Mentoring Students

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Supervising the PhD: A Guide to Success

Book
Delamont, Sara, Paul Atkinson, and Odette Parry
1997
Open University Press, Philadelphia, PA
LB2386.D45 1997
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This guide to supervising doctoral research is a practical handbook for both the novice and the experienced higher degree supervisor. It looks at how to get students to produce good PhD theses on time, and how to prevent failed theses. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This guide to supervising doctoral research is a practical handbook for both the novice and the experienced higher degree supervisor. It looks at how to get students to produce good PhD theses on time, and how to prevent failed theses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface and acknowledgements

ch. 1 A most persuasive piece of argument
ch. 2 Caught and held by a cobweb: getting the student started
ch. 3 The balance between tradition and progress: designing and planning a project
ch. 4 Old manuscripts: the literature review
ch. 5 Heavy and thankless task: overseeing the data collection
ch. 6 Disagreeableness and danger: keeping up the student's motivation
ch. 7 Contorted corkscrew: the getting and giving of judgement
ch. 8 An emotional excitement: writing up the thesis
ch. 9 A lack of genuine interest: choosing the right external and preparing the student for the examination
ch. 10 The brave pretence at confidence: launching the student's career
ch. 11 A rather unpromising consignment: selecting successful students and building a research culture

Appendix: Further reading
References
Index
The Society for Research into Higher Education
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Motivation from Within: Approaches for Encouraging Faculty and Students to Excel

Book
Theall, Michael, ed.
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1025.2.M68 1999
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Motivation is not something one "does to" someone else--good motivational practice requires that we engage others in a common quest. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Motivation is not something one "does to" someone else--good motivational practice requires that we engage others in a common quest. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Motivation and Diversity
Motivation and Diversity: A Framework for Teaching.
Student Motivation and Epistemological Beliefs (Michael B. Paulsen & Kenneth A. Feldman).
Motivation for Higher-Order Learning (Janet G. Donald).

Motivation and Methods
Using the ARCS Motivational Process in Computer-Based Instruction and Distance Education (John M. Keller).
CORE Elements of Student Motivation in Problem-Based Learning (Marjorie M. MacKinnon).
The Motivational Benefits of Cooperative Learning (Theodore Panitz)

Motivation and The Institution
Faculty Motivation: The Role of Supportive Teaching Culture (Kenneth A. Feldman & Michael B. Paulsen).
Motivation in Interdisciplinary Programs (Edward B. Nuhfer).
Institutional Improvement and Motivated Faculty: A Case Study (Donald W. Farmer).

Conclusion
What Have We Learned? A Synthesis and Some Guidelines for Effective Motivation in Higher Education (Michael Theall & Jennifer Franklin)
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Beyond Theological Tourism: Mentoring as a Grassroots Approach to Theological Education

Book
Thistlethwaite, Susan B. and George F. Cairns
1994
Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY
BV4070.C489B48 1994
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Since the early days of liberation theology, Northern Hemisphere theological education has used the phrase "solidarity with the oppressed" to denote the religiously and morally appropriate response to situations of violence and oppression. Yet efforts to inculcate solidarity of heart and mind often devolve into a kind of "theological tourism" wherein professors and students visit oppressed communities without truly participating as subjects in the subjectivity of the marginalized. Beyond Theological ...
Additional Info:
Since the early days of liberation theology, Northern Hemisphere theological education has used the phrase "solidarity with the oppressed" to denote the religiously and morally appropriate response to situations of violence and oppression. Yet efforts to inculcate solidarity of heart and mind often devolve into a kind of "theological tourism" wherein professors and students visit oppressed communities without truly participating as subjects in the subjectivity of the marginalized. Beyond Theological Tourism shows how one group of theological teacher-mentors and students attempt to overcome the limits of visits as "tourists of the revolution" to exotic locations. Starting from the challenge of Robert Evans of the Plowshares Institute, a group of Chicago-based Christians struggled with new modes of education for prospective ministers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

ch. 1 Beyond Theological Tourism
ch. 2 Stand by Me
ch. 3 Globalization in the Hyde Park Seminaries: A History in Process
ch. 4 Education for Ministry in an Urbanized World: The Chicago Connection
ch. 5 The Theory and Practice of Transformative Education: The Chicago Mentoring Model
ch. 6 Ministry on the Boundaries: Cooperation without Exploitation
ch. 7 Ministry with Persons in Female Prostitution
ch. 8 A Matter of Homelessness
ch. 9 Theological Reflection in the Community Based Model
ch. 10 Mentoring for Transformation
ch. 11 Individual and Social Transformation

Appendixes
Notes
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Teaching through Academic Advising: A Faculty Perspective

Book
Reinarz, Alice G. and Eric R. White, eds.
1995
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 62)
LB2343.T42 1995
Topics: Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
This volume in the New Directions for Teaching and Learning Series offers faculty writings on academic advising as a form of teaching. The issue examines several facets of advising including the university's role in supporting advising as an educational tool, faculty advisors as mentors, the relationship between advising and student assessment, and suggestions for faculty who want to improve their mastery of advising. Advising in specific academic areas such as ...
Additional Info:
This volume in the New Directions for Teaching and Learning Series offers faculty writings on academic advising as a form of teaching. The issue examines several facets of advising including the university's role in supporting advising as an educational tool, faculty advisors as mentors, the relationship between advising and student assessment, and suggestions for faculty who want to improve their mastery of advising. Advising in specific academic areas such as humanities, sciences, and social sciences are included. Also, the volume includes a discussion of the unique advising needs of specialized student groups such as honor students, first year students, and members of ethnic or cultural minorities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Educating the whole person (Robert M. Berdahl)
ch. 2 Faculty speak to advising (James Kelly)
ch. 3 Advising special populations of students (Diane W. Strommer)
ch. 4 Professional development and training for faculty advisers (Carol C. Ryan)
ch. 5 Advising in the arts: Some thoughts and observations for arts advisers (William J. Kelly)
ch. 6 Social science advising (Gilbert Geis, Ted L. Huston)
ch. 7 The role of faculty advising in science and engineering (J.R. Cogdell)
ch. 8 Advising women considering nontraditional fields of study (Leodocia M. Pope)
ch. 9 Faculty as mentors (Jeanne M. Lagowski, James W. Vick)
ch. 10 Academic advising and assessment (Gary R. Hanson, Christine Huston)
ch. 11 The professional status of teachers and academic advisers: It matters (Barbara K. Wade, Edgar P. Yoder)
ch. 12 Resources for academic advising (Virginia N. Gordon)
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"Social Vision and Moral Courage: Mentoring a New Generation"

Article
Parks, Sharon Daloz
1990
Cross Currents 40, no. 3 (1990): 351-367
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Wabash tree

Mentor: Guiding the Journey of Adult Learners

Book
Daloz, Laurent A.
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5225.M45D35 1999
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Drawing on the myth of Mentor as companion and advisor to Odysseus, preeminent educational mentoring expert Laurent A. Daloz uses the metaphor of the mythic journey as a way of making sense of life's changes. He looks closely at what good teachers and mentors actually do, and inspires post-secondary educators to think of their work in fresh new ways. This classic, beautifully written work has been newly updated and is ...
Additional Info:
Drawing on the myth of Mentor as companion and advisor to Odysseus, preeminent educational mentoring expert Laurent A. Daloz uses the metaphor of the mythic journey as a way of making sense of life's changes. He looks closely at what good teachers and mentors actually do, and inspires post-secondary educators to think of their work in fresh new ways. This classic, beautifully written work has been newly updated and is available for the first time in paperback. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Adult Learning As Development
First Shards: The Search for Meaning as a Motive for Learning.
Mentors, Myths, and Metamorphosis: Education as a Transformational Journey.
Maps of Transformation: How Adults Change and Develop.

Learning As A Transformative Journey
The Deep and Savage Way: The Unsettling First Steps of an Educational Journey.
The Dynamic of Transformation: How Learning Changes the Learner.
Returning Home: Helping Adults Integrate New Insights.

Fostering Adult Learning
The Ecology of Adult Learning: Barriers and Incentives to Learning and Growth.
The Yoda Factor: Guiding Adults Through Difficult Transitions.
The Art of the Mentor: Limits and Possibilities.
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Wabash tree

Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Young Adults in Their Search For Meaning,Purpose, and Faith

Book
Daloz Parks, Sharon
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
BL42.P37 2000
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
A smart, compassionate look at the important and often bewildering questions young adults face in their search for purpose, meaning and faith, and a clarion call to concerned adults to actively mentor the next generation. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A smart, compassionate look at the important and often bewildering questions young adults face in their search for purpose, meaning and faith, and a clarion call to concerned adults to actively mentor the next generation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Young Adulthood in a Changing World: Promise and Vulnerability.
ch. 2 Meaning and Faith.
ch. 3 Becoming at Home in the Universe.
ch. 4 It Matters How We Think.
ch. 5 It All DepAnds . . . . On Belonging.
ch. 6 Imagination: The Power of Adult Faith.
ch. 7 The Gifts of a Mentoring Environment.
ch. 8 Mentoring Communities: Higher Education: A Community of Imagination
ch. 9 Culture as Mentor.

Notes.
The Author.
Index.
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"Vanishing Boundaries: When Teaching About Religion Becomes Spiritual Guidance in the Classroom"

TTR
Simmons, John K.
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 1 (2006): 37-43
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Mentoring Students   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
This article revisits the pedagogical dilemma of maintaining neutrality in the religious studies/theology classroom. I argue that if the boundary between teaching about religion and actually teaching spirituality seems to be vanishing, it is because the boundary was inappropriately constructed in the first place. To the extent that the religious concepts, even when compressed into religious studies categories, inherently inspire personal transformation, how can a boundary exist between the ...
Additional Info:
This article revisits the pedagogical dilemma of maintaining neutrality in the religious studies/theology classroom. I argue that if the boundary between teaching about religion and actually teaching spirituality seems to be vanishing, it is because the boundary was inappropriately constructed in the first place. To the extent that the religious concepts, even when compressed into religious studies categories, inherently inspire personal transformation, how can a boundary exist between the ideas students encounter and the power of those ideas to transform? Spiritual guidance emerges naturally in the academic study of religion, and those of us who teach in the field might as well get used to it. In explaining my position, I draw on my experience as a teaching assistant in Professor Walter Capps's course, "Religion and the Impact of the Vietnam War." I, then, develop a pragmatic teaching strategy, neutral enthusiasm, which preserves the important neutrality of classroom presentation in religious studies courses, yet recognizes the unavoidable evocative power present in the intellectual territory that is religion. Neutral enthusiasm allows the content to do the work.
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"Echo's Lament: Teaching, Mentoring, and the Danger of Narcissistic Pedagogy"

TTR
Hess, Carol Lakey
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 127-137
BL41.T4
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
In this essay, I explore "narcissistic pedagogy," a pedagogy that centers disproportionately on the needs of the teacher – especially the need for admiration. I engage psychological discussions of narcissistic patterns, and I retell the ancient myth of Narcissus. The core of narcissistic pedagogy is that the teacher experiences students not as centers of their own activity but as part of the teacher's self. All educational situations are vulnerable to narcissistic ...
Additional Info:
In this essay, I explore "narcissistic pedagogy," a pedagogy that centers disproportionately on the needs of the teacher – especially the need for admiration. I engage psychological discussions of narcissistic patterns, and I retell the ancient myth of Narcissus. The core of narcissistic pedagogy is that the teacher experiences students not as centers of their own activity but as part of the teacher's self. All educational situations are vulnerable to narcissistic dynamics, and I will consider strongly narcissistic pedagogy as well as milder narcissistic dangers. I will, additionally, explore healthy narcissism. I pose "conversational education" as an alternative to narcissistic patterns.
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"Rethinking the Educational Practices of Biblical Doctoral Studies"

TTR
Fiorenza, Elisabeth Schüssler
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 65-75
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Mentoring Students   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
The paper explores the impact of the change in populations, the impact of electronic communication, and the multiplicity of methodological approaches on the ethos and practices of biblical studies. It proposes a rhetorical emancipatory educational paradigm and explores its possibilities for the professional education of biblical scholars on the doctoral level. Since both college and seminary teachers are shaped in and through their doctoral studies, it is necessary to focus ...
Additional Info:
The paper explores the impact of the change in populations, the impact of electronic communication, and the multiplicity of methodological approaches on the ethos and practices of biblical studies. It proposes a rhetorical emancipatory educational paradigm and explores its possibilities for the professional education of biblical scholars on the doctoral level. Since both college and seminary teachers are shaped in and through their doctoral studies, it is necessary to focus on doctoral education in order to address the growing recognition that the discipline of biblical studies in its present form needs to cultivate transformative intellectuals who are not only at home in the academy but also can critically intervene in the public discourses and uses of the Bible in religious communities, democratic publics, or global inter-religious relations.
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"'Can We Talk?': Boundary Crossing and Sexual Misconduct in Seminary Teaching"

TTR
Ashby Jr., Homer U. and Carol Hepokoski
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 2 (2002): 80-89
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Mentoring Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This article explores a variety of personal and professional boundary issues encountered by seminary faculty. The authors contend that boundary crossing is inevitable in contemporary theological education, which is structured such that professors engage in multiple roles with students as they attend to the education of the whole person. Guidelines are reviewed for minimizing risk to students and professors. Topics include life as a community member, student-faculty friendship, and romantic ...
Additional Info:
This article explores a variety of personal and professional boundary issues encountered by seminary faculty. The authors contend that boundary crossing is inevitable in contemporary theological education, which is structured such that professors engage in multiple roles with students as they attend to the education of the whole person. Guidelines are reviewed for minimizing risk to students and professors. Topics include life as a community member, student-faculty friendship, and romantic relationships. Attention to work/life balance is seen as critical to the prevention of misconduct. The article ends with a call for continued conversation as well as institutional accountability and change.
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Working One-to-One with Students: Supervising, Coaching, Mentoring, and Personal Tutoring

Book
Wisker, Gina, Kate Exley, Maria Antoniou & Pauline Ridley
2008
Routledge, Taylor & Francis, New York
LB1031.W65 2008
Topics: Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Working One-to-One with Students is written for Higher Education academics, adjuncts, teaching assistants and research students who are looking for guidance inside and outside the classroom. This book is a jargon-free, practical guide to improving one-to-one teaching, covering a wide range of teaching contexts, including mentoring students and staff, supervising dissertations and how to approach informal meetings outside of lectures. Written in an engaging, accessible style and grounded in experience, ...
Additional Info:
Working One-to-One with Students is written for Higher Education academics, adjuncts, teaching assistants and research students who are looking for guidance inside and outside the classroom. This book is a jargon-free, practical guide to improving one-to-one teaching, covering a wide range of teaching contexts, including mentoring students and staff, supervising dissertations and how to approach informal meetings outside of lectures. Written in an engaging, accessible style and grounded in experience, this book offers a combination of practical advice backed by relevant learning theory. Featuring a wealth of case studies and useful resources, the book covers areas including:
º Supporting students
º Encouraging independent learning Mentoring coaching and personal tutoring
º Developing peer groups and buddying programmes
º Dealing with diversity, difficult students and ethical dilemmas
º Supervising the undergraduate dissertation
º Supervising postgraduates in the arts, social sciences and sciences.
This book is a short, snappy, practical guide that covers this key element of a lecturer's work. In the spirit of the series (KEY GUIDES FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING in HIGHER EDUCATION) this book covers relevant theory that effectively informs practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction Supervising, mentoring, coaching and personal tutoring: working one-to-one with students

ch. 1 An introduction to the skills and the roles: Coaching, mentoring, supervising and personal tutoring
ch. 2 Coaching skills and supporting learners: Generic skills for one-to-one work
ch. 3 Personal tutoring
ch. 4 Mentoring, work-based and community placement support
ch. 5 Supervising projects and dissertations
ch. 6 Dealing with diversity 1
ch. 7 Dealing with diversity 2: Academic advice, disability and mental health
ch. 8 Supervising and supporting students one-to-one at a distance
ch. 9 Helping students help themselves: Peer support
ch. 10 Supervising postgraduates in the Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities
ch. 11 Supervising postgraduates in the Sciences, Engineering and Medicine

Bibliography
Index
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Wabash tree

What the Best College Students Do

Book
Bain, Ken
2012
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LA229.B24 2012
Topics: Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
The author of the best-selling What the Best College Teachers Do is back with more humane, doable, and inspiring help, this time for students who want to get the most out of college—and every other educational enterprise, too.

The first thing they should do? Think beyond the transcript. The creative, successful people profiled in this book—college graduates who went on to change the world we live ...
Additional Info:
The author of the best-selling What the Best College Teachers Do is back with more humane, doable, and inspiring help, this time for students who want to get the most out of college—and every other educational enterprise, too.

The first thing they should do? Think beyond the transcript. The creative, successful people profiled in this book—college graduates who went on to change the world we live in—aimed higher than straight A’s. They used their four years to cultivate habits of thought that would enable them to grow and adapt throughout their lives.

Combining academic research on learning and motivation with insights drawn from interviews with people who have won Nobel Prizes, Emmys, fame, or the admiration of people in their field, Ken Bain identifies the key attitudes that distinguished the best college students from their peers. These individuals started out with the belief that intelligence and ability are expandable, not fixed. This led them to make connections across disciplines, to develop a “meta-cognitive” understanding of their own ways of thinking, and to find ways to negotiate ill-structured problems rather than simply looking for right answers. Intrinsically motivated by their own sense of purpose, they were not demoralized by failure nor overly impressed with conventional notions of success. These movers and shakers didn’t achieve success by making success their goal. For them, it was a byproduct of following their intellectual curiosity, solving useful problems, and taking risks in order to learn and grow. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The Roots of Success
ch. 2 What Makes an Expert?
ch. 3 Managing Yourself
ch. 4 Learning How to Embrace Failure
ch. 5 Messy Problems
ch. 6 Encouragement
ch. 7 Curiosity and Endless Education
ch. 8 Making the Hard Choices

Epilogue
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
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Interpersonal Boundaries in Teaching and Learning

Book
Schwartz, Harriet L., ed.
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 131)
LB1033.I584 2012
Topics: Adult Learners   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
New Directions for Teaching & Learning, Number 131 While issues of interpersonal boundaries between faculty and students is not new, more recent influences such as evolving technology and current generational differences have created a new set of dilemmas. How do we set appropriate expectations regarding e-mail response time in a twenty-four-hour, seven-day-a-week Internet-connected culture? How do we maintain our authority with a generation that views the syllabus as negotiable? Complex questions about ...
Additional Info:
New Directions for Teaching & Learning, Number 131 While issues of interpersonal boundaries between faculty and students is not new, more recent influences such as evolving technology and current generational differences have created a new set of dilemmas. How do we set appropriate expectations regarding e-mail response time in a twenty-four-hour, seven-day-a-week Internet-connected culture? How do we maintain our authority with a generation that views the syllabus as negotiable? Complex questions about power, positionality, connection, distance, and privacy underlie these decision points. This sourcebook provides an in-depth look at interpersonal boundaries between faculty and students, giving consideration to the deeper contextual factors and power dynamics that inform how we set, adjust, and maintain boundaries as educators. This is the 131st volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. New Directions for Teaching and Learning offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. From the Publisher

Table Of Content:
Editor's Note

ch. 1 Boundaries and Student Self-Disclosure in Authentic, Integrated Learning Activities and Assignments (Melanie Booth)
ch. 2 Managing Boundaries in the Web 2.0 Classroom (Bree McEwan)
ch. 3 Millennial Values and Boundaries in the Classroom (Chip Espinoza)
ch. 4 We're All Adults Here: Clarifying and Maintaining Boundaries with Adult Learners (Melanie Booth, Harriet L. Schwartz)
ch. 5 The Coconut and the Peach: Understanding, Establishing, and Maintaining Interpersonal Boundaries with International Students (Miki Yamashita, Harriet L. Schwartz)
ch. 6 Complicity or Multiplicity? Defining Boundaries for Graduate Teaching Assistant Success (Karen Dunn-Haley, Anne Zanzucchi)
ch. 7 Crossing Boundaries in Doctoral Education: Relational Learning, Cohort Communities, and Dissertation Committees (Elizabeth L. Holloway, Laurien Alexandre)
ch. 8 Reflections and Intention: Interpersonal Boundaries in Teaching and Learning (Harriet L. Schwartz)

Index
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Make Yourself a Teacher: Rabbinic Tales of Mentors and Disciples

Book
Handleman, Susan
2011
University of Washing Press, Seattle Washington
BM496.9.T43 H36 2011
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
National Jewish Book Award finalist in Contemporary Jewish Life and Practice category Make Yourself a Teacher is a teaching book and a book about teaching. It discusses three dramatic, well-known stories about the student and teacher Rabbi Eliezer ben Hyrcanus from the Oral Torah. The stories of R. Eliezer serve as teaching texts and models for reflection on the teacher/student relationship in the Jewish tradition and in contemporary culture, ...
Additional Info:
National Jewish Book Award finalist in Contemporary Jewish Life and Practice category Make Yourself a Teacher is a teaching book and a book about teaching. It discusses three dramatic, well-known stories about the student and teacher Rabbi Eliezer ben Hyrcanus from the Oral Torah. The stories of R. Eliezer serve as teaching texts and models for reflection on the teacher/student relationship in the Jewish tradition and in contemporary culture, with special emphasis on the hevruta mode of Jewish learning, a collaborative process that invites the reader into a dialogue with teachers past and present.

Susan Handelman considers how teacher/student relations sustain and renew the Jewish tradition, especially during troubled times. As a commentary on historical and contemporary educational practices, she asks a range of questions about teaching and learning: What is it that teachers do when they teach? How do knowledge, spirituality, and education relate? What might Jewish models of study and commentary say about how we teach and learn today? Handelman not only presents pedagogical issues that remain controversial in today's debates on education but she also brings the stories themselves to life. Through her readings, the stories beckon us to sit among the sages and be their students.

Susan Handelman is professor of English at Bar-Ilan University, Israel. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Note on Translation and Transliteration of Hebrew
Notes on Notes
Introduction

"I Only Want the Piece Which Is in Your Mouth"
ch. 1 "Torah of the Belly": Rabbi Eliezer Starves for a Teacher
ch. 2 "The Gates of Wounded Feelings"" Rabbi Eliezer Is Banned
ch. 3 "Father! Father! Israel's Chariot and Its Horsemen!": The Passing of Rabbi Eliezer

Epilogue
Notes
Selected Bibliography
Index
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Reflections From The Field: How Coaching Made Us Better Teachers

Book
DeMeulenaere, Eric J.; Cann, Colette N.; McDermott, James E.; and Maline, Chad R.
2013
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB1025.3.D445 2013
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The coaching metaphor first entered the educational literature over twenty-five year ago when Ted Sizer urged classroom teachers to model the pedagogical relationship between coaches and athletes. Yet, since then, educators have rarely drawn direct lessons from the athletic arena for their practice... until now. DeMeulenaere, Cann, Malone and McDermott, in this groundbreaking analysis, explore the implications of athletic coaching for improved pedagogy. ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The coaching metaphor first entered the educational literature over twenty-five year ago when Ted Sizer urged classroom teachers to model the pedagogical relationship between coaches and athletes. Yet, since then, educators have rarely drawn direct lessons from the athletic arena for their practice... until now. DeMeulenaere, Cann, Malone and McDermott, in this groundbreaking analysis, explore the implications of athletic coaching for improved pedagogy. They offer concrete lessons and suggestions for best practices in the classroom. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Winning Has Little to Do With the Score
ch. 3 Commentary on Coach McDermott’s Narrative
ch. 4 The Lie Is More Sinful Than the Score
ch. 5 Commentary on Coach Malone’s Narrative
ch. 6 Learning to Detrack on the Volleyball Court
ch. 7 Commentary on Coach Cann’s Narrative
ch. 8 Lessons from the Soccer Field
ch. 9 Commentary on Coach DeMeulenaere’s Narrative
ch. 10 Reconciliations
ch. 11 Reflections from the Field and Classroom

References
About the Authors
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Hidden Treasures in Theological Education: The Writing Tutor, the Spiritual Director, and Practices of Academic and Spiritual Mentoring

TTR
Yaghjian, Lucretia B.
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 3 (2013): 221-245
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 3
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Mentoring is an important but often overlooked resource in theological education and students' academic and spiritual formation. This essay profiles the mentoring practices and postures of the writing tutor and the spiritual director as exemplars of academic and spiritual mentoring. An extended probe of this analogy affirms the integration of academic and spiritual formation as a core value in theological education; identifies mentoring in theological education as a hidden treasure ...
Additional Info:
Mentoring is an important but often overlooked resource in theological education and students' academic and spiritual formation. This essay profiles the mentoring practices and postures of the writing tutor and the spiritual director as exemplars of academic and spiritual mentoring. An extended probe of this analogy affirms the integration of academic and spiritual formation as a core value in theological education; identifies mentoring in theological education as a hidden treasure fostering this integration and warranting attention as a theological practice; and re-envisions the theological practice of mentoring under the traditional rubric of the “care of souls,” embracing the relational, educational, formational, spiritual, and rhetorical dimensions of this practice.
Additional Info:
Responding To Distressed Students Extensive list of topics, prepared for UC Santa Barbara teaching assistants, with do’s and don’ts in responding to student issues such as anxiety, hazing, depression, eating disorders.
Additional Info:
Responding To Distressed Students Extensive list of topics, prepared for UC Santa Barbara teaching assistants, with do’s and don’ts in responding to student issues such as anxiety, hazing, depression, eating disorders.
Additional Info:
Aimed at students, this site is a user-friendly bulleted list of briefly treated topics, all related to college study skills and how to learn.
Additional Info:
Aimed at students, this site is a user-friendly bulleted list of briefly treated topics, all related to college study skills and how to learn.
Additional Info:
Reviews research and explains several concrete best practices on how to motivate students. Idea Paper no. 1, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Reviews research and explains several concrete best practices on how to motivate students. Idea Paper no. 1, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Personal reflection on the importance of informal moments in the education of students, and the implications for our metaphor of teaching.
Additional Info:
Personal reflection on the importance of informal moments in the education of students, and the implications for our metaphor of teaching.
Additional Info:
Reviews briefly the scope of duties, effective strategies, and necessary skills to achieve effective advising beyond a perfunctory “signatory function.” Includes a brief list of references. Idea Paper no. 3, from the series developed by the Center for faculty Evaluation and development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Reviews briefly the scope of duties, effective strategies, and necessary skills to achieve effective advising beyond a perfunctory “signatory function.” Includes a brief list of references. Idea Paper no. 3, from the series developed by the Center for faculty Evaluation and development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
A clearinghouse with a wealth of publications dealing with undergraduate research and related areas: curriculum, pedagogy, mentoring, program development, and more.
Additional Info:
A clearinghouse with a wealth of publications dealing with undergraduate research and related areas: curriculum, pedagogy, mentoring, program development, and more.
Additional Info:
The ARCS model of motivational design consists of a set of categories of motivational concepts and strategies that are derived from a synthesis of the research on human motivation combined with a review of successful motivational practices. This website provides an overview of the model and cites further research.ARCS stands for attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction.
Additional Info:
The ARCS model of motivational design consists of a set of categories of motivational concepts and strategies that are derived from a synthesis of the research on human motivation combined with a review of successful motivational practices. This website provides an overview of the model and cites further research.ARCS stands for attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction.
Additional Info:
Video. A short video summarizing some of the most important characteristics of students today - how they learn, what they need to learn, their goals, hopes, dreams, what their lives will be like, and what kinds of changes they will experience in their lifetime. Created by Michael Wesch in collaboration with 200 students at Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Video. A short video summarizing some of the most important characteristics of students today - how they learn, what they need to learn, their goals, hopes, dreams, what their lives will be like, and what kinds of changes they will experience in their lifetime. Created by Michael Wesch in collaboration with 200 students at Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Video. Four extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, showing faculty in various disciplines (NOT in religion or theology) addressing the issue of how to foster students’ abilities to integrate learning–over time, across courses, and between academic, personal, and community life.
Additional Info:
Video. Four extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, showing faculty in various disciplines (NOT in religion or theology) addressing the issue of how to foster students’ abilities to integrate learning–over time, across courses, and between academic, personal, and community life.
Additional Info:
Video. Extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, illustrating exemplary practices for developing students understanding, attitudes and capabilities for academic integrity.
Additional Info:
Video. Extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, illustrating exemplary practices for developing students understanding, attitudes and capabilities for academic integrity.
Additional Info:
Nearly a hundred or more citations on the issue of students and plagiarism, especially with international students, compiled by Rebecca Moore Howard, Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University, and specialist in "authorship studies."
Additional Info:
Nearly a hundred or more citations on the issue of students and plagiarism, especially with international students, compiled by Rebecca Moore Howard, Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University, and specialist in "authorship studies."
Additional Info:
Maximizing your educational potential isn't easy; learning effective habits and habits of mind can make a significant difference. Utilize the resources shared here to help yourself achieve all you can. A set of handouts, checklists and short essays to help students adopt effect learning habits (taking notes, studying, time management, etc.)
Additional Info:
Maximizing your educational potential isn't easy; learning effective habits and habits of mind can make a significant difference. Utilize the resources shared here to help yourself achieve all you can. A set of handouts, checklists and short essays to help students adopt effect learning habits (taking notes, studying, time management, etc.)
Additional Info:
Instructors’ attentiveness to the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical environments creates a classroom climate conducive to student engagement with the content and skills of the discipline.
Additional Info:
Instructors’ attentiveness to the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical environments creates a classroom climate conducive to student engagement with the content and skills of the discipline.
Additional Info:
The research on teaching and learning indicates that a student’s personal interaction with an instructor is one of the most important factors affecting his college experience. Office hours can be one of the places where a meaningful exchange of ideas occurs and individual interactions can be fostered.
Additional Info:
The research on teaching and learning indicates that a student’s personal interaction with an instructor is one of the most important factors affecting his college experience. Office hours can be one of the places where a meaningful exchange of ideas occurs and individual interactions can be fostered.
Additional Info:
Learning students’ names may seem trivial but helps with two kinds of interactions that make a significant difference in students’ undergraduate experience: faculty-student interaction and student-student interaction
Additional Info:
Learning students’ names may seem trivial but helps with two kinds of interactions that make a significant difference in students’ undergraduate experience: faculty-student interaction and student-student interaction
Additional Info:
"Threshold concepts" is a concept term gives a name to points in new learning that mark a departure from old ways of viewing the world and entrance into new ways that may be counterintuitive and thus upsetting ("troublesome knowledge") and yet they are ways that must be grasped in order to go forward in learning.
Additional Info:
"Threshold concepts" is a concept term gives a name to points in new learning that mark a departure from old ways of viewing the world and entrance into new ways that may be counterintuitive and thus upsetting ("troublesome knowledge") and yet they are ways that must be grasped in order to go forward in learning.
Additional Info:
Unrealistic expectations: Many students are under the impression that if they have to work hard at something, they must not be talented in that field, and as a result, they should do something else. (Science and Engineering focus. However the principles apply to all domains of learning.)
Additional Info:
Unrealistic expectations: Many students are under the impression that if they have to work hard at something, they must not be talented in that field, and as a result, they should do something else. (Science and Engineering focus. However the principles apply to all domains of learning.)
Additional Info:
The discovery that students don't love the new teacher's content area is one of those school of hard knock lessons.
Additional Info:
The discovery that students don't love the new teacher's content area is one of those school of hard knock lessons.
Additional Info:
When students ask for studying advice, what should we tell them?
Additional Info:
When students ask for studying advice, what should we tell them?
Additional Info:
The story is a familiar one across college campuses:students stay up late into the night cramming weeks’ worth of material into one study session before the big exam, only to forget the material as soon as the exam is over.
Additional Info:
The story is a familiar one across college campuses:students stay up late into the night cramming weeks’ worth of material into one study session before the big exam, only to forget the material as soon as the exam is over.
Additional Info:
Some tips for encouraging your students to come to office hours, and to make their time there more effective
Additional Info:
Some tips for encouraging your students to come to office hours, and to make their time there more effective
Additional Info:
Whether you are a professor, instructor, or graduate student, many students will look up to you. At times, you may find yourself in the position of counseling a student about matters beyond the scope of your official academic relationship.
Additional Info:
Whether you are a professor, instructor, or graduate student, many students will look up to you. At times, you may find yourself in the position of counseling a student about matters beyond the scope of your official academic relationship.
Additional Info:
A helpful list of good practices for writing letters for students
Additional Info:
A helpful list of good practices for writing letters for students
Additional Info:
Some advice from students on striking the right balance between friendly and strict.
Additional Info:
Some advice from students on striking the right balance between friendly and strict.
Additional Info:
Professors articulate appropriate classroom participation practices.
Additional Info:
Professors articulate appropriate classroom participation practices.
Additional Info:
Advice for students on best practices for effective learning and good grades.
Additional Info:
Advice for students on best practices for effective learning and good grades.
Additional Info:
Advice for students, that recording, prioritizing, analyzing, and scheduling your assignments will help you perform better (with less stress) and maximize your learning.
Additional Info:
Advice for students, that recording, prioritizing, analyzing, and scheduling your assignments will help you perform better (with less stress) and maximize your learning.
Additional Info:
Advice for students to get more out of reading: prepare yourself BEFORE your read, demand understanding DURING reading, and be transformed by your learning AFTER you read.
Additional Info:
Advice for students to get more out of reading: prepare yourself BEFORE your read, demand understanding DURING reading, and be transformed by your learning AFTER you read.
Additional Info:
Advice for students on the importance of life-long learning and some things to do to become a better learner now and throughout life.
Additional Info:
Advice for students on the importance of life-long learning and some things to do to become a better learner now and throughout life.
Additional Info:
The developer of the University of Mary (Washington) project "A Domain of One's Own," explains the program’s innovative and expansive understanding of student e-portfolios in a TEDx talk.
Additional Info:
The developer of the University of Mary (Washington) project "A Domain of One's Own," explains the program’s innovative and expansive understanding of student e-portfolios in a TEDx talk.
Additional Info:
Information, web links, and videos explaining "A Domain of One's Own," the University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating.
Additional Info:
Information, web links, and videos explaining "A Domain of One's Own," the University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating.
Cover image

Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty

Book
Cook-Sather, Alison; Bovill, Catherine; and Felten, Peter
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.C647 2014
Topics: Problem-Based Learning   |   Mentoring Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
A guide to developing productive student-faculty partnerships in higher education
Student-faculty partnerships is an innovation that is gaining traction on campuses across the country. There are few established models in this new endeavor, however. Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty offers administrators, faculty, and students both the theoretical grounding and practical guidelines needed to develop student-faculty partnerships that affirm and improve teaching and ...
Additional Info:
A guide to developing productive student-faculty partnerships in higher education
Student-faculty partnerships is an innovation that is gaining traction on campuses across the country. There are few established models in this new endeavor, however. Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty offers administrators, faculty, and students both the theoretical grounding and practical guidelines needed to develop student-faculty partnerships that affirm and improve teaching and learning in higher education.

• Provides theory and evidence to support new efforts in student-faculty partnerships
• Describes various models for creating and supporting such partnerships
• Helps faculty overcome some of the perceived barriers to student-faculty partnerships
• Suggests a range of possible levels of partnership that might be appropriate in different circumstances
• Includes helpful responses to a range of questions as well as advice from faculty, students, and administrators who have hands-on experience with partnership programs

Balancing theory, step-by-step guidelines, expert advice, and practitioner experience, this book is a comprehensive why- and how-to handbook for developing a successful student-faculty partnership program. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Authors

ch. 1 What Are Student-Faculty Partnerships? Our Guiding Principles and Definition
ch. 2 Preliminary Questions about Student-Faculty Partnerships
ch. 3 Partnerships with Students Examples from Individual Faculty
ch. 4 Program-Level Approaches to Student-Faculty Partnerships
ch. 5 Outcomes of Student-Faculty Partnerships Support from Research Literature and Outcomes for Faculty and Students
ch. 6 The Challenges of Student-Faculty Partnerships
ch. 7 Practical Strategies for Developing Student-Faculty Partnerships
ch. 8 Further Questions about Student-Faculty Partnerships
ch. 9 Assessing Processes and Outcomes of Student-Faculty Partnerships
ch. 10 Next Steps . . . Toward a Partnership Movement?

Appendix I: The Ladder of Active Student Participation in Curriculum Design
Appendix II: Guidelines for the Students as Learners and Teachers (SaLT) Program at Bryn Mawr College (Modified for This Volume)
Appendix III: Practical Strategies for Developing Student-led Research Projects From the Students as Change Agents Program, University of Exeter, United Kingdom
References
Index
Cover image

The New Science of Learning: How to Learn in Harmony With Your Brain

Book
Doyle, Terry; and Zakrajesek, Todd
2013
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB1134.D68 2013
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Learning to learn is the key skill for tomorrow. This breakthrough book builds the foundation every student needs, from freshman orientation to graduate school

Recent advances in brain science show that most students’ learning strategies are highly inefficient, ineffective or just plain wrong. While all learning requires effort, better learning does not require more effort, but rather effectively aligning how the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Learning to learn is the key skill for tomorrow. This breakthrough book builds the foundation every student needs, from freshman orientation to graduate school

Recent advances in brain science show that most students’ learning strategies are highly inefficient, ineffective or just plain wrong. While all learning requires effort, better learning does not require more effort, but rather effectively aligning how the brain naturally learns with the demands of your studies. This book shows you what is involved in learning new material, how the human brain processes new information, and what it takes for that information to stick with you even after the test.

Taking a small amount of time to read and act upon the material in this book will prove to be one of the best decisions you can make as a learner. What you discover will change the way you learn in college and will be helpful in your personal and professional life. You live in a world where you will have to be a lifelong learner, constantly updating your skills and changing jobs to compete in the global marketplace. Most college students today will have as many as 10-14 different jobs by age 38. Learning how to learn in harmony with your brain is crucial to your long-term success.

This succinct book explains straightforward strategies for changing how you prepare to learn, engage with your course material, and set about improving recall of newly learned material whenever you need it. This is not another book about study skills and time management strategies, but instead an easy-to-read description of the research about how the human brain learns in a way that you can put into practice right away.

Did you know neuroscientists have shown that memories are made while you sleep, and by studying right before sleeping you can make stronger memories for your information? In this book the authors explain the role that sleep, exercise and your senses play in learning; how memory works and what makes the brain pay attention; the importance of your mindset towards learning and pattern recognition; as well as new breakthroughs in brain science that can enhance your ability to learn new information and make later recall (for tests or everyday life) easier. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword (Jeannie H. Loeb)
Introduction

ch. 1 A New Look at Learning
ch. 2 Sleep, Naps, and Breaks
ch. 3 Exercise and Learning
ch. 4 Using All Your Senses to Learn
ch. 5 Patterns and Learning
ch. 6 Memory
ch. 7 Mindsets Toward Learning
ch. 8 Paying Attention
ch. 9 A Message From the Authors

Appendix
Index
Cover image

Becoming Beholders: Cultivating Sacramental Imagination and Actions in College Classrooms

Book
Eifler, Karen E.; and Landy, Thomas M., eds.
2014
Liturgical Press, Collegeville, MN
BX922.B43 2014
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Mentoring Students   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Catholic colleges and universities have long engaged in conversation about how to fulfill their mission in creative ways across the curriculum. The "sacramental vision" of Catholic higher education posits that God is made manifest in the study of all disciplines.

Becoming Beholders is the first book to share pedagogical strategies about how to do that. Twenty faculty—from many religious backgrounds ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Catholic colleges and universities have long engaged in conversation about how to fulfill their mission in creative ways across the curriculum. The "sacramental vision" of Catholic higher education posits that God is made manifest in the study of all disciplines.

Becoming Beholders is the first book to share pedagogical strategies about how to do that. Twenty faculty—from many religious backgrounds and teaching in fields as varied as chemistry, economics, English, history, mathematics, sociology, and theology—discuss ways that their teaching nourishes students' ability to find the transcendent in their studies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Karen E. Eifler and Thomas M. Landy)

Part I - The Sacramental Imagination as a Theological Perspective
ch. 1 Finding God in All Things: A Sacramental Worldview and Its Effects (Michael J. Himes)
ch. 2 Detectives of Grace in the Adventures of Scholarship (James Corkey, SJ)

Part II - A Long, Loving Look at the Real
ch. 3 Practice Makes Reception: The Role of Contemplative Ritual in Approaching Art (Joanne E. Ziegler)
ch. 4 Radical Transcendence: Teaching Environmental Literature at a Catholic University (Kimberly P. Bowers)
ch. 5 You Are Here: Engagement, Spirituality, and Slow Teaching (Anita Houck)
ch. 6 Pauses

Part III - Word and Sacrament
ch. 7 Rhetorics of Silence: A Pedagogy of Contemplation, Empathy, and Action (Melissa A. Godlthwaite)
ch. 8 Stumbling toward Grace: Meditations on Communion and Community in the Writing Classroom (Anne E. Green)Hello - Thanks for providing your street address.  The book will be mailed today.
ch. 9 Looking into the Bible (Michael Patella, OSB)

Part IV - In Places of Struggle and Challenge
ch. 10 Catholic Social Teaching, Community-Based Learning, and the Sacramental Imagination (Susan Crawford Sullivan)
ch. 11 Solidarity through “Poverty and Politics” (William Purcell and Rev. William Lies, CSC)
ch. 12 Exorcizing Taboos: Teaching End-of-Life Communication (Michael P. Pagano)
ch. 13 Who Decides? Encountering Karma and Catastrophe in the Catholic Liberal Arts (Michael Bathgate)
ch. 14 Beholding the Eschaton: Transforming Self and World through the Study of World History (Eric Cunningham)

Part V - Appreciating Where We Stand and What Other See
ch. 15 Shiver of Wonder: A Dialogue about Chemistry with Sister Angela Hoffman, OSB (Karen E. Eifler)
ch. 16 “Finding the Unfamiliar in the Familiar Places”: The Regis Community-Based Spanish/English Exchange Project: Journeys in Place (Obdulia Castro and Elizabeth Grassi)
ch. 17 Dialogues of Discernment: Science for Social Justice (Audrey A. Friedman)
ch. 18 Cultivating Empathy and Mindfulness: Religious Praxis (Angela Kim Harkins)
ch. 19 This I Believe: Linking the Mathematical Axiomatic Method with Personal Belief Systems (Stephanie Anne Salomone)
ch. 20 Mutual Benefice: Helping Students Find God in a Research Methods Course (Joanthan W. Bowman)

About the Authors
Cover image

Student Learning in College Residence Halls: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why

Book
Blimling, Gregory S.
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB3227.B53 2015
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Grounded in current research and practical experience, Student Learning in College Residence Halls: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why shows how to structure the peer environment in residence halls to advance student learning. Focusing on the application of student learning principles, the book examines how neurobiological and psychosocial development influences how students learn in residence halls. The book is filled with examples, useful ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Grounded in current research and practical experience, Student Learning in College Residence Halls: What Works, What Doesn't, and Why shows how to structure the peer environment in residence halls to advance student learning. Focusing on the application of student learning principles, the book examines how neurobiological and psychosocial development influences how students learn in residence halls. The book is filled with examples, useful strategies, practical advice, and best practices for building community and shaping residential environments that produce measureable learning outcomes. Readers will find models for a curriculum-based approach to programming and for developing student staff competencies, as well as an analysis of what types of residential experiences influence student learning. An examination of how to assess student learning in residence halls and of the challenges residence halls face provide readers with insight into how to strategically plan for the future of residence halls as learning centers.

The lack of recent literature on student learning in college residence halls belies the changes that have taken place. More traditional-age students are enrolled in college than ever before, and universities are building more residence halls to meet the increased demand for student housing. This book addresses these developments, reviews contemporary research, and provides up-to-date advice for creating residence hall environments that achieve educationally purposeful outcomes.

• Discover which educational benefits are associated with living in residence halls
• Learn how residential environments influence student behavior
• Create residence hall environments that produce measureable learning outcomes
• Monitor effectiveness with a process of systematic assessment

Residence halls are an integral part of the college experience; with the right programs in place they can become dynamic centers of student learning. Student Learning in College Residence Halls is a comprehensive resource for residence hall professionals and others interested in improving students' learning experience. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

ch. 1 The Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Student Learning in Residence Halls
ch. 2 How Biological and Psychological Development Influence Student Learning and Behavior
ch. 3 How Students Learn in Residence Halls
ch. 4 How to Create Learning Environments in Residence Halls
ch. 5 Selecting and Developing Residence Life Staff to Advance Student Learning
ch. 6 How Residential Environments Influence Student Learning
ch. 7 How to Shape the Peer Environment in Residence Halls to Advance Student Learning
ch. 8 Managing Student Life in Residence Halls to Support Student Learning
ch. 9 Assessing and Improving Residence Life Programs
ch. 10 The Future of Residence Halls

References
Name Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Tim Gunn: The Natty Professor: A Master Class on Mentoring, Motivating, and Making It Work!

Book
Gunn, Tim
2015
Gallery Books, New York, NY
LB1025.3.G858 2015
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Mentoring Students   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: A timeless book of lessons on mentorship, teaching, and learning from New York Times bestselling author Tim Gunn, host of the Emmy Award–nominated Project Runway and the reality show Under the Gunn.

Tim Gunn, America’s favorite reality TV cohost, is known for his kind but firm approach in providing wisdom, guidance, and support to the scores of design hopefuls ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: A timeless book of lessons on mentorship, teaching, and learning from New York Times bestselling author Tim Gunn, host of the Emmy Award–nominated Project Runway and the reality show Under the Gunn.

Tim Gunn, America’s favorite reality TV cohost, is known for his kind but firm approach in providing wisdom, guidance, and support to the scores of design hopefuls on Project Runway. Having begun his fashion career as a teacher at Parsons The New School for Design, Tim knows more than a thing or two about mentorship and how to convey invaluable pearls of wisdom in an approachable, accessible manner.

While Gunn’s Golden Rules showcased Tim “as life coach,” imparting lessons based on his personal experiences, Tim Gunn: The Natty Professor will focus on Tim “as teacher.” Divided into sections on common themes—leadership, curiosity, diversity, understanding, empathy—this practical, timely book takes us on a journey through life lessons and uses Tim’s own personal experiences, from the classroom to the therapist’s office, to illustrate larger concepts. Each chapter will end with a “life assignment,” where Tim challenges you to apply the lessons you’ve learned in practical mentoring or teaching situations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: My T.E.A.C.H. Philosophy

I. Truth Telling
ch. 1 Life as a New Teacher
ch. 2 The Under the Gunn Workroom
ch. 3 The Lifetime Upfronts
ch. 4 Classroom Critiques
ch. 5 The Admission Office
ch. 6 My First Parsons Fashion Class
ch. 7 Repositioning the Parsons Fashion Design Program
ch. 8 The Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum Teen Fair
ch. 9 The Faculty Lounge
ch. 10 Test Day

II. Empathy
ch. 11 Project Runway Home Visits
ch. 12 Jury Duty
ch. 13 The Supermarket
ch. 14 Shopping at Mood
ch. 15 Church
ch. 16 Speaking Engagements
ch. 17 Reading Online Comments
ch. 18 Navigating Academic Politics
ch. 19 My Therapist’s Office

III. Asking
ch. 20 Meeting New People
ch. 21 On the Talk Show Couch
ch. 22 Around the Neighborhood
ch. 23 Registration Day
ch. 24 Teacher Evaluations ( and the Three Types of Bad Teacher)
ch. 25 My Senior Show
ch. 26 Out in Nature
ch. 27 The Library
ch. 28 The Barnes Collection
ch. 29 The Metropolitan Museum of Art
ch. 30 Playing with Lego Bricks
ch. 31 Clothes Shopping

IV. Cheerleading
ch. 32 Dinners Out
ch. 33 On Vacation
ch. 34 Shooting a Scholastic Webisode
ch. 35 At the Movies
ch. 36 Taping Guide to Style
ch. 37 Project Runway Auditions
ch. 38 Competing on Hollywood Game Night

V. Hoping For The Best
ch. 39 Going Down to the Runway
ch. 40 Disciplinary Hearings
ch. 41 Giving Final Grades
ch. 42 Awards Ceremonies
ch. 43 School Visits

VI. Take Aways
ch. 44 Five Fast Ways to Learn Something New Right Now
ch. 45 T.E.A.C.H. Book Clubs

Acknowledgments
Notes
Cover image
Wabash tree

Collaborative Futures: Critical Reflections on Publicly Active Graduate Education

Book
Gilvin, Amanda; Roberts, Georgia M.; and Martin, Craig, eds.
2012
Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, New York
LB2371.4.C66 2012
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Collaborative Futures places graduate education at the center of ongoing efforts to legitimize publicly engaged scholarship within the academic profession. It is indispensable reading not only for graduate students seeking inspiration, resources, and usable frameworks for their engaged scholarship, but for the faculty who are called upon to mentor them and for university administrators seeking encouraging answers to questions about the future of graduate education. Given the erosion of the ...
Additional Info:
Collaborative Futures places graduate education at the center of ongoing efforts to legitimize publicly engaged scholarship within the academic profession. It is indispensable reading not only for graduate students seeking inspiration, resources, and usable frameworks for their engaged scholarship, but for the faculty who are called upon to mentor them and for university administrators seeking encouraging answers to questions about the future of graduate education. Given the erosion of the tenure system and the casualization of teaching labor, graduate programs and professional organizations in many fields now recognize the imperative to prepare doctoral students for careers wholly or partially outside academe. This book powerfully indicates both the need and the means to change institutional cultures and forge a publicly active path for graduate education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Illustrations
Contributors
Foreword (Kevin Bott)
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Amanda Gilvin)

PART ONE: THEORY IN PRACTICE: Contextualizing Collaboration: Publicly Active Graduate Scholarship in United States Higher Education
ch. 1 The Arc of the Academic Career Bends Toward Publicly Engaged Scholarship (Timothy K. Eatman)
ch. 2 The Land-Grant System and Graduate Education: Reclaiming a Narrative of Engagement (Timothy J. Shaffer)
ch. 3 To Hell With Good Intentions (Ivan Illich)
ch. 4 Publicly Engaged Graduate Research and the Transformation of the American Academy (Susan Curtis, Shirley Rose, and Kristina Bross)
ch. 5 From Returning to Our Roots: The EngagedInstitution; Executive Summary with “Seven-Part Test” (Kellogg Commission on the Future of State and Land-Grant Universities)
ch. 6 Publicly Engaged Scholarship and Academic Freedom: Rights and Responsibilities (Nicholas Behm and Duane Roen)
Interchapter  ~  Statements of the American Association of University Professors
ch. 7 The Scholarship of Engagement (Ernest L. Boyer)
ch. 8 Community (Miranda Joseph)

PART TWO: Programs of Action: Institutionalizing Publicly Active Graduate Education
ch. 9 New Ways of Learning, Knowing, and Working: Diversifying Graduate Student Career Options Through Community Engagement (Kristen Day, Victor Becerra, Vicki L. Ruiz, and Michael Powe)
ch. 10 Getting Outside: Graduate Learning Through Art and Literacy Partnerships with City Schools (Judith E. Meighan)
ch. 11 Crossing Figueroa: The Tangled Web of Diversity and Democracy (George J. Sánchez)
ch. 12 The Engaged Dissertation: Three Points of View (Linda S. Bergmann, Allen Brizee, and Jaclyn M. Wells)
ch. 13 When the Gown Goes to Town: The Reciprocal Rewards of Fieldwork for Artists (Jan Cohen-Cruz)
ch. 14 Reimagining the Links Between Graduate Education and Community Engagement (Marcy Schnitzer and Max Stephenson Jr.)
ch. 15 Graduate Mentoring Against Common Sense (Ron Krabill)
ch. 16 First and Lasts: Lessons from Launching the Patient Voice Project at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop (Austin Bunn)

PART THREE: A Balancing Act: Publicly Active Graduate Students' Reflections and Analyses
ch. 17 Arcs, Checklists, and Charts: The Trajectory of a Public Scholar? (Sylvia Gale)
Interchapter  ~  Specifying the Scholarship of Engagement: Skills for Community-Based Projects in the Arts, Humanities, and Design (Imagining America)
ch. 18 Leveraging the Academy: Suggestions for Radical Grad Students and Radicals Considering Grad School (Chris Dixon and Alexis Shotwell)
ch. 19 Collaboration Conversation: Collaborative Ethnography as Engaged Scholarship (Ali Colleen Neff)
ch. 20 Reality Is Stranger than Fiction: The Politics of Race and Belonging in Los Angeles, California (Damien M. Schnyder)
ch. 21 Participatory Art, Engaged Scholarship: The Embedded Critic in Nadia Myre’s Scar Project (Amanda Jane Graham)

Resources
Index
Cover image

Meeting the Transitional Needs of Young Adult Learners

Book
Davis, C. Amelia; and Olson, Joann S., eds.
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, Number 143)
HQ799.5.M448 2014
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This is the first New Directions volume related to young adult learners since 1984. Then, as now, young adults are an important segment of the adult population but have received scant attention in the adult education literature.

Increasingly, youths and young adults are enrolling in adult education programs and in doing so are changing the meaning of adulthood. Given the significant demographic, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This is the first New Directions volume related to young adult learners since 1984. Then, as now, young adults are an important segment of the adult population but have received scant attention in the adult education literature.

Increasingly, youths and young adults are enrolling in adult education programs and in doing so are changing the meaning of adulthood. Given the significant demographic, technological, and cultural shifts during the past 30 years, there is an increasing need for practitioners and program planners to reconsider what constitutes “adult” and “adult education.” An understanding of the changing meaning of adulthood is fundamental to developing programs and policies that will address the needs of younger learners, and we believe it is time for an updated discussion among adult educators and scholars in other disciplines.

This sourcebook is designed to reignite the discussion related to meeting the educational needs of young adults along with a timely and interdisciplinary discussion that highlights the transitional needs of young adult learners.

This is the 143rd volume of the Jossey Bass series New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. Noted for its depth of coverage, it explores issues of common interest to instructors, administrators, counselors, and policymakers in a broad range of education settings, such as colleges and universities, extension programs, businesses, libraries, and museums. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Note (C. Amelia Davis, Joann S. Olson)

ch. 1 Conceptualizing Transitions to Adulthood (Johanna Wyn)

ch. 2 Culture, Conditions, and the Transition to Adulthood (Brendaly Drayton)

ch. 3 Vulnerable Youth and Transitions to Adulthood (Rongbing Xie, Bisakha (Pia) Sen, E. Michael Foster)

ch. 4 Young Adulthood, Transitions, and Dis/ability (Jessica Nina Lester)

ch. 5 Becoming an Adult in a Community of Faith (Steven B. Frye)

ch. 6 Youths Transitioning as Adult Learners (C. Amelia Davis)

ch. 7 Transitions From Formal Education to the Workplace (Joann S. Olson)

ch. 8 Themes and Issues in Programming for Young Adults (Joann S. Olson, C. Amelia Davis)

Index
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

Learning as Leaving Home: Fear, Empathy and Hospitality in the Theology and Religion Classroom

TTR
Fleming, Daniel and Lovat, Terence
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 207-223
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
The article is a response to this journal's call for papers on metaphors for teaching, and also draws from a previous publication in which Kent Eilers developed a methodology for teaching global theologies. In this methodology, the ultimate goal was the development of “hermeneutical dispositions of empathy, hospitality, and receptivity toward culturally diverse voices” (2014, 165). This article considers the goals of Eilers' methodology, and others like his, and how it is ...
Additional Info:
The article is a response to this journal's call for papers on metaphors for teaching, and also draws from a previous publication in which Kent Eilers developed a methodology for teaching global theologies. In this methodology, the ultimate goal was the development of “hermeneutical dispositions of empathy, hospitality, and receptivity toward culturally diverse voices” (2014, 165). This article considers the goals of Eilers' methodology, and others like his, and how it is that the metaphors of “leaving home” and “communal imagination” highlight the importance of the ambient and interpersonal features of a classroom and their effect on the attainment of the above goals. In so doing, it extends the conversation beyond content and methodology in teaching theology and religion into the realms of philosophy of education, as well as the fields of moral and values education. It is contended that the metaphors informed by these areas of study facilitate the attainment of such goals, and similar ones, by demonstrating that the cultivation of an ambience of care, trust, and compassion within the classroom constitutes an essential foundation for learning in which students “leave home” and cultivate “communal imagination.” The article finishes with practical suggestions for educators in theology and religion.
TTR cover image

Transformations: The World Religions Survey through an Adjunct Feminist Lens

TTR
Downie, Alison
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 193-206
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This essay describes a transformation in my experience as an adjunct teaching underprepared students from one of shame toward a desire to assert the value of this work. Insights from my feminist theological training helped me to affirm the importance of encouraging transformative learning in teaching the academically marginalized and prompted my analysis of student writing in an introductory World Religions course, in order to determine whether or not the ...
Additional Info:
This essay describes a transformation in my experience as an adjunct teaching underprepared students from one of shame toward a desire to assert the value of this work. Insights from my feminist theological training helped me to affirm the importance of encouraging transformative learning in teaching the academically marginalized and prompted my analysis of student writing in an introductory World Religions course, in order to determine whether or not the course was a site of transformative learning. I argue that despite many contextual limitations, the movement toward deepening self-awareness and increasing openness to religious diversity seen in student writing demonstrates that transformative learning began in this course, and that is valuable for students' lives whether or not they are academically successful.
Additional Info:
Tips for enhancing the advising relationship by encouraging student responsibility and participation – without “intruding” or being overbearing.
Additional Info:
Tips for enhancing the advising relationship by encouraging student responsibility and participation – without “intruding” or being overbearing.
Cover image

Bullying Among University Students: Cross-national perspectives

Book
Cowie, Helen; and Myers, Carrie Anne, eds.
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2345.3.B85 B85 2016
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Bullying Amongst University Students is a pioneering collection of knowledge and evidence exploring the under-researched phenomenon of bullying in universities. Abusive behaviour amongst young people is a serious and pervasive problem that is exacerbated by the rapid advances in electronic communication, and in this book the authors highlight the problem and proceed to facilitate new practices and policies to address it.

...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Bullying Amongst University Students is a pioneering collection of knowledge and evidence exploring the under-researched phenomenon of bullying in universities. Abusive behaviour amongst young people is a serious and pervasive problem that is exacerbated by the rapid advances in electronic communication, and in this book the authors highlight the problem and proceed to facilitate new practices and policies to address it.

This book brings together an international team of authors from a range of disciplines, encompassing education, psychology, criminology, law and counselling, who have carried out research in the area of university bullying. Addressing critical dialogues and debates, the authors explore peer on peer violence, intimidation and social exclusion before considering its effects on students and making recommendations for action and further research. Key topics include:

• Cyberbullying and cyber aggression
• Rape culture across the university
• Homophobic and transphobic bullying
• The impact of bullying on mental health
• The role of bully and victim across the lifespan
• Policies and procedures to address bullying

International in authorship and scope, this book will be an invaluable resource for students and researchers in fields such as education, psychology, sociology, health studies and criminology. It is also essential reading for university policy-makers and union representatives responsible for the emotional and physical well-being of students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Overview
ch. 1 What we know to date about bullying and cyberbullying among university students (Helen Cowie and Carrie-Anne Myers)

The Student Experience
ch. 2 The student voice (Toni Pearce)
ch. 3 The postgraduate student experience (Rashid Aziz)
The Nature of Bullying at Univeristy
ch. 4 Do the roles of bully and victim remain stable from school to university? Theoretical considerations (Maili Pörhölä)
ch. 5 Homophobic and transphobic bullying in universities (Ian Rivers)
ch. 6 Stalking and violence among university students (Katja Björklund)
ch. 7 The relationship between mental health and bullying (Osman Tolga Arıcak)

The Social Context of Bullying at University
ch. 8 Cyberaggression among members of college fraternities and sororities in the United States (Jessica Simmons, Sheri Bauman, and Johanne Ives)
ch. 9 Bullying at Greek universities: an empirical study (Theodoros Giovazolias and Maria Malikiosi-Loizos)
ch. 10 Cross-cultural comparisons of bullying among university students: perspectives from Argentina, Estonia, Finland and United States (Maili Pörhölä, Kristen Cvancara, Esta Kaal, Kaja Tampere and Beatriz Torres)

Interventions and Policies
ch. 11 The role of the therapist in helping university students who have been bullied (Maria Luca)
ch. 12 Policies and procedures to address bullying at Australian universities (Marilyn Campbell)
ch. 13 Cyberbullying and rape culture in universities: defining the legal lines between fun and intentional harm (Shaheen Shariff and Ashley DeMartini)

Reflections
ch. 14 Commentary: Bullying among university students: awakening and harnessing the sleeping dragon of student power (Keith Sullivan)
ch. 15 Commentary: what universities can learn from workplace bullying research (Iain Coyne)
ch. 16 Epilogue: what can be done? (Helen Cowie and Carrie-Anne Myers)

Index
Cover image

Fragile Learning: The Influence of Anxiety

Book
Mathew, David
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1088.M38 2015
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: What are the barriers and obstacles to adults learning? What makes the process of adult learning so fragile? And what exactly do we mean by fragile learning? This book addresses these questions in two ways. In Part One, it looks at challenges to learning, examining issues such as language invention in a maximum security prison, geography and bad technology, and pedagogic fragility in ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: What are the barriers and obstacles to adults learning? What makes the process of adult learning so fragile? And what exactly do we mean by fragile learning? This book addresses these questions in two ways. In Part One, it looks at challenges to learning, examining issues such as language invention in a maximum security prison, geography and bad technology, and pedagogic fragility in Higher Education. Through a psychoanalytic lens, Fragile Learning examines authorial illness and the process of slow recovery as a tool for reflective learning, and explores ethical issues in problem-based learning.

The second part of the book deals specifically with the problem of online anxiety. From cyberbullying to Internet boredom, the book asks what the implications for educational design in our contemporary world might be. It compares education programs that insist on the Internet and those that completely ban it, while exploring conflict, virtual weapons and the role of the online personal tutor. The book also examines the issue of time as a barrier to learning and its links to unconscious thinking, as well as defining fragility in a summative essay. Using real-life examples, originality and wit, Fragile Learning is an important contribution to the field of psychoanalysis and pedagogy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
About the Author and Contributor
Introduction

Part I—Challenges to Learning
ch. 1 Prison language
ch. 2 Disease and distance: an anxious diptych (Susan Sapsed)
ch. 3 The Stable group
ch. 4 Ethical issues in problem-based learning (Susan Sapsed)
ch. 5 On empty spaces: an afterword
ch. 6 Steps forward, steps back (Susan Sapsed)
ch. 7 Ghosting

Part II—Online Anxiety
Introduction to Part II
ch. 8 Cyberbullying: a workplace virus
ch. 9 From fatigue to anxiety
ch. 10 The absence of E
ch. 11 Cyber tools and virtual weapons
ch. 12 E-learning, time, and unconscious thinking
ch. 13 The role of the online learning personal tutor
ch. 14 Conflict in online learning
ch. 15 The Internet is unwell . . . and will not be at school today

Notes
References
Index
Cover image

Mentoring as Transformative Practice: Supporting Student and Faculty Diversity: New Directions for Higher Education, Number 171

Book
Turner, Caroline S., ed.
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Higher Education, Number 171)
LB1731.4.M455 2015
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Scholars examining how women and people of color advance in academia invariably cite mentorship as one of the most important factors in facilitating student and faculty success.

Contributors to this volume underscore the importance of supporting one another, within and across differences, as critical to the development of a diverse professoriate. This volume emphasizes and highlights:

- the importance ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Scholars examining how women and people of color advance in academia invariably cite mentorship as one of the most important factors in facilitating student and faculty success.

Contributors to this volume underscore the importance of supporting one another, within and across differences, as critical to the development of a diverse professoriate. This volume emphasizes and highlights:

- the importance of mentorship;
- policies, processes, and practices that result in successful mentoring relationships;
- real life mentoring experiences to inform students, beginning faculty, and those who would be mentors;
- evidence for policy makers about what works in the development of supportive and nurturing higher education learning environments.

The guiding principles underlying successful mentorships, interpersonally and programmatically, presented here can have the potential to transform higher education to better serve the needs of all its members.

This is the 171st volume of the Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Higher Education. Addressed to presidents, vice presidents, deans, and other higher education decision makers on all kinds of campuses, it provides timely information and authoritative advice about major issues and administrative problems confronting every institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Caroline S. Turner)

ch. 1 Mentoring Outside the Line: The Importance of Authenticity, Transparency, and Vulnerability in Effective Mentoring Relationships (Sharon Fries-Britt, Jeanette Snider)
Informed by the literature and professional practice, this chapter examines the unique mentoring challenges facing women and underrepresented minorities in higher education. Findings indicate that traditional mentoring approaches fall short in fully supporting the needs of underrepresented populations in higher education.

ch. 2 Digging Deeper: Exploring the Relationship Between Mentoring, Developmental Interactions, and Student Agency (Kimberly A. Griffin, Jennifer L. Eury, Meghan E. Gaffney, with Travis York, Jessica Bennett, Emil Cunningham, Autumn Griffin)
While many cite the importance of having a mentor, focusing on the quality and nature of specific interactions between students and faculty can lead to better strategies promoting student agency. This chapter presents narratives from students who work with the same mentor, focusing on their interactions and how they shaped students’ experiences and outcomes.

ch. 3 Critical Mentoring Practices to Support Diverse Students in Higher Education: Chicana/Latina Faculty Perspectives (Julie L´opez Figueroa, Gloria M. Rodriguez)
This chapter outlines critical practices that emerged from utilizing social justice frameworks to mentor first-generation, underrepresented minority students at the undergraduate to doctoral levels. The mentoring strategies include helping students to reframe instances when faculty and peers unconsciously conflate academic rigor with color-blind scholarship.

ch. 4 Educational Testimonio: Critical Pedagogy as Mentorship (Rebeca Burciaga, Natalia Cruz Navarro)
This chapter chronicles the use of educational testimonio as one approach to critical pedagogy as mentoring in a college classroom. Written from the perspectives of an instructor and a student, it explores educational testimonio as one tool that has implications beyond the classroom, including retention in higher education and supporting the development of aspirations beyond undergraduate schools on the path to the professoriate.

ch. 5 Of Feral Faculty and Magisterial Mowglis: The Domestication of Junior Faculty (Richard J. Reddick)
This chapter presents an assistant professor’s scholarly personal narrative at the precipice of promotion, and reveals how the feral child metaphor might aptly describe many junior professors’ experiences as they navigate a path toward tenure. This chronicling of mentorship in sometimes unexpected venues may aid new faculty and those invested in their success in both earning tenure and retaining them in the field.

ch. 6 Providing the Psychosocial Benefits of Mentoring to Women in STEM: CareerWISE as an Online Solution (Amy E. Dawson, Bianca L. Bernstein, Jennifer M. Bekki)
This chapter outlines the psychosocial aspects of mentoring that help women combat the barriers they commonly face in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The authors describe the CareerWISE online resilience training and how it can address the shortage of effective mentors and role models who have been shown to increase the persistence of women in STEM fields.

ch. 7 Transforming the Undergraduate Research Experience Through Sustained Mentoring: Creating a Strong Support Network and a Collaborative Learning Environment (Erika T. Camacho, Raquell M. Holmes, Stephen A. Wirkus)
This chapter describes how sustained mentoring together with rigorous collaborative learning and community building contributed to successful mathematical research and individual growth in the Applied Mathematical Sciences Summer Institute (AMSSI), a program that focused on women, underrepresented minorities, and individuals from small teaching institutions who might not have had the opportunity to do research otherwise. The collective learning and developmental experiences of AMSSI’s cofounders as students, teaching assistants, and faculty in other research programs, together with their humble upbringings and cultural histories, are what define the unique structure and mentoring blueprint of AMSSI.

ch. 8 Developing a Latino Mentoring Program: Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success) (Victor B. S´aenz, Luis Ponjuan, Jorge Segovia Jr., Jos´e Del Real Viramontes)
This chapter highlights the development of Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success). At the center of Project MALES is a mentoring program that aims to cultivate an engaged support network for males of color at the University of Texas at Austin and across surrounding communities. Specifically, there is a discussion of the theories and framework that guided the creation of this mentoring program and its ongoing development.

ch. 9 Weaving Authencity and Legitimacy: Latina Faculty Peer Mentoring (Anne-Marie N´u˜ nez, Elizabeth T. Murakami, Leslie D. Gonzales)
As an alternative to typical top-down mentoring models, the authors advance a conception of peer mentoring that is based on research about collectivist strategies that Latina faculty employ to navigate the academy. The authors advance recommendations for institutional agents to support mentoring for faculty who are members of historically underrepresented groups.

ch. 10 Enacting Feminist Alliance Principles in a Doctoral Writing Support Group (Beth Blue Swadener, Lacey Peters, Kimberly A. Eversman)
This study utilizes a multivocal narrative approach to analyze the dynamics, accomplishments, and challenges of an interdisciplinary doctoral support group consisting primarily of female members. The authors raise issues of power, alliance, troubling expert-novice models of mentoring, and the role of social justice pedagogy in the group.

Index
Cover image

The Mentoring Continuum From Graduate School through Tenure

Book
Wright, Glenn, ed.
2015
Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, New York
LB1731.4.M455 2015
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Skill at mentoring has . . . attained a certain cachet among those at all career stages who find in it an alternative way of being in academe-one that tilts away from the endemic competition of the research environment in favor of cooperation and mutual purpose. Part of mentoring’s appeal lies in its ability to gesture in two directions at once: forward . . . to new modalities and more egalitarian relationships, and backward, to ...
Additional Info:
Skill at mentoring has . . . attained a certain cachet among those at all career stages who find in it an alternative way of being in academe-one that tilts away from the endemic competition of the research environment in favor of cooperation and mutual purpose. Part of mentoring’s appeal lies in its ability to gesture in two directions at once: forward . . . to new modalities and more egalitarian relationships, and backward, to a tradition of cross-generational support and identification as old as universities themselves, and that continues to feed the romance of the academic life in the minds of would-be faculty. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Glenn Wright)

Part One: Origins
ch. 1 With a Little Help from My Friends: The Role of Peer Mentoring in Graduate Student Teaching Assistant Development (Michael Amlung, Elizabeth A. Simpson, Melissa Dengler, Brian Stone, Grace Williams, and   Denise P. Domizi)
ch. 2 Graduate School–Facilitated Peer Mentoring for Degree Completion: Dissertation-Writing Boot Camps (Jan Allen)
ch. 3 Subject Matter Plus: Mentoring for Nonacademic Careers (Paula Chambers)
ch. 4 Graduate Mentoring against Common Sense (Ron Krabill)
 
Part Two: Transitions
ch. 5 Mentors’ Conceptions of Mentoring in Formalized Faculty Relationships (Susanna Calkins and Greg Light)
ch. 6 Taking Ownership of Your Mentoring: Lessons Learned from Participating in the Earth Science Women’s Network (Mirjam S. Glessmer, Amanda S. Adams, Meredith G. Hastings, and Rebecca T. Barnes)
ch. 7 “Mentoring Up”: Learning to Manage Your Mentoring Relationships (Steven Paul Lee, Richard McGee, Christine Pfund, and Janet Branchaw)
ch. 8 Shifting Vision: Mentoring as Faculty Development for All Levels of Experience (Jennifer W. Shewmaker and Phyllis Bolin)
ch. 9 Building a Culture of Mentoring via a Faculty Mentoring Portal (Julie Welch, Krista Hoffman-Longtin, Miriam Cohen Dell, Jon Eynon, Daniel Rusyniak, and Mary Dankoski)
 
Part Three: Dialogues and Reflections 
ch. 10 Graduate Student Peer-Mentoring Programs: Benefiting Students, Faculty, and Academic Programs (Beth A. Boehm and Amy J. Lueck)
ch. 11 The Family Plan: A Dialogue about Graduate Students, Babies, and the Unique Demands of the Advisor-Student Relation (Leonard Cassuto and Jane Van Slembrouck)
ch. 12 Cross-Race Faculty Mentoring (Christine A. Stanley and Yvonna S. Lincoln)
ch. 13 Graduate Student ISO a Mentor: A Dialogue about Mentoring (Jan Allen and Kevin Johnston)
ch. 14 Growing into Mentoring, and into the Profession: A Reflection on Intentionally Cultivating Mentoring Communities (Nina B. Namaste)
ch. 15 My Lucky Life and Hard Times (Leonard Cassuto)

Resources
Index
Cover image

Teaching the Whole Student - Engaged Learning With Heart, Mind, and Spirit

Book
Schoem, David; Modey, Christine; St. John, Edward P., eds.
2017
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC995.T427 2017
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Teaching the Whole Student is a compendium of engaged teaching approaches by faculty across disciplines. These inspiring authors offer models for instructors who care deeply about their students, respect and recognize students’ social identities and lived experiences, and are interested in creating community and environments of openness and trust to foster deep-learning, academic success, and meaning-making.

The authors in this volume stretch ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Teaching the Whole Student is a compendium of engaged teaching approaches by faculty across disciplines. These inspiring authors offer models for instructors who care deeply about their students, respect and recognize students’ social identities and lived experiences, and are interested in creating community and environments of openness and trust to foster deep-learning, academic success, and meaning-making.

The authors in this volume stretch the boundaries of academic learning and the classroom experience by seeking to identify the space between subject matter and a student's core values and prior knowledge. They work to find the interconnectedness of knowledge, understanding, meaning, inquiry and truth. They appreciate that students bring their full lives and experiences—their heart and spirit—into the classroom just as they bring their minds and intellectual inquiry.

These approaches contribute to student learning and the core academic purposes of higher education, help students find meaning and purpose in their lives, and help strengthen our diverse democracy through students’ active participation and leadership in civic life. They also have a demonstrated impact on critical and analytical thinking, student retention and academic success, personal well-being, commitments to civic engagement, diversity, and social justice.

Topics discussed:
• Teacher-student relationships and community building

• How teaching the whole student increases persistence and completion rates

• How an open learning environment fosters critical understanding

• Strategies for developing deep social and personal reflection in experiential education and service learning

The authors of this book remind us in poignant and empirical ways of the importance of teaching the whole student, as the book's title reflects. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward
Preface
Introduction

PART ONE: WHOLE STUDENT LEARNING APPROACHES
ch. 1. The Whole Student Approach as a Retention Model (Jerry A. Pattengale)
ch. 2. Incorporating Social Justice into Teaching - An Integrative Pedagogy Approach (Kathleen Manning)
PART TWO: ENGAGED LEARNING AND TEACHING IN PRACTICE
ch. 3. Learning Community Classrooms and Educating For Critical Hope (Gillies Malnarich)
ch. 4. Relational Teaching and Learning - The Classroom as Community and the Community as Classroom (David Schoem)
ch. 5. Toward a New Pedagogy to Help Create a Sustainable Future (James Crowfoot)
ch. 6. Experiential and Dialogic Pedagogy in a Religious and Ethnic Conflict Course (Adrienne B. Dessel)
ch. 7. Service Learning and Integrative Pedagogy for Engaging the Whole Student (Joseph A Galura)
PART THREE: INTEGRATIVE PEDAGOGY
ch. 8. Teaching and Learning that make a Difference (James L. Heft)
ch. 9. Integrative Approaches for Sustained Diversity Engagement in the Early Years of College (Angela M. Locks)
ch. 10. Assessment - Rethinking the Role of Integrative Pedagogies (Kimberly A. Kline; Edward P. St. John; Annie E. Connors)
ch. 11. Teaching the Whole Student (Christine Modey; David Schoem; Edward P. St. John)

Editors and Contributors
Index
Cover image

Bandwidth Recovery - Helping Students Reclaim Cognitive Resources Lost to Poverty, Racism, and Social Marginalization

Book
Verschelden, Cia
2017
Stylus Publishing, Llc.
LC4091V.47 2017
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book argues that the cognitive resources for learning of over half our young people have been diminished by the negative effects of economic insecurity, discrimination and hostility against non-majority groups based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or gender identity, and other aspects of difference. Recognizing that these students are no different than their peers in terms of cognitive capacity, this book offers a set of strategies and interventions to ...
Additional Info:
This book argues that the cognitive resources for learning of over half our young people have been diminished by the negative effects of economic insecurity, discrimination and hostility against non-majority groups based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or gender identity, and other aspects of difference. Recognizing that these students are no different than their peers in terms of cognitive capacity, this book offers a set of strategies and interventions to rebuild the available cognitive resources necessary to succeed in college and reach their full potential.>br>
Members of these groups systematically experience conditions in their lives that result in chronic stress and, therefore, decreased physical and mental health and social and economic opportunity. The costs of the many kinds of scarcity in their lives – money, health, respect, safety, affirmation, choices, belonging – is seriously reduced “mental bandwidth,” the cognitive and emotional resources needed to deal with making good decisions, learning, healthy relationships, and more. People who are operating with depleted mental bandwidth are less able to succeed in school, starting in childhood, and are much less likely to make it to college. For those who do make it, their bandwidth capacity often interferes with learning, and therefore, persisting and graduating from college.

This book presents variety of evidence-based interventions that have been shown, through implementation in high schools and colleges, to help students to regain bandwidth. They are variously intended for application inside and outside the classroom and address not only cognitive processes but also social-psychological, non-cognitive factors that are relevant to the college environment as a whole.

Beginning with an analysis of the impacts on mental and physical health and cognitive capacity, of poverty, racism, and other forms of social marginalization, Cia Verschelden presents strategies for promoting a growth mindset and self-efficacy, for developing supports that build upon students’ values and prior knowledge and for creating learning environments both in and out of the classroom so students can feel a sense of belonging and community. She addresses issues of stereotyping and exclusion and discusses institutional structures and processes that create identity-safe rather than identity-threat learning environment.

This book is intended for faculty, student affairs professionals, and college and university administrators, all of whom have an interest in creating learning environments where all students have a chance to succeed. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by Lynn Pasquerrella
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part 1: The Costs of Racism, Poverty, and Social Marginalization
ch 1. Physical Health
ch 2. Mental Health
ch 3. Human Capacity
ch 4. Loss of Cognitive Resources and Bandwidth – Scarcity

Part 2: Sociopsychological Underminers
ch 5. Microaggressions and “Modern Racism”
ch 6. Stereotype Threat
ch 7. Disidentification with Academic Self
ch 8. Belongingness Uncertainty
ch 9. Focus on LGBT Students

Part 3: Interventions that Mitigate the Negative Effects of Poverty and the Underminers
ch 10. Growth Mind-Set
ch 11. Belonging
ch 12. Decreasing Stereotype Threat and Identity Threat
ch 13. Institutional Structures and Processes
ch 14. Case Study – Georgia State University

Conclusion
References
About the Author
Index
Cover image

Urban Preparation - Young Black Men Moving from Chicago's South Side to Success in Higher Education

Book
Warren, Chezare A
2017
Harvard Education Publishing Group
LC2779.W37 2017
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Chezare A. Warren chronicles the transition of a cohort of young Black males from Urban Prep Charter Academy for Young Men to their early experiences in higher education. A rich and closely observed account of a mission-driven school and its students, Urban Preparation makes a significant contribution to our understanding of how young males of color can best be served in schools throughout the United States today.

A ...
Additional Info:
Chezare A. Warren chronicles the transition of a cohort of young Black males from Urban Prep Charter Academy for Young Men to their early experiences in higher education. A rich and closely observed account of a mission-driven school and its students, Urban Preparation makes a significant contribution to our understanding of how young males of color can best be served in schools throughout the United States today.

A founding teacher at Urban Prep, Warren offers a detailed exploration of what this single-sex public high school on the South Side of Chicago has managed to accomplish amid profoundly challenging circumstances. He provides a comprehensive portrait of the school—its leaders, teachers, and professional staff; its students; and the community that the school aims to serve—and highlights how preparation for higher education is central to its mission.

Warren focuses on three main goals: to describe Urban Prep’s plans and efforts to prepare young Black males for college; to understand how race, community, poverty, and the school contributed, in complex and interrelated ways, to the academic goals of these students; and to offer a wide-ranging set of conclusions about the school environments and conditions that might help young Black males throughout the country succeed in high school and college. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by H. Richard Milner
Urban Preparation: An Introduction

ch 1. Improving Urban Education for Young Black Men and Boys with Derrick R. Brooms
ch 2. Living and Learning on the South Side of Chicago
ch 3. UP Years 1 and 2: Schooling Environment
ch 4. UP Years 3 and 4: Preparation for College
ch 5. College Transition, Persistence, and Completion
ch 6. Reimagining the P–20 Education Pipeline for Young Black Men and Boys with Derrick R. Brooms
ch 7. Recommendations for Contemporary Urban Education Reform

Appendix Research Methods
Afterword by James Earl Davis
Notes
Acknowledgments
About the Author
Index
Article cover image

"The Idea of the PhD: The Doctorate in the Twenty-First Century Imagination (Chapter 3)"

Article
Kelly, Frances Jennifer
2017
Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
How is PhD pedagogy conceptualised in contemporary discourse? Doctoral pedagogy is usually figured as supervision, often, in particular in literature and popular culture, in the traditional dyadic form. Like other kinds of teachers, supervisors seem to hold a fascination, particularly for writers of novels and television dramas. In research literature, the attention garnered by supervision stems from another goal, a sense of needing to be more reflexive about it as ...
Additional Info:
How is PhD pedagogy conceptualised in contemporary discourse? Doctoral pedagogy is usually figured as supervision, often, in particular in literature and popular culture, in the traditional dyadic form. Like other kinds of teachers, supervisors seem to hold a fascination, particularly for writers of novels and television dramas. In research literature, the attention garnered by supervision stems from another goal, a sense of needing to be more reflexive about it as a form teaching, usually by showing supervision at work through transcripts of supervisory meetings or through student and supervisor accounts of their experience of supervision. This examination of what is (or was) essentially a private form of teaching has operated in tandem with an increased scrutiny on supervision by institutions, as articulated in institutional policies, and a fostering of self-induced scrutiny through manuals on supervision. Both of these trends are suggestive of a perception at the end of the twentieth century, aided by studies showing high attrition rates and lengthy times to submission, that supervision was often not going well.