Assessing Students

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Changing the Way We Grade Student Performance: Classroom Assessment and the New Learning Paradigm

Book
Anderson, Rebecca S. and Bruce W. Speck, eds.
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 74)
LB3051.C43 1998
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Assigning grades to student work raises many dilemmas for college and university teachers. This volume helps teachers deal with these dilemmas by providing rubrics to be used as guides for scoring various kinds of student performance. The authors offer a range of alternative approaches to assessing student performance that are rooted in the belief that students should be active rather than passive learners.They draw on their own classroom experience ...
Additional Info:
Assigning grades to student work raises many dilemmas for college and university teachers. This volume helps teachers deal with these dilemmas by providing rubrics to be used as guides for scoring various kinds of student performance. The authors offer a range of alternative approaches to assessing student performance that are rooted in the belief that students should be active rather than passive learners.They draw on their own classroom experience to explain how to use each assessment measure presented--including developing criteria, integrating peer and self-assessment, and assigning grades--and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. This is the 74th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. For more information on the series, please see the Journals and Periodicals section. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Why Talk About Different Ways to Grade? The Shift from Traditional Assessment to Alternative Assessment (Rebecca S. Anderson)
ch. 2 Unveiling Some of the Mystery of Professional Judgment in Classroom Assessment (Bruce W. Speck)
ch. 3 Grading Classroom Participation (John C. Bean, Dean Peterson)
ch. 4 Designing and Grading Oral Communication Assignments(Brooke L. Quigley)
ch. 5 Designing and Grading Written Assignments (Eric H. Hobson)
ch. 6 Grading Cooperative Projects (Karl A. Smith)
ch. 7 Evaluating Technology-Based Processes and Products(Gary R. Morrison, Steven M. Ross)
ch. 8 Portfolios: Purposeful Collections of Student Work(Joan A. Mullin)
ch. 9 Grading Inquiry Projects (Beverly Busching)
ch. 10 Grading Student Performance in Real-World Settings (Patricia A. Scanlon, Michael P. Ford)

Index
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Classroom Assessment and Research: An Update on Uses, Approaches and Research Findings

Book
Angelo, Thomas A., ed.
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 75)
LB2822.75.C55 1998
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Classroom research has evolved considerably in the past few years. This sourcebook explores how classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are now being used to build student learning skills, and examines current research on how classroom assessment has changed both teaching and learning. It also introduces new uses for CATs—to promote effective student teamwork, help institutions answer the call for more accountability, and guide new teachers in developing their teaching philosophies. ...
Additional Info:
Classroom research has evolved considerably in the past few years. This sourcebook explores how classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are now being used to build student learning skills, and examines current research on how classroom assessment has changed both teaching and learning. It also introduces new uses for CATs—to promote effective student teamwork, help institutions answer the call for more accountability, and guide new teachers in developing their teaching philosophies. This is the 75th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. For more information on the series, please see the New Directions for Teaching and Learning page. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part One: The Philosophy of Classroom Assessment and Research
ch. 1 Classroom Research: Implementing the Scholarship of Teaching (K. Patricia Cross)
ch. 2 CATs: A Student's Gateway to Better Learning (Mimi Steadman, Marilla Svinicki)

Part Two: Research on Classroom Assessment and Research
ch. 3 Using Classroom Assessment to Change Both Teaching and Learning (Mimi Steadman)
ch. 4 Do Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) Improve Student Learning? (Philip Cottell, Elaine Harwood)
ch. 5 Quality in the Classroom: Classroom Assessment Techniques as TQM (Elaine Soetaert)

Part Three: New Applications, New Considerations
ch. 6 Classroom Assessment Across the Disciplines (Regina Eisenbach, Vicki Golich, Renee Curry)
ch. 7 A Minnesota Story: A System Approach to Classroom Assessment and Research (Joel Peterson, Connie Stack)
ch. 8 Using CATs to Help New Instructors Develop as Teachers (Laurie Richlin)
ch. 9 Classroom Research and Program Accountability: A Match Made in Heaven? (Margaret Tebo-Messina, Chris Van Aller)
ch. 10 A Collective Effort Classroom Assessment Technique: Promoting High Performance in Student Teams (Charles Walker, Thomas Angelo)
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Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers, 2nd ed.

Book
Angelo, Thomas A. and K. Patricia Cross
1993
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2822.75.A54 1993
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
This revised and greatly expanded edition of the 1988 handbook offers teachers at all levels of experience detailed, how-to advice on classroom assessment—from what it is and how it works to planning, implementing, and analyzing assessment projects. The authors illustrate their approach through twelve case studies that detail the real-life classroom experiences of teachers carrying out successful classroom assessment projects. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This revised and greatly expanded edition of the 1988 handbook offers teachers at all levels of experience detailed, how-to advice on classroom assessment—from what it is and how it works to planning, implementing, and analyzing assessment projects. The authors illustrate their approach through twelve case studies that detail the real-life classroom experiences of teachers carrying out successful classroom assessment projects. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Authors

Part 1 Getting Started in Classroom Assessment
ch. 1 What Is Classroom Assessment?
ch. 2 The Teaching Goals Inventory
ch. 3 First Steps
ch. 4 Planning and Implementing Classroom Assessment Projects
ch. 5 Twelve Examples of Successful Projects

Part 2 Classroom Assessment Techniques
ch. 6 Choosing the Right Technique
ch. 7 Techniques for Assessing Course-Related Knowledge and Skills
ch. 8 Techniques for Assessing Learner Attitudes, Values, and Self-Awareness
ch. 9 Techniques for Assessing Learner Reactions to Instruction
pt. 3 Building on What We Have Learned
ch. 10 Lessons and Insights from Six Years of Use
ch. 11 Taking the Next Steps in Classroom Assessment and Research

A. Colleges Participating in the 1990 Teaching Goals Inventory Survey
B. Teaching Goals Inventory and Self-Scorable Worksheet
C. 1990 Comparative Data on the Teaching Goals Inventory in Community Colleges
D. 1990 Comparative Data on the Teaching Goals Inventory in Four-Year Colleges
E. Bibliography of Resources on Classroom Research and Assessment

References
Index
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Assessment for Excellence: The Philosophy and Practice of Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education

Book
Astin, Alexander W.
1993
Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LB2366.2.A89 1993
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In this detailed study, Astin examines why assessment activity has produced such meager results and, just as important, how existing activities can be improved. The author also discusses what new assessment practices can be implemented and shares specific and sometimes startling ideas on: How assessment information can most effectively be used for evaluation How results can be used to enlighten and inform the practitioner How practical, technical, and political problems ...
Additional Info:
In this detailed study, Astin examines why assessment activity has produced such meager results and, just as important, how existing activities can be improved. The author also discusses what new assessment practices can be implemented and shares specific and sometimes startling ideas on: How assessment information can most effectively be used for evaluation How results can be used to enlighten and inform the practitioner How practical, technical, and political problems can be overcome when building an assessment database from student and faculty input How the movement of externally mandated assessments in various states is having a negative impact on higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 The Philosophy and Logic of Assessment
ch. 2 A Conceptual Model for Assessment
ch. 3 Assessing Outcomes
ch. 4 Assessing Student Inputs
ch. 5 Assessing the Environment
ch. 6 Analyzing Assessment Data
ch. 7 Use of Assessment Results
ch. 8 Building a Data Base
ch. 9 Assessment as Direct Feedback to the Learner
ch. 10 Assessment and Equity
ch. 11 Assessment and Public Policy
ch. 12 The Future of Assessment

Appendix
Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data
References
Index
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Perspectives on Plagiarism and Intellectual Property in a Postmodern World

Book
Buranen, Lise and Alice M. Roy, eds.
1999
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
PN167.P47 1999
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Assessing Students   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This book offers a wealth of thinking about the complex and often contradictory definitions surrounding the concepts of plagiarism and intellectual property. The authors show that plagiarism is not nearly as simple and clear cut a phenomenon as we may think. Contributors offer many definitions and facets of plagiarism and intellectual property, demonstrating that if defining a supposedly "simple" concept is difficult, then applying multiple definitions is even harder, creating ...
Additional Info:
This book offers a wealth of thinking about the complex and often contradictory definitions surrounding the concepts of plagiarism and intellectual property. The authors show that plagiarism is not nearly as simple and clear cut a phenomenon as we may think. Contributors offer many definitions and facets of plagiarism and intellectual property, demonstrating that if defining a supposedly "simple" concept is difficult, then applying multiple definitions is even harder, creating practical problems in many realms. This volume exposes the range and breadth of these overlapping and complex issues, reflecting a postmodern sensibility of fragmentation, and clarifies some of the confusion, not by reducing plagiarism to ever-simpler definitions and providing new or better rules to apply, but by complicating the issue, examining what plagiarism and intellectual property are (and are not) in our more or less postmodern world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Pt. I Definitions
Legal and Historical Definitions
Copy Wrong: Plagiarism, Process, Property, and the Law (Laurie Stearns)
Originality, Authenticity, Imitation, and Plagiarism: Augustine's Chinese Cousins (C. Jan Swearingen)
Intellectual Property, Authority, and Social Formation: Sociohistorical Perspectives on the Author Function (James Thomas Zebroski)
Competing Notions of Authorship: A Historical Look at Students and Textbooks on Plagiarism and Cheating (Sue Carter Simmons)
Academic Definitions
Whose Words These Are I Think I Know: Plagiarism, the Postmodern, and Faculty Attitudes (Alice M. Roy)
"But I Wasn't Cheating": Plagiarism and Cross-Cultural Mythology (Lisa Buranen)
A Distant Mirror or Through the Looking Glass? Plagiarism and Intellectual Property in Japanese Education (L.M. Dryden)
The New Abolitionism Comes to Plagiarism (Rebecca Moore Howard)
Literary and Theoretical Definitions
The Illusion of Modernist Allusion and the Politics of Postmodern Plagiarism (Kevin J.H. Dettmar)
Poaching and Plagiarizing: Property, Plagiarism, and Feminist Futures (Deborah Halbert)
From Kant to Foucault: What Remains of the Author in Postmodernism (Gilbert Larochelle)
Imperial Plagiarism
Literary Borrowing and Historical Compilation in Medieval China (Robert André LaFleur)

Pt. II Applications
In the Writing Center
Writing Centers and Plagiarism (Irene L Clark)
Writing Centers and Intellectual Property: Are Faculty Members and Students Differently Entitled? (Carol Peterson Haviland and Joan Mullin)
Plagiarism, Rhetorical Theory, and the Writing Center: New Approaches, New Locations (Linda Shamoon and Deborah H. Burns)
In Academic Administration
Confusion and Conflict about Plagiarism in Law Schools and Law Practice (Terri LeClercq)
Student Plagiarism as an Institutional and Social Issue
When Collaboration Becomes Plagiarism: The Administrative Perspective (Edward M. White)
In Instruction and Research
Plagiarism as Metaphor (David Leight
The Ethics of Appropriation in Peer Writing Groups (Candace Spigelman)
The Role of Scholarly Citations in Disciplinary Economies (Shirley K. Rose)
In the Marketplace
Brand Name Use in Creative Writing: Genericide or Language Right? (Shawn M. Clankie)
GenX Occupies the Cultural Commons: Ethical Practices and Perceptions of Fair Use (John Livingston-Webber

Works Cited
Contributors
Index
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Planning and Implementing Assessment

Book
Freeman, Richard, and Roger Lewis
1998
Kogan Page, London
LB3051.F74 1998
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The authors provide a set of timeless principles and analytical methods that can be adapted to a variety of assessment scenarios, and which individual teachers can use to construct their own effective methods for assessment. They provide college, university teachers, and faculty development staff with clear guidelines for design, and methods of planning, choosing and implementing assessment. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The authors provide a set of timeless principles and analytical methods that can be adapted to a variety of assessment scenarios, and which individual teachers can use to construct their own effective methods for assessment. They provide college, university teachers, and faculty development staff with clear guidelines for design, and methods of planning, choosing and implementing assessment. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1: Principles of assessment
ch. 1 The purposes of assessment
ch. 2 Norm- and cirterion-referenced, and ipsative, or self-referenced, assessment
ch. 3 Reliability and validity
ch. 4 Assessment modes and sources
ch. 5 Assessment criteria
ch. 6 Feedback
ch. 7 The proactive learner
ch. 8 Describing the learning

Part 2: The methods toolbox
ch. 9 Methods and their characteristics
ch. 10 Choosing methods

Part 3: Sources of assessment
ch. 11 Self-assessment
ch. 12 Peer assessment
ch. 13 Using computers in assessment

Part 4: Using assessment methods
ch. 14 Objective tests
ch. 15 Short answer questions
ch. 16 Exams and tests
ch. 17 Extended written work
ch. 18 Assessment of oral work and class presentation
ch. 19 Performance tests
ch. 20 Projects
ch. 21 Assessing problem solving

Part 5: Recording and reporting
ch. 22 Recording, collecting and presenting evidence
ch. 23 Reporting Achievement
ch. 24 Portfolios

Part 6: Assessment issues
ch. 25 Helping learners prepare for assessment
ch. 26 Marking group work
ch. 27 Workload
ch. 28 Cheating, fairness, bias
ch. 29 Making changes

Glossary
Index
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Student Assessment in Higher Education: A Handbook for Assessing Performance

Book
Miller, Allen H., Bradford W. Imrie, Kevin Cox
1999
Kogan Page, London
LB2368.M55 1999
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This comprehensive overview of higher educational assessment features a guide to setting, marking and reviewing the coursework, assignments, tests and examinations used in higher education. In addition, the authors examine the various programs for certificates, diplomas, first degrees as well as higher degrees. The strong influence that assessment has on the way students approach their learning is also discussed.

Truly international in focus, this book features authors with ...
Additional Info:
This comprehensive overview of higher educational assessment features a guide to setting, marking and reviewing the coursework, assignments, tests and examinations used in higher education. In addition, the authors examine the various programs for certificates, diplomas, first degrees as well as higher degrees. The strong influence that assessment has on the way students approach their learning is also discussed.

Truly international in focus, this book features authors with higher education experience in Australia, New Zealand, Scotland, England, Canada, Hong Kong, USA, and Thailand. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part 1 The place of assessment in higher education
ch. 1 Purposes of higher education
ch. 2 Functions of assessment
ch. 3 Cognitive educational objectives, learning outcomes and levels of testing
ch. 4 Measuring the outcomes of non-cognitive educational objectives
ch. 5 Stages of intellectual and ethical development

Part 2 Some assessment methods
ch. 6 Timing of assessment tasks
ch. 7 Essays
ch. 8 Theses
ch. 9 Objective tests
ch. 10 Assessing group projects
ch. 11 Practical skills and field work
ch. 12 Designing a final examination

Part 3 Examining assessment
ch. 13 Reporting on assessment
ch. 14 Evaluation of assessment procedures
ch. 15 Academic (dis)honesty
ch. 16 Current and future developments

References
Index
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Effective Grading: A Tool for Learning and Assessment

Book
Walvoord, Barbara E. and Virginia Johnson Anderson
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2368.W35 1998
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
The grading process can yield rich information about student learning. Effective Grading enables faculty to go beyond using grades as isolated artifacts and helps them make classroom grading processes more fair, time-efficient, and conducive to learning. Classroom assessment of student learning can then contribute to departmental and general-education assessment in ways that meet the needs of institutions and accrediting agencies. Tailored to specific needs of faculty members who seek to ...
Additional Info:
The grading process can yield rich information about student learning. Effective Grading enables faculty to go beyond using grades as isolated artifacts and helps them make classroom grading processes more fair, time-efficient, and conducive to learning. Classroom assessment of student learning can then contribute to departmental and general-education assessment in ways that meet the needs of institutions and accrediting agencies. Tailored to specific needs of faculty members who seek to make grading a valuable part of student learning and motivation, Effective Grading balances assessment theory and hands-on advice. It offers an in-depth examination of the link between teaching and grading and provides concrete guidance on such critical steps as setting and communicating grading standards, developing assignments to grade, managing time spent on grading, and providing feedback for students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
The Authors

ch. 1 The Power of Grading for Learning and Assessment
ch. 2 Managing the Grading Process
ch. 3 Making Assignments Worth Grading
ch. 4 Fostering Motivation and Learning in the Grading Process
ch. 5 Establishing Criteria and Standards for Grading
ch. 6 Calculating Course Grades
ch. 7 Communicating with Students About Their Grades
ch. 8 Making Grading More Time-Efficient
ch. 9 Using the Grading Process to Improve Teaching
ch. 10 Determining Faculty Performance, Rewards, and Incentives
ch. 11 Strengthening Departmental and Institutional Assessment
ch. 12 A Case Study of Grading as a Tool for Assessment

App. A AAHE's Principles of Good Practice for Assessing Student Learning
App. B Types of Assignments and Tests
App. C Examples of Primary Trait-Based Scales Developed by Faculty

References
Index
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A Practical Guide to Alternative Assessment

Book
Herman, Joan L., Pamela R. Aschbacher, Lynn Winters
1992
Assn. for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, VA
LB3051.H45 1992
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Joan Herman, Pamela Aschbacher, and Lynn Winters offer cogent guidance on the creation and use of alternative measures of student achievement. They present a systemic and iterative process model that links assessment with decisions affecting curriculum and instruction, according to developmental theories of learning and cognition.
The authors review the purposes of assessment and provide a substantive rationale for alternative structures. The heart of the book is the illumination ...
Additional Info:
Joan Herman, Pamela Aschbacher, and Lynn Winters offer cogent guidance on the creation and use of alternative measures of student achievement. They present a systemic and iterative process model that links assessment with decisions affecting curriculum and instruction, according to developmental theories of learning and cognition.
The authors review the purposes of assessment and provide a substantive rationale for alternative structures. The heart of the book is the illumination of several key assessment issues that reaffirm our knowledge that assessment tasks must be informed by the most important elements of instructional practice.
Includes sample forms and figures to help readers begin revamping their assessment programs. (From the Publisher)
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Student Self-Evaluation: Fostering Reflective Learning

Book
MacGregor, Jean, ed.
1993
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 56)
LB2822.75.S83 1993
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
For several decades, college teachers have been asking students to engage in self-evaluation, to reflect on their academic work and describe and evaluate it in writing. Student self-evaluation is both a process--consisting of acts of reflecting, composing, and writing--and a product, a writtten document. Student self-evaluation does not obviate the need for student exams and papers, crucial indicators of student mastery of material or complexity of thinking. Rather, student self-evaluation ...
Additional Info:
For several decades, college teachers have been asking students to engage in self-evaluation, to reflect on their academic work and describe and evaluate it in writing. Student self-evaluation is both a process--consisting of acts of reflecting, composing, and writing--and a product, a writtten document. Student self-evaluation does not obviate the need for student exams and papers, crucial indicators of student mastery of material or complexity of thinking. Rather, student self-evaluation supplements and complements that information by asking students to describe in their own words their learning and its value to them. This writing, and the conversations that faculty members and students have about it, can be instructional, illuminating, and at times transformative. Student self-evaluation is primarily a learning strategy, but it is also a promising assessment approach: while enriching learning for students, it also can help teachers and institutions learn about student learning. This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning introduces the many forms of student self-evaluation in undergraduate teaching settings and describes how student self-evaluation creates connections between learners and learning, knowers and the known, and the self and the mind. This is the 56th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. For more information on the series, please see the Journals and Periodicals page. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes

ch. 1 Student Self-Evaluation: An Introduction and Rationale (Edith Kusnic, and Mary Lou Finley)
ch. 2 Self-Evaluation: Settings and Uses (Carl J. Waluconis)
ch. 3 Learning Self-Evaluation: Challenges for Students (Jean MacGregor)
ch. 4 Work, Reflection, and Community: Conditions That Support Writing Self-Evaluations (Marie Eaton, Rita Pougiales)
ch. 5 Beyond "Mildly Interesting Facts": Student Self-Evaluations and Outcomes Assessment (William S. Moore, Steve Hunter)
ch. 6 Student Self-Evaluations and Developmental Change (Richard H. Haswell)
ch. 7 Appendix

Index
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Writing to Learn: Strategies for Assigning and Responding to Writing Across the Disciplines

Book
Sorcinelli, Mary Deane and Peter Elbow
1997
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 69)
LB2365.E5W75 1997
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
This volume provides instructors who teach writing with an array of strategies and philosophies about the way writing is learned, both in the context of a discipline and as an independent skill. Focusing primarily on the best ways to give feedback about written work, the authors describe a host of alternatives that have a solid foundation in research. This is the 69th issue of the journal New Directions for Teaching ...
Additional Info:
This volume provides instructors who teach writing with an array of strategies and philosophies about the way writing is learned, both in the context of a discipline and as an independent skill. Focusing primarily on the best ways to give feedback about written work, the authors describe a host of alternatives that have a solid foundation in research. This is the 69th issue of the journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 High Stakes and Low Stakes in Assigning and Responding to Writing (Peter Elbow)
ch. 2 Writing Back and Forth: Class Letters (Toby Fulwiler)
ch. 3 Mentoring, Modeling, Monitoring, Motivating: Response to Students' Ungraded Writing as Academic Conversation (Art Young)
ch. 4 Peer Response to Low Stakes Writing in a WAC Literature Classroom (M. Elizabeth Sargent)
ch. 5 Student Writing in Philosophy: A Sketch of Five Techniques (Stephen M. Fishman)
ch. 6 Developing and Responding to Major Writing Projects (Anne J. Herrington)
ch. 7 Negotiating the Margins: Some Principles for Responding to Our Students' Writing, Some Strategies for Helping Students Read Our Comments (Elizabeth Hodges)
ch. 8 When Less is More: Principles for Responding in the Disciplines (Ronald F. Lunsford)
ch. 9 In Our Own Voices: Using Recorded Commentary to Respond to Writing (Chris M. Anson)
ch. 10 Responding to Writing On-Line (Gail E. Hawisher and Charles Moran)
ch. 11 Grading Student Writing: Making It Simpler, Fairer, Clearer (Peter Elbow)
ch. 12 The Role of Faculty Development Programs in Helping Teachers to Improve Student Learning Through Writing (Elizabeth Ann Caldwell and Mary Deane Sorcinelli)
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"Thoughts on Evaluation"

Article
Cross, Art
1989
Appalachian State University, Faculty Development and Instructional Services (May 1989): 2-3
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
We in the Center are aware of diverse viewpoints regarding teaching evaluation. A recent article by Robert Boice and Jim Turner ("Helping Faculty Recognize Myths About Teaching Evaluations", which appeared in Vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 159-161, Winter, 1988 issue of The Journal of Staff, Program and Organizational Development) addressed a summary of misunderstandings and literature related to teaching evaluation. We reproduce here their major findings for your consideration.
Additional Info:
We in the Center are aware of diverse viewpoints regarding teaching evaluation. A recent article by Robert Boice and Jim Turner ("Helping Faculty Recognize Myths About Teaching Evaluations", which appeared in Vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 159-161, Winter, 1988 issue of The Journal of Staff, Program and Organizational Development) addressed a summary of misunderstandings and literature related to teaching evaluation. We reproduce here their major findings for your consideration.
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"Improving Student Writing" (pdf)

Article
Smit, David W.
1993
Idea Paper No. 25, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1993)
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Strategies for teaching writing across the curriculum. Idea Paper no. 25, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Strategies for teaching writing across the curriculum. Idea Paper no. 25, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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"Improving Essay Tests" (pdf)

Article
Cashin, William E.
1987
Idea Paper No. 17, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1987)
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Discusses the strengths and weaknesses of essay tests, and recommends best practices. Idea Paper no. 17, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Discusses the strengths and weaknesses of essay tests, and recommends best practices. Idea Paper no. 17, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
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"Assessment in the Classroom"

Article
Cross, K. Patricia
1992
Briefing 10, no. 2 (1992): 1-4
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Discusses the relationship between student assessment and instructional improvement. Describes the development and administration of a Teaching Goals Inventory, which helps teachers clarify what they want their students to learn and helps institutions discover teaching priorities among departments and within the college as a whole. (DMM)
Additional Info:
Discusses the relationship between student assessment and instructional improvement. Describes the development and administration of a Teaching Goals Inventory, which helps teachers clarify what they want their students to learn and helps institutions discover teaching priorities among departments and within the college as a whole. (DMM)
Additional Info:
Argues that if teachers wish to see greater recognition and reward attached to teaching they must change the status of teaching from private to community property. Need to reconnect teaching to the disciplines; The problem with student evaluation forms that are identical across the disciplines; More.
Additional Info:
Argues that if teachers wish to see greater recognition and reward attached to teaching they must change the status of teaching from private to community property. Need to reconnect teaching to the disciplines; The problem with student evaluation forms that are identical across the disciplines; More.
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"On Grading Exams: Procedural Suggestions for Large Courses"

Article
Bikales, William
1991
Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 1991)
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs   |   Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Responding to Student Writing"

Article
MacAllister, Joyce
1982
in Teaching Writing in All Disciplines (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass,1982), 59-65
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Minimal Marking"

Article
Haswell, Richard H.
1983
College English 45, no. 6 (1983): 600-604
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Students React to Portfolio Assessment"

Article
Dutt-Doner, Karen, and David Alan Gilman
1998
Contemporary Education 69, no. 3 (1998): 159-165
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Student Portfolios

Additional Info:
Surveyed preservice teachers, following their final portfolio conference, to determine their views on the efficacy of using portfolio evaluation. The portfolio process helped students gain self-confidence, better relationships with instructors, organizational skills, professional attitudes, job interviewing skills, knowledge about teaching, and a knowledge base for teaching. Students expressed concerns about various aspects of portfolio evaluations.
Additional Info:
Surveyed preservice teachers, following their final portfolio conference, to determine their views on the efficacy of using portfolio evaluation. The portfolio process helped students gain self-confidence, better relationships with instructors, organizational skills, professional attitudes, job interviewing skills, knowledge about teaching, and a knowledge base for teaching. Students expressed concerns about various aspects of portfolio evaluations.
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"Unveiling Some of the Mystery of Professional Judgment in Classroom Assessment"

Article
Speck, Bruce W.
1998
in Classroom Assessment and the New Learning Paradigm (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998), 17-31
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
College faculty have a responsibility to help students unveil some of the mystery of professional judgment in student assessment, both to help explain instructional practices and to create a model for students' use when they become professional evaluators. Teachers can use a variety of methods to ensure that subjectivity in assessment is not perceived simply as unfairness.
Additional Info:
College faculty have a responsibility to help students unveil some of the mystery of professional judgment in student assessment, both to help explain instructional practices and to create a model for students' use when they become professional evaluators. Teachers can use a variety of methods to ensure that subjectivity in assessment is not perceived simply as unfairness.
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Tips for Improving Testing and Grading

Book
Ory, John C. and Katherine E. Ryan
1993
Sage Publications, Newbury Park, CA
LB3060.65.075 1993
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Using detailed examples, checklists and exercises, the authors show how to develop, use and grade classroom examinations. They provide a thorough, step-by-step discussion of general testing and grading issues, including: deciding on the content of an exam; assessing difficulty levels; writing different kinds of test items; scoring different test items; evaluating different subject areas; helping students review for an exam; and developing grading methods and strategies. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Using detailed examples, checklists and exercises, the authors show how to develop, use and grade classroom examinations. They provide a thorough, step-by-step discussion of general testing and grading issues, including: deciding on the content of an exam; assessing difficulty levels; writing different kinds of test items; scoring different test items; evaluating different subject areas; helping students review for an exam; and developing grading methods and strategies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Testing What You Want to Be Testing
Developing a Test Plan
Suggestions for Writing Objective Test Items
Suggestions for Writing Constructed Response Test Items
Preparing, Administering, and Scoring Classroom Exams
Evaluating the Quality of Classroom Exams
Assigning Grades
Twelve Activities for Classroom Testing and Grading
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Art and Science of Classroom Assessment: The Missing Part of Pedagogy

Book
Brookhart, Susan M.
1999
ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, George Washington Univ. Press, Washington, DC
LB2822.75.B76 1999
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Discusses the quality of individual student assessments in higher education courses and their composite effect on course grades. Reviews the literature on making classroom assessments and their impact on the science of student assessment. Such activity requires instructional skill, interest, and a disposition toward clarity and fairness. Brookhart discusses such critical issues and suggests resources for further study. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Discusses the quality of individual student assessments in higher education courses and their composite effect on course grades. Reviews the literature on making classroom assessments and their impact on the science of student assessment. Such activity requires instructional skill, interest, and a disposition toward clarity and fairness. Brookhart discusses such critical issues and suggests resources for further study. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction.
Defining Student Learning for Assessment.
Ensuring the Quality of Classroom Assessment Information.
Options for Classroom Assessment.
Assessment in the Disciplines.
Grading.
Grade Distributions and Grading Policies.
Conclusions and Further Resources for Faculty.
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Assessment Matters in Higher Education: Choosing and Using Diverse Approaches

Book
Brown, Sally and Angela Glasner, eds.
1999
Society for Research into Higher Education & Open University Press, Philadelphia, PA
LB2366.A77 1999
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Provides both theoretical perspectives and pragmatic advice on how to conduct effective assessment in higher education, drawing on relevant research and contributors' first-hand experience. Contains sections on a systems approach to assessment, the effectiveness of innovative assessment, assessing practice, and autonomous assessment, peer assessment, and self-assessment. Material is oriented toward the UK and New Zealand experience. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Provides both theoretical perspectives and pragmatic advice on how to conduct effective assessment in higher education, drawing on relevant research and contributors' first-hand experience. Contains sections on a systems approach to assessment, the effectiveness of innovative assessment, assessing practice, and autonomous assessment, peer assessment, and self-assessment. Material is oriented toward the UK and New Zealand experience. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Notes on Contributors

ch. 1 Institutional Strategies for Assessment (Sally Brown)
ch. 2 Innovations in Student Assessment: A System-wide Perspective (Angela Glasner)
ch. 3 Assessment and Evaluation: A Systems Approach for their Utilization (T. Dary Erwin)
ch. 4 Using Assessment Strategically to Change the Way Students Learn (Graham Gibbs)
ch. 5 Why Assess Innovatively? (Phil Race)
ch. 6 The Experience of Innovative Assessment: Student Perspectives (Liz McDowell and Kay Sambell)
ch. 7 Biases in Marking Students' Written Work: Quality?
ch. 8 Assessing Practice (Neil D. Fleming)
ch. 9 Assessment of Key Skills (Garth Rhodes and Fred Tallantyre)
ch. 10 Using Portfolios for Assessment in Teacher Preparation and Health Sciences (Gill Young)
ch. 11 Group-based Assessment: An Evaluation of the Use of Assessed Tasks as a Method of Fostering Higher Quality Learning (Mike Heathford)
ch. 12 Dimensions of Oral Assessment and Student Approaches to Learning (Gordon Joughin)
ch. 13 Towards Autonomous Assessment: Using Self-Assessment and Peer Assessment (Angela Brew)
ch. 14 Self-Assessment and Peer Assessment (Shirley Jordan)
ch. 15 Peer Assessment of Undergraduate Seminar Presentations: Motivations, Reflection and Future Directions (Andy Lapham and Ray Webster)
ch. 16 Using Peer Assessment and Self-Assessment for the First Time (Paul Roach)

Conclusion
Index
The Society for Research into Higher Education
Article cover image

"Responding to Response Papers"

Article
Lonoff, Sue
2002
Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 2002)
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"An A is an A is an A ... And That's the Problem"

Article
Johnson, Valen E.
2002
New York Times, April 14,
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"The Impact of Technology on Teaching"

Article
Graves, Bill
2002
The Faculty Network, Special Issue (Spring 2002)
Topics: Online Learning   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Grading Classroom Participation" (pdf)

Article
Bean, John C. and Dean Peterson
1998
in Classroom Assessment and the New Learning Paradigm (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998), 33-40
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Grading class participation signals students the kind of learning and thinking an instructor values. This chapter describes three models of class participation, several models for assessment including a sample rubric, problems with assessing classroom participation, and strategies for overcoming these problems.
Additional Info:
Grading class participation signals students the kind of learning and thinking an instructor values. This chapter describes three models of class participation, several models for assessment including a sample rubric, problems with assessing classroom participation, and strategies for overcoming these problems.
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"Writing in Large Classes: Don't Be overwhelmed With Grading!"

Article
McKinney, Kathleen
2000
Center for the Advancement of Teaching, Illinois State University (2000)
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students   |   Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Electronic Portfolios: Emerging Practices in Student, Faculty, and Institutional Learning

Book
Cambridge, Barbara L., ed.
2001
American Association for Higher Education, Washington, D.C.
LB1029.P67E45 2001
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Assessing Students   |   Student Portfolios   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The portfolio is a powerful tool for learning and assessment. Introducing the electronic into the mix increases its power, especially through the key feature of interactive hyperlinks and the potential to promote continuous reflection on, and updating of, learning. This introduction examines the potential of electronic portfolios by addressing: rationales for creating an electronic portfolio; possible features of the portfolio; examples of current practice; cautions; and recommendations. Chapters by nineteen ...
Additional Info:
The portfolio is a powerful tool for learning and assessment. Introducing the electronic into the mix increases its power, especially through the key feature of interactive hyperlinks and the potential to promote continuous reflection on, and updating of, learning. This introduction examines the potential of electronic portfolios by addressing: rationales for creating an electronic portfolio; possible features of the portfolio; examples of current practice; cautions; and recommendations. Chapters by nineteen portfolio practitioners from a range of disciplines and institutions describe the construction and use of electronic portfolios. They describe the uses:

* By students to display and reflect on work for a specific course or program

* By faculty to document and reflect on their classroom practice and allow comment by colleagues or others

* By institutions to demonstrate accountability to their stakeholders and as a vehicle for institution-wide reflection, learning, and improvement. The section on institutional portfolios includes chapters on the incorporation of institutional research and data, and the potential role for such portfolios in accreditation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Yolanda T. Moses)
Preface

ch. 1 Electronic Portfolios as Knowledge Builders (Barbara L. Cambridge)

ch. 2 Student Portfolios
Introduction: Digitized Student Portfolios (Kathleen Blake Yancey)
Reflective Webfolios in a Humanities Course (Donna Reiss)
Composing the Intranet-Based Electronic Portfolio Using ``Common'' Tools (Rich Rice)
Electronic Portfolios in a Management Major Curriculum (Katrina A. Zalatan)
A Major Redesign of the Kalamazoo Portfolio (Emily Springfield)
Using On-Line Portfolios to Assess English Majors at Utah State University (Christine Hult)
Development of Electronic Portfolios for Nursing Students (Peggy Jenkins)
Comparing Electronic and Paper Portfolios (Emily Springfield)
Conclusion: General Patterns and the Future (Kathleen Blake Yancey)

ch. 3 Faculty Portfolios
Introduction: Ambassadors With Portfolios: Electronic Portfolios and the Improvement of Teaching (Daniel P. Tompkins)
Teaching Great Books on the Web (Marc Stier)
Electronic Portfolios = Multimedia Development + Portfolio Development: The Electronic Portfolio Development Process (Helen Barrett)
From Bach to Tupac: Using an Electronic Course Portfolio to Analyze a Curricular Transformation (Elizabeth F. Barkley)
Wired for Trouble? Creating a Hypermedia Course Portfolio (T. Mills Kelly)
Conclusion: Ambassadors With Portfolios: Recommendations (Daniel P. Tompkins)

ch. 4 Institutional Portfolios
Linking Learning, Improvement, and Accountability: An Introduction to Electronic Institutional Portfolios (Susan Kahn)
Snake Pit in Cyberspace: The 1UPU1 Institutional Portfolio (Sharon J. Hamilton)
Portland State University's Electronic Institutional Portfolio: Strategy, Planning, and Assessment (Kathi A. Ketcheson)
The Role of Institutional Research and Data in Institutional Portfolios (Victor M.H. Borden)
Electronic Department Portfolios: A New Tool for Departmental Learning and Improvement (Dean S. Dorn)
The Role of Institutional Portfolios in the Revised WASC Accreditation Process (Judie Gaffin Wexler)

Conclusion: Recommendations (Susan Kahn)
Index
Article cover image

"Helping Students Perform Better on Essay Examinations"

Article
Whipple, Jr., Bob
2002
Teaching Professor 16, no. 9 (2002): 6
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Educative Assessment: Designing Assessments to Inform and Improve Student Performance

Book
Wiggins, G.
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB3051.W495 1998
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
In this book, Grant Wiggins outlines design standards for performance-based assessments that promise students - no matter what their ability - clear and worthy performance targets, useful feedback, coaching, and the opportunity to progress toward excellence. Educative Assessment furnishes the information needed to design performance-based assessments, craft performance tasks that meet rigorous educational standards, score assessments fairly, and structure and judge student portfolios. It also shows how performance assessment can ...
Additional Info:
In this book, Grant Wiggins outlines design standards for performance-based assessments that promise students - no matter what their ability - clear and worthy performance targets, useful feedback, coaching, and the opportunity to progress toward excellence. Educative Assessment furnishes the information needed to design performance-based assessments, craft performance tasks that meet rigorous educational standards, score assessments fairly, and structure and judge student portfolios. It also shows how performance assessment can be used to improve curriculum and instruction, grading, and reporting, as well as teacher accountability. In addition, the book includes numerous design templates and flowcharts, strategies for design and troubleshooting, and myriad examples of assessment tasks and scoring rubrics that Wiggins has developed and repeatedly refined using feedback from clients in schools, districts, and state departments of education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
Preface
The Author

ch. 1 Educative Assessment: A Vision
ch. 2 Ensuring Authentic Performance
ch. 3 Providing Ongoing Feedback
ch. 4 Promoting Student Understanding
ch. 5 Standards and Criteria
ch. 6 Individual Performance Tasks
ch. 7 Scoring Rubrics
ch. 8 Portfolio as Evidence
ch. 9 Curriculum and Instruction
ch. 10 Grading and Reporting
ch. 11 Teaching and Accountability
ch. 12 Feasibility: Real and Imagined
ch. 13 Next Steps

Notes
Bibliography
Index
Article cover image

"An Assessment Riddle"

Article
Walvoord, Barbara E., and Anderson, Virginia
1993
Assessment Update 7, no. 6 (1993): 8-9, 11
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Evaluating Writing"

Article
Tchudi, Stephen
1986
in Teaching Writing in the Content Areas: College Level (Washington, D.C.: National Education Association of the United States, 1986), 51-62
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Assessment Strategies for the On-line Class: From Theory to Practice

Book
Anderson, Rebecca S., John F. Bauer, Bruce W. Speck, eds.
2002
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1028.5.A83 2002
Topics: Online Learning   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Addresses the kinds of questions that instructors need to ask themselves as they begin to move at least part of their students' work to an on-line format. The chapters present an initial overview of the need for evaluating students' on-line work with the same care that instructors give to the students' work in hard-copy format; what an instructor needs to know about the technology, a discussion of alternative instructional formats ...
Additional Info:
Addresses the kinds of questions that instructors need to ask themselves as they begin to move at least part of their students' work to an on-line format. The chapters present an initial overview of the need for evaluating students' on-line work with the same care that instructors give to the students' work in hard-copy format; what an instructor needs to know about the technology, a discussion of alternative instructional formats such as group work and fieldwork; as well as participation in chatrooms and threaded discussions. Two chapters address curricular issues and the value of on-line learning as a supplement to more traditional instructional formats. The issues explored here will help guide instructors who are considering using on-line learning in conjunction with their regular classes, as well as those interested in going totally on-line.

This is the 91st volume in the Jossey-Bass quarterly series New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Learning-Teaching-Assessment Paradigms and the On-Line Classroom (Bruce W. Speck): Professors need to engage in rigorous design and assessment of on-line learning just as they would in face-to-face and printed materials, grounding their decisions in solid pedagogical theory and practice.

ch. 2 What Professors Need to Know About Technology to Assess On-Line Student Learning (Marshall G. Jones, Stephen W. Harmon): There is much movement in the direction of on-line learning, but it is important to consider the nature of on-line courses and the extent to which that nature determines what is done by instructors and students.

ch. 3 Assessing Student Work from Chatrooms and Bulletin Boards (John F. Bauer): An advantage of on-line learning is that it can provide a permanent record of student participation in discussions. The question addressed in this chapter is how to assess that participation fairly and objectively.

ch. 4 Assessing Students Written Projects (Robert Gray): Because so much of student work on-line is done in written format, it is important for instructors to know how to evaluate writing and how to take advantage of the technology to do it.

ch. 5 Group Assessment in the On-Line Learning Environment (John A. Nicolay): Just as group work is becoming more and more prevalent in college classrooms, it is also a growing part of on-line learning. This chapter provides five principles for assessing group work on-line.

ch. 6 Assessing Field Experiences (Jane B. Puckett, Rebecca S. Anderson): In professional preparation programs that feature a great deal of fieldwork, can on-line formats be used to monitor and assess student work?

ch. 7 Enhancing On-Line Learning for Individuals with Disabilities (James M. Brown): One of the advantages of on-line instruction is that it provides access for students who would not normally be able to participate in many course activities. This chapter provides guidelines on how to take advantage of this feature.

ch. 8 Assessing E-Folios in the On-Line Class (Mark Canada): On-line instruction provides an excellent opportunity for students to create and publish on-line portfolios of their work. This method of assessment is just beginning to make inroads into the on-line environment.

ch. 9 Preparing Students for Assessment in the On-Line Class (Michele L. Ford): Just as instructors are adapting to new technologies, students must adjust their thinking about teaching and learning. This chapter provides suggestions about how to help students make the transition to on-line assessment.

ch. 10 Assessing the On-Line Degree Program (Joe Law, Lory Hawkes, Christina Murphy): As more programs are offered on-line, it is important that institutions maintain the quality of those offerings. This chapter describes guidelines for assessing the integrity and quality of such degrees.

ch. 11 Assessing the Usability of On-Line Instructional Materials (Brad Mehlenbacher): In addition to the quality of the content and instructional method, a number of other considerations are useful in assessing whether on-line materials will be effective. This chapter covers a wide range of criteria for instructor use in this task.

ch. 12 Epilogue: A Cautionary Note About On-Line Assessment (Richard Thomas Bothel): Not all instructors are enthusiastic about the movement toward on-line learning. This chapter raises some concerns that should be addressed now.

INDEX
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Grading Students' Classroom Writing: Issues and Strategies

Book
Speck, Bruce W.
2000
ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report 27, no. 3, George Washington Univ. Press, Washington, DC
LB1576.S72 2000
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This report explores the connection between the process of writing and the process of grading. It also explains how to construct effective writing assignments, resolve issues of fairness and professional judgment, include students in the process of assessment, and provide effective feedback to students as they revise their writing. Speck synthesizes the best practices in teaching and learning to help faculty and part-time instructors envision grading as a process, not ...
Additional Info:
This report explores the connection between the process of writing and the process of grading. It also explains how to construct effective writing assignments, resolve issues of fairness and professional judgment, include students in the process of assessment, and provide effective feedback to students as they revise their writing. Speck synthesizes the best practices in teaching and learning to help faculty and part-time instructors envision grading as a process, not a product. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Overview
Why is it Important to Integrate Grading into the Writing Process?
Why do Professors Need to Construct Effective Writing Assignments?
How Can Professors Ensure That Their Professional Judgments Are Fair?
How Can Professors Use Their Authority To Promote Students' Learning
How Can the Professors Help Students to Learn How to Respond Effectively in Writing?
What Support is Available to Help Professors Effectively Grade Student's Writing?
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Student Learning Assessment: Options and Resources

Book
2003
Middle States Commission on Higher Education, Philadelphia, PA
LB2331.6.S78 2003
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
The explanations and examples in the handbook and website are intended to help each institution to develop goals and to select the best methods. They do not increase or modify accreditation standards.

The handbook addresses the needs of everyone interested in, or practicing, higher education assessment. Each chapter focuses on a separate aspect of the assessment process, so the chapters can be used individually and at any stage ...
Additional Info:
The explanations and examples in the handbook and website are intended to help each institution to develop goals and to select the best methods. They do not increase or modify accreditation standards.

The handbook addresses the needs of everyone interested in, or practicing, higher education assessment. Each chapter focuses on a separate aspect of the assessment process, so the chapters can be used individually and at any stage of the process as a guide and stimulus.

Useful appendices include: Assessment Standards in Characteristics of Excellence in Higher Education; An Assessment Practices Quiz; Key to “Assessment Practices Quiz”; A Department/Program Student Outcomes Survey; Learning Goals and Assessment Techniques; From Effect to Cause: A Brainstorming Exercise; and Student Learning Styles: Frequently Asked Questions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Motivating and Involving Campus Communities
ch. 2 Learning Goals
ch. 3 Evaluating Student Learning
ch. 4 The Student Learning Assessment Plan in the Context of Institutional Planning
ch. 5 Using Results to Improve Teaching and Learning
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Metateaching and the Instructional Map

Book
Timpson, William M.
1999
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB1025.3.T56 1999
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Bill Timpson presents his conception of metateaching. As metacognition is the idea of thinking about thinking, metateaching is the idea of thinking about teaching. Your mind will be infused with new, innovative — yet practical — ways to think about your classroom after reading this book.
You will learn about the Instructional Map, a systematic tool to help you organize your classes and visualize the direction, components, and impact of different ...
Additional Info:
Bill Timpson presents his conception of metateaching. As metacognition is the idea of thinking about thinking, metateaching is the idea of thinking about teaching. Your mind will be infused with new, innovative — yet practical — ways to think about your classroom after reading this book.
You will learn about the Instructional Map, a systematic tool to help you organize your classes and visualize the direction, components, and impact of different aspects of teaching. Ideas from the fields of cartography and orienteering will give you a fresh angle from which to view your teaching practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Passages and Pathfinders
Introduction

ch. 1: Of Story and Journey, Map, and Place
ch. 2: The Essence of Maps
ch. 3: Metacognition and Metateaching
ch. 4: The Instructional Map Explained
ch. 5: Using the Instructional Map
ch. 6: Observations, Presentations. and Student Reflections
ch. 7: The Instructional Map and Various Instructional Approaches

References
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Humor as an Instructional Defibrillator: Evidence-Based Techniques in Teaching and Assessment

Book
Berk, Ronald A.
2002
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1027.B472 2002
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Grab those paddles. Charge 300. Clear! "Ouch!" Now how do you feel? "Great!"

Humor can be used as a systematic teaching or assessment tool in your classroom and course Web site. It can shock students to attention and bring deadly, boring course content to life. Since some students have the attention span of goat cheese, we need to find creative online and offline techniques to hook them, engage their ...
Additional Info:
Grab those paddles. Charge 300. Clear! "Ouch!" Now how do you feel? "Great!"

Humor can be used as a systematic teaching or assessment tool in your classroom and course Web site. It can shock students to attention and bring deadly, boring course content to life. Since some students have the attention span of goat cheese, we need to find creative online and offline techniques to hook them, engage their emotions, and focus their minds and eyeballs on learning.

This book offers numerous techniques on how to effectively use humor in lectures and in-class activities, printed materials, course Web sites and course tests and exams.

These techniques can convert any course into an adult version of Sesame Street. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I Teaching
ch. 1 Creating Humor to Hook Your Students
ch. 2 The Active Ingredients in Humor and Laughter
ch. 3 Lights, Camera, Active Learning!
ch. 4 www.hilariouscourse.yeahright

Part II Assessment
ch. 5 Assessment is Like a box of Chocolates ...
ch. 6 Do-It-Yourself Test Construction
ch. 7 Detecting Flaws in This Old Test
ch. 8 Injecting Jest into Your Test

Conclusions
References
Index
Article cover image

"Improving Multiple-Choice Tests" (pdf)

Article
Clegg, Victoria L., and William E. Cashin
1986
Idea Paper No. 16, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1986)
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs   |   Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
Guidelines for writing good multiple-choice exam questions that can evaluate higher levels of learning (such as integrating material from several sources, critically evaluate data, contrast and compare information), as well as provide diagnostic information. Idea Paper no. 16 , from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Guidelines for writing good multiple-choice exam questions that can evaluate higher levels of learning (such as integrating material from several sources, critically evaluate data, contrast and compare information), as well as provide diagnostic information. Idea Paper no. 16 , from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Article cover image

"Matching Instructional Objectives, Subject Matter, Tests, and Score Interpretations" (pdf)

Article
Hanna, Gerald S., and William E. Cashin
1987
Idea Paper No. 18, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1987)
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
This article explores the implications for a particular model of teaching, by looking at differences between students, types of subject material, types of instruction, instructional objectives, texts, and ways to interpret test results. Idea Paper no. 18, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
This article explores the implications for a particular model of teaching, by looking at differences between students, types of subject material, types of instruction, instructional objectives, texts, and ways to interpret test results. Idea Paper no. 18, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Article cover image

"Improving College Grading" (pdf)

Article
Hanna, Gerald S., and William E. Cashin
1988
Idea Paper No. 19, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1988)
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Compares the “percentage” grading system to the “class-curve” system, to derive a set of goals or criteria for grading systems, which are then employed to evaluate three additional illustrative grading systems. Idea Paper no. 19, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Compares the “percentage” grading system to the “class-curve” system, to derive a set of goals or criteria for grading systems, which are then employed to evaluate three additional illustrative grading systems. Idea Paper no. 19, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Article cover image

"Test Feedback Class Sessions: Creating a Positive Learning Experience"

Article
Kher, Neelam, Gayle Juneau and Susan Molstad
2002
College Teaching 50, no. 4 (2002): 148-150
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Returning tests following an examination is often a difficult task for the instructor, particularly in courses that are perceived by students as anxiety producing. The purpose of this article is to offer suggestions for designing this class session so that students view it as a positive part of the learning process. the four phases suggested for this feedback session are (a) preparing the students for receiving test feedback, (b) implementing ...
Additional Info:
Returning tests following an examination is often a difficult task for the instructor, particularly in courses that are perceived by students as anxiety producing. The purpose of this article is to offer suggestions for designing this class session so that students view it as a positive part of the learning process. the four phases suggested for this feedback session are (a) preparing the students for receiving test feedback, (b) implementing a strategy for returning tests, (c) selecting an approach for reviewing test items, and (d) bringing closure to the class a positive way. young professionals lacking the experiences to anticipate problems when returning examinations to students may especially benefit from these suggestions.
Article cover image

"Negotiating the Margins: Some Principles for Responding to Our Students' Writing, Some Strategies for Helping Students Read Our Comments"

Article
Hodges, Elizabeth
1997
in Writing to Learn: Strategies for Assigning and Responding to Writing Across the Disciplines (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997), 77-89
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

500 Tips on Assessment

Book
Brown, Sally, Phil Race and Brenda Smith
1996
Kogan Smith, London
LB2368.B76
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
In the highly successful '500 Tips' format, the authors look at the questions and problems that teachers face and provide them with practical guidance. Their advice is down-to-earth, jargon free and digestible, covering such key issues as developing strategies and structures; assessment quality control; traditional exams, vivas, multiple choice questions; assessing independent learning; self, peer and group assessment; and assessing competence and transferable skills. 500 Tips on Assessment is an invaluable ...
Additional Info:
In the highly successful '500 Tips' format, the authors look at the questions and problems that teachers face and provide them with practical guidance. Their advice is down-to-earth, jargon free and digestible, covering such key issues as developing strategies and structures; assessment quality control; traditional exams, vivas, multiple choice questions; assessing independent learning; self, peer and group assessment; and assessing competence and transferable skills. 500 Tips on Assessment is an invaluable dip-in aid for hard-pressed lecturers and teachers in further and higher education. It should be read, enjoyed and seriously considered by anyone concerned about the quality and appropriateness of their assessment methods. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Putting assessment into context
ch. 2 Exams of various sorts
ch. 3 Specific assessment formats
ch. 4 Feedback and assessment
ch. 5 Involving students in their own assessment
ch. 6 Assessing group learning
Cover image

Assessment: Case Studies, Experience, and Practice from Higher Education

Book
Schwartz, Peter and Graham Webb, eds.
2002
Kogan Page, London
LB3051.A88
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Assessment is central to the work of all education professionals in higher education, and is recognized as the main driver of learning for most students. Offering a compelling series of case studies, this book brings together a variety of assessment techniques. By taking the reader right into the middle of "real-life" situations it focuses on showing how assessment can provide a transparent and meaningful link between learning activities and desired ...
Additional Info:
Assessment is central to the work of all education professionals in higher education, and is recognized as the main driver of learning for most students. Offering a compelling series of case studies, this book brings together a variety of assessment techniques. By taking the reader right into the middle of "real-life" situations it focuses on showing how assessment can provide a transparent and meaningful link between learning activities and desired learning outcomes.

The book is accessible to a broad range of readers, regardless of experience. It includes authoritative and stimulating cases from the UK, the United States, Australia and New Zealand, covering traditional and contemporary assessment techniques. Key topics include: information technology and assessment; reflective assessment techniques; institution-wide assessment; assessment methods for problem-based learning and short, intensive courses; dealing with everyday problems in assessment.

"Assessment" will be welcomed by teachers, lecturers, tutors and support staff, as well as course leaders and developers - whatever their subject area or level of experience. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Introduction

Sect. 1 Information Technology: One Answer to Assessment in Large Classes
ch. 1 Taking the Byte Out of Computer-based Testing (T. Dary Erwin, and Adina Bailey)
ch. 2 IT to the Rescue (Peter Grebenik, and Chris Rust)
ch. 3 Gain without Pain? (Peter Schwartz)
ch. 4 What to Do about John? (Sally Brown)

Sect. 2 Reflective Assessment: Journals, Logbooks, Portfolios, Peer Assessment
ch. 5 Assessing Reflection or Supporting Learning? (Lorraine Stefani)
ch. 6 The Reflection Jigsaw (Helen Woodward)
ch. 7 Portfolios from Cyberia (Carol Bowie, Gordon Joughin, Peter Taylor, Brad Young, Craig Zimitat)
ch. 8 Portfolio Assessment? Yes, but ... (David Vaume, and Mantz Yorke)
ch. 9 'Unpacking' Peer Assessment (Nancy Falchikov)

Sect. 3 Institution-wide Assessment Programmes: the US Perspective
ch. 10 Wading Through Glue (Barbara D. Wright)
ch. 11 Barking at Straw Dogma (Trudy W. Banta, and Sharon J. Hamilton)
ch. 12 Towards a Culture of Assessment (Kenneth W. Broland, Jr.)

Sect. 4 Assessment Methods for Special Purposes
ch. 13 But They Looked Great on Paper (Gill Young, and Di Marks-Maran)
ch. 14 Making the Grade (Louise F. Deretchin)
ch. 15 Read, Think and Be Merry for in Two Weeks Your Assignment Is Due (Keith Stullivan)

Sect. 5 Addressing the Needs of Individual Students in Assessment
ch. 16 Ah! ... So That's Quality (D. Royce Sadler)
ch. 17 Let's Get the Assessment to Drive the Learning (Kay Sambell, Sue Miller, and Susan Hodgson)
ch. 18 Refusing to Learn or Learning to Refuse? (Tim Riordan)

Sect. 6 Hands-on Assessment: Everyday Problems in Assessment Practice
ch. 19 Why Did They Get More than I Did? (Chris Davies)
ch. 20 Between a Rock and a Hard Place (Phil Race)
ch. 21 Standards + Distance = Trouble? (Liz McDowell)
ch. 22 Organized Chaos (Melissa de Zwart)br>
Conclusion
Further reading
Index
Cover image

Assessing Students' Learning

Book
McMillian, James H., ed.
1988
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2366.2.A87 1988
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Assessment is most effective when it is conceived, discussed, and implemented by faculty and their classes. This sourcebook presents assessment strategies and information, based on recent research and practical experience, to provide new assessment ideas and approaches that emphasize student learning and effective teaching. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Assessment is most effective when it is conceived, discussed, and implemented by faculty and their classes. This sourcebook presents assessment strategies and information, based on recent research and practical experience, to provide new assessment ideas and approaches that emphasize student learning and effective teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch.1 Basic issues and Principles in classroom assessment (Jon F. Wergin)
ch.2 Faculty as a force to improve instruction through assessment (Georgine Loacker)
ch.3 Assessing Critical thinking across the curriculum (C. Blaine Carpenter, James C. Doig)
ch.4 Assessing writing: Theory and practice (Karen L. Greenberg)
ch.5 Assessing experiential learning (Susan Simosko)
ch.6 Assessing the departmental major (Bobby Fong)
ch.7 Grading students (Howard R. Pollio, W. Lee Humphreys)
ch.8 A synthesis with further recommendations (James H. McMillan)

Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Introduction to Rubrics: An Assessment Tool to Save Grading Time, Convey Effective Feedback and Promote Student Learning

Book
Stevens, Dannelle D. and Antonia J. Levi
2005
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB3063.S74 2005
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
At its most basic a rubric is a scoring tool that divides an assignment into its component parts and objectives, and provides a detailed description of what constitutes acceptable and unacceptable levels of performance for each part. Rubrics can be used to grade any assignment or task: research papers, book reviews, participation in discussions, laboratory work, portfolios, oral presentations, group work, and more. This book defines what rubrics are, and ...
Additional Info:
At its most basic a rubric is a scoring tool that divides an assignment into its component parts and objectives, and provides a detailed description of what constitutes acceptable and unacceptable levels of performance for each part. Rubrics can be used to grade any assignment or task: research papers, book reviews, participation in discussions, laboratory work, portfolios, oral presentations, group work, and more. This book defines what rubrics are, and how to construct and use them. It provides a complete introduction for anyone starting out to integrate rubrics in their teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 What is a rubric?
ch. 2 Why use rubrics?
ch. 3 How to construct a rubric
ch. 4 Rubric construction and the classroom
ch. 5 Rubric construction with others : teaching assistants, tutors, or colleagues
ch. 6 Grading with rubrics
ch. 7 Variations on the theme

App. A Blank rubric format for a three-level rubric
App. B Blank rubric format for a four-level rubric
App. C Blank rubric format for a four-level rubric, landscape format
App. D Blank rubric format for a scoring guide rubric
App. E Interview analysis paper scoring guide rubric
App. F Leading a class discussion scoring guide rubric
App. G Portland State University studies program rubric : ethical issues
App. H Portland State University studies program rubric : holistic critical thinking
App. I Portland State University studies program rubric : quantitative literacy
App. J Portland State University studies program rubric : writing
App. K Portland State University studies program rubric : diversity
App. L Web site information for Introduction to rubrics
Cover image

Assessing Student Learning: A Common Sense Guide

Book
Suskie, Linda
2004
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Suskie (Towson U.) believes in developing an assessment culture in schools and universities. She describes assessment as a four-step continuous cycle of establishing learning goals, providing learning opportunities, assessing student learning, and making good use of results. She provides rubrics for evaluating a variety of learning opportunities and media, and supplies model examinations, surveys, checklists, and reports for publication. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Suskie (Towson U.) believes in developing an assessment culture in schools and universities. She describes assessment as a four-step continuous cycle of establishing learning goals, providing learning opportunities, assessing student learning, and making good use of results. She provides rubrics for evaluating a variety of learning opportunities and media, and supplies model examinations, surveys, checklists, and reports for publication. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part I - Laying A Foundation For Assessment
ch. 1 What Is Assessment? Why Assess?
ch. 2 What Are Good Assessment Practices?
ch. 3 Promoting an Assessment Culture

Part II - Planning For Assessment Success
ch. 4 Creating an Assessment Plan
ch. 5 Developing Learning Goals
ch. 6 Choosing an Assessment Strategy

Part III - The Assessment Toolbox
ch. 7 Using a Scoring Guide to Plan and Evaluate an Assignment
ch. 8 Creating an Effective Assignment
ch. 9 Encouraging Student Reflection
ch. 10 Assembling Assessment Information Into Portfolios
ch. 11 Writing a Traditional Objective Test
ch. 12 Conducting Surveys, Focus Groups, and Interviews
ch. 13 Selecting a Published Instrument

Part IV. Putting Assessment Results To Good and Appropriate Use
ch. 14 Summarizing and Analyzing Assessment Results
ch. 15 Sharing Assessment Results
ch. 16 Using Assessment Findings Effectively and Appropriately

Appendix - Key Resources on Assessing Student Learning
Additional Info:
Assessment Clear and Simple is "Assessment 101" in a book -- a concise, step-by-step guide written for everyone who participates in the assessment process. This practical book helps to make assessment simple, cost-efficient, and useful to the institution, while at the same time meeting the requirements of accreditation agencies, legislatures, review boards, and others. Assessment Clear and Simple can help your institution employ assessment as a powerful instrument for improvement and ...
Additional Info:
Assessment Clear and Simple is "Assessment 101" in a book -- a concise, step-by-step guide written for everyone who participates in the assessment process. This practical book helps to make assessment simple, cost-efficient, and useful to the institution, while at the same time meeting the requirements of accreditation agencies, legislatures, review boards, and others. Assessment Clear and Simple can help your institution employ assessment as a powerful instrument for improvement and provide a basis for wiser planning, budgeting, and change in curriculum, pedagogy, staffing, programming, and student support. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
About the Author
ch. 1 For Everyone: The Basics of Assessment
ch. 2 For Institution-Wide Planners
ch. 3 For Departments and Programs
ch. 4 For General Education
App. A Sample Rubrics for Evaluating Student Classroom Work
App. B Guidelines for Program Review of Departments, Incorporating Assessment
App. C Guidelines for the Evaluations of Teaching, Incorporating Assessment of Learning
App. D Sample Analysis of Audiences and Purposes for Assessment
App. E Institution-Wide Data to Assess Institution-Wide Goals
App. F Departmental Assessment Reports
App. G Matrix for Analyzing Professional Accreditation
App. H Matrix for Analyzing Institution-Wide Departmental Assessment Information
App. I Analysis of Assessment in Institution, Departments, and General Education
App. J Departmental Learning Goals
App. K Identifying Classroom Assessment in the Department
App. L Sample General Education Assessment Matrix
Resources: A Short List
References
Index
Cover image

New Paradigms for Testing Student Learning: Addressing Faculty and Student Classroom Improprieties

Book
Braxton, John M. and Alan E. Bayer, eds.
2004
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1779.A3 2004
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Assessing Students   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Changes in instructional paradigms are leading to changes in the way student achievement is tested, including group testing, online testing and authentic testing. This issue discusses the theory and practice of these new forms of testing and offers practical suggestions for instructors considering their use. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Changes in instructional paradigms are leading to changes in the way student achievement is tested, including group testing, online testing and authentic testing. This issue discusses the theory and practice of these new forms of testing and offers practical suggestions for instructors considering their use. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction: Faculty and student classroom improprieties (John M. Braxton, Alan E. Bayer)
ch. 2 Sociological explanations for faculty and student classroom incivilities (Nathaniel J. Bray, Marietta Del Favero)
ch. 3 Dynamics of gender, ethnicity, and race in understanding classroom incivility (Mia Alexander-Snow)
ch. 4 Incidence and student response to faculty teaching norm violations (John M. Braxton, Melinda Rogers Mann)
ch. 5 The influence of teaching norm violations on the welfare of students as clients of college teaching (John M. Braxton, Alan E. Bayer, James A. Noseworthy)
ch. 6 Toward a code of conduct for undergraduate teaching (John M. Braxton, Alan E. Bayer)
ch. 7 Student norms of classroom decorum (Timothy C. Caboni, Amy S. Hirschy, Jane R. Best)
ch. 8 Effects of student classroom incivilities on students (Amy S. Hirschy, John M. Braxton)
ch. 9 Promulgating statements of student rights and responsibilities (Alan E. Bayer)
ch. 10 Conclusions and recommendations: Avenues for addressing teaching and learning improprieties (Alan E. Bayer, John M. Braxton)
Appendix: Description of research methods and analyses
Cover image

Portfolio Development and the Assessment of Prior Learning: Perspectives, Models and Practices

Book
Michelson, Elana; and Alan Mandell
2004
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1029.P67P665 2004
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Assessing Students   |   Student Portfolios

Additional Info:
For over thirty years, portfolios have been used to help adult learners gain recognition for their prior learning and take greater control of their educational experiences. The portfolio has become a distinctive means of assessing such learning, serving as a meaningful alternative to conventional papers and standardized testing.

Portfolio Development and the Assessment of Prior Learning: Perspectives, Models, and Practices provides a primer of flexible approaches to shaping ...
Additional Info:
For over thirty years, portfolios have been used to help adult learners gain recognition for their prior learning and take greater control of their educational experiences. The portfolio has become a distinctive means of assessing such learning, serving as a meaningful alternative to conventional papers and standardized testing.

Portfolio Development and the Assessment of Prior Learning: Perspectives, Models, and Practices provides a primer of flexible approaches to shaping and conducting portfolio-development courses. It offers practitioners in the field an extensive range of model assignments, readings, and classroom activities, each organized around a specific theme: Academic Orientation, The Meaning of Education, Personal Exploration, Learning from the Outsider Within, The World of Work and Careers, and Dimensions of Expertise. Twelve case studies by practitioners in the field then show how academics in the US and around the English-speaking world have adapted the portfolio to changing circumstances in order to deliver academically rich educational services for adults. These case studies highlight portfolio development in the context of web-based instruction, changing institutional imperatives, service to historically disenfranchised groups, partnerships with industry, and cross-institutional cooperation.

In addition to serving as a valuable hands-on resource for practitioners, Portfolio Development and the Assessment of Prior Learning locates portfolios and assessment in a broad social and intellectual context. Thus, the authors also offer an historical overview of the usefulness of portfolios in the assessment of prior learning and then consider their use inthe future, given current trends in higher education for adults. The book explores the implications of a changing educational landscape, in which new student populations, budgetary pressures, and understandings of knowledge both enrich and challenge student-centered approaches such as portfolios.

The approaches and case studies are not only valuable to adult educators but, equally, to faculty in higher education concerned with the development of competency- and outcomes-based assessment. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction : portfolio development in historic context
ch. 2 Approaches to portfolio development
Resources for portfolio development for chapter 2
ch. 3 Model studies in portfolio development : an introduction

Model 1 The offspring of doing : framing experience at Alverno College
Model 2 Learning from our experience : portfolio development at Sinclair Community College
Model 3 Love talk : educational planning at Empire State College, State University of New York
Model 4 I am a writer : writing from life at the Evergreen State College
Model 5 The wholeness of life : a Native North American approach to portfolio development at First Nations Technical Institute
Model 6 Cracking the code : the assessment of prior experiential learning at London Metropolitan University
Model 7 Building on the past, moving toward the future : prior learning assessment in a changing institution at Metropolitan State University
Model 8 All of who we are : foundations of learning at The School for New Learning, Depaul University
Model 9 Delineations on the Web : computer-mediated portfolio development at the University of Maryland University College
Model 10 Corporatizing knowledge : work-based learning at the University of Technology, Sydney
Model 11 After apartheid : the recognition of prior learning at the College of Education, University of the Witwatersrand
Model 12 The components of learning : statewide assessment of prior learning at the Vermont State Colleges
Cover image

Alternative Strategies for Evaluating Student Learning

Book
Achacoso, Michelle V. and Marilla D. Svinicki, eds.
2004
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 100)
LB2822.75.A573 2005
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Although new forms of learning call for new forms of assessment, many faculty struggle to find different ways of testing their students' achievements. This issue introduces readers to both theory and practical examples of innovations in assessment in the college classroom. Examples include authentic testing, testing with multimedia, portfolios, visual synthesis, and performance-based testing, among others. Contributors also argue that student performance on exams can be improved by techniques that ...
Additional Info:
Although new forms of learning call for new forms of assessment, many faculty struggle to find different ways of testing their students' achievements. This issue introduces readers to both theory and practical examples of innovations in assessment in the college classroom. Examples include authentic testing, testing with multimedia, portfolios, visual synthesis, and performance-based testing, among others. Contributors also argue that student performance on exams can be improved by techniques that can be implemented both before and after the exam to make the students better learners. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's notes

ch. 1 Assessment theory for college classrooms (Susan M. Brookhart)
ch. 2 Assessing fundamentals in every course through mastery learning (J. Ronald Gentile)
ch. 3 Authentic assessment : testing in reality (Marilla D. Svinicki)
ch. 4 Developing a student-based evaluation tool for authentic assessment (Joseph M. La Lopa)
ch. 5 Student portfolios : an alternative way of encouraging and evaluating student learning (Carmel Parker White)
ch. 6 Alternative assessment in a mathematics course (Nancy J. Simpson)
ch. 7 Assessing performance in problem-based service-learning projects (Tim O. Peterson)
ch. 8 Performance-based assessment : improving the value of laboratory and skills examinations (Judy M. Silverstrone)
ch. 9 Aligning paper tests with multimedia instruction (Scott L. Howell)
ch. 10 Computerized testing in large courses : a case study (John F. Kremer)
ch. 11 Group exams in science courses (Linda C. Hodges)
ch. 12 Making student thinking visible by examining discussion during group testing (Theresa Castor)
ch. 13 Two examples of group exams from communication and engineering (Karin L. Sandell and Lonnie Welch)
ch. 14 Using practice tests on a regular basis to improve student learning (Margaret K. Snooks)
ch. 15 Post-test analysis : a tool for developing students' metacognitive awareness and self-regulation (Michelle V. Achacoso)
Cover image

A Teacher's Guide to Classroom Assessment: Understanding and Using Assessment to Improve Student Learning

Book
Butler, Susan and Nancy D. McMunn
2006
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB3051.B88 2006
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
A comprehensive guide for effectively integrating assessment in the classroom.

Based on extensive research, this book offers teachers a thorough grounding in all aspects of classroom assessment for enhancing student learning and achievement. While the major focus is on how to design quality performance tasks and scoring guides, the book also provides guidance on setting standards-based learning targets, analyzing assessment data, and using instructional strategies to provide effective ...
Additional Info:
A comprehensive guide for effectively integrating assessment in the classroom.

Based on extensive research, this book offers teachers a thorough grounding in all aspects of classroom assessment for enhancing student learning and achievement. While the major focus is on how to design quality performance tasks and scoring guides, the book also provides guidance on setting standards-based learning targets, analyzing assessment data, and using instructional strategies to provide effective feedback to students. The book also covers portfolios, grading practices, and issues of high-stakes testing. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction : Assessment for classroom learning

ch. 1 Understanding the varieties of assessment

Part 1 Clarifying learning targets
ch. 2 Unpacking standards and benchmarks
ch. 3 Defining student expectations

Part 2 Gathering assessment evidence
ch. 4 Understanding and selecting assessment methods
ch.5 Written product, portfolio, and project assessments
ch. 6 Designing quality classroom assessment tasks
ch. 7 Creating useful scoring guides

Part 3 Making sense of assessment data
ch. 8 Tracking and analyzing results

Part 4 Linking assessment to instruction
ch. 9 Revising feedback and instructional plans
ch. 10 Using assessment to motivate students

Part 5 Related assessment factors
ch. 11 Rethinking grading practices
ch. 12 Challenges of high-stakes assessment

Conclusion : an appeal for change
Cover image

The Student Assessment Handbook

Book
Morgan, Chris, Lee Dunn, Sharon Parry and Meg O'Reilly
2004
RoutledgeFalmer, London, UK
LB2368.S88 2004
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Aimed primarily at higher education professionals, this book is a comprehensive guide to assessment issues, particularly for those professionals who are coming to terms with the range of new pressures on their traditional teaching practices. Agents of change such as increased use of IT, flexible assessment methods and quality assurance all converge on the area of assessment, making new demands of assessors.

Outlining how traditional assessment practices can ...
Additional Info:
Aimed primarily at higher education professionals, this book is a comprehensive guide to assessment issues, particularly for those professionals who are coming to terms with the range of new pressures on their traditional teaching practices. Agents of change such as increased use of IT, flexible assessment methods and quality assurance all converge on the area of assessment, making new demands of assessors.

Outlining how traditional assessment practices can be updated and diversified to suit these contemporary teaching and learning methods, this book is a practical resource, with reflection boxes and diagnostic tools that encourage the reader to apply the principles to their own practice.

Other areas covered include: Assessing large groups, Authentication of student work, Maintaining assessment standards, Assessing generic skills and Quality assurance. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part A: Issues and themes in assessment
ch. 1 The link between assessment and learning
ch. 2 Roles and purposes of assessment
ch. 3 The grading game: norm- and criterion-referenced assessment
ch. 4 Valid assessment
ch. 5 Assessing in flexible modes
ch. 6 Assessing with new technology
ch. 7 Assessing in diverse contexts
ch. 8 Assessing large cohorts
ch. 9 Academic fraud and plagiarism
ch. 10 Maintaining standards in a consumer market
ch. 11 Accountability and the quality agenda: evaluative purposes of assessment

Part B: Assessing key learning outcomes
ch. 12 Communicating
ch. 13 Accessing and managing information
ch. 14 Demonstrating knowledge and understanding
ch. 15 Demonstrating procedures and techniques
ch. 16 Designing, creating, performing
ch. 17 Thinking critically and making judgements
ch. 18 Problem solving
ch. 19 Managing and developing oneself

Part C: Assessment in practice
ch. 20 Designing assessment tasks
ch. 21 Developing marking schemes
ch. 22 Communicating assessment tasks
ch. 23 Marking and grading
ch. 24 Evaluating assessment practices
ch. 25 Dealing with plagiarism

References
Index
TTR cover image

"Doing It Differently: Unleashing Student Creativity"

TTR
O'Donovan, Theresa
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 3 (2003): 159-163
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Student assignments and assessment – is there life beyond the ten-page essay? Drawing on the theory of multiple intelligences and experience with an assignment in which students were asked to address course content in anything but an essay, the author considers the challenges and virtues of a creative format that does not rely exclusively on linguistic intelligence. The process, presentations, and evaluative approach employed in an assignment that called upon student ...
Additional Info:
Student assignments and assessment – is there life beyond the ten-page essay? Drawing on the theory of multiple intelligences and experience with an assignment in which students were asked to address course content in anything but an essay, the author considers the challenges and virtues of a creative format that does not rely exclusively on linguistic intelligence. The process, presentations, and evaluative approach employed in an assignment that called upon student creativity in a "Women and the Bible" course are described, and pedagogical and practical considerations explored. The analysis of a particularly memorable student submission reveals layers of complexity seldom achieved in a conventional essay format.
TTR cover image

"Improving Graduate Theological Instruction: Using Classroom Assessment Techniques to Connect Teaching and Learning"

TTR
Gaeddert, Barry K.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 1 (2003): 48-52
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) offer immediate, relevant feedback to professors on the teaching process as well as feedback to students on the learning process. While Classroom Assessment Techniques have been introduced, studied and analyzed in undergraduate education, application to graduate theological education has not been advanced. The author describes a recent research project that discerned faculty attitudes toward the implementation of Classroom Assessment Techniques in a seminary setting in hopes ...
Additional Info:
Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) offer immediate, relevant feedback to professors on the teaching process as well as feedback to students on the learning process. While Classroom Assessment Techniques have been introduced, studied and analyzed in undergraduate education, application to graduate theological education has not been advanced. The author describes a recent research project that discerned faculty attitudes toward the implementation of Classroom Assessment Techniques in a seminary setting in hopes that more effective faculty development programs can be designed by implementing CATs.
TTR cover image

"After the Facts: Alternative Student Evaluation for Active Learning Pedagogies in the Undergraduate Biblical Studies Classroom"

TTR
Aspan, Paul F. and Faith Kirkham Hawkins
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 3 (2000): 133-151
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
After laying a theoretical basis for an active learning orientation in the classroom, the co-authors describe methods they developed to evaluate active learning in two different settings of introductory courses in biblical studies. They argue that honoring diverse learning and communication styles among students does not need to compromise academic rigor. The authors show how portfolio-based assessment of student learning allows students a range of ways to demonstrate their mastery ...
Additional Info:
After laying a theoretical basis for an active learning orientation in the classroom, the co-authors describe methods they developed to evaluate active learning in two different settings of introductory courses in biblical studies. They argue that honoring diverse learning and communication styles among students does not need to compromise academic rigor. The authors show how portfolio-based assessment of student learning allows students a range of ways to demonstrate their mastery of the material. Examples are provided of components of student portfolios from their undergraduate classes.
TTR cover image

"The Meaning and the Ends of Teaching Religion"

TTR
Markham, Ian
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 3 (1998): 135-138
BL41.T4
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This paper explores the relationship between assessment and ethical value. It starts by reflecting on the traditional assessment convention that distinguishes strongly between process (the ways in which a student constructs a piece of work) and conclusion. The paper then examines three case studies from Holocaust studies, feminist theology, and Providence. The argument of the paper is that these three case studies illustrate that imparting certain values is part of ...
Additional Info:
This paper explores the relationship between assessment and ethical value. It starts by reflecting on the traditional assessment convention that distinguishes strongly between process (the ways in which a student constructs a piece of work) and conclusion. The paper then examines three case studies from Holocaust studies, feminist theology, and Providence. The argument of the paper is that these three case studies illustrate that imparting certain values is part of the teaching process, and therefore it should not be excluded from assessment.
Article cover image

"Beyond "Good" and "Awk": Paper Comments That Challenge Students to Think, Rethink, and Revise"

Article
Cozzens, Christine
Center for Writing and Speaking, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, GA
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Journal cover image

Some Aspects of Evaluation

Journal Issue
1971
Theological Education 7, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Student Evaluation: Neglected Stepchild of Curricular Revision (Donald C. Houts)
Toward a More Genuinely Comprehensive Examination (James C. Logan)
The New Presbyterian System of Evaluation Candidates for Ordination (Lewis A. Briner)
Performance Evaluation in Ministry (Henry Babcock Adams)
Psychological Testing in Evaluation and Guidance of Seminary Students (John B. McConahay)
A Modified Form of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory for Religious Personnel (William C. Bier, S.J.)
“Breakdown of Society,” “Opinion Pollster,” and Ministry (James E. Dittes and Carlton D. Blanchard)
Journal cover image

Evaluation in Theological Education

Journal Issue
1974
Theological Education 10, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Evaluative Criteria for Seminary Governing Boards (Warren H. Deem)
Psychological Measurement in Theological Schools (Richard A. Hunt)
The Theological School Inventory: Is It Still Valid? (Sue W. Cardwell)
The MMPI Reconsidered: A Study of the Cart-Horse Problem in the Prediction of Success in the Ministry (John M. Berecz)
Assessing Simulated and Actual Job Performance (Robert J. Menges)
Maturity Appropriate for Advancement to the Theologate (Alfred C. Hughes)
Good News for Seminary Personnel (Jesse H. Ziegler)
Journal cover image

Evaluation in Theological Education

Journal Issue
1985
Theological Education 22, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
A Theological Evaluation of Evaluations: The Evangelicals (Bill J. Leonard)
Measuring-Up for Ministry in the Roman Catholic Tradition (James A. Coriden)
A Theological Analysis of Evaluation within Protestantism (Grayson L. Tucker, Jr.)
The Evaluation of People in Theological Schools (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Program Evaluation: Some Practical Guidelines (Barbara G. Wheeler)
Cover image

Character and Assessment of Learning for Religious Vocation (pdf)

Journal Issue
2006
Theological Education 41, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v.41 no.2 2006
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2006-theological-education-v41-n2.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2006-theological-education-v41-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Vocation in a New Key: Spiritual Formation and the Assessment of Learning (Mary Kay Oosdyke)
Speaking Assessment in the Local Vernacular (Linda Lee Clader)
Leclerq among the Blue Devils: Assessing Theological Learning in the Modern University (Willie James Jennings)
Progressing Towards Ministry: Student Perceptions of the Dispositional Evaluation Process at Emmanuel School of Religion (Jack Holland)
Preparing Leaders for Mission: The Experience of Assessment at Luther Seminary (James L. Boyce and Richard W. Nysse)
Practicing Assessment/Resisting Assessment (Robert A. Cathey)
Preaching, Proclamation, and Pedagogy: An Experiment in Integrated Assessment (Elaine Park)
Moving the Mission Statement into the Classroom (Jo-Ann Badley)
Evaluation Rubrics: Weaving a Coherent Fabric of Assessment (Stephen Graham, Kimberly Sangster, and Yasuyuki Kamata)
Toward an Integrated Model of Assessment (Dennis H. Dirks)
Profiles of Ministry: History and Current Research (Francis A. Lonsway)
Imagining Faith: The Biblical Imagination in Theory and Practice (Mary Karita Ivancic)
Cover image

Meaningful Course Revision: Enhancing Academic Engagement Using Student Learning Data

Book
Wehlburg, Catherine M.
2006
Anker Publishing Company, Inc., Bolton, MA
LB2822.75.W44 2006
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Teaching   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Faculty are often motivated to change the activities and design of their courses for reasons not based on data. In Meaningful Course Revision, the author seeks instead to illustrate how the appropriate use of multiple, direct measures of student-learning outcomes can lead to enhanced course development and revision. While providing an outline of methods for creating significant learning experiences, the book also includes practical suggestions for shaping the design of ...
Additional Info:
Faculty are often motivated to change the activities and design of their courses for reasons not based on data. In Meaningful Course Revision, the author seeks instead to illustrate how the appropriate use of multiple, direct measures of student-learning outcomes can lead to enhanced course development and revision. While providing an outline of methods for creating significant learning experiences, the book also includes practical suggestions for shaping the design of a course to meet student needs.

Meaningful Course Revision urges a rethinking of teaching and learning. By making student advancement its focal point, it offers guidance through

* Data-based decision making
* Designing course-based assessment activities
* Using data to enhance innovation in course redesign
* Rethinking teaching and learning
* Embedding assessment activities in meaningful ways
* Planning the course
* Closing the feedback loop
* Moving from course-level decision making to departmental curriculum planning
* Creating a culture of student-learning outcomes assessment

Written for faculty seeking advice on how to keep their teaching interesting and effective, Meaningful Course Revision is a practical guide for collecting information about how well students are reaching course goals, learning what impact course changes are having on student learning, and putting courses into a cycle of continual revision and improvement. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Preface

ch. 1 Date-Based Decision-Making
Engaged Students

ch. 2 Designing Course-Based
Assessment Activities
Measures you Already Have
Measures You Can Create
Student Satisfaction Measures
Specific Methods for Course-Based Assessment

ch. 3 Using Data Enhance Innovation in Course Redesign
What is innovation in course redesign?
Getting Innovative

ch. 4 Rethinking Teaching and Learning
Student-Centered Teaching
Student Engagement
Transfer of Learning
The "Guide on the Side."
Active Learning
Applying Rubrics to Enhance Learning
Conclusion

ch. 5 Embedding Assessment Activities in Meaningful Ways
Outline Your Teaching Goals
Review Current Teaching and In-Class Activities
Consider Adapting Existing Activities
Create New Methods to Assess Student Learning
The Importance of Embedding Activities

ch. 6 Planning The Course
Student Learning Outcomes and Other Data Sources
Teaching and Learning Activities
Grading Policies and Process
Enjoyment of Teaching

ch. 7 Closing the Feedback Loop
Collecting Informal Feedback
Embedded Assessment Items
Closing the Feedback Loop

ch. 8 Moving from Course-Level Decision-Making to Departmental Curriculum Planning
Mission Statement
Development of Student Learning Outcomes
Determining When Specific Outcomes Should Be Met
Sharing Objectives with Students
Collecting Information on Specific Objectives
Identifying Other Sources of Data
Using Data to Make Departmental Curricular Decisions
Conclusion

ch. 9 Creating a Culture of Student Learning Outcomes Assessment
Benefits of a Culture of Assessment
Possible Obstacles to Building a Culture of Assessment
Transforming an Institution's Culture
Accreditation Issues
Characteristics of an Institutional Culture of Assessment
Conclusion

Suggested Reading
Bibliography
Cover image

Beyond Tests and Quizzes: Creative Assessments in the College Classroom

Book
Mezeske, Richard J., and Barbara A. Mezeske, eds.
2007
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2368.B49 2007
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Because the drive toward external assessment speaks almost exclusively in terms of standardized testing, we need to be reminded of the internal purposes of assessment: measuring learning for both student and teacher so that instruction can be adjusted and improved. This book is written for college instructors who are striving to creatively change assessment practice to better reflect learner-centered teaching. It is intended to consider not only the multiple ways ...
Additional Info:
Because the drive toward external assessment speaks almost exclusively in terms of standardized testing, we need to be reminded of the internal purposes of assessment: measuring learning for both student and teacher so that instruction can be adjusted and improved. This book is written for college instructors who are striving to creatively change assessment practice to better reflect learner-centered teaching. It is intended to consider not only the multiple ways in which individuals learn content, but also the multiple avenues to assessment the variety of learning styles demands.
Creative assessment is defined here as assessments that spin, twist, and reform what might be a standard kind of assessment in an ordinary classroom. Instructors should use these examples of creative assessment as starting points, and as the beginnings of an internal discussion on what matters most in the courses they teach: What components of each course count the most for solving a range of problems in the discipline? If facts are important, and they usually are, how can they be used to support a flexible approach to thinking, solving, considering options, and gathering and interpreting evidence? What are the facts not telling us? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Why These Assessment Opportunities Make Sense in a World Where Assessment of Factual Knowledge Has Taken Hold (Elizabeth Gayton)

ch. 1 Why Creative Assessment? (Richard J. Mezeske, Barbara A. Mezeske)
ch. 2 Concept Mapping: Assessing Pre-Service Teachers' Understanding and Knowledge (Richard J. Mezeske)
ch. 3 Getting Creative in a Required Course: Variable Grading, Learning Logs, and Authentic Testing (Barbara A. Mezeske)
ch. 4 "From Now on You'll Be History": The Transition from Memorization to Analysis (Janis M. Gibbs)
ch. 5 Resurrecting the Lab Practical (Kathy Winnett-Murray)
ch. 6 Exams as Learning Experiences: One Nutty Idea After Another (Thomas Smith)
ch. 7 Web-Based Instruction and Assessment in a German Culture Course (Lee Forester)
ch. 8 Challenging Students (and the Professor) to Use All of Their Brains: A Semester-Long Exercise in Thinking Styles and Synthesis (Elizabeth A. Trembley)
ch. 9 Demonstrating Synthesis: Technology Assessment Tools for Field Experience Learning (Susan Cherup)
ch. 10 Assessing an Engineering Design Team Project: Build It, and They Will Come (Michael Misovich and Roger Veldman)
ch. 11 Tracking Learning Over Time in Health Care Education Using Clinical Proficiency Transcripts (Richard Ray)
ch. 12 Verbing the Noun: Grammar in Action (Rhoda Janzen)
ch. 13 Hands-On Assessment Can Work for Pre-Service Elementary Teachers (Mary DeYoung)
ch. 14 Building Assignments Within Community: Assessment in the Real World (David B. Schock)

Conclusion: Do Classroom Assessment Techniques Improve Student Learning and Fulfill Larger Assessment Goals? (Scott VanderStoep and Carla Reyes)
Index
Cover image

Promoting Integrated and Transformative Assessment: A Deeper Focus on Student Learning

Book
Wehlburg, Catherine M.
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2822.75.W445 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Assessment plays a key role in institutions of higher education. However, many colleges and universities simply add their assessment plans onto other teaching, learning, service, and research activities in order to prepare for an impending accreditation visit. In this important resource, Catherine M. Wehlburg outlines an integrated and ongoing system for assessment that both prepares for an accreditation visit and truly enhances student learning. This innovative approach can be adapted ...
Additional Info:
Assessment plays a key role in institutions of higher education. However, many colleges and universities simply add their assessment plans onto other teaching, learning, service, and research activities in order to prepare for an impending accreditation visit. In this important resource, Catherine M. Wehlburg outlines an integrated and ongoing system for assessment that both prepares for an accreditation visit and truly enhances student learning. This innovative approach can be adapted for use in a wide variety of situations to transform a department or an entire institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 What Is Transformative Assessment?
ch. 2 Transformative Assessment: A Historical Perspective
ch. 3 Institutional Dynamics: Using Organizational Structure and Campus Climate
ch. 4 Encouraging Faculty Support for Transformative Assessment
ch. 5 Transformative Assessment Across Student and Academic Affairs
ch. 6 Aligning Institutional Mission with Assessment: Elements of a Meaningful Institutional Effectiveness Program
ch. 7 Institutional Implementation of Transformative Assessment
ch. 8 Embedding Transformative Assessment Activities Across the Institution
ch. 9 Transformative Assessment as a Method to Support Ongoing Accreditation and Accountability
ch. 10 The Future of Transformative Assessment in Higher Education
References
Index
Cover image

Evaluation in Distance Education and E-Learning: The Unfolding Model

Book
Ruhe, Valerie, and Bruno D. Zumbo
2009
The Guilford Press, New York
LC5800.R84 2009
Topics: Online Learning   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
With the rapid proliferation of distance education and e-learning courses, the need is growing for a comprehensive, professional approach to evaluating their effectiveness. This indispensable book offers a road map to guide evaluation practice in these innovative learning environments. Providing practical, step-by-step guidelines and tools for conducting evaluation studies—including how to deal with stakeholders, develop surveys and interview protocols, collect other scientific evidence, and analyze and blend mixed-methods data—...
Additional Info:
With the rapid proliferation of distance education and e-learning courses, the need is growing for a comprehensive, professional approach to evaluating their effectiveness. This indispensable book offers a road map to guide evaluation practice in these innovative learning environments. Providing practical, step-by-step guidelines and tools for conducting evaluation studies—including how to deal with stakeholders, develop surveys and interview protocols, collect other scientific evidence, and analyze and blend mixed-methods data—the work also features a template for writing high-quality reports. The "unfolding model" developed by the authors draws on Messick's influential assessment framework and applies it to program evaluation. Two case studies of actual programs (a distance learning course and an e-learning course) demonstrate the unfolding model in action. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Why Do We Need a New Approach to Evaluation in Distance Education and E-Learning?
ch. 2 The Theory and Practice of Program Evaluation
ch. 3 Evaluation Theory and Practice in Distance Education and E-Learning
ch. 4 Messick's Framework: What Do Evaluators Need to Know?
ch. 5 Getting Started
ch. 6 The Unfolding Model: Scientific Evidence
ch. 7 The Unfolding Model: Values and Consequences
ch. 8 Findings from Two Authentic Case Studies
ch. 9 Bringing It All Together

App. A Summary of the 1994 Program Evaluation Standards
App. B Glossary
App. C List of Associations

References
Author Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Enhancing Learning through Formative Assessment and Feedback

Book
Irons, Alastair
2008
Routledge, Taylor & Francis, New York
LB3051.I76 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
This book is based on the argument that detailed and developmental formative feedback is the single most useful thing teachers can do for students. It helps to clarify the expectations of higher education and assist all students to achieve their potential.

This book promotes student learning through formative assessment and feedback, which:

* enables self-assessment and reflection in learning
* encourages teacher-student dialogue
* helps clarify what ...
Additional Info:
This book is based on the argument that detailed and developmental formative feedback is the single most useful thing teachers can do for students. It helps to clarify the expectations of higher education and assist all students to achieve their potential.

This book promotes student learning through formative assessment and feedback, which:

* enables self-assessment and reflection in learning
* encourages teacher-student dialogue
* helps clarify what is good performance
* provides students with quality information to help improve their learning
* encourages motivation and self-confidence in students
* aids the teacher in shaping teaching

Underpinned by the relevant theory, the practical advice and examples in this book directly address the issues of how to motivate students to engage in formative assessment effectively and shows teachers how they can provide further useful formative feedback. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Student Learning Environment
ch. 3 Principles of Formative Assessment and Feedback
ch. 4 Using Formative Assessment and Formative Feedback in Learning and Teaching
ch. 5 Formative Feedback and Reflective Learning
ch. 6 Types of Formative Assessment and Feedback
ch. 7 Making Use of ICTs for Formative Feedback
ch. 8 Benefits of Formative Feedback for Academic Staff
ch. 9 Conclusions
Cover image

Electronic Portfolios 2.0: Emergent Research on Implementation and Impact

Book
Darren Cambridge, Barbara Cambridge, and Kthleen Yancey, eds.
2009
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1029.P67E43 2009
Topics: Online Learning   |   Assessing Students   |   Student Portfolios   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Higher education institutions of all kinds—across the United States and around the world—have rapidly expanded the use of electronic portfolios in a broad range of applications including general education, the major, personal planning, freshman learning communities, advising, assessing, and career planning.

Widespread use creates an urgent need to evaluate the implementation and impact of eportfolios. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, the contributors to this book—all ...
Additional Info:
Higher education institutions of all kinds—across the United States and around the world—have rapidly expanded the use of electronic portfolios in a broad range of applications including general education, the major, personal planning, freshman learning communities, advising, assessing, and career planning.

Widespread use creates an urgent need to evaluate the implementation and impact of eportfolios. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, the contributors to this book—all of whom have been engaged with the Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research—have undertaken research on how eportfolios influence learning and the learning environment for students, faculty members, and institutions.

This book features emergent results of studies from 20 institutions that have examined effects on student reflection, integrative learning, establishing identity, organizational learning, and designs for learning supported by technology. It also describes how institutions have responded to multiple challenges in eportfolio development, from engaging faculty to going to scale.

These studies exemplify how eportfolios can spark disciplinary identity, increase retention, address accountability, improve writing, and contribute to accreditation. The chapters demonstrate the applications of eportfolios at community colleges, small private colleges, comprehensive universities, research universities, and a state system. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction: On Transitions: Past to Present

Section One - Introduction: Reflection In Electronic Portfolio Practice
ch. 1 Reflection and Electronic Portfolios: Inventing the Self and Reinventing the University (Kathleen Blake Yancey)
ch. 2 Studying Student Reflection in an Electronic Portfolio Environment: An Inquiry in the Context of Practice (W.H. Rickards and Lauralee Guilbault)
ch. 3 Using ePortfolios to Support Lifelong and Lifewide Learning (Helen L. Chen)

Section Two - Integrative Learning
ch. 4 Two Faces of Integrative Learning Online (Darren Cambridge)
ch. 5 Becoming ePortfolio Learners and Teachers (Julie Huges)
ch. 6 Making Connections: The LaGuardia ePortfolio (Bret Eynon)
ch. 7 Connecting Contexts and Competencies: Using ePortfolios for Integrative Learning (Tracy Penny Light, Bob Sproule and Katherine Lithgow)

Section Three - Establishing Indentities: Roles, Competencies, Values, and Outcomes
ch. 8 Influencing Learning Through Faculty- and Student-Generated Outcome Assessment Michael Day)
ch. 9 The Promise of E-Portfolios for Institutional Assessment (Thomas S. Ewards and Colleen Burnham)
ch. 10 Demonstrating Intellectual Growth and Development: The IUPUI ePort (Sharon Hamilton and Susan Kahn)
ch. 11 A Values-Driven ePortfolio Journey: Na Wa‘a (Judith Kirkpatrick)
ch. 12 E-Portfolios in an Undergraduate Psychology Research Experiences Program Benjamin R. Stephens)
ch. 13 Perceptions of Teacher Candidates on ePortfolio Use(Neil W. Topp and Robert L. Goeman)

Section Four - Organizational Learning
ch. 14 Diffusing ePortfolios in Organizational Settings (Stephen R. Acker)
ch. 15 A Catalyst Without a Mandate: Building an ePortfolio Culture at the University of Washington (Tom Lewis and Janice Fournier)
ch. 16 Documenting the Outcomes of Learning (Milton D. Hakel and Erin N. Smith)
ch. 17 Sustaining Change through Student, Departmental, and Institutional Portfolios (Kathi A. Ketcheson)

Section Five - Electronic Portfolio Technology and Design For Learning
ch. 18 Technology and Change (Cara Lane)
ch. 19 Re-visioning Revision with ePortfolios in the University of Georgia First-year Composition Program (Christy Desmet, June Griffin, Deborah Church Miller, Ron Balthazor, and Robert Cummings)
ch. 20 Moving eFolio Minnesota to the Next Generation: From Individual Portfolios to an Integrated Institutional Mode (Lynette Olson, Lori Schroeder, and Paul Wakso
ch. 21 Assessing the Learning Potential of E-Portfolio Through Thinking Sheets (Mary Zamon and Debra Sprague)
ch. 22 The Maed English Education Electronic Portfolio Experience: What Preservice English Teachers Have to Teach Us About Eps and Reflection (Carl Young)

Conclusion: Moving Into The Future (Barbara Cambridge, Darren Cambridge, and Kathleen Yancey)
Index
Cover image

Grade Inflation: Academic Standards in Higher Education

Book
Hunt, Lester, H., ed.
2008
State University of New York Press, Albany
LB2368.G73 2008
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This book provides a provocative look at the issues and controversies surrounding grade inflation, and, more generally, grading practices in American higher education. The contributors confront the issues from a number of different disciplines and varying points of view. Topics explored include empirical evidence for and against the claim that there is a general upward trend in grading, whether grade inflation (if it exists) is a problem, which ethical considerations ...
Additional Info:
This book provides a provocative look at the issues and controversies surrounding grade inflation, and, more generally, grading practices in American higher education. The contributors confront the issues from a number of different disciplines and varying points of view. Topics explored include empirical evidence for and against the claim that there is a general upward trend in grading, whether grade inflation (if it exists) is a problem, which ethical considerations are relevant to grading, and whether heavy reliance on anonymous student evaluations of teaching excellence has a distorting effect on grading practices. Finally, the contributors offer contrasting perspectives on the prospects for reform.

"As state and federal agencies begin to talk about accountability for universities, the topic of grade inflation could become even more politicized. This timely book addresses a topic of significant public interest and does it well. The fact that the contributors disagree, take different approaches, and address different aspects of grade inflation is a virtue." - Kenneth A. Strike, author of Ethical Leadership in Schools: Creating Community in an Environment of Accountability

"This book encourages academic communities to engage in constructive debate over their professional responsibilities as evaluators of student academic work. Its greatest strength is that it presents disparate perspectives on the complex topics of grading and grade inflation. The contributors are in a real sense engaged in a discussion on the subject, which makes the book refreshing and intellectually stimulating." - Matthew Hartley, University of Pennsylvania

Contributors include CliffordAdelman, David T. Beito, Mary Biggs, Harry Brighouse, Lester H. Hunt, Richard Kamber, Alfie Kohn, Charles W. Nuckolls, Francis K. Schrag, and John D. Wiley.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Dangerous Myth of Grade Inflation (Alfie Kohn)
ch. 2 Undergraduate Grades: A More Complex Story Than "Inflation" (Clifford Adelman)
ch. 3 Understanding Grade Inflation (Richard Kamber)
ch. 4 Grade Inflation and Grade Variation: What's All the Fuss About? (Harry Brighouse)
ch. 5 From Here to Equality: Grading Policies for Egalitarians (Francis K. Schrag)
ch. 6 Grade "Inflation" and the Professionalism of the Professoriate (Mary Biggs)
ch. 7 Fissures in the Foundation: Why Grade Conflation Could Happen (Mary Biggs)
ch. 8 Grading Teachers: Academic Standards and Student Evaluations (Lester H. Hunt)
ch. 9 Combating Grade Inflation: Obstacles and Opportunities (Richard Kamber)
ch. 10 Grade Distortion, Bureaucracy, and Obfuscation at the University of Alabama (David T. Beito and Charles W. Nuckolls)

Afterword: Focusing on the Big Picture (Lester H. Hunt)
List of Contributors
Index
Tactics cover image

"The Mastery Quiz"

Tactic
Shaffer, Peg
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 1 (2009): 53
BL41.T4
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs   |   Liberal Arts

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: building review into a lecture.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: building review into a lecture.
Cover image

A Guide to Course Design & Assessment of Student Learning: A basic guide for professors and instructors at the Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond

Book
Galindo, Israel
2009
Israel Galindo
BV4020.G34 2009
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
"This guide is primarily for the Master of Divinity degree program ... and the M.Div. concentrations"--P. 1.
Additional Info:
"This guide is primarily for the Master of Divinity degree program ... and the M.Div. concentrations"--P. 1.

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 A Quick Start Guide to Designing Your Course
ch. 2 Constructivist Teaching and Learning
ch. 3 Teaching for Understanding
ch. 4 Designing Your Course for Understanding
ch. 5 Using Learning Objectives to Design Your Course
ch. 6 Organizing Your Course
ch. 7 Assessing Student Learning

Appendices
Cover image

Evaluating e-learning: Guiding Research and Practice

Book
Phillips, Rob; McNaught Carmel; and Kennedy, Gregor
2012
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1028.3.P475 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
How can the average educator who teaches online, without experience in evaluating emerging technologies, build on what is successful and modify what is not?

Written for educators who feel ill-prepared when required to evaluate e-learning initiatives, Evaluating e-Learning offers step-by-step guidance for conducting an evaluation plan of e-learning technologies. It builds on and adapts familiar research methodology to offer a robust and accessible approach to effectively evaluate a ...
Additional Info:
How can the average educator who teaches online, without experience in evaluating emerging technologies, build on what is successful and modify what is not?

Written for educators who feel ill-prepared when required to evaluate e-learning initiatives, Evaluating e-Learning offers step-by-step guidance for conducting an evaluation plan of e-learning technologies. It builds on and adapts familiar research methodology to offer a robust and accessible approach to effectively evaluate a range of innovative initiatives, including those covered in other books in the connecting with e-learning series.

This useful guide offers a multi-level approach that allows both beginners and experienced professionals to follow the level of text that suits their current needs. Practical applications discussed include:

• how to develop broad evaluation questions
• how to use an evaluation framework
• how to determine the sources of data to be used
• how to develop an evaluation matrix
• how to collect, analyze and interpret the data.

Readers will find this jargon-free guide is a must-have resource that provides the proper tools for evaluating their own e-learning practices with ease. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contents
Preface

I. Setting the Scene
ch. 1 E-learning, learning and evaluation
ch. 2 Evaluation as part of a teacher’s role

II. Theory
ch. 3 The Learning Environment, Learning Processes and Learning Outcomes (LEPO) Framework
ch. 4 What is meant by educational evaluation and research?
ch. 5 Research paradigms and methodologies
ch. 6 Evaluation-research approaches suitable for e-learning
ch. 7 The process of carrying out evaluation research
ch. 8 Evaluation research across the e-learning lifecycle
ch. 9 Conducting an Evaluation-research Study
ch. 10 Project-management Evaluation
ch. 11 Using evaluation-research results: An overview of impact issues beyond the confines of a single project
Cover image

Idea-Based Learning: A Course Design Process to Promote Conceptual Understanding

Book
Hansen, Edmund J.
2011
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB2361.5.H354 2011
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
Synthesizing the best current thinking about learning, course design, and promoting student achievement, this is a guide to developing college instruction that has clear purpose, is well integrated into the curriculum, and improves student learning in predictable and measurable ways.

The process involves developing a transparent course blueprint, focused on a limited number of key concepts and ideas, related tasks, and corresponding performance criteria; as well as on ...
Additional Info:
Synthesizing the best current thinking about learning, course design, and promoting student achievement, this is a guide to developing college instruction that has clear purpose, is well integrated into the curriculum, and improves student learning in predictable and measurable ways.

The process involves developing a transparent course blueprint, focused on a limited number of key concepts and ideas, related tasks, and corresponding performance criteria; as well as on frequent practice opportunities, and early identification of potential learning barriers.

Idea-based Learning takes as its point of departure the big conceptual ideas of a discipline that give structure and unity to a course and even to the curriculum, as opposed to a focus on content that can lead to teaching sequences of loosely-related topics; and aligns with notions of student-centered and outcomes-based learning environments.

Adopting a backwards design model, it begins with three parallel processes: first, identifying the material that is crucial for conceptual understanding; second, articulating a clear rationale for how to choose learning outcomes based on student needs and intellectual readiness; and finally, aligning the learning outcomes with the instructional requirements of the authentic performance tasks.

The resulting syllabi ensure cohesion between sections of the same course as well as between courses within a whole curriculum, assuring the progressive development of students’ skills and knowledge.

Key elements of IBL include:
* Helping students see the big picture
* Building courses around one or more authentic performance tasks that illuminate the core concepts of the discipline
* Clearly identifying performance criteria for all tasks
* Incorporating practice in the competencies that are deemed important for students’ success
* By placing the onus of learning on the student, liberating faculty to take on the role of learning coaches
* Designing tasks that help students unlearn simplistic ideas and replace them with improved understandings

Edmund Hansen expertly guides the reader through the steps of the process, providing examples along the way, and concluding with a sample course design document and syllabus that illustrate the principles he propounds. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Practical Benefits of Course Design
Faculty stressors in teaching
Benefits from idea-based course design

ch. 2 Backward Design
Traditional course design
Critique of the traditional design
The Backward Design Model
The importance of course design

ch. 3 Learning Outcomes
Problems with (conceptualizing) Learning Outcomes
Identifying Big Ideas
Deriving Enduring Understandings
Determining Learning Outcomes

ch. 4 Critical Thinking
Significance of critical thinking
Lay definitions of critical thinking
The confusing state of the critical thinking literature
Need for teaching critical thinking
Barrier 1: Human development
Barrier 2: Habits of mind
Barrier 3: Misconceptions
Barrier 4: Complex reasoning
Conclusion

ch. 5 Content, Part 1: Guiding Questions and Concepts
Topics
Two parts of course content
Essential Questions
Guiding concepts
Course content and critical thinking

ch. 6 Assessment, Part 1: Educative Assessment
Assessment for grading
Assessment for learning
A continuum of assessments
Assessment as coaching
Principles of assessing for understanding

ch. 7 Assessment, Part 2: Rubrics
Examples of assignments lacking clear criteria
The main parts of a rubric
Sample rubric: Critical Thinking
Common misunderstandings about rubrics
The triple function of rubrics for:

ch. 8 Content, Part 2: Learning Experiences
Examples of poor assignments
Authentic performance tasks
Assignment-centered instruction
Assignment-related competencies
Building-block designs
Principles for designing effective learning experiences

ch. 9 Course Design Document
Why create course design documents?
Elements of the course design document
Sample Design Document: Psychology 624 - Theories of Motivation
Summary of course design features and benefits
Translating the Course Design Document into a Syllabus

ch. 10 Implementing Course Design with Online Technology
Key characteristics of online teaching
Course design elements enhanced by online technology
Conclusion

References
Appendix
Syllabus for Theories of Motivation course
TTR cover image

"Metaphors We Teach By: The Language of “Learning Outcomes”

TTR
Batten, Alicia J.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 1 (2012): 16-28
BL41.T4 v.15 no. 1 2012
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Liberal Arts   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
This article employs George Lakoff and Mark Johnson's work on metaphor (1980) to examine the current use of the term “learning outcomes” within higher education. It argues that “learning outcomes” is an ontological metaphor (education becomes focused on results that one can understand and measure) that resonates with contemporary academic capitalism. Yet because metaphors highlight some things and conceal others, thinking about teaching and disciplines using “learning outcomes” hides other dimensions ...
Additional Info:
This article employs George Lakoff and Mark Johnson's work on metaphor (1980) to examine the current use of the term “learning outcomes” within higher education. It argues that “learning outcomes” is an ontological metaphor (education becomes focused on results that one can understand and measure) that resonates with contemporary academic capitalism. Yet because metaphors highlight some things and conceal others, thinking about teaching and disciplines using “learning outcomes” hides other dimensions of academic capitalism and obscures unquantifiable and highly complex aspects of education. Finally, the article explores ways in which an emphasis upon outcomes has consequences for the field of Religious Studies.
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Practice of Response: Strategies for Commenting on Student Writing

Book
Straub, Richard
2000
Hampton Press, Cresskill, NJ
PE1404.S8368 2000
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
This book sets out to help teachers gain a practical understanding of response to student writing---essentially, by examining sample comments by knowledgeable teachers. It displays and analyzes over 30 sets of comments from a variety of settings, by a variety of teachers, all of them informed by composition studies. It defines the strategies these teachers put into practice. And it situates teacher repines in the larger context of writing instruction. (From ...
Additional Info:
This book sets out to help teachers gain a practical understanding of response to student writing---essentially, by examining sample comments by knowledgeable teachers. It displays and analyzes over 30 sets of comments from a variety of settings, by a variety of teachers, all of them informed by composition studies. It defines the strategies these teachers put into practice. And it situates teacher repines in the larger context of writing instruction. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Models of Response: How Recognized Teachers Respond to Student Writing
ch. 2 A Way to Analyze Comments
ch. 3 Comments in Context: New Compositionists' Responses to Student Writing
ch. 4 Classroom Instruction, Response, and the Student's Evolving Text: Three Case Studies
ch. 5 Guidelines for Responding to Student Writing
ch. 6 Managing the Paper Load, Or Making Good Use of Time
ch. 7 Students' Perceptions of Teach Comments
ch. 8 A Selected Bibliography on Teach Response
ch. 9 Sample Papers for Response

Appendix
List of Contributors
Index
Cover image

Assessing 21st Century Skills: A Guide to Evaluating Mastery and Authentic Learning

Book
Greenstein, Laura
2012
Corwin Press, A SAGE Publications Company, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB3051.G715 2012
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Liberal Arts   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The Common Core State Standards clearly define the skills students need for success in college and the 21st century workplace. The question is, how can you measure student mastery of skills like creativity, problem solving, and use of technology? Laura Greenstein demonstrates how teachers can teach and assess 21st century skills using authentic learning experiences and rigorous, varied assessment strategies. Based on the best ideas of renowned experts in education, ...
Additional Info:
The Common Core State Standards clearly define the skills students need for success in college and the 21st century workplace. The question is, how can you measure student mastery of skills like creativity, problem solving, and use of technology? Laura Greenstein demonstrates how teachers can teach and assess 21st century skills using authentic learning experiences and rigorous, varied assessment strategies. Based on the best ideas of renowned experts in education, this book provides a framework and practical ideas for measuring

• Thinking skills: critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, and metacognition
• Actions: communication, collaboration, digital and technological literacy
• Living skills: citizenship, global understanding, leadership, college and career readiness

Included are numerous rubrics and checklists, a step-by-step model for developing your own classroom assessments, a lesson planning template, and sample completed lesson plans. Assessing 21st Century Skills gives you the tools and strategies you need to prepare students to succeed in a rapidly changing world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 A Synthesis of 21st Century Skills
ch. 3 Assessment Fundamentalsv ch. 4 Assessment Strategies
ch. 5 Assessing Thinking Skills
ch. 6 Assessing Actions
ch. 7 Assessing Skills for Living in the World
ch. 8 Multipurpose Assessments
ch. 9 Moving Assessment Into the 21st Century

Appendices
References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Assessing Student Learning: A Common Sense Guide, 2nd Edition

Book
Suskie, Linda, and Banta, Trudy W.
2009
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2336.S87 2009
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The first edition of Assessing Student Learning has become the standard reference for college faculty and administrators who are charged with the task of assessing student learning within their institutions. The second edition of this landmark book offers the same practical guidance and is designed to meet ever-increasing demands for improvement and accountability. This edition includes expanded coverage of vital assessment topics such as promoting an assessment culture, characteristics of ...
Additional Info:
The first edition of Assessing Student Learning has become the standard reference for college faculty and administrators who are charged with the task of assessing student learning within their institutions. The second edition of this landmark book offers the same practical guidance and is designed to meet ever-increasing demands for improvement and accountability. This edition includes expanded coverage of vital assessment topics such as promoting an assessment culture, characteristics of good assessment, audiences for assessment, organizing and coordinating assessment, assessing attitudes and values, setting benchmarks and standards, and using results to inform and improve teaching, learning, planning, and decision making. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One: Understanding Assessment
ch. 1 What Is Assessment?
ch. 2 How Can Student Learning Be Assessed?
ch. 3 What Is Good Assessment?

Part Two: Planning For Assessment Success
ch. 4 Why Are You Assessing Student Learning?
ch. 5 The Keys to a Culture of Assessment: Tangible Value and Respect
ch. 6 Supporting Assessment Efforts with Time, Infrastructure, and Resources
ch. 7 Organizing an Assessment Process
ch. 8 Developing Learning Goals

Part Three: The Assessment Toolbox
ch. 9 Using a Scoring Guide or Rubric to Plan and Evaluate an Assignment
ch. 10 Creating an Effective Assignment
ch. 11 Writing a Traditional Test
ch. 12 Assessing Values, Attitudes, Dispositions, and Habits of Mind
ch. 13 Assembling Assessment Information into Portfolios
ch. 14 Selecting a Published Test or Survey

Part Four: Understanding and Using Assessment Results
ch. 15 Setting Benchmarks or Standards
ch. 16 Summarizing and Analyzing Assessment Results
ch. 17 Sharing Assessment Results with Internal and External Audiences
ch. 18 Using Assessment Results Effectively and Appropriately
ch. 19 Keeping the Momentum Going

References
Recommended Readings
Assessment Resources
Index
Cover image

Cheating in College: Why Students Do It and What Educators Can Do about It

Book
McCabe, Donald L., Butterfield, Kenneth D., and Trevino, Linda K.
2012
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB3609.M27 2012
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Today's students are tomorrow's leaders, and the college years are a critical period for their development of ethical standards. Cheating in College explores how and why students cheat and what policies, practices, and participation may be useful in promoting academic integrity and reducing cheating.

The authors investigate trends over time, including internet-based cheating. They consider personal and situational explanations, such as the culture of groups in which dishonesty ...
Additional Info:
Today's students are tomorrow's leaders, and the college years are a critical period for their development of ethical standards. Cheating in College explores how and why students cheat and what policies, practices, and participation may be useful in promoting academic integrity and reducing cheating.

The authors investigate trends over time, including internet-based cheating. They consider personal and situational explanations, such as the culture of groups in which dishonesty is more common (such as business majors) and social settings that support cheating (such as fraternities and sororities).

Faculty and administrators are increasing their efforts to promote academic honesty among students. Orientation and training sessions, information on college and university websites, student handbooks that describe codes of conduct, honor codes, and course syllabi all define cheating and establish the consequences.

Based on the authors' multiyear, multisite surveys, Cheating in College quantifies and analyzes student cheating to demonstrate why academic integrity is important and to describe the cultural efforts that are effective in restoring it. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 A Journey and a Commitment to Action
ch. 2 Where to Begin: Academic Dishonesty among High School Students
ch. 3 Prevalence, Types, and Methods of Cheating in College
ch. 4 Individual Student Characteristics That Influence Cheating
ch. 5 Institutional Factors That Influence Academic Integrity: The Role of Honor Codes
ch. 6 Institutional Factors That Influence Academic Integrity: Other Contextual Influences
ch. 7 The Faculty Role in Creating a Strong Environment of Academic Integrity
ch. 8 Academic Integrity in Business and Professional Schools
ch. 9 Creating a Culture of Integrity: Practical Advice for Faculty and Administrators

References
Index
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Evaluating Teaching and Learning: A practical handbook for colleges, universities and the scholarship of teaching

Book
Kember, David, and Ginns, Paul
2011
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2331.K386 2012
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Every semester, colleges and universities ask students to complete innumerable course and teaching evaluation questionnaires to evaluate the learning and teaching in courses they have taken. For many universities it is a requirement that all courses be evaluated every semester. The laudable rationale is that the feedback provided will enable instructors to improve their teaching and the curriculum, thus enhancing the quality of student learning.

In spite of ...
Additional Info:
Every semester, colleges and universities ask students to complete innumerable course and teaching evaluation questionnaires to evaluate the learning and teaching in courses they have taken. For many universities it is a requirement that all courses be evaluated every semester. The laudable rationale is that the feedback provided will enable instructors to improve their teaching and the curriculum, thus enhancing the quality of student learning.

In spite of this there is little evidence that it does improve the quality of teaching and learning. Ratings only improve if the instruments and the presentation of results are sufficiently diagnostic to identify potential improvements and there is effective counselling. Evaluating Teaching and Learning explains how evaluation can be more effective in enhancing the quality of teaching and learning and introduces broader and more diverse forms of evaluation.

This guide explains how to develop questionnaires and protocols which are valid, reliabile and diagnostic. It also contains proven instruments that have undergone appropriate testing procedures, together with a substantial item bank. The book looks at the specific national frameworks for the evaluation of teaching in use in the USA, UK and Australia.

It caters for diverse methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative and offers solutions that allow evaluation at a wide range of levels: from classrooms to programmes to departments and entire institutions. With detail on all aspects of the main evaluation techniques and instruments, the authors show how effective evaluation can make use of a variety of approaches and combine them into an effective project.

With a companion website which has listings of the questionnaires and item bank, this book will be of interest to those concerned with organising and conducting evaluation in a college, university, faculty or department. It will also appeal to those engaged in the scholarship of teaching and learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Evaluation Principles
ch. 2 Questionnaire design
ch. 3 Questionnaires
ch. 4 Item Bank
ch. 5 Collecting and Processing Questionnaire Data
ch. 6 Collection of Qualitative Data
ch. 7 Analysis of Qualitative Data
ch. 8 Observation
ch. 9 Use of Assessment for Evaluation
ch. 10 Using Evaluation Data for the Scholarship of Teaching
ch. 11 International Perspectives on Teaching Evaluation
ch. 12 Institutional Use of Teaching Evaluation Data
ch. 13 Conclusion
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Improving Student Engagement and Development through Assessment: Theory and practice in higher education

Book
Clouder,Lynn; Broughan, Christine; Jewell, Steve; and Steventon, Graham, eds.
2012
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2368.I47 2012
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
With a unique focus on the relationship between assessment and engagement this book explores what works in terms of keeping students on course to succeed.

Against a backdrop of massification and the associated increase in student diversity there is an escalating requirement for personalized, technology driven learning in higher education. In addition, the advent of student fees has promoted a consumer culture resulting in students having an increasingly ...
Additional Info:
With a unique focus on the relationship between assessment and engagement this book explores what works in terms of keeping students on course to succeed.

Against a backdrop of massification and the associated increase in student diversity there is an escalating requirement for personalized, technology driven learning in higher education. In addition, the advent of student fees has promoted a consumer culture resulting in students having an increasingly powerful voice in shaping curricula to their own requirements. How does one engage and retain a group of students of such diverse culture, ethnicity, ambition and experience?

Using examples from a variety of institutions worldwide this edited collection provides a well-researched evidence base of current thinking and developments in assessment practices in higher education. The chapters discuss:

• Staff and student views on assessment
• Engaging students through assessment feedback
• Assessment for learning
• Assessing for employability
• Interdisciplinary and transnational assessment
• Technology supported assessment for retention

The book draws together a wealth of expertise from a range of contributors including academic staff, academic developers, pedagogical researchers, National Teaching Fellows and Centres for Excellence in Higher Education. Recognising that a pedagogy which is embedded and taken-for-granted in one context might be completely novel in another, the authors share best practice and evaluate evidence of assessment strategies to enable academic colleagues to make informed decisions about adopting new and creative approaches to assessment. This interdisciplinary text will prove an invaluable tool for those working and studying in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of illustrations
Notes on contributors
Foreword
Introduction (Lynn Clouder and Christina Hughes)

ch. 1 Student views on assessment (Alex Bols)
ch. 2 Trained for the high jump; asked to do the long jump: does first year assessment promote retention? (Anthony Cook)
ch. 3 Exploring new students’ conceptions of engagement and feedback (Ed Foster, Jane McNeil, and Sarah Lawther)
ch. 4 Helping them succeed: the staff–student relationship (Christine Broughan and David Grantham)
ch. 5 Evaluating assessment practices: the academic staff perspective (Frances Deepwell and Greg Benfield)
ch. 6 Assessment for learning (Liz McDowell)
ch. 7 Finding their voice: podcasts for teaching, learning and assessment (Graham Steventon)
ch. 8 Student peer mentoring for engagement and retention: challenges in community building and assessment (Heather Conboy and Richard Hall)
ch. 9 The impact of assessment and feedback processes on student engagement in a research methods module (Steve Jewell)
ch. 10 Digital storytelling as an alternative assessment (Martin Jenkins and Phil Gravestock)
ch. 11 Interdisciplinary assessment (Clinton Golding and Chi Baik)
ch. 12 Assessing employability skills: understanding employer needs and how to engage with students (Marie Hardie and Norman Day)
ch. 13 Getting the context right for good assessment practice (Lynne Hunt, Sara Hammer and Michael Sankey)
ch. 14 Technology-supported assessment for retention (Ormond Simpson)
ch. 15 Issues and strategies for student engagement through assessment in transnational higher education (Glenda Crosling)

Conclusion (Christine Broughan and Steve Jewell)
Index
Additional Info:
Writing good test questions, all kinds – from multiple-choice to essays. A site designed for a teacher education course. Includes essays on principles to guide assessment, guidelines for constructing good questions, and help for students taking exams.
Additional Info:
Writing good test questions, all kinds – from multiple-choice to essays. A site designed for a teacher education course. Includes essays on principles to guide assessment, guidelines for constructing good questions, and help for students taking exams.
Additional Info:
Extensive rubric for grading student papers. Clear, concise, and helpful. By Richard Ascough, religion faculty member.
Additional Info:
Extensive rubric for grading student papers. Clear, concise, and helpful. By Richard Ascough, religion faculty member.
Additional Info:
University of Minnesota’s Center for Writing offers this brief essay outlining a process for creating a rubric.
Additional Info:
University of Minnesota’s Center for Writing offers this brief essay outlining a process for creating a rubric.
Additional Info:
A thorough but accessible bulleted list of items to consider when designing writing assignments, from University of Minnesota’s Center for Writing.
Additional Info:
A thorough but accessible bulleted list of items to consider when designing writing assignments, from University of Minnesota’s Center for Writing.
Additional Info:
University of Minnesota’s Writing Center provides this index with definitions, advice, handouts, and resources.
Additional Info:
University of Minnesota’s Writing Center provides this index with definitions, advice, handouts, and resources.
Additional Info:
A multi-chapter “how-to” hypertext on creating authentic tasks, rubrics and standards for measuring and improving student learning.
Additional Info:
A multi-chapter “how-to” hypertext on creating authentic tasks, rubrics and standards for measuring and improving student learning.
Additional Info:
A short grading rubric from the Bok Center at Harvard University.
Additional Info:
A short grading rubric from the Bok Center at Harvard University.
Additional Info:
A statement on best practices from the council of Writing Program Administrators, covering such issues as: what is plagiarism? why does it occur? what are our shared responsibilities? Provides a concise list of best practices to make plagiarism difficult and unnecessary.
Additional Info:
A statement on best practices from the council of Writing Program Administrators, covering such issues as: what is plagiarism? why does it occur? what are our shared responsibilities? Provides a concise list of best practices to make plagiarism difficult and unnecessary.
Additional Info:
Includes helpful links for students on “safe practices” to avoid plagiarism.
Additional Info:
Includes helpful links for students on “safe practices” to avoid plagiarism.
Additional Info:
An online resource for people concerned with the growing problem of internet plagiarism. Provides the latest information on online. Offers detailed information on the technologies behind Turnitin and iThenticate as well as facts about the rise of internet plagiarism.
Additional Info:
An online resource for people concerned with the growing problem of internet plagiarism. Provides the latest information on online. Offers detailed information on the technologies behind Turnitin and iThenticate as well as facts about the rise of internet plagiarism.
Additional Info:
Recommends theoretically grounded and empirically supported strategies to improve the development and assessment of students’ thinking skills – with bibliography. Idea Paper no. 37, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Recommends theoretically grounded and empirically supported strategies to improve the development and assessment of students’ thinking skills – with bibliography. Idea Paper no. 37, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Discusses the strengths and weaknesses of essay tests, and recommends best practices. Idea Paper no. 17, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Discusses the strengths and weaknesses of essay tests, and recommends best practices. Idea Paper no. 17, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Guidelines for writing good multiple-choice exam questions that can evaluate higher levels of learning (such as integrating material from several sources, critically evaluate data, contrast and compare information), as well as provide diagnostic information. Idea Paper no. 16 , from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Guidelines for writing good multiple-choice exam questions that can evaluate higher levels of learning (such as integrating material from several sources, critically evaluate data, contrast and compare information), as well as provide diagnostic information. Idea Paper no. 16 , from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Article cover image

Matching Instructional Objectives, Subject Matter, Tests, and Score Interpretations (pdf)

Article
1987
Idea Paper No. 18, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1987)
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
This article explores the implications for a particular model of teaching, by looking at differences between students, types of subject material, types of instruction, instructional objectives, texts, and ways to interpret test results. Idea Paper no. 18, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
This article explores the implications for a particular model of teaching, by looking at differences between students, types of subject material, types of instruction, instructional objectives, texts, and ways to interpret test results. Idea Paper no. 18, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
A concept map is a diagramming technique for assessing how well students see the "big picture".
Additional Info:
A concept map is a diagramming technique for assessing how well students see the "big picture".
Additional Info:
A series of websites providing rubrics, presentation tips, and a host of related topics on student assessment.
Additional Info:
A series of websites providing rubrics, presentation tips, and a host of related topics on student assessment.
Additional Info:
This page links to a Word document with a rubric to guide students when peer-reviewing each other’s written work.
Additional Info:
This page links to a Word document with a rubric to guide students when peer-reviewing each other’s written work.
Additional Info:
 An overview of using peer review in the classroom, including: planning for peer review, helping students make effective comments, helping students handle divergent advice, sample worksheet and additional information.
Additional Info:
 An overview of using peer review in the classroom, including: planning for peer review, helping students make effective comments, helping students handle divergent advice, sample worksheet and additional information.
Additional Info:
A wealth of resources and interconnected websites suggesting ways to prepare students for peer review. Includes sample forms and grading grids.
Additional Info:
A wealth of resources and interconnected websites suggesting ways to prepare students for peer review. Includes sample forms and grading grids.
Additional Info:
Over 40 short (4-6 page) essays by leading faculty development and learning experts. Many are tied to specific items in their Student Ratings of Instruction system. The IDEA Center (Individual Development & Educational Assessment)) is a non-profit founded by Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Over 40 short (4-6 page) essays by leading faculty development and learning experts. Many are tied to specific items in their Student Ratings of Instruction system. The IDEA Center (Individual Development & Educational Assessment)) is a non-profit founded by Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
RubiStar is an online generator of assessment rubrics for student projects of all kinds: writing, oral, reading, multimedia, etc.
Additional Info:
RubiStar is an online generator of assessment rubrics for student projects of all kinds: writing, oral, reading, multimedia, etc.
Additional Info:
A book chapter excerpt that describes the use of student portfolios, discusses the underlying philosophical approach of student portfolios, outlines where the student learning occurs. and describes assessment measures.
Additional Info:
A book chapter excerpt that describes the use of student portfolios, discusses the underlying philosophical approach of student portfolios, outlines where the student learning occurs. and describes assessment measures.
Additional Info:
A book excerpt discussing the development and use of electronic learning portfolios, including pros and cons, best practices, and lots of resources for further reading.
Additional Info:
A book excerpt discussing the development and use of electronic learning portfolios, including pros and cons, best practices, and lots of resources for further reading.
Additional Info:
This website is a rich repository of resources to support the design model advocated in the book "Understanding by Design" (Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, 1998), particularly around backwards design for effective "outputs."
Additional Info:
This website is a rich repository of resources to support the design model advocated in the book "Understanding by Design" (Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, 1998), particularly around backwards design for effective "outputs."
Additional Info:
A brief overview of the differences between measurable (good) and non-measurable (poor) learning outcomes and the importance of the former. "Learning outcomes should flow from a needs assessment. The needs assessment should determine the gap between an existing condition and a desired condition. Learning outcomes are statements which describe a desired condition -- that is, the knowledge, skills, or attitudes needed to fulfill the need."
Additional Info:
A brief overview of the differences between measurable (good) and non-measurable (poor) learning outcomes and the importance of the former. "Learning outcomes should flow from a needs assessment. The needs assessment should determine the gap between an existing condition and a desired condition. Learning outcomes are statements which describe a desired condition -- that is, the knowledge, skills, or attitudes needed to fulfill the need."
Additional Info:
Although this is a commercial site, it has many great summaries of major theorists and theories in easy to read charts and diagrams. Based on Robert Mager’s “Criterion Referenced Instruction (CRI) it demonstrates how instruction can be measurable and thus capable of being evaluated and systematically improved.
Additional Info:
Although this is a commercial site, it has many great summaries of major theorists and theories in easy to read charts and diagrams. Based on Robert Mager’s “Criterion Referenced Instruction (CRI) it demonstrates how instruction can be measurable and thus capable of being evaluated and systematically improved.
Additional Info:
Using a business model, this web site makes a nice distinction between “outputs” (that which is a direct result of a process) and “outcomes” (that which is achieved over the longer term).
Additional Info:
Using a business model, this web site makes a nice distinction between “outputs” (that which is a direct result of a process) and “outcomes” (that which is achieved over the longer term).
Additional Info:
A thorough overview, with multiple internal links/articles, to help students as well as professionals identify and prevent plagiarism and to develop an awareness of ethical writing.
Additional Info:
A thorough overview, with multiple internal links/articles, to help students as well as professionals identify and prevent plagiarism and to develop an awareness of ethical writing.
Additional Info:
A unique tool designed to assess and promote the improvement of critical thinking and real-world problem solving skills. The instrument is the product of extensive development, testing, and refinement with a broad range of institutions, faculty, and students across the country. The National Science Foundation has provided support for many of these activities.
Additional Info:
A unique tool designed to assess and promote the improvement of critical thinking and real-world problem solving skills. The instrument is the product of extensive development, testing, and refinement with a broad range of institutions, faculty, and students across the country. The National Science Foundation has provided support for many of these activities.
Additional Info:
Video. Extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, illustrating exemplary practices for developing students understanding, attitudes and capabilities for academic integrity.
Additional Info:
Video. Extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, illustrating exemplary practices for developing students understanding, attitudes and capabilities for academic integrity.
Additional Info:
A wide range of specific learning designs and strategies for the online and blended classroom, organized and reviewed by The University of Central Florida's Center for Distributed Learning. Each entry describes a strategy drawn from the pedagogical practice of online/blended teaching faculty, depicts this strategy with artifacts from actual courses, and is aligned with findings from research or professional practice literature. Search and browse interface.
Additional Info:
A wide range of specific learning designs and strategies for the online and blended classroom, organized and reviewed by The University of Central Florida's Center for Distributed Learning. Each entry describes a strategy drawn from the pedagogical practice of online/blended teaching faculty, depicts this strategy with artifacts from actual courses, and is aligned with findings from research or professional practice literature. Search and browse interface.
Additional Info:
Nearly a hundred or more citations on the issue of students and plagiarism, especially with international students, compiled by Rebecca Moore Howard, Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University, and specialist in "authorship studies."
Additional Info:
Nearly a hundred or more citations on the issue of students and plagiarism, especially with international students, compiled by Rebecca Moore Howard, Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at Syracuse University, and specialist in "authorship studies."
Additional Info:
Full-length videos and video clips can be very useful in teaching. However, it is important to consider ahead of time what you hope your students will learn from the videos.
Additional Info:
Full-length videos and video clips can be very useful in teaching. However, it is important to consider ahead of time what you hope your students will learn from the videos.
Additional Info:
How can I tell what my students are thinking? Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) are feedback devices to help us determine how much, how well, and simply how our students learn.
Additional Info:
How can I tell what my students are thinking? Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) are feedback devices to help us determine how much, how well, and simply how our students learn.
Additional Info:
In designing assessments or assignments for a course, instructors often think of exams or term papers, but there are many other types of assessments that may be appropriate for your course.
Additional Info:
In designing assessments or assignments for a course, instructors often think of exams or term papers, but there are many other types of assessments that may be appropriate for your course.
Additional Info:
When considering how to assess student learning in a course, most instructors would agree that the ideal assessment would be one that not only assesses students’ learning; it also teaches students and improves their skills and understanding of course content.
Additional Info:
When considering how to assess student learning in a course, most instructors would agree that the ideal assessment would be one that not only assesses students’ learning; it also teaches students and improves their skills and understanding of course content.
Additional Info:
Learning outcomes are user-friendly statements that tell students what they will be able to do at the end of a period of time.
Additional Info:
Learning outcomes are user-friendly statements that tell students what they will be able to do at the end of a period of time.
Additional Info:
A rubric articulates the expectations for an assignment by listing the criteria, or what counts, and describing levels of quality from excellent to poor.
Additional Info:
A rubric articulates the expectations for an assignment by listing the criteria, or what counts, and describing levels of quality from excellent to poor.
Additional Info:
Make a plan for evaluating the students and stick to it. Evaluation procedures should be decided on when the course is in the planning stages.
Additional Info:
Make a plan for evaluating the students and stick to it. Evaluation procedures should be decided on when the course is in the planning stages.
Additional Info:
The two-stage exam is a relatively simple way to introduce collaborative learning and formative assessment into an exam.
Additional Info:
The two-stage exam is a relatively simple way to introduce collaborative learning and formative assessment into an exam.
Additional Info:
The story is a familiar one across college campuses:students stay up late into the night cramming weeks’ worth of material into one study session before the big exam, only to forget the material as soon as the exam is over.
Additional Info:
The story is a familiar one across college campuses:students stay up late into the night cramming weeks’ worth of material into one study session before the big exam, only to forget the material as soon as the exam is over.
Additional Info:
Short accessbile overview, with several ideas to try.
Additional Info:
Short accessbile overview, with several ideas to try.
Additional Info:
Papers, projects, and presentations are excellent opportunities for students to demonstrate their learning and investment in a course.
Additional Info:
Papers, projects, and presentations are excellent opportunities for students to demonstrate their learning and investment in a course.
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Rubrics: Our best friends

Web
Ableser, Judith
Topics: Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Basic overview of how and why to use grading rubrics.
Additional Info:
Basic overview of how and why to use grading rubrics.
Web cover image

Prior Knowledge Check

Web
Jackson, Michelle
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
Teaching tip for the 1st day of class: how to assess what your students already know on the topic, and what to do with that information.
Additional Info:
Teaching tip for the 1st day of class: how to assess what your students already know on the topic, and what to do with that information.
Additional Info:
Knowing the difference between a good item that helps you understand whether or not your students have a grasp of a concept or can perform a skill is not always a simple matter.
Additional Info:
Knowing the difference between a good item that helps you understand whether or not your students have a grasp of a concept or can perform a skill is not always a simple matter.
Additional Info:
An essential lifelong skill for students is to think about their learning, or be metacognitive about it. Karen M. Kortz, Ph.D., shares three activities that help students practice this important skill.
Additional Info:
An essential lifelong skill for students is to think about their learning, or be metacognitive about it. Karen M. Kortz, Ph.D., shares three activities that help students practice this important skill.
Additional Info:
This tip suggests ways to both promote academic inteagrity and help those struggling to avoid cheating in the wake of 21st century attitudes more accepting of cheating and technologies that can facilitate it.
Additional Info:
This tip suggests ways to both promote academic inteagrity and help those struggling to avoid cheating in the wake of 21st century attitudes more accepting of cheating and technologies that can facilitate it.
Additional Info:
Students who say that they did not complete assigned readings suggested three ways that instructors might increase their motivation to complete the reading assignment.
Additional Info:
Students who say that they did not complete assigned readings suggested three ways that instructors might increase their motivation to complete the reading assignment.
Additional Info:
Not all students in a class will master material at the same rate. This post discusses techniques for verifying that your class is prepared to learn new concepts, as well as ideas for helping those who fall behind.
Additional Info:
Not all students in a class will master material at the same rate. This post discusses techniques for verifying that your class is prepared to learn new concepts, as well as ideas for helping those who fall behind.
Additional Info:
This post offers ideas for different types of final exams and instructions for implementing them effectively. Try using one that fits your course and your students.
Additional Info:
This post offers ideas for different types of final exams and instructions for implementing them effectively. Try using one that fits your course and your students.
Additional Info:
Assessments are a necessary part of gaining knowledge, and they can help point students toward more learning in the future. Learn how to create inspiring assessments that do just that.
Additional Info:
Assessments are a necessary part of gaining knowledge, and they can help point students toward more learning in the future. Learn how to create inspiring assessments that do just that.
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Educator Resources

Web
Wolcott, Susan K.; and Lynch, Cindy L.
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
A well-organized collection of assessment rubrics for critical thinking and problem-solving. These include instructor assessments and self-assessments. Also valuable for fostering faculty discussion of critical thinking.
Additional Info:
A well-organized collection of assessment rubrics for critical thinking and problem-solving. These include instructor assessments and self-assessments. Also valuable for fostering faculty discussion of critical thinking.
Additional Info:
By the Carnegie Mellon Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation. This page briefly describes assessment rubrics and explains their value for teachers and for students. Several examples are offered (in *.doc file format), including those for paper assignments, projects, oral presentations, and class participation.
Additional Info:
By the Carnegie Mellon Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation. This page briefly describes assessment rubrics and explains their value for teachers and for students. Several examples are offered (in *.doc file format), including those for paper assignments, projects, oral presentations, and class participation.
Additional Info:
A guide to the creation of assessment rubrics, including ways an instructor might improve existing rubrics in light of experience. Describes the elements of a rubric (descriptors, levels of performance), and the difference between analytic and holistic rubrics.
Additional Info:
A guide to the creation of assessment rubrics, including ways an instructor might improve existing rubrics in light of experience. Describes the elements of a rubric (descriptors, levels of performance), and the difference between analytic and holistic rubrics.
Additional Info:
A comparison of traditional ("forced-choice") assessment and authentic (performance-based) assessment. "Teaching to the test" ceases to be a problem when the test involves the performance of meaningful tasks that provide evidence of the understandings desired.
Additional Info:
A comparison of traditional ("forced-choice") assessment and authentic (performance-based) assessment. "Teaching to the test" ceases to be a problem when the test involves the performance of meaningful tasks that provide evidence of the understandings desired.
Additional Info:
This is a mobile app that allows the professor to award points "on the go" using their smartphone. Obviously aimed at K-12 teachers, but useful as well in higher education.
Additional Info:
This is a mobile app that allows the professor to award points "on the go" using their smartphone. Obviously aimed at K-12 teachers, but useful as well in higher education.
Additional Info:
Allows students or groups create their own graphic novel.
Additional Info:
Allows students or groups create their own graphic novel.
Additional Info:
An instructor reports, from the benefit of hindsight, on the mistakes he made when assigning students a multimedia project (podcasting, in this case). Commenters offer their own insights on pedagogically sound multimedia assignments.
Additional Info:
An instructor reports, from the benefit of hindsight, on the mistakes he made when assigning students a multimedia project (podcasting, in this case). Commenters offer their own insights on pedagogically sound multimedia assignments.
Additional Info:
Easy way to create surveys. Use for personalized midterm evaluations.
Additional Info:
Easy way to create surveys. Use for personalized midterm evaluations.
Article cover image

Roundtable on Pedagogy: Renunciation as Pedagogy

Article
Sasson, Vanessa R., et al
2014
Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Vol. 82, No. 2 (2014): 313-370
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This "roundtable" collection of articles discusses the notion of renunciation in relation to an experiment in which a college class had the option to renounce the right to learn about their grades during the course. Topics include the history of grading in university and college courses, the problem of plagiarism, and the role of evaluation in higher education. Responses by Kimberly Rae Connor, Michael Desjardins Yasaman Samiksa Munro, Tina Pippin, ...
Additional Info:
This "roundtable" collection of articles discusses the notion of renunciation in relation to an experiment in which a college class had the option to renounce the right to learn about their grades during the course. Topics include the history of grading in university and college courses, the problem of plagiarism, and the role of evaluation in higher education. Responses by Kimberly Rae Connor, Michael Desjardins Yasaman Samiksa Munro, Tina Pippin, and Ken Derry
Additional Info:
Materials developed through a series of workshops, consultations, and reciprocal peer review processes. Helpful to faculty, chairs, and directors interested in learning how they could use peer review to enhance teaching effectiveness in their programs. 
Additional Info:
Materials developed through a series of workshops, consultations, and reciprocal peer review processes. Helpful to faculty, chairs, and directors interested in learning how they could use peer review to enhance teaching effectiveness in their programs. 
Cover image

Leveraging the ePortfolio for Integrative Learning: A Faculty Guide to Classroom Practices for Transforming Student Learning

Book
Reynolds, Candyce; and Patton, Judith
2014
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1029.P67 R46 2014
Topics: Using Technology   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
The fruit of the authors’ more than 15 years of using and writing about ePortfolios in general education and disciplinary programs and courses, this book is a comprehensive and practical guide to the use of the ePortfolio as a pedagogy that facilitates the integrative learning that is a central goal of higher education.

Faculty and administrators of programs using ePortfolios can use this guide to help their students work ...
Additional Info:
The fruit of the authors’ more than 15 years of using and writing about ePortfolios in general education and disciplinary programs and courses, this book is a comprehensive and practical guide to the use of the ePortfolio as a pedagogy that facilitates the integrative learning that is a central goal of higher education.

Faculty and administrators of programs using ePortfolios can use this guide to help their students work individually on an ePortfolio or as part of a class or program requirement. Readers will discover through examples of student portfolios and targeted exercises how to assist students in making their learning visible to themselves, their peers, their instructors and their future employers.

While interest in ePortfolios has exploded—because they provide an easier and more comprehensive ways to assess student learning than traditional portfolios, and because they have the potential to transformatively develop students’ ability to connect and apply their knowledge—faculty and administrators all too often are disappointed by the lackluster ePortfolios that students submit. Reynolds and Patton demonstrate how systematically embedding practices in the classroom that engage students in integrative learning practices dramatically improves outcomes. The authors describe easy to use and practical strategies for faculty to incorporate integrative ePortfolios in their courses and curricula, and create the scaffolding to develop students’ skills and metacognition.

The book opens by outlining the underlying learning theory and the key concepts of integrative learning and by describing the purpose, structure and implementation of ePortfolios. Subsequent sections cover classroom practices and assignments to help students understand themselves as learners; make connections between course content, their personal lives, and to the curriculum; bridge theory to practice; and consider issues of audience and communication and presentation in developing their portfolios. The book goes on to cover technological issues and assessment, with a particular emphasis on the use of rubrics; and concludes with explicated examples of ePortfolios created in a first-year program, ePortfolios created by graduating students, career-oriented ePortfolios, and lifelong ePortfolios.

For both experienced faculty and administrators, and readers just beginning to use ePortfolios, this book provides a framework and guidance to implement them to their fullest potential. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Terry Rhodes)
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One: Key Concepts
ch. 1 ePortfolios as a Tool for Integrative Learning
ch. 2 Integrating Knowledge: The Crux of an Education
ch. 3 Retooling Your Syllabus and Teaching: Integrating Integrative Learning and ePortfolios Into Your Course

Part Two: Teaching for Integrative Learning
ch. 4 Fostering Reflective Practice
ch. 5 Making Connections or Integrating Knowledge
ch. 6 Making Connections for Lifelong Learning
ch. 7 Communicating Effectively in ePortfolios: A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words

Part Three: Creating the ePortfolio
ch. 8 Designing an ePortfolio System
ch. 9 Making an ePortfolio Using Free Web-Based Software

Part Four: At the End
ch. 10 Assessment of ePortfolios: Using Rubrics to Assess
ch. 11 Parting Thoughts

References
Index
Cover image

Using Technology to Gather, Store and Report Evidence of Learning: Digital Learning Guides

Book
Loane, Terry
2014
National Institute of Adult Continuing Education NIACE (England and Wales)
LB1029.P67 L63 2014
Topics: Using Technology   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
The use of digital technology to capture evidence of learning has been an area of rapid development recently, both in terms of the devices (such as smartphones and tablet computers) and the range of e-portfolios that has become available. Such a rapid pace of change is a major challenge to established practice in assessing learning, which can be daunting for tutors and assessors, even those who have sought to embrace ...
Additional Info:
The use of digital technology to capture evidence of learning has been an area of rapid development recently, both in terms of the devices (such as smartphones and tablet computers) and the range of e-portfolios that has become available. Such a rapid pace of change is a major challenge to established practice in assessing learning, which can be daunting for tutors and assessors, even those who have sought to embrace technology in their practice.

This book provides lots of straightforward, practical advice on how to use digital technology confidently and effectively to gather, store and report evidence of learning. It will be highly valuable to any adult learning practitioner or manager involved in collecting evidence either for accredited programmes (such as apprenticeships) or for non-accredited programmes. Terry Loane explains how to use both the latest hardware and online systems such as e-portfolios. He also describes how technology is now helping adult educators to move away from the ‘tick-box culture’ towards broader and more holistic methods of recording learners’ achievements. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Author’s introductory Notes

ch. 1 A Revolution Whose Time Has Come
ch. 2 What Do We Mean By Assessing?
ch. 3 Different Types of Evidence and How To Gather It
ch. 4 The Digital Toolkit
ch. 5 E-portfolios
ch. 6 Three Important Issues: Confidentiality, Authenticity and Motivation
ch. 7 Beyond the Ticked Box

Glossary
References
Tactics cover image

Increasing Engagement through Oral Exams

Tactic
Gaudet, Matthew J.
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 98
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: individual oral exams during office hours in place of the first high stakes exam, helps encourage student engagement and diagnose learning problems.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: individual oral exams during office hours in place of the first high stakes exam, helps encourage student engagement and diagnose learning problems.
Article cover image

Learning Outcomes for Ethics Across the Curriculum Programs

Article
Ozar, David T.
2001
Teaching Ethics, Ethics Across the Curriculum Programs, 1-28 (Fall)
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
This paper discusses undergraduate ethics education from the point of view of a learning-outcomes centered approach to curriculum design. It aims to identify the kinds of learning-out comes that Ethics Across the Curriculum programs ought to aim at and be judged successful by. The first section explains the learning-outcomes-centered approach to designing and evaluating curriculum proposals. The second section applies this approach specifically to ethics education for undergraduates. It concludes ...
Additional Info:
This paper discusses undergraduate ethics education from the point of view of a learning-outcomes centered approach to curriculum design. It aims to identify the kinds of learning-out comes that Ethics Across the Curriculum programs ought to aim at and be judged successful by. The first section explains the learning-outcomes-centered approach to designing and evaluating curriculum proposals. The second section applies this approach specifically to ethics education for undergraduates. It concludes with a proposal for Ideal Learning Outcomes for ethics education in an undergraduate curriculum. The third section asks which of these learning outcomes can reasonably be achieved by an Ethics Across the Curriculum program and which of these learning outcomes could not dependably be achieved unless a formal course in ethics is a requirement for every student. The fourth section briefly examines teaching strategies for Ethics Across the Curriculum programs and discusses ways of helping faculty in Ethics Across the Curriculum programs become effective ethics teachers.
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Critical Perspectives on Service-Learning in Higher Education

Book
Deeley, Susan J.
2015
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
LC220.5.D437 2015
Topics: Service Learning   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Assessing Students   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Service-learning in higher education combines students' academic coursework with their voluntary work, enhancing students' learning and benefiting the community. The key to unlocking the connections between the theory and practice of service-learning is critical reflection, which is examined in this book along with students' academic reflective writing and assessment. The power and dynamics of service-learning are explored through the construction of a theoretical ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Service-learning in higher education combines students' academic coursework with their voluntary work, enhancing students' learning and benefiting the community. The key to unlocking the connections between the theory and practice of service-learning is critical reflection, which is examined in this book along with students' academic reflective writing and assessment. The power and dynamics of service-learning are explored through the construction of a theoretical paradigm and the assertion that it can be extended further to critical pedagogy. Critical Perspectives of Service-Learning in Higher Education takes a refreshingly critical and innovative look at service-learning, employing theoretical and empirical work to shed new light on this approach to education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Contextualising Service-Learning
ch. 3 A Theoretical Paradigm for Service-Learning
ch. 4 Service-Learning as a Critical Pedagogy
ch. 5 Critical Reflection
ch. 6 Academic Writing in Service-Learning
ch. 7 Reflections in and on Assessment
ch. 8 Conclusion

References
Index
Journal cover image

Assessing Online Learning: Strategies, Challenges and Opportunities

Journal Issue
2009
Magna Publication: Faculty Focus Online Classroom, May
Topics: Online Learning   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
A special report featuring 12 articles from Online Classroom examining methods of online assessment and common assessment mistakes to avoid.
Additional Info:
A special report featuring 12 articles from Online Classroom examining methods of online assessment and common assessment mistakes to avoid.

Table Of Content:
Four Typical Online Learning Assessment Mistakes
Authentic Experiences, Assessment Develop Online Students’ Marketable Skills
Assessing Whether Online Learners Can DO: Aligning Learning Objectives with Real-world Applications
Strategies for Creating Better Multiple-Choice Tests
Assessing Student Leaning Online: It’s More Than Multiple Choice
To Plan Good Online Instruction, Teach to the Test
Using Self-Check Exercises to Assess Online Learning
Assessment for the Millennial Generation
Self-Assessment in Online Writing Course Focuses Students on the Learning Process
Using Online Discussion Forums for Minute Papers
Additional Info:
UNC Charlotte’s Learning Center provides this helpful example of a gradation of activities for assessment (specific to “social studies”), from classify, define, demonstrate, to  order, predict, solve, and state a rule
Additional Info:
UNC Charlotte’s Learning Center provides this helpful example of a gradation of activities for assessment (specific to “social studies”), from classify, define, demonstrate, to  order, predict, solve, and state a rule
Cover image

Demystifying Outcomes Assessment for International Educators: A Practical Approach

Book
Deardorff, Darla K.
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2822.75.D43 2015
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
For many in international education, assessment can seem daunting and overwhelming, especially given that such efforts need to involve much more than a pre/post survey. This book is a practical guide to learning-outcomes assessment in international education for practitioners who are starting to engage with the process, as well as for those who want to improve the quality and effectiveness of their assessment efforts.

Assuming no prior ...
Additional Info:
For many in international education, assessment can seem daunting and overwhelming, especially given that such efforts need to involve much more than a pre/post survey. This book is a practical guide to learning-outcomes assessment in international education for practitioners who are starting to engage with the process, as well as for those who want to improve the quality and effectiveness of their assessment efforts.

Assuming no prior knowledge, the book offers an accessible and clear road map to the application of assessment. Recognizing that a “one size fits all” approach cannot capture the diversity of goals and settings of international education, or the rich variety of programs and organizations involved in delivering it, author Darla Deardorff provides the reader with foundational principles and knowledge to develop appropriate assessment approaches for evaluating and improving student learning outcomes, which are the drivers of higher education internationalization.

She provides the background for assessment, highlights how the characteristics of international education pose unique challenges for assessment, considers the contexts to which assessment may be applied – whether in cross-border or “at home” institutional experiences, such as in curricular, co-curricular or extracurricular settings – and distills a seemingly convoluted process into a manageable approach. From the basics of getting started in assessment to highlighting pitfalls to avoid, this book offers a holistic and practical approach to assessment that moves beyond seeing assessment as a discrete activity to on-going process that is integrated into student learning. There is also a unique chapter for education leaders on assessment essentials from a leadership-perspective.

The appendices include worksheets for implementing assessment, creating an assessment team, and getting buy-in from stakeholders. Other appendices include a list of standards adapted to international education outcomes assessment, guidance on assessing intercultural competence, and resources.

This book reflects the author’s experience of over a decade of work with international education programs and higher education institutions around the world, and synthesizes what she has learned into an easy-to-use resource for anyone who wants to understand and utilize effective assessment in the field of international education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Trudy Banta)
Foreword (Hans de Wit)
Acknowledgements
Introduction

ch. 1 Framing International Education Assessment
ch. 2 Thirty Frequently Asked Questions on Assessment in International Practice
ch. 3 The Unique Assessment Context of International Education
ch. 4 Principles for Effective Assessment in International Education
ch. 5 Approaching International Education Assessment Holistically: The Logic Model
ch. 6 Getting Started
ch. 7 Developing an Assessment Strategy: The Assessment Process
ch. 8 Pitfalls to Avoid, Strategies, and Lessons Learned
ch. 9 The Leadership Role in International Education Assessment
ch. 10 The Future of International Education Assessment

Appendices
Appendix A: Handouts and Worksheets
Appendix B: Assessing Intercultural Competence as a Learning Outcome of International Education
Appendix C: Some Thoughts on Assessing Intercultural Competence
Appendix D: Checklist for Evaluating the Effectiveness of Outcomes Assessment in International Education
Appendix E: Some Assessment Tools for International Education Contexts
Appendix F: International Education Learning Outcomes Examples
Appendix G: Selected Assessment Resources for International Educators
References
Index
TTR cover image

Transformative Learning: A Case for Using Grounded Theory as an Assessment Analytic

TTR
Patterson, Barbara A. B.; Munoz, Leslie; Abrams, Leah; and Bass, Caroline
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 4 (2015): 303-325
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 4 2015
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Transformative Learning Theory and pedagogies leverage disruptive experiences as catalysts for learning and teaching. By facilitating processes of critical analysis and reflection that challenge assumptions, transformative learning reframes what counts as knowledge and the sources and processes for gaining and producing it. Students develop a broader range of perspectives on and entry points for learning and behavior change engaging cognition, embodiment, aesthetics, emotions, and ethics (see Mezirow 1991 and Figures 1 and 2). ...
Additional Info:
Transformative Learning Theory and pedagogies leverage disruptive experiences as catalysts for learning and teaching. By facilitating processes of critical analysis and reflection that challenge assumptions, transformative learning reframes what counts as knowledge and the sources and processes for gaining and producing it. Students develop a broader range of perspectives on and entry points for learning and behavior change engaging cognition, embodiment, aesthetics, emotions, and ethics (see Mezirow 1991 and Figures 1 and 2). The open-inquiry, multi-modal nature of transformative learning defies most traditional assessment strategies. This article demonstrates that grounded theory offers the rigorous qualitative analysis needed to document and track transformative learning outcomes in practice. By applying a grounded theory approach to data from over eighty student portfolios across several iterations of a Religion and Ecology course at Emory University, this article demonstrates a successful and replicable assessment of transformative learning pedagogies.
TTR cover image

Teaching Critical Thinking without (Much) Writing: Multiple-Choice and Metacognition

TTR
Bassett, Molly H.
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 1 (2016): 20-40
BL41.T4 v.19 no.1
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

Additional Info:
In this essay, I explore an exam format that pairs multiple-choice questions with required rationales. In a space adjacent to each multiple-choice question, students explain why or how they arrived at the answer they selected. This exercise builds the critical thinking skill known as metacognition, thinking about thinking, into an exam that also engages students in the methods of the academic study of religion by asking them to compare familiar ...
Additional Info:
In this essay, I explore an exam format that pairs multiple-choice questions with required rationales. In a space adjacent to each multiple-choice question, students explain why or how they arrived at the answer they selected. This exercise builds the critical thinking skill known as metacognition, thinking about thinking, into an exam that also engages students in the methods of the academic study of religion by asking them to compare familiar excerpts and images. As a form of assessment, the exam provides a record of students' knowledge and their thought processes, and as a learning strategy, it encourages students to examine the thought processes they use to understand religion(s) and its many manifestations.
Article cover image

"Portable, Stackable Credentials A New Education Model for Industry-Specific Career Pathways" (pdf)

Article
Austin, James T.; Mellow, Gail O.; Rosin, Mitch; and Seltzer, Marlene
2012
McGraw-Hill Research Foundation, November 28,
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Changes in Higher Education

Additional Info:
Argues for a new system of credentials in place of university degree programs, focused on education for job skill acquisition and professional development.
Additional Info:
Argues for a new system of credentials in place of university degree programs, focused on education for job skill acquisition and professional development.
Cover image

Tell Me So I Can Hear You: A Developmental Approach to Feedback for Educators

Book
Drago-Severson, Eleanor; and Blum-DeStefano, Jessica
2016
Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2831.57.C65 D7 2016
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In Tell Me So I Can Hear You, Eleanor Drago-Severson and Jessica Blum-DeStefano show how education leaders can learn to deliver feedback in a way that strengthens relationships as well as performance and builds the capacity for growth. Drawing on constructive-developmental theory, the authors describe four stages of adult growth and development and explain how to differentiate feedback for colleagues with different “ways ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In Tell Me So I Can Hear You, Eleanor Drago-Severson and Jessica Blum-DeStefano show how education leaders can learn to deliver feedback in a way that strengthens relationships as well as performance and builds the capacity for growth. Drawing on constructive-developmental theory, the authors describe four stages of adult growth and development and explain how to differentiate feedback for colleagues with different “ways of knowing,” which include:

- Instrumental knowers, who tend to see things in black and white (“Did I do it right or wrong?”) and may need to develop the capacity for reflection.
- Socializing knowers, who are concerned with maintaining relationships (“What do you want me to do?”) and may need support developing their own ideas.
- Self-authoring knowers, who have strong ideologies and values (“How does this fit with my goals and vision?”) and may need help with perspective taking.
- Self-transformative knowers, who are able to examine issues from multiple points of view (“How can I understand this more deeply?”) and may need guidance in resolving tensions and contradictions.

The authors show how leaders can provide feedback in ways that “meet people where they are” while expanding the developmental capacities educators bring to their work. Drago-Severson and Blum-DeStefano provide real-life examples with practical strategies for creating a safe space for feedback, finding the right words, and bridging feedback and action. Tell Me So I Can Hear You offers invaluable guidance to help educators support a culture of learning in classrooms, schools, and districts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 A Developmental Approach to Feedback
ch. 2 What Do We Know About Effective Feedback?
ch. 3 Theoretical Foundations of Feedback for Growth
ch. 4 How Do Different Ways of Knowing Influence
How We Receive Feedback?
ch. 5 How Do Different Ways of Knowing Influence
How We Give Feedback?
ch. 6 Building a Culture of Feedback and Trust
ch. 7 Framing Constructive and Inquiry-Oriented Feedback
ch. 8 Giving Feedback in the Moment
ch. 9 Bridging Feedback and Action
ch. 10 king Out and Growing from Feedback

Epilogue
Notes
Acknowledgments
About the Author
Index
TTR cover image

Stealing or Sharing? Cross-Cultural Issues of Plagiarism in an Open-Source Era

TTR
Haitch, Russell
2016
Teaching Theology and Religion 19, no. 3 (2016): 264-275
BL41.T4 v.19 no. 3 2016
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
More professors and institutions want to move from a detect-and-punish to an educate-and-prevent model for dealing with plagiarism. Understanding the causes of plagiarism, especially among international students, can aid in efforts to educate students and prevent plagiarism. Research points to a confluence of causal factors, such as time pressure, language differences, and unclear rules. Though not the primary factor, ethical differences between cultures are also germane. Overall, the plight of ...
Additional Info:
More professors and institutions want to move from a detect-and-punish to an educate-and-prevent model for dealing with plagiarism. Understanding the causes of plagiarism, especially among international students, can aid in efforts to educate students and prevent plagiarism. Research points to a confluence of causal factors, such as time pressure, language differences, and unclear rules. Though not the primary factor, ethical differences between cultures are also germane. Overall, the plight of international students summons institutions to examine their ethical norms of attribution. Plagiarism has a cultural history tied to concepts of individual creativity, but its future may look quite different in an era with increased communal sharing of ideas and images.
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

Look Before you Leap: Reconsidering Contemplative Pedagogy

TTR
Fisher, Kathleen
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 1 (2017): 4-21
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 1
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Assessing Students   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Liberal Arts   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This paper presents a critique of a set of teaching strategies known as “contemplative pedagogy.” Using practices such as meditation, attentive listening, and reflective reading, contemplative inquiry focuses on direct first-person experience as an essential means of knowing that has historically been overshadowed and dismissed by an emphasis on analytical reasoning. In this essay, I examine four problematic claims that appear frequently in descriptions of contemplative pedagogy: (1) undergraduate students have ...
Additional Info:
This paper presents a critique of a set of teaching strategies known as “contemplative pedagogy.” Using practices such as meditation, attentive listening, and reflective reading, contemplative inquiry focuses on direct first-person experience as an essential means of knowing that has historically been overshadowed and dismissed by an emphasis on analytical reasoning. In this essay, I examine four problematic claims that appear frequently in descriptions of contemplative pedagogy: (1) undergraduate students have a kind of spiritual hunger; (2) pedagogies focused on cognitive skills teach students only what, not how, to think; (3) self-knowledge fosters empathy; and (4) education needs a new epistemology centered on spiritual and emotional, rather than intellectual, experience. I argue that these claims underestimate the diversity of undergraduate students, the complexity of what it means to think and know, the capacity for self-knowledge to become self-absorption, and the dangers of transgressing the boundaries between intellectual, psychological, and religious experiences. [See as well “Response to Kathleen Fisher's ‘Look Before You Leap,’” by Andrew O. Fort and Louis Komjathy, published in this issue of the journal.]
TTR cover image

Response to Kathleen Fisher’s Look Before You Leap

TTR
Fort, Andrew O.; and Komjathy, Louis
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 1 (2017): 22-27
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 1
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Assessing Students   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
This article provides two short responses to Kathleen M. Fisher's essay “Look Before You Leap: Reconsidering Contemplative Pedagogy,” published in this issue of the journal.
Additional Info:
This article provides two short responses to Kathleen M. Fisher's essay “Look Before You Leap: Reconsidering Contemplative Pedagogy,” published in this issue of the journal.
Cover image

Research on Student Civic Outcomes in Service Learning: Conceptual Frameworks and Methods

Book
Hatcher, Julie A.; Bringle, Robert G.; and Hahan, Thomas W., eds.
2017
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC220.5.R478 2017
Topics: Service Learning   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
At this time of a renewed call for colleges and universities to create campus cultures that support and develop students’ understanding and commitment to civic participation, what is known about the design of service learning courses and their effectiveness to achieve this goal? This volume presents research on--and deepens understanding of--teaching strategies that foster the knowledge, skills and dispositions of college graduates to be ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
At this time of a renewed call for colleges and universities to create campus cultures that support and develop students’ understanding and commitment to civic participation, what is known about the design of service learning courses and their effectiveness to achieve this goal? This volume presents research on--and deepens understanding of--teaching strategies that foster the knowledge, skills and dispositions of college graduates to be actively engaged in their communities as citizens and civic-minded professionals.

The first section offers an overview of civic learning and the importance of intentional service learning course design to reach civic outcomes. The next section employs various disciplinary perspectives to identify theories and conceptual frameworks for conducting research on student civic outcomes. The third section focuses on research methods and designs to improve research using quantitative and qualitative approaches, cross-institutional research strategies, longitudinal designs, authentic data, and local and national data sets. Chapters also address implications for practice and future research agendas for scholars. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
PART ONE: SERVICE LEARNING AND STUDENT CIVIC OUTCOMES
ch. 1 Introduction to Research on Service Learning and Student Civic Outcomes (Julie A. Hatcher, Robert G. Bringle, and Thomas W. Hahn)
ch. 2 Civic Outcomes in Higher Education (Kevin M. Hemer and Robert D. Reason)
ch. 3 Civic Learning in Higher Education (Patti H. Clayton and Stephanie Stokamer)

PART TWO: THEORETICAL FRAMEWORKS FOR RESEARCH ON SERVICE LEARNING AND STUDENT CIVIC OUTCOMES
ch. 4 Social Psychology and Civic Outcomes (Robert G. Bringle)
ch. 5 Political Theory and Civic Outcomes (Steven G. Jones)
ch. 6 Educational Theory and Civic Outcomes (Marcia Baxter-Magolda and Lisa Boes)
ch. 7 Philanthropic Studies and Civic Outcomes (Julie A. Hatcher)
ch. 8 Well-being and Civic Outcomes (Claire Berezowitz, Alisa Pykett, Victoria Faust, and Connie Flanagan)
ch. 9 Critical Theories and Civic Outcomes (Tania D. Mitchell and Colleen Rost-Banik)
ch. 10 Boundary Zone Perspectives and Civic Outcomes (Janice McMillan)

PART THREE: CONDUCTING RESEARCH ON SERVICE LEARNING AND STUDENT CIVIC OUTCOMES
ch. 11 Quantitative Research on Service Learning and Civic Outcomes (Dan Richard)
ch. 12 Qualitative Research on Service Learning and Civic Outcomes (Susan R. Jones and Zak Foste)
ch. 13 Cross- institutional Research on Civic Outcomes (Emily M. Janke and Jennifer M. Domagal-Goldman)
ch. 14 Longitudinal Research on Civic Outcomes (Patrick L. Hill, Kira Pasquesi, Nicholas A. Bowman, and Jay W. Brandenberger)
ch. 15 Documenting and Gathering Authentic Evidence of Civic Outcomes (Ashley Finley and Terrel Rhodes)
ch. 16 Enhancing Research on Civic Outcomes Using Local and National Data Sets (Steven S. Graunke and Michele J. Hansen)
Tactics cover image

A Choose-Your-Own-Adventure Strategy for Unlocking Theory in Religious Studies

Tactic
Duperon, Matthew
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 3 (2017): 263-264
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 3
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Learning Designs

Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: scaffolds progressively more nuanced student understanding of difficult religious studies theory.
Additional Info:
One page TTR Teaching Tactic: scaffolds progressively more nuanced student understanding of difficult religious studies theory.