Teaching for Transformation

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Transformative Dimensions of Adult Learning

Book
Mezirow, Jack
1991
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5225.L42M53 1991
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Transformative Dimensions of Adult Learning describes the dynamics of how adults learn--and how their perceptions are transformed by learning--as a framework for formulating educational theory and practice. It presents an in-depth analysis of the ways in which adults learn, how they make meaning of the learning experience, and how their lives can be transformed by it. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Transformative Dimensions of Adult Learning describes the dynamics of how adults learn--and how their perceptions are transformed by learning--as a framework for formulating educational theory and practice. It presents an in-depth analysis of the ways in which adults learn, how they make meaning of the learning experience, and how their lives can be transformed by it. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1. Making Meaning: The Dynamics of Learning
ch. 2. Meaning Perspectives: How We Understand Experience
ch. 3. Intentional Learning: A Process of Problem Solving
ch. 4. Making Meaning Through Reflection
ch. 5. Distorted Assumptions: Uncovering Errors in Learning
ch. 6. Perspective Transformation: How Learning Leads to Change
ch. 7. Fostering Transformative Adult Learning
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Wabash tree

Learning as Transformation: Critical Perspectives on a Theory in Progress

Book
Mezirow, Jack and Associates
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1059.M49 2000
Topics: Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
In 1978, Jack Mezirow introduced the concept of transformative learning in his groundbreaking study of women who returned to community college to continue their education. As their understanding of personal, cultural, and social histories grew, so did the students' ability to modify their assumptions and expectations of learning. Since that time, transformative learning has inspired a significant body of research and theory. This volume continues the work begun over twenty years ...
Additional Info:
In 1978, Jack Mezirow introduced the concept of transformative learning in his groundbreaking study of women who returned to community college to continue their education. As their understanding of personal, cultural, and social histories grew, so did the students' ability to modify their assumptions and expectations of learning. Since that time, transformative learning has inspired a significant body of research and theory. This volume continues the work begun over twenty years ago—revealing the impact of transformative learning on the theory and practice of adult education

Fifteen of the field's top scholars and practitioners join Jack Mezirow in these pages. Together, they review the core principles of transformation theory, analyze the process of transformative learning, describe different types of learning and learners, suggest key conditions for socially responsible learning, explore group and organizational learning, and present revelations from the latest research. They also share real-world examples drawn from their own experiences as educators and assess the evolution of transformative learning in practice and philosophy. Learning as Transformation presents an intimate portrait of a powerful learning concept and invites educators, researchers, and scholars to consider the implications of transformative learning in their own professional work. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Developing Concepts of Transformative Learning
Learning to Think Like an Adult: Core Concepts of Transformation Theory (J. Mezirow)
What "Form" Transforms? A Constructive-Developmental Approach to Transformative Learning (R. Kegan)
Inequality, Development, and Connected Knowing (M. Belenky & A. Stanton
Transformative Learning for the Common Good (L. Daloz)
Transformative Learning as Ideology Critique (S. Brookfield)

Fostering Transformative Learning in Practice
Teaching with Developmental Intention (K. Taylor)
Individual Differences and Transformative Learning (P. Cranton)
Transformation in a Residential Adult Learning Community (J. Cohen & D. Piper)
Creating New Habits of Mind in Small Groups (E. Kasl & D. Elias)
Organizational Learning and Transformation (L. Yorks & V. Marsick)

Moving Ahead From Practice to Theory
Analyzing Research on Transformative Learning Theory (E. Taylor)
Theory Building and the Search for Common Ground (C. Wiessner & J. Mezirow)
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"The Historical Reconstruction of Knowledge about Race: Implications for Transformative Teaching"

Article
Banks, James A.
1995
Educational Researcher 24, no. 2 (1995): 15-25
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Cognitive Development   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
A historical case study of the construction and reconstruction of race between the late 19th century and the 1940s is used to document the ways in which the social, cultural, political, and historical contexts in which knowers are embedded influence the knowledge they construct and reconstruct.
Additional Info:
A historical case study of the construction and reconstruction of race between the late 19th century and the 1940s is used to document the ways in which the social, cultural, political, and historical contexts in which knowers are embedded influence the knowledge they construct and reconstruct.
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Passion and Pedagogy: Relation, Creation, and Transformation in Teaching

Book
Mirochnik, Elijah and Debora C. Sherman, eds.
2002
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LC196.P37 2002
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
The inaugural title of a series in which faculty members at Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts will address critical issues in arts education for university faculty, classroom teachers, and students of education, based on the innovation programs in the arts there. The 25 contributions discuss creating the teacher and changing the world, collaborative learning and improvisation, constructing a space for creativity in science, and other topics. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The inaugural title of a series in which faculty members at Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts will address critical issues in arts education for university faculty, classroom teachers, and students of education, based on the innovation programs in the arts there. The 25 contributions discuss creating the teacher and changing the world, collaborative learning and improvisation, constructing a space for creativity in science, and other topics. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Co-creators and Contributors
Come to Dinner: An Invitation to a Party (Debora C. Sherman)
The Possibilities of Passion (Elijah Mirochnik)

ch. 1 Creating the Teacher and Changing the World (William Ayers)
ch. 2 The Telling of Racism - Narratives for Healing and Change (Cecelia Baldwin)
ch. 3 Who Cares? A Play about Passion in Teaching and in the Researching of Teaching (Tom Barone)
ch. 4 Experimenting with Postmodernism: The New "Gothic" in Arts-Based Pedagogy, Inquiry, and Teacher Development (C.T. Patrick Diamond and Carol Mullen)
ch. 5 I Teach, Therefore I Am (Mary Aswell Doll)
ch. 6 Beyond Methods? Teaching as an Aesthetic and Spirit-ful Quest (William E. Doll, Jr.)
ch. 7 Constructing the Sacred: Empathic Engagement, Aesthetic Regard, and Discernment in Clinical Teaching (Susan H. Gere, Lisa Tsoi Hoshmand and Rick Reinkraut)
ch. 8 Collaborative Learning and Improvisation: Our Stories Experience (Lynne Hamer, Sandra Spickard Prettyman and Lynette Brown)
ch. 9 The Challenge of Constructivist Teaching (George E. Hein)
ch. 10 Uncovering an Artistic Identity While Learning to Teach Through the Arts (Victoria R. Jacobs, Merryl R. Goldberg and Tom R. Bennett)
ch. 11 Images, Movements, and Sounds: Working Toward Meaning (Patricia James)
ch. 12 Transforming Experience: Readers' Theater as Pedagogy (A Readers' Theater Script in Three Parts) (Jean L. Konzal, Susan Finley and kelli Jo Kerry Moran)
ch. 13 "Taking Care" as a Pedagogue/Actor/Son in a Theater/Drama Process (Warren Linds)
ch. 14 The Breath of Interpreting Movements (Rebecca Luce-Kapler)
ch. 15 The Intertwining of Voice and Structure: Reflections on Teaching and Learning (Susan Martin)
ch. 16 Imagining the New: Constructing a Space for Creativity in Science (Margery D. Osborne and David J. Brady)
ch. 17 Becoming My Own Juliet: Teacher Transformation through Acting Shakespeare (Carol Philips)
ch. 18 Why I Send the Poet to Teach My Courses (Mary Clare Powell)
ch. 19 A Pedagogy that Presupposes Passion (Rosalie M. Romano)
ch. 20 The Dance Critic, the Classroom, and the Re-Education of Perception (Janice Ross)
ch. 21 Reading and Art in the Lives of Teachers (Mary Kay Rummel and Elizabeth P. Quintero)
ch. 22 Multi-Genre Case Studies (Karen Covington Soul)
ch. 23 The Favorite Song (Kim Stafford)
ch. 24 Entertaining Doubts: Enjoyment and Ambiguity in White, Antiracist Classrooms (Audrey Thompson)
ch. 25 Finding Center and Balancing There: Spirals of Change in Art and Testing (Gwendolyn Yoppolo
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Risky Writing: Self-Disclosure and Self-Transformation in the Classroom

Book
Berman, Jeffrey
2001
University of Massachusetts Press, Amherst, MA
PE1404 .B465 2001
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This is the final volume in a trilogy of works that examine the impact of writing and reading about traumatic subjects. "Diaries to an English Professor" (1994) explores the ways in which undergraduate students use psychoanalytic diaries to probe conflicted issues in their lives. "Surviving Literary Suicide" (1999) investigates how graduate students respond to suicidal literature-novels and poems that portray and sometimes glorify self-inflicted death.

In Risky Writing, Jeffrey Berman ...
Additional Info:
This is the final volume in a trilogy of works that examine the impact of writing and reading about traumatic subjects. "Diaries to an English Professor" (1994) explores the ways in which undergraduate students use psychoanalytic diaries to probe conflicted issues in their lives. "Surviving Literary Suicide" (1999) investigates how graduate students respond to suicidal literature-novels and poems that portray and sometimes glorify self-inflicted death.

In Risky Writing, Jeffrey Berman builds on those earlier studies, describing ways teachers can encourage college students to write safely on a wide range of subjects often deemed too personal or too dangerous for the classroom: grieving the loss of a beloved relative or friend, falling into depression, coping with the breakup of one's family, confronting sexual abuse, depicting a drug or alcohol problem, encountering racial prejudice. Berman points out that nearly everyone has difficulty talking or writing about such issues because they arouse shame and tend to be enshrouded in secrecy and silence. This is especially true for college students, who are just emerging from adolescence and find themselves at institutions that rarely promote self-disclosure.

Recognizing the controversial nature of his subject, Berman confronts academic opposition to personal writing head on. He also discusses the similarities between the "writing cure" and the "talking cure," the role of the teacher and audience in the self-disclosing classroom, and the pedagogical strategies necessary to minimize risk, including the importance of empathy and other befriending skills. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Risky Writing: Theoretical and Practical Implications
ch. 2 Seeing Ourselves through the Eyes of Others
ch. 3 The Dark Side of Diversity
ch. 4 Sexual Disclosures Revisited
ch. 5 Unmasking Shame
ch. 6 Writing under the Influence
ch. 7 Pedagogy of Risk

Afterword
Appendix
Works Cited
Student Writers
Index
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Writing Alone and With Others

Book
Schneider, Pat
2003
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
PE 1408.S3154 2003
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
For more than a quarter of a century, Pat Schneider has helped writers find and liberate their true voices. She has taught all kinds -- the award winning, the struggling, and those who have been silenced by poverty and hardship. Her innovative methods have worked in classrooms from elementary to graduate level, in jail cells and public housing projects, in convents and seminaries, in youth at-risk programs, and with groups ...
Additional Info:
For more than a quarter of a century, Pat Schneider has helped writers find and liberate their true voices. She has taught all kinds -- the award winning, the struggling, and those who have been silenced by poverty and hardship. Her innovative methods have worked in classrooms from elementary to graduate level, in jail cells and public housing projects, in convents and seminaries, in youth at-risk programs, and with groups of the terminally ill. Now, in Writing Alone and with Others, Schneider's acclaimed methods are available in a single, well-organized, and highly readable volume. The first part of the book guides the reader through the perils of the solitary writing life: fear, writer's block, and the bad habits of the internal critic. In the second section, Schneider describes the Amherst Writers and Artists workshop method, widely used across the U.S. and abroad. Chapters on fiction and poetry address matters of technique and point to further resources, while more than a hundred writing exercises offer specific ways to jumpstart the blocked and stretch the rut-stuck. Schneider's innovative teaching method will refresh the experienced writer and encourage the beginner. Her book is the essential owner's manual for the writer's voice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contents
Foreword by Peter Elbow
Acknowledgments
How to Use This Book
Introduction: A Writer Is Someone Who Writes

Part I: The Writer Alone
1. "Feeling and Facing Fear"
2. "Getting Started (Again)"
3. "Toward a Disciplined Writing Life"
4. "Writing Practice: The Journal"
5. "Writing Practice: Developing Craft"
6. "Voice"
7. "Growing as a Writer"
8. "The Form Your Writing Takes"
9. "The Ethical Questions: Spirituality, Privacy, and Politics"

Part II: Writing With Others
Introduction: Writing With Others
10. "Basic Principles of a Healthy Workshop"
11. "Writing in a Classroom"
12. "Creating Your Own Workshop or Writing Group"
13. "Using Writing to Empower the Silenced"

Part III: Additional Exercises
Afterword
List of Exercises
Recommended Resources and Reading List
Credits

Index
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"From Sole Learning to Soul Learning"

TTR
Baldwin, Gayle R.
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 3 (2006): 148-155
BL41.T4
Topics: Student Learning Goals   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Is it effective or even possible to teach an introductory course in religious studies that not only provides first-year university students with the fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and critical tools of religious inquiry but also invites and stimulates the transformation of the religious imagination? In what kind of teaching and learning method could the process of personal transformation occur and how might one assess it? These are the questions that led ...
Additional Info:
Is it effective or even possible to teach an introductory course in religious studies that not only provides first-year university students with the fundamental vocabulary, concepts, and critical tools of religious inquiry but also invites and stimulates the transformation of the religious imagination? In what kind of teaching and learning method could the process of personal transformation occur and how might one assess it? These are the questions that led to an experiment in teaching religion the objective of which was to prepare beginning students for the academic approach to religion and, at the same time, transmit the experience of learning as an embodied process that engages personal narrative within a community context. This essay is based on a three-year project that has made considerable progress in meeting these goals and answering these questions.
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"Teaching for Transformation: Insights from Fiji, India, South Africa, and Jamaica"

TTR
Hill, Jack A.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 4 (2005): 218-231
BL41.T4
Topics: Student Learning Goals   |   Religious Diversity   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
How can teaching and living abroad impact our teaching in North America? This article explores how what I do teaching religion and ethics to undergraduates at Texas Christian University has been influenced by twelve years of teaching in the two-thirds world. It is structured in terms of three insights that correlate with what I call the past, present, and future dimensions of ethics, respectively. First, we need to begin where ...
Additional Info:
How can teaching and living abroad impact our teaching in North America? This article explores how what I do teaching religion and ethics to undergraduates at Texas Christian University has been influenced by twelve years of teaching in the two-thirds world. It is structured in terms of three insights that correlate with what I call the past, present, and future dimensions of ethics, respectively. First, we need to begin where our students are – taking their contexts seriously. Second, we should expose them to the moral and religious experience of others, so that they might be pulled by those others toward broader perspectives. Third, we should challenge them to envision new ways of living, including new self-understandings and images of society. Drawing on examples of how I use these insights in courses at TCU, I contend that we can best promote transformation in our students by holding these three insights in creative tension.
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"Conversational Learning: A Feminist Pedagogy for Teaching Preaching"

TTR
Kim, Eunjoo Mary
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 3 (2002): 69-177
BL41.T4
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
An increasing number of female students populate preaching classes in seminaries and theological schools across the United States. Based on the analysis of female students' needs and demands in preaching courses, I propose a pedagogy for conversational learning to teach homiletics. My own teaching experience and the knowledge gained through conversations with other feminist educators and homileticians are major resources upon which the principles and strategies of conversational learning are ...
Additional Info:
An increasing number of female students populate preaching classes in seminaries and theological schools across the United States. Based on the analysis of female students' needs and demands in preaching courses, I propose a pedagogy for conversational learning to teach homiletics. My own teaching experience and the knowledge gained through conversations with other feminist educators and homileticians are major resources upon which the principles and strategies of conversational learning are drawn. The ultimate goal for conversational learning is to enable "transformative learning" through which students transform their sense of identity, worldviews, values, ways of thinking, and enhance their unique voices in the pulpit. For this purpose, conversational learning employs student-centered, group-oriented, and inductive approaches in an egalitarian learning environment. Conversational learning is an on-going process of learning preaching in a collaborative way.
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"Community Happens: Anatomy of a Remarkable Teaching Experience"

TTR
Haynes, Stephen R.
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 3 (2001): 133-140
BL41.T4
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
There is no pedagogical philosophy or technique that ensures the emergence of genuine community in the religious studies classroom. But teachers can engage in activities that create the conditions for community and student transformation. Among these is strategic self-disclosure – the practice of revealing one's own orientation toward a subject matter, a discipline, or the institutional context in which teaching and learning take place. But strategic self-disclosure is not without risks. ...
Additional Info:
There is no pedagogical philosophy or technique that ensures the emergence of genuine community in the religious studies classroom. But teachers can engage in activities that create the conditions for community and student transformation. Among these is strategic self-disclosure – the practice of revealing one's own orientation toward a subject matter, a discipline, or the institutional context in which teaching and learning take place. But strategic self-disclosure is not without risks. It can permanently alter the classroom environment and may tap into the teacher's insecurities. The author explores these matters by analyzing a remarkable teaching experience in which community happened.
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"Teaching and Self-Formation: Why the Ignoble "Intro to World Religions" Really Matters"

TTR
Burns, Charles P. E.
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 1 (2001): 15-22
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This paper explores the idea that the educational process plays a vital role in the formation and transformation of selves. Peter Hodgson's theological interpretation of education as paideia and Lucinda Huffaker's work on the achievement of "clarity of self" are brought together to demonstrate that empathy is central not only to evolution of self, but the educational process as well. The argument insists that introductory courses are places of immense ...
Additional Info:
This paper explores the idea that the educational process plays a vital role in the formation and transformation of selves. Peter Hodgson's theological interpretation of education as paideia and Lucinda Huffaker's work on the achievement of "clarity of self" are brought together to demonstrate that empathy is central not only to evolution of self, but the educational process as well. The argument insists that introductory courses are places of immense potential for helping students in the lifelong task of achieving self-clarity. The "Introduction to World Religions" course is used as a practical illustration of the thesis.
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"Liberal Theology and Transformative Pedagogy"

TTR
Hodgson, Peter C.
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 2 (1999): 65-76
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
The author makes a case for the contributions of liberal theology to the transformative pedagogy that is essential for the flourishing of human beings in the twenty-first century. First he advocates the retention of liberal theology, but in a postmodern form that is open, critical, experiential, visionary, and culturally transformative. Then he demonstrates points of contact between this revisioned theology and liberal education, particularly those connections manifested in five elements ...
Additional Info:
The author makes a case for the contributions of liberal theology to the transformative pedagogy that is essential for the flourishing of human beings in the twenty-first century. First he advocates the retention of liberal theology, but in a postmodern form that is open, critical, experiential, visionary, and culturally transformative. Then he demonstrates points of contact between this revisioned theology and liberal education, particularly those connections manifested in five elements of transformative pedagogy: education and life-formation, the rhythm of education, constructive and interactive knowledge, connected and imaginative teaching, and education as the practice of freedom. The author concludes that a revisioned liberal theology can contribute significantly to the recovery and explication of the religious dimension of education and its incumbent power of transformation.
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Education as Transformation: Religious Pluralism, Spirituality, & a New Vision for Higher Education in America

Book
Kazanjian, Victor, Jr., and Peter L. Laurence, eds.
2006
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LB2324.E36 2000
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Reflecting a national movement that seeks to create a more holistic model of learning and teaching on college and university campuses, Education as Transformation is a collection of twenty-eight essays written by a wide range of educators - including presidents, chancellors, deans, faculty members, administrators, religious life professionals, students, and other leaders in the field of education - on the themes of religious pluralism and spirituality in higher education. These ...
Additional Info:
Reflecting a national movement that seeks to create a more holistic model of learning and teaching on college and university campuses, Education as Transformation is a collection of twenty-eight essays written by a wide range of educators - including presidents, chancellors, deans, faculty members, administrators, religious life professionals, students, and other leaders in the field of education - on the themes of religious pluralism and spirituality in higher education. These essays provide scholarly analysis, practical information, and inspiration for those who agree that higher education can combine both head and heart in the teaching and learning process and in campus and community life. In seeking to articulate a new vision for higher education in America, the authors explore the possibility that both scholarship and spirituality are essential to fostering global learning communities and responsible global citizens who can address the challenges of a diverse world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Victor H. Kazanjian, Jr., and Peter L. Laurence)
Introduction - Transforming Education: An Overview (Diana Chapman Walsh)

ch. 1 A Vision of Education as Transformation (Parker J. Palmer)
ch. 2 Spirituality in an Integrative Age (David K. Scott)
ch. 3 Spiritual Assumptions Undergird Educational Priorities: A Personal Narrative (Cheryl H. Keen)
ch. 4 Spiritual Quest Among Young Adults (Andrés G. Niño)
ch. 5 Molding the Self and the Common Cognitive Sources of Science and Religion (Arthur G. Zajonc)
ch. 6 A Faculty Perspective on Magic, Meaning, and Desire in the Educational Process (Patrick Morton)
ch. 7 Changing Lives, Changing Communities: Building a Capacity for Connection in a Pluralistic Context (Beverly Daniel Tatum)
ch. 8 Education as Transformation: A Bahá'í Model of Education for Unity (Suheil Badi Bushrui, James Malarkey)
ch. 9 The Transformtion of DrowningBear (Brad DrowningBear)
ch. 10 Judaism, Religious Diversity, and the American Academy (Arthur Green)
ch. 11 From Diversity to Pluralism: The Roman Catholic Challenge and the Roman Catholic Opportunity (John W. Healey)
ch. 12 Buddhism as a Pluralistic Tradition (Ji Hyang Sunim)
ch. 13 Pluralism, Awareness, and Mastery of the Mind: A Sikh Imperative for Education (Gurucharan Singh Khalsa)
ch. 14 American Pluralism, Islam, and the Challenges of Interfaith Dialogue for Muslims on the College Campus (Sulayman S. Nyang)
ch. 15 A Hindu Perspective on Moving from Religious Diversity to Religious Pluralism (Anantanand Rambachan)
ch. 16 Religious Pluralism and the Claim to Uniqueness (Krister Stendahl)
ch. 17 Quaker to the Core, Welcoming All (Douglas C. Bennett)
ch. 18 Deep Calls to Deep: Spirituality and Diversity at Goshen College (Shirley Hershey Showalter)
ch. 19 Appreciative Engagement of Diversity: E Pluribus Unum and the 'Education' as Transformation Project (James P. Keen)
ch. 20 Beyond Tolerence: From Mono-religious to Multi-religious Life at Wellesley College (Victor H. Kazanjian, Jr.)
Students of the Wellesley College Multi-Faith Council
ch. 21 The Possibility of Transformation: 25 Years Later (Donna Bivens)
ch. 22 Burn the Ark: Kindling the Sacred at the Heart of American Higher Education (Janet Cooper Nelson)
ch. 23 Building a Multi-faith Center at MIT (Robert M. Randolph)
ch. 24 Notes from a Jewish Dean of Religious Life: On Moving from Religious Diversity to Religious Pluralism (Susan Laemmle)
ch. 25 LINKS: Establishing Communities of Dialogue on Campuses (Frederic Bradford Burnham)
ch. 26 Teacher Formation: Identity, Integrity, and the Heart of a Teacher (Sally Z. Hare, Marcy Jackson, and Rick Jackson)
ch. 27 Teacher Education, Spiritual Transformation, & Child Advocacy (Carol L. Flake) ch. 28 A Walk in the Wilderness (Claudia Horwitz)

Conclusion (Victor H. Kazanjian, Jr., Peter L. Laurence)
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"Transforming to Teach: Teaching Religion to Today's Black College Student"

TTR
Coleman, Monica A.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 2 (2007): 95-100
BL41.T4
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Emerging from the particular experiences of the marginalized, postmodern pedagogies (bell hooks, Paolo Freire, feminist pedagogies) argue that education is more than conveying information from teacher to student. Rather education should encompass the transformative process of shaping character, values, and politics through the dynamic interaction among the teacher, the students' experiences, and the content of the instructional material. These perspectives argue that educators should reject "the banking model" of education, ...
Additional Info:
Emerging from the particular experiences of the marginalized, postmodern pedagogies (bell hooks, Paolo Freire, feminist pedagogies) argue that education is more than conveying information from teacher to student. Rather education should encompass the transformative process of shaping character, values, and politics through the dynamic interaction among the teacher, the students' experiences, and the content of the instructional material. These perspectives argue that educators should reject "the banking model" of education, and teach to transform. However, religious studies with today's black college student tests the mettle of these approaches. On the one hand, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have long practiced transformative education through a commitment to shaping both the minds and characters of their students. On the other hand, many of today's black college students are less receptive to transformation, particularly in the academic study of religion. This resistance to transformation is a reflection of (1) the socio-economic reality of the current student, and (2) a new black religiosity that portrays the world in binary terms. These economic and religious realities present a teaching context for which few religious scholars are prepared. This essay discusses the particularities of teaching religion to today's black college student by sharing the challenges, failures, successes, and joys of teaching religion at a small church-related, historically black women's college in the south. I will discuss the techniques that fail, and the way in which this unique context causes me to transform the way I teach religion. In the midst of a commitment to postmodern pedagogies, I feel a need to return to the banking model's establishment of authority and emphasis on content. As I negotiate with this method, I find ways to stealthily infuse transformative pedagogical techniques. I also discuss the way such a dramatic shift in pedagogy has transformed me, the teacher.
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Teaching for Change: Fostering Transformative Learning in the Classroom

Book
Taylor, Edward W., ed.
2006
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC1100.T4 2006
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This volume aims to give teachers and scholars a greater understanding of the challenges associated with the practice of fostering transformative learning, along with providing a recognition of the complexity of practice beyond the application of strategies and techniques. Teaching for Change will encourage and motivate practitioners to take more risks in the classroom, pushing the limits of what is presently known about transformative education.
Fostering transformative learning is ...
Additional Info:
This volume aims to give teachers and scholars a greater understanding of the challenges associated with the practice of fostering transformative learning, along with providing a recognition of the complexity of practice beyond the application of strategies and techniques. Teaching for Change will encourage and motivate practitioners to take more risks in the classroom, pushing the limits of what is presently known about transformative education.
Fostering transformative learning is about teaching for change. It requires intentional action, a willingness to take personal risk, a genuine concern for the learners' betterment, and the wherewithal to draw on a variety of methods and techniques that help create a classroom environment that encourages and supports personal growth. To become effective at fostering transformative learning, it is helpful to look through the lens of those who have been engaged in the practice. The contributing authors to this volume are seasoned practitioners and scholars who have introduced innovations that enhance the practice of fostering transformative learning and have asked ethical questions that need to be explored and reflected upon when practicing transformative learning in the classroom. This volume provides a tutorial and analysis of teaching for change by showing how these seasoned practitioners and scholars grapple with the fundamental issues associated with the subject.
Teaching for Change is the 109th issue of the quarterly higher education report New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, published by Jossey-Bass. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Fostering authentic relationships in the transformative classroom (Patricia Cranton)
ch. 2 Engaging emotions in adult learning : a Jungian perspective on emotion and transformative learning (John M. Dirkx)
ch. 3 Expressive ways of knowing and transformative learning (Jacki Davis-Manigaulte, Lyle Yorks, and Elizabeth Kasl)
ch. 4 Engaging spirituality in the transformative higher education classroom (Denise E. Tolliver and Elizabeth J. Tisdell)
ch. 5 Transformational teaching and the practices of black women adult educators (Juanita Johnson-Bailey and Mary V. Alfred)
ch. 6 Ethical demands of transformative learning (Dorothy Ettling)
ch. 7 Using fiction for transformation (Christine Jarvis)
ch. 8 Do the write thing (Adrienne L. Burk)
ch. 9 The challenge of teaching for change (Edward W. Taylor)
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Creative Expression in Transformative Learning: Tools and Techniques for Educators of Adults

Book
Chad Hoggan, Soni Simpson and Heather Stuckey, eds.
2009
Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, FL
LC1100.C74 2009
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Transformative learning is a theory of adult education that focuses on the profound changes-or transformations-that can occur in the lives of adults. It is not as concerned with incremental advances in learners' knowledge as it is with their mental frameworks for making meaning from life experiences. This book explores the role of creative expression in this transformational process. It provides a practical and accessible approach to using creative expression with ...
Additional Info:
Transformative learning is a theory of adult education that focuses on the profound changes-or transformations-that can occur in the lives of adults. It is not as concerned with incremental advances in learners' knowledge as it is with their mental frameworks for making meaning from life experiences. This book explores the role of creative expression in this transformational process. It provides a practical and accessible approach to using creative expression with adult learners. The book provides various tools, methods and creative modalities that have been used to promote transformative learning, and discusses how adult educators themselves are transformative learners. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward
Acknowledgements
The Editors
The Contributors

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Transformative Learning, Multiple Ways of Knowing, and Creativity Theory in Progress (Chad Hoggan, Soni Simpson, Heather Stuckey)
ch. 3 The Body as a Way of Knowing: Meditation, Movement, and Image (Heather Stuckey)
ch. 4 The Power of Story: Metaphors, Literature, and Creative Writing (Chad Hoggan)
ch. 5 Raising Awareness of Transformative: Collage, Creative Expression, and Imagination (Soni Simpson)
ch. 6 Noting the Potential for Transformative: Creative Expression through Music (Colleen Wiessner)
ch. 7 The Other Side of the Mirror: Intuitive Knowing, Visual Imagery, and Transformative Learning (Randee Lipson Lawrence)
ch. 8 Improvising Learning Space (Pamela Meyer)
ch. 9 Using Creative Expression in Adult Learning (Chad Hoggan, Soni Simpson, Heather Stuckey)
Contexts
References
Index
Additional Info:
Educational theorist Richard Kiely highlights the central importance of “high intensity dissonance” in successful international service-learning. This essay applies Kiely’s model of dissonance and transformative learning to Intercordia, an international service-learning program offered at the University of St. Michael’s College and the University of Toronto, in partnership with the Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) Intercordia Canada. By placing its students in situations of significant vulnerability and weakness, the Intercordia program ...
Additional Info:
Educational theorist Richard Kiely highlights the central importance of “high intensity dissonance” in successful international service-learning. This essay applies Kiely’s model of dissonance and transformative learning to Intercordia, an international service-learning program offered at the University of St. Michael’s College and the University of Toronto, in partnership with the Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) Intercordia Canada. By placing its students in situations of significant vulnerability and weakness, the Intercordia program attempts to problematize familiar assumptions about the otherness of oppressed persons and thereby encourage an authentic sense of belonging across boundaries of difference. The results, as reported by participants in the program, are quite profound. At the same time, the program design invites critical questions about how, and to what extent, such transformative experiences of dissonance should be scripted for students as an expected and desired result of their international service.
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Teaching Transformation: Transcultural Classroom Dialogues

Book
Keating, AnaLouise
2007
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LC1099.K43 2010
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Drawing on indigenous belief systems and recent work in critical race studies and multicultural-feminist theory, Keating provides detailed step-by-step suggestions, based on her own teaching experiences, designed to anticipate students' resistance to social-justice issues and encourage them to change. She offers a holistic approach to theory and practice. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Drawing on indigenous belief systems and recent work in critical race studies and multicultural-feminist theory, Keating provides detailed step-by-step suggestions, based on her own teaching experiences, designed to anticipate students' resistance to social-justice issues and encourage them to change. She offers a holistic approach to theory and practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Transformational Multiculturalism: Definitions, Alterations, Interventions

ch. 1 We are related to all that lives: Creating New Stories for Social Change
ch. 2 Forging Commonalities: Relational Patterns of Reading and Teaching
ch. 3 Giving Voice to 'Whiteness'? (De)Constructing 'Race'
ch. 4 Reading 'Whiteness,' Unreading 'Race'
ch. 5 Teaching the Other?

Conclusion: May We Dream New Worlds into Being: Transforming Status-Quo Stories

Appendix 1: Dialogue: Some of My Presuppositions
Appendix 2: Listening with Raw Openness
Appendix 3: Two Creation Stories
Appendix 4: Epistemologies of 'Whiteness'
Appendix 5: Critics on Literary and Cultural Representations of 'Whiteness'

Appendix 6: Sample Syllabi

Notes
References
Acknowledgments
Index
TTR cover image

"Learning as a Path, Not a Goal: Contemplative Pedagogy – Its Principles and Practices"

TTR
Grace, Fran
2011
Teaching Theology and Religion 14, no. 2 (2011): 99-124
BL41.T4
Topics: Faith in the Classroom   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
What is contemplative pedagogy and how is it practiced in Religious Studies classrooms? Contemplative pedagogy cultivates inner awareness through first-person investigations, often called “contemplative practices.” Contemplative teaching practices range widely: silent sitting meditation, compassion practices, walking meditation, deep listening, mindfulness, yoga, calligraphy, chant, guided meditations, nature observation, self-inquiry, and many others. Since narrative is a mode of instruction prevalent in contemplative literature, the article includes first-hand reflections from students and ...
Additional Info:
What is contemplative pedagogy and how is it practiced in Religious Studies classrooms? Contemplative pedagogy cultivates inner awareness through first-person investigations, often called “contemplative practices.” Contemplative teaching practices range widely: silent sitting meditation, compassion practices, walking meditation, deep listening, mindfulness, yoga, calligraphy, chant, guided meditations, nature observation, self-inquiry, and many others. Since narrative is a mode of instruction prevalent in contemplative literature, the article includes first-hand reflections from students and a narrative account of how an initially skeptical professor came to incorporate contemplative teaching methods into her courses. It expands from the personal narratives to highlight the work of many contemplative professors in the field. These real-life examples are put into the context of recent publications on shifts in higher education and meditation research. The article seeks to demonstrate the power of contemplative teaching to fulfill many hopes for liberal arts learning. Of particular importance is its emphasis on interior qualities of lifelong impact, such as self-knowledge and ethical cultivation.
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The Handbook of Transformative Learning: Theory, Research, and Practice

Book
Taylor, Edward W., and Cranton, Patricia
2012
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco
LC1100.H363 2012
Topics: Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
The Handbook of Transformative Learning provides a comprehensive and critical review of more than three decades of theory development, research, and practice in Transformative Learning (TL). It will help adult educators understand what transformative learning is, distinguish it from other forms of learning, and foster it in their practice. The book covers five broad areas: historical, theoretical, practical, research, and future perspective. It is comprehensive, interdisciplinary, critical, reflective, and accessible ...
Additional Info:
The Handbook of Transformative Learning provides a comprehensive and critical review of more than three decades of theory development, research, and practice in Transformative Learning (TL). It will help adult educators understand what transformative learning is, distinguish it from other forms of learning, and foster it in their practice. The book covers five broad areas: historical, theoretical, practical, research, and future perspective. It is comprehensive, interdisciplinary, critical, reflective, and accessible to a wide audience of interested scholars, students, and practitioners. Co-edited by leading experts in the field with an advisory group of prominent authorities, this handbook is the leading resource for the field. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Editors
About the Contributors

Part One: Setting the Context
ch. 1 Transformative Learning Theory: Seeking a More Unified Theory
ch. 2 Themes and Variations of Transformational Learning: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Forms That Transform
ch. 3 A Critical Review of Research on Transformative Learning Theory, 2006–2010
ch. 4 Studying Transformative Learning: What Methodology?
ch. 5 Learning to Think Like an Adult: Core Concepts of Transformation Theory

Part Two: Exploring The Theory of Transformative Learning: Diverse Perspectives
ch. 6 Mezirow’s Theory of Transformative Learning from 1975 to Present
ch. 7 Nurturing Soul Work: A Jungian Approach to Transformative Learning
ch. 8 Critical Theory and Transformative Learning
ch. 9 Transformative Learning: A Developmental Perspective
ch. 10 Deep Transformation: Forging a Planetary Worldview
ch. 11 Transformative Learning and the Challenges of Complexity
ch. 12 Transforming Transformative Learning Through Sustainability and the New Science
ch. 13 An Existential Approach to Transformative Learning

Part Three: Transformative Learning: Culture, Postionality, and International Perspectives
ch. 14 Cultural-Spiritual Perspective of Transformative Learning
ch. 15 Women and Transformative Learning
ch. 16 Positionality and Transformative Learning: A Tale of Inclusion and Exclusion
ch. 17 Transformative Learning Theory: A Perspective from Africa
ch. 18 Transformative Learning in Europe: An Overview of the Theoretical Perspectives
ch. 19 International and Community-Based Transformative Learning

Part Four: Transformative Learning: Central Concepts and Settings
ch. 20 Critical Reflection and Transformative Learning
ch. 21 The Role of Experience in Transformative Learning
ch. 22 Group Work and Dialogue: Spaces and Processes for Transformative Learning in Relationships
ch. 23 Transformative Learning in the Workplace: Leading Learning for Self and Organizational Change
ch. 24 Fostering Transformative Learning in Higher Education Settings
ch. 25 Fostering Transformative Learning Online

Part Five: Fostering Transformative Learing: Practices andEthics
ch. 26 Transformation as Embodied Narrative
ch. 27 Learner-Centered Teaching and Transformative Learning
ch. 28 Storytelling and Transformative Learning
ch. 29 Transformative Learning Through Artistic Expression: Getting Out of Our Heads
ch. 30 Fiction and Film and Transformative Learning
ch. 31 Learning to Be What We Know: The Pivotal Role of Presentational Knowing in Transformative Learning
ch. 32 Evaluating Transformative Learning
ch. 33 Educator as Change Agent: Ethics of Transformative Learning

Part Six: Reflecting on the Future of Transformative Learning
34 Reflecting Back and Looking Forward

Name Index
Subject Index
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Pathways to Transformation: Learning in Relationship

Book
Boden McGill, Carrie J., and Kippers, Sola M., eds.
2012
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LC5225.L42 P35 2012
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Pathways to Transformation: Learning in Relationship is an edited collection that synthesizes current research on transformative learning and expands the current knowledge-base. This book is timely and significant as it provides a synthesis of some of the most exciting research in two fields: adult education and human services.

The objectives of this themed edited collection, Pathways to Transformation: Learning in Relationship, are threefold. First, this collection serves as ...
Additional Info:
Pathways to Transformation: Learning in Relationship is an edited collection that synthesizes current research on transformative learning and expands the current knowledge-base. This book is timely and significant as it provides a synthesis of some of the most exciting research in two fields: adult education and human services.

The objectives of this themed edited collection, Pathways to Transformation: Learning in Relationship, are threefold. First, this collection serves as a space to synthesize current research on transformative learning. Through an extensive literature review, the editors have discerned several important strands of research in the area of transformative learning and solicited chapters dealing with these topics. The second objective of the collection is to expand the current knowledge-base in the area of transformative learning by creating a space for dialog on the subject and bringing together diverse voices. The third objective of the collection is to transcend the field of adult education, with a specific goal to reach an audience in human services (psychology, counseling, social work, marriage and family therapy). (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Relationship With Self & Others
Part I: The Role of Communication and Dialogue in Transformative Learning
ch. 1 Meaningful Conversations: Coaching to Transform the Heart, Head, and Hands of Teaching and Learning (Angela Webster-Smith, Shelly Albritton, Patty Kohler-Evans)
ch. 2 Learning About Learning in Relationships: Novice Teacher Educators Give Transformative Dialogue a Try (Elizabeth Bondy, Lauren Tripp, D. Alvarez Caron)
ch. 3 Communication is the Relationship (Julien C. Mirivel)
ch. 4 Narrative Tools for Facilitating Research and Learning for Transformation (Leann M. R. Kaiser and Elizabeth A. Erichsen)

Part II: Learning in Relationship with Self and Others
ch. 5 Narrative, Somatic, and Social/Constructivist Approaches to Transformative Learning in Training Programs for the Helping Professions (Daniel Stroud, Julie Prindle, Stacy England)
ch. 6 In Hope of Transformation: Teaching and Learning Through Relational Practice in the Adult Learning Classroom (Teresa J. Carter.)
ch. 7 Spiritual Autobiography: A Transformative Journey for a Counselor in Training (Michelle Kelley Shuler and Katrina Cook.)
ch. 8 Developing Scholarship Through Mentoring and Reflection: A Transformative Process for Doctoral Studentsv(Brandé Flamez, Javier Cavazos Jr., Varunee Faii Sangganjanavanich, and Joshua C. Watson)
ch. 9 The Transformative Relationship Within Teaching Counseling Skills and Methods: Implications for Training and Practice (Laura J. Fazio-Griffith)
ch. 10 The Role of Faculty in Dispositional Development of Teacher Candidates: A Neglected Voice in Teacher Preparation J(anet Filer, Candice Dowd Barnes, and Mark Cooper)

Relationship With Culture, Context & Technology
Part I: Transformative Learning in Multicultural, Cross-Cultural, and Intercultural Contexts
ch. 11 Easing Teacher Candidates Toward Cultural Competence Through the Multicultural Step Out (Freddie A. Bowles and Nancy P. Gallavan)
ch. 12 The Transformative Path of Local, Cross-Cultural Relationships (Ellen L. Marmon)
ch. 13 In Black and White: Transformation Through Examined Selves (Gabriele Strohschen)
ch. 14 Developing Intercultural Effectiveness Competencies: The Journey of Transformative Learning and Cross-Cultural Learning for Foreign-Born Faculty in American Higher Education (Pi-Chi Han)
ch. 15 Transformational Learning Experience of Haitian Americans in Response to the Earthquake in Haiti (Emmanuel Jean Francois and William H. Young III)

Part II: Learning in Relationship with Culture, Context, and Technology
ch. 16 Rhythm, Rhyme, Reel, Resistance: Transformative Learning Using African American Popular Culture (Malik Saafir)
ch. 17 Transformative Learning Experiences of Black African International Students (Alex Kumi Yeboah and William H. Young III.)
ch. 18 Facilitating Transformative Learning Opportunities in Higher Education Contexts for Adult Learners in Online and Virtual Spaces (Kathleen P. King and Shelley Stewart.)
ch. 19 Video Technology: Transforming Reflective Practice, (Sejal Parikh and Christopher Janson)

Relationship With Education & Human Services Fields
ch. 20 Advancing Transformative Theory: Multifold and Cyclical Transformation (Fujuan Tan and Lee Nabb.)
ch. 21 The Self in Transformation: What Gets Transformed in Transformative Learning? (Ted Fleming)
ch. 22 Positive Life Changes in Response to Cancer: Perspective Transformation and Posttraumatic Growth (Allen C. Sherman, Avinash Thombre, and Stephanie Simonton)

About the Editors
About the Contributors
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The Learning Self: Understanding the Potential for Transformation

Book
Tennant, Mark
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC1100.T46 2012
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This new book from the award-winning author of Psychology and Adult Learning puts the spotlight on the kind of learning that brings about significant personal change. Tennant explores the techniques, processes, and practices educators can use to promote learning that leads to change and examines assumptions about self and identity, how we are formed, and our capacity for change.

Throughout the book, Tennant posits that individuals can be ...
Additional Info:
This new book from the award-winning author of Psychology and Adult Learning puts the spotlight on the kind of learning that brings about significant personal change. Tennant explores the techniques, processes, and practices educators can use to promote learning that leads to change and examines assumptions about self and identity, how we are formed, and our capacity for change.

Throughout the book, Tennant posits that individuals can be agents in their own self-formation and change by understanding and acting on the circumstances and forces that surround and shape them. Educators, he argues, must be open to different theoretical ideas and practices while simultaneously valuing these practices and viewing them with a critical eye.

The book aims to:

• promote, among educators and others with an educational dimension to their work, a more critical approach to their learning designs and practices;
• equip individuals with a framework for understanding and being agents of their own self-formation and change.

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Author

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 The Authentic or Real Self
ch. 3 The Autonomous Self
ch. 4 The Repressed Self
ch. 5 The Socially Constructed Self
ch. 6 The Storied Self
ch. 7 Knowing Oneself
ch. 8 Controlling Oneself
ch. 9 Caring for Oneself
ch. 10 (Re)creating Oneself

References
Index
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Wabash tree

Me-Search and Re-Search: A Guide for Writing Scholarly Personal Narrative Manuscripts

Book
Nash, Robert, and Bradley, DeMethra LaSha
2011
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
PN146.N37 2011
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Robert and DeMethra’s book, Me-Searching and Re-Search, has caught my fancy in a number of ways. The book title cleverly captures what SPN is all about—it is about self narratives (the “me-search” part) and about scholarly meaning making (the “re-search” part). This eye-catching title also illuminates the authors’ intent to turn this seemingly intimidating method of self-inquiry into something very accessible and doable. Their jargon-free language is friendly ...
Additional Info:
Robert and DeMethra’s book, Me-Searching and Re-Search, has caught my fancy in a number of ways. The book title cleverly captures what SPN is all about—it is about self narratives (the “me-search” part) and about scholarly meaning making (the “re-search” part). This eye-catching title also illuminates the authors’ intent to turn this seemingly intimidating method of self-inquiry into something very accessible and doable. Their jargon-free language is friendly and inviting. Although they don’t intend to make their many methodological tips and tools too prescriptive, their practical suggestions provided in this guide book are, indeed, helpful and useful. I believe that Robert and DeMethra have demonstrated admirable talents as effective educators by unpacking the complex method of SPN writing into bite-sized steps. I am fully convinced that the steps will help both novices, and the experienced researcher, to reach the ultimate height of producing engaging, and scholarly significant, SPN’s. The book is also fun to read. The authors intersperse throughout their own SPN’s, pedagogical insights from their doing and teaching, and real-life stories, in order to illustrate the methodological process, challenges, and triumphs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

Part I: Setting The Stage For Writing An Spin
ch. 1 What Our Book Is About
ch. 2 Why Can’t I Write More Personally, More Honestly?
ch. 3 Autoethnographies, Memoirs, Personal Narrative Essays, Autobiographies
ch. 4 Okay Then! What Exactly Is Scholarly Personal Narrative Writing?

Part II: The Four Components of Spn: Pre-Search, Me-Search, Re-Search, We-Search
ch. 5 How Do You Get Started?
ch. 6 DeMethra’s Pre-Search Dissertation Process
ch. 7 Speaking to All the Me-Search Self-Doubters
ch. 8 Tell Your Story, Speak Your Truth
ch. 9 The SPN Way to Think About Research
ch. 10 The Relationship of Art to Truth in SPN Writing
ch. 11 The Centrality of Theme-Search in SPN Research
ch. 12 Moving from the Pre-, the Me-, and the Re-, to the We
ch. 13 DeMethra’s Use of We-Search and Universalizability in Her Dissertation

Part III: The Nuts and Bolts Spn Toolbox
ch. 14 The Nuts and Bolts Spn Toolbox

Part IV: Additional Resources For Spn Writers
ch. 15 Our SPN Course Syllabus
ch. 16 Putting It All Together
ch. 17 How to Deal with PSPND Syndrome
ch. 18 Creating an SPN Code of Ethics
ch. 19 How to Create Faculty Support for SPN Writing

References
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Teaching and Learning from the Inside Out: Revitalizing Ourselves and Our Institutions

Book
Golden, Margaret, ed.
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 130)
LB1705.T43 2012
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
By reclaiming the passions of our hearts and exploring insights and ideas, we begin a remembering of ourselves. As we begin to reclaim our wholeness, we also have the capacity to renew and revitalize our institutions from within.

After a long career of writing and speaking about how living in congruence—without division between inner and outer life—allows for being present with ourselves and those who journey ...
Additional Info:
By reclaiming the passions of our hearts and exploring insights and ideas, we begin a remembering of ourselves. As we begin to reclaim our wholeness, we also have the capacity to renew and revitalize our institutions from within.

After a long career of writing and speaking about how living in congruence—without division between inner and outer life—allows for being present with ourselves and those who journey with us, Parker Palmer and colleagues at the Center for Courage & Renewal developed a process of shared exploration. This Circle of Trust approach encourages people to live and work more authentically within their families, workplaces, and communities.

This issue explores the transformative power of engaging in a Circle of Trust. The authors examine its direct applications to teaching and learning, and they explore and discuss the research being done by the facilitators of this work.

This is the 130th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. New Directions for Teaching and Learning offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor's Notes

ch. 1 Principles and Practices of the Circle of Trust Approach 3- The directors of the Center for Courage & Renewal discuss the principles and practices of a Circle of Trust approach that have broad applicability across disciplines of teaching and learning. (Terry Chadsey, and Marcy Jackson)

ch. 2 Soul and Role Dialogues in Higher Education: Healing the Divided Self - This chapter describes the creation of a university faculty–staff group formed to explore the deep heartfelt and heartbroken nature of work in academia and to develop an intentional community to discuss ways of working productively in the tension between soul and role in higher education. (Paul Michalec, and Gary Brower)

ch. 3 The Circle of Trust Approach and a Counselor Training Program: A Hand in Glove Fit - This chapter explains how the Circle of Trust principles and practices have been actively infused in a Master's of Counseling Psychology, Marriage and Family Therapy Program and issues a call for systemic reform in our institutions of higher education to embrace a model more aligned with the relational and connected world in which we live. (Judith A. Goodell)

ch. 4 Dialing In to a Circle of Trust: A 'Medium' Tech Experiment and Poetic Evaluation - A distance learning model in Montana uses "found poems" as an evaluative tool to provide evidence that elements of transformational learning are achievable without direct face-to-face interaction between participants. (Christine T. Love)

ch. 5 The Power of Paradox in Learning to Teach - This chapter acknowledges the inherent uncertainty of both teaching and learning to teach and how learning to hold paradoxes may help teacher candidates live creatively with ambiguity. (Karen Noordhoff)

ch. 6 The Role of Identity in Transformational Learning, Teaching, and Leading - This chapter explores the relationship between the development of identity and integrity and the process of transformation within the context of a leadership preparation program. (Michael I. Poutiatine, and Dennis A. Conners)

ch. 7 Lessons Learned from Transformational Professional Development - A description and evaluation of a transformational professional development approach resulting in school cultures with greater relational trust and responsibility and commitment therein. (Twyla T. Miranda)

ch. 8 Circles of Learning in Mississippi: Community Recovery and Democracy Building - How an innovative community recovery and democracy building project, begun in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, offers a new approach for social change that addresses the root of human suffering lodged deep in the human heart where seeds of transformation also rest. (Bonnie Allen, and Estrus Tucker)

ch. 9 Measuring the Impact of the Circle of Trust Approach - This research identifies the impact of the Circle of Trust experience on the personal lives of the participants and the ways in which the experience has led to constructive action in their professional roles. (Janet Smith)

Index
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Transforming Ourselves, Transforming the World: Justice in Jesuit Higher Education

Book
Combs, Mary Beth; and Schmidt, Patricia Ruggiano
2013
Fordham University Press, New York, NY
LC493.T73 2013
Topics: Faith in the Classroom   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Transforming Ourselves, Transforming the World is an insightful collection that articulates how Jesuit colleges and universities create an educational community energized to transform the lives of its students, faculty, and administrators and to equip them to transform a broken world. The essays are rooted in Pedro Arrupe’s ideal of forming men and women for others and inspired by Peter-Hans Kolvenbach’s October 2000 ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Transforming Ourselves, Transforming the World is an insightful collection that articulates how Jesuit colleges and universities create an educational community energized to transform the lives of its students, faculty, and administrators and to equip them to transform a broken world. The essays are rooted in Pedro Arrupe’s ideal of forming men and women for others and inspired by Peter-Hans Kolvenbach’s October 2000 address at Santa Clara in which he identified three areas where the promotion of justice may be manifested in our institutions: formation and learning, research and teaching, and our way of proceeding.

Using the three areas laid out in Fr. Kolvenbach’s address as its organizing structure, this stimulating volume addresses the following challenges: How do we promote student life experiences and service? How does interdisciplinary collaborative research promote teaching and reflection? How do our institutions exemplify justice in their daily practices? Introductory pieces by internationally acclaimed authors such as Rev. Dean Brackley, S.J.; David J. O’Brien; Lisa Sowle Cahill; and Rev. Stephen A. Privett, S.J., pave the way for a range of smart and highly creative essays that illustrate and honor the scholarship, teaching, and service that have developed out of a commitment to the ideals of Jesuit higher education. The topics covered span disciplines and fields from the arts to engineering, from nursing to political science and law. The essays offer numerous examples of engaged pedagogy, which as Rev. Brackley points out fits squarely with Jesuit pedagogy: insertion programs, community-based learning, study abroad, internships, clinical placements, and other forms of interacting with the poor and with cultures other than our own. This book not only illustrates the dynamic growth of Jesuit education but critically identifies key challenges for educators, such as: How can we better address issues of race in our teaching and learning? Are we educating in nonviolence? How can we make the college or university “greener”? How can we evoke a desire for the faith that does justice?

Transforming Ourselves, Transforming the World is an indispensable volume that has the potential to act as an academic facilitator for the promotion of justice within not only Jesuit schools but all schools of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: A Fruitful New Branch

Part I: Formation and Learning
ch. 1 Beauty Limned in Violence: Experimenting with Protest Music in the Ignatian Classroom
ch. 2 Teaching Poverty in America through the Arts
ch. 3 Encuentro Dominicano: Creighton University's Commitment to Education for Transformation
ch. 4 Teaching Social Analysis through Academic Immersion
ch. 5 Adopting the Mission of Social Justice in a Political Science Department

Part II: Research and Teaching
ch. 6 Social Justice Themes in the Foreign Language Classroom
ch. 7 Coffee for Justice
ch. 8 Personal Transformation and Curricula Change
ch. 9 Doing Well by Doing Good: The Application of Ignatian Principles to Legal Education
ch. 10 Promoting Social Justice: Closing the Gap Between Rhetoric and Reality

Part III: Our Way of Proceeding
ch. 11 Opening Remarks to the Jesuit Justice Conference, June 18, 2009
ch. 12 Transforming Ourselves in Order to Transform the World
ch. 13 Nonviolently Transforming the Road to Jericho
ch. 14 The Ethic of Environmental Concern and the Jesuit Mission
ch. 15 Companions, Prophets, Martyrs: Jesuit Education as Justice Education

Conclusion: Further and Deeper

Notes
References
List of Contributors
Index
Cover image

Transformative Learning and Identity

Book
Illeris,Knud
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LC 1100.I45 2014
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In the current ever changing world – the liquid modernity – the most pressing psychological challenge to all of us is to create and maintain a personal balance between mental stability and mental flexibility. In Transformative Learning and Identity Knud Illeris, one of the leading thinkers on the way people learn, explores, updates and re-defines the concept and understanding of transformative learning while linkingthe concept ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In the current ever changing world – the liquid modernity – the most pressing psychological challenge to all of us is to create and maintain a personal balance between mental stability and mental flexibility. In Transformative Learning and Identity Knud Illeris, one of the leading thinkers on the way people learn, explores, updates and re-defines the concept and understanding of transformative learning while linkingthe concept of transformative learning to the concept of identity. He thoroughly discusses what transformative learning is or could be in a broader learning theoretical perspective, including various concepts of learning by change, as opposed to learning by addition, and ends up with a new, short and distinct definition.

He also explores and discusses the concept of identity and presents a general model depicting the complexity of identities today. Building on the work of Mezirow, various perspectives of transformative learning are analysed and discussed, including; transformative learning in different life ages; progressive and regressive transformations; motivation and identity defence; development of identity; personality and competence, and transformative learning in school, education, working life, and in relation to current and future life conditions.

This vital new book by one of the leading learning theorists of our time will prove of lasting interest to academics, teachers, instructors, leaders and researchers in the field of adult learning and education. It will also appeal to many students and researchers of psychology and sociology in general. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction

Part I: The Concept Of Transformative Learning
ch. 2 The approach to transformative learning
ch. 3 Other approaches to change oriented learning
ch. 4 What is transformed by transformative learning?
ch. 5 The definition of transformative learning

Part II: The Concept Of Identity
ch. 6 The concept of identity by Erik Erikson
ch. 7 Newer psychological approaches
ch. 8 Topical sociological approaches
ch. 9 A general understanding of identity

Part III: Transformative Learning In Practice
ch. 10 Identity, transformative learning and life age
ch. 11 Progressive, regressive, restoring and collective transformations
ch. 12 Motivation and identity defence
ch. 13 Personality and competence development
ch. 14 Transformative learning in school and education
ch. 15 Transformative learning in working life
ch. 16 Transformative learning, individual and society

References
Index
Cover image

Pedagogy of Commitment

Book
Freire, Paulo
2014
Paradigm Publishers, Boulder, CO
LC196.F455 2014
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This new book, constructed from Paulo Freire’s writings near the end of his life, is characterized by the eloquence of his dreams—dreams that constituted the utopia underlying Freire’s lifelong work. Freire challenges all educators to create Circles of Dialogues, or reflective spaces, for passionate and critical reflection that is coherent and humanizing, favoring the oppressed peoples of the world.

The chapters, crafted toward the end ...
Additional Info:
This new book, constructed from Paulo Freire’s writings near the end of his life, is characterized by the eloquence of his dreams—dreams that constituted the utopia underlying Freire’s lifelong work. Freire challenges all educators to create Circles of Dialogues, or reflective spaces, for passionate and critical reflection that is coherent and humanizing, favoring the oppressed peoples of the world.

The chapters, crafted toward the end of the twentieth century, reflect Freire’s deep concern with the assault by neoliberal policies on the basic democratic rights of the dispossessed, as he argues for the right and facility of the people to take power by reinventing power democratically. Freire’s critical reflections were prescient of the twenty-first century’s revolts and denunciations of autocratic and antidemocratic policies during the Arab Spring, the Occupy movement, and other courageous demonstrations for social justice throughout the world. Once more, Freire challenges our conscience in accessible, deep, thought-provoking writings that urge us to rehumanize popular education, employing “critical reflection steeped in history, [and] a more critical knowledge of how society works and functions.” (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

ch. 1 Argentina: Paulo Freire’s Presence at the National University of San Luis
Speech: I Feel Happy and Challenged
Seminars on Critical Pedagogy
Critical Pedagogy Practice
Elements of the Educative Situation
The Struggle Never Ends, but Is Reinvented: Participants’ Questions and Paulo Freire’s Answers
Media Interview: The Confrontation
Is Not Pedagogical, but Rather Political

ch. 2 Chile
Interviews with Boris Bezama
Unafraid to Love
Educating for Freedom

ch. 3 Nicaragua
Manifesto: Ten Years of the People’s Sandinista Revolution

ch. 4 Paraguay
Discuss Seminar with Paulo Freire
Popular Education in Lati America: Contextualization and Possibilities within Transition Processes
Interview
Popular Education in Paraguay: Our Questions in Freire

ch. 5 Uruguay
Interviews
On Education, Politics, and Religion
Dialogue on Education, Television, and Social Change

Index
About the Author
Additional Info:
As students develop cognitively, integrating knowledge in ways that reflect their learning, they also need to grow both interpersonally, by considering themselves as part of a larger whole, and intrapersonally, by establishing a belief system that can influence and guide their choices and experiences.
Additional Info:
As students develop cognitively, integrating knowledge in ways that reflect their learning, they also need to grow both interpersonally, by considering themselves as part of a larger whole, and intrapersonally, by establishing a belief system that can influence and guide their choices and experiences.
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Contemplative Learning and Inquiry Across Disciplines

Book
Gunnlaugson, Olen; Sarath, Edward W.; Scott, Charles; and Bai, Heesoon, eds.
2014
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
LC268.C775.2014
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: A wide-ranging consideration of the emerging field of contemplative education.

Contemplative approaches to higher education have been gaining in popularity and application across a wide range of disciplines. Spurring conferences, a growing body of literature, and several academic programs or centers, these approaches promise to contribute significantly to higher education in the years to come. This volume provides an overview of ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: A wide-ranging consideration of the emerging field of contemplative education.

Contemplative approaches to higher education have been gaining in popularity and application across a wide range of disciplines. Spurring conferences, a growing body of literature, and several academic programs or centers, these approaches promise to contribute significantly to higher education in the years to come. This volume provides an overview of the current landscape of contemplative instruction, pedagogy, philosophy, and curriculum from the perspectives of leading researchers and scholar-practitioners. Contributors come from a variety of disciplines, including education, management and leadership studies, humanities, social sciences, the arts, and information science. Drawing on diverse contexts, the essays reveal the applicability of contemplative studies as a watershed field, capable of informing, enriching, and sustaining the many disciplines and instructional contexts that comprise higher education. Chapters discuss the theoretical aspects of the field; the details, experiences, and challenges of contemplative approaches; and the hopes and concerns for the future of this field. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
An Introduction to Contemplative Learning and Inquiry Across Disciplines Olen Gunnlaugson, Edward W. Sarath, Charles Scott, and Heesoon Bai)

Part I. Contemplative Studies: A New Academic Descipline ch. 1 Contemplative Pedagogy in Higher Education: Toward a More Reflective Academy (Arthur Zajonic, Amherst University)
ch. 2 A Philosophical Framework for Contemplative Education (Deborah Orr, York University)
ch. 3 Kindred Spirits in Teaching Contemplative Practice: Distraction, Solitude, and Simplicity (Mara Adelman, Seattle University)
ch. 4 Contemplation: The Soul’s Way of Knowing (John (Jack) P. Miller, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto)
ch. 5 Fitting in Breath Hunting: Thai and U.S. Perspectives of Contemplative Pedagogy (David Lee Keiser, Monclair State University, and Saratid Sakulkoo, Burapha University)
ch. 6 A Pedagogy for the New Field of Contemplative Studies (Harold D. Roth, Brown University)

Part II. Domain Specific Perspectives
ch. 7 Learning about Obligation, Compassion, and Global Justice: The Place of Contemplative Pedagogy (David Khane, University of Alberta)
ch. 8 History as Dharma: A Contemplative Practice Model for Teaching the Middle East and Africa (Elise G. Young, Westfield State University)
ch. 9 Paying Attention: Introspection as a Ground of Learning (Daniel Barbezat, Amherst College)
ch. 10 Integrating Mindfulness Theory and Practice at Lesley University (Nancy W. Waring, Lesley University
ch. 11 Information and Contemplation: Exploring Contemplative Approaches to Information Technology (David M. Levy, University of Washington
ch. 12 Contemplative Pedagogy: Perspectives from Cognitive and Affective Science (Alfred W. Kaszniak, University of Arizona< )

Part III. Contemplating Change: Individual and Collective Transformation in Contemplative Education Environments
ch. 13 Transformative Pathways: Engaging the Heart in Contemplative Education (Diana Denton, University of Waterloo)
ch. 14 Contemplating Uncomfortable Emotions: Creating Transformative Spaces for Learning in Higher Education (John Eric Baugher, University of Southern Maine)
ch. 15 Contemplative Disciplines in Higher Education: Cutting through Academic Materialism (Daniel Vokey, University of British Columbia)
ch. 16 Transitions: Teaching from the Spaces Between (Richard C. Brown, Naropa University)
ch. 17 A Call for Wisdom in Higher Education: Contemplative Voices from the Dao-Field (Heeson Bai, Simon Fraser University; Avraham Cohen, City University; Tom Culham, Sean Park, Shahar Rabi, Charles Scott, and Saskia Tait, Simon Fraser University)

Part IV. New Frontiers of Contemplative Learning and Instruction
ch. 18 Considerations for Collective Leadership: A Threefold Contemplative Curriculum for Engaging the Intersubjective Field of Learning (Olen Gunnlaugson, Université Laval)
ch. 19 Buberian Dialogue as an Intersubjective Contemplative Praxis (Charles Scott, Simon Fraser University)
ch. 20 Contemplative Pedagogy and Compassionate Presence (Joanne Gozawa, California Institute of Integral Studies)
ch. 21 What Next?: Contemplating the Future of Contemplative Education (Edward W. Sarath, University of Michigan)
ch. 22 An Inquiry into the Field Dynamics of Collective Learning (Chris Bache, Youngstown State University in conversation with Olen Gunnlaugson, Université Laval)

Author Biographies
Index
Article cover image

"Transformational Teaching: Theoretical Underpinnings, Basic Principles, and Core Methods" (pdf)

Article
Slavich, George M. and Zimbardo, Philip G.
2012
Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, July 24,
Topics: Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Approaches to classroom instruction have evolved considerably over the past 50 years. This progress has been spurred by the development of several learning principles and methods of instruction, including active learning, student-centered learning, collabora- tive learning, experiential learning, and problem-based learning. In the present paper, we suggest that these seemingly different strategies share important underlying characteristics and can be viewed as complimentary components of a broader approach to classroom instruction called ...
Additional Info:
Approaches to classroom instruction have evolved considerably over the past 50 years. This progress has been spurred by the development of several learning principles and methods of instruction, including active learning, student-centered learning, collabora- tive learning, experiential learning, and problem-based learning. In the present paper, we suggest that these seemingly different strategies share important underlying characteristics and can be viewed as complimentary components of a broader approach to classroom instruction called transformational teaching. Transformational teaching involves creating dynamic relationships between teachers, students, and a shared body of knowledge to promote student learning and personal growth. From this perspective, instructors are intel- lectual coaches who create teams of students who collaborate with each other and with their teacher to master bodies of information. Teachers assume the traditional role of facilitating students’ acquisition of key course concepts, but do so while enhancing students’ personal development and attitudes toward learning. They accomplish these goals by establishing a shared vision for a course, providing modeling and mastery experiences, challenging and encouraging students, personalizing attention and feedback, creating experiential lessons that transcend the boundaries of the classroom, and promoting ample opportunities for preflection and reflection. We propose that these methods are synergistically related and, when used together, maximize students’ potential for intellectual and personal growth.
TTR cover image
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Learning as Leaving Home: Fear, Empathy and Hospitality in the Theology and Religion Classroom

TTR
Fleming, Daniel and Lovat, Terence
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 207-223
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
The article is a response to this journal's call for papers on metaphors for teaching, and also draws from a previous publication in which Kent Eilers developed a methodology for teaching global theologies. In this methodology, the ultimate goal was the development of “hermeneutical dispositions of empathy, hospitality, and receptivity toward culturally diverse voices” (2014, 165). This article considers the goals of Eilers' methodology, and others like his, and how it is ...
Additional Info:
The article is a response to this journal's call for papers on metaphors for teaching, and also draws from a previous publication in which Kent Eilers developed a methodology for teaching global theologies. In this methodology, the ultimate goal was the development of “hermeneutical dispositions of empathy, hospitality, and receptivity toward culturally diverse voices” (2014, 165). This article considers the goals of Eilers' methodology, and others like his, and how it is that the metaphors of “leaving home” and “communal imagination” highlight the importance of the ambient and interpersonal features of a classroom and their effect on the attainment of the above goals. In so doing, it extends the conversation beyond content and methodology in teaching theology and religion into the realms of philosophy of education, as well as the fields of moral and values education. It is contended that the metaphors informed by these areas of study facilitate the attainment of such goals, and similar ones, by demonstrating that the cultivation of an ambience of care, trust, and compassion within the classroom constitutes an essential foundation for learning in which students “leave home” and cultivate “communal imagination.” The article finishes with practical suggestions for educators in theology and religion.
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Transformations: The World Religions Survey through an Adjunct Feminist Lens

TTR
Downie, Alison
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 193-206
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This essay describes a transformation in my experience as an adjunct teaching underprepared students from one of shame toward a desire to assert the value of this work. Insights from my feminist theological training helped me to affirm the importance of encouraging transformative learning in teaching the academically marginalized and prompted my analysis of student writing in an introductory World Religions course, in order to determine whether or not the ...
Additional Info:
This essay describes a transformation in my experience as an adjunct teaching underprepared students from one of shame toward a desire to assert the value of this work. Insights from my feminist theological training helped me to affirm the importance of encouraging transformative learning in teaching the academically marginalized and prompted my analysis of student writing in an introductory World Religions course, in order to determine whether or not the course was a site of transformative learning. I argue that despite many contextual limitations, the movement toward deepening self-awareness and increasing openness to religious diversity seen in student writing demonstrates that transformative learning began in this course, and that is valuable for students' lives whether or not they are academically successful.
Additional Info:
An open access academic journal devoted to the practice and application of transformative education. Essays address curricular and co-curricular elements, explore active and reflective learning experiences, leadership, service learning and civic engagement, global and cultural awareness, and the learner’s intellectual, psychological and physical development.
Additional Info:
An open access academic journal devoted to the practice and application of transformative education. Essays address curricular and co-curricular elements, explore active and reflective learning experiences, leadership, service learning and civic engagement, global and cultural awareness, and the learner’s intellectual, psychological and physical development.
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Meeting the Challenge: Teaching Sensitive Subject Matter

Web
Crosby, Dorian B.
2012
Journal of Effective Teaching, Vol. 12, No. 2,
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
When teaching diversity courses that discuss sensitive issues, such as racial, gender, sexuality, religious, and ethnic discrimination, it is possible to encounter student resistance, which can subsequently prevent students from comprehending the content. While teaching an introductory course on African American history in a Black Studies Department at a predominantly white institution of higher education in Middle America, I experienced such resistance. This article discusses how I initially taught the ...
Additional Info:
When teaching diversity courses that discuss sensitive issues, such as racial, gender, sexuality, religious, and ethnic discrimination, it is possible to encounter student resistance, which can subsequently prevent students from comprehending the content. While teaching an introductory course on African American history in a Black Studies Department at a predominantly white institution of higher education in Middle America, I experienced such resistance. This article discusses how I initially taught the course, evaluated and then restructured my active learning approach to include reflective learning and Black Studies techniques to address that resistance.
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Contemplative Studies and the Liberal Arts

Article
Fort, Andrew O.
2013
Buddhist-Christian Studies, v33 n1: 23-32
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Contemplative Studies—meaning both standard “third-person” study of contemplative traditions in history and various cultures as well as actual “first-person” practice of contemplative exercises as part of coursework—is a new field in academia, and aspects have been controversial in some quarters, seen as not completely compatible with the rigorous “critical inquiry” of liberal arts study. While there are agendas within contemplative studies (CS) that go beyond the traditional questions ...
Additional Info:
Contemplative Studies—meaning both standard “third-person” study of contemplative traditions in history and various cultures as well as actual “first-person” practice of contemplative exercises as part of coursework—is a new field in academia, and aspects have been controversial in some quarters, seen as not completely compatible with the rigorous “critical inquiry” of liberal arts study. While there are agendas within contemplative studies (CS) that go beyond the traditional questions and issues of liberal education, I want to argue that CS has, for a number of reasons, a place right at the heart of such inquiry. CS can be approached from many disciplines, including psychology, medicine, and neuroscience, as well as literature and visual, fine, and performing arts, but here I will focus on its place in liberal arts generally, and in religious studies specifically.
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Transformative Learning: A Case for Using Grounded Theory as an Assessment Analytic

TTR
Patterson, Barbara A. B.; Munoz, Leslie; Abrams, Leah; and Bass, Caroline
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 4 (2015): 303-325
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 4 2015
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Transformative Learning Theory and pedagogies leverage disruptive experiences as catalysts for learning and teaching. By facilitating processes of critical analysis and reflection that challenge assumptions, transformative learning reframes what counts as knowledge and the sources and processes for gaining and producing it. Students develop a broader range of perspectives on and entry points for learning and behavior change engaging cognition, embodiment, aesthetics, emotions, and ethics (see Mezirow 1991 and Figures 1 and 2). ...
Additional Info:
Transformative Learning Theory and pedagogies leverage disruptive experiences as catalysts for learning and teaching. By facilitating processes of critical analysis and reflection that challenge assumptions, transformative learning reframes what counts as knowledge and the sources and processes for gaining and producing it. Students develop a broader range of perspectives on and entry points for learning and behavior change engaging cognition, embodiment, aesthetics, emotions, and ethics (see Mezirow 1991 and Figures 1 and 2). The open-inquiry, multi-modal nature of transformative learning defies most traditional assessment strategies. This article demonstrates that grounded theory offers the rigorous qualitative analysis needed to document and track transformative learning outcomes in practice. By applying a grounded theory approach to data from over eighty student portfolios across several iterations of a Religion and Ecology course at Emory University, this article demonstrates a successful and replicable assessment of transformative learning pedagogies.
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Understanding and Promoting Transformative Learning: A Guide to Theory and Practice, Edition: 3

Book
Cranton, Patricia
2016
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC5225.L42 C72 2016
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The third edition of Patricia Cranton’s Understanding and Promoting Transformative Learning brings a wealth of new insight from the tremendous growth in the field during the decade since the previous edition. As in the previous editions, the book helps adult educators understand what transformative learning is, distinguish it from other forms of learning, and foster it in their practice. The first part ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The third edition of Patricia Cranton’s Understanding and Promoting Transformative Learning brings a wealth of new insight from the tremendous growth in the field during the decade since the previous edition. As in the previous editions, the book helps adult educators understand what transformative learning is, distinguish it from other forms of learning, and foster it in their practice. The first part of the book is dedicated to clarifying transformative learning theory and relating it to other theoretical frameworks. The author examines transformative learning from the learner’s perspective, and discusses individual differences in how learners go through the process. In the second half of the book, the focus is squarely on strategies for promoting transformative learning in a wide variety of adult and higher education contexts. Practitioners will be able to take ideas from the text and apply them directly in their teaching.

Since 1975, transformative learning has become a core theoretical perspective in adult and higher education, and research has proliferated. In the past decade, adult education and especially transformative learning grew into a noticeably larger field. The numbers of undergraduate and graduate programs in adult education have increased and continue to increase as more and more individuals are seeking the expertise, skills, and training necessary to work with adult learners in higher education, business, industry, government, health professions, non-profit organizations, and community development. In addition, the number of programs in higher education (both undergraduate and graduate) that include courses in transformative learning has grown dramatically. These academic audiences use the book to further their understanding of transformative learning theory and practice.

Drawing on the latest research as well as the author’s own teaching experience in both online and face-to-face courses, this new edition will be a vital resource for members of the transformative learning community, as well as those encountering the topic for the first time. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface To The Third Edition
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Context of Transformative Learning
ch. 2 The Origins of Transformative Learning Theory
ch. 3 Transformative Learning Theory as an Integrated Perspective
ch. 4 Transformation: The Learner’s Story
ch. 5 Individual Differences
ch. 6 Educator Roles
ch. 7 The Importance of Power
ch. 8 Fostering Critical Self-Reflection and Self-Awareness
ch. 9 Supporting Transformative Learning
ch. 10 The Educator’s Transformative Process

References
About the Author
Index
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Look Before you Leap: Reconsidering Contemplative Pedagogy

TTR
Fisher, Kathleen
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 1 (2017): 4-21
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 1
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Assessing Students   |   Faith in the Classroom   |   Liberal Arts   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
This paper presents a critique of a set of teaching strategies known as “contemplative pedagogy.” Using practices such as meditation, attentive listening, and reflective reading, contemplative inquiry focuses on direct first-person experience as an essential means of knowing that has historically been overshadowed and dismissed by an emphasis on analytical reasoning. In this essay, I examine four problematic claims that appear frequently in descriptions of contemplative pedagogy: (1) undergraduate students have ...
Additional Info:
This paper presents a critique of a set of teaching strategies known as “contemplative pedagogy.” Using practices such as meditation, attentive listening, and reflective reading, contemplative inquiry focuses on direct first-person experience as an essential means of knowing that has historically been overshadowed and dismissed by an emphasis on analytical reasoning. In this essay, I examine four problematic claims that appear frequently in descriptions of contemplative pedagogy: (1) undergraduate students have a kind of spiritual hunger; (2) pedagogies focused on cognitive skills teach students only what, not how, to think; (3) self-knowledge fosters empathy; and (4) education needs a new epistemology centered on spiritual and emotional, rather than intellectual, experience. I argue that these claims underestimate the diversity of undergraduate students, the complexity of what it means to think and know, the capacity for self-knowledge to become self-absorption, and the dangers of transgressing the boundaries between intellectual, psychological, and religious experiences. [See as well “Response to Kathleen Fisher's ‘Look Before You Leap,’” by Andrew O. Fort and Louis Komjathy, published in this issue of the journal.]
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Transformative Learning and Adult Higher Education

Book
Cohen, Judith Beth; Gammel, Jo Ann; and Rustein-Riley, Amy, eds.
2016
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 147)
LC5219.T72 2016
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Presenting current trends in transformative learning and adult higher education, this volume paints a vivid picture of the Transformative Learning theory in action. The concepts that knit these articles together despite the variety of educational settings and populations are: relationships, community, and the body experience - often missing in higher education.

This volume includes:
- the voices of marginalized populations often ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Presenting current trends in transformative learning and adult higher education, this volume paints a vivid picture of the Transformative Learning theory in action. The concepts that knit these articles together despite the variety of educational settings and populations are: relationships, community, and the body experience - often missing in higher education.

This volume includes:
- the voices of marginalized populations often excluded from research studies such as community college students, emerging adults with learning differences, English language learners, native Alaskans, African-American health educators, doctoral students, and yoga practitioners;
- new paradigms for thinking about adult undergraduate education;
- new ways to deal with social conflict and advise doctoral students; and
- personal stories from Black women leaders, college teachers, student writers as well as pregnant women, and social service providers.

This is the 147th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors’ Notes (Judith Beth Cohen, Jo Ann Gammel, Amy Rutstein-Riley)

ch. 1 The Spiral Road of Transformative Learning: Through the Lens of College Students with Learning Differences (Lynn Abrahams)
This chapter explores how college students with diagnosed learning differences develop identity within the family system.

ch. 2 Transformative Learning and the Road to Maternal Leadership (Rachel Panton)
This study of three African-American holistic health educators shows how their woman-centered learning cultures influenced their personal transformations and leadership roles.

ch. 3 A Relational Approach to Mentoring Women Doctoral Students (Jo Ann Gammel, Amy Rutstein-Riley)
In an examination of six dyads of women advisors and advisees in one doctoral program, the authors found that a relational model for mentoring women can be an alternative to the authority-based approach most common to doctoral work.

ch. 4 Examining Transformation on the Road to the Professoriate (Anne C. Benoit)
In this chapter, two college teachers, an African-American woman and a White man, identify pivotal events in their development as educators.

ch. 5 Whose Job Is It to Change? (Kathryn L. Nielsen)
Co-director of a college writing center proposes a plan for insitutional change that honors the voices of English language learners rather than expecting them to adjust to the dominant instituational culture.

ch. 6 Making Voices Visible: Using Visual Data in Teacher Education and Research (Debra Murphy)
This chapter describes changes in the thinking and practice of eight early childhood teachers after they used visual data to complete a teacher research assignment in a community college teacher education course.

ch. 7 Teaching Creative Nonfiction: The Transformative Nature of the Workshop Method (Suzanne Cope)
A writer and teacher of nonfiction examines the widely used workshop method to show how student writers gain greater control over their choice of language, and insight into the meaning of their writing.

ch. 8 Transformative Graduate Education Through the Use of Restorative Practices (John W. Bailie, Craig W. Adamson)
As professors and administrators in a graduate program based upon Restorative Justice, these authors show how classroom pedagogy can model alternatives that promote personal and professional transformation.

ch. 9 Adult Learning, Transformative Education, and Indigenous Epistemology (Diane McEachern)
A social worker, teaching in an undergraduate satellite program in Alaska, explores how a culturally resonant degree program can overcome the barriers faced by native Yupik women attending college.

ch. 10 Iyengar Yoga for Motherhood: Teaching Transformation in a Nonformal Learning Environment (Amy Tate)
A yoga teacher and practitioner explores the widespread phenomenon of yoga by focusing on its empowering effects for pregnant women and its implications for challenging the traditional medical model.

ch. 11 Embodying Authenticity in Higher Education (Laura Douglass)
The author explores how listening to the wisdom of her body was a primary method she used to interpret the competing demands and disorienting dilemmas of scholarship, teaching, and administration.

Index
Additional Info:
How do we deal with our own sexuality as teachers and as learners in the classroom? As a seminary professor in a mainline Christian context, I find that discussing sexuality increases student discomfort levels by threatening to raise questions about the connections between morality, behavior, and bodies of those in the room – questions we have been culturally trained to avoid. In order to decrease discomfort, many instructors approach sexuality only ...
Additional Info:
How do we deal with our own sexuality as teachers and as learners in the classroom? As a seminary professor in a mainline Christian context, I find that discussing sexuality increases student discomfort levels by threatening to raise questions about the connections between morality, behavior, and bodies of those in the room – questions we have been culturally trained to avoid. In order to decrease discomfort, many instructors approach sexuality only as content-based subject matter. Particularly for ministry students, this approach can be a disservice to their discernment process and preparation for future ministry contexts, especially for those in turmoil regarding sexuality-related issues. By explicitly engaging how personal experience and cultural contexts shape our sexuality, pedagogical models can promote critical self-reflection and seek perspective transformation, not values change, as a resource for professional sexual ethics training in ministry.
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The Contemplative Mind in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Book
Owen Smith, Patricia
2017
Indiana University Press
LB2331.094 2018
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
In The Contemplative Mind in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Patricia Owen-Smith considers how contemplative practices may find a place in higher education. By creating a bridge between contemplative practices and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), Owen-Smith brings awareness of contemplative pedagogy to a larger audience of college instructors, while also offering classroom models and outlining the ongoing challenges of both defining these practices and assessing their ...
Additional Info:
In The Contemplative Mind in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Patricia Owen-Smith considers how contemplative practices may find a place in higher education. By creating a bridge between contemplative practices and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), Owen-Smith brings awareness of contemplative pedagogy to a larger audience of college instructors, while also offering classroom models and outlining the ongoing challenges of both defining these practices and assessing their impact in education. Ultimately, Owen-Smith asserts that such practices have the potential to deepen a student’s development and understanding of the self as a learner, knower, and citizen of the world.

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

Introduction

Ch 1. A Historical Review
Ch 2. Contemplative Practices in Higher Education
Ch 3. Challenges and Replies to Contemplative Methods
Ch 4. Contemplative Research
Ch 5. The Contemplative Mind: A Vision of Higher Education for the 21st Century

Coda

References

Index