduates were less satisfied with their ministry education and acquired competence than were church members. The study also identified significant differences between ministers, recent graduates and church members with regard to the priorities they perceived theological colleges should pursue.
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Multiple Paths to Ministry: New Models for Theological Education

Book
Barker, Lance R. and B. Edmon Martin, eds.
2004
Pilgrim Press, Cleveland, OH
BV 4030.M85 2004
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
In a rapidly changing congregational and professional environment, how will churches and their institutions of theological education prepare ministers for diverse contexts? Barker and Martin affirm the theological school's continued role yet claim that American Protestantism can no longer rely on graduate theological schools as the sole educational institutions charged with providing curricula for theological study related to ministerial preparation. To support their thesis, the authors researched the graduate theological ...
Additional Info:
In a rapidly changing congregational and professional environment, how will churches and their institutions of theological education prepare ministers for diverse contexts? Barker and Martin affirm the theological school's continued role yet claim that American Protestantism can no longer rely on graduate theological schools as the sole educational institutions charged with providing curricula for theological study related to ministerial preparation. To support their thesis, the authors researched the graduate theological education programs of The Episcopal Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the Presbyterian Church (USA), the United Church of Christ, the United Church of Canada, and The United Methodist Church; and compiled essays that show powerful new models for successful ministry preparation. Contributors: Janet Silman, Carol Bell, Isaac McDonald, Richard Sales, Bert Affleck, Minka Shura Sprague, Glenn Miller, Ken McFayden, and Thomas Ray. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction : Judicatory-based theological education (Lance R. Barker and B. Edmon Martin)

ch. 1 Keepers of the vision : aboriginal community-based learning for ministry (Janet Silman)
ch. 2 From survival to vitality : a journey into mutual ministry (Carol Bell)
ch. 3 Called : an alternative path to ordination Isaac McDonald)
ch. 4 Theology among the people : theological education by extension and the TAP program (Richard Sales)
ch. 5 Standing in the wings : United Methodist local pastors and their preparation (Bert Affleck)
ch. 6 Shall we dance? : living the adventure that is New York theological seminary (Minda Shura Sprague)
ch. 7 Why the seminary? : a historical inquiry (Glenn Miller)
ch. 8 Education or calling : what makes a commissioned lay pastor a pastor? (Ken McFayden)
ch. 9 The small church : radical reformation and renewal of ministry (Thomas Ray)
ch. 10 Re-visioning ministry leadership : beyond adapting congregational and clerical models (B. Edmon Martin and Lance R. Barker)
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Wabash tree

God's Potters: Pastoral Leadership and the Shaping of Congregations

Book
Carroll, Jackson W.
2006
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
BV4011.3.C37 2006
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Pastoral ministry is an occupation in flux. In this comprehensive study Jackson Carroll considers the many factors — changing roles among clergy and laypeople, the opening of ordination to women, an increasing shortage of clergy, and more — that are shaping congregations and ministers today. Building on Paul’s image of Christians as “clay jars,” Carroll paints a portrait of “God’s potters” — pastors whose calling is to form their congregational jars ...
Additional Info:
Pastoral ministry is an occupation in flux. In this comprehensive study Jackson Carroll considers the many factors — changing roles among clergy and laypeople, the opening of ordination to women, an increasing shortage of clergy, and more — that are shaping congregations and ministers today. Building on Paul’s image of Christians as “clay jars,” Carroll paints a portrait of “God’s potters” — pastors whose calling is to form their congregational jars so that they reveal rather than hide God’s treasure.

A veteran clergy watcher, Carroll uses data from what is likely the most representative survey of Protestant and Catholic clergy ever undertaken, as well as focus group interviews and congregational responses, to take a hard look at who is doing ministry today, what it involves, and how pastors are faring in leading their congregations. Significantly, his study covers clergy from a broad range of traditions — Catholic, mainline Protestant, conservative Protestant, and historic black churches.

Replete with pertinent tables and figures, God’s Potters culminates with specific strategies for strengthening pastoral leadership and nurturing excellence in ministry. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Pastoral leadership at the beginning of the 21st century
ch. 2 The social and cultural context in which clergy work
ch. 3 Who are God's potters today?
ch. 4 What do clergy do? : the work of ordained ministry
ch. 5 How do pastors lead? : leadership and cultural production
ch. 6 Potters' problems : commitment, satisfaction, and health
ch. 7 "A manner of life worthy of the gospel" : exploring the meaning of excellence in ministry and pastoral leadership
ch. 8 Strengthening pastoral leadership and nurturing excellence : some strategies

Appendix A: research methods
Appendix B: interview protocol and response frequencies
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Wabash tree

Resurrecting Excellence: Shaping Faithful Christian Ministry

Book
Jones, L. Gregory and Kevin R. Armstrong
2006
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
BV4011.3.J66 2006
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Christians are of two minds about excellence. We commend excellent teaching, seek out excellent health care, and celebrate excellence in the arts. When a Christian life of congregation is described as excellent, however, we are suspicious that achievement, ambition or success may get the best of us. Cultural standards of excellence may turn out to be Christian stumbling blocks.

"Resurrecting Excellence" urges Christians to reclaim their distinctive understanding ...
Additional Info:
Christians are of two minds about excellence. We commend excellent teaching, seek out excellent health care, and celebrate excellence in the arts. When a Christian life of congregation is described as excellent, however, we are suspicious that achievement, ambition or success may get the best of us. Cultural standards of excellence may turn out to be Christian stumbling blocks.

"Resurrecting Excellence" urges Christians to reclaim their distinctive understanding and emphasis on excellence: an unselfish ambition for the gospel. The life death and resurrection of Jesus are both the basis and the goal of our summons to excellence. Drawing on ancient traditions as well as contemporary voices, the authors -- a divinity school dean and a parish pastor -- offer both a theology of excellence and compelling portraits of pastors, lay leader, congregations, and judicatories who embody "a more excellent way."

Excellence in Christian ministry requires the capacity for measuring life by the complexities of judgment and grace as well as budgets and buildings. "Resurrecting Excellence" commends this beautiful and challenging task to all with a heart and mind for the excellence of God. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Ambition for the Gospel : a call to resurrecting excellence
ch. 2 Inhabiting the intersections : a still more excellent way
ch. 3 Resurrecting excellence in the Christian vocation
ch. 4 Resurrecting excellence in the pastoral vocation
ch. 5 Learning and leading : the cultivation of excellent ministry
ch. 6 The treasures of excellent ministry
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Aging Education: Teaching and Practice Strategies

Book
Langer, Nieli and Terry Tirrito, eds.
2004
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
HQ1064.U5 A63385 2004
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Adult Learners

Additional Info:
Aging Education provides educators in aging studies with a unique text that responds to the paucity of instructional strategies and teaching materials. By developing and explaining a multidisciplinary approach to working with older adults in areas related to health, education, ethics, law, cultural competency for a multicultural population, translating social policy into practice, spirituality, and human services, the editors provide an imaginative and thought-provoking unmet need for gerontology educators by ...
Additional Info:
Aging Education provides educators in aging studies with a unique text that responds to the paucity of instructional strategies and teaching materials. By developing and explaining a multidisciplinary approach to working with older adults in areas related to health, education, ethics, law, cultural competency for a multicultural population, translating social policy into practice, spirituality, and human services, the editors provide an imaginative and thought-provoking unmet need for gerontology educators by providing them with teaching and practice strategies in aging education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

ch. 1 Programs and services for older adults : a national and international focus (Terry Tirrito)
ch. 2 Strategies for teaching aging social welfare problems and policies (Julie Miller-Cribbs)
ch. 3 Teaching the adult learner about mental health issues in aging (Vicki Murdock)
ch. 4 Families and aging : Alzheimer's disease spousal caregiver support group (Gil Choi)
ch. 5 An approach to teaching spirituality for practice with the older adult (Larry P. Ortiz and Melissa B. Littlefield)
ch. 6 Education about dying, death, grief and loss : principles and strategies (Kenneth J. Doka)
ch. 7 Act III : maximizing choices in retirement (Nieli Langer)
ch. 8 Senior volunteers : staying connected with the community (Nina Dubler Katz)
ch. 9 Elder abuse : policy and training for law enforcement personnel (Nieli Langer and Tan Kirby Davis)
ch. 10 Gericare specialist : an educational response to the elder home care crisis (Jane M. Cardea, Jane F. McGarrahan and Bernice C. Brennan)

Epilogue
Editors and contributors
Index
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Teaching the Bible in the Church

Book
Bracke, John M. and Karen B. Tye
2003
Chalice Press, St. Louis, MO
BS600.3.B72 2003
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
John Bracke and Karen Tye, a biblical scholar and a religious educator, have come together to offer a vital new work of practical insight into the task of teaching the Bible in the church. Intended for pastors, church educators, lay teachers, and those in seminary, this book provides a blueprint for effective teaching that lead beyond just conveying information to opening oneself and the learner to transformation through the text. ...
Additional Info:
John Bracke and Karen Tye, a biblical scholar and a religious educator, have come together to offer a vital new work of practical insight into the task of teaching the Bible in the church. Intended for pastors, church educators, lay teachers, and those in seminary, this book provides a blueprint for effective teaching that lead beyond just conveying information to opening oneself and the learner to transformation through the text. It is teaching the Bible in its most faithful form, as an invitation to fully encounter the scriptures and the God who empowers transformation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Teaching the Bible: How We Learn
ch. 2 Teaching the Bible: How We Teach
ch. 3 Teaching the Bible: An Intercultural Education Experience
ch. 4 Teaching the Bible: Issues of Interpretation
ch. 5 Teaching the Bible: Putting It All Together

Notes
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"Preparing Religious Leaders for Our Time"

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Premawardhana, Shanta
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 71-72
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church

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"Educating American Muslim Leadership (Men and Women) for the Twenty-First Century"

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al-Islam, Amir
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 73-78
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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Educating and training Muslim men and women leaders who are capable of effectively navigating the multi-ethnic and multi-religious terrain in America – particularly in the post 9–11 milieu – requires the development of a new critical American Muslim pedagogy. This new pedagogy, centered in Islamic epistemology and ontology, should selectively appropriate the best of traditional Muslim educational paradigms and modalities used over time. However, the traditional Muslim model must not be reified, but ...
Additional Info:
Educating and training Muslim men and women leaders who are capable of effectively navigating the multi-ethnic and multi-religious terrain in America – particularly in the post 9–11 milieu – requires the development of a new critical American Muslim pedagogy. This new pedagogy, centered in Islamic epistemology and ontology, should selectively appropriate the best of traditional Muslim educational paradigms and modalities used over time. However, the traditional Muslim model must not be reified, but rather be subjected to a sharp critique which maintains the richness of its spiritual and intellectual legacy but rejects teachings and interpretations used to create false dichotomies resulting in binary constructs, particularly those which pit Muslims against the west. Finally, the new critical American Muslim pedagogy must embrace all of the best discursive practices (e.g., pedagogies of Freire and others) that engage us in a critical analysis of the way in which power and privilege, even in religious communities, operate to marginalize and suppress women, minorities, and people of color.
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"Training for Priesthood in the Modern World: A Zarathushtrian Perspective"

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Bagli, Jehan
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 79-84
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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This essay traces the development of the Zarathushtrian (Zoroastrian) priesthood from the time of the prophet Zarathushtra, through the Median priestly tribe as Magi, and the Macedonian and Arab invasions. This sets the stage for the separation of the Zarathushti priesthood between Iran and India and the generation of independent training methods. Centuries later dialogue between the two groups revealed some remarkable differences due to diverse cultural influences. From the ...
Additional Info:
This essay traces the development of the Zarathushtrian (Zoroastrian) priesthood from the time of the prophet Zarathushtra, through the Median priestly tribe as Magi, and the Macedonian and Arab invasions. This sets the stage for the separation of the Zarathushti priesthood between Iran and India and the generation of independent training methods. Centuries later dialogue between the two groups revealed some remarkable differences due to diverse cultural influences. From the eighteenth to the twentieth century there is a loss of respect for the priestly class and organization by the community of learning institutions to revamp the priestly training. The last portion of the paper discusses factors that affect the training of priests in North America. Some recommendations are put forward to adapt the training of the priesthood in the changing world society, and how these ideas can be brought to reality.
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"Catholic Theological Education in a Religiously Pluralistic Age"

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Lefebure, Leo D.
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 85-90
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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This article describes the transformation of Catholic theological education over the last fifty years from a highly defensive posture vis-à-vis other religions toward dialogical engagement with members of other religions and all persons of good will. Until Vatican II, most Catholic theologians and officials distrusted exploration of other religions as leading to a dilution of Catholic identity. Vatican II condemned anti-Semitism and called for dialogue among religions in pursuit ...
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This article describes the transformation of Catholic theological education over the last fifty years from a highly defensive posture vis-à-vis other religions toward dialogical engagement with members of other religions and all persons of good will. Until Vatican II, most Catholic theologians and officials distrusted exploration of other religions as leading to a dilution of Catholic identity. Vatican II condemned anti-Semitism and called for dialogue among religions in pursuit of common values. Since the Council, there have been developments in interfaith education on three levels: religious studies, comparative theology, and inter-religious practice.
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"Vodou: A Sacred Multidimensional, Pluralistic Space"

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Désir, Dowoti
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 91-96
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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This paper uses the language of Vodou doctrine to articulate its key tenets and speak to how the challenge of plurality or diversity in the twenty-first century has been and continues to be addressed among African and Afro Atlantic spiritual leadership. Following the slave trade and colonialism's aftermath, a pluralistic vision, reflecting the harsh new global order, permitted spiritual sustainability by reconfiguring African ontologisms. Embracing pluralism through annexation of non-native ...
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This paper uses the language of Vodou doctrine to articulate its key tenets and speak to how the challenge of plurality or diversity in the twenty-first century has been and continues to be addressed among African and Afro Atlantic spiritual leadership. Following the slave trade and colonialism's aftermath, a pluralistic vision, reflecting the harsh new global order, permitted spiritual sustainability by reconfiguring African ontologisms. Embracing pluralism through annexation of non-native spiritual practices augmented the power of African rulers, providing them with other epistemes and access to spiritual forces they believed enhanced their position. The issue of preparing for the priesthood in a global or pluralistic society is examined in this essay through the historical and metaphysical framework that shaped the making of our societies.
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"'To a Land that I Will Show You': Training Rabbis for the Future"

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Greenstein, David
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 97-102
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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Rabbis are commonly perceived as bearers of Torah – the sacred traditions and ways of life of Judaism. As such, rabbis certainly have an important role to play in a community seeking guidance and inspiration from and a renewed connection to those traditions. Yet, historically, rabbis arose as a class in a period of crisis and were not merely conservative figures, but were also radical agents for change. The training of ...
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Rabbis are commonly perceived as bearers of Torah – the sacred traditions and ways of life of Judaism. As such, rabbis certainly have an important role to play in a community seeking guidance and inspiration from and a renewed connection to those traditions. Yet, historically, rabbis arose as a class in a period of crisis and were not merely conservative figures, but were also radical agents for change. The training of rabbis in the contemporary world calls for an assessment of our situation. Is our time a time of crisis? If it is, how should we prepare to meet that crisis? Do rabbis have a role to play in the future? While the texts and traditions of the past are available for study, interpretation, and application, is there a need to prepare rabbis to become effective agents for change? How can we embark upon such an uncharted path?
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"Catholicity and Context: The Cenotaphs of Orthodox Theological Education"

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Marangos, Frank
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 103-108
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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For more than twenty-five years, field education programs have been the primary pedagogical strategy by which contextual (practical) theological training has occurred at most Orthodox theological schools in America. These programs are based on a developmental approach, with students progressing from observation to participation to actual leadership. A synthetic model of contextualism will prepare students more effectively for ministry in the third millennium by providing attention to the contemporary context ...
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For more than twenty-five years, field education programs have been the primary pedagogical strategy by which contextual (practical) theological training has occurred at most Orthodox theological schools in America. These programs are based on a developmental approach, with students progressing from observation to participation to actual leadership. A synthetic model of contextualism will prepare students more effectively for ministry in the third millennium by providing attention to the contemporary context throughout the entire curriculum. This article will: (a) discuss the current practice of Orthodox theological education in America, (b) examine six classifications of contextual theology, and (c) suggest nine core values and goals that support a synthetic model for the contextualization of Orthodox theological education in America.
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"Training vs. Education in Forming Won Buddhist Kyomus in the USA"

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Kim, Bokin
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 109-114
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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An historically familiar tension in East Asian Buddhism between meditation and cultivation in broad learning has appeared in discussions and planning for preparing ministerial students in Won Buddhism. This paper reviews the history of preparation in this order, which was founded in 1916. While the alternatives of training based on practice and education based on classroom intellectual experience have occurred in Won Buddhism, the tension has appeared within the recently founded ...
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An historically familiar tension in East Asian Buddhism between meditation and cultivation in broad learning has appeared in discussions and planning for preparing ministerial students in Won Buddhism. This paper reviews the history of preparation in this order, which was founded in 1916. While the alternatives of training based on practice and education based on classroom intellectual experience have occurred in Won Buddhism, the tension has appeared within the recently founded Won Institute of Graduate Studies in the USA in a clear manner. While the pre-ministerial students coming from Korea have preferred the experiential/practical emphasis, it is recognized that graduate education in the USA normally requires broader learning and critical thinking. The faculty of Won Institute respects both strategies and their respective, almost incompatible, goals, and has tried to create a curriculum embracing both. This effort is described and viewed in the context of Won participation in a culture of pluralism and interreligious relations.
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"Hindu Leaders in North America?"

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Sarma, Deepak
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 115-120
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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"Are there Hindu leaders in North America"? Can there be leaders of a purportedly invented or imaginary religion that has no shared doctrines or beliefs? This provocative essay offers answers to these and related questions about the nature of Hindu leadership in North America. Three ideal types are examined: Ritualists, Guides, and Administrators. Their roles and responsibilities, though relatively clear in India, have become complicated in their current incarnations in ...
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"Are there Hindu leaders in North America"? Can there be leaders of a purportedly invented or imaginary religion that has no shared doctrines or beliefs? This provocative essay offers answers to these and related questions about the nature of Hindu leadership in North America. Three ideal types are examined: Ritualists, Guides, and Administrators. Their roles and responsibilities, though relatively clear in India, have become complicated in their current incarnations in North America. The difficulties are further enhanced when combined with a drive to derive a syncretic form of Hinduism, a pan-Hinduism that never existed before. This article challenges the leaders of Hinduism in North America to confront and perhaps even jettison their invented identity as a way of becoming better leaders.
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"Models and Methods of Continuing Education for Christian Ministry in the Religiously Plural Context"

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Mosher, Lucinda Allen
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 121-126
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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This paper asserts that Continuing Education aimed at equipping Christian leaders (lay and ordained) to carry out their ministries in the midst of America's increasing religious diversity in a way that views this diversity positively must be two-pronged: (1) it must provide accurate information about the beliefs and practices of the neighbors, and (2) it must provide theological resources rooted in Christian scripture and tradition. As this paper explores a variety of ...
Additional Info:
This paper asserts that Continuing Education aimed at equipping Christian leaders (lay and ordained) to carry out their ministries in the midst of America's increasing religious diversity in a way that views this diversity positively must be two-pronged: (1) it must provide accurate information about the beliefs and practices of the neighbors, and (2) it must provide theological resources rooted in Christian scripture and tradition. As this paper explores a variety of models, it reflects on the difficulty of holding these two goals together and the problems inherent in attempting to measure what such Continuing Education programs and events accomplish. In considering ways forward, it offers a Christian theology of religious difference informed by notions of neighbor-love.
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"A Long and Winding Road: Soto Zen Training in America"

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Senauke, Hozan Alan
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 127-132
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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This paper seeks to outline the broad parameters of Soto Zen Buddhist training in the North American context. Using his personal experience of training as a case study, the author argues that Zen in America is strongly oriented towards meditation and everyday practice in the world by dedicated lay people, a situation relatively rare in the history of Buddhism. The training of today's Zen teachers calls for unique skills conditioned ...
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This paper seeks to outline the broad parameters of Soto Zen Buddhist training in the North American context. Using his personal experience of training as a case study, the author argues that Zen in America is strongly oriented towards meditation and everyday practice in the world by dedicated lay people, a situation relatively rare in the history of Buddhism. The training of today's Zen teachers calls for unique skills conditioned by modern life in the developed world: pastoral counseling, psychological acuity, communication training, political awareness, and an ability to translate traditional teachings into terms that are relevant. Teacher training still observes traditional Soto Zen ordinations and pathways. But though the ritual forms endure, their meaning continues to evolve and shift according to the different needs and expressions of American Zen.
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"Sikh Leadership: Established Ideals and Diasporic Reality"

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Singh, Harinder and Simran Singh
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 133-138
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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As established in the Sikh scriptural canon, ideal leaders internalize qualities of self-sovereignty, intentional servitude, integrative creativity, authentic compassion, and perhaps most significant of all, Divine inspiration. Models of communal decision-making can also be derived from the lives of the Gur -Prophets (1469–1708 C.E.) and the institutions they established. Though the faith recognizes no clergy class, graduates of historical seminaries often emerge as significant leaders for the Sikh nation. The ...
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As established in the Sikh scriptural canon, ideal leaders internalize qualities of self-sovereignty, intentional servitude, integrative creativity, authentic compassion, and perhaps most significant of all, Divine inspiration. Models of communal decision-making can also be derived from the lives of the Gur -Prophets (1469–1708 C.E.) and the institutions they established. Though the faith recognizes no clergy class, graduates of historical seminaries often emerge as significant leaders for the Sikh nation. The community outside of the homeland, however, has experienced a lesser effort in the cultivation of leadership. With a primary focus on education, religious centers, youth camps, and retreats have played a critical role in imparting Sikh culture to the masses. While ideals are clearly articulated within the Sikh tradition, it is the application of the ideals that is necessary – Sikh leadership continually works towards these ends, and will ever seek to progress as individuals as well as a community.
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"An Integrative Educational Strategy for Christian Leaders in a Multifaith World"

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Talvacchia, Kathleen T.
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 2 (2006): 139-145
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Education   |   Religious Diversity

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This paper asserts that training Christian leaders for faithful and effective leadership in religious communities, which is responsive to the reality of the diverse religious experiences of this country, requires that they learn the skills of integration, specifically the ability to integrate formation into a community within the context of a multicultural, multifaith world. The process of pastoral theological reflection, a process that seeks to methodically put into conversation the ...
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This paper asserts that training Christian leaders for faithful and effective leadership in religious communities, which is responsive to the reality of the diverse religious experiences of this country, requires that they learn the skills of integration, specifically the ability to integrate formation into a community within the context of a multicultural, multifaith world. The process of pastoral theological reflection, a process that seeks to methodically put into conversation the student's experience, social context, and religious tradition, holds promise in a Christian context as a way to accomplish such integration. After discussing the process of pastoral theological reflection, the paper examines a seminary ministerial formation curriculum, based on this integrative process, to discern how it might better engage multifaith realities in its formation of leaders for Christian communities.
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"Pedagogies of Interpretation in Educating Clergy"

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Foster, Charles R., Lisa E. Dahill, Lawrence A. Golemon and Barbara Wang Tolentino
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 4 (2005): 204-217
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Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Student Learning Goals

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In this essay the authors describe how four seminary educators pedagogically engage students in practices of interpretation and explore how the variations in their teaching practices shape the critical thinking they seek to cultivate in their students. The piece is excerpted from an ethnographic study of Jewish and Christian seminary educator teaching practices sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (Educating Clergy: Teaching Practices and Pastoral Imagination, ...
Additional Info:
In this essay the authors describe how four seminary educators pedagogically engage students in practices of interpretation and explore how the variations in their teaching practices shape the critical thinking they seek to cultivate in their students. The piece is excerpted from an ethnographic study of Jewish and Christian seminary educator teaching practices sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (Educating Clergy: Teaching Practices and Pastoral Imagination, Jossey-Bass Publishers, November 2005). The study explores how the classroom- and community-based teaching practices of seminary educators prepare students to integrate professional knowledge and skill with moral integrity and religious commitment in professional practice. In addition to the pedagogies of interpretation explicated here, we observed pedagogies that engage students in practices of formation, contextualization, and performance. Attention is also given in the study to the influence of pedagogies embedded in the traditions of seminary education on student learning and to the cultivation of spiritual and professional practices beyond the classroom in community worship and through strategies of field education and small groups.
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"Exploring Positive Learning Experiences in the Context of Practical Theological Education"

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Lynch, Gordon and Stephen Pattison
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 3 (2005): 144-154
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Topics: Course Design   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

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This article presents findings from an empirical study exploring student and teacher perspectives on positive learning experiences in practical theological education. Forty-five students and twenty teachers were interviewed in focus groups in four educational institutions delivering programs in practical theology. The findings indicated that students valued practical theological education when it enabled them to think critically in relation to their personal or professional experience, and that students valued tutors, their ...
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This article presents findings from an empirical study exploring student and teacher perspectives on positive learning experiences in practical theological education. Forty-five students and twenty teachers were interviewed in focus groups in four educational institutions delivering programs in practical theology. The findings indicated that students valued practical theological education when it enabled them to think critically in relation to their personal or professional experience, and that students valued tutors, their peers and a flexible curriculum design in promoting this kind of learning. There was a high correlation between students' views of positive learning experiences and what tutors perceived as important qualities that they hoped their students would develop. Difficulties associated with the students' lack of clarity about the learning process and the tensions between academic and professional contexts are also discussed.
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"'We're Going to Read Poetry in This Class?'"

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Frank, Thomas E.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 1 (2005): 47-50
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Learning Designs

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How can poetry be a resource for effective teaching of congregational life and leadership? Drawing on poetry from an array of sources, the author weaves a narrative to discuss specific strategies employed for using poetry in the classroom. Recognizing the capacity of poems to awaken latent imaginations and evoke new insights about church leadership among his students, the author provides details about particular methods that can serve as alternative approaches ...
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How can poetry be a resource for effective teaching of congregational life and leadership? Drawing on poetry from an array of sources, the author weaves a narrative to discuss specific strategies employed for using poetry in the classroom. Recognizing the capacity of poems to awaken latent imaginations and evoke new insights about church leadership among his students, the author provides details about particular methods that can serve as alternative approaches for learning about a subject.
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This essay draws on insights from studies on learning to explore the role of formation in the classroom. Studies of intellectual development, learning styles, and the physiology of learning are reviewed. Methodologies and models for encouraging formative learning in seminary classrooms are explored. This essay was written to address one of the issues that have focused the attention of the participants in the Lexington Seminar on Theological Teaching for the ...
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This essay draws on insights from studies on learning to explore the role of formation in the classroom. Studies of intellectual development, learning styles, and the physiology of learning are reviewed. Methodologies and models for encouraging formative learning in seminary classrooms are explored. This essay was written to address one of the issues that have focused the attention of the participants in the Lexington Seminar on Theological Teaching for the Church's Ministries, a project sponsored by Lexington Theological Seminary and supported by the Lilly Endowment, Inc. It will be included in Practical Wisdom: On Theological Teaching and Learning, edited by Malcolm L. Warford, a collection of essays intended to (1) affirm the teaching ministry of theological educators, (2) raise up and discern the diverse ways in which issues of teaching and learning present themselves in institutional contexts, (3) evoke new perspectives on the challenges facing individual schools, and (4) encourage faculty to make conversations about teaching and learning a crucial part of faculty life. Peter Lang Publishing will release the book in fall 2004. Additional information about the work of the Lexington Seminar is available on the Lexington Seminar's Web site .
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"The Pedagogy of the Online Wisdom Community: Forming Church Ministers in a Digital Age"

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Esselman, Thomas
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 3 (2004): 159-170
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Topics: Online Learning   |   Ministerial Formation

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While electronic learning is transforming the face of higher education today, some in the theological community question whether it is appropriate for the specific goals of graduate level theological formation for ministry. Drawing on the work of one theological faculty, this article answers yes. The author describes the school's hybrid model of distance education pedagogy. He discusses the underlying teaching and learning principles that guided the faculty in their development ...
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While electronic learning is transforming the face of higher education today, some in the theological community question whether it is appropriate for the specific goals of graduate level theological formation for ministry. Drawing on the work of one theological faculty, this article answers yes. The author describes the school's hybrid model of distance education pedagogy. He discusses the underlying teaching and learning principles that guided the faculty in their development of this model, and, in particular, the pedagogical ideal of the learning cohort as a "wisdom community." Web-based instruction can be effectively designed to nurture wisdom communities for integrative learning. The author describes the "pedagogy of the online wisdom community" from his experience of Web-based distance education teaching. The growing demand for ministry formation programs, particularly in mission areas, underlines the urgent need for continued study of the role of technology in theological pedagogy.
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"Teaching Theological Reflection Well, Reflecting on Writing as a Theological Practice"

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Yaghjian, Lucretia B.
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 2 (2004): 83-94
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Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Ministerial Formation

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In order to teach theological reflection well, it is necessary to teach students how to write it well. This paper probes the writing of theological reflection as a rhetorical process and a theological practice by (1) situating theological reflection broadly within a "correlation" model, adapted for theological writers; (2) identifying two "generic" styles of theological reflection papers, the pastoral reflection paper and the systematic reflection paper; (3) following a writer's progress as she ...
Additional Info:
In order to teach theological reflection well, it is necessary to teach students how to write it well. This paper probes the writing of theological reflection as a rhetorical process and a theological practice by (1) situating theological reflection broadly within a "correlation" model, adapted for theological writers; (2) identifying two "generic" styles of theological reflection papers, the pastoral reflection paper and the systematic reflection paper; (3) following a writer's progress as she writes a one-page pastoral reflection paper and constructs a working theology in the process of writing it. In conclusion, the correlation-based "Reflecting on Paper" process provides a pedagogical bridge between the writing and teaching of "pastoral" and "systematic" theological reflection, and exemplifies the dynamic interplay between teaching theological reflection and reflecting on writing as a theological practice.
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"Spiritual Formation for Ordained Ministry: An Ecumenical Approach"

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Keely, Barbara Anne
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 4 (2003): 202-207
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Topics: Course Design   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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Seminaries have a responsibility to engage students in reflecting upon the spiritual life, as well as providing opportunities to deepen their own spiritual journeys. It also is important that they consider the intentional ways that their understandings and experiences of the spiritual life influence their leadership in the Church. Spiritual formation of seminarians provides particular challenges to faculty of liberal, ecumenical seminaries. This article describes a course designed to address ...
Additional Info:
Seminaries have a responsibility to engage students in reflecting upon the spiritual life, as well as providing opportunities to deepen their own spiritual journeys. It also is important that they consider the intentional ways that their understandings and experiences of the spiritual life influence their leadership in the Church. Spiritual formation of seminarians provides particular challenges to faculty of liberal, ecumenical seminaries. This article describes a course designed to address these issues and argues that spiritual formation can be effectively integrated into the curricula of liberal, ecumenical seminaries.
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"The Tensile Core: Theological Pedagogy in a New Context"

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Ricciuti, Gail A.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 146-150
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Adult Learners

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Older, second-career and non-traditional students in seminaries present challenges for theological curricula and teaching in situations where theological study and the actual practice of ministry are no longer sequential but simultaneous. The author proposes a threefold response to these challenges, combining scholarly excellence and compassionate pedagogy with an eye toward seamless integration of study, formation, and life. The axis connecting past and future within this trinity is compassionate pedagogy: an ...
Additional Info:
Older, second-career and non-traditional students in seminaries present challenges for theological curricula and teaching in situations where theological study and the actual practice of ministry are no longer sequential but simultaneous. The author proposes a threefold response to these challenges, combining scholarly excellence and compassionate pedagogy with an eye toward seamless integration of study, formation, and life. The axis connecting past and future within this trinity is compassionate pedagogy: an approach to teaching in which passionate mutual participation yields creative contextualizing of academics and practice, guiding students toward a comprehension of their lives and work as the central arena of theological inquiry.
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"Ministerial Formation in a Multi–Faith Society"

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Gilliat–Ray, Sophie
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 1 (2003): 9-17
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

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This article reports on the findings of a study carried out with ordinands and faculty in English theological Colleges and Courses (programs). The project aimed to discover (a) how and to what extent students are trained to work in Britain's multi–faith society, and (b) how are ordinands thinking theologically about issues of religious diversity. This article highlights the examples of good practice that emerged from the study and considers ...
Additional Info:
This article reports on the findings of a study carried out with ordinands and faculty in English theological Colleges and Courses (programs). The project aimed to discover (a) how and to what extent students are trained to work in Britain's multi–faith society, and (b) how are ordinands thinking theologically about issues of religious diversity. This article highlights the examples of good practice that emerged from the study and considers what makes for good learning about multi–faith issues for ordinands training for the ministry.
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"Theological Education on the Web: A Case Study in Formation for Ministry"

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Graham, Susan Lochrie
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 4 (2002): 227-235
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Topics: Online Learning   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Theological education has traditionally required students to come together in real (and often residential) communities and to learn in classroom settings with face–to–face teaching. Until recently, this model alone has been thought to provide the opportunity for the development of personal knowledge and the formation of character necessary for those engaged in professional ministry. This paper outlines a research project on the use of the Web in theological ...
Additional Info:
Theological education has traditionally required students to come together in real (and often residential) communities and to learn in classroom settings with face–to–face teaching. Until recently, this model alone has been thought to provide the opportunity for the development of personal knowledge and the formation of character necessary for those engaged in professional ministry. This paper outlines a research project on the use of the Web in theological education, using an introductory course in biblical studies, offered for the first time this year in an online environment through the University of Exeter. The course is designed to enable the creation of a virtual community where personal theological formation is fostered. This paper describes the design of the course, analyzing the complex competencies required in terms of goals and outcomes, and identifying issues for further research. It provides some preliminary results, with an eye to making recommendations for future curriculum development.
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"Beyond Diversity: Cultural Competence, White Racism Awareness, and European–American Theology Students"

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Kujawa-Holbrook, Sheryl
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 3 (2002): 141-148
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Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

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As the population within our religious institutions and the United States grows increasingly diverse, the need for a greater awareness of cultural and racial differences is a challenge facing theology students who will live and work within a changing context. For European American students this challenge includes an understanding of the power dynamics inherent in "whiteness" and how the resultant social power affects persons of other races and cultures. This ...
Additional Info:
As the population within our religious institutions and the United States grows increasingly diverse, the need for a greater awareness of cultural and racial differences is a challenge facing theology students who will live and work within a changing context. For European American students this challenge includes an understanding of the power dynamics inherent in "whiteness" and how the resultant social power affects persons of other races and cultures. This article focuses on the need for cultural competence among current theology students, and outlines a five-stage developmental process whereby they have an opportunity to enhance their understanding of multiculturalism and anti-racism within their own context.
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"Spiritual Machines, Personal Bodies, and God: Theological Education and Theological Anthropology"

TTR
Kelsey, David H.
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 1 (2002): 2-9
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Programs of theological education in Christian traditions are exploring "distanced learning" as one way to address certain challenges to their educational excellence. A major strand in a twenty-year old discussion of the nature and purpose of theological education has urged that analysis of theological schooling's failures and assessment of proposed remedies ought to be framed explicitly in theological terms as part of an ongoing inquiry into what makes theological education ...
Additional Info:
Programs of theological education in Christian traditions are exploring "distanced learning" as one way to address certain challenges to their educational excellence. A major strand in a twenty-year old discussion of the nature and purpose of theological education has urged that analysis of theological schooling's failures and assessment of proposed remedies ought to be framed explicitly in theological terms as part of an ongoing inquiry into what makes theological education properly theological. This essay tries to show how following that advice can make a practical difference in assessing the merits of distanced learning. It does so by raising questions about the theological-anthropological assumptions, respectively, of theological education and of distanced learning.
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"De-schooling the Theological Seminary: An Appropriate Paradigm for Effective Ministerial Formation"

TTR
Harkness, Allan G.
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 3 (2001): 141-154
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
The most common paradigm of contemporary Protestant theological education for ministerial formation is that of schooling, seen in the institution of the theological seminary/college. This article notes the limitations of the schooling paradigm for educational intervention in the range of domains inherent in effective ministerial formation; recognizes that teaching and learning take different but still legitimate shape when used to describe educational processes in this context; and argues for ...
Additional Info:
The most common paradigm of contemporary Protestant theological education for ministerial formation is that of schooling, seen in the institution of the theological seminary/college. This article notes the limitations of the schooling paradigm for educational intervention in the range of domains inherent in effective ministerial formation; recognizes that teaching and learning take different but still legitimate shape when used to describe educational processes in this context; and argues for an integrated, formational, and missional community paradigm modeled especially on the relationship of Jesus with his disciples as being both more consistent with biblical precedents and more effective educationally. The implications of this for the role of faculty of theological institutions are explored.
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"Some Practical Distinctions Between Preaching, Teaching, and Training"

Article
Pestel, Beverly C.
1988
Journal of College Science Teaching 18, no. 1 (1988): 26-31
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Describes some of the teaching techniques found to be effective for educating students and combatting scientific illiteracy. Presents instructional methods developed for implementing learner-oriented educational philosophies and interactive teaching strategies.
Additional Info:
Describes some of the teaching techniques found to be effective for educating students and combatting scientific illiteracy. Presents instructional methods developed for implementing learner-oriented educational philosophies and interactive teaching strategies.
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Experiences of Priests Ordained Five to Nine Years

Book
Hoge, Dean R.
2006
National Catholic Educational Association, Washington, DC
BX1912.H59 2006
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
"This is a valuable study, following up on Dean Hoge's groundbreaking study on priests ordained 1 to 5 years. This is a critical study of a critical time in a priest's life and, as always, Dean Hoge makes a critical contribution to our understanding, offering a solid basis beyond anecdotal impressions, for t he formation of helpful policies and programs to assist these servants of God."
Rev. Dan Danielson, pastor, Diocese ...
Additional Info:
"This is a valuable study, following up on Dean Hoge's groundbreaking study on priests ordained 1 to 5 years. This is a critical study of a critical time in a priest's life and, as always, Dean Hoge makes a critical contribution to our understanding, offering a solid basis beyond anecdotal impressions, for t he formation of helpful policies and programs to assist these servants of God."
Rev. Dan Danielson, pastor, Diocese of Oakland
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword: Rev. Eugene F. Hemrick
Preface: Bernard F. Stratman, SM

ch. 1 Summary of Major Findings
ch. 2 The Surveys of 1990 and 2005
ch. 3 Evaluation of Seminary Training
ch. 4 The Transition to Priesthood
ch. 5 Two Models of Priesthood
ch. 6 Priestly Life and Ongoing Formation
ch. 7 Satisfaction and Morale
ch. 8 Recommendations Made by the Priests

Commentary 1: Theology, Reading the Signs of the Times, and Connecting the Gospel with Everyday Life: Rev. James J. Bacik
Commentary 2: Understanding Self as Key to Spiritual and Human Development: Rev. Melvin C. Blanchette, SS
Commentary 3: Theological Education and Leadership Development: Rev. Msgr. Jeremiah J. McCarthy
Commentary 4: Three Phases of the Priest's Life and Ministry: Katarina Schuth, OSF
Commentary 5: Hidden Challenge of Taking up the Role of Pastoral Leader: Theresa Monroe, RSCJ
Commentary 6: Initial and Ongoing Priestly Formation: Rev. Mark O'Keefe, OSB

Appendix: Research Method
References
Index
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Theological Education for a Changing Ministry

Journal Issue
1967
Theological Education 3, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
The Education of Ministers in Contemporary Society (Olin T. Binkley)
The Significance of the Church—World Dialogue for Theological Education (Harvey Cox)
Response to Professor Cox—II (Martin E. Marty)
Theological Education and Societal Revolution (John C. Bennett)
Response to President Bennett—I Richard Shaull)
Response to President Bennett—II (C. Shelby Rooks)
The Import of Ecumenical Developments for Theological Education—A Roman Catholic View (Walter J. Burghardt, S.J.)
The Import of Ecumenical Developments for Theological Education—A Protestant View (Paul S. Minear)
Response to Professors Burghardt and Minear—An Orthodox View (Alexander Schememann)
Sources of Renewal (Charles L. Taylor)
Notes to:
Presidents (Robert T. Fauth)
Trustees (Fred A. Replogle)
Seminary Staff Officers (Richard D. Curley)
Librarians (Niels H. Sonne)
Professors (Jesse H. Ziegler)
Educational Developments (John H. Lawton)
Appointment of Associate Director
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Patterns of Ministry and Theological Education

Journal Issue
1967
Theological Education 4, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
An Introduction to a Study of Patterns of Ministry and Theological Education (Theodore E. Wedel)
A Functional Approach to the Understanding of Ministry (Philip R. Phenix)
Form and Function in the Education of Ministers (Keith R. Bridston)
Professional Education and Theological Education Owen C. Thomas)
Patterns: The 1967 Consultation in Perspective (John E. Eiersdorf)
Case Method in Theological Education (David S. Schuller)
They Deserve a First—Class Education (Mark Gibbs)
An Appeal for Firm Direction and Specific Guidelines (Turner N. Clinard)
Note to:
Presidents (Frederick C. Whittaker)
Trustees (William C. Zimmann)
Seminary Staff Officers (Henry W. Brooks)
Professors (David S.Schuller)
Librarians (Donn Michael Farris)
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Issues, Setting, and Process in Education for Ministry

Journal Issue
1969
Theological Education 5, no. 4, supp. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Double Messages in Seminary Training (David K. O’Rourke)
Key Issues in the Personal Preparation of Clergy (Barton M. Lloyd)
Self-Reflective Process in a Pastoral Field Training Program (William P Heffernan)
Theological Education and Field Education (Robert S. Lowndes)
Dissimilar Field Placement in the Pastoral Training Seminar: A Way of Instructing in the Pastoral Contact (David K. O’Rourke)
An Experiment in Education for an Overseas Pastoral Ministry (Edmund V. Glomski)
Mental Health, the Clergyman, and Marriage Counseling—A New Training Setting (John A. Snyder)
Processing a First Year Pastoral Training Program (William C. Myers)
The Use of “Reality Practice” in a Pastoral Counseling Course (Robert A. Nykamp)
Professional Supervision of Pastoral Work (Denis J. Hanly)
Dilemmas Confronting the Supervisor in Theological Education (Hilda M. Goodwin)
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Voyage: Vision: Venture Report of the Task Force on Spiritual Development The American Association of Theological Schools

Journal Issue
1972
Theological Education 8, no. 3 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Report of Task Force on Spiritual Development
Vignette
Voyage
Vision
Venture
Conclusion
Persisters and Withdrawals (Frederick A. Lonsway)
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Theological Field Education For Ministry

Journal Issue
1975
Theological Education 11, no. 4 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Creating a Model for Field Education (George W. Baldwin and Paul B. Maves)
Education Models in Field Education (James D. Whitehead and Evelyn Eaton Whitehead)
The Internship Year: Preparation for Professional Self-Development (Robert A. Chesnut)
Integration of Field Education into the Curriculum (David M. Murphy)
Spiritually and the Director of Field Education (Marylu J. Fowler and James Simmons)
Women in Field Education: Some New Answers to Old Questions (Arabella Meadows-Rogers)
Training Field Education Supervisors (William S. Pregnall and Elizabeth E. Hampton)
Ministry is an Art: Field Education and the Case Method as Loop System (Keith R. Bridston)
The Teaching Parish and the Supervising Pastor (Robert K. Nace)
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Readiness for Ministry: Significance for Church and Seminary

Journal Issue
1976
Theological Education 12, no. 3 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Readiness for Ministry: Implementation in Church and Seminary (David S. Schuller)
Readiness for Ministry and Curriculum Design (Neely D. McCarter and Sara Little)
Basis of Dialogue Between Church and Seminary (Joseph D. Quillian, Jr.)
Sharpening Goals and Evaluation in Field Education (Nicholas B. Van Dyck)
New Foundations for Institutional Assessment (Eugene I. Van Antwerp)
From Skeptic to Cautious Enthusiast: A Bureaucratic View (Howard M. Mills)
Curricula, Accreditation, and Ordination (Meredith B. Handspicker)
Developing Goals for Continuing Education (Connolly C. Gamble)
Readiness for Ministry and Career Development (J. Bentley Peters)
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Education for Readiness for Ministry in a Pluralistic Setting

Journal Issue
1976
Theological Education 13, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Freedom’s Holy Light (Frederick W. Whittaker)
ATS: 1974–76—The Executive Director’s Report (Jesse H. Ziegler)
Readiness for Ministry: Report on the Research (Milo L. Brekke, David S. Schuller, and Merton P. Strommen)
The Role of the States in Theological Education (Richard M. Millard)
Indicators of Crisis in Theological Education (Jesse H. Ziegler)
Seminary Management from the President’s Perspective: A Bicentennial Overview (David A. Hubbard)
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Education for Ministry in Aging: Gerontology in Seminary Training

Journal Issue
1980
Theological Education 16, no. 3, spec. issue (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Gerontology in Seminary Training: Introduction and Overview(Thomas C. Cook, Jr.)
Spiritual Well-being Definition and Commentary

Part I
Aging and Theological Education (David O. Moberg)

Part II
Education for Ministry in Aging: Guidelines for Competency Objectives (Thomas C. Cook, Jr.; Thomas W. Mahler; and Donna L. McGinty)
(Writing team)
Guidelines for competency Objectives—Development and Potential (Thomas W. Mahler)
Interdisciplinary Approaches and Concerns
Theological and Biblical Foundations (Paul Maves)
Life Contexts of Older Persons (Mildred M. Seltzer)
Process of Aging (Dan G. Blazer, II)
Policies and Aging (Clinton W. Hess)
Programs (James A. Thorson and Bruce J. Horacek)
Religious Education and Aging (Jerry C. Grubbs)
Action in Aging: A Religious View (Herman H. Denning)
Values and Aging (Arthur H. Becker)
Strategies for Using the Guidelines
. . . In Seminary Curricula (Jesse H. Ziegler)
. . . In Seminary and Continuing Education (Clyde L. Manschreck)
. . . In Congregational Settings(Sanford Seltzer)
. . . In Individual Competency-Building (Samuel L. Gandy)
. . . In Higher Education in Gerontology (Mildred M. Seltzer)
. . . In Developing Curricula in Secular Gerontology and in Professional In-Service Training (Dan G. Blazer, II)

Part III
Emerging Curricular Models for Education for Ministry in Aging Ministry with Older Persons (Albert L. Meiburg)
To Know With Feeling (Mary Alice D. Edwards)
The Life Span and Older Persons (Marcus D. Bryant)
Ministry of the Church with Older Adults (Robert E. Fillinger)
Aging: A Challenging Theme for Theological Reflection (Maureen Egan)
Caring for the Aging (Vernon L. Strempke)
A Developmental View of Aging (David W. Danner)
References

Part IV
Bringing Spirit to Aging Education in the 1980s (Reuel L. Howe)

Appendix
National Consultants to Project-GIST and Project-GIST Staff
Participants in Project-GIST, 1977–79
Abstracts: GIST Participants Sub-projects
Organizations and Agencies with Direct Participation or Representation in Project-GIST
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Mission, Spirituality, and Scholarship

Journal Issue
1980
Theological Education 17, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Spirituality Formation in Theological Schools: Ferment and Challenge. A Report of the ATS-Salem Institute on Spirituality (Tilden H. Edwards, Jr.)
The Seminary Enterprise: An Appraisal (James I. McCord)
The Accountability of Theological Education to the Mission of the Church (Donald W. Shriver, Jr.)
Unravelling the Library Mystique (John Dillenberger)
Dealing with PAIN: Preservation, Automation, Interpretation, and Negotiation (John B. Trotti)
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PART I: Spirituality in Theological Education PART II: Theological Scholarship and Research

Journal Issue
1987
Theological Education 24, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial Introduction (Maura Fortkort)

Part I
Are We Lovers Anymore? (Alan Jones)
Responses: (Sandra M. Schneiders, Dwight L. Grubbs, Ralph W. Klein, John Meyendorff)
Spiritual Direction for Seminaries (Forster Freeman)
The Impact of Changing Ecclesiological and Christiological Models on Roman Catholic Seminary Education (Edward J. Ciuba)

Part II:
Living on Two Levels: The Work of the Academic Dean in North American Theological Education (Robert Wood Lynn)
The Scholarly Vocation: Its Future Challenges and Threats (Ronald F. Thiemann)
The Dean’s Responsibility for Faculty Research (Joseph C. Hough)
Response: (Jane I. Smith)
The Nature and State of Theological Scholarship and Research (Schubert M. Ogden)
Review of Scholarly Works

Christian Ethics:
Ethics From A Theocentric Perspective (Gustafson) (Robin W. Lovin)
Our Right to Choose: Toward a New Ethic of Abortion (Harrison) (Peter J. Paris)
The Westminster Dictionary of Christian Ethics (Childress, Macquarrie (J. Phillip Wogaman)

Theology:
The Humiliation of the Word (Ellul) (Donald G. Bloesch)
Christian Theology: An Introduction to Its Traditions and Tasks (Hodgson, King) (John B. Cobb, Jr.)
Sexism and God-Talk: Toward a Feminist Theology (Ruether) (Ellen Leonard)
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Theological Education as the Formation of Character

Journal Issue
1988
Theological Education 24, supp. (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial Introduction (W. Clark Gilpin)
Spiritual Formation and Theological Education (George Lindbeck)
Can Virtue Be Taught? Education, Character, and the Soul (David Tracy)
Responses:
Theological Education as Character Formation? (Douglas John Hall)
Spiritual Awareness and the Formation of Character (Jane I. Smith)
Theological Education as Character Formation (Robert P. Meye)
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Character and Assessment of Learning for Religious Vocation (pdf)

Journal Issue
2006
Theological Education 41, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v.41 no.2 2006
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2006-theological-education-v41-n2.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2006-theological-education-v41-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Vocation in a New Key: Spiritual Formation and the Assessment of Learning (Mary Kay Oosdyke)
Speaking Assessment in the Local Vernacular (Linda Lee Clader)
Leclerq among the Blue Devils: Assessing Theological Learning in the Modern University (Willie James Jennings)
Progressing Towards Ministry: Student Perceptions of the Dispositional Evaluation Process at Emmanuel School of Religion (Jack Holland)
Preparing Leaders for Mission: The Experience of Assessment at Luther Seminary (James L. Boyce and Richard W. Nysse)
Practicing Assessment/Resisting Assessment (Robert A. Cathey)
Preaching, Proclamation, and Pedagogy: An Experiment in Integrated Assessment (Elaine Park)
Moving the Mission Statement into the Classroom (Jo-Ann Badley)
Evaluation Rubrics: Weaving a Coherent Fabric of Assessment (Stephen Graham, Kimberly Sangster, and Yasuyuki Kamata)
Toward an Integrated Model of Assessment (Dennis H. Dirks)
Profiles of Ministry: History and Current Research (Francis A. Lonsway)
Imagining Faith: The Biblical Imagination in Theory and Practice (Mary Karita Ivancic)
TTR cover image

"What Difference Does It Make? "

TTR
Marshall, Joretta
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 158-161
BL41.T4
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion has its most direct influence on faculty members who teach in colleges, universities, and theological schools. These faculty members, in turn, have an impact upon churches through their leadership and teaching in local communities. Wabash workshops encourage faculty to continue to develop four qualities that make a difference in their teaching and scholarship, in the lives of students who ...
Additional Info:
The Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion has its most direct influence on faculty members who teach in colleges, universities, and theological schools. These faculty members, in turn, have an impact upon churches through their leadership and teaching in local communities. Wabash workshops encourage faculty to continue to develop four qualities that make a difference in their teaching and scholarship, in the lives of students who become community and church leaders, and ultimately in the life of the church: these are the abilities to (1) help pastoral leaders integrate multiple kinds of knowledge, (2) value context and particularity, (3) strengthen their skills as public theologians and community leaders, and (4) cultivate the encouragement to live lives of wholeness. The gift of hospitality at Wabash workshops provides the environment and space for faculty to engage these qualities in their teaching, research, scholarship, and living.
TTR cover image

"Rethinking Classroom Diversity: Three Student Cultures in a Mainline Seminary"

TTR
Evans, Christopher H.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 4 (2007): 223-230
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Discussions on teaching and learning within theological seminaries often center on the question of student diversity, focused primarily upon issues of race, gender, and ethnicity. At the same time that seminaries are challenged to deal with a multitude of pedagogical suppositions emerging from increasingly diverse learning goals, seminaries must also pay attention to the ways their students challenge an institution's core mission to train ministers for service in churches and ...
Additional Info:
Discussions on teaching and learning within theological seminaries often center on the question of student diversity, focused primarily upon issues of race, gender, and ethnicity. At the same time that seminaries are challenged to deal with a multitude of pedagogical suppositions emerging from increasingly diverse learning goals, seminaries must also pay attention to the ways their students challenge an institution's core mission to train ministers for service in churches and denominations. Based upon the author's experience teaching in a mainline Protestant seminary, the essay discusses three student cultures that often overlap among today's seminarians. These three student cultures, referred to here as "church seminarian," "new paradigm seminarian," and "vocational seminarian," carry very different understandings of the seminary's role to prepare students for ministry. A critical discernment of these cultures might challenge seminary faculty to reevaluate their educational and missional suppositions amidst divergent student career objectives.
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Theological Reflection and Education for Ministry:The Search for Integration in Theology

Book
Paver, John. E.
2006
Ashgate Publishing Company, Burlington, VT
BV4164.5.P38 2006
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
A major and continuing problem for theological education and the practice of Christian ministry is how to best achieve a genuine integration between theory and practice, theology and experience. The key claim of this book is that theological reflection, beginning with experience, is a method of integration and that pastoral supervision is a vehicle for theological reflection. In establishing this claim, John Paver demonstrates that the model and method have ...
Additional Info:
A major and continuing problem for theological education and the practice of Christian ministry is how to best achieve a genuine integration between theory and practice, theology and experience. The key claim of this book is that theological reflection, beginning with experience, is a method of integration and that pastoral supervision is a vehicle for theological reflection. In establishing this claim, John Paver demonstrates that the model and method have potential to be a catalyst for reform within theological colleges and seminaries. Three different theological reflection models are developed and critiqued in this book, and their capacity to be developed in particular contexts is explored. This book does not stop at ministry, cultural and personal integration, but is bold enough to make recommendations for structural integration within the theological institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Setting the scene
ch. 2 Theological reflection as a method of integration
ch. 3 Pastoral Supervision - a vehicle for theological reflection
ch. 4 An integrated approach to theological education through the theological reflection seminar
ch. 5 Structural integration within the theological institution -- a case study

Conclusion
Appendices
Bibliography
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

For Life Abundant: Practical Theology, Theological Education, and Christian Ministry

Book
Bass, Dorothy C., and Craig Dykstra, eds.
2008
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, MI
BV3.F65 2008
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
What does it mean to lead a truly "life-giving way of life"? What kinds of learning and teaching will best prepare ministers to foster such a way of life in their congregations? How might teachers of practical theology best understand and undertake their task to educate and form ministers? Respected scholars and ministers explore such questions in For Life Abundant, probing and clarifying the significance of practical theology in the ...
Additional Info:
What does it mean to lead a truly "life-giving way of life"? What kinds of learning and teaching will best prepare ministers to foster such a way of life in their congregations? How might teachers of practical theology best understand and undertake their task to educate and form ministers? Respected scholars and ministers explore such questions in For Life Abundant, probing and clarifying the significance of practical theology in the classroom, in the wider academy, and in actual ministry settings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction by Dorothy C. Bass and Craig Dykstra

Part 1 Envisioning Practical Theology
ch. 1 Ways of Life Abundant by (Dorothy C. Bass)
ch. 2 Pastoral and Ecclesial Imagination by (Craig Dykstra)
ch. 3 Mapping the Field of Practical Theology by (Kathleen A. Cahalan and James R. Nieman)

Part 2 Practical Theology in the Classroom
ch. 4 Introducing Ministry and Fostering Integration: Teaching the Bookends of the Master of Divinity Program by (Kathleen A. Calahan)
ch. 5 Teaching Worship as a Christian Practice by (John D. Witvliet)
ch. 6 Liturgy and Life: An Account of Teaching Ritual Practices by (James R. Nieman)
ch. 7 Practical Theology and Pedagogy: Embodying Theological Know-How (Bonnie J. Miller-McLemore)

Pt. 3 Practical Theology in the Wider Academy
ch. 8 Practical Theology in Two Modes (Serene Jones)
ch. 9 History, Practice, and Theological Education (David D. Daniels III and Ted A. Smith)
ch. 10 Practical Theology on the Quad: Doctoral Study in Practical Theology in a University Context (Thomas G. Long)

Part 4 Practical Theology in Ministry ch. 11 Learning Ministry over Time: Embodying Practical Wisdom (Christian Scharen)
ch. 12 Transition into Ministry: Preconceiving the Boundaries between Seminaries and Congregations (David J. Wood)
ch. 13 Shaping Communities: Pastoral Leadership and Congregational Formation (Peter W. Marty)
ch. 14 Educating and Forming Disciples for the Reign of God: Reflections on Youth Pilgrimages to the Holy Land (Gordon S. Mikosi)

Part 5 For Life Abundant
ch. 15 In Anticipation

Acknowledgements
Contributors
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching Reflectively in Theological Contexts: Promises and Contradictions

Book
Hess, Mary E., and Stephen D. Brookfield, eds.
2008
Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, FL
BV4020.T43 2008
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Teaching Reflectively in Theological Contexts explores the dynamics, principles, contradictions and tensions of teaching within theological contexts. It offers practical suggestions on modeling pastoral leadership, building trust with learners, negotiating the dynamics of team-teaching, questioning received truth, teaching through discussions, working with diversities, and building a culture of reflective teaching. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Teaching Reflectively in Theological Contexts explores the dynamics, principles, contradictions and tensions of teaching within theological contexts. It offers practical suggestions on modeling pastoral leadership, building trust with learners, negotiating the dynamics of team-teaching, questioning received truth, teaching through discussions, working with diversities, and building a culture of reflective teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Foundational Questions
ch. 1 “How can we teach authentically?” Reflective practice in the dialogical classroom (Stephen D. Brookfield and Mary E. Hess)
ch. 2 “How do we make space for students to seek truth?” Teaching with conviction (David J. Lose)
ch. 3 “How do we invite students into conversation?” Teaching dialogically (Stephen D. Brookfield)
ch. 4 “How do we meet students where they are, while challenging them further?” Teaching developmentally (Mary E. Hess)

Questions Arising From Practice
ch. 5 “How do students experience the teacher?” Knowing who you are as a teacher (and knowing that your students do not) (Rolf Jacobson)
ch. 6 “How can students learn to trust us as we challenge who they are?” Building trust and trustworthiness in a biblical studies classroom. (Matthew L. Skinner)
ch. 7 “How does team teaching model trust in and beyond the classroom?” Teaming to create the conditions for transformation (Janet Ramsey)
ch. 8 “How do we teach across cultural diversity?” Teaching in the face of cross-cultural conversation (Frieder Ludwig)

Realizing promises and confronting contradictions
ch. 9 “How can white teachers recognize and challenge racism?”Acknowledging collusion and learning an aggressive humility (Mary E. Hess and Stephen D. Brookfield)
ch. 10 “How do we enter students’ worlds we cannot know?” Praying and teaching when not “at home” (Mary E. Hess)
ch. 11 “How do we know what our students are learning?” Assessing learning in the context of pastoral engagement and candidacy processes (Alvin Luedke)
ch. 12 “How can technology stretch us without snapping?” Teaching with technology (Mary E. Hess)

Conclusions
ch. 13 “How do we connect classroom teaching to institutional practice?” Sustaining a culture of reflective practice in teaching (Mary E. Hess and Stephen D. Brookfield)

References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

From Midterms to Ministry

Book
Cole, Allen Hugh, ed.
2008
William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, Grand Rapids, MI
BV4011.F75 2008
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
In this collection of essays, a seasoned group of ministers, scholars, and theological educators share reflections, born out of personal experience, on the transition from seminarian to minister. All the authors have worked with two assumptions. First, they acknowledge that the school experience, though related, is a different world from the ministry setting. Secondly, they point out that while these arenas share things in common they also differ in significant ...
Additional Info:
In this collection of essays, a seasoned group of ministers, scholars, and theological educators share reflections, born out of personal experience, on the transition from seminarian to minister. All the authors have worked with two assumptions. First, they acknowledge that the school experience, though related, is a different world from the ministry setting. Secondly, they point out that while these arenas share things in common they also differ in significant ways.
The contributors speak in a very personal way to the ways these worlds operate under dissimilar sets of expectations and values, with different cultures and ways of life, and also with their own set of distinct challenges, objective, rewards, and focal points. Honest and full of wisdom, Midterms to Ministry will help students and ministers find help to travel on their own vocational path.
Contributors:
Wallace M. Alston, Ray S. Anderson, M. Craig Barnes, Elizabeth F. Caldwell, Allan Hugh Cole Jr., Pamela D. Couture, Kathy Dawson, Carrie Doehring, Michael Jinkins, L. Gregory Jones, Susan Pendleton Jones, James F. Kay, Cleophus J. LaRue, Thomas G. Long, Loren B. Mead, Bonnie J. Miller-McLemore, Earl F. Palmer, Stephanie Paulsell, Anthony B. Robinson, Carol L. Schnabel Schweitzer, Theodore J. Wardlaw, Traci C. West, William H. Willamon, J. Philip Wogaman, Karen Marie Yust
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword Michael L. Lindvall Lindvall, Michael L.

ch. 1 The Essential Untidiness of Ministry (Thomas G. Long)
ch. 2 Leadership, Pastoral Identity, and Friendship: Navigating the Transition from Seminary to the Parish (L. Gregory Jones and Susan Pnedleton Jones)
ch. 3 Making the Transition: From a Theology of Ministry to a Ministry of Theology (Ray S. Anderson)
ch. 4 Pulpit Supply (Stephanie Paulsell)
ch. 5 Blackduck (James F. Kay)
ch. 6 Have You Asked a Good Question Today? (Elizabeth F. Caldwell)
ch. 7 Ministry and Clouds of Witnesses (Michael Jinkins)
ch. 8 Fragile Connections: Constructing an Identity in the First Year of Ministry (Carrie Doehring)
ch. 9 The Meandering Ministry (M. Craig Barnes)
ch. 10 The Furnace of Humiliation (Pamela D. Couture)
ch. 11 You Can Never Be Too Smart (Karen Marie Yust)
ch. 12 From Texas Pastor to Princeton Professor (Cleophus J. LaRue)
ch. 13 Contemplation in Action (Anthony B. Robinson)
ch. 14 Spinning Gold from Straw: A Matter of Multiple Vocations (Bonnie J. Miller-McLemore)
ch. 15 Sustaining the Pastoral Life (Earl F. Palmer)
ch. 16 Gossip: The Grace Notes of Congregational Life (Carol L. Schnabl Schweitzer)
ch. 17 Three Teachers (Loren B. Mead)
ch. 18 Bearing a Memory, Sticking Out Like a Sore Thumb, Expressing a Hope (Theodore J. Wardlaw)
ch. 19 A Different Kind of Transition (J. Philip Wogaman)
ch. 20 Learning to Build Christian Community: Males, Whites, Heterosexuals Wanted for Leadership (Traci C. West)
ch. 21 What a Minister Is to Do (Wallace M. Alston Jr.)
ch. 22 Blooming Where We Are Planted (Kathy Dawson)
ch. 23 Between Two Worlds (William H. Willimon)
ch. 24 Lessons Learned (Allan Hugh Cole, Jr.)

Contributors
Index of Names
Index of Subjects
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Teaching Preaching as a Christian Practice: A New Approach to Homiletical Pedagogy

Book
Long, Thomas G. and Leonora Tubbs Tisdale, eds.
2008
Westminster John Knox Press, Louisville, KY
BV4211.3.T43 2008
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Preaching's most able practitioners gather in this book to call for a radical change in how Christian preaching is taught. Arguing that preaching is a living practice with a long tradition, an identifiable shape, and a broad set of norms and desired outcomes, these scholars propose that teachers initiate their students into the larger practice of preaching-the habits of mind, patterns of action, and ways of being that are integral ...
Additional Info:
Preaching's most able practitioners gather in this book to call for a radical change in how Christian preaching is taught. Arguing that preaching is a living practice with a long tradition, an identifiable shape, and a broad set of norms and desired outcomes, these scholars propose that teachers initiate their students into the larger practice of preaching-the habits of mind, patterns of action, and ways of being that are integral to the ministry of preaching. The book concludes with designs for a basic preaching course and addresses the question of how preaching courses fit into the larger patterns of seminary curricula. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Sect. I Preaching as a Christian practice
ch. 1 A new focus for teaching preaching (Thomas G. Long)
ch. 2 Why the idea of practice matters (James Nieman)
ch. 3 Teaching preaching as a Christian practice (David J. Lose)

Sect. II The components of the practice of preaching
ch. 4 Interpreting texts for preaching (James W. Thompson)
ch. 5 Exegeting the congregation (Leonora Tubbs Tisdale)
ch. 6 Interpreting the larger social context (James Henry Harris)
ch. 7 The use of language (Teresa Fry Brown)
ch. 8 The preaching imagination (Anna Carter Florence)
ch. 9 Creation of form (Lucy Hogan)
ch. 10 Cultivating historical vision( Joseph R. Jeter, Jr.)
ch. 11 Voice and diction (Teresa Fry Brown)

Sect. III Assessment and formation
ch. 12 Marks of faithful preaching practice (Paul Scott Wilson)
ch. 13 Methods of assessment (Daniel E. Harris)

Sect. IV Preaching in the curriculum
ch. 14 Designing the introductory course in preaching (Barbara K. Lundblad)
ch. 15 Finding support from school, denomination, and academy (Gregory Heille)
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In Fulfillment of Their Mission: The Duties and Tasks of a Roman Catholic Priest: An Assessment Project

Book
Ippolito, Joseph, Mark Latcovich and Joyce Malyn-Smith
2008
National Catholic Educational Association, Washington, DC
BX1912.I66 2008
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Project Overview
Introduction
Project Background and Methodology
Project Panel Members

The Nine Ministerial Duties
The Matrix: Duties and Tasks of a Catholic Priest
Rubric Key
One - Celebrates Liturgy and Sacraments
Two - Provides Pastoral Care and Spiritual Guidance
Three - Teaches the Faith
Four - Leads Parish Administration
Five - Practices a Ministry of Presence with Parish ...
Additional Info:
Project Overview
Introduction
Project Background and Methodology
Project Panel Members

The Nine Ministerial Duties
The Matrix: Duties and Tasks of a Catholic Priest
Rubric Key
One - Celebrates Liturgy and Sacraments
Two - Provides Pastoral Care and Spiritual Guidance
Three - Teaches the Faith
Four - Leads Parish Administration
Five - Practices a Ministry of Presence with Parish Groups
Six - Participates in the Life of the Diocesan Church
Seven - Engages with Diverse Publics
Eight - Engages in Professional Development
Nine - Engages in Personal Development
The Use of an Assessment Portfolio in Seminary Formation
Sample Elements of a Seminarian Portfolio

Appendix
The Successful Priest - Skills and Knowledge
The Successful Priest - Behaviors and Attributes
Resources for Priests
Defining the Current Context of the Ministry

Table Of Content:
From the Publisher
Offers a profile of what a successful priest needs to know and be able to do. It outlines nine major areas of ministerial concern - the duties - and enumerates several tasks within each performance area. Four levels of competency are described for each task, with accompanying descriptions, laid out in a chart format. An excellent guide for priests to use in self-assessment and professional growth plans.
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Artisanal Theology: Intentional Formation in Covenantal Companionship

Book
Hess, Lisa M.
2009
Cascade Books, Eugene, OR
BV1464.H48 2009
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Paradox and surprise face those who pursue deeper spiritual practice, theological wisdom, and even a religious calling "into the ministry." Unbeknownst to incoming students, the pursuit of theological education in established institutions today furthers a faith that is recognizable in delight and compassion, even as it may just as easily deform it into a moral duty and autonomous professionalism so divisive in today's religious ecology. How may those drawn into ...
Additional Info:
Paradox and surprise face those who pursue deeper spiritual practice, theological wisdom, and even a religious calling "into the ministry." Unbeknownst to incoming students, the pursuit of theological education in established institutions today furthers a faith that is recognizable in delight and compassion, even as it may just as easily deform it into a moral duty and autonomous professionalism so divisive in today's religious ecology. How may those drawn into ministry formation today receive its deep theological treasures and sustain a vibrant faith with a theologically expressive delight able to companion the suffering of self and others? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by Mary Elizabeth Mullino Moore
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Intentional Formation toward an Artisanal Theology
ch. 2 Community and Knowledge for an Intentional Formation
ch. 3 Practicing Into Wisdom-Knowing: Personal and Communal Stories in Covenantal Community
ch. 4 Shaped by God's Story: Becoming a Seasoned Apprentice-Artisan
ch. 5 An Artisanal Theological Loaf

Epilogue
Appendices
Bibliography
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Are You Mortgaging Your Ministry? Student Loans and Seminary Costs, An Auburn Media production

Book
2009
Center for the Study of Theological Education
BV4167.A7 2008
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Adult Learners

Additional Info:
From the Publisher
This 30 minute video introduces five recent seminary graduates, some of the financial challenges they faced and decisions they made. Two experienced seminary administrators also offer advice on how to manage finances while in school.

The video, along with accompanying resources, including Financial Planning worksheets, can be used by schools to help students plan for how they will pay for their theological education. All materials, ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher
This 30 minute video introduces five recent seminary graduates, some of the financial challenges they faced and decisions they made. Two experienced seminary administrators also offer advice on how to manage finances while in school.

The video, along with accompanying resources, including Financial Planning worksheets, can be used by schools to help students plan for how they will pay for their theological education. All materials, including this video, are free and can be downloaded. Students as well as school administrators are welcome to use the material provided on this site.

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Instructions for Financial Planning

Manna From Heaven?: 1995 Report on Debt (pdf)

The Gathering Storm: 2005 Report on Debt (pdf)

Tools for Budgeting (Excel forms)
Budget Plan
Spending Worksheet
Family Monthly Budget Schedule
Affordability Rule-of-Thumb Calculator
Debt Repayment Plan
Post Graduation Budget Plan

How Much Do You Need to Earn?

On-Line Resources and Tools
Journal cover image

Transformation: An International Evangelical Dialogue on Mission and Ethics

Journal Issue
Bediako, et al, eds.
1985
Sage Publication, Thousand Oaks, CA
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Critical Issues Facing Theological Education in Asia (Hwa Yung)
ch. 2 Preparing New Leaders for the Church of the Future: Transforming Theological Education Through Multi-Institutional Partnerships (Timothy Dearbon)
ch. 3 The Leader as . . . Discipline (David Bennett)
ch. 4 The Ministry of the Presidency or Principalship with Special Reference to the Two-thirds World (Horace O. Russell)
ch. 5 Institutional Development for Theological Education in the Two-thirds World (Findings Report by Various Authors)
TTR cover image

"Formation in the Worlds of Theological Education: Moving from "What" to "How"

TTR
Hess, Lisa M.
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 1 (2008): 14-23
BL41.T4
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Theological educators in church and academy alike continue to ask, "What is formation for ministry?" Dissatisfaction has increased within all participants of theological education – faculty, students, administrators, pastors, and church professionals. Temporarily postponing the "what" of formation, this article explores the dissatisfaction with formation language in terms of one critical dissonance: the improbable quest for a pastoral identity amidst the observable reality of multiple identities, chosen and imposed. A constructive ...
Additional Info:
Theological educators in church and academy alike continue to ask, "What is formation for ministry?" Dissatisfaction has increased within all participants of theological education – faculty, students, administrators, pastors, and church professionals. Temporarily postponing the "what" of formation, this article explores the dissatisfaction with formation language in terms of one critical dissonance: the improbable quest for a pastoral identity amidst the observable reality of multiple identities, chosen and imposed. A constructive response crafted by identities-in-practice, as configured by disciplined spiritual stewardship, gives both critical and contemplative guidance for a fuller participation by all in Christian formation. Formation then becomes defined with a publicly theological coherence: the "shaping-being-shaped" primarily by the Holy in the worlds mutually configured within improvised, risked service.
TTR cover image

"Introducing Ministry and Fostering Integration: Teaching the Bookends of the Masters of Divinity Program"

TTR
Cahalan, Kathleen A.
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 2 (2008): 65-74
BL41.T4
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
The challenge of integrating knowledge, practice and vocational identity is a persistent challenge to theological educators. Cahalan describes how teaching two book-end courses in the M.Div. curriculum have opened up possibilities for integration as a process and a goal of the entire curriculum. In the course, Introduction to Pastoral Ministry, students explore six questions in relationship to ministry: who, what, where, when, how and why. In the culminating Integration ...
Additional Info:
The challenge of integrating knowledge, practice and vocational identity is a persistent challenge to theological educators. Cahalan describes how teaching two book-end courses in the M.Div. curriculum have opened up possibilities for integration as a process and a goal of the entire curriculum. In the course, Introduction to Pastoral Ministry, students explore six questions in relationship to ministry: who, what, where, when, how and why. In the culminating Integration Seminar, students demonstrate their capacity for thinking theologically about a particular pastoral situation. Through both written and oral presentation, students' ministerial identity and authority are shaped and challenged as they gain proficiency in drawing what they know from and into what they do in the practice of ministry. Integration is also a strategy for theological educators who strive to take seriously the experiences students come with, the settings to which they will go, and what they most need from the M.Div. degree to gain solid footing in practice while also engaging lifelong learning. This essay is reprinted from Dorothy Bass and Craig Dykstra, eds., For Life Abundant (Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2008).
TTR cover image

"Immunity-to-Change Language Technology": An Educational Tool for Pastoral Leadership Education"

TTR
Ste-Marie, Lorraine
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 2 (2008): 92-102
BL41.T4
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Adult Learners

Additional Info:
One of the primary aims of pastoral leadership education is to offer reflective processes that enable learners to surface, critique, and construct different epistemological conceptions of reality leading to more effective pastoral practice. In many pastoral leadership education programs, this type of intentional reflection usually takes place in a mentoring or supervisory relationship as well as in a reflective seminar. In this essay, I describe how I have used the "...
Additional Info:
One of the primary aims of pastoral leadership education is to offer reflective processes that enable learners to surface, critique, and construct different epistemological conceptions of reality leading to more effective pastoral practice. In many pastoral leadership education programs, this type of intentional reflection usually takes place in a mentoring or supervisory relationship as well as in a reflective seminar. In this essay, I describe how I have used the "immunity-to-change language technology" as one type of reflective process for intentional reflection and transformational learning in pastoral leadership education. The results of my research and ongoing use of this educational tool indicate that it can be valuable for enabling change by helping learners expand their pastoral leadership capacities and become more effective in their practice. Given my findings, I conclude that this educational tool could be of interest to other educators who are seeking to broaden their own repertoire of approaches to transformational learning. A version of this research appears in a forthcoming book by the same author, published by Novalis, in Fall 2008.
TTR cover image

"The Idea of Practice and Why It Matters in the Teaching of Preaching"

TTR
Nieman, James
2008
Teaching Theology and Religion 11, no. 3 (2008): 123-133
BL41.T4
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
The concept of practice helps us better understand how preaching works, as well as how we can teach that practice more effectively. This essay develops a compact but wide-ranging view of practices, reflecting the current scholarly discussion. It also argues that preaching is a particular instance of this larger concept of practices. Understanding preaching as a practice gives new perspectives on what preaching is and allows us to consider how ...
Additional Info:
The concept of practice helps us better understand how preaching works, as well as how we can teach that practice more effectively. This essay develops a compact but wide-ranging view of practices, reflecting the current scholarly discussion. It also argues that preaching is a particular instance of this larger concept of practices. Understanding preaching as a practice gives new perspectives on what preaching is and allows us to consider how to employ broadly recognized standards of excellence to evaluate particular instances of students' preaching. Further, this essay explores how the teaching of preaching is a practice in its own right. The value of this insight is that it allows us then to explore how the character of the teaching and the character of what is taught can be consonant with one another, and in ways that can guide. This essay is from "Teaching Preaching as a Christian Practice," edited by Thomas G. Long and Nora Tisdale. Used by permission of Westminster John Knox Press.
TTR cover image

"Should We Be Teaching the Historical Critical Method?"

TTR
Adam, A.K.M.; Ascough, Richard; Gravett, Sandra; Hunt, Alice; Martin, Dale; Wimberly, Edward, and Yang, Seung Ai
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 2 (2009): 162-187
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
This manuscript is an edited transcript of a panel discussion held at a Society of Biblical Literature conference (Boston, Massachusetts, November 22 to 24, 2008). Alice Hunt begins the discussion by summarizing the content and significance of a new book by Dale Martin, The Pedagogy of The Bible (Westminster John Knox Press, 2008) in which he argues that biblical studies in seminaries and divinity schools give too much emphasis to teaching the historical critical ...
Additional Info:
This manuscript is an edited transcript of a panel discussion held at a Society of Biblical Literature conference (Boston, Massachusetts, November 22 to 24, 2008). Alice Hunt begins the discussion by summarizing the content and significance of a new book by Dale Martin, The Pedagogy of The Bible (Westminster John Knox Press, 2008) in which he argues that biblical studies in seminaries and divinity schools give too much emphasis to teaching the historical critical method and not enough to preparing students for ministry by teaching them to be self-reflective practioners of the improvisational skills of interpreting scripture. Then a panel of bible scholars, including the author, conduct a wide-ranging discussion that raises questions about how biblical studies might better prepare students for ministry, as well as the proper role and appropriate pedagogies for introducing biblical studies in the undergraduate liberal arts curriculum.
TTR cover image

"Three Reviews of For Life Abundant: Practical Theology, Theological Education, and Christian Ministry, edited by Dorothy C. Bass and Craig Dykstra, 2008"

TTR
Slough, Rebecca Stortz, Martha E. Pui-Lan, Kwok
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 1 (2010): 54-63
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
For Life Abundant, the fruit of sustained reflection among systematic theologians, practical theologians, and pastors, is an important new work that deserves attention. The volume provokes creative and critical thinking about practical theology. Its contributors conceptualize the field as a disciplined practice of imagination and skill residing at the confluence of Christian tradition and living ecclesial communities, and ask what such a construal of practical theology might mean for theological ...
Additional Info:
For Life Abundant, the fruit of sustained reflection among systematic theologians, practical theologians, and pastors, is an important new work that deserves attention. The volume provokes creative and critical thinking about practical theology. Its contributors conceptualize the field as a disciplined practice of imagination and skill residing at the confluence of Christian tradition and living ecclesial communities, and ask what such a construal of practical theology might mean for theological education.

Given the significance of For Life Abundant, Teaching Theology and Religion asked three theological educators who are located in different regions, types of institutions and fields, to review and respond to it. Rebecca Slough describes the volume’s central questions and organization, and considers how it might contribute to the deliberations of a seminary faculty regarding a school’s curriculum. Martha Stortz shows how the process and structure of For Life Abundant are in themselves illustrative of the conceptualization of practical theology for which it argues. Kwok Pui-Lan notes the volumes strengths and goes on to probe its lacunae, particularly with regard to global, gender and multi-cultural considerations relevant to a robust construal of pastoral theology in our time.

While the authors of these three reviews and responses to the volume did not interact as they wrote them, together they comprise a conversation that should be on-going. TTR invites further responses to the volume.
Cover image

Teaching Our Story: Narrative Leadership and Pastoral Formation

Book
Larry A. Golemon, ed.
2010
The Alban Institute, Herndon, VA
BT83.78.T43 2010
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
As congregations become intentional story-forming communities, they can shape the lives of millions of generative, faithful, and civic-minded adults. To do so, a framework that relates narrative work to the full range of congregational life is needed. Teaching Our Story offers such a framework, featuring essays that examine crucial shapers of narrative, outline a course in preaching that addresses crucial questions for today's church leaders, illuminate the creative power of ...
Additional Info:
As congregations become intentional story-forming communities, they can shape the lives of millions of generative, faithful, and civic-minded adults. To do so, a framework that relates narrative work to the full range of congregational life is needed. Teaching Our Story offers such a framework, featuring essays that examine crucial shapers of narrative, outline a course in preaching that addresses crucial questions for today's church leaders, illuminate the creative power of listening to the collective stories of a faith community, and observe what can happen when first-year seminary students are asked to become story brokers--integrating the stories from their communities with biblical stories, their own personal stories, and the theological doctrines formed within the story of their tradition. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Toward a Framework for Narrative Leadership in Ministry (Larry A. Golemon)
ch. 2 The Official and Unofficial Story: A Narrative of Identity and Faithfulness in the Bible (Judy Fentress-Williams)
ch. 3 Preaching the Christian Story among Other Faith Stories: A Case Study of a Course (Susan K. Hedahl)
ch. 4 Enlivening Local Stories through Pastoral Ethnography (Mary Clark Moschella)
ch. 5 Shared Narrative: Story Brokering as an Approach to Contextual Learning at Seminary (Kathryn Vitalis Hoffman)
ch. 6 Story Lines for Redemptive Leadership (Robert Charles Anderson)
ch. 7 Place-Based Narrative: Paradoxical Landscape and Rooted Realities (Susan Kendall)

Contributors
Cover image

The Missional Church & Leadership Formation: Helping Congregations Develop Leadership Capacity

Book
Van Gelder, Craig, ed.
2009
William B Eerdmans Publishing Co., Grand Rapids, MI
BV601.8.M5945 2007
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
In this volume - the third book in the Missional Church series - eminent missional church expert Craig Van Gelder continues to track and contribute to the expanding missional church conversation, inviting today's brightest minds in the field to speak to key questions concerning church leadership. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
In this volume - the third book in the Missional Church series - eminent missional church expert Craig Van Gelder continues to track and contribute to the expanding missional church conversation, inviting today's brightest minds in the field to speak to key questions concerning church leadership. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Contributors
Introduction: Engaging the Missional Church Conversation

Section I Missional Leadership Formation In Relation To Theological Education
ch. 1 Theological Education and Missional Leadership Formation: Can Seminaries Prepare Missional Leaders for Congregations? (Craig Van Gelder)
ch. 2 Missional Theology for Schools of Theology: Re-engaging the Question What Is Theological about a Theological School?(Kyle J. A. Small)
ch. 3 Developing Evangelical Public Leadership for Apostolic Witness: A Missional Alternative to Traditional Pastoral Formation (Richard H. Bliese)

Section II Missional Leadership Formation In Relation To Congregations
ch. 4 Cultivating Missional Leaders: Mental Models and the Ecology of Vocation (Scott Cormode)
ch. 5 Forming Lay Missional Leaders for Congregations and the World (Sharon Hnderson Callahan)
ch. 6 Vision-Discerning vs. Vision-Casting: How Shared Vision Can Raise Up Communities of Leaders Rather than Mere Leaders of Communities (Dave Daubert)

Section III Missional Leadership Formation In Relation To Recent Research
ch. 7 Characteristics of Congregations That Empower Missional Leadership: A Lutheran Voice (Terri Martinson Elton)
ch. 8 Leadership and the Missional Church Conversation: Listening In on What Leaders in Four Denominational Systems Have to Say (Kristine M. Stache)
Cover image

Common Worship in Theological Education

Book
Garrigan, Siobhan and Todd Johnson, eds.
2010
Pickwick Publications, Eugene OR
BV4022.C63 2010
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
What is the place of corporate warship in theological education? Certainly it is not unexpected to have ministry students attending seminary chapel, but what are the expectations for the students who attend chapel? Is it to form their liturgical sensibilities into conformity with a particular worship tradition or style? Or is it to provide a safe place to try things that one would be reluctant to experiment with in congregational ...
Additional Info:
What is the place of corporate warship in theological education? Certainly it is not unexpected to have ministry students attending seminary chapel, but what are the expectations for the students who attend chapel? Is it to form their liturgical sensibilities into conformity with a particular worship tradition or style? Or is it to provide a safe place to try things that one would be reluctant to experiment with in congregational worship? Although common worship for ministry students is almost a given in all theological schools, there are few common understandings about it goals and purposes.

Common Worship in Theological Education is the first book to address the theological, pedagogical, and political issues involved in the planning and execution of seminary chapel. It offers voices from across the theological and ecumenical spectrum about chapel, as well as involving multiple disciplines in the conversation. This volume provides the first comprehensive survey of the worship issues at stake in seminary education today. The essays in this collection provide the foundation for a productive conversation within a seminary faculty or among colleagues within a theological discipline. This volume makes the case that the chapel ought to have a seat at the table when the education mission of a theological school is being discussed. So pull up a chair and prepare for a fascinating conversation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Contributors

Preface

ch. 1 Ora et Labora: Reflections on the (Non-) History of Seminary Chapel (Todd E. Johnson)

ch. 2 The Politics of Seminary Chapels (Swight W. Vogel)

ch. 3 My Cup Runneth Over? Seminary Chapel As A Laboratory (Mark W. Stamm)

ch. 4 Musical Formation in Seminary Chapel Worship (Patrick Evans)

ch. 5 Seminary Chapel in a Prayer Book Context (Lizette Larson-Miller)

ch. 6 Naming the Elephant: Leading Chapel in a Multi-Denominational Seminary Context (Michelle K. Baker-Wright)

ch. 7 In Spirit and in Truth: The Liturgical Space as a Territory (Claudio Caralhaes)

ch. 8 Table Teaching: Practicing the Lord's Supper at Seminary (Ron Rienstra)

ch. 9 Worship and Formation for Ministry (E. Bryon Anderson)

ch. 10 Crediting Chapel: Worship and the Theological Curriculum (Siobhan Garrigan)
TTR cover image

"Let Us Pray: Classroom Worship in Theological Education"

TTR
Laytham, Brent
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 110-124
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Theological education typically includes classroom worship, a practice of great pedagogical power and curricular import. As pedagogy, classroom worship does four things. It focuses teaching and learning on God, and fosters theological dispositions necessary for sustaining that attention. Second, it rightly positions the entire class in dialogical relation to the divine Thou, in communal relation to each other, the larger church and the wider world, and in personal relations that ...
Additional Info:
Theological education typically includes classroom worship, a practice of great pedagogical power and curricular import. As pedagogy, classroom worship does four things. It focuses teaching and learning on God, and fosters theological dispositions necessary for sustaining that attention. Second, it rightly positions the entire class in dialogical relation to the divine Thou, in communal relation to each other, the larger church and the wider world, and in personal relations that risk transformation. Third, it frames theological education as an integrative practice of faith and learning. Finally, it invites teachers to know their students as whole persons and students to trust their teachers as spiritual guides. As curriculum, classroom worship may have greater significance than chapel worship for many students and at particular schools. It should be moved from implicit curriculum to explicit, with careful attention to the null curriculum and to the matrices of relationship within which worship has meaning.
Tactics cover image

"Discussing Sermon Texts: New Breathing Spaces"

Tactic
Hedahl, Susan K.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 1 (2011): 22
BL41.T4
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a method for improving students' sermons.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a method for improving students' sermons.
TTR cover image

"St. Andrew’s College Integration Seminar: Interdisciplinary Action-Reflection Methods for Sustained Conversations"

TTR
Caldwell, Lynn
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 3 (2011): 252-253
BL41.T4
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
Article cover image

"Spiritual Formation in Online Higher Education Communities: Nurturing Spirituality in Christian Higher Education Online Degree Programs"

Article
Maddix, Mark A.
2010
Christian Education Journal, Series 3, Vol. 7, No. 2, pgs. 423-434
Topics: Online Learning   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Spiritual formation is one of the recognized benchmarks of higher education that is Christian. A communal commitment to spiritual formation is indeed part of the Christian higher education community's DNA, and is in fact reflected in the criteria for accreditation in both the Association of Biblical Higher Education (ABHE) and the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). However, as many Christian institutions of higher education begin to engage in online instruction, ...
Additional Info:
Spiritual formation is one of the recognized benchmarks of higher education that is Christian. A communal commitment to spiritual formation is indeed part of the Christian higher education community's DNA, and is in fact reflected in the criteria for accreditation in both the Association of Biblical Higher Education (ABHE) and the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). However, as many Christian institutions of higher education begin to engage in online instruction, even offering entire degree programs online, how can they affirm their campus's commitment to the spiritual formation of students? This article addresses the question of providing intentional Christian nurture toward spiritual formation in online degree programs. The aim of the article is to inform participants of the challenges and opportunities for student spiritual formation in online degree programs so as to better equip participants to develop Christian nurture initiatives for online students from an informed perspective. To do so the article includes two parts: (a) the development of a theoretical matrix for online spiritual formation, based principally on precedent literature and the experience of the two authors; and (b) a survey of actual Christian nurture and spiritual formation models specifically designed for online programs.
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“Holy cow! This stuff is real!” From Imagining Ministry to Pastoral Imagination"

TTR
Campbell-Reed, Eileen R., and Scharen, Christian
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 4 (2011): 323-342
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
How do seminarians move from imagining ministry to embodying pastoral imagination? Stories gathered from seminarians in their final year of study show the complexity of shifting from classroom work, which foregrounds theory and intellectual imagination, to more embodied, relational, and emotionally intense engagements of ministry. Stories about learning ministry articulate a process we call the birth of pastoral imagination. New ministers test their use of knowledge acquired in classroom and ...
Additional Info:
How do seminarians move from imagining ministry to embodying pastoral imagination? Stories gathered from seminarians in their final year of study show the complexity of shifting from classroom work, which foregrounds theory and intellectual imagination, to more embodied, relational, and emotionally intense engagements of ministry. Stories about learning ministry articulate a process we call the birth of pastoral imagination. New ministers test their use of knowledge acquired in classroom and books within the limits of actual ministry situations. They become overwhelmed by multiple variables in situations where they must make choices and act. These moments of action are fraught with risk and responsibility for the outcomes. Articulation and theological reflection are formative for students learning the practice of ministry. Implications for theological education include making greater “use of knowledge” in ministry practice and “use of practice” in classrooms. Points of crisis in the student stories raise additional questions about how some complications and interruptions to the “birth process” may present tragic consequences.
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"Reframing Knowing, Being, and Doing in the Seminary Classroom"

TTR
Cahalan, Kathleen A.
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 4 (2011): 343-353
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Seminary education requires that students learn a complex body of theological knowledge, engage in the practices of ministry, and develop as persons of faith and vocation. Utilizing the six aspects of significant learning experiences defined by L. Dee Fink – foundational knowledge, application, integration, the human dimension, caring, and learning how to learn – the author explores teaching practices that reframe knowing, doing, and being in seminary classrooms.
Additional Info:
Seminary education requires that students learn a complex body of theological knowledge, engage in the practices of ministry, and develop as persons of faith and vocation. Utilizing the six aspects of significant learning experiences defined by L. Dee Fink – foundational knowledge, application, integration, the human dimension, caring, and learning how to learn – the author explores teaching practices that reframe knowing, doing, and being in seminary classrooms.
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"Formation in the Classroom"

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Glennon, Fred; Jacobsen, Douglas; Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt; Thatamanil, John J.; Porterfield, Amanda; and Moore, Mary Elizabeth
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 4 (2011): 357-381
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Student Learning Goals

Additional Info:
What is the relationship between the academic knowledge of the guild and the formation of students in the classroom? This Forum gathers four essays originally presented at a Special Topics Session at the 2009 conference of the American Academy of Religion (Atlanta, Georgia), with a brief introductory essay by Fred Glennon explaining the genesis of the panel. Douglas Jacobsen and Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen clarify some of the issues at stake in ...
Additional Info:
What is the relationship between the academic knowledge of the guild and the formation of students in the classroom? This Forum gathers four essays originally presented at a Special Topics Session at the 2009 conference of the American Academy of Religion (Atlanta, Georgia), with a brief introductory essay by Fred Glennon explaining the genesis of the panel. Douglas Jacobsen and Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen clarify some of the issues at stake in undergraduate liberal arts classrooms by distinguishing between four dimensions of what they refer to as “the (in)formation teaching matrix: institutional context, course content, faculty roles, and student outcomes. John Thatamanil argues that all learning necessarily presupposes formation. Amanda Porterfield argues against using the word “formation” because it complicates and undermines her teaching goals to historicize religion and narratives about it through open-ended inquiry. And, finally, Mary Elizabeth Moore explores the interactive processes linking formation, information, reformation, and transformation.
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"Beginning a Life-Long Process: The Summative Evaluation for Ministry"

TTR
Attridge, Michael, and Darren Dias
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 1 (2012): 46-47
BL41.T4 v.15 no. 1 2012
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
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Creating Connections in Teaching and Learning

Book
Abawl, Lindy; Conway, Joan; Henderson, Robyn, eds.
2011
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB1060.C755 2011
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
This book explores the wide range of contexts in which research into creating connections in learning and teaching may take place. Creating connections can encompass making links, crossing divides, forming relationships, building frameworks, and generating new knowledge. The cognitive, cultural, social, emotional and/or physical aspects of understanding, meaning-making, motivating, acting, researching, and evaluating are explored as constituent forms of creativity in relation to such connections.

From this ...
Additional Info:
This book explores the wide range of contexts in which research into creating connections in learning and teaching may take place. Creating connections can encompass making links, crossing divides, forming relationships, building frameworks, and generating new knowledge. The cognitive, cultural, social, emotional and/or physical aspects of understanding, meaning-making, motivating, acting, researching, and evaluating are explored as constituent forms of creativity in relation to such connections.

From this exploration the authors identify varied connective contexts and means which include the learner, the educator, the organisation, and the relevant community. The crossing of divides, forming learner-educator relationships, bringing together diverse groups of learners, establishing networks and partnerships among educators, and establishing links between organisations and communities are all considered as connections which can be created by and within the learning and teaching dynamic.

By examining the factors which help to facilitate and/or restrict the possibilities for creating connections in educational contexts, implications for and outcomes of learning and/or teaching arise from the connections created. The final chapter of this book will explicate the realisations that have emerged for educators and researchers working to create connections. These offer suggestions for future directions and enunciate what and how connections might contribute to both educational institutions and the broader society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Authors
Exposing Threads: Creating Connections in Teaching and Learning

Section I: Connecting Within School Contexts
ch. 1 Connecting Early Childhood Educators, Action Research, and Teaching for Social Justice (Karen Hawkins)
ch. 2 Inspire to Connect a Learning Desirec (Brad McLennan and Karen Peel)
ch. 3 Shared Values Connecting Parents, Teachers, and Students (J. Anne Casley)
ch. 4 Engaging Students Through Student Voice: Negotiating Pedagogy (Ian Fraser)
ch. 5 Relational Trust as a Core Resource for Building Capacity in Schools (Richard Scagliarini)
ch. 6 International Teachers Making Connections in Times of Change (Marie Davis)

Section II: Connecting Beyond School Contexts
ch. 7 Enhancing Relationships in Doctoral Student Supervision: Shibboleths, Signifiers, and Strategies (P. A. Danaher and Henriette van Rensburg)
ch. 8 Productive Partnerships: Cross-Departmental Connections in a Tertiary Context (Karen Noble and Robyn Henderson)
ch. 9 Addressing Offshore Disconnections Between Chinese and Western Business Academics and Students (Joe Peng Zhou and Cec Pedersen)
ch. 10 Curriculum Connections: Lessons from Post-Compulsory Vocational Education and Training (Lindsay Parry, R. E. (Bobby) Harreveld and P. A. Danaher)

Section III: Making Meaning From Lived Experiences
ch. 11 Look Who’s Listening: Using the Superaddressee for Understanding Connections in Dialogue (Warren Midgley)
ch. 12 Effective Cluster Collaborations: Transformation Through School and University Connections (Joan M. Conway and Lindy Abawi)
ch. 13 Linking Pedagogical Documentation to Phenomenological Research (Laurie Kocher)
ch. 14 Juggling Research with Teaching: Building Capacity in a University Research Team (Margaret Baguley and Helmut Geiblinger)
ch. 15 Sharing Japanese and Australian Culture: A Case Study in Second Language Learning (Junichi Hatai and Robert D. White)

Section IV: Making Virtual Connections
ch. 16 A New Zealand Tertiary Educator’s Online Journey (C. E. Haggerty)
ch. 17 Connecting Learners in Virtual Space: Forming Learning Communities (Lyn Brodie and Peter Gibbings)
ch. 18 Bridging a Discipline Divide Through the Lens of Community of Inquiry (Petrea Redmond and Christine McDonald)
ch. 19 Finding the Right Online Learning Connections: Comparing Models in Practice (Tina van Eyk)
ch. 20 Linking the Threads: Creating Clearer Connections (Lindy Abawi, Joan M. Conway, and Robyn Henderson)
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"Formation Amidst War and Peace: Strategies for Theological Integration in the Battlefield and Borough of Gettysburg"

TTR
Hummel,Leonard M.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 182-183
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
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Dimensions of Expertise: A Conceptual Exploration of Vocational Knowledge

Book
Winch, Christopher
2012
Continuum International Publishing Group, New York
LC1042.W55 2012
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Adult Learners   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
A detailed philosophical debate on the nature of expertise is long overdue and Dimensions of Expertise opens up that debate. Christopher Winch firstly explores an account of know-how, derived primarily from the pioneering work of Gilbert Ryle, and moves on to relate this epistemological debate to discussions concerning the nature of expertise in vocational and professional education, including attempts to provide a theory of expertise. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A detailed philosophical debate on the nature of expertise is long overdue and Dimensions of Expertise opens up that debate. Christopher Winch firstly explores an account of know-how, derived primarily from the pioneering work of Gilbert Ryle, and moves on to relate this epistemological debate to discussions concerning the nature of expertise in vocational and professional education, including attempts to provide a theory of expertise. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1. The Two Faces of Expertise 
ch. 2. Current Philosophical Debates about Knowing How
ch. 3.  Skills and Their Discontents
ch. 4.  Beyond Skill: The Complexities of Competence
ch. 5. To Follow a Rule…: The Normative Basis of Practical Knowledge
ch. 6. Theory, Underpinning Knowledge and Practice
ch. 7. Tacit Knowledge
ch. 8. Can There be a Theory of Expertise? 
ch. 9. Novice, Journeyman, Expert
ch. 10.  Vocational Education and the Development of Expertise

Bibliography
Index
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Assigning Integration: A Framework for Intellectual, Personal, and Professional Development in Seminary Courses

TTR
Kanarek, Jane, and Lehman, Marjorie
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 1 (2013): 18-32
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 1
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
This article explores assignments as a core teaching practice essential to integrating the cognitive, personal, and professional identities of seminary students. These core practices emerge in seminary curricula where there is a strong focus on the teaching of canonical texts and a goal of achieving textual mastery. We propose that carefully chosen and constructive assignments achieve the kind of integration necessary for building content knowledge and the professional, spiritual, and ...
Additional Info:
This article explores assignments as a core teaching practice essential to integrating the cognitive, personal, and professional identities of seminary students. These core practices emerge in seminary curricula where there is a strong focus on the teaching of canonical texts and a goal of achieving textual mastery. We propose that carefully chosen and constructive assignments achieve the kind of integration necessary for building content knowledge and the professional, spiritual, and religious identities of our students. While the difference between the educational goals of clergy-training in a seminary and training graduate students in the academy can be sharp, we argue here for ways to make that contrast both productive and generative.
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Theological Education Matters: Leadership Education for the Church

Book
Cannell, Linda
2008
BookSurge Publishing
BV4020.C255
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Linda Cannell served churches and theological schools in Canada for about twenty years before joining the faculty of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois in 1990. While at Trinity, she served as a professor of Educational Ministry and directed the PhD in Educational Studies program. She now serves as Lois W. Bennett Distinguished Professor of Educational Ministries at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, Massachusetts. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Linda Cannell served churches and theological schools in Canada for about twenty years before joining the faculty of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois in 1990. While at Trinity, she served as a professor of Educational Ministry and directed the PhD in Educational Studies program. She now serves as Lois W. Bennett Distinguished Professor of Educational Ministries at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, Massachusetts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction
Emerging Trends in Theological Education: An Interview

Part I - A Threat Matrix For Theological Education: Special Problems For The Church
ch. 1 Perspectives on Contemporary Theological Education
ch. 2 Persisting Factors That Affect the Future of Theological Education
ch. 3 A Threat Matrix: Challenges Confronting the Seminary and the Church

Part II - Historical Backgrounds
ch. 4 The Development of Institutions of Theological Education
ch. 5 The Shaping of Academic Theology
ch. 6 The Emergence of Professionalism in Theological Education
ch. 7 Theologia and the Desire to Know God

Part III - Implications For 21st Century International Theological Education
ch. 8 Recovering a Focus on the Church
ch. 9 Toward a "Learning Century" for Theological Education
ch. 10 Toward an International 21st Century Theological Education

Conclusion
What Does It Mean to Be Theologically Educated?
References
Index
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From Civic Engagement to Circles of Grace: Mid-Range Reflection on Teaching for Global Citizenship

TTR
Corrie, Elizabeth W.
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 2 (2013): 165-181
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 2
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
The course “Empowering Youth for Global Citizenship” seeks to equip students to teach global citizenship by engaging them in practices of ascetic withdrawal from consumer habits and active engagement in the public sphere. These goals underlie the design of the assignments, but should have also shaped the relationship between the assignments themselves. This article addresses the issue of course design in the service of empowering students for engagement in the ...
Additional Info:
The course “Empowering Youth for Global Citizenship” seeks to equip students to teach global citizenship by engaging them in practices of ascetic withdrawal from consumer habits and active engagement in the public sphere. These goals underlie the design of the assignments, but should have also shaped the relationship between the assignments themselves. This article addresses the issue of course design in the service of empowering students for engagement in the public sphere by reflecting upon the course assignments, with emphasis on a project that worked well, and the implications this has for its relationship to the other course assignments, including one that missed the mark. The exploration of this misalignment between the learning goals and actual outcomes of the different assignments brings to light the unique role of learning communities of accountability and acceptance in deepening the impact of assignments aimed at personal transformation, as well as the rich dynamic that can come from coordinating course assignments to bring “head, heart, and hands” together.
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Hidden Treasures in Theological Education: The Writing Tutor, the Spiritual Director, and Practices of Academic and Spiritual Mentoring

TTR
Yaghjian, Lucretia B.
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 3 (2013): 221-245
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 3
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Mentoring is an important but often overlooked resource in theological education and students' academic and spiritual formation. This essay profiles the mentoring practices and postures of the writing tutor and the spiritual director as exemplars of academic and spiritual mentoring. An extended probe of this analogy affirms the integration of academic and spiritual formation as a core value in theological education; identifies mentoring in theological education as a hidden treasure ...
Additional Info:
Mentoring is an important but often overlooked resource in theological education and students' academic and spiritual formation. This essay profiles the mentoring practices and postures of the writing tutor and the spiritual director as exemplars of academic and spiritual mentoring. An extended probe of this analogy affirms the integration of academic and spiritual formation as a core value in theological education; identifies mentoring in theological education as a hidden treasure fostering this integration and warranting attention as a theological practice; and re-envisions the theological practice of mentoring under the traditional rubric of the “care of souls,” embracing the relational, educational, formational, spiritual, and rhetorical dimensions of this practice.
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Wabash tree

What did you learn in the real world today?: The case of practicum in university educations

Book
Henriksen, Lars Bo, ed.
2013
Aalborg University Press, Denmark
LC1072.P73 W49 2013
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Service Learning   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Practice, praxis, traineeship, internship, or practicum - these are all names for the specific arrangements where students from universities engage in real life experiences; in arrangements where they leave the secure tranquility of the university and enter into the chaotic world of work. Practicum is a very good way of learning, and it can be very interesting for all parties involved. The students ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Practice, praxis, traineeship, internship, or practicum - these are all names for the specific arrangements where students from universities engage in real life experiences; in arrangements where they leave the secure tranquility of the university and enter into the chaotic world of work. Practicum is a very good way of learning, and it can be very interesting for all parties involved. The students appreciate it, even if it is cumbersome, frustrating, and requires a lot of work - work that is different from what they know in their previous encounters with the education system. This book asks a simple question in relation to practicum, paraphrasing Tom Paxton's song: What Did You Learn in the Real World Today? The question is asked without the irony of Paxton's original one, in order to find out what is learned in the practicum. The chapters in this book shed some light on this simple question. The question is confronted from philosophical and pedagogical perspectives, while investigating a number of cases of students' learning experiences in the real world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 "What did you learn in the real world today?" (Lars Bo Henriksen, David O'Donnell)
ch. 2 Epistemology and learning in practice (Mogens Pahuus)
ch. 3 About the logic of practice (Jörg Zeller)
ch. 4 Praxis, PBL and the application of knowledge (Lars Bo Henriksen)
ch. 5 Embodiment as the existential soil of practice. Philosophical reflections on the concept of practice as "doing" (Ulla Thøgersen)
ch. 6 PBL and stories of body in the hospital world (Lars Botin)
ch. 7 Inquiry in the swampy lowland (Merete Wiberg)
ch. 8 Engineering students in the real world - on-campus PBL (Lars Bo Henriksen, Johan Askehave)
ch. 9 The Aalborg PBL model and employability (Lone Krogh)
ch. 10 Lessons from the Euronet-PBL project (Pekka Kämääinen, Ludger Deitmer)
ch. 11 About the authors
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Christian Hospitality and Pastoral Practices in a Multifaith Society - Reports and Reflections (pdf)

Journal Issue
2013
Theological Education 47, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v. 47 no. 2 2013
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2013-theological-education-v47-n2.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2013-theological-education-v47-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Taking Interfaith Off the Hill: Revelation in the Abrahamic Traditions (Gregory Mobley)
The Pastoral Practice of Christian Hospitality as presence in Muslim-Christian Engagement: Contextualizing the Classroom (Mary Hess)
Raising Awareness of Christian Hospitality and Pastoral Practices: Equipping Ourselves for a Multifaith World (Barbara Sutton)
Christian Hospitality in a World of Many Faith: Equipping the New Generation of Religious Leaders in a Multifaith Context (Eleazar S. Fernandez)
Caring Hospitably in Multifaith Situations (Daniel S. Schipani)
Interfaith Perspectives on Religious Practices (Timothy H. Robinson; and Nancy Ramsay)
Putting into Practice an Intercultural Approach to Spiritual Care with Veterans (Carrie Doehring; and Kelly Arora)
Table Fellowship with Our Buddhist Neighbors for Beloved Community (Paul Louis Metzger)
Developing a Cultural Competency Module to Facilitate Christian Hospitality and Promote Pastoral Practices in a Multifaith Society (Paul De Neui; and Deborah Penny)

Open Forum
Pedagogic Principles for Multifaith Education (Rabbi Or N. Rose)
Christian Hospitality and Muslims (Amir Hussain)
Muslim Studies in a Christian Theological School: The Muslim Studies Program at Emmanuel College in Toronoto (Mark G. Toulouse)
Additional Info:
A brief accessible article that summarizes the findings of the “Educating Clergy” study conducted by the Carnegie Endowment and published by Jossey-Bass in 2006, written by one of the authors of the study.
Additional Info:
A brief accessible article that summarizes the findings of the “Educating Clergy” study conducted by the Carnegie Endowment and published by Jossey-Bass in 2006, written by one of the authors of the study.
Additional Info:
Sponsored by the Seminary Department of the National Catholic Educational Association for the purpose of advancing the education of future priests within a distributed learning framework shared by all member schools. Sponsors courses that foster excellence in human, spiritual, intellectual, and pastoral formation within seminaries through the sharing of resources between them.
Additional Info:
Sponsored by the Seminary Department of the National Catholic Educational Association for the purpose of advancing the education of future priests within a distributed learning framework shared by all member schools. Sponsors courses that foster excellence in human, spiritual, intellectual, and pastoral formation within seminaries through the sharing of resources between them.
Additional Info:
Video. Four extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, showing faculty in various disciplines (NOT in religion or theology) addressing the issue of how to foster students’ abilities to integrate learning–over time, across courses, and between academic, personal, and community life.
Additional Info:
Video. Four extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, showing faculty in various disciplines (NOT in religion or theology) addressing the issue of how to foster students’ abilities to integrate learning–over time, across courses, and between academic, personal, and community life.
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Leadership Can Be Taught: A Bold Approach for a Complete World

Book
Parks, Sharon Daloz
2005
Harvard Business School Publshing, Boston, MA
HD57.7.P3655 2005
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
If leaders are made, not born, what is the best way to teach the skills they need to be effective? Today's complex times require a new kind of leadership--one that encompasses a mind-set and capabilities that can't necessarily be taught by conventional methods. In this unique leadership book, Sharon Daloz Parks invites readers to step into the classroom of Harvard leadership virtuoso Ronald Heifetz and his colleagues to understand this ...
Additional Info:
If leaders are made, not born, what is the best way to teach the skills they need to be effective? Today's complex times require a new kind of leadership--one that encompasses a mind-set and capabilities that can't necessarily be taught by conventional methods. In this unique leadership book, Sharon Daloz Parks invites readers to step into the classroom of Harvard leadership virtuoso Ronald Heifetz and his colleagues to understand this dynamic type of leadership and experience a corresponding mode of learning called "case in point." Unlike traditional teaching approaches that analyze the experiences of past leaders, case in point uses individuals' own experiences--and the classroom environment itself--as a crucible for learning. This bold approach enables emerging leaders to work actively through the complex demands of today's workplace and build their skills as they discover theory in practice. Through an engaging, you-are-there writing style, Parks outlines essential features of this approach that can be applied across a range of settings. In the process, Leadership Can Be Taught reveals how we can learn, practice, and teach the art of leadership in more skilled, effective, and inspired forms. Sharon Daloz Parks is director of leadership for the New Commons--an initiative of the Whidbey Institute in Clinton, WA. She has held faculty and research positions at the Harvard Divinity School, Harvard Business School, and the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Leadership for a Changing Word - A Call to Adaptive Work
ch. 2 How De We Begin? - Differing Expectations
ch. 3 What is Really Going On Here? - Engaging People at the Edge of Learning
ch. 4 Learning from Failure in Public - The Power of Small Group Consultation
ch. 5 Listening to the Music Beneath the Words - The Practice of Presence
ch. 6 What Endures? - The Power of Language, Image, and Metaphor
ch. 7 Courage and Costs - Discovering How to Teach the Unteachable
ch. 8 The Same Approach - Other Teachers - The Question of Transferability
ch. 9 Toward a More Adequate Myth - The Art of Leadership
ch. 10 Leadership Can Be-Learned - Strengths and Limitations of This Approach

Notes
Index
About the Author
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Seminary Journal vol. 18, no 3, 2012

Journal Issue
2012
National Catholic Educational Association, Arlington, VA
BV4019.S46 v. 18 no. 3 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Theme: 50th Anniversary of the Second Vatican Council
ch. 2 From the Desk of the Executive Director ( Msgr. Jeremiah McCarthy)
ch. 3 Vatican II on the Priesthood: Fifty Years Later (Rev. Thomas P. Rausch)
ch. 4 The Vision of Vatican II: Some Implications for Priestly Formation in Light of Collaborative Leadership (Michael Attridge)
ch. 5 Priestly Formation in the Wake of Vatican II: From Dualism to Integration (Rev. Melvin C. Blanchette)
ch. 6 Implementing the Vision of Vatican II: What is the Future of Preaching in the Next Fifty Years? (Karla Bellinger)
ch. 7 Pope John XXIII's Opening Address as a Pedagogical Tool in Teaching Vatican II Documents (Cynthia Toolin)
ch. 8 Catholic Priestly Formation for the Unity of Christians (Bro. Jeffrey Gros)
ch. 9 Abiding in Prayer While in Ministry: An Ecclesiological Perspective (Rev. Mark Robson)
ch. 10 A Homiletics Program Overhaul: An Interdisciplinary Approach (Rev. Louis T. Guerin)
ch. 11 Manly Mentoring for Maturity (Rev. Paul Anthony McGavin)
ch. 12 Book Review - English Language Teaching in Theological Contexts, edited by Kitty Barnhouse Purgason (Reviewed by Hilda Kleiman)
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"Bifocaling" Faculty and Formation

Journal Issue
2013
Theological Education 48, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v. 48 no. 1 2013
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Reciprocal Ecology: A Comprehensive Model of Spiritual Formation in Theological Education (Mary E. Lowe; and Stephen D. Lowe)
Formation and the Education of Ministers (Kathleen Hope Brown)
Assessing a Program of Spiritual Formation Using Pre and Post Self-Report Measures (Karen Kangas Dwyer; and Edward M. Hogan)
Held Hostage by Method? Interrupting Pedagogical Assumptions-Latinamente (Carmen Nanko-Fernández)
Does Our Understanding Lack Complexity? Faculty Perceptions on Multicultural Education (Deborah Gin)
Loving the Questions: Finding Food for the Future of Theological Education in the Lexington Seminar (Mary Hess)
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Virtual Empathy? Anxieties and Connections Teaching and Learning Pastoral Care Online

TTR
Sharp, Melinda McGarrah; and Morris, Mary Ann
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 3 (2014): 247-263
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 3
Topics: Online Learning   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Is it possible to teach pastoral care online? McGarrah Sharp and Morris describe their process of transforming a residential on-campus pastoral care course into the first online offering of the course at their seminary. They begin by describing a series of pedagogical choices made with the intent of facilitating dynamic movement between peer-to-peer, small group, and whole class discussions throughout the semester. Before and during the course, anxieties arose at ...
Additional Info:
Is it possible to teach pastoral care online? McGarrah Sharp and Morris describe their process of transforming a residential on-campus pastoral care course into the first online offering of the course at their seminary. They begin by describing a series of pedagogical choices made with the intent of facilitating dynamic movement between peer-to-peer, small group, and whole class discussions throughout the semester. Before and during the course, anxieties arose at many levels of instruction for the professor, teaching assistant, and students. Anecdotes and examples from the online course show how the online course design and facilitation was able to name and respond to anxieties as part of integrating pastoral care course content and practice – a key learning goal for the course. The authors are persuaded that online pedagogy can help identify how anxieties create space for developing empathy as much, if not more than, a traditional on-campus format.
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Assessment of the Impact of Specialized Theological Education on Pastoral Ministry (pdf)

Article
Fortune, Marie M.; and Moore-Orbih, Aleese
2008
Faith Trust Institute
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
This report of a Wabash Center grant project outlines the current status of efforts to incorporate clergy ethics in theological education settings, recommendations to seminaries and recommendations to the FaithTrust Institution in two areas: curriculum and teaching; and policy and procedure. 
Additional Info:
This report of a Wabash Center grant project outlines the current status of efforts to incorporate clergy ethics in theological education settings, recommendations to seminaries and recommendations to the FaithTrust Institution in two areas: curriculum and teaching; and policy and procedure. 
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Sex and the Seminary: Preparing Ministers for Sexual Health and Justice

Article
Ott, Kate M.
2009
Religious Institute on Sexual Morality, Justice, and Healing Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York 
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
A survey of 36 leading seminaries and rabbinical schools, evaluated on criteria for a sexually healthy and responsible seminary. These criteria measure sexuality content in the curriculum; institutional commitment to sexuality and gender equity (e.g., the existence of anti‐discrimination, sexual harassment and full inclusion policies); and advocacy and support for sexuality‐related issues.
Additional Info:
A survey of 36 leading seminaries and rabbinical schools, evaluated on criteria for a sexually healthy and responsible seminary. These criteria measure sexuality content in the curriculum; institutional commitment to sexuality and gender equity (e.g., the existence of anti‐discrimination, sexual harassment and full inclusion policies); and advocacy and support for sexuality‐related issues.
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Seminary Journal vol. 19, no 2, 2013

Journal Issue
2013
National Catholic Educational Association, Arlington, VA
BV4019.S46 v. 19 no. 2 2013
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Theme: Human Formation in Light of the John Jay Study From the Desk of the Associate Editor
ch. 2 From the Desk of the Associate Editor (Sebastian Mahfood)
ch. 3 The Rector's Conference - A Column by Rev. Denis Robinson
ch. 4 Seminary Human Formation Lessons from the Causes and Context of Sexual Abuse Study (Fernando Ortiz)
ch. 5 Organizational Dynamics and Seminary Formation (Len Sperrry)
ch. 6 Recognizing and Affirming a Priestly Character for the Sake of Formation (Robert M. Vallee)
ch. 7 Sexuality and the Spiritual Life (Patricia Cooney Hathaway)
ch. 8 Human Formation and Communion with Christ (James Keating)
ch. 9 Candidate Assessments: Navigating Psychological Reports Successfully (Emily Cash)
ch. 10 A Process to Improve Treatment for Spanish-Speaking Clergy and Religious (Daniel Kidd)
ch. 11 Forming Priests for the New Evangelization: One Seminary's Response (Ralph Martin)
ch. 12 A Case for the Curriculum: NACOA'S Workshop on Addition and the Family (Robert H. Albers, and Sebastian Mahfood)
ch. 13 Pastores Dederunt Nobis: Three Novelists, Three Priests, and a Few Thoughts on Priestly Formation (Peter Eberle)
ch. 14 St. Thomas Aquinas's Theology of Sacrifice (John P. Joy)
ch. 15 Book Reviews - Seminary Theology III: Seminary Formation and Psychology by Deacon James Keating (Reviewed by Paul C. Vitz)
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Interreligious Education & US Rabbinical Schools

Web
Rose, Or N.
2014
Journal of Inter-Religious Studies, Issue 15, November 22
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Religious Diversity

Additional Info:
See the responses by Nancy Fuchs Kreimer, Yael Shy, and Yehuda Sarna directly following in the table of contents linked here. Rabbinical students gain important knowledge and become more reflective teachers by learning about other religions and with people who practice them. They can also learn how to help educate non-Jews about Judaism and serve as representatives of, and advocates for, our community.
Additional Info:
See the responses by Nancy Fuchs Kreimer, Yael Shy, and Yehuda Sarna directly following in the table of contents linked here. Rabbinical students gain important knowledge and become more reflective teachers by learning about other religions and with people who practice them. They can also learn how to help educate non-Jews about Judaism and serve as representatives of, and advocates for, our community.
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The Power of the Learning Community Model for the Development of Supervisor/Mentor

Article
Floding, Matthew; Fuller Thomas; Huffaker, Lucinda; Parker, Rhonda; Rodriguez, Jennie Lee; and St. Louis, Allison
2015
Reflective Practice: Formation and Supervision in Ministry, Volume 35
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Field Education supervisors from 6 schools report on different learning community opportunities they facilitated among a selected group of supervisors, regarding each as a “community of practice.”
Additional Info:
Field Education supervisors from 6 schools report on different learning community opportunities they facilitated among a selected group of supervisors, regarding each as a “community of practice.”
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Forming the Theological Imagination: Strategies of Integration in Theological Education

Journal Issue
Golemon, ed., Lawrence
2007
Spotlight on Theological Education 1, no. 1 March
BV4019.S66
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/spotlightontefinal.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/images/pdfs/spotlightontefinal.pdf

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Practical Theology at Saint Paul School of Theology (Pamela D. Couture)
ch. 2 How Religious Tradition Serves Theological Education (Richard Benson)
ch. 3 Teaching and Learning Scripture as If We Remember Why We Cared about It in the First Place (James T. Butler)
ch. 4 Cultural Diversity as a Theological Resource (Elizabeth Conde-Frazier)
ch. 5 Coaching Theological Imagination (Serene Jones)
ch. 6 Community Practices of Integration (Michael Battle)
ch. 7 Shaping Vocational Identity in Field Education (Lynn Rhodes)
ch. 8 Spiritual Formation as Integrative Practice (Elizabeth Liebert)
ch. 9 Integration across the Curriculum (Diane Hymans)
ch. 10 From the Bottom Up: The Role of Contextualization in Theological Education (Keith A. Russell)
ch. 11 Theological Education in the New Global Reality (Dwight N. Hopkins)
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Exploring the Transition from Graduate School to Seminary Teaching

Journal Issue
Thatamanil, ed., John T.
2011
Spotlight on Theological Education, March
BV4019.S66
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index4783.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=308&Itemid=270
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index4783.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=308&Itemid=270

Table Of Content:
Exploring the Transition from Graduate School to Seminary Teaching (John J. Thatamanil, ed.)

ch. 1 Perspective on Teaching, Scholarship, and Service for New Faculty in Theological Schools (Daniel O. Aleshire)
ch. 2 Pedagogical Pilgrimage Taking: Exploring the Transition from Graduate School to Seminary Teaching (Emmanuel Y. Lartey)
ch. 3 Life on the Other Side: Moving from a Graduate School of Religion to a Theological Seminary (Alton B. Pollard III)
ch. 4 The Academic Voice of the Church (Edwin Chr. van Driel)
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Equipping the Equippers: The Pedagogical and Programmatic Implications of The Christians' Callings in the World Project

TTR
Lose, David J.; Mikoski, Gordon S.; Crowley, Eileen D.; Jacobson, Rolf; Cormode, Scott; and Conklin-Miller-Jeffrey
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 4 (2015): 387-408
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 4 2015
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
When five theological schools realized (a) their graduates affirmed vocation as central to their theology and practice, yet (b) the parishioners of their graduates nevertheless did not feel called, they knew they had to do something. For six years, faculty teams from these schools conducted a variety of experiments in pedagogy, curriculum reform, and program development in order to train their graduates to equip all of God's people to claim ...
Additional Info:
When five theological schools realized (a) their graduates affirmed vocation as central to their theology and practice, yet (b) the parishioners of their graduates nevertheless did not feel called, they knew they had to do something. For six years, faculty teams from these schools conducted a variety of experiments in pedagogy, curriculum reform, and program development in order to train their graduates to equip all of God's people to claim and live their vocational identity in the world. This article introduces the identified challenge and necessary theological and pedagogical shift and then describes five of those experiments in greater detail.
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Character Formation in Online Education: A Guide for Instructors, Administrators, and Accrediting Agencies

Book
Jung, Joanne J.
2015
Zondervan, Grand Rapids, MI
LB1044.87.J845 2015
Topics: Online Learning   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The unfortunate reputation of online education today is one of little or no effort on the professor's part and little or no learning on the student's part. A missing element in much online education is the kind of mutual engagement between student and instructor that provides not only a higher level of learning but also lasting character formation within the student.

...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The unfortunate reputation of online education today is one of little or no effort on the professor's part and little or no learning on the student's part. A missing element in much online education is the kind of mutual engagement between student and instructor that provides not only a higher level of learning but also lasting character formation within the student.

Character Formation in Online Education stems from author Joanne Jung's years of experience teaching online courses with the aim of improving the teaching environment for professors and the learning environment for students. By replicating, customizing, and incorporating the best and most effective practices of what a great professor does in on-campus classes, reimagined for an online delivery system, Jung shows how a higher level of learning and transformation can be achieved through online learning communities.

Handy and practical, this user-friendly book provides guidance, helpful tools, and effective suggestions for growing learning communities in online courses that are marked by character growth in students—the kind of growth that is central to the mission of Christian higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
To the Reader
Foreword by David Nystrom
Introduction: Rising to the Challenge

Part One: Rising to the Challenge
ch. 1 Log On to Learn: Inspiring Students through and Online Course
ch. 2 Charting a Course: Basics to Developing an Online Course
ch. 3 Partnerships That Deliver: Tag-Teaming with a Course Designer

Part Two: Elements of Online Character Formation
ch. 4 Taking Online Classroom Technology to Greater Depths: The Heart and Community
ch. 5 Conversation Friendly: Collaborative Learning Tools
ch. 6 Premium Blend: The Hybrid Course
ch. 7 But I Teach Math! Integrating Faith and Learning
ch. 8 Social Media: Forming Character with 140 Characters

Part Three: Building Better Outcomes
ch. 9 Assessment: It’s about Stewardship

Appendix A: Coming to Terms with Terms
Appendix B: iFLIP catalog
Gratitudes
Notes
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An Intriguing Third Way: Mapping Contextual Education for Curricular Integration

TTR
Wigg-Stevenson, Natalie
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 1 (2016): 41-56
BL41.T4 v.19 no.1
Topics: Course Design   |   Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
This article emerges from the experience of incorporating doctoral students into our Contextual Education (CXE) Program at Emmanuel College (Toronto). This change, I argue, helped us to distinguish more clearly among and thus distinctly orient the different kinds of relationships and theological practices that make up our program towards the often-elusive goal of curricular integration. After outlining a definition of integration, I contextualize that definition in our particular practices at ...
Additional Info:
This article emerges from the experience of incorporating doctoral students into our Contextual Education (CXE) Program at Emmanuel College (Toronto). This change, I argue, helped us to distinguish more clearly among and thus distinctly orient the different kinds of relationships and theological practices that make up our program towards the often-elusive goal of curricular integration. After outlining a definition of integration, I contextualize that definition in our particular practices at Emmanuel College using Kathryn Tanner's (1997) understanding of theology as a cultural practice as my guide. I then offer a brief overview of our CXE Programs to demonstrate how nurturing strategic partnerships within them has made certain forms of integration possible for our students. I close with some activities for practical application in other CXE contexts.
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Learning Pastoral Imagination: A Five-Year Report On How New Ministers Learn in Practice

Journal Issue
Scharen, Christin A.B. and Campbell-Reed, Eileen R.
2016
Auburn Studies (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY 2016)
BV4070.A8 A1 2016 no. 21
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
To lead with courage and pastoral wisdom in the twenty-first century requires ministers to make a transition from simply imagining ministry to embodying pastoral imagination. The relational and embodied capacity for ministry, what Craig Dykstra first called pastoral imagination, emerges over time and remains indispensable for effective pastoral leadership in congregations and community ministries.

We find through listening to ministry leaders across the country that ministry today is ...
Additional Info:
To lead with courage and pastoral wisdom in the twenty-first century requires ministers to make a transition from simply imagining ministry to embodying pastoral imagination. The relational and embodied capacity for ministry, what Craig Dykstra first called pastoral imagination, emerges over time and remains indispensable for effective pastoral leadership in congregations and community ministries.

We find through listening to ministry leaders across the country that ministry today is less about exercising the authority of an office or role and more about embodying an authentic contextual wisdom only gained by daily practice of leadership on the long arc of learning ministry.

Yet few studies of learning over time have been conducted, leading to this unique, broadly ecumenical, and national study of learning ministry in practice.

In this five-year report, we describe the experiences of a cohort of 50 diverse ministers from across the United States, recruited from 10 theological schools ranging from Pentecostal to Eastern Orthodox and coming from many different denominational traditions.

This study deepens engagement of Auburn research on patterns of teaching and learning in theological education, offering a dynamic view into the formation of faith leaders for the twenty-first century. (From the Publisher)
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Portfolio to Go: 1000+ Reflective Writing Prompts and Provocations for Clinical Learners

Book
Peterkin, Allan D.
2016
University of Toronto Press, Toronto
R119.P48 2016
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Student Portfolios

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Preparing a learning portfolio has become a mandatory part of the course work in most clinical professions. Students and educators alike sometimes complain that these mandatory assignments become repetitive and uninspired. However, we all need to be able to speak and write clearly as we work with our colleagues, students and those we care for.

In Portfolio To Go, Allan D. ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Preparing a learning portfolio has become a mandatory part of the course work in most clinical professions. Students and educators alike sometimes complain that these mandatory assignments become repetitive and uninspired. However, we all need to be able to speak and write clearly as we work with our colleagues, students and those we care for.

In Portfolio To Go, Allan D. Peterkin insists that reflective capacity, critical thinking, creative expression, and narrative competence are attributes that should be developed in every health professional – regardless of the discipline or specialty. Trainees will find over 1000 prompts organized under themes highly relevant to students and educators, including those not formally addressed in class, such as coping with uncertainty and ambiguity, team conflict, and resilience through good self-care. Practical tips for writing effectively and for discussing and evaluating narratives in a helpful, respective manner are provided throughout. Peterkin is a pioneer in emphasizing patient-centred, humanistic care and Portfolio To Go will help to train and develop more reflective practitioners. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction - Some Background on Reflective Capacity

ch. 1 Why We Write (and How We Can Do It Better)
ch. 2 What Can My Reflective Portfolio Be?
ch. 3 Finding Optimal Conditions to Write and Reflect
ch. 4 Getting Started: Learning as a Journey - Writing Prompts
ch. 5 Using Writing Prompts and Storytelling to Maximize Growth and Reflection
ch. 6 Communication - Writing Prompts
ch. 7 Collaboration and Teamwork - Writing Prompts
ch. 8 Conflict - Writing Prompts
ch. 9 The Personal Narrative Reflection Tool – Steps for Enhancing Critical Reflection in your Portfolio Entries
ch. 10 The Patient or Client as Person - Writing Prompts
ch. 11 Diversity Culture Equity - Writing Prompts
ch. 12 Social Justice/ Advocacy - Writing Prompts
ch. 13 From Portfolio to Action: Practical Strategies for Practicing Narrative-Based Care
ch. 14 Well-Being and the Clinician as a Person - Writing Prompts
ch. 15 Ambiguity/ Uncertainty - Writing Prompts
ch. 16 Career Satisfaction - Writing Prompts
ch. 17 Battling the Inner Critic - How to Stay Open when you Reflect and Write
ch. 18 Personal Reflections - Writing Prompts
ch. 19 Elements of Critical Written Reflection
ch. 20 Sample Course Guidelines – USCF LEAP and Reflection on Action Rubric (UCSF)
ch. 21 The Body - Writing Prompts
ch. 22 Things to Consider when Forming a Reflective Writing Group
ch. 23 Professionalism and Ethics - Writing Prompts
ch. 24 Values, Beliefs and Assumptions - Writing Prompts
ch. 25 Toward a More In-depth Assessment of Reflective Writing Evaluation – How do Professors Grade Your Assignments?
ch. 26 Hidden Curriculum and Power - Writing Prompts
ch. 27 Am I a Good Group Member? Positive Characteristics
ch. 28 Dilemmas and Difficult Stories - Writing Prompts
  ch. 29 Sample Discussion Points when Working with Students
ch. 30 For Teachers and Student Leaders
ch. 31 A Sample Narrative Reflection Workshop Evaluation
ch. 32 Creativity - Writing Prompts
ch. 33 Graphic Medicine - Reflecting Without Words
ch. 34 Getting Published - Common Themes that Predict Success
  ch. 35 Guidelines for Narrative Accountability when Writing about Patients / Clients
ch. 36 Finding Publishing Opportunities
ch. 37 A Few Words on Blogging and Social Media
ch. 38 Other Writing and Healing References
ch. 39 Author Biography
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Coffee Hour Role Play

Tactic
Jorgensen, David W.
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 1 (2017): 66
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 1
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a warm-up exercise requiring students to recall and synthesize course material by selecting what is applicable to a practical pastoral care setting that they might reasonably expect to encounter.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: a warm-up exercise requiring students to recall and synthesize course material by selecting what is applicable to a practical pastoral care setting that they might reasonably expect to encounter.
Additional Info:
Sexual activity and desire have often been seen as inimical to Christian spirituality and practice, and many people have come to view Christianity as austere and shaming regarding sexuality. However, sexuality, religion, and policy-making have become so intertwined, that to ignore how they intersect and affect particular individuals' lives does a disservice to students. This article presents resources and strategies for incorporating the topic of sexuality into liberal undergraduate and ...
Additional Info:
Sexual activity and desire have often been seen as inimical to Christian spirituality and practice, and many people have come to view Christianity as austere and shaming regarding sexuality. However, sexuality, religion, and policy-making have become so intertwined, that to ignore how they intersect and affect particular individuals' lives does a disservice to students. This article presents resources and strategies for incorporating the topic of sexuality into liberal undergraduate and graduate theological classrooms. It provides guidance to instructors lacking research expertise in sexuality and focuses on three main pedagogical categories: perspective transformation; embodiment pedagogy; and sexual violence and trauma. One purpose of this article is to generate conversation: there is a need for further collaboration with colleagues who are experts in various disciplines to continue mining resources to offer diverse strategies and resources.
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Integrating Work in Theological Education

Book
Cahalan, Kathleen A.; Foley, Edward; Mikoski, Gordon S., eds.
2017
Wipf & Stock Publishers, Eugene, OR
BV4022.I68 2017
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
If only we could do a better job of helping students at "connecting the dots," theological educators commonly lament. Integration, often proposed as a solution to the woes of professional education for ministry, would help students integrate knowledge, skills, spirituality, and integrity. When these remain disconnected, incompetence ensues, and the cost runs high for churches, denominations, and ministers themselves.

However, we fail ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
If only we could do a better job of helping students at "connecting the dots," theological educators commonly lament. Integration, often proposed as a solution to the woes of professional education for ministry, would help students integrate knowledge, skills, spirituality, and integrity. When these remain disconnected, incompetence ensues, and the cost runs high for churches, denominations, and ministers themselves.

However, we fail in thinking that integrating work is for students alone. It is a multifaceted, constructive process of learning that is contextual, reflective, and dialogical. It aims toward important ends--competent leaders who can guide Christian communities today. It entails rhythms, not stages, and dynamic movement, including disintegration. Integrating work is learning in motion, across domains, and among and between persons. It is social and communal, born of a life of learning together for faculty, staff, administrators and students. It is work that bridges the long-standing gaps between school, ministry practice, and life. It's a verb, not a noun.

Here a diverse group of theological educators, through descriptive case studies, theological reflection, and theory building, offer a distinctive contribution to understanding integrating work and how best to achieve it across three domains: in community, curriculums, and courses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward (Stephen R. Graham)
Contributors
Introducing Integrating Work (Kathleen A. Cahalan)

Part I: Schools
ch. 1 Widening the Aperture: School as Agent of the Integrating Process (Edward Foley)
ch. 2 What's Love got to Do with It? Faculty Development in a Community of Practice (Revecca Slough)
ch. 3 Integrating Foci in a School's Renewal Process (David Rylaarsdam)
ch. 4 The Ecosystem of Theological Education: A Case Study (Edward Foley)
ch. 5 Harvesting Insights (Edward Foley)
Part 2: Curriculums
ch. 6 Integrating Dynamics in the Seminary Curriculum (Kathleen A. Cahalan)
ch. 7 Overhauling the Curriculum: A Rhetorical Model of Integrating Work (David Rylaarsdam)
ch. 8 The Professor-Practitioner Program and Field Education (Jeffrey D. Jones)
ch. 9 Satisfying Grace in the Integrating Work of Contextual Education (David O. Jenkins)
ch. 10 Harvesting Insights (Kathleen A. Cahalan)
Part 3: Courses
ch. 11 Integrating Work at the Course Level (Gordon S. Mikoski)
ch. 12 Using Adaptive Leadership in Redesigning a Leadership Course (Emily Click)
ch. 13 A Travel Seminar and the Unfamiliar Self (David O. Jenkins)
ch. 14 Creating a New Course on Leadership in the Small Church (Jeffray D. Jones)
ch. 15 The Pain of Racial Differences Emerges in the Introductory Integrating Course (Jeffrey L Tribble, Sr.)
ch. 16 Online Teaching and the Challenges of Integrating (Edward Foley)
ch. 17 Harvesting Insights (Gordon S. Mikoski)
Part 4: Frameworks
ch. 18 Conceptual Models and Theological Frameworks for Thinking about Integrating Work (Gordon S. Mikoski) ch. 19 Integrative Knowing and Practical Wisdom (Kathleen A. Calahan)
ch. 20 The Integrating Task: A Theological Reflection (Edward Foley)
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How Youth Ministry Can Change Theological Education - If We Let It

Book
Dean, Kenda Creasy, and Hearlson, Christy Lang, eds.
2016
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
BV4163.H69 2016
Topics: Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Since 1993, forty-nine theological seminaries have created opportunities for high school students to participate in on-campus High School Theology Programs (HSTPs) that invite them to engage in serious biblical and theological study. Many of the young people who take part in these programs go on to become pastoral or lay leaders in their churches. What has made these programs so successful — especially given the well-documented "crisis of faith" among young people ...
Additional Info:
Since 1993, forty-nine theological seminaries have created opportunities for high school students to participate in on-campus High School Theology Programs (HSTPs) that invite them to engage in serious biblical and theological study. Many of the young people who take part in these programs go on to become pastoral or lay leaders in their churches. What has made these programs so successful — especially given the well-documented "crisis of faith" among young people today?

In this book thirteen contributors — many of whom have created or led one of these innovative theology programs — investigate answers to this question. They examine the pedagogical practices the HSTPs have in common and explore how they are contributing to the leadership of the church. They then show how the lessons gleaned from these successful programs can help churches, denominations, and seminaries reimagine both theological education and youth ministry.

Table Of Content:
PART ONE
A More Excellent Way: Vocational Discernment as a Practice of Christian Community
Ch 1. Taste Tests and Teenagers: Vocational Discernment as a Creative Social Practice (Kenda Creasy Dean and Christy Lang Hearlson)
Ch 2. Calling as Creative Process: Wicked Questions for Theological Education (Kenda Creasy Dean and Christy Lang Hearlson)

PART TWO
MORE THAN A JOB FAIR: CREATING CULTURES OF VOCATIONAL DISCERNMENT
Ch 3. Catalyzing Community: Forming the Community as Catechist (Anabel Proffitt and Jacquie Church Young)
Ch 4. Give Me Mentors: Pedagogies of Spiritual Accompaniment (Anne Streaty Wimberly)
Ch 5. Holy Noticing: The Power of Nominations and Commissioning for Missional Formation (Katherine M. Douglass)
Ch 6. Taking It Home: Separation and Reintegration as Teachable Moments (Christy Lang Hearlson)

PART THREE
More Than Summer Camp: Adventures in Vocational Pedagogies
Ch 7. Getting All Turned Around: Truth, Disruption, and Reorientation in High School Teology Programs (Andrew Brubacher Kaethler)
Ch 8. Fuel My Faith: Padagogies of Theological Reflection in High School Theoloogy Programs (Jeffrey Kaster)
Ch 9. The Formative Power of Awe: Pedagogies of Worship and Wonder (Fred Edie)
Ch 10. Prepare Me for a Worthy Adventure: Pedagogies of Pilgrimage in Adolescent Formation (David Horn)
Ch 11. Let Me Try: Experiential Learning in the Theological Formation of Young People (Judy Steers)

PART FOUR
More than Teenagers: Vocational Discernment in the Lives of Program Staff, Faculty, and Theological Institutions
Ch 12. Becoming Christ's Hands and Feet in the World: The Vocational Formation of Staff (Elizabeth W. Corrie)
Ch 13. Teaching in a New Key: The Pedagogical Formation of Theological Faculty (Brent A. Strawn)
Ch 14. Hitting It Out of the Park: Why Churches Need Farm Teams (Kenda Creasy Dean)

Appendixes

Index
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Addressing the Economic challenges Facing Future Ministers

Journal Issue
2017
Theological Education 51, no. 1, 2017 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.51
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2017-theological-education-v51-n1.pdf
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Grading Matters in Theological Education

TTR
Blodgett, Barbara J.
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 4 (2017): 314-326
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Adult Learners   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Grading systems matter more to the teaching and learning enterprise than many teachers may realize, as demonstrated in the author's experience of adopting a new one. Different systems emphasize different values such as excellence vs. perfection, achievement vs. talent, and second chances vs. partial credit. The author relates her experiment with specifications grading, an outcome‐based, pass/fail, rubric‐based, and contractual grading system, and demonstrates its promise. She then ...
Additional Info:
Grading systems matter more to the teaching and learning enterprise than many teachers may realize, as demonstrated in the author's experience of adopting a new one. Different systems emphasize different values such as excellence vs. perfection, achievement vs. talent, and second chances vs. partial credit. The author relates her experiment with specifications grading, an outcome‐based, pass/fail, rubric‐based, and contractual grading system, and demonstrates its promise. She then addresses three questions her experiment raised: Should I grade at all and if so, toward what end? Exactly what am I grading when I grade? and Is there any way to lessen the sting of failure?