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"Beyond Diversity: Cultural Competence, White Racism Awareness, and European–American Theology Students"

TTR
Kujawa-Holbrook, Sheryl
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 3 (2002): 141-148
BL41.T4
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
As the population within our religious institutions and the United States grows increasingly diverse, the need for a greater awareness of cultural and racial differences is a challenge facing theology students who will live and work within a changing context. For European American students this challenge includes an understanding of the power dynamics inherent in "whiteness" and how the resultant social power affects persons of other races and cultures. This ...
Additional Info:
As the population within our religious institutions and the United States grows increasingly diverse, the need for a greater awareness of cultural and racial differences is a challenge facing theology students who will live and work within a changing context. For European American students this challenge includes an understanding of the power dynamics inherent in "whiteness" and how the resultant social power affects persons of other races and cultures. This article focuses on the need for cultural competence among current theology students, and outlines a five-stage developmental process whereby they have an opportunity to enhance their understanding of multiculturalism and anti-racism within their own context.
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"Cone's Consistency: Reflections from a Teaching Assistant"

WCJOT
Willison, Thurman Todd
2020
The Wabash Center Journal on Teaching, volume 1:2, (85-88)

Additional Info:
Beyond his academic contribution of Black Liberation Theology to the church and academy at large, James Cone should be remembered on a personal level as one who prioritized the task of teaching his students, placed the student perspective and the development of independent student voices at the center of his pedagogy, pushed his students to take classroom learning out into the world, maintained exemplary standards of consistency in his theological ...
Additional Info:
Beyond his academic contribution of Black Liberation Theology to the church and academy at large, James Cone should be remembered on a personal level as one who prioritized the task of teaching his students, placed the student perspective and the development of independent student voices at the center of his pedagogy, pushed his students to take classroom learning out into the world, maintained exemplary standards of consistency in his theological work and moral character, and contributed to the legacy of his home institution Union Theological Seminary in immeasurable ways. This is one of several short essays presented by recent students at a public forum at Union Theological Seminary after his death in 2018.
Additional Info:
This essay discusses the process and findings of an experiment on the scholarship of teaching and learning conducted in a religious ethics classroom that utilized an experiential approach to teaching and learning about social justice. The first part lays out the focus of the investigation and the pedagogical principles drawn from experiential learning theory that provided the foundation for the experiment. The second part describes all of the components of ...
Additional Info:
This essay discusses the process and findings of an experiment on the scholarship of teaching and learning conducted in a religious ethics classroom that utilized an experiential approach to teaching and learning about social justice. The first part lays out the focus of the investigation and the pedagogical principles drawn from experiential learning theory that provided the foundation for the experiment. The second part describes all of the components of the pedagogical strategy used in the experiment, the social justice action project. The third part discusses the qualitative methodology used to gather evidence and the findings drawn from that evidence. What the evidence shows is that an experiential approach to teaching and learning about social justice can be quite effective. The essay concludes with discussions of areas for further study and the implications for the practice of others.
Additional Info:
This article contends that teaching more effectively for diversity requires a radical re-envisioning of pedagogical practice. Drawing on qualitative interviews with religion and theology professors of color throughout the United States, it explores how faculty can re-imagine their teaching by engaging students where they are, acknowledging the reality of oppression, and dealing with resistance. Stressing mindfulness of social location, it provides examples of liberating teaching activities and competences and shows ...
Additional Info:
This article contends that teaching more effectively for diversity requires a radical re-envisioning of pedagogical practice. Drawing on qualitative interviews with religion and theology professors of color throughout the United States, it explores how faculty can re-imagine their teaching by engaging students where they are, acknowledging the reality of oppression, and dealing with resistance. Stressing mindfulness of social location, it provides examples of liberating teaching activities and competences and shows how literary and visual "texts" from the margins and personal metaphors of embodiment can challenge captivities to hegemonic paradigms in the classroom. The article concludes with responses from colleagues who have worked closely with the author. Ethicist Melanie Harris brings Hill's method into dialogue with Womanist pedagogy, and historian of religion Hjamil Martínez-Vázquez reflects on the role of suffering in building a revolutionary/critical pedagogy.
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"James Cone: Notes on a Critical Theologian"

WCJOT
Clark, Adam
2020
The Wabash Center Journal on Teaching, volume 1:2, (89-92)

Additional Info:
This short essay reflects on James Cone’s transformational impact as a teacher inside the classroom and through his voluminous writings. This is one of several short essays presented by recent students at a public forum at Union Theological Seminary after his death in 2018.
Additional Info:
This short essay reflects on James Cone’s transformational impact as a teacher inside the classroom and through his voluminous writings. This is one of several short essays presented by recent students at a public forum at Union Theological Seminary after his death in 2018.
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"James Cone’s Liberative Pedagogy"

WCJOT
Wyman, Jason
2020
The Wabash Center Journal on Teaching, volume 1:2, (97-100)

Additional Info:
James Cone is known primarily as the founder of Black liberation theology. Yet for those who were his students, his teaching was equally as powerful. Cone managed to mentor people, create dialogue, and foster collaboration, all around the common collective task of seeking justice and liberation through theological study and construction. These things made Cone such an effective teacher. His work existed on a continuum, in which the liberation of ...
Additional Info:
James Cone is known primarily as the founder of Black liberation theology. Yet for those who were his students, his teaching was equally as powerful. Cone managed to mentor people, create dialogue, and foster collaboration, all around the common collective task of seeking justice and liberation through theological study and construction. These things made Cone such an effective teacher. His work existed on a continuum, in which the liberation of Black people, of all the oppressed, was a non-negotiable baseline. While he used “traditional” methods, primarily lecture and seminar formats, the purpose behind his teaching wasn’t traditional at all. And as a result, he has put in place a network of clergy, academics, and of many other vocations, who in one way or another are promulgating that commitment to liberation and justice quite literally throughout the world. This is one of several short essays presented by recent students at a public forum at Union Theological Seminary after his death in 2018.
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"Learning Theology In The Struggle For Freedom"

WCJOT
Wessel-McCoy, Colleen
2020
The Wabash Center Journal on Teaching, volume 1:2, (101-104)

Additional Info:
In his work as a scholar and educator, James Cone developed leaders. He built a network of scholars, clergy, and activists committed to the power of God in history and to the role of the poor and dispossessed in realizing earthly freedom. Cone’s courses began with the situatedness of the theologians being studied and always returned to the problems of the world that theologians sought to answer. He challenged ...
Additional Info:
In his work as a scholar and educator, James Cone developed leaders. He built a network of scholars, clergy, and activists committed to the power of God in history and to the role of the poor and dispossessed in realizing earthly freedom. Cone’s courses began with the situatedness of the theologians being studied and always returned to the problems of the world that theologians sought to answer. He challenged his students to do the same, identifying and answering the crises of our communities, doing theology in the struggle for justice and liberation. This is one of several short essays presented by recent students at a public forum at Union Theological Seminary after his death in 2018.
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"Race, Ethnicity, and the Bible: Pedagogical Challenges and Curricular Opportunities"

TTR
Byron, Gay L.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 105-124
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
Theological educators are now fostering dialogues, projects, and practices that are designed to acknowledge the challenges and opportunities resulting from the shifting racial and ethnic demographic climate in the U.S. and Canada. As well-intentioned as these efforts are, most of the scholarship focuses on the contemporary experiences of underrepresented minorities, current institutional concerns, or practical classroom scenarios, leaving Scripture courses, which have long been the backbone of theological education, ...
Additional Info:
Theological educators are now fostering dialogues, projects, and practices that are designed to acknowledge the challenges and opportunities resulting from the shifting racial and ethnic demographic climate in the U.S. and Canada. As well-intentioned as these efforts are, most of the scholarship focuses on the contemporary experiences of underrepresented minorities, current institutional concerns, or practical classroom scenarios, leaving Scripture courses, which have long been the backbone of theological education, beyond the scope of critical engagement. In this article I argue that the existing scholarship on teaching and learning in general, and among biblical scholars in particular, does not adequately address the specific challenges that arise when questions about race and ethnicity are exposed in Scripture courses. Therefore, based on my own classroom experiences, I develop a pedagogy of (Emb)Racing the Bible that seeks to bridge the gap between theoretical readings and practical applications of ancient and contemporary discourses about race and ethnicity.
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"Teaching Effectively in Racially and Culturally Diverse Classrooms"

TTR
Ramsay, Nancy J.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 1 (2005): 18-23
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Issues of racial and cultural diversity and racism pose particular challenges for effective teaching and learning in diverse theological classrooms. In this essay the author outlines specific strategies to confront racism and engage racially and culturally diverse students. Through the use of a model for understanding multicultural dynamics of teaching and learning, the author helps readers consider four epistemological categories: knowing our students, knowing ourselves as instructors, knowing how we ...
Additional Info:
Issues of racial and cultural diversity and racism pose particular challenges for effective teaching and learning in diverse theological classrooms. In this essay the author outlines specific strategies to confront racism and engage racially and culturally diverse students. Through the use of a model for understanding multicultural dynamics of teaching and learning, the author helps readers consider four epistemological categories: knowing our students, knowing ourselves as instructors, knowing how we teach, and knowing what we teach.
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"Teaching for Racial Justice: A Participative Approach"

TTR
Reddie, Anthony G.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 95-109
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This article outlines an ongoing method the author developed for seeking to enable predominantly White students in theological education (those training for authorized public ordained ministry) to engage with the central tenets of racial justice. The quest for racial justice has been an important part of the mission of the major church denominations in the United Kingdom over the past twenty years, as they have declared that "Racism is a ...
Additional Info:
This article outlines an ongoing method the author developed for seeking to enable predominantly White students in theological education (those training for authorized public ordained ministry) to engage with the central tenets of racial justice. The quest for racial justice has been an important part of the mission of the major church denominations in the United Kingdom over the past twenty years, as they have declared that "Racism is a sin." Ordained ministers are now charged with the task of seeking to lead church congregations into faithful, anti-racist forms of practice – namely, the quest for racial justice. This paper outlines the working method the author has developed in order to conscientize ministers in training for this significant task.
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"Teaching What I'm Not: Embodiment, Race, and Theological Conversation in the Classroom"

TTR
Thompson, Deanna A.
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 3 (2000): 164-169
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This article examines the theoretical and practical concerns of a White professor who teaches a course on African American religious thought. It begins with a discussion of what it means to be embodied White, and how that affects the teaching of another embodied reality. From there it moves to the major assignment of the course, the evolutionary essay, and how this assignment facilitates student reflection upon their own embodied existence, ...
Additional Info:
This article examines the theoretical and practical concerns of a White professor who teaches a course on African American religious thought. It begins with a discussion of what it means to be embodied White, and how that affects the teaching of another embodied reality. From there it moves to the major assignment of the course, the evolutionary essay, and how this assignment facilitates student reflection upon their own embodied existence, particularly in terms of race. The article concludes with a brief reflection on the continuing challenges the author faces when teaching such a course.
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Wabash tree

"Transforming to Teach: Teaching Religion to Today's Black College Student"

TTR
Coleman, Monica A.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 2 (2007): 95-100
BL41.T4
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Emerging from the particular experiences of the marginalized, postmodern pedagogies (bell hooks, Paolo Freire, feminist pedagogies) argue that education is more than conveying information from teacher to student. Rather education should encompass the transformative process of shaping character, values, and politics through the dynamic interaction among the teacher, the students' experiences, and the content of the instructional material. These perspectives argue that educators should reject "the banking model" of education, ...
Additional Info:
Emerging from the particular experiences of the marginalized, postmodern pedagogies (bell hooks, Paolo Freire, feminist pedagogies) argue that education is more than conveying information from teacher to student. Rather education should encompass the transformative process of shaping character, values, and politics through the dynamic interaction among the teacher, the students' experiences, and the content of the instructional material. These perspectives argue that educators should reject "the banking model" of education, and teach to transform. However, religious studies with today's black college student tests the mettle of these approaches. On the one hand, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have long practiced transformative education through a commitment to shaping both the minds and characters of their students. On the other hand, many of today's black college students are less receptive to transformation, particularly in the academic study of religion. This resistance to transformation is a reflection of (1) the socio-economic reality of the current student, and (2) a new black religiosity that portrays the world in binary terms. These economic and religious realities present a teaching context for which few religious scholars are prepared. This essay discusses the particularities of teaching religion to today's black college student by sharing the challenges, failures, successes, and joys of teaching religion at a small church-related, historically black women's college in the south. I will discuss the techniques that fail, and the way in which this unique context causes me to transform the way I teach religion. In the midst of a commitment to postmodern pedagogies, I feel a need to return to the banking model's establishment of authority and emphasis on content. As I negotiate with this method, I find ways to stealthily infuse transformative pedagogical techniques. I also discuss the way such a dramatic shift in pedagogy has transformed me, the teacher.
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African American Biblical Interpretation

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects   |   bible
Course Level-Format: graduate

Instructor: Cheryl Anderson
Institution: Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

Course Term: Fall
Course Year: 2014

A 2014 course by Cheryl Anderson at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary acquaints students "with the variety of biblical interpretations in the African American tradition" and the general principles of biblical hermeneutics.

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African American Ministry: Confronting Historical Challenges

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects   |   leadership
Course Level-Format: graduate

Instructor: Larry Murphy
Institution: Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

Course Term: Fall
Course Year: 2014

A 2014 course by Larry Murphy at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary examines "select issues black ministers have faced and addressed as they pursued the mission and ministries of the church" as well as "insights into the effective contemporary practice of ministry."

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African American Religions

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects   |   united states -- religious aspects
Course Level-Format: undergraduate

Instructor: Yvonne Chireau
Institution: Swarthmore College

A course by Yvonne Chireau at Swarthmore College begins "with the period of African-European contact and move through to the evolution and transformation of African religion in the present day."

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African American Religious Experiences

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects   |   united states -- religious aspects
Course Level-Format: undergraduate

Instructor: Stephanie Mitchem
Institution: University of South Carolina

A course by Stephanie Mitchem at the University of South Carolina explores "African American religious life from twin perspectives, 1) historical, cultural, and theological dimensions and 2) through cultural expressions, particularly music and art."

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African Religion

Syllabus
Topics: abortion -- religious aspects

Instructor: Katie G. Cannon
Institution: Temple University

Course Term: Fall
Course Year: 2000

A 2000 course by Katie Cannon at Temple University introduces "students to some of the central aspects of African Traditional Religion(s) presented in selected, influential studies by African scholars of religion. Utilizing interdisciplinary and multi-methodological approaches, . . . [examines] the profile of religious plurality in Africa and pursue reading in the literature of the field."

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African Religions in the Americas

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects   |   caribbean area -- religious aspects
Course Level-Format: undergraduate

Instructor: Elias Bongmba and Mary Ann Clark
Institution: Rice University

Course Term: Summer
Course Year: 1999

A 1999 course by Elias Bongmba and Mary Ann Clark at Rice University surveys " the transplantation and development of African religions in the Americas. It will include an introduction to Santería, Vodoun , Candomblé, Rastafaris and various revivalist movements with African connections."

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African-American Religious History

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects
Course Level-Format: undergraduate

Instructor: Daniel Sack
Institution: Hope College

Course Term: Spring
Course Year: 2000

A 2000 course by Daniel Sack at Hope College traces the ways in which "African-Americans have formed religious traditions from a variety of influences—including Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and African religions."

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Black Methodist History and Polities

Syllabus
Topics: methodism   |   african americans -- religious aspects

Instructor: Ron Sommerville
Institution: Christian Theological Seminary

Course Term: Spring
Course Year: 2012

A 2012 course by Ron Sommerville at Christian Theological Seminary "re-examine(s) the historical, theological, social roots of these religious bodies" and looks ahead to their future.

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Black Religion and Black Political Thought

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects   |   religion and politics

Instructor: Melissa Hart-Perry
Institution: Wake Forest University

Course Term: Spring
Course Year: 2013

A 2013 course by Melissa Harris-Perry at Wake Forest University on the "connections between black religious ideas and political activism."

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Black Theology

Syllabus
Topics: united states -- religious aspects   |   black theology
Course Level-Format: graduate

Instructor: Shannon Craigo-Snell Lewis Brogdon
Institution: Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary

Course Term: Spring
Course Year: 2013

A 2013 course by Shannon Craigo-Snell and Lewis Brogdon at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary explores "African American theologies before the Civil Rights movement, the origins and development of Black Theology as a theological movement in the late 1960s against the backdrop of the Black power and Black Consciousness movements, and Womanist Theologies."

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Challenging Racism and White Privilege in Undergraduate Theology Contexts: Teaching and Learning Strategies for Maximizing the Promise of Community Service-Learning

TTR
Reed-Bouley, Jennifer; and Kyle, Eric
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 1 (2015): 20-36
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 1 2015
Topics: Service Learning   |   Teaching Religion   |   Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This paper explores the possibilities and challenges inherent in employing community service-learning as a pedagogy for engaging undergraduates in theology and religious studies courses that contribute to racial reconciliation. The paper summarizes research from the scholarship of teaching and learning on best practices for structuring service-learning projects and processes that hold the possibility of students' genuine engagement with issues of race and the wisdom of the Catholic tradition.
Additional Info:
This paper explores the possibilities and challenges inherent in employing community service-learning as a pedagogy for engaging undergraduates in theology and religious studies courses that contribute to racial reconciliation. The paper summarizes research from the scholarship of teaching and learning on best practices for structuring service-learning projects and processes that hold the possibility of students' genuine engagement with issues of race and the wisdom of the Catholic tradition.
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Critical Race Theory as Theological Challenge

Syllabus
Topics: religion and culture   |   religion and race
Course Level-Format: graduate

Instructor: Mark Lewis Taylor
Institution: Princeton Theological Seminary

Course Term: Spring
Course Year: 2012

A 2012 course by Mark Lewis Taylor at Princeton Theological Seminary examines "Christianity's relation to the problems of white supremacist and racist phenomena" and to explore how "different theological works . . . enable Christian faith to be anti-racist in practice, and to facilitate course member’s creation of their own anti-racist strategies in belief and practice."

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Wabash tree

Getting Out of the Left Lane: The Possibility of White Antiracist Pedagogy

TTR
Teel, Karen
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 1 (2014): 3-26
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 1 2014
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
This article maintains that knowledge of the literature on multicultural education and social justice pedagogy is indispensable for white college professors who desire to teach effectively about racial justice concerns. In exploring this literature, I have noticed that many publications either articulate theory or reflect on concrete classroom strategies, while relatively few deploy theory to evaluate specific attempts at teaching for justice. This seems to me a gap worth filling. ...
Additional Info:
This article maintains that knowledge of the literature on multicultural education and social justice pedagogy is indispensable for white college professors who desire to teach effectively about racial justice concerns. In exploring this literature, I have noticed that many publications either articulate theory or reflect on concrete classroom strategies, while relatively few deploy theory to evaluate specific attempts at teaching for justice. This seems to me a gap worth filling. Speaking as a white, conventionally trained, Catholic theologian, I begin by explaining why I deem it appropriate to employ antiracist pedagogy. I then demonstrate that the literature on multicultural education and social justice pedagogy is essential to this effort by utilizing both types of literature, theoretical and practical, to analyze my own strategies and goals to date. Throughout, I discuss white antiracist theological pedagogy not as an accomplished fact, but as an emerging endeavor. See a companion essay in this issue of the journal (Anna Floerke Scheid and Elisabeth T. Vasko, “Teaching Race: Pedagogical Challenges in Predominantly White Undergraduate Theology Classrooms”), and responses by the authors of both essays, also published in this issue of the journal (“Responses: Toward an Antiracist Pedagogy”).
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History of African-American Religion

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects
Course Level-Format: undergraduate

Instructor: Herbert G. Ruffin II
Institution: Syracuse University

Course Term: Fall
Course Year: 2009

A 2009 course by Herbert Ruffin at Syracuse University "emphasizes Black religious practices, institutions, and thought in African Americans."

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Introduction to African American Religion

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects
Course Level-Format: introductory   |   undergraduate

Instructor: Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons
Institution: University of Florida

Course Term: Spring
Course Year: 2013

A 2013 course by Gwendolyn Simmons at the University of Florida "designed to give the student a coherent, interdisciplinary understanding of the African American religious experience from the beginning of the African sojourn here in North America until the present."

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James and Cross-cultural Wisdoms

Syllabus
Topics: bible -- n.t.   |   religion and culture
Course Level-Format: graduate

Instructor: Yeo Khiok-Khng
Institution: Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

Course Term: Fall

A course by Yeo Khiok-khng at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary explores "various reception and hermeneutical theories of rhetoric and intertextuality on cross-cultural wisdoms (such as ancient Jewish, Greco-Roman, Chinese, Islamic, African-American, etc.) of various communities" through the lens of the Book of James.

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Pedagogy Beyond Piracy: Un-Learning the White Body to Recreate a Body of Learning

TTR
Perkinson, James W.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 4 (2012): 323-337
BL.T4 v.15 no. 4 2012
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This essay highlights a range of questions that arise when white suburban students engage urban neighborhoods of poverty and color in the United States. How can involvement in an “other” context move beyond “educational tourism”? The essay presents a pedagogical style that raises questions of the kind of socialized body one inhabits: either one shaped by presumptions of control and rights of academic observation, or one mobilized to risk involvement ...
Additional Info:
This essay highlights a range of questions that arise when white suburban students engage urban neighborhoods of poverty and color in the United States. How can involvement in an “other” context move beyond “educational tourism”? The essay presents a pedagogical style that raises questions of the kind of socialized body one inhabits: either one shaped by presumptions of control and rights of academic observation, or one mobilized to risk involvement in a differently communalized episteme. And while the pedagogy described may not be replicable by faculty who do not share the author's background or cross-cultural orientation, the rhetorical style of the essay itself enacts the tensions that this pedagogy contends with: the efforts of a white male educator – altered by decades of inner city involvement – to open “white” space in the classroom to other norms of embodiment and other modes of learning. Here is the necessity and impossibility of moving beyond “educational tourism.”
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Pentecostalism and African American Religion

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects   |   pentecostalism
Course Level-Format: graduate

Instructor: Anthea Butler
Institution: Loyola Marymount University

A course by Anthea Butler at Loyola Marymount University on African American Pentecostalism through the lens of a multiple disciplines.

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Preaching in African American Traditions

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects   |   preaching
Course Level-Format: graduate

Instructor: Gennifer Brooks
Institution: Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

Course Term: Spring
Course Year: 2014

A 2014 course by Gennifer Brooks at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary surveys "the history, theology and practice of preaching in the African American context, generally referred to as Black Preaching."

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Religion and the Civil Rights Movement

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects   |   united states -- religious aspects
Course Level-Format: graduate

Instructor: Ray Owens
Institution: Phillips Theological Seminary

Course Term: Spring
Course Year: 2012

A 2012 course by Ray Owens at Phillips Theological Seminary "examines the ways in which religious beliefs, practices and institutions helped to form and inform the modern Civil Rights movement as well as the Anti-Civil Rights forces."

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Religion in Multicultural America

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects   |   united states -- religious aspects   |   asian-americans -- religious aspects
Course Level-Format: graduate

Instructor: Diana L. Eck
Institution: Harvard University

Course Term: Fall
Course Year: 1997

A 1997 course by Diana Eck at Harvard University on "the various religious traditions that now compose the American religious scene" with a focus on "the religious life of Asian-Americans . . . and on the African-American and immigrant traditions of Islam."

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Religion in the South

Syllabus
Topics: united states -- religious aspects

Instructor: Terry Matthews
Institution: Wake Forest University

Course Term: Fall
Course Year: 1995

A 1995 course by Terry Matthews at Wake Forest University seeks to develop " an appreciation of the rich religious history of the South, as well as an awareness of the intellectual, moral, political, social and economic forces that helped mold the region and give it a distinctive ethos." Attention is paid to the often-overlooked experience of African Americans, Roman Catholics, and Jews in the South in addition to Protestantism.

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Religions of the Americas I

Syllabus
Topics: united states -- religious aspects

Instructor: Ron Grimes
Institution: Wilfrid Laurier University

Course Year: 1998


A 1998 course by Ron Grimes at Wilfrid Laurier University "concentrates on the religious and cultural interactions of people who are of indigenous or African descent as they encounter European religion and culture."

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Resources for a Constructive Ethic: The Black Women's Literary Tradition

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects   |   women -- religious aspects

Instructor: Katie G. Cannon
Institution: Temple University

Course Term: Spring
Course Year: 1997

A 1997 course by Katie Cannon at Temple University examines "the Black Women's Literary tradition to understand how it functions as a continuing symbolic expression and transformer of value patterns fashioned by the female members of the African American community" with a focus on ethical perspectives.

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Response: Toward an Antiracist Pedagogy

TTR
Scheid, Anna Floerke; Vasko, Elisabeth T.; and Teel, Karen
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 1 (2014): 46-49
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 1 2014
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
The authors respond here to each other's essays published in this issue of the journal. In “Holding Us Accountable,” Anna Floerke Scheid and Elisabeth T. Vasko respond to Karen Teel's essay, “Getting Out of the Left Lane.” In “Challenges and Convergences,” Karen Teel responds to the essay “Teaching Race” by Anna Floerke Scheid and Elisabeth T. Vasko.
Additional Info:
The authors respond here to each other's essays published in this issue of the journal. In “Holding Us Accountable,” Anna Floerke Scheid and Elisabeth T. Vasko respond to Karen Teel's essay, “Getting Out of the Left Lane.” In “Challenges and Convergences,” Karen Teel responds to the essay “Teaching Race” by Anna Floerke Scheid and Elisabeth T. Vasko.
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Slave Narratives as Religious Sources

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects
Course Level-Format: undergraduate

Instructor: Katie G. Cannon
Institution: Temple University

Course Year: 1998


A 1998 course by Katie Cannon at Temple University "focuses on autobiographical narratives written or dictated by ex-slaves of African descent from 1750 to the twentieth century."

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Social Location Project

Tactic
Dupree-Dominguez, Molleen N.
2019
Teaching Theology and Religion 22, no. 1 (2019): 53
BL41.T4 v.22 no. 1
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
One-page Teaching Tactic in which students share their social location, to build community and set the stage for tough conversations about race, gender and privilege.
Additional Info:
One-page Teaching Tactic in which students share their social location, to build community and set the stage for tough conversations about race, gender and privilege.
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Wabash tree

Teaching Race: Pedagogical Challenges in Predominantly White Undergraduate Theology Classrooms

TTR
Scheid, Anna Floerke; and Vasko, Elisabeth T.
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 1 (2014): 27-45
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 1 2014
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice

Additional Info:
While a number of scholars in the field of Christian theology have argued for the importance of teaching diversity and social justice in theology and religious studies classrooms, little has been done to document and assess formally the implementation of such pedagogy. In this article, the authors discuss the findings of a yearlong Scholarship of Multicultural Teaching and Learning (SoMTL) study, which examined student learning and faculty teaching regarding race ...
Additional Info:
While a number of scholars in the field of Christian theology have argued for the importance of teaching diversity and social justice in theology and religious studies classrooms, little has been done to document and assess formally the implementation of such pedagogy. In this article, the authors discuss the findings of a yearlong Scholarship of Multicultural Teaching and Learning (SoMTL) study, which examined student learning and faculty teaching regarding race and white privilege in two theology classrooms. After a brief overview of the study's design and execution, we reflect upon our findings and draw out implications for pedagogical practices. In particular we discuss students' emotional responses to the material and the role of cognitive dissonance in student learning with respect to racial inequality via social structures. See a companion essay in this issue of the journal (Karen Teel, “Getting Out of the Left Lane: The Possibility of White Antiracist Pedagogy”) and responses by the authors of both essays, also published in this issue of the journal (“Responses: Toward an Antiracist Pedagogy”).
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The Black Church and the Culture of Hip Hop

Syllabus
Topics: african americans -- religious aspects   |   united states -- religious aspects   |   religion and music
Course Level-Format: graduate

Instructor: Michael Brandon McCormack
Institution: Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary

Course Term: Spring
Course Year: 2013

A 2013 course by Michael Brandon McCormack at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary seeks "to foster critical reflection on the relationship between black churches, religious practices and popular culture in the post- Civil Rights era."

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