Civic Engagement

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Public Character in Action: Patterns and Possibilities (pdf)

Journal Issue
2001
Theological Education 38, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47V.38no.1
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2001-theological-education-v38-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Theme Introduction (Robin W. Lovin and Richard J. Mouw)
Spirituality and Public Character: A Qualitative Cross-Sectional Study of Master of Divinity Students in Toronto (Jeffrey P. Greenman and Yau Man Siew)
Educating for Public Ministry: Models and Strategies for Mainline Seminaries (Elizabeth Nordbeck and Douglas Ottati)
From the Margins to the Center: Exploring the Seminary’s Leadership Role in Developing the Public Presence of Pentecostalism (Cheryl Bridges Johns)
A Public Voice: Preaching on Justice Issues (Ray John Marek, OMI, and Daniel E. Harris, CM)
Making Connections: Faith in the Public Square (Daniel McLellan, OFM)
Connecting Faith and Vocational Discipleship at Covenant Theological Seminary (Donald C. Guthrie and James A. Meek)
Responsibility, Repentance, and Right Relations (Phyllis D. Airhart and Roger C. Hutchinson)
Geographies of Memory: Theological Reflections on Racial Reconciliation in South Africa and the United States (L. Gregory Jones and Willie James Jennings)

OPEN FORUM
The Seminary Chapel Building as Spiritual Formation (James F. White)
Technology and Educational Practices (Louis Charles Willard)
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The Public Character of Theological Education (pdf)

Journal Issue
2000
Theological Education 37, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.37no.1
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2000-theological-education-v37-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Theme Introduction (Robin W. Lovin and Richard J. Mouw)
The Public Character of Theological Education: An Evangelical Perspective (David Jones, Jeffrey Greenman, Christine Pohl)
The Public Character of Theological Education: A Perspective from Roman Catholic Schools of Theology and Seminaries (Jeremiah J. McCarthy, William Morell, O.M.I., William McGrattan, Daniel McLellan, O.F.M., Kevin O’Neil, C.Ss.R.)
The Public Character of Mainline Theological Education (Elizabeth C. Nordbeck, Douglas F. Ottati)
The Public Character of the University-Related Divinity School (Bonnie J. Miller-McLemore, Robin W. Lovin, Richard J. Wood)

Open Forum
A Contextual Theology of Leadership (Diane Kennedy, O.P.)
A Womanist Perspective on Spirituality in Leadership (Emilie M. Townes)
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Educating Citizens: Preparing America's Undergraduates for Lives of Moral and Civic Responsibility

Book
Colby, Ann, Thomas Ehrlich, Elizabeth Beaumont, and Jason Stephens
2003
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC268.E355 2003
Topics: Liberal Arts   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Educating Citizens reports on how some American colleges and universities are preparing thoughtful, committed, and socially responsible graduates. Many institutions assert these ambitions, but too few act on them. The authors demonstrate the fundamental importance of moral and civic education, describe how the historical and contemporary landscapes of higher education have shaped it, and explain the educational and developmental goals and processes involved in educating citizens. They examine the challenges ...
Additional Info:
Educating Citizens reports on how some American colleges and universities are preparing thoughtful, committed, and socially responsible graduates. Many institutions assert these ambitions, but too few act on them. The authors demonstrate the fundamental importance of moral and civic education, describe how the historical and contemporary landscapes of higher education have shaped it, and explain the educational and developmental goals and processes involved in educating citizens. They examine the challenges colleges and universities face when they dedicate themselves to this vital task and present concrete ways to overcome those challenges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
The Authors

ch. 1 Educating Citizens in a Pluralistic Society
ch. 2 The Broader Undergraduate Context
ch. 3 When Educating Citizens is a Priority
ch. 4 The Multiple Dimensions of Moral and Civic Development
ch. 5 Pedagogical Strategies for Educating Citizens
ch. 6 Weaving Moral and Civic Learning into the Curriculum
ch. 7 Faculty: The Cornerstone
ch. 8 Moral and Civic Learning Beyond the Classroom
ch. 9 Assessment in Moral and Civic Education
ch. 10 Bringing Moral and Civic Learning to Center Stage References

Name Index
Subject Index
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The Academic Citizen: The Virtue of Service in University Life

Book
Bruce Macfarlane
2007
Routledge, New York
LC220.5.M33 2007
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Contemporary universities are very much an integral part of communities. However, while much has been written about teaching and research in universities, the "service" role of universities has been neglected. In an attempt to address this imbalance, The Academic Citizen looks at how these three roles interrelate and explores the idea of a compact between universities and society.
This book argues that in order to achieve a compact, we ...
Additional Info:
Contemporary universities are very much an integral part of communities. However, while much has been written about teaching and research in universities, the "service" role of universities has been neglected. In an attempt to address this imbalance, The Academic Citizen looks at how these three roles interrelate and explores the idea of a compact between universities and society.
This book argues that in order to achieve a compact, we need to re-evaluate the poorly rewarded aspects of service and leading academics need to set a new standard. Based on in-depth interviews with an international group of academics, it sets out to:
· outline the interconnecting communities served by university lecturers
· explore what the notion of "service" means for academic staff
· develop a moral basis for the "service" role in academic life as both a collegial and civic duty
· show how service supports teaching and research in a more competitive environment
·examine the ideal character required to fulfill the functions academic citizenship
Drawing on a range of university and service traditions, The Academic Citizen has a strong historical and comparative perspective that should prove stimulating for those interested in the role of the academic in modern society. It has international relevance and will appeal to staff and educational developers in universities and colleges, as well as students of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Book summary
Acknowledgements
About the author
Foreword
Introduction

The retreat from citizenship
The disengaged academic
The roots of service
The new compact
Service and citizenship
Interpretations of service
The call of service
Rewarding service
The academic citizen
Recovering academic citizenship
Re-valuing student service
Leading academic citizens
Recovering academic citizenship

Bibliography
Index
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Pedagogy and the University: Critical Theory and Practice

Book
McLean, Monica
2006
Continuum International Publishing Company, NY
LB2322.2.M395 2006
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
An investigation of how the contemporary university should develop and the form of pedagogy used. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
An investigation of how the contemporary university should develop and the form of pedagogy used. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 University pedagogy for a better world
ch. 2 Critical theory and the transformation of university pedagogy
ch. 3 Socio-historical options and constraints
ch. 4 Accounting for pedagogic quality
ch. 5 Pedagogic justice
ch. 6 Student experience as the development of communicative reason
ch. 7 Intellectualizing university teaching and student learning
ch. 8 Creating the environment for critical pedagogy
ch. 9 University pedagogy for justice, communication and reason

References
Index
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Teach Them to Challenge Authority: Educating for Healthy Societies

Book
Gregory S. Prince, Jr.
2008
Continuum International Publishing Group Inc.
LB41.P7657 2008
Topics: Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Teach Them to Challenge Authority gets to the heart of what education should really be about. Drawing on decades of experience, Gregory S. Prince Jr. moves seamlessly between his experience as President of Hampshire College and the broader picture made up of national and international issues. He demonstrates that the debate between "neutral" versus "engaged" universities could have radical consequences - not just for the world of education, but for ...
Additional Info:
Teach Them to Challenge Authority gets to the heart of what education should really be about. Drawing on decades of experience, Gregory S. Prince Jr. moves seamlessly between his experience as President of Hampshire College and the broader picture made up of national and international issues. He demonstrates that the debate between "neutral" versus "engaged" universities could have radical consequences - not just for the world of education, but for society as a whole. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Forward

Part I Two Views of Education
ch. 1 Origins: Educating a College President
ch. 2 The Engaged University vs. the Neutral University
ch. 3 Protecting vs. Challenging Students

Part II Mirrors for America
ch. 4 The University of Natal: Modeling the Behavior We Expect from Students
ch. 5 The European Humanities University: Challenging Authority Abroad and at Home
ch. 6 The Asian University for Women: Charting a New Course and Living Up to Expectations
ch. 7 Singapore Management University: Teaching Critical Thinking and Why Teachers Teach
ch. 8 The American University in Bulgaria: Speaking to Authority

Part III The Engaged University
ch. 9 What is Enough?: Communities and Universities
ch. 10 What is Enough?: The Role of the Professor
ch. 11 Conclusion: Listen to Students

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Teaching for Civic Engagement: Background and Overview

Journal Issue
Posman, Ellen, and Locklin, Reid B., eds.
2010
Spotlight on Teaching 25, no. 4 October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching for Civic Engagement: Background and Overview (Ellen Posman, and Reid B. Locklin)
ch. 2 Engaged Pedagogy and Civic Engagement (Swasti Bhattacharyya)
ch. 3 Site Visits and Civic Engagement (Marianne Delaporte, and Hans Wiersma)
ch. 4 Civic Engagement and International Service-Learning (Philip Wingeier-Rayo)
ch. 5 Civic Engagement and Civic Spaces (Rebekka King)
ch. 6 Reflections on Engaged Civic Learning and Teaching (Bobbi Patterson)
ch. 7 Teaching for Civic Engagement: Suggested Resources
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The Engaged Campus: Certificates, Minors, and Majors as the New Community Engagement

Book
Butin, Dan W., and Seider, Scott, eds.
2012
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LC221.E52 2012
Topics: Service Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
The Engaged Campus offers a set of emerging best practices and articulation of critical issues for faculty and administrators committed to developing, strengthening, or expanding majors or minors in community engagement at their respective institutions. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The Engaged Campus offers a set of emerging best practices and articulation of critical issues for faculty and administrators committed to developing, strengthening, or expanding majors or minors in community engagement at their respective institutions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I Engagement in Action
ch. 1 Theory Matters: Articulating a Theoretical Framework for Civic Engagement (Tracey Burke, Tara Palmer Smith, and Diane Hirshberg)
ch. 2 Creating the Character, Culture, and Craft of Engagement (Sandra L. Enos)
ch. 3 Negotiating the Boundary between the Academy and the Community (Hollyce (Sherry) Giles)
ch. 4 Contending with Political and Cultural Campus Challenges ( Arthur S. Keene and John Reiff)
ch. 5 Process, Content, and Community Building (Keith Morton)
ch. 6 The Politics of Engagement (Mary Beth Pudup)
ch. 7 Measuring the Impact of Community Service Learning (Scott Seider and Sarah Novick)
ch. 8 Building in Place (Talmage A. Stanley)

Part II Reflecting on the Future of Community Engagement
ch. 9 A New Hull House? The Monumental Challenge of Service-Learning and Community Engagement (Peter Levine)
ch. 10 Disciplining Higher Education for Democratic Community Engagement (Ariane Hoy, Mathew Johnson, and Robert Hackett)
ch. 11 De Tocqueville Rediscovered: Community-Based Civic Engagement (Elizabeth L. Hollander)

List of Contributors
Index
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The Art of Effective Facilitation: Reflections from Social Justice Educators

Book
Landreman, Lisa M., ed.
2013
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC192.2.A78 2013
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: How can I apply learning and social justice theory to become a better facilitator?
Should I prepare differently for workshops around specific identities?
How do I effectively respond when things aren’t going as planned?

This book is intended for the increasing number of faculty and student affairs administrators – at whatever their level of experience -- who are being ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: How can I apply learning and social justice theory to become a better facilitator?
Should I prepare differently for workshops around specific identities?
How do I effectively respond when things aren’t going as planned?

This book is intended for the increasing number of faculty and student affairs administrators – at whatever their level of experience -- who are being are asked to become social justice educators to prepare students to live successfully within, and contribute to, an equitable multicultural society.

It will enable facilitators to create programs that go beyond superficial discussion of the issues to fundamentally address the structural and cultural causes of inequity, and provide students with the knowledge and skills to work for a more just society. Beyond theory, design, techniques and advice on practice, the book concludes with a section on supporting student social action.

The authors illuminate the art and complexity of facilitation, describe multiple approaches, and discuss the necessary and ongoing reflection process. What sets this book apart is how the authors illustrate these practices through personal narratives of challenges encountered, and by admitting to their struggles and mistakes.

They emphasize the need to prepare by taking into account such considerations as the developmental readiness of the participants, and the particular issues and historical context of the campus, before designing and facilitating a social justice training or selecting specific exercises.

They pay particular attention to the struggle to teach the goals of social justice education in a language that can be embraced by the general public, and to connect its structural and contextual analyses to real issues inside and outside the classroom.

The book is informed by the recognition that “the magic is almost never in the exercise or the handout but, instead, is in the facilitation”; and by the authors’ commitment to help educators identify and analyze dehumanizing processes on their campuses and in society at large, reflect on their own socialization, and engage in proactive strategies to dismantle oppression. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface

Part I: Frameworks from Theory to Practice
ch. 1 The Evolution of Social Justice Education and Facilitation (Lisa M. Landreman, and Christopher MacDonald-Dennis)
ch. 2 Building a Framework for Social Justice Education: One Educator's Journey (Annematrie Vaccaro)
ch. 3 The Evolution of a Social Justice Educator’s Professional Identity: Impacts of Professional Maturation and Multiple Discourse Perspectives on Personal Practice (Kelly Carter Merrill)

Part II: Understanding Identities and Facilitation
ch. 4 Developing Gender Inclusive Facilitation: Understanding Genderism (Brent L. Bilodeau)
ch. 5 Engaging Whiteness in Higher Education (Rebecca Ropers-Huilman)
ch. 6 Developing & Sustaining Effective Co-Facilitation Across Identities (Tanya Williams, Elaine Brighan)
ch. 7 Understanding and Supporting Multiracial Students (Adam J. Ortiz)

Part III: Facilitation Design and Techniques
ch. 8 From Safe Spaces To Brave Spaces: A New Way to Frame Dialogue Around Diversity and Social Justice (Brian Arao, and Kristi Clemens)
ch. 9 Navigating Triggering Events: Critical Competencies for Social Justice Educators (Kathy Obear)
ch. 10 When Neutrality Is Not Enough (Wrestling With the Challenges of Multipartiality (Robbie Routenberg, Elizabeth Thompson, and Rhian Waterberg)
ch. 11 Facilitating Interactive Privilege Awareness Programs: Employing Intentionality From Design Through Implementation (Gregory I. Meyer, Karen Connors, Rebecca Haselmeyer, Dusty M. Krihau, Tracy L. Lanier, Matthew R. Lee, Chris D. Orem, and Nancy Trantham Poe)

Part IV: Supporting Student Social Action
ch. 12 Training and Supporting Peer Facilitators (Heather Wilhelm, and Robbie Routenberg)
ch. 13 Why is it so Hard to Take Action? A Reflective Dialogue about Preparing Students for Social Action Engagement (Andrea D. Domingue, and David S. Neely)

About the Editor and Contributors
Index
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Secularity and the Liberal Arts

Web
A Teagle Foundation consortium
Topics: Faith in the Classroom   |   Liberal Arts   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
This White Paper describes how four campuses with different Protestant histories developed conversations about their institutions’ secular boundaries. Paying attention to and beginning to analyze what makes this conversation difficult helps educators and students see the conversation’s promise—for student learning and civic life.
Additional Info:
This White Paper describes how four campuses with different Protestant histories developed conversations about their institutions’ secular boundaries. Paying attention to and beginning to analyze what makes this conversation difficult helps educators and students see the conversation’s promise—for student learning and civic life.
Additional Info:
Baker offers four (4) strategies for being a public intellectual in one's field: Embrace mass media; imrove your communication style; resist the urge to dumb down the message; keep communication channels open.
Additional Info:
Baker offers four (4) strategies for being a public intellectual in one's field: Embrace mass media; imrove your communication style; resist the urge to dumb down the message; keep communication channels open.
Additional Info:
This piece concerns "public work" in the sense of student assignments taking place outside the classroom or a closed Learning Management System. It is in the form of a Storify of a Twitter chat that took place March 26, 2012.
Additional Info:
This piece concerns "public work" in the sense of student assignments taking place outside the classroom or a closed Learning Management System. It is in the form of a Storify of a Twitter chat that took place March 26, 2012.
Additional Info:
The developer of the University of Mary (Washington) project "A Domain of One's Own," explains the program’s innovative and expansive understanding of student e-portfolios in a TEDx talk.
Additional Info:
The developer of the University of Mary (Washington) project "A Domain of One's Own," explains the program’s innovative and expansive understanding of student e-portfolios in a TEDx talk.
Additional Info:
Information, web links, and videos explaining "A Domain of One's Own," the University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating.
Additional Info:
Information, web links, and videos explaining "A Domain of One's Own," the University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating.
Additional Info:
Emory College of Arts and Sciences describes its rollout of its version of "A Domain of One's Own," a University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating. This ECAS page includes a description of the program, and links to extensive documentation for faculty, students, and support staff.
Additional Info:
Emory College of Arts and Sciences describes its rollout of its version of "A Domain of One's Own," a University of Mary (Washington) initiative whereby students craft their own web presence into a portfolio that they control and can take with them after graduating. This ECAS page includes a description of the program, and links to extensive documentation for faculty, students, and support staff.
Additional Info:
Responding to Nicholas Kristof's widely-read NYT piece lamenting the lack of civic engagement by professors, Goldberg describes how academic institutions can punish civic engagement because it distracts from grant procurement or other institutional service.
Additional Info:
Responding to Nicholas Kristof's widely-read NYT piece lamenting the lack of civic engagement by professors, Goldberg describes how academic institutions can punish civic engagement because it distracts from grant procurement or other institutional service.
Additional Info:
Responding to Nicholas Kristof's widely-read NYT piece lamenting the lack of civic engagement by professors, Robin provides URLs to a great many online "public intellectuals" in several fields. An excellent resource for instructors looking for existing models of "civic engagement."
Additional Info:
Responding to Nicholas Kristof's widely-read NYT piece lamenting the lack of civic engagement by professors, Robin provides URLs to a great many online "public intellectuals" in several fields. An excellent resource for instructors looking for existing models of "civic engagement."
Additional Info:
Panel discussion of Jolyon Mitchell and Owen Gower's Religion and the News
Additional Info:
Panel discussion of Jolyon Mitchell and Owen Gower's Religion and the News
Additional Info:
Teach students to love the library.
Additional Info:
Teach students to love the library.
Additional Info:
In 2001, 33 upperclassmen representing 27 colleges gathered at the Johnson Foundation for the Wingspread Summit on Student Civic Engagement. They participated in a group discussion focused on their “civic experiences” in college. Report captures the tensions and promise surrounding meanings that students assign to politics and development as citizens.
Additional Info:
In 2001, 33 upperclassmen representing 27 colleges gathered at the Johnson Foundation for the Wingspread Summit on Student Civic Engagement. They participated in a group discussion focused on their “civic experiences” in college. Report captures the tensions and promise surrounding meanings that students assign to politics and development as citizens.
Additional Info:
Importance of teaching civic engagement in humanities courses.
Additional Info:
Importance of teaching civic engagement in humanities courses.
Additional Info:
Website for Imagining America, a consortium of universities and organizations committed to advancing the public and civic purposes of humanities, arts, and design.
Additional Info:
Website for Imagining America, a consortium of universities and organizations committed to advancing the public and civic purposes of humanities, arts, and design.
Additional Info:
Harvard deans argue it’s time to reimagine higher education’s civic mission. The public purposes of education should go beyond benefits to individuals and focus on a tripod of intellect, morality, and action, all grounded in a knowledge base of American history and constitutional principles.
Additional Info:
Harvard deans argue it’s time to reimagine higher education’s civic mission. The public purposes of education should go beyond benefits to individuals and focus on a tripod of intellect, morality, and action, all grounded in a knowledge base of American history and constitutional principles.
Additional Info:
Project Pericles is a not-for-profit that encourages and facilitates commitments by universities to include social responsibility and participatory citizenship as elements of their education. It works directly with member institutions as they individually and collaboratively develop model civic engagement programs in their classrooms, on their campuses, and in their communities.
Additional Info:
Project Pericles is a not-for-profit that encourages and facilitates commitments by universities to include social responsibility and participatory citizenship as elements of their education. It works directly with member institutions as they individually and collaboratively develop model civic engagement programs in their classrooms, on their campuses, and in their communities.
Additional Info:
Campus Compact-- national coalition of 1,100+ university presidents committed to fulfilling the civic purposes of higher education. It promotes public and community service that develops citizenship skills, helps campuses forge effective community partnerships, and provides resources for faculty seeking to integrate civic-based. Membership includes public, private, two- and four-year institutions.
Additional Info:
Campus Compact-- national coalition of 1,100+ university presidents committed to fulfilling the civic purposes of higher education. It promotes public and community service that develops citizenship skills, helps campuses forge effective community partnerships, and provides resources for faculty seeking to integrate civic-based. Membership includes public, private, two- and four-year institutions.
Additional Info:
The Serve Program combines academic study of theology w/year-long community service project combating poverty. Analysis of the program during 2008–09 revealed that students demonstrated a significant increase in interest in theology; a greater desire to enroll in theology coursework; and a deeper interest in theology than non-participating classmates.
Additional Info:
The Serve Program combines academic study of theology w/year-long community service project combating poverty. Analysis of the program during 2008–09 revealed that students demonstrated a significant increase in interest in theology; a greater desire to enroll in theology coursework; and a deeper interest in theology than non-participating classmates.
Additional Info:
The Center for Religion and Civic Culture at USC, founded 1996, to create, translate, and disseminate scholarship on the civic role of religion in a globalizing world. Its innovative partnerships link academics and the faith community to empower emerging leaders through various programs.
Additional Info:
The Center for Religion and Civic Culture at USC, founded 1996, to create, translate, and disseminate scholarship on the civic role of religion in a globalizing world. Its innovative partnerships link academics and the faith community to empower emerging leaders through various programs.
Additional Info:
As students develop cognitively, integrating knowledge in ways that reflect their learning, they also need to grow both interpersonally, by considering themselves as part of a larger whole, and intrapersonally, by establishing a belief system that can influence and guide their choices and experiences.
Additional Info:
As students develop cognitively, integrating knowledge in ways that reflect their learning, they also need to grow both interpersonally, by considering themselves as part of a larger whole, and intrapersonally, by establishing a belief system that can influence and guide their choices and experiences.
Additional Info:
Study used the Measure of Epistemology Reflection to explore impact of service-learning and social justice education on cognitive development. Results showed service-learning courses had a positive impact on cognitive development, while service-learning courses w/a social justice emphasis appeared to have more impact on students’ cognitive development than those without.
Additional Info:
Study used the Measure of Epistemology Reflection to explore impact of service-learning and social justice education on cognitive development. Results showed service-learning courses had a positive impact on cognitive development, while service-learning courses w/a social justice emphasis appeared to have more impact on students’ cognitive development than those without.
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Intercultural and Transnational Pedagogy

Journal Issue
Posman, Ellen, and Locklin, Reid B., eds.
2011
Spotlight on Teaching, October
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Intercultural and Transnational Pedagogy: Editors' Introduction (Ellen Posman, and Reid B. Locklin)
ch. 2 Thoughts on Intercultural Education in Religious Studies (Edwin David)
ch. 3 The 2010 Census and the Undergraduate Classroom (Philip Wingeier-Rayo)
ch. 4 Teaching Buddhism, Teaching Otherness?: “Many Buddhisms” in Transnational Chicago (Anne Mocko)
ch. 5 Chi, Postcolonial Theory, and Theological Pedagogy (Grace Ji-Sun Kim)
ch. 6 Interrogating the University Archive (Gregory Lee Cuéllar)
ch. 7 Teaching Religion and Theology: Intercultural and Transnational Online Resources (Jonathan Y. Tan)
ch. 8 Intercultural and Transnational Pedagogies: Suggested Resources
Additional Info:
Includes syllabi from a variety of college and university courses, across all disciplines, that have a strong flavor of “civic agency,” the capacity to work across differences to solve public problems, create lasting civic goods, and shape the world around us in democratic ways. The project emphasizes courses that speak to citizens as citizens, concerned about co-creating their communities of different scale.
Additional Info:
Includes syllabi from a variety of college and university courses, across all disciplines, that have a strong flavor of “civic agency,” the capacity to work across differences to solve public problems, create lasting civic goods, and shape the world around us in democratic ways. The project emphasizes courses that speak to citizens as citizens, concerned about co-creating their communities of different scale.
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Wabash tree

Collaborative Futures: Critical Reflections on Publicly Active Graduate Education

Book
Gilvin, Amanda; Roberts, Georgia M.; and Martin, Craig, eds.
2012
Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, New York
LB2371.4.C66 2012
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Collaborative Futures places graduate education at the center of ongoing efforts to legitimize publicly engaged scholarship within the academic profession. It is indispensable reading not only for graduate students seeking inspiration, resources, and usable frameworks for their engaged scholarship, but for the faculty who are called upon to mentor them and for university administrators seeking encouraging answers to questions about the future of graduate education. Given the erosion of the ...
Additional Info:
Collaborative Futures places graduate education at the center of ongoing efforts to legitimize publicly engaged scholarship within the academic profession. It is indispensable reading not only for graduate students seeking inspiration, resources, and usable frameworks for their engaged scholarship, but for the faculty who are called upon to mentor them and for university administrators seeking encouraging answers to questions about the future of graduate education. Given the erosion of the tenure system and the casualization of teaching labor, graduate programs and professional organizations in many fields now recognize the imperative to prepare doctoral students for careers wholly or partially outside academe. This book powerfully indicates both the need and the means to change institutional cultures and forge a publicly active path for graduate education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Illustrations
Contributors
Foreword (Kevin Bott)
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Amanda Gilvin)

PART ONE: THEORY IN PRACTICE: Contextualizing Collaboration: Publicly Active Graduate Scholarship in United States Higher Education
ch. 1 The Arc of the Academic Career Bends Toward Publicly Engaged Scholarship (Timothy K. Eatman)
ch. 2 The Land-Grant System and Graduate Education: Reclaiming a Narrative of Engagement (Timothy J. Shaffer)
ch. 3 To Hell With Good Intentions (Ivan Illich)
ch. 4 Publicly Engaged Graduate Research and the Transformation of the American Academy (Susan Curtis, Shirley Rose, and Kristina Bross)
ch. 5 From Returning to Our Roots: The EngagedInstitution; Executive Summary with “Seven-Part Test” (Kellogg Commission on the Future of State and Land-Grant Universities)
ch. 6 Publicly Engaged Scholarship and Academic Freedom: Rights and Responsibilities (Nicholas Behm and Duane Roen)
Interchapter  ~  Statements of the American Association of University Professors
ch. 7 The Scholarship of Engagement (Ernest L. Boyer)
ch. 8 Community (Miranda Joseph)

PART TWO: Programs of Action: Institutionalizing Publicly Active Graduate Education
ch. 9 New Ways of Learning, Knowing, and Working: Diversifying Graduate Student Career Options Through Community Engagement (Kristen Day, Victor Becerra, Vicki L. Ruiz, and Michael Powe)
ch. 10 Getting Outside: Graduate Learning Through Art and Literacy Partnerships with City Schools (Judith E. Meighan)
ch. 11 Crossing Figueroa: The Tangled Web of Diversity and Democracy (George J. Sánchez)
ch. 12 The Engaged Dissertation: Three Points of View (Linda S. Bergmann, Allen Brizee, and Jaclyn M. Wells)
ch. 13 When the Gown Goes to Town: The Reciprocal Rewards of Fieldwork for Artists (Jan Cohen-Cruz)
ch. 14 Reimagining the Links Between Graduate Education and Community Engagement (Marcy Schnitzer and Max Stephenson Jr.)
ch. 15 Graduate Mentoring Against Common Sense (Ron Krabill)
ch. 16 First and Lasts: Lessons from Launching the Patient Voice Project at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop (Austin Bunn)

PART THREE: A Balancing Act: Publicly Active Graduate Students' Reflections and Analyses
ch. 17 Arcs, Checklists, and Charts: The Trajectory of a Public Scholar? (Sylvia Gale)
Interchapter  ~  Specifying the Scholarship of Engagement: Skills for Community-Based Projects in the Arts, Humanities, and Design (Imagining America)
ch. 18 Leveraging the Academy: Suggestions for Radical Grad Students and Radicals Considering Grad School (Chris Dixon and Alexis Shotwell)
ch. 19 Collaboration Conversation: Collaborative Ethnography as Engaged Scholarship (Ali Colleen Neff)
ch. 20 Reality Is Stranger than Fiction: The Politics of Race and Belonging in Los Angeles, California (Damien M. Schnyder)
ch. 21 Participatory Art, Engaged Scholarship: The Embedded Critic in Nadia Myre’s Scar Project (Amanda Jane Graham)

Resources
Index
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Lifelong Learning, The Arts and Community Cultural Engagement In The Contemporary University: International Perspectives

Book
Clover, Darlene E. and Sanford, Kathy, eds.
2013
Manchester University Press, Manchester, UK
LC5215.L54 2013
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

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Abstract: Lifelong learning, the arts, and community cultural engagement in the contemporary university maps the work of adult educators, teachers, researchers and graduate students from North America, Europe and Africa who use the arts in their university classroom teaching, their research and in service. It is written specifically for graduate students, and educators working in higher education, communities, schools, and practitioners who want to ...
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Abstract: Lifelong learning, the arts, and community cultural engagement in the contemporary university maps the work of adult educators, teachers, researchers and graduate students from North America, Europe and Africa who use the arts in their university classroom teaching, their research and in service. It is written specifically for graduate students, and educators working in higher education, communities, schools, and practitioners who want to learn how to better integrate the arts in their practice to critically and creativity communicate, teach, make meaning, uncover, and involve. The book contextualises the place and role of the arts in society, adult education, higher education and knowledge creation, outlines current arts-based theories and methodologies and provides examples of visual and performing arts practices to critically and creatively see, explore, represent, learn and discover the potential of the human aesthetic dimension in higher education teaching and research. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Darlene E. Clover and Kathy Sanford)

Section One: Arts-based teaching and learning
ch. 1 Embodied learning through story and dramatic play: Shifting values in university settings (Kathy Sanford and Kristin Mimick)
ch. 2 Dream, believe, lead: Learning citizenship playfully at the University of Cape Town (Astrid von Kotze and Janet Small)
ch. 3 Crossing a cultural divide: Transgressing the margins into public spaces fosters adult learning (Tara Hyland-Russell and Janet Groen)
ch. 4 University teacher education and the Pop-up Art School (Christine Jarvis and Sarah Williamson)
ch. 5 Fear of glue, fear of thread: Teaching arts-based practice in the adult education classroom (Shauna Butterwick and Darlene E. Clover)

Section Two: Arts-based Research and Enquiry
ch. 6 Mentoring arts-based research in the academy: A tale of two professors (Randee Lipson Lawrence and Patricia Cranton)
ch. 7 Collage-making for interdisciplinary research skills training in Northern Ireland (Shelley Tracey and Joe Allen)
ch. 8 Theatre-based action research for health in Denmark (Mia Husted and Ditte Tofteng)
ch. 9 Weaving tales of hope and challenge: Exploring diversity through Metissage (Catherine Etmanski, Will Weigler, and Grace Wong-Sneddon)
ch. 10 A new ‘Age of Enlightenment’: Challenges and opportunities for lifelong learning, museums and cultural engagement at the University of Glasgow (Maureen Park)
ch. 11 Empowering literary educators and learners in Northern Ireland: University-community engagements for peace (Rob Mark)
ch. 12 Creative pathways: Developing lifelong learning for community dance practitioners (Victoria Hunter)

Overlay: Messages, Tension and Threads (Darlene E. Clover and Kathy Sanford)
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Civic Pedagogies in Higher Education: Teaching for Democracy in Europe, Canada and the USA

Book
Laker, Jason; Naval, Concepción ; and Mrnjaus, Kornelija, eds.
2014
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
LC1091.C586 2014
Topics: Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
In this text, university teachers from Eastern Europe, Western Europe and North America report on their efforts to prepare students for engaged democratic citizenship. Their case studies illustrate methods employed to prepare citizens for meaningful participation in democracies, whether long-standing, young or emerging. The contributors describe their approaches in detail, reflecting on the philosophical and pedagogical considerations being employed, as well as exploring models of experiential service-learning, action research, and ...
Additional Info:
In this text, university teachers from Eastern Europe, Western Europe and North America report on their efforts to prepare students for engaged democratic citizenship. Their case studies illustrate methods employed to prepare citizens for meaningful participation in democracies, whether long-standing, young or emerging. The contributors describe their approaches in detail, reflecting on the philosophical and pedagogical considerations being employed, as well as exploring models of experiential service-learning, action research, and other curricular innovations. Stakeholders are encouraged to replicate, modify or entirely recast the ideas presented, in the interest of building capacity within their institutions, peers and partners to realize and maintain the promise of democracy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Notes on Contributors
Introduction – Civic Pedagogies in Higher Education: Teaching for Democracy in Europe, Canada and the USA (Jason Laker, Concepción Naval and Kornelija Mrnjaus)

ch. 1 Colleges and Universities Can Make a Difference: Human Rights Education through Study Visits of Human Rights Institutions (Peter G. Kirchschlaeger)
ch. 2 CommUniverCity: Building Community in the Silicon Valley (Dayana Salazar and Melinda Jackson)
ch. 3 Negotiating Change in Romanian Tertiary Education: Volunteering and Democratic Citizenship (Maria-Carmen Pantea)
ch. 4 Democratic Citizenship and the University Curriculum: Three Initiatives in England (Tristan McCowan)
ch. 5 Standing on Guard? History, Identity and the Quandaries of Citizenship Education in Canada (Jane G. V. McGaughey)
ch. 6 Student Designed Deliberative Forums as a Pedagogical Method (Alex Sager)
ch. 7 Learning to Participate: International Experiences of Service-Learning and Community Service Programs (Concepción Naval, Carolina Ugarte and Arantzazu Martínez-Odría)
ch. 8 The Personal Is Pedagogical: A Microcosmic Conversation on Democratic Education (Jason Laker, Minna J. Holopainen and Lorri Capizzi)

Index
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Learning Through Serving: A Student Guidebook for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement Across Academic Disciplines and Cultural Communities Edition: 2

Book
Cress, Christine M.; Collier, Peter J.; and Reitenauer, Vicki L.
2013
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC220.5.C72 2013
Topics: Service Learning   |   Civic Engagement

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Abstract: This substantially expanded new edition of this widely-used and acclaimed text maintains the objectives and tenets of the first. It is designed to help students understand and reflect on their community service experiences both as individuals and as citizens of communities in need of their compassionate expertise. It is designed to assist faculty in facilitating student development of compassionate expertise through the context ...
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Abstract: This substantially expanded new edition of this widely-used and acclaimed text maintains the objectives and tenets of the first. It is designed to help students understand and reflect on their community service experiences both as individuals and as citizens of communities in need of their compassionate expertise. It is designed to assist faculty in facilitating student development of compassionate expertise through the context of service in applying disciplinary knowledge to community issues and challenges. In sum, the book is about how to make academic sense of civic service in preparing for roles as future citizen leaders.

Each chapter has been developed to be read and reviewed, in sequence, over the term of a service-learning course. Students in a semester course might read just one chapter each week, while those in a quarter-term course might need to read one to two chapters per week. The chapters are intentionally short, averaging 8 to 14 pages, so they do not interfere with other course content reading.

This edition presents four new chapters on Mentoring, Leadership, Becoming a Change Agent, and Short-Term Immersive and Global Service-Learning experiences. The authors have also revised the original chapters to more fully address issues of social justice, privilege/power, diversity, intercultural communication, and technology; have added more disciplinary examples; incorporated additional academic content for understanding service-learning issues (e.g., attribution theory); and cover issues related to students with disabilities, and international students.

This text is a student-friendly, self-directed guide to service-learning that:

• Develops the skills needed to succeed
• Clearly links service-learning to the learning goals of the course
• Combines self-study and peer-study workbook formats with activities that can be incorporated in class, to give teachers maximum flexibility in structuring their service-learning courses
• Promotes independent and collaborative learning
• Equally suitable for courses of a few weeks’ or a few months’ duration
• Shows students how to assess progress and communicate end-results
• Written for students participating in service learning as a class, but also suitable for students working individually on a project. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Figures
Exercises
Acknowledgments
Preface
Introduction: Why a Book about Learning through Serving? (Christine M. Cress)

Part One: Understanding the Learning Through Serving Proposition
1. What is Service-Learning?(Christine M. Cress)
2. Building and Maintaining Community Partnership (Vicki L. Reitenauer, Amy Spring, Kevin Kecskes, Seanna M. Kerrigan, Christine M. Cress, and Peter J. Collier)
3. Becoming Community: Moving From I to We (Vicki L. Reitenauer)

Part Two: Learning the Landscape, Learning the Language
4. Groups Are Fun, Groups Are Not Fun: Teamwork for the Common Good (Peter J. Collier and Janelle D. Voegele)
5 Creating Cultural Connections: Navigating Difference, Investigating Power, Unpacking Privilege (Vicki L. Reitenauer, Christine M. Cress, and Janet Bennett)

Part Three: Facilitating Learning and Meaning - Making Inside and Outside the Classroom
6. Reflection in Action: The Learning–Doing Relationship (Peter J. Collier and Dilafruz R. Williams)
7. Mentoring: Relationship Building for Empowerment (Peter J. Collier)
Mentoring
8. Leadership and Service-Learning: Leveraging Change (Peter J. Collier)
9. Failure with the Best of Intensions: When Things Go Wrong (Janelle D. Voegele and Devorah Lieberman)
10. Expanding Horizons: New Views of Course Concepts (Christine M. Cress and Judy Patton)

Part Four: Assessing the Engagement Effort
11. Beyond a Grade: Are We Making a Difference? The Benefits and Challenges of Evaluating Learning and Serving (Sherril B. Gelmon, Susan Agre-Kippenhan, and Christine M. Cress)
12. Global and Immersive Service-Learning: What You Need to Know as You Go (Christine M. Cress, Stephanie T. Stokamer, Thomas J. Van Cleave, Chithra Edwin)
13. Start Anywhere, Follow It Everywhere: Agents of Change (Vicki Reitenauer)
14. Looking Back, Look Forward: Where Do You Go from Here? (Peter J. Collier and Vicki L. Reitenauer)

About the Authors
Index
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eService-Learning: Creating Experiential Learning and Civic Engagement Through Online and Hybrid Courses

Book
Strait, Jean R.; and Nordyke, Katherine, eds.
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC220.5.E74 2015
Topics: Online Learning   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
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Abstract: This book serves as an introduction to using online teaching technologies and hybrid forms of teaching for experiential learning and civic engagement. Service-learning has kept pace neither with the rapid growth in e-learning in all its forms nor with the reality that an increasing number of students are learning online without exposure to the benefits of this powerful pedagogy.

Eservice-learning (electronic ...
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Abstract: This book serves as an introduction to using online teaching technologies and hybrid forms of teaching for experiential learning and civic engagement. Service-learning has kept pace neither with the rapid growth in e-learning in all its forms nor with the reality that an increasing number of students are learning online without exposure to the benefits of this powerful pedagogy.

Eservice-learning (electronic service-learning) combines service-learning and on-line learning and enables the delivery of the instruction and/or the service to occur partially or fully online. Eservice-learning allows students anywhere, regardless of geography, physical constraints, work schedule, or other access limitations, to experience service-learning. It reciprocally also equips online learning with a powerful tool for engaging students.

In eservice-learning, the core components of service, learning, and reflection may take a different form due to the online medium—for example, reflection often occurs through discussion board interactions, journals, wikis, or blogs in an eservice-learning course. Moreover, the service, though still community-based, creates a world of opportunities to connect students with communities across the globe—as well as at their very own doorstep.

This book introduces the reader to the four emerging types of eservice-learning, from Extreme EService-Learning (XE-SL) classes where 100% of the instruction and 100% of the service occur online, to three distinct forms of hybrid where either the service or the instruction are delivered wholly on-line – with students, for instance, providing online products for far-away community partners – or in which both are delivered on-site and online. It considers the instructional potential of common mobile technologies – phones, tablets and mobile reading devices. The authors also address potential limitations, such as technology challenges, difficulties sustaining three-way communication among the instructor, community partner, and students, and added workload.

The book includes research studies on effectiveness as well as examples of practice such drafting grants for a community partner, an informational technology class building online communities for an autism group, and an online education class providing virtual mentoring to at-risk students in New Orleans from across the country. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreward (Andrew Furco)
Acknowledgements (Katherine Nordyke and Jean Strait)
Introduction (Katherine Nordyke)

Part I: Essentials/Components / Nuts and Bolts of eService-Learning
ch. 1 Pedagogy of Civic Engagement, High Impact Practices, and eService-learning (Jean Strait, Jane Turk and Katherine Nordyke)
ch. 2 eService-Learning: Breaking Through the Barrier (Leora Waldner)
ch. 3 Developing an eService-learning Course (Katherine Nordyke)
ch. 4 Supporting eService-Learning Through Technology (Jean Strait)

Part II: Models of eService-Learning
ch. 5 Hybrid I: Missouri State University Embraces eService-learning (Katherine Nordyke)
ch. 6 Hybrid II: A Model Design for Web Development (Pauline Mosley)
ch. 7 Hybrid III: Each One Teach One Lessons from the Storm (Jean Strait)
ch. 8 Hybrid IV: Extreme eService-learning: Online Service-Learning in an Online Course (Sue McGorry)
ch. 9 Mixed Hybrid: Investigating the Influence of Online Components on Service-Learning Outcomes at the University of Georgia Hybrid I and III E-Service-Learning (Paul Matthews)

Part III: Next Steps and Future Directions
ch. 10 Community Engagement and Technology for a More Relevant Higher Education (John Hamerlinck)
ch. 11 Conclusions and Future Directions (Jean Strait)

Editors and Contributors
Index
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Experiential Education in the College Context: What it is, How it Works, and Why it Matters

Book
Roberts, Jay W.
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2331.R53 2016
Topics: Course Design   |   Learning Designs   |   Civic Engagement

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Abstract: Experiential Education in the College Context provides college and university faculty with pedagogical approaches that engage students and support high-impact learning. Organized around four essential categories—active learning, integrated learning, project-based learning, and community-based learning—this resource offers examples from across disciplines to illustrate principles and best practices for designing and implementing experiential curriculum in the college and university setting. Framed by theory, ...
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Abstract: Experiential Education in the College Context provides college and university faculty with pedagogical approaches that engage students and support high-impact learning. Organized around four essential categories—active learning, integrated learning, project-based learning, and community-based learning—this resource offers examples from across disciplines to illustrate principles and best practices for designing and implementing experiential curriculum in the college and university setting. Framed by theory, this book provides practical guidance on a range of experiential teaching and learning approaches, including internships, civic engagement, project-based research, service learning, game-based learning, and inquiry learning. At a time when rising tuition, consumer-driven models, and e-learning have challenged the idea of traditional liberal education, this book provides a compelling discussion of the purposes of higher education and the role experiential education plays in sustaining and broadening notions of democratic citizenship. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Foreword

Part One: Landscape of Experiential Education
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Defining Experiential Education
ch. 3 Models and Methodologies of Experiential Education
ch. 4 The Instructional Paradigm: Leaving Safe Harbors

Part Two: Principles and Practices of Experiential Education
ch. 5 Design and Experiential Education
ch. 6 Facilitation and Experiential Education
ch. 7 Assessment and Experiential Education
ch. 8 The Integrated, Experiential Campus

Afterword
Cover image

Working Side by Side: Creating Alternative Breaks as Catalysts for Global Learning, Student Leadership, and Social Change

Book
Sumka, Shoshanna; Porter, Melody Christine; and Piacitelli, Jill
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC220.5.S86 2015
Topics: Civic Engagement

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Abstract: This book constitutes a guide for student and staff leaders in alternative break (and other community engagement, both domestic and international) programs, offering practical advice, outlining effective program components and practices, and presenting the underlying community engagement and global learning theory.

Readers will gain practical skills for implementing each of the eight components of a quality alternative break program developed by ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: This book constitutes a guide for student and staff leaders in alternative break (and other community engagement, both domestic and international) programs, offering practical advice, outlining effective program components and practices, and presenting the underlying community engagement and global learning theory.

Readers will gain practical skills for implementing each of the eight components of a quality alternative break program developed by Break Away, the national alternative break organization.

The book advances the field of student-led alternative breaks by identifying the core components of successful programs that develop active citizens. It demonstrates how to address complex social issues, encourage structural analysis of societal inequities, foster volunteer transformation, and identify methods of work in mutually beneficial partnerships. It emphasizes the importance of integrating a justice-centered foundation throughout alternative break programs to complement direct service activities, and promotes long-term work for justice and student transformation by offering strategies for post-travel reorientation and continuing engagement.

The authors address student leadership development, issue-focused education, questions of power, privilege, and diversity, and the challenges of working in reciprocal partnerships with community organizations. They offer guidance on fundraising, budget management, student recruitment, program structures, the nuts and bolts of planning a trip, risk management, health and safety, and assessment and evaluation. They address the complexities of international service-learning and developing partnerships with grassroots community groups, non-governmental and nonprofit organizations, and intermediary organizations.

For new programs, this book provides a starting point and resource to return to with each stage of development. For established programs, it offers a theoretical framework to reflect on and renew practices for creating active citizens and working for justice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Preface
Introduction

PART ONE: FOUNDATIONS
ch. 1 Alternative Breaks Defined
ch. 2 A Brief History of Alternative Breaks: The Beginnings of the Movement
ch. 3 Working Together for Justice: a Theoretical Framework
ch. 4 Developing Community Partnerships for Mutual Benefit
ch. 5 Alternative Breaks as Catalysts of Active Citizenship

PART TWO: KEY COMPONENTS OF ALTERNATIVE BREAKS
ch. 6 The Eight Components: Foundations of a Successful Alternative Break Program
ch. 7 Diversity and Social Justice: Addressing Power, Privilege, and Systems of Oppression
ch. 8 Education: Understanding Social Issues
ch. 9 Orientation: Learning about the Organization, Location, and Context
ch. 10 Training: Building Skills
ch. 11 Strong Direct Service: Working with Communities
ch. 12 Alcohol- and Drug-Free Programs: Practicing Full Engagement
ch. 13 Reflection: Synthesizing Learning and Experience
ch. 14 Reorientation: Active Citizens Reorganizing Locally

PART THREE: STUDENT LEADERSHIP, LEARNING, AND TRANSFORMATION
ch. 15 Student Leadership in Action
ch. 16 Program Structures and Leadership Roles
ch. 17 Training Student Leaders
ch. 18 Student Learning Outcomes, Assessment, and Evaluation

PART FOUR: DEVELOPING AND STRENGTHENING ALTERNATIVE BREAK PROGRAMS
ch. 19 Program Growth and Continual Improvement
ch. 20 Community Building
ch. 21 Recruiting Leaders and Participants
ch. 22 Budgeting, Finances, and Fundraising
ch. 23 Risk Management and Other Logistics

PART FIVE: GOING GLOBAL
ch. 24 The Complexities of International Alternative Breaks
ch. 25 Developing International Community Partnerships
ch. 26 Working with Intermediary Organizations

PART SIX: A SOCIETY OF ACTIVE CITIZENS
ch. 27 Working Collaboratively through Compacts and Collectives
ch. 28 The Power of Alternative Break Alumni
ch. 29 Vision for the Future of Alternative Breaks: A Call to Action

Appendices
Index
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Turning Teaching Inside Out: A Pedagogy of Transformation for Community-Based Education

Book
Davis, Simone Weil; and Roswell, Barbara Sherr, eds.
2013
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
LB1025.3.T85 2013
Topics: Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
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Abstract: The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program brings campus-enrolled and incarcerated students together as classmates in postsecondary courses built around dialogue, collaboration, and experiential learning. Contributors to this book consider the broader lessons that Inside-Out provides for community-based learning praxis, prison education and postsecondary teaching in general, both on campus and in community settings. An international network of practitioner-scholars probe the challenges and contradictions inherent ...
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Abstract: The Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program brings campus-enrolled and incarcerated students together as classmates in postsecondary courses built around dialogue, collaboration, and experiential learning. Contributors to this book consider the broader lessons that Inside-Out provides for community-based learning praxis, prison education and postsecondary teaching in general, both on campus and in community settings. An international network of practitioner-scholars probe the challenges and contradictions inherent in community-based work, but especially charged in the prison setting: the intersections of race, class and gender, and the tensions between teaching and activism, evaluation and advocacy, and compromise with and resistance to oppressive and dehumanizing systems. At a time when many in the Academy are seeking to deepen the impact of the community-based learning initiatives on their campuses, Turning Teaching Inside Out offers a model. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editor’s Preface: The Walls We Build and Break Apart: Inside-Out as Transformational Pedagogy (Butin)
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction - Radical Reciprocity: Civic Engagement from Inside Out (Simone Weil Davis and Barbara Roswell)


PART I: ORIGIN TALES: SEEDING AND BUILDING A PROGRAM

ch. 2 Drawing Forth, Finding Voice, Making Change: Inside-Out Learning as Transformative Pedagogy (Lori Pompa)

ch. 3 Inside-Out in Oregon: Transformative Education at the Community Level (Melissa Crabbe)

ch. 4 Death of a Street Gang Warrior (Paul Perry)

PART II: EXPANDING TEACHING AND LEARNING

ch. 5 What the World Needs Now (M. Kay Harris)

ch. 6 Liberation from University Education: A Lesson in Humility for a Helper (Amelia Lawson)

ch. 7 The American Educational System: Abuses and Alternatives (K.D.A. Daniel-Bey)

ch. 8 Opened Arms, Eyes and Minds (Charles Boyd)

ch. 9 Full Circle: A Journey from Students to Trainers (Mario Carines)

ch. 10 Teaching Itself: A Philosophical Exploration of Inside-Out Pedagogy (Gitte Butin)

PART III: PRODUCTIVE INTERSECTIONALITY: NAVIGATING RACE, PLACE, GENDER, AND CLASS

ch. 11 Roundtable: From Safe Space to Brave Space: Strategies for the Anti-Oppression Classroom (Shahad Atiya, Simone Weil Davis, Keisha Green, Erin Howley, Shoshana Pollack, Barbara Roswell, Ella Turenne and Tyrone Werts)

ch. 12 Being Human (Erin Howley)

ch. 13 Breaking Through 'Isms' (Ella Turenne)

ch. 14 Trusting the Process: Growing Self-Reflective Capacities Behind the Prison Walls (Kayla Follett and Jessie Rodger)


PART IV: TRANSFORMATION?: CONNECTION AS CATALYST

ch. 15 Turned Inside Out: Reading the Russian Novel in Prison after Levinas (Steven Shankman)

ch. 16 Look at Me! (Tony Vick)

ch. 17 Access for Whom? Inside-Out's Opening Door (Tyrone Werts)

ch. 18 The Reach and Limits of a Prison Education Program (Simone Weil Davis)

ch. 19 Transformative Learning in Prisons and Universities: Reflections on Homologies of Institutional Power (Kristin Bumiller)

ch. 20 Access or Justice? Prison College Programs and Transformative Education (Gillian Harkins)


PART V: YARDSTICKS AND ROADMAPS: ASSESSING CHANGE

ch. 21 Alchemy and Inquiry: Reflections on an Inside-Out Research Roundtable (Sarah Allred, Angela Bryant, Simone Weil Davis, Kurt Fowler, Phil Goodman, Jim Nolan, Lori Pompa, Barbara Roswell and Dan Stageman)
ch. 22 Relational Learning and the Inside-Out Experience (Sarah Allred, Nathan Belcher and Todd Robinson)

ch. 23 Evaluating the Impact of Community-Based Learning: Participatory Action Research as a Model for Inside-Out (Angela Bryant and Yasser Payne)


PART VI: LEANING INTO THE FUTURE: HELPING CHANGE ENDURE)

ch. 24 Inside-Out as Law School Pedagogy (Giovanna Shay)

ch. 25 Teaching the Instructors (Matt Soares)

ch. 26 Beyond 'Replication': Inside-Out in Canada (Simone Weil Davis)


PART VII: CLOSING CIRCLE

ch. 27 Preconceived Notions (Nyki Kish)

ch. 28 Barriers Comin' Down (Damien and Shawn)

ch. 29 Essence of Inside-Out (Lori Pompa)


Appendices
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching Civic Engagement (AAR Teaching Religious Studies) 1st Edition

Book
Clingerman, Forrest and Locklin, Reid B., eds.
2016
Oxford University Press, Oxford, NY
LC220.5.T38 2016
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Religion and Academia   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
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Abstract: Using a new model focused on four core capacities-intellectual complexity, social location, empathetic accountability, and motivated action--Teaching Civic Engagement explores the significance of religious studies in fostering a vibrant, just, and democratic civic order.

In the first section of the book, contributors detail this theoretical model and offer an initial application to the sources and methods that already define much teaching ...
Additional Info:
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Abstract: Using a new model focused on four core capacities-intellectual complexity, social location, empathetic accountability, and motivated action--Teaching Civic Engagement explores the significance of religious studies in fostering a vibrant, just, and democratic civic order.

In the first section of the book, contributors detail this theoretical model and offer an initial application to the sources and methods that already define much teaching in the disciplines of religious studies and theology. A second section offers chapters focused on specific strategies for teaching civic engagement in religion classrooms, including traditional textual studies, reflective writing, community-based learning, field trips, media analysis, ethnographic methods, direct community engagement and a reflective practice of "ascetic withdrawal." The final section of the volume explores theoretical issues, including the delimitation of the "civic" as a category, connections between local and global in the civic project, the question of political advocacy in the classroom, and the role of normative commitments.

Collectively these chapters illustrate the real possibility of connecting the scholarly study of religion with the societies in which we, our students, and our institutions exist. The contributing authors model new ways of engaging questions of civic belonging and social activism in the religion classroom, belying the stereotype of the ivory tower intellectual. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Introduction

Section I: What are the Dimensions of Teaching Civic Engagement in the Religious Studies or Theology Classroom?
ch. 1 Discourse, Democracy, and the Many Faces of Civic Engagement: Four Guiding Objectives for the University Classroom (Reid B. Locklin, with Ellen Posman)
ch. 2 Sacred Sites and Staging Grounds: The Four Guiding Objectives of Civic Engagement in the Religion Classroom (Ellen Posman, with Reid B. Locklin)

Section II: What Practical Strategies and Questions Emerge from Teaching Civic Engagement in Religious Studies and Theology?
ch. 3 Teaching for Civic Engagement: Insights from a Two-Year Workshop (Melissa Stewart)
ch. 4 Giving and Receiving Hospitality during Community Engagement Courses (Marianne Delaporte)
ch. 5 Civic Engagement in the Heart of the City (Rebekka King)
ch. 6 Engaging Media and Messages in the Religion Classroom (Hans Wiersma)
ch. 7 Service and Community-Based Learning: A Pedagogy for Civic Engagement and Critical Thinking (Phil Wingeier-Rayo)
ch. 8 Religious Diversity, Civic Engagement and Community-Engaged Pedagogy: Forging Bonds of Solidarity through Interfaith Dialogue (Nicholas Rademacher)
ch. 9 Stopping the Zombie Apocalypse: Ascetic Withdrawal as a Form of Civic Learning (Elizabeth W. Corrie)

Section III: What are the Theoretical Issues and Challenges in Teaching Civic Engagement in Religious Studies and Theology?
ch. 10 Thinking about the 'Civic' in Civic Engagement and Its Deployment in the Religion Classroom (Carolyn M. Jones Medine)
ch. 11 More than Global Citizenship: How Religious Studies Expands Participation in Global Communities (Karen Derris and Erin Runions)
ch. 12 Political Involvement, the Advocacy of Process, and the Religion Classroom (Forrest Clingerman and Swasti Bhattacharyya)
ch. 13 The Difference between Religious Studies and Theology in the Teaching of Civic Engagement (Tom Pearson)
ch. 14 Dreams of Democracy (Tina Pippin)

Bibliography
Index
Additional Info:
An interface between academic learning and civic engagement. The Initiative promotes the divergent thinking of arts and humanities in the service of solutions to real life problems.
Additional Info:
An interface between academic learning and civic engagement. The Initiative promotes the divergent thinking of arts and humanities in the service of solutions to real life problems.
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Work of Art in the World: Civic Agency and Public Humanities

Book
Sommer, Doris
2014
Duke University Press, Durham, NC
NX180.S6 S623 2014
Topics: Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Celebrating art and interpretation that take on social challenges, Doris Sommer steers the humanities back to engagement with the world. The reformist projects that focus her attention develop momentum and meaning as they circulate through society to inspire faith in the possible. Among the cases that she covers are top-down initiatives of political leaders, such as those launched by Antanas Mockus, former mayor of Bogotá, Colombia, and also bottom-up movements ...
Additional Info:
Celebrating art and interpretation that take on social challenges, Doris Sommer steers the humanities back to engagement with the world. The reformist projects that focus her attention develop momentum and meaning as they circulate through society to inspire faith in the possible. Among the cases that she covers are top-down initiatives of political leaders, such as those launched by Antanas Mockus, former mayor of Bogotá, Colombia, and also bottom-up movements like the Theatre of the Oppressed created by the Brazilian director, writer, and educator Augusto Boal. Alleging that we are all cultural agents, Sommer also takes herself to task and creates Pre-Texts, an international arts-literacy project that translates high literary theory through popular creative practices. The Work of Art in the World is informed by many writers and theorists. Foremost among them is the eighteenth-century German poet and philosopher Friedrich Schiller, who remains an eloquent defender of art-making and humanistic interpretation in the construction of political freedom. Schiller's thinking runs throughout Sommer's modern-day call for citizens to collaborate in the endless co-creation of a more just and more beautiful world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Prologue, Welcome Back

ch. 1 From the Top - Government-Sponsored Creativity
ch. 2 Press Here - Cultural Acupuncture and Civic Stimulation
ch. 3 Art and Accountability
ch. 4 Pre-Texts - The Arts Interpret
ch. 5 Play Drive in the Hard Drive - Schiller's Poetics of Politics

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Wabash tree

Introduction to Service-Learning Toolkit: Readings and Resources for Faculty, 2nd Edition

Book
Compact, Campus
2003
Campus Compact, Boston, MA
LC220.5.I59 2003
Topics: Service Learning   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
This new revised edition of our bestselling book brings together the best, most up-to-date writing and resources on service-learning, from learning theory and pedagogy to practical guidance on how to implement service-learning in the classroom. This edition reflects the tremendous growth in service-learning that has occurred since the first Toolkit was published in 2000. In addition to updated material throughout, this volume includes expanded chapters on community partnerships, student development, and ...
Additional Info:
This new revised edition of our bestselling book brings together the best, most up-to-date writing and resources on service-learning, from learning theory and pedagogy to practical guidance on how to implement service-learning in the classroom. This edition reflects the tremendous growth in service-learning that has occurred since the first Toolkit was published in 2000. In addition to updated material throughout, this volume includes expanded chapters on community partnerships, student development, and redesigning curriculum, as well as two new chapters—one exploring the connection between service-learning and civic engagement and the other focusing on community-based research. Revised and expanded recommended reading lists, broken down by topic, bring readers a wealth of print and online resources for further study. The Introduction to Service-Learning Toolkit is an essential resource for faculty and administrators who wish to be part of the growing movement toward civic engagement in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction to the Second Edition (Steven Jones)

ch. 1 Definitions and Principles
ch. 2 Service-Learning Definitions and Principles of Good Practice
ch. 3 Service-Learning: A Balanced Approach to Experiential Education (Andrew Furco)
ch. 4 At a Glance: What We Know About the Effects of Service-Learning on College Students, Faculty, Institutions, and Communities, 1993-2000, Third Edition (Janet S. Eyler, Dwight E.Giles, Jr., Christine M. Stenson, and Charlene J. Gray)
ch. 5 Service-Learning Resources on the Web
ch. 6 Definitions and Principles: Recommended Reading
ch. 7 Learning Theory
ch. 8 Service-Learning Practice: Developing a Theoretical Framework (Dick Cone and Susan Harris)
ch. 9 Toward a Theory of Engagement: A Cognitive Mapping of Service-Learning Experiences (Kerry Ann Rockquemore and Regan Harwell Schaffer)
ch. 10 Learning Theory: Recommended Reading
ch. 11 Pedagogy
ch. 12 Academic Service Learning: A Counternormative Pedagogy (Jeffrey P.F. Howard)
ch. 13 Pedagogy and Engagement (Edward Zlotkowski)
ch. 14 Pedagogy: Recommended Reading

ch. 15 Reflection
ch. 16 Reflection in Service Learning: Making Meaning of Experience (Robert G. Bringle and Julie A. Hatcher)
ch. 17 Reading, Writing, and Reflection (David D. Cooper)
ch. 18 Reflection: Recommended Reading
ch. 19 Redesigning Curriculum
ch. 20 Community Service Learning in the Curriculum (Jeffrey Howard)
ch. 21 Course Organization (Kerrissa Heffernan and Richard Cone)
ch. 22 Model Syllabi
ch. 23 Redesigning Curriculum: Recommended Reading
ch. 24 Model Programs
ch. 25 From Accreditation to Strategic Planning: An Administrator?s Interpretation of Service Learning (Erin Swezey)
ch. 26 Rediscovering Our Heritage: Community Service and the Historically Black University (Beverly W. Jones)
ch. 27 Model Programs: Recommended Reading
ch. 28 Student Development
ch. 29 Long-Term Effects of Volunteerism During the Undergraduate Years (Alexander W. Astin, Linda J. Sax, and Juan Avalos)
ch. 30 Comparing the Effects of Community Service and Service-Learning (Lori J. Vogelgesang and Alexander W. Astin)
ch. 31 Student Development: Recommended Reading
ch. 32 Civic Engagement
ch. 33 Civic Skill Building: The Missing Component in Service Programs? (Mary Kirlin)
ch. 34 The Service/Politics Split: Rethinking Service to Teach Political Engagement (Tobi Walker)
ch. 35 What Should Be Learned through Service Learning? (Michael X. Delli Carpini and Scott Keeter)
ch. 36 What Is Good Citizenship? Conceptual Frameworks Across Disciplines (Richard M. Battistoni)
ch. 37 Civic Engagement: Recommended Reading
ch. 38 Civic Engagement Resources on the Web
ch. 39 Community Partnerships
ch. 40 The State of the ?Engaged Campus?: What Have We Learned About Building and Sustaining University-Community Partnerships? (Barbara A. Holland and Sherril B. Gelmon)
ch. 41 Higher Education/Community Partnerships: Assessing Progress in the Field (David J. Maurrasse)
ch. 42 Community Partnerships: Recommended Reading
ch. 43 Community-Based Research
ch. 44 Principles of Best Practice for Community-Based Research (Kerry Strand, Sam Marullo, Nick Cutforth, Randy Stoecker, and Patrick Donohue)
ch. 45 Community-Based Research: Recommended Reading
ch. 46 Assessment
ch. 47 An Assessment Model for Service-Learning: Comprehensive Case Studies of Impact on Faculty, Students, Community, and Institution (Amy Driscoll, Barbara Holland, Sherril Gelmon, and Seanna Kerrigan)
ch. 48 How Do We Know That Our Work Makes A Difference? Assessment Strategies for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement (Sherril B. Gelmon)
ch. 49 Assessment: Recommended Reading
ch. 50 Academic Culture
ch. 51 The Scholarship of Engagement (Ernest L. Boyer)
ch. 52 Factors and Strategies that Influence Faculty Involvement in Public Service, by Barbara A. Holland
ch. 53 Addressing Academic Culture: Service Learning, Organizations, and Faculty Work (Kelly Ward)
ch. 54 Uncovering the Values in Faculty Evaluation of Service as Scholarship (KerryAnn O?Meara)
ch. 55 Academic Culture: Recommended Reading
ch. 56 Promotion and Tenure
ch. 57 Promotion & Tenure: Introduction
ch. 58 Retention, Tenure and Promotion Policy and Process, California State University, Monterey Bay
ch. 59 Criteria, Documentation and Procedures for Reappointment, Tenure and Promotion, Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Montclair State University
ch. 60 Policies and Procedures for the Evaluation of Faculty for Tenure, Promotion, and Merit Increases, Portland State University
ch. 61 Promotion and Tenure: Recommended Reading
ch. 62 Great Books for Further Reading
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Teachers Act Up! Creating Multicultural Learning Communities Through Theatre

Book
Cahnmann-Taylor, Melisa and Souto-Manning, Mariana
2010
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC1099.3.C34 2010
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Learning Designs   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
If teachers want to create positive change in the lives of their students, then they must first be able to create positive change in their own lives. This book describes a powerful professional development approach that merges the scholarship of critical pedagogy with the Theatre of the Oppressed. Participants “act up” in order to explore real-life scenarios and rehearse difficult conversations they are likely to have with colleagues, students, administrators, ...
Additional Info:
If teachers want to create positive change in the lives of their students, then they must first be able to create positive change in their own lives. This book describes a powerful professional development approach that merges the scholarship of critical pedagogy with the Theatre of the Oppressed. Participants “act up” in order to explore real-life scenarios and rehearse difficult conversations they are likely to have with colleagues, students, administrators, and parents. The authors have practiced the theatrical strategies presented here with pre- and in-service teachers in numerous contexts, including college courses, professional development seminars, and PreK–12 classrooms. They include step-by-step instructions and vivid photographs to help readers use these revolutionary theatre strategies in their own contexts for a truly unique learning experience. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward (Johnny Saldaña)
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Learning from Conflict, Performing Change
Acting Up
Breaking the Fourth Wall-From Spectator to Spect-actor
Reading This Book Together

Part I - Theatre of the Oppressed as a Critical Performative Approach to Creating Multicultural Learning Communities: An Overview
ch. 1 Pushing the Chairs Aside: How and Why We Got Started
Stresses and Tensions of Teaching in Multicultural Schools Within Monocultural Norms
The Personal and Interactional Nature of Teaching in a Diverse World
Focusing on Culturally Responsive Practices
Why Theatre? Exploring Possibilities in Multicultural Teaching Education

ch. 2 The Oppressed or the Oppressor? How Much Power Does the Teacher Have?
From Pedagogy to Theatre of the Oppressed: The Influence of Paulo Freire on the Work of Augusto Boal
The Revolutionary Nature of Boalian Theatre
Theatre of the Oppressed in Europe, Canada, and the United States

Part II - Teachers Act Up! Practicing Transformative Theatre
ch. 3 Liberating the Body: More Then Fun Games
Establishing Ground Rules
The Games: What’s in a Name; How Many A’s in an A; Stopping Around; House, Inhabitant, Tempest; Power Shuffle; Carnival
Learning Case
Games as Rehearsals for Change

ch. 4 Seeing Is Believing: Image Theatre Is Worth a Thousand Words
Releasing the Imagination
The Imagine Exercises: Complete the Image; Come, My Friends . . .; Columbian Hypnosis; The Machine: Building Interrelations; Image Techniques; The Model; Real/Ideal
Imaging the World, Imagining the Possibilities

ch. 5 Forum Theatre: Telling Stories of Teaching Conflict and Rehearsing Change
Forum Theatre: Foundations for Creating Change
How Forum Theatre Works: Generating Shard Doubts and Concerns
Performing Strategies for Action
Changing Scripts in Real Lives
Facilitating the Process: Forum Theatre as Foundations for Professional Development
Art Takes Time, but Time is Short

ch. 6 Troubling Oppressions, Seeking Change: Rainbow of Desire, Invisible, and Legislative Theatre
Somewhere Over the Rainbow: The Many Shades of Teaching and Rainbow of Desire Techniques
How Rainbow of Desire Takes Place
Invisible Theatre: Making the Invisible Visible
Legislative Theatre: Theatre as Politics and Democracy as Theatre

Conclusion: Implications Across Contexts
Call to Authority and Documentation
Networks of Support to Endure Struggle
(In)Subordination Through Parody and Humor
Evaluating Teachers Act Up!
Possibilities and Challenges: Theatre of the Oppressed in Teacher Education
Teatro as a Collective Problem-Solving Activity for Social Action: An Afterword by Kris D. Gutiérrez
Appendix: Reflecting on Embodied Teaching Education: A Teacher’s Testimony
References
Index
About the Authors
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Multiversities, Ideas, and Democracy

Book
Fallis, George
2007
University of Toronto Press, Toronto
LB2322.2.F35 2007
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Multiversities are sprawling conglomerates that provide liberal undergraduate, graduate, and professional education. As well-springs of innovation and ideas, these universities represent the core of society's research enterprise. Multiversities, Ideas, and Democracy forcibly argues that, in the contemporary world, multiversities need to be conceptualized in a new way, that is, not just as places of teaching and research, but also as fundamental institutions of democracy.

Building upon the history ...
Additional Info:
Multiversities are sprawling conglomerates that provide liberal undergraduate, graduate, and professional education. As well-springs of innovation and ideas, these universities represent the core of society's research enterprise. Multiversities, Ideas, and Democracy forcibly argues that, in the contemporary world, multiversities need to be conceptualized in a new way, that is, not just as places of teaching and research, but also as fundamental institutions of democracy.

Building upon the history of universities, George Fallis discusses how the multiversity is a distinctive product of the later twentieth century and has become an institution of centrality and power. He examines five characteristics of our age - the constrained welfare state, the information technology revolution, postmodern thought, commercialization, and globalization - and in each case explains how the dynamic of multiversity research alters societal circumstances, leading to the alteration of the institution itself and creating challenges to its own survival. The character of our age demands reappraisal of the multiversity, Fallis argues, in order to safeguard them from so-called 'mission drift.' Writing from a multi-national perspective, this study establishes how similar ideas are shaping multiversities across the Anglo-American world.

Ultimately, Multiversities, Ideas, and Democracy seeks to uncover the ethos of the multiversity and to hold such institutions accountable for their contribution to democratic life. It will appeal to anyone interested in the role of education in society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One: The Emergence of the Multiversity
ch. 1 The Idea of a University
ch. 2 The Uses of the Multiversity in Postindustrial Society
ch. 3 The Multiversity and the Welfare State
ch. 4 A Social Contract: Tasks, Autonomy, and Academic Freedom

Part Two: The Character of Our Age
ch. 5 The Constrained Welfare State
ch. 6 The Information Technology Revolution
ch. 7 Postmodern Thought
ch. 8 Commercialization
ch. 9 Globalization

Part Three: Renewing the Social Contract
ch. 10 The Multiversity and Liberal Democracy
ch. 11 A Liberal Education for Our Age

Notes
References
Index
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Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement

Book
Ronan, Bernie and Kisker, Carrie, eds.
2016
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC220.5.C59 2016
Topics: Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Concepts of civic learning and democratic engagement are central to the purpose of higher education, especially for community colleges. This volume:

- establishes a philosophical framework for civic learning and democratic engagement in community colleges,
- details several approaches to enhancing the civic capacities of students in these institutions,
- provides best practice examples and lessons learned from practitioners ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Concepts of civic learning and democratic engagement are central to the purpose of higher education, especially for community colleges. This volume:

- establishes a philosophical framework for civic learning and democratic engagement in community colleges,
- details several approaches to enhancing the civic capacities of students in these institutions,
- provides best practice examples and lessons learned from practitioners in the field, and
- addresses some of the sticky issues such as: What are the outcomes of civic learning programs and practices? How might civic competencies transfer to other settings? Is there a connection between civic skills and those valued in the workplace?

This is the 173rd volume of this Jossey-Bass quarterly report series. Essential to the professional libraries of presidents, vice presidents, deans, and other leaders in today's open-door institutions, New Directions for Community Colleges provides expert guidance in meeting the challenges of their distinctive and expanding educational mission. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Carrie B. Kisker, Bernie Ronan)

ch. 1 An Inventory of Civic Programs and Practices (Carrie B. Kisker)
This chapter describes the ways in which civic learning and democratic engagement are incorporated into colleges’ mission and strategic plans, curricula, professional development, and extracurricular programming.

ch. 2 Love of the World: Civic Skills for Jobs, Work, and Action (Bernie Ronan)
This chapter explores the philosophical roots of civic learning that are essential in helping students become engaged in their communities and active in democracy.

ch. 3 The Community College’s Role in Helping to Make Democracy Work as It Should (David Mathews)
This chapter examines how the work of community colleges relates to the democratic work that citizensmust do and makes the case for better alignment between the two.

ch. 4 Political Science, Civic Engagement, and the Wicked Problems of Democracy (John J. Theis)
This chapter describes the uncomfortable marriage between political science and civic education and calls for a reformulation of how we engage students in the wicked problems of democracy.

ch. 5 Civic Engagement and Cosmopolitan Leadership (Clifford P. Harbour)
This chapter explores the leadership qualities important to the development of civic engagement at a large, suburban community college.

ch. 6 Implementing the Civic Engagement Graduation Requirement at Kingsborough Community College (Lavita McMath Turner)
This chapter describes the process and challenges of implementing a civic engagement graduation requirement at Kingsborough Community College.

ch. 7 Overcoming Faculty Fears About Civic Work: Reclaiming Higher Education’s Civic Purpose (Cynthia Kaufman)
This chapter describes fears that may lead to faculty resistance to civic engagement and suggests ways of conquering these fears in order to further develop the civic capacity of our students and our institutions.

ch. 8 Reframing Teacher Education for Democratic Engagement (Lisa Strahley, Tracy D’Arpino)
This chapter describes a Public Achievement partnership between teacher education students at SUNY Broome and students at a local elementary school that led to all participants gaining a stronger sense of themselves as civic change agents in their communities.

ch. 9 Bridging Cultures to Form a Nation: The Humanities and Democratic Learning (Caryn McTighe Musil)
This chapter describes a 3-year curriculum and faculty development collaboration between the American Association of Colleges and Universities and The Democracy Commitment called Bridging Cultures to Form a Nation: Difference, Community, and Democratic Thinking.

ch. 10 Civic Engagement at a Small Rural College: If We Can Do It . . . (Kurt Hoffman)
This chapter describes the cocurricular activities offered through The Democracy Commitment at Allegany College of Maryland and the selfreported civic outcomes of its students.

ch. 11 The Civic Outcomes of Community College (Carrie B. Kisker, Mallory Angeli Newell, Dayna S. Weintraub)
This chapter describes the individual and institutional factors leading to greater civic outcomes among students at four The Democracy Commitment colleges in California.

ch. 12 Empowering and Transforming a Community of Learners via a Student-Centered Approach to Campus Dialogue and Deliberation (Jennifer Mair)
This chapter describes Skyline College’s student-centered approach to campus dialogue and deliberation and assesses the transferability of these skills to civic, workplace, and personal settings.

ch. 13 Bridging the Workforce and Civic Missions of Community Colleges (Lena Jones)
This chapter explores the relationship between the civic and workforce missions at Minneapolis Community and Technical College and suggests ways that they might be better integrated.

Index
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Theatre for Community Conflict and Dialogue: The Hope Is Vital Training Manual 1st Edition

Book
Rohd, Michael
1998
Heinemann Publishing, Portsmouth, NH
RJ505.P89R64 1998
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Classroom Management   |   Learning Designs   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
The first step forward in working with today's youth is to create a dialogue, and that is exactly what this exciting new book does. It helps you provide opportunities for young people to open up and explore their feelings through theatre, offering a safe place for them to air their views with dignity, respect, and freedom.

The purpose of this manual is to provide a clear look at ...
Additional Info:
The first step forward in working with today's youth is to create a dialogue, and that is exactly what this exciting new book does. It helps you provide opportunities for young people to open up and explore their feelings through theatre, offering a safe place for them to air their views with dignity, respect, and freedom.

The purpose of this manual is to provide a clear look at the process and specifics involved in the Hope Is Vital interactive theatre techniques. The organization is sequential, providing a blueprint for creating a workable plan. Beginning with warm-up exercises and bridging activities, the process moves forward to improvisational scenework, where students actually replace characters in the stories. It is at this point that young people engage in their own mini-theatre and look at choices, strategies, and communication.

Teachers will want to read this book. Counselors will want to read this book. Community leaders will want to read this book. It is useful in any group setting or as a tool for outreach. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward (Doug Paterson)
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Warm-ups
Energy and Focus Work
Circle Dash
Cover the Space
Tilt
Defender
Blind Handshakes
Minefield
Zip Zap Zop
Donkey
Machine

ch. 2 Trust Work
Trust Circle
Trust Falls
Blind (No Contact)
Find Your Mother Like a Little Penguin
Glass Cobra
Circle Height
Falling
Storytelling
Tour of a Place

ch. 3 Bridge Work
Environment
Values Clarification
Two Revelations
Complete the Image
Sculpting
Machine
Monologue Work

ch. 4 Improvisation
Activity/Urgency
Relationship Wheel
Russel's Soup (A/B)
Line Improvs
Exit
Entrance
Image Alive
Line/Location/Theme

ch. 5 Activating Material
Monologues
Sculpting
Machine
Small Groups

ch. 6 Facilitation

ch. 7 Peer Education

ch. 8 One Last Story

Appendix A: Performance Workshop Feedback Sheet
Appendix B: Sample Plans
Appendix C: Resources: Books
Appendix D: Resources: Contacts
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Liberating Service Learning and the Rest of Higher Education Civic Engagement

Book
Stoecker, Randy
2016
Temple University Press, Philadelphia, PA
LC220.5.S76 2016
Topics: Service Learning   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Randy Stoecker has been "practicing" forms of community-engaged scholarship, including service learning, for thirty years now, and he readily admits, "Practice does not make perfect." In his highly personal critique, Liberating Service Learning and the Rest of Higher Education Civic Engagement, the author worries about the contradictions, unrealized potential, and unrecognized urgency of the causes as well as the risks and rewards of ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Randy Stoecker has been "practicing" forms of community-engaged scholarship, including service learning, for thirty years now, and he readily admits, "Practice does not make perfect." In his highly personal critique, Liberating Service Learning and the Rest of Higher Education Civic Engagement, the author worries about the contradictions, unrealized potential, and unrecognized urgency of the causes as well as the risks and rewards of this work.

Here, Stoecker questions the prioritization and theoretical/philosophical underpinnings of the core concepts of service learning: 1. learning, 2. service, 3. community, and 4. change. By "liberating" service learning, he suggests reversing the prioritization of the concepts, starting with change, then community, then service, and then learning. In doing so, he clarifies the benefits and purpose of this work, arguing that it will create greater pedagogical and community impact.

Liberating Service Learning and the Rest of Higher Education Civic Engagement challenges—and hopefully will change—our thinking about higher education community engagement. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Prelude: Confessions and Acknowledgments

I The Problem and Its Context

ch. 1 Why I Worry

ch. 2 A Brief Counterintuitive History of Service Learning

ch. 3 Theories (Conscious and Unconscious) of Institutionalized Service Learning
Interlude

II Institutionalized Service Learning

ch. 4 What Is Institutionalized Service Learning's Theory of Learning?

ch. 5 What Is Institutionalized Service Learning's Theory of Service?

ch. 6 What Is Institutionalized Service Learning's Theory of Community?

ch. 7 What Is Institutionalized Service Learning's Theory of Change?

III Liberating Service Learning

ch. 8 Toward a Liberating Theory of Change

ch. 9 Toward a Liberating Theory of Community

ch .10 Toward a Liberating Theory of Service

ch. 11 Toward a Liberating Theory of Learning

ch. 12 Toward a Liberated World?

Postlude
References

Index
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Community-Based Research Teaching for Community Impact

Book
Beckman, Mary; and Long, Joyce F., eds.
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC237.C614 2016
Topics: Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Community-based research (CBR) refers to collaborative investigation by academics and non-academic community members that fosters positive change on a local level. Despite recent trends toward engaged scholarship, few publications demonstrate how to effectively integrate CBR into academic course work or take advantage of its potential for achieving community change.

Community-Based Research: Teaching for Community Impact fills these gaps by providing:
* An overview of language and methods used ...
Additional Info:
Community-based research (CBR) refers to collaborative investigation by academics and non-academic community members that fosters positive change on a local level. Despite recent trends toward engaged scholarship, few publications demonstrate how to effectively integrate CBR into academic course work or take advantage of its potential for achieving community change.

Community-Based Research: Teaching for Community Impact fills these gaps by providing:
* An overview of language and methods used by professionals engaged in CBR

* A framework for orienting CBR toward concrete community outcomes

* Effective ways to integrate CBR into course content, student-driven projects, and initiatives spanning disciplines, curricula, campuses and countries

* Lessons learned in working toward positive outcomes for students and in communities

This text is designed for faculty, graduate students, service-learning and other engaged learning and scholarship practitioners, alliance members, special interest groups, and organizations that desire to strengthen student learning and utilize research for improvement in their communities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Figures and Tables
Foreword (Timothy K. Eatman)
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Mary Beckman and Joyce F. Long)

PART ONE: DEFINITIONS, ORIENTING FRAMEWORKS, AND PARTNERS (Mary Beckman)
ch. 1 The Language and Methods Of Community Research (James M. Frabutt and Kelly N. Graves)
ch. 2 The Role of Community-Based Research in Achieving Community Impact (Mary Beckman and Danielle Wood)
ch. 3 Community-Based Research From the Perspective of the Community Partners (Jessica Quaranto and Debra Stanley)
ch. 4 Why Teach Community-Based Research? A Story of Developing Faculty Interest (Joyce F. Long, Paul Schadewald, and Brooke Kiener)

PART TWO: GUIDING COMMUNITY-BASED RESEARCH TOWARD COMMUNITY OUTCOMES AND STUDENT LEARNING (Joyce F. Long)
ch. 5 The Power Model Five Core Elements for Teaching Community-Based Research (Jennifer M. Pigza)
ch. 6 Applying the Power Model in a Second-Language Class (Rachel Parroquin with Emily Geiger-Medina)
ch. 7 Multicampus Partnerships Studying the Feasibility of Buying Local (Christopher S. Ruebeck)
ch. 8 Meeting The Objectives Of Faculty Engagement In Undergraduate Community-Based Research Projects (Anna Sims Bartel and Georgia Nigro)
ch. 9 Mathematical Modeling + A Community Partner = the Fulfillment of Student Learning Objectives (Ethan Berkove)
ch. 10 Strategic Training Goals
Preparing Graduate Students to Conduct School-Based Action Research (Anthony C. Holter and James M. Frabutt)
ch. 11 Working Through the Challenges of Globally Engaged Research (Elizabeth Tryon and Norbert Steinhaus)
ch. 12 Deepening Levels of Engagement
What Works, What Doesn’t, and the Important Role of a Community-Based Research Center (Judith Owens-Manley)
ch. 13 Engagement With the Common Good Curriculum and Evaluation of a Long-Term Commitment (Amy Lee Persichetti, Beth Sturman, and Jeff Gingerich)
ch. 14 Reflections on a Graduate Student’s Dissertation Experience Using Community Data for Research and Mentoring (Jody Nicholson)

PART THREE: COMMUNITY-BASED RESEARCH IN COMMUNITY-WIDE LONG-TERM EFFORTS (Mary Beckman)
ch. 15 The Poverty Initiative in Rockbridge County, Virginia (Don E. Dailey and David Dax)
ch. 16 Learning to Co-Construct Solutions to Urban School Challenges in Los Angeles (Adrianna Kezar and Sylvia Rousseau)
ch. 17 Community-Based Research and Development in Haiti Leveraging Multiple Resources for Maximum Impact (Anthony Vinciguerra)
ch. 18 Progressive Projects on Parent Involvement (Joyce F. Long)

Conclusion
Themes, Challenges, and Thoughts About the Future (Mary Beckman)
Editors and Contributors
Index
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Teaching as Scholarship: Preparing Students for Professional Practice in Community Services

Book
Gingras, Jacquui; Robinson, Pamela; Waddell, Janice; and Cooper, Linda D., eds.
2016
Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
HV11.T4 2016
Topics: Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book is about teaching for professional practice and explores ways to engage students in the classroom. It draws on the principles of rigorous scholarship and focuses on interactive learning between the class and the professor and among the students. Each contributor addresses the need to connect theory with community practice, deploying different methods in different contexts, and sharing scholarly reflections about how ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book is about teaching for professional practice and explores ways to engage students in the classroom. It draws on the principles of rigorous scholarship and focuses on interactive learning between the class and the professor and among the students. Each contributor addresses the need to connect theory with community practice, deploying different methods in different contexts, and sharing scholarly reflections about how to improve the craft of teaching. The essays offer practical suggestions that allow readers to adapt and apply these ideas in their own classrooms to suit their particular contexts and share the outcomes of that process. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Pamela Robinson)
Introduction: Teaching as Scholarship: Preparing Students for Professional Practice in Community Services (Jacqui Gingras, Janice Waddell, and Linda D. Cooper)

ch. 1 Intrerprofessional Education in a Community Services Context: Lessons Learned (Corinne Hart and Sanne Kaas-Mason)
ch. 2 The Writing Skills Initiative (V. Logan Kenney and Sonya Jancar)
ch. 3 Learning the Ethic of Care through Family Narratives (Mehrunissa Ali)
ch. 4 The Audacity of Critical Awakening through Intellectual Partnerships (Annette Bailey, Margareth Zanchetta, Gordon Pon, Divine Velasco, Karline Wilson-Mitchell and Aafreen Hassan)
ch. 5 My Dinners with Tara and Nancy: Feminist Conversations about Teaching for Professional Practice (Kathryn Church)
ch. 6 Drawing Close: Critical Nurturing as Pedagogical Practice (May Friedman and Jennifer Poole)
ch. 7 Educating for Social Action among Future Healthcare Professionals (Jacqui Gingras and Erin Rudolph)
ch. 8 Narrative Reflective Process, a Creative Experiential path to Personal Knowing in Teaching-Learning Situations (Jasna K. Schwind)
ch. 9 Introducing Art into the Social Work Classroom: Tensions and Possibilities (Samantha Wehbi, Susan Preston and Ken Moffatt)

Conclusion (Usha George)
About the Contributors
Index
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Interfaith Leadership: A Primer

Book
Patel, Eboo
2016
Beacon Press, Boston, MA
BL65.L42 P38 2016
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Religious Diversity   |   Civic Engagement

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A guide for students, groups, and organizations seeking to foster interfaith dialogue and promote understanding across religious lines

In this book, renowned interfaith leader Eboo Patel offers a clear, detailed, and practical guide to interfaith leadership, illustrated with compelling examples. Patel explains what interfaith leadership is and explores the core competencies and skills of interfaith leadership, before turning to the issues interfaith leaders face and how they can ...
Additional Info:
A guide for students, groups, and organizations seeking to foster interfaith dialogue and promote understanding across religious lines

In this book, renowned interfaith leader Eboo Patel offers a clear, detailed, and practical guide to interfaith leadership, illustrated with compelling examples. Patel explains what interfaith leadership is and explores the core competencies and skills of interfaith leadership, before turning to the issues interfaith leaders face and how they can prepare to solve them. Interfaith leaders seek points of connection and commonality—in their neighborhoods, schools, college campuses, companies, organizations, hospitals, and other spaces where people of different faiths interact with one another. While it can be challenging to navigate the differences and disagreements that can arise from these interactions, skilled interfaith leaders are vital if we are to have a strong, religiously diverse democracy. This primer presents readers with the philosophical underpinnings of interfaith theory and outlines the skills necessary to practice interfaith leadership today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Identity
ch. 1 The Identity of an Interfaith Leader

Theory
ch. 2 The “Inter” in Interfaith
ch. 3 The “Faith” in Interfaith

Vision
ch. 4 The Vision of Interfaith Leadership

Knowledge Base
ch. 5 The Knowledge Base of Interfaith Leadership

Skill Set
ch. 6 The Skill Set of Interfaith Leadership

Qualities
ch. 7 The Qualities of Interfaith Leadership

Conclusion
Appendix: Summary of Frameworks
Acknowledgments
Notes
Works Cited
Index
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Engaging Higher Education: Purpose, Platforms, and Programs for Community Engagement

Book
Welch, Marshall
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC238.W45 2016
Topics: Civic Engagement

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For directors of campus centers that have received the Carnegie Classification for Community Engagement, this book offers research and models to further advance their work. For directors starting out, or preparing for application for the Carnegie Classification, it provides guidance on setting up and structuring centers as well as practical insights into the process of application and the criteria they will need to meet.

Building on the findings ...
Additional Info:
For directors of campus centers that have received the Carnegie Classification for Community Engagement, this book offers research and models to further advance their work. For directors starting out, or preparing for application for the Carnegie Classification, it provides guidance on setting up and structuring centers as well as practical insights into the process of application and the criteria they will need to meet.

Building on the findings of the research undertaken by the author and John Saltmarsh on the infrastructure of campus centers for engagement that have received the Carnegie Classification for Community, this book responds to the expressed needs of the participating center directors for models and practices they could share and use with faculty, and mid-level and upper-level administrators to more fully embed engagement into institutional culture and practice.

This book is organized around the purpose (the “why”), platforms (the “how”), and programs (the “what”) that drive and frame community engagement in higher education, offering practitioners valuable information on trends of current practice based on Carnegie Classification criteria. It will also serve the needs of graduate students aspiring to become the future professoriate as engaged scholars, or considering preparation for new administrative positions being created at centers.

Co-published with Campus Compact. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward - The Continuing Evolution of Community Engagement Centers (John Saltmarsh)
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I - Purpose
ch. 1 Pathway to Public Service: Getting to Now
ch. 2 What Is Engagement?

Part II - Platforms
ch. 3 Institutionalization of Community Engagement
ch. 4 Implementation of Community Engagement
ch. 5 Infrastructure and Operations of Campus Centers for Engagement

Part III - Programs
ch. 6 Engaging Students
ch. 7 Engaging Faculty
ch. 8 Engaging Community Partners
ch. 9 Promise, Peril, and Projections

Appendices
References
About the Author
Index
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Publicly Engaged Scholars: Next-Generation Engagement and the Future of Higher Education

Book
Post, Margaret A.; Ward, Elaine; Longo, Nicholas V.; Satlmarsh, John, eds.
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC238.P84 2016
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Civic Engagement

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Abstract: The concern that the democratic purposes of higher education -- and its conception as a public good -- are being undermined, with the growing realization that existing structures are unsuited to addressing today's complex societal problems, and that our institutions are failing an increasingly diverse population, all give rise to questioning the current model of the university.

This book presents the ...
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Abstract: The concern that the democratic purposes of higher education -- and its conception as a public good -- are being undermined, with the growing realization that existing structures are unsuited to addressing today's complex societal problems, and that our institutions are failing an increasingly diverse population, all give rise to questioning the current model of the university.

This book presents the voices of a new generation of scholars, educators, and practitioners who are committed to civic renewal and the public purposes of higher education. They question existing policies, structures, and practices, and put forward new forms of engagement that can help to shape and transform higher education to align it with societal needs.

The scholars featured in this book make the case for public scholarship and argue that, in order to strengthen the democratic purposes of higher education for a viable future that is relevant to the needs of a changing society, we must recognize and support new models of teaching and research, and the need for fundamental changes in the core practices, policies, and cultures of the academy.

These scholars act on their values through collaboration, inclusiveness, participation, task sharing, and reciprocity in public problem solving. Central to their approach is an authentic respect for the expertise and experience that all stakeholders contribute to education, knowledge generation, and community building.

This book offers a vision of the university as a part of an ecosystem of knowledge production, addressing public problems with the purpose of advancing a more inclusive, deliberative democracy; and explores the new paradigm for teaching, learning, and knowledge creation necessary to make it a reality. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward (Timothy K. Eatman)
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introducing Next-Generation Engagement (Margaret A. Post, Elaine Ward, Nicholas V. Longo, and John Saltmarsh)

Part One: The Collaborative Engagement Paradigm
ch. 2 The Inheritance of Next Generation Engagement Scholars (John Saltmarsh and Matthew Hartley)
ch. 3 A Brief History of a Movement - Civic Engagement and American Higher Education (Matthew Hartley and John Saltmarsh)
ch. 4 Collaborative Engagement—The Future of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (Nicholas V. Longo and Cynthia M. Gibson)
ch. 5 Collaborative Engagement Research and Implications for Institutional Change (Farrah Jacquez, Elaine Ward, and Molly Goguen)
ch. 6 Legitimacy, Agency, and Inequality - Organizational Practices for Full Participation of Community Engaged Faculty (KerryAnn O’Meara)

Part Two: New Public Scholars
Opening (Elaine Ward)
ch. 7 Disrupting Role Dichotomies (Lina Dostillio, Emily Janke, Margaret A. Post, Annie Miller, and Elaine Ward)
ch. 8 Developing a Community-Engaged Scholarly Identity (Katie Beck, Adam Bush, Lorena Holguin, Demetri Morgan, and Cecilia Orphan)
ch. 9 Paving New Professional Pathways for Community Engaged Scholarship (Patrick Green, Barbara Harrison, Jessica Reading, and Timothy Shaffer)
ch. 10 Critical Commitments to Community and Campus Change (Eric Hartman, Glennys Sanchez, Sabina Shakya, and Brandon Whitney)
ch. 11 Fortunate accidents and winding pathways – The personal and professional spaces of authenticity (Ben Anderson-Nathe, Farrah Jacquez, Rachael Kerns-Wetherington, and Tania D. Mitchell)
ch. 12 Next Generation Engaged Scholars – Stewards of Change (Elaine Ward and Annie Miller)

Part Three: The Future of Engagement
ch. 13 The Future of the Academy with Students as Colleagues (Nicholas V. Longo, Abby Kiesa, and Richard Battistoni)
ch. 14 Next Generation Engagement Scholars in the Neoliberal University (Cecilia M. Orphan and KerryAnn O’Meara)
ch. 15 Building an Organizational Structure that Fosters Blended Engagement (Byron P. White)

Afterword: Practice and Theory in the Service of Social Change (Peter Levine)

About the Authors
Index
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Creating Citizens: Liberal Arts, Civic Engagement, and the Land-Grant Tradition

Book
Brunner, Brigitta R.
2016
University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, AL
LC220.5.C698 2016
Topics: Academic Histories and Contexts   |   Civic Engagement

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In Creating Citizens, professors and administrators at Auburn University’s College of Liberal Arts recount valuable, first-hand experiences teaching Community and Civic Engagement (CCE). They demonstrate that, contrary to many expectations, CCE instruction both complements the mission of liberal arts curricula and powerfully advances the fundamental mission of American land-grand institutions.

The nine essays in Creating Citizens offer structures for incorporating CCE ...
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In Creating Citizens, professors and administrators at Auburn University’s College of Liberal Arts recount valuable, first-hand experiences teaching Community and Civic Engagement (CCE). They demonstrate that, contrary to many expectations, CCE instruction both complements the mission of liberal arts curricula and powerfully advances the fundamental mission of American land-grand institutions.

The nine essays in Creating Citizens offer structures for incorporating CCE initiatives into university programs, instructional methods and techniques, and numerous case studies and examples undertaken at Auburn University but applicable at any university. Many contributors describe their own rewarding experiences with CCE and emphasize the ways outreach efforts reinvigorate their teaching or research.

Creating Citizens recounts the foundation of land-grant institutions by the Morrill Act of 1862. Their mission is to instruct in agriculture, military science, and mechanics, but these goals augmented rather than replaced an education in the classics, or liberal arts. Land-grant institutions, therefore, have a special calling to provide a broad spectrum of society with an education that not only enriched the personal lives of their students, but the communities they are a part of. Creating Citizens demonstrates the important opportunities CCE instruction represents to any university but are especially close to the heart of the mission of land-grant colleges.

In open societies, the role and mission of public institutions of higher learning that are supported by public subsidies are perennial subjects of interest and debate. Creating Citizens provides valuable insights of interest to educators, education administrators, students, and policy makers involved in the field of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Brigitta R. Brunner)

I. Structures Designed to Support Community and Civic Engagement
ch. 1 Engaged Scholarship’s Place within the Tenure and Promotion Process (Brigitta R. Brunner)
ch. 2 A Profile of a University Community and Civic Engagement Political Science Internship (William E. Kelly)

II. Community and Civic Engagement Method and Technique
ch. 3 Community Inquiry in the Writing Classroom: Bridging Liberal Arts and Education with the Work of Civic Engagement (Chad Wickman)
ch. 4 Bridges across Wire (Kyes Stevens with James Emmett Ryan)
ch. 5 An Exploration of Outreach Opportunities for College German Programs in Alabama (Iulia Pittman and Anne-Katrin Gramberg)

III. Community and Civic Engagement Examples
ch. 6 Nobody is Telling Our Story (Nan Fairley)
ch. 7 Culturing Connection, Growing Community: The Art in Agriculture Initiative (Christopher McNulty and Barb Bondy)
ch. 8 Group Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Community-Based Research with a Family Focus (Elizabeth Brestan-Knight and Timothy S. Thornberry, Jr.)
ch. 9 Community and Civic Engagement, Civil Society, and Anthropological Research in India (Kelly D. Alley)

Conclusion (Brigitta R. Brunner)
Contributors
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Sexual Violence in and around the Classroom

TTR
Raybill, Rhiannon; Minister, Meredith; and Lawrence, Beatrice
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 1 (2017): 70-88
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 1
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Learning Designs   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Civic Engagement

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Sexual violence on campus is a major issue facing students, faculty, and administrators, and institutions of higher education are struggling to respond. This forum brings together three responses to the problem, with a focus on the religious studies classroom. The responses move from the institution to the faculty to the classroom, exploring three separate but linked spaces for responding to sexual violence. The first contribution (Graybill) critiques common institutional responses ...
Additional Info:
Sexual violence on campus is a major issue facing students, faculty, and administrators, and institutions of higher education are struggling to respond. This forum brings together three responses to the problem, with a focus on the religious studies classroom. The responses move from the institution to the faculty to the classroom, exploring three separate but linked spaces for responding to sexual violence. The first contribution (Graybill) critiques common institutional responses to sexual violence. The second contribution (Minister) advocates for long-term, classroom-based responses to sexual violence and describes a faculty/staff workshop response. The third contribution (Lawrence) emphasizes the classroom, examining the issues that arise when perpetrators of sexual assault are part of the student body. Read together, the pieces offer a comprehensive view of the complicated intersections of sexual violence, the university, and pedagogical issues in religious studies.
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Experiential Education: Making the Most of Learning Outside the Classroom

Book
Qualters, Donna M., ed.
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 124)
BF318.5.E973 2010
Topics: Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Donna M. Qualters)

ch. 1 Forms and Issues in Experiential Learning (David Thornton Moore)

This chapter identifies the major forms of experiential education in terms of their institutional settings, core educational practices, and constituencies, while addressing where experience fits in the academy's educational mission.

ch. 2 Community-Based Learning and Research (Elise Dallimore, David A. Rochefort, Kristen Simonelli)

Community-based learning and research enhances individual learning experiences, and the culture and curriculum of an institution. With a focus on administrative structure and classroom-based models, the authors address what is necessary to implement service-learning and community-based research.

ch. 3 Learning Abroad (Lori Gardinier, Dawn Colquitt-Anderson)

This chapter discusses the internationalization of higher education and the models for education abroad. The authors address the specific challenges these programs face and provide strategies for overcoming them.

ch. 4 Demystifying Experiential Learning in the Performing Arts (Nancy Kindelan)

This chapter discusses the intersection of performing arts, liberal arts, and experiential education through an exploration of operational and value-focused skills and active and intentional learning, as well as the application of these in a performing arts student’s capstone project.

ch. 5 Work-Based Learning: Valuing Practice as an Educational Event (Joseph A. Raelin)

This chapter explains work-based learning and offers practical guidelines to teach and assess learning of this nature. The author emphasizes the importance of and strategies for effective reflective practice.

ch. 6 Empowering Reflective Ethical Engagement in Field Settings (Perrin Cohen)

This chapter explores some of the ethical challenges faced by students in experiential education and provides strategies for teachers, supervisors, and administrators to assist students in gaining the skills and practices necessary to deal with such challenges.

ch. 7 Bringing the Outside In: Assessing Experiential Education (Donna M. Qualters)

This chapter challenges a negative view of assessment and explains the value of assessment to an experiential learning program. The author provides practical methods and models for involving faculty and measuring student learning.

ch. 8 Growing and Funding Experiential Learning Programs: A Recipe for Success (Monica R. Cowart)

This chapter outlines how a college or university with limited financial resources can best utilize internal and external resources to launch a new experiential learning program or enhance an existing one.

ch. 9 Campus Stories: Three Case Studies - In this chapter, three different sets of authors reflect on their experiences in creating or developing experiential learning programs.

Part A: Institutionalizing Pedagogical Change: A Case Study in Building a Learning Organization (Victoria A. Farrar-Myers, Dana Dunn)

This case study examines the lessons learned from the University of Texas at Arlington experience in developing and designing a strategic plan including active learning and experiential education.

Part B: The Odyssey Program at Hendrix College (Nancy P. Fleming, Mark S. Schantz)

The authors share the factors that contributed to the success of an experiential learning program at a small liberal arts college, and examine the consequences for students, faculty, staff, and the institution as a whole.

Part C: Putting Experiential Education into Practice: Using Kolb as a Learning Model for Implementing Organizational Change (James R. Johnson, Ronald J. Kovach, Patricia N. Roberson)

David A. Kolb's Experiential Learning Model provides the organizational change methodology for the implementation of innovative graduation requirements in experiential education at Purdue University Calumet.

ch. 10 Experiencing Success: Some Strategies for Planning the Program (Timothy Donovan, Richard Porter, James Stellar)

Drawing from their own experiential learning, the authors provide strategies for preparing an experiential education program and coping with the numerous challenges faced in developing this type of programming.

ch. 11 Making the Most of Learning Outside the Classroom (Donna M. Qualters)

This chapter describes the importance of developing the skill of deep reflection and calls for the establishment of a reflective curriculum strand to promote learning in the field.

Additional Resources
Index
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Civic Learning and Teaching as a Resource for Sexual Justice: An Undergraduate Religious Studies Course Module

TTR
Vasko, Elisabeth T.
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 2 (2017): 162-170
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Civic learning and teaching, a form of critical and democratically engaged pedagogy, is utilized in an upper-level undergraduate sexual ethics course to leverage public problem solving around the sexual violence on a mid-size Catholic collegiate campus. Through the course, students, faculty, staff, and community members work together to deepen understanding of the causes and consequences of sexual violence within society and the local community in order to evaluate and design ...
Additional Info:
Civic learning and teaching, a form of critical and democratically engaged pedagogy, is utilized in an upper-level undergraduate sexual ethics course to leverage public problem solving around the sexual violence on a mid-size Catholic collegiate campus. Through the course, students, faculty, staff, and community members work together to deepen understanding of the causes and consequences of sexual violence within society and the local community in order to evaluate and design programming for bystander intervention, education, and sexual violence prevention advocacy. After a discussion of the application of civic teaching and learning to sexual violence, the course module describes the learning outcomes and assignments used to assess them. See as well Donna Freitas's response to this essay, “The Risk and Reward of Teaching about Sexual Assault for the Theologian on a Catholic Campus,” published in this issue of the journal.
Additional Info:
This article is a response to Elisabeth T. Vasko's essay “Civic Learning and Teaching as a Resource for Sexual Justice: An Undergraduate Religious Studies Course Module” published in this issue of the journal.
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This article is a response to Elisabeth T. Vasko's essay “Civic Learning and Teaching as a Resource for Sexual Justice: An Undergraduate Religious Studies Course Module” published in this issue of the journal.
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Using Action Inquiry in Engaged Research: An Organizing Guide

Book
St. John, Edward P.; Lijana, Kim Callahan; and Musoba, Glenda D.
2017
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2326.3.U86 2017
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Civic Engagement

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Using Action Inquiry in Engaged Research: A Professional Guide offers higher education and school professionals practical guidance and methods for using the Action Inquiry Model (AIM) in engaged research initiatives and community partnerships. Replete with group exercises and case studies, this guide was originally developed to supplement workshops for faculty, administrators and students working on action initiatives that focused on critical educational issues facing ...
Additional Info:
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Using Action Inquiry in Engaged Research: A Professional Guide offers higher education and school professionals practical guidance and methods for using the Action Inquiry Model (AIM) in engaged research initiatives and community partnerships. Replete with group exercises and case studies, this guide was originally developed to supplement workshops for faculty, administrators and students working on action initiatives that focused on critical educational issues facing local communities. It provides a useful framework and straightforward techniques for building empowering partnerships.

The Action Inquiry Model (AIM) includes four stages:
• Assessment: Using research and experience to identify critical challenges facing the university with respect to the improvement of educational opportunities
• Organization: Developing workgroups to collaborate on initiatives that address critical challenges; providing financial support for new initiatives; and providing release time and professional development opportunities for faculty and staff who engage in reform initiatives
• Action Initiatives: Treating reforms as pilot tests for new strategies, as a means of promoting organizational learning, professional development, and student success
• Evaluation: Integrating the evaluation of current programs and incorporating new initiatives into the reform process.

This guide provides two methods for learning the inquiry process: a step-by-step process for defining tasks for teams of researchers and practitioners working together to use research to inform the educational improvement; and sets of case studies on assessment and action inquiry to inform groups in collectively discussing problems and strategies, an approach that supports the classroom use of the Guide.

The key tasks in action inquiry initiatives include:
1. Build an understanding of the challenge
2 Identify the causes of the challenge using data to test hypotheses
2. Look internally and externally for solutions
3. Assess possible solutions
4. Develop action plans
5. Implement pilot test, and evaluate

This guide is appropriate for professional development programs and as a text for higher education Masters and Ph.D. programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Tables
Figures
Foreword (Timothy K. Eatman)
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Getting Started
ch. 2 Focus on Barriers to Social Justice
ch. 3 Organizing for Change
ch. 4 Using Information for Change
ch. 5 Learning From Experience

Afterword (Rick Dalton)
References
About the Contributors
Index