Philosophy of Teaching

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Embracing Contraries: Explorations in Learning and Teaching

Book
Elbow, Peter
1986
Oxford University Press, New York, NY
LB2331.E48 1986
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Peter Elbow's widely acclaimed and original theories on the writing process, set forth in Writing Without Teachers and Writing With Power, have earned him a reputation as a leading educational innovator. Now Elbow has drawn together twelve of his essays on the nature of learning and teaching to suggest a comprehensive philosophy of education. At once theoretical and down-to-earth, this collection will appeal not only to teachers, adminitrators and students, ...
Additional Info:
Peter Elbow's widely acclaimed and original theories on the writing process, set forth in Writing Without Teachers and Writing With Power, have earned him a reputation as a leading educational innovator. Now Elbow has drawn together twelve of his essays on the nature of learning and teaching to suggest a comprehensive philosophy of education. At once theoretical and down-to-earth, this collection will appeal not only to teachers, adminitrators and students, but to anyone with a love of learning.

Elbow explores the "contraries" in the educational process, in particular his theory that clear thinking can be enhanced by inviting indecision, incoherence, and paradoxical thinking. The essays, written over a period of twenty-five years, are engaged in a single enterprise: to arrive at insights or conclusions about learning and teaching while still doing justice to the "rich messiness" of intellectual inquiry. Drawing his conclusions from his own perplexities as a student and as a teacher, Elbow discusses the value of interdisciplinary teaching, his theory of "cooking" (an interaction of conflicting ideas), the authority relationship in teaching and the value of specifying learning objectives. A full section is devoted to evaluation and feedback, both of students and faculty. Finally, Elbow focuses on the need to move beyond the skepticism of critical thinking to what he calls "methodological belief" -- an ability to embrace more than one point of view. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part 1 The Learning Process
ch. 1 Nondisciplinary Courses and the Two Roots of Real Learning
ch. 2 Cooking: The Interaction of Conflicting Elements
ch. 3 Teaching Two Kinds of Thinking by Teaching Writing

Part 2 The Teaching Process
ch. 4 Exploring My Teaching
ch. 5 The Pedagogy of the Bamboozled
ch. 6 Trying to Teach While Thinking About the End
ch. 7 Embracing Contraries in the Teaching Process

Part 3 The Evaluation Process
ch. 8 Evaluating Students More Accurately
ch. 9 Collaborative Peer Evaluation by Faculty
ch. 9a Visiting Pete Sinclair
ch. 9b On Being Visited
ch. 9c Contraries in Responding
ch. 10 Trustworthiness in Evaluation

Part 4 Contraries and Inquiry
ch. 11 The Value of Dialectic
ch. 12 Methodological Doubting and Believing: Contraries in Inquiring

Bibliography
Index
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Teaching Positions: Difference, Pedagogy and the Power of Address

Book
Ellsworth, Elizabeth
1997
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LB1033.5.E53 1997
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Drawing on media studies, literary theory, and the work of psychoanalytical feminist theorist Shoshana Felman, Ellsworth (curriculum and instruction, U. of Wisconsin-Madison) portrays the work of pedagogy as a performance practice. She argues that pedagogy's mode of address - its positioning of teachers and students in relation to one another - is crucial in the success or failure of education efforts. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Drawing on media studies, literary theory, and the work of psychoanalytical feminist theorist Shoshana Felman, Ellsworth (curriculum and instruction, U. of Wisconsin-Madison) portrays the work of pedagogy as a performance practice. She argues that pedagogy's mode of address - its positioning of teachers and students in relation to one another - is crucial in the success or failure of education efforts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I Teaching as a Scene of Address
ch. 1 Mode of Address: It's a Film Thing
ch. 2 The Paradoxical Power of Address: It's an Education Thing, Too
ch. 3 "Who" Learns? "Who" Teaches? Figuring the Unconscious in Pedagogy
ch. 4 Who Does Communicative Dialogue Think You Are?
ch. 5 Communicative Dialogue: Control Through Continuity
ch. 6 The Power of Discontinuity: Teaching Through Analytic Dialogue

Part II Teaching Through Paradoxical Modes of Address
ch. 7 A Paradox: Teaching as the Taking of Action Without a Positive Reference
ch. 8 A Second Paradox: The Paradox of Power and Authority in Teaching
ch. 9 A Third Paradox: Teaching as a Performance Suspended in the Space Between Self and Other
ch. 10 A Fourth Paradox: Teaching as Performance Suspended in Time - Interactive Pedagogy in New Media
ch. 11 A Fifth Paradox: Pedagogy as a Performance Suspended in Thought - The Power of a Magical Realist Address in Academic Writing

Coda
References
Index
About the Author
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Pedagogy of the Heart

Book
Freire, Paulo
1998
Continuum, New York, NY
LC71.F7413 1997
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This book represents some of the last writings by Paulo Freire, who has been acclaimed one of the most important educators of the 20th century. Pedagogy of the Heart is filled with Freire's reminiscences of his early life and meditations "under my mango tree." Many of these will be familiar themes to those who have walked with Freire before. For those coming to his work for the first time, Pedagogy ...
Additional Info:
This book represents some of the last writings by Paulo Freire, who has been acclaimed one of the most important educators of the 20th century. Pedagogy of the Heart is filled with Freire's reminiscences of his early life and meditations "under my mango tree." Many of these will be familiar themes to those who have walked with Freire before. For those coming to his work for the first time, Pedagogy of the Heart will open new doors to the interrelations of education and political struggle. Further enhancing the text are substantive notes by Ana Maria Araujo Freire. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Under the Shade of a Mango Tree
Solitude-Communion
Life Support and the World
My First World
Hope
The Limit of the Right
Neoliberals and Progressives
Democratic Administration
Lessons from Exile
The "Lefts" and the Right
Seriousness and Happiness
Dialogism
My Faith and Hope
Notes
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God's Wisdom: Toward a Theology of Education

Book
Hodgson, Peter
1999
Westminster John Knox, Louisville, KY
BT738.17.H63 1999
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Drawing upon classical and modern theological resources as well as postmodern pedagogical theories, Peter Hodgson argues that God's Wisdom, incarnate in paradigmatic teachers such as Jesus of Nazareth, forms and transforms human beings by evoking critical thinking, heightened imagination, and liberating practice. This groundbreaking book reexamines the place of religion in liberal education and the relationship between religious and theological studies. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Drawing upon classical and modern theological resources as well as postmodern pedagogical theories, Peter Hodgson argues that God's Wisdom, incarnate in paradigmatic teachers such as Jesus of Nazareth, forms and transforms human beings by evoking critical thinking, heightened imagination, and liberating practice. This groundbreaking book reexamines the place of religion in liberal education and the relationship between religious and theological studies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction: Teaching as a Religious Vocation
Religious Dimensions of Teaching
"The Lord's Way of Education"

ch. 2 God as Teacher: Classical and Modern Theologies
The Hebraic and Hellenic Heritages: Torah and Paideia
The Greek Fathers: The Alexandrines and Cappadocians
Latin Theology: Augustine, Aquinas, Bonaventure
Reformed Theology: Calvin and Bushnell
The Enlightenment: Lessing and Herder
Speculative and Existential Philosophy: Hegel and Kierkegaard

ch. 3 Transformative Pedagogy: Modern and Postmodern Theories
Education and Life Formation
The Rhythm of Education
Constructive and Interactive Knowledge
Education as the Practice of Freedom
Connected Teaching and Cooperative Learning

ch. 4 God's Wisdom: Education as Paideia
The Figure of Wisdom: Sophia/Spirit 8
The Incarnation of Wisdom
The Pedagogy of Wisdom: Paideia

ch. 5 Conclusion: Paideia in Higher Education Today
Paideia in Liberal Education
Paideia in Religious and Theological Studies

Notes
Index
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Three Rival Versions of Moral Enquiry: Encyclopedia, Genealogy and Tradition

Book
MacIntyre, Alasdair
1990
University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, IN
BJ37.M23 1990
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Alasdair MacIntyre—whom Newsweek has called "one of the foremost moral philosophers in the English-speaking world"—here presents his 1988 Gifford Lectures as an expansion of his earlier work Whose Justice? Which Rationality? He begins by considering the cultural and philosophical distance dividing Lord Gifford's late nineteenth-century world from our own. The outlook of that earlier world, MacIntyre claims, was definitively articulated in the Ninth Edition of the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, which ...
Additional Info:
Alasdair MacIntyre—whom Newsweek has called "one of the foremost moral philosophers in the English-speaking world"—here presents his 1988 Gifford Lectures as an expansion of his earlier work Whose Justice? Which Rationality? He begins by considering the cultural and philosophical distance dividing Lord Gifford's late nineteenth-century world from our own. The outlook of that earlier world, MacIntyre claims, was definitively articulated in the Ninth Edition of the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, which conceived of moral enquiry as both providing insight into and continuing the rational progress of mankind into ever greater enlightenment. MacIntyre compares that conception of moral enquiry to two rival conceptions also formulated in the late nineteenth century: that of Nietzsche's Zur Genealogie der Moral and that expressed in the encyclical letter of Pope Leo XIII Aeterni Patris.
The lectures focus on Aquinas's integration of Augustinian and Aristotelian modes of enquiry, the inability of the encyclopaedists' standpoint to withstand Thomistic or genealogical criticism, and the problems confronting the contemporary post-Nietzschean genealogist. MacIntyre concludes by considering the implications for education in universities and colleges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

Adam Gifford's Project in Context
Genealogies and Subversions
Too Many Thomisms?
The Augustinian Conception of Moral Enquiry
Aristotle and/or/against Augustine: Rival Traditions of Enquiry
Aquinas and the Rationality of Tradition
In the Aftermath of Defeated Tradition
Tradition against Encyclopaedia
Tradition against Genealogy
Reconceiving the University as an Institution and the Lecture as a Genre

Index
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Showing How: The Act of Teaching

Book
Moran, Gabriel
1997
Trinity Press, Valley Forge, PA
LB1025.3.M664 1997
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Here is a thoroughly original work on the meaning of teaching by one who has been widely credited with reshaping the field of religious education in the United States, and to have had a significant effect also in many other countries. Part 1 establishes a fundamental meaning for "to teach," grounding it in its most basic forms and moving from examples in the nonhuman world (what the mountain teaches the mountain ...
Additional Info:
Here is a thoroughly original work on the meaning of teaching by one who has been widely credited with reshaping the field of religious education in the United States, and to have had a significant effect also in many other countries. Part 1 establishes a fundamental meaning for "to teach," grounding it in its most basic forms and moving from examples in the nonhuman world (what the mountain teaches the mountain climber) to communal and nonverbal forms of teaching among humans. Part 2 explores the languages of teaching and the diverse forms of speech appropriate to teaching: rhetorical forms, including storytelling and preaching; therapeutic languages; and religion's preservation of these languages in ritualized settings, including confessing and mourning. Part 3 draws out the implications of a full understanding of "to teach" for education, the school, and the teaching of morality. Showing How addresses schoolteachers, parents, counselors, ministers, administrators, and all who recognize teaching as a fundamental human act. By exposing the root meaning of teaching, the book represents a challenge to any proposals for educational reform. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Teaching as a Moral Dilemma
ch. 2 Regrounding the Verb "To Teach"
ch. 3 Teaching by Design
ch. 4 Teaching with the End in View
ch. 5 Teaching to Remove Obstacles
ch. 6 Teaching the Conversation
ch. 7 Educational Forms of Teaching
ch. 8 Teaching in School
ch. 9 Teaching Morally, Teaching Morality

Conclusion
Notes
Index
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Feminist Teaching in Theory and Practice: Situating Power & Knowledge in Poststructural Classrooms

Book
Ropers-Huilman, Becky
1998
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
HQ1426.R75 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Using a feminist poststructural focus, Ropers-Huilman (Louisiana State Univ.) investigates feminist teachers' positions and styles in order to examine the practices of a theory of teaching. She explores teachers' reflections on power and gender, how they operate in the classroom, and their experiences as innovators in feminist teaching. No one particular approach or process is emphasized. The application of theory to practice allows the 22 teachers who were interviewed to explore ...
Additional Info:
Using a feminist poststructural focus, Ropers-Huilman (Louisiana State Univ.) investigates feminist teachers' positions and styles in order to examine the practices of a theory of teaching. She explores teachers' reflections on power and gender, how they operate in the classroom, and their experiences as innovators in feminist teaching. No one particular approach or process is emphasized. The application of theory to practice allows the 22 teachers who were interviewed to explore and debate the interaction between students and teachers. The complexity of investigating feminist practices, rather than just the teachers themselves, allows a more flexible look at the issues and the social forces defining their interpretations. Ropers-Huilman explores factors contributing to the many forms of feminist teaching and how power affects and shapes the experience. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editor's Foreword
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
ch. 1 Puzzling My Way Toward/Through Feminist Teaching
Pt. I Engaging Change: Social Forces and Feminist Teaching Practice
ch. 2 Multiplicity in Action: Working Through Identities
ch. 3 Unsettling Roles: Teacher and Student Interactions
ch. 4 Mapping the Terrain: Institutional Barriers, Supports, and Strategies
Pt. II Engaging Power: Critical Tensions and Resistances
ch. 5 Powerful Places: (De)constructing Power and Resistance
ch. 6 Situated Texts: Negotiating Knowledge and Knowing
ch. 7 Classroom Ruptures: Politics of Difference
ch. 8 Powers of Language: Interrogating Silence and Speech
ch. 9 Intersections and Interruptions: Letting Loose with Disruption
Notes
References
Index
About the Author
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Educating the Reflective Practitioner: Toward a New Design for Teaching and Learning in the Professions

Book
Schon, Donald A.
1987
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC1059.S45 1987
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Doctors, architects, lawyers and engineers are all trained in schools that emphasize technique but neglect the key element of artistry that distinguishes the true professional. Today's professional is a drudge, mechanically applying privileged knowledge to rote tasks. That is Schon's diagnosis of higher education, and as a remedy he recommends learning by doing. To teach skills of improvisation and problem-framing, he feels our universities should borrow the methods used in ...
Additional Info:
Doctors, architects, lawyers and engineers are all trained in schools that emphasize technique but neglect the key element of artistry that distinguishes the true professional. Today's professional is a drudge, mechanically applying privileged knowledge to rote tasks. That is Schon's diagnosis of higher education, and as a remedy he recommends learning by doing. To teach skills of improvisation and problem-framing, he feels our universities should borrow the methods used in art studios, dance conservatories, athletics coaching, craft appenticeships and psychoanalytic training. In all these settings, a dialogue between student and coach in a low-risk atmosphere encourages creativity. Despite its academic prose, this primer by an MIT urban studies professor will enlighten students, teachers and professionals. Schon concludes the book (a sequel to The Reflective Practitioner with a description of his attempt to create a ``studiolike'' curriculum for MIT's city planning courses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The Roles of Artistry in Professional Education.
The Architectural Studio: A Prototype of Education for Reflection-in-Action.
Examples and Experiments.
Implications for Professional Education.
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When Students Have Power: Negotiating Authority in a Critical Pedagogy

Book
Shor, Ira
1996
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LC196.5.U6S566 1996
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Adult Learners   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
What happens when teachers share power with students? In this profound book, Ira Shor--the inventor of critical pedagogy in the United States-- relates the story of an experiment that nearly went out of control.

Shor provides the reader with a reenactment of one semester that shows what really can happen when one applies the theory and democratizes the classroom. This is the story of one class in which ...
Additional Info:
What happens when teachers share power with students? In this profound book, Ira Shor--the inventor of critical pedagogy in the United States-- relates the story of an experiment that nearly went out of control.

Shor provides the reader with a reenactment of one semester that shows what really can happen when one applies the theory and democratizes the classroom. This is the story of one class in which Shor tried to fully share with his students control of the curriculum and of the classroom. After twenty years of practicing critical teaching, he unexpectedly found himself faced with a student uprising that threatened the very possibility of learning. How Shor resolves these problems, while remaining true to his commitment to power-sharing and radical pedagogy, is the crux of the book. Unconventional in both form and substance, this deeply personal work weaves together student voices and thick descriptions of classroom experience with pedagogical theory to illuminate the power relations that must be negotiated if true learning is to take place. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface and Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Siberian Syndrome: Students as Exiles in the Culture War of the Classroom
ch. 2 Sharing Power, Democratizing Authority, and Mediating Resistance
ch. 3 Escaping Siberia: Students Ask, "Why Come to Class?"
ch. 4 Power-Sharing and the Birth of the "After-Class Group"
ch. 5 The "After-Class Group" Constructs the Unknown
ch. 6 Power Is Knowledge - "Positive Resistance" and "Ultra-Expectations"
ch. 7 Can Siberia Become a Critical Territory?
ch. 8 Siberian Harvest: Measuring the Yield of Power-Sharing

Afterword
Bibliography
Index
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Women Teaching for Change: Gender, Class and Power

Book
Weiler, Kathleen
1988
Bergin & Garvey, Westport, CT
LB2837.W45 1988
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Applying theory to practice, Women Teaching for Change reveals the complexity of being a feminist teacher in a public school setting, in which the forces of sexism, racism, and classism, which so characterize society as a whole, are played out in multiracial, multicultural classrooms. "A fine book, a rich melding of critical theory in education, feminist literature, and pedagogical experience and expertise." Maxine Green, Columbia University. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Applying theory to practice, Women Teaching for Change reveals the complexity of being a feminist teacher in a public school setting, in which the forces of sexism, racism, and classism, which so characterize society as a whole, are played out in multiracial, multicultural classrooms. "A fine book, a rich melding of critical theory in education, feminist literature, and pedagogical experience and expertise." Maxine Green, Columbia University. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction by Henry A. Giroux and Paulo Freire
Critical Educational Theory
Feminist Analyses of Gender and Schooling
Feminist Methodology
The Dialects of Gender in the Lives of Feminist Teachers
The Struggle for a Critical Literacy
Gender, Race and Class in the Feminist Classroom
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
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Gendered Subjects: The Dynamics of Feminist Teaching

Book
Cully, Margo and Catherine Portuges
1985
Routledge, Boston, MA
LC1756.G46 1985
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Two decades after the first Women's Studies courses appeared on campuses in the US, feminist research and teaching are now thriving around the world. The editors of this book provide a rich sample of theoretical and practical reflections on classroom experience by teachers of Women's Studies over the past ten years, raising provocative questions which apply broadly to many areas of progressive teaching. The collection features new, unpublished and original ...
Additional Info:
Two decades after the first Women's Studies courses appeared on campuses in the US, feminist research and teaching are now thriving around the world. The editors of this book provide a rich sample of theoretical and practical reflections on classroom experience by teachers of Women's Studies over the past ten years, raising provocative questions which apply broadly to many areas of progressive teaching. The collection features new, unpublished and original work as well as a selection of the best articles to have appeared in recent years. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Part one - Frameworks and definitions
ch. 1 The politics of nurturance
ch. 2 Taking women students seriously
ch. 3 Classroom pedagogy and the new scholarship on women
ch. 4 Women's studies - a knowledge of one's own
ch. 5 The educational process of Women's Studies in Argentina - reflections on theory and technique
Part two - Transforming the disciplines
ch. 6 Feminist pedagogy as subversive activity
ch. 7 Teaching mediation - a feminist perspective on the study of law
ch. 8 Staging the feminist classroom - a theoretical model
Part three - Teaching as other
ch. 9 Pink elephants - confessions of a black feminist in an all white, mostly male English department...
ch. 10 Is there room for me in the closet, or my life as the only lesbian professor
ch. 11 A male feminist in a women's college classroom
Part four - Experience as text
ch. 12 Breaking silences - life in the feminist classroom
ch. 13 Black-eyed blues connections - teaching black women
Part five - Theory as text
ch. 14 Suspicious pleasures - on teaching feminist theory
ch. 15 The spectacle of gender - cinema and psyche
ch. 16 Mastery, identity and the politics of work - a feminist teacher in the graduate classroom
Part six - Authority and affect
ch. 17 Authority in the feminist classroom - a contradiction in terms?
ch. 18 Anger and authority in the introductory Women's Studies classroom
Part seven - Communication across differences
ch. 19 How racial differences helped us discover our common ground
ch. 20 Toward a pedagogy of Everywoman's Studies
ch. 21 Combating the marginalization of black women in the classroom
ch. 22 Teaching the feminist minority
Pedagogy of the oppressors?
Bibliography
Index
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The Gender Question in Education: Theory, Pedagogy and Politics

Book
Diller, Ann and Ayim Morgan
1996
Westview Press, Boulder, CO
LC212.9.G45 1996
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Four leading philosophers of education offer a sophisticated but accessible introduction to the central debates about the role of gender in educational practice, policymaking, and theory. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Four leading philosophers of education offer a sophisticated but accessible introduction to the central debates about the role of gender in educational practice, policymaking, and theory. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction
ch. 1 A Conceptual Analysis of Sexism and Sexist Education
ch. 2 Genderized Education: Tradition Reconsidered
ch. 3 Freeing the Children: The Abolition of Gender
ch. 4 Gender Freedom and the Subtleties of Sexist Education
ch. 5 The Androgynous Classroom: Liberation or Tyranny?
ch. 6 Theorizing Gender: How Much of It Do We Need?
ch. 7 The Ethics of Care and Education: A New Paradigm, Its Critics, and Its Educational Significance
ch. 8 Describing the Emperor's New Clothes: Three Myths of Educational (In-)Equity
ch. 9 The Perils and Paradoxes of the Bearded Mothers
ch. 10 Is Rapprochement Possible Between Educational Criticism and Nurturance?
ch. 11 Role Models: Help or Hindrance in the Pursuit of Autonomy?
ch. 12 An Ethics of Care Takes On Pluralism
ch. 13 The Moral Politics of Sex Education
ch. 14 Women's Physical Education: A Gender-Sensitive Perspective
ch. 15 Political Correctness: The Debate Continues
References
About the Book and Authors
Index
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Pedagogy of the Oppressed

Book
Freire, Paulo
1974
Seabury Press, New York, NY
LB880.F7313 1974
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This text argues that the ignorance and lethargy of the poor are the direct result of the whole economic, social and political domination. By being kept in a situation in which it is practically impossible to achieve a critical awareness and response the disadvantaged are kept "submerged". The book suggests that in some countries the oppressors use the system to maintain this "culture of silence". Through the right kind of ...
Additional Info:
This text argues that the ignorance and lethargy of the poor are the direct result of the whole economic, social and political domination. By being kept in a situation in which it is practically impossible to achieve a critical awareness and response the disadvantaged are kept "submerged". The book suggests that in some countries the oppressors use the system to maintain this "culture of silence". Through the right kind of education, the book suggests, avoiding authoritarian teacher-pupil models and based on the actual experiences of students and on continual shared investigation, every human being, no matter how impoverished or illiterate, can develop a new awareness of self, and the right to be heard. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Publisher's Foreword
Foreword
Preface

ch. 1 The justification for a pedagogy of the oppressed; the contradiction between the oppressors and the oppressed, and how it is overcome; oppression and the oppressors; oppression and the oppressed; liberation: not a gift, not a self-achievement, but a mutual process.
ch. 2 The "banking" concept of education as an instrument of oppression - its presuppositions - a critique; the problem-posing concept of education as an instrument for liberation - its presuppositions; the "banking" concept and the teacher-student contradiction; the problem-posing concept and the supersedence of the teacher-student contradiction; education: a mutual process, world-mediated; people as uncompleted beings, conscious of their incompletion, and their attempt to be more fully human.
ch. 3 Dialogics - the essence of education as the practice of freedom; dialogics and dialogue; dialogue and the search for program content; the human-world relationship, "generative themes," and the program content of education as the practice of freedom; the investigation of "generative themes" and its methodology; the awakening of critical consciousness through the investigation of "generative themes"; the various stages of the investigation.
ch. 4 Antidialogics and dialogics as matrices of opposing theories of cultural action: the former as an instrument of oppression and the latter as an instrument of liberation; the theory of antidialogical action and its characteristics: conquest, divide and rule, manipulation, and cultural invasion; the theory of dialogical action and its characteristics: cooperation, unity, organization, and cultural synthesis.
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Learning to Question: A Pedagogy of Liberation

Book
Freire, Paulo and Antonio Faundez
1989
Continuum, New York, NY
LB880.F73.L43 1989
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This book is a conversation between Antonio Faundez and Paulo Freire. They discuss their work in the Portugese speaking countries of Africa (Guinea-Bissau, Mazambique, Angola) and their attempts to apply the principles of empowerment through literacy that is their trademark. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book is a conversation between Antonio Faundez and Paulo Freire. They discuss their work in the Portugese speaking countries of Africa (Guinea-Bissau, Mazambique, Angola) and their attempts to apply the principles of empowerment through literacy that is their trademark. (From the Publisher)
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Pedagogy and the Politics of Hope

Book
Giroux, Henry A.
1997
Westview Press, Boulder, CO
LC196.G573 1997
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Henry A. Giroux is one of the most respected and well-known critical education scholars, social critics, and astute observers of popular culture in the modern world. For those who follow his considerably influential work in critical pedagogy and social criticism, this first-ever collection of his classic writings, augmented by a new essay, is a must-have volume that reveals his evolution as a scholar. In it, he takes on three major ...
Additional Info:
Henry A. Giroux is one of the most respected and well-known critical education scholars, social critics, and astute observers of popular culture in the modern world. For those who follow his considerably influential work in critical pedagogy and social criticism, this first-ever collection of his classic writings, augmented by a new essay, is a must-have volume that reveals his evolution as a scholar. In it, he takes on three major considerations central to pedagogy and schooling. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editors' Foreword

ch. 1 Schooling and the Culture of Positivism: Notes on the Death of History
ch. 2 Culture and Rationality in Frankfurt School Thought: Ideological Foundations for a Theory of Social Education
ch. 3 Ideology and Agency in the Process of Schooling
ch. 4 Authority, Intellectuals, and the Politics of Practical Learning
ch. 5 Radical Pedagogy and the Politics of Student Voice
ch. 6 Border Pedagogy in the Age of Postmodernism
ch. 7 Disturbing the Peace: Writing in the Cultural Studies Classroom
ch. 8 Rethinking the Boundaries of Educational Discourse: Modernism, Postmodernism, and Feminism
ch. 9 Insurgent Multiculturalism and the Promise of Pedagogy
ch. 10 Public Intellectuals and the Culture of Reaganism in the 1990s

List of Credits
About the Book and Author
Index
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Teachers as Intellectuals: Toward a Critical Pedagogy of Learning

Book
Giroux, Henry A.
1988
Bergin & Garvey, Granby, MA
LA217.G57 1988
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Teachers as Intellectuals is a book for all practitioners and all members of the general community. Giroux demands reader involvement, transformation, and empowerment. He helps understand that the political relationship between schools and society is neither artificial nor neutral nor necessarily negative. Rather, school personnel have a positive and dynamic political role to play. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Teachers as Intellectuals is a book for all practitioners and all members of the general community. Giroux demands reader involvement, transformation, and empowerment. He helps understand that the political relationship between schools and society is neither artificial nor neutral nor necessarily negative. Rather, school personnel have a positive and dynamic political role to play. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction
Rethinking the Language of Schooling
Rethinking in Language of Schooling
Toward a New Sociology of Curriculum
Social Education in the Classroom: The Dynamics of the Hidden Curriculum
Overcoming Behavioral and Humanistic Objectives
Literacy, Writing, and the Politics of Voice
Writing and Critical Thinking in the Social Studies
Mass Culture and the Rise of the New Illiteracy: Implications for Reading
Critical Pedagogy, Cultural Politics, and the Discourse of Experience
Culture, Power, and Transformation in the Work of Paulo Freire: Toward a Politics of Education
Teaching, Intellectual Work, and Education as Cultural Politics
Teachers as Transformative Intellectuals
Curriculum Study and Cultural Studies
The Need for Cultural Studies
Teacher Education and the Politics of Democratic Reform
Toward a Language of Critique and Possibility
Crisis and Possibilities in Education
Reproducing Reproduction: The Politics of Tracking
Antonio Gramsci
Solidarity, Ethics, and Possibility in Critical Education
Index
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The Feminist Classroom

Book
Teteault, Mary Katheryn and Frances A. Maher
1994
Basic Books, New York, NY
LC197.M35 1994
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This book provides an intimate view of how feminist teachers are revolutionizing higher education. Drawing on in-depth interviews and on-site observations, and using the actual words of students and teachers, the authors take the reader into the classrooms of seventeen feminist college professors at six colleges and universities - Lewis and Clark College, Wheaton College, the University of Arizona, Towson State University, Spelman College, and San Francisco State University. As ...
Additional Info:
This book provides an intimate view of how feminist teachers are revolutionizing higher education. Drawing on in-depth interviews and on-site observations, and using the actual words of students and teachers, the authors take the reader into the classrooms of seventeen feminist college professors at six colleges and universities - Lewis and Clark College, Wheaton College, the University of Arizona, Towson State University, Spelman College, and San Francisco State University. As these teachers integrate feminist and multicultural content into the curriculum, they demonstrate that pedagogy concerns not only "teaching techniques" but the whole process of the construction of knowledge in classrooms. Learning derives from relationships and interactions among teachers, students, and subject materials, not from any single perspective. In showing how the integration of feminist and multicultural content revitalizes the classroom, the book portrays innovative teaching in action. Feminist and cultural studies scholars have demonstrated that American higher education has traditionally represented the world in terms of the perspectives and achievements of a dominant minority. To educate students for a complex multicultural World, the voices of those who have been excluded need to emerge. There is widespread concern today about the quality of teaching in our colleges, particularly the predominance of lecturing and passive modes of learning. This important book presents a vision of teaching that counteracts the silence and alienation these practices engender. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
ch. 1 Breaking Through Illusion
ch. 2 Creating a Kaleidoscope: Portraits of Six Institutions
ch. 3 Mastery
ch. 4 Voice
ch. 5 Authority
ch. 6 Positionality
ch. 7 Toward Positional Pedagogies
ch. 8 Looking Back, Looking Forward
Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Ethical Dimensions of College and University Teaching: Understanding and Honoring the Special Relationship Between Teachers and Students

Book
Fisch, Lincoln
1996
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 66)
LB1779.E83 1996
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This volume focuses on the ethical dimensions of teaching, bringing fresh insights and perspectives to inform ongoing discussions of ethics among faculty colleagues, administrators, and students. From these chapters emerges a dominant principle: responsibility to students is directly related to understanding of one's ethical self, and the first step in establishing that ethical identity is self-reflection. By teaching ethically, faculty members model and advocate appropriate behavior to students in a ...
Additional Info:
This volume focuses on the ethical dimensions of teaching, bringing fresh insights and perspectives to inform ongoing discussions of ethics among faculty colleagues, administrators, and students. From these chapters emerges a dominant principle: responsibility to students is directly related to understanding of one's ethical self, and the first step in establishing that ethical identity is self-reflection. By teaching ethically, faculty members model and advocate appropriate behavior to students in a voice more effective than any proclamation. They also answer calls for accountability from the public, the press, and politicians. In all, teaching ethically requires transformations of structures, attitudes, and persons--faculty as well as students--if faculty are to meet fully their responsibilities to themselves, to their students, and to society. This is the 66th issue of New Directions for Teaching and Learning. For more information on the series, please see the Journals and Periodicals page. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The ethics of teaching / David C. Smith
Teaching the subject: developmental identities in teaching / Mary Burgan
The ethics of student-faculty friendships / Richard L. Baker, Jr.
Between apathy and advocacy: teaching and modeling ethical reflection / Karen Hanson
nstitutional commitment to fairness in college teaching / Rita Cobb Rodabaugh
Differentiating the related concepts of ethics, morality, law and justice / Terry T. Ray
The ethics of knowledge / Clark Kerr
Ethical principles for college and university teaching / Harry Murray, Eileen Gillese, Madeline Lennon, Paul Mercer, Marilyn Robinson
Making responsible academic ethical decisions / Charles H. Reynolds
Intervening with colleagues / Patricia Keith-Spiegel, Arno F. Wittig, David V. Perkins, Deborah Ware Balogh, Bernard E. Whitley, Jr.
Reflecting on the ethics and values of our practice / Ronald A. Smith
Toward more ethical teaching / Linc. Fisch
Ethics in teaching: putting it together / Kathleen McGrory.
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The Changing Face of College Teaching

Book
Svinicki, Marilla D
1990
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.C456 1990
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
It has been suggested that the greatest educational reform will come not through the sweeping changes of large institutionally mandated programs but through the small, day-to-day improvements that faculty members make in their own courses. The faculty is the first line of revolution in teaching; without their cooperation, no change is possible; with it, no challenge is impossible. This volume provides some insights into how individual instructors can make interesting ...
Additional Info:
It has been suggested that the greatest educational reform will come not through the sweeping changes of large institutionally mandated programs but through the small, day-to-day improvements that faculty members make in their own courses. The faculty is the first line of revolution in teaching; without their cooperation, no change is possible; with it, no challenge is impossible. This volume provides some insights into how individual instructors can make interesting changes in their classes and in their approaches to teaching in general. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Changing the face of your teaching / Marilla D. Svinicki
ch. 2 Collaborative learning : shared inquiry as a process of reform / Jean MacGregor
ch. 3 Writing to learn : back to another basic / Sandra Tomlinson
ch. 4 Teaching with cases : learning to question / John Boehrer, Marty Linsky
ch. 5 Rescue to perishing : a new approach to supplemental instruction / Calvin B. Peters
ch. 6 Classroom assessment : improving learning quality where it matters not / Thomas A. Angelo
ch. 7 Assessing and improving students' learning strategies / Paul R. Pintrich, Glenn Ross Johnston
ch. 8 Grades : their influence on students and faculty / Fred Janzow, James Eison
ch. 9 Using pyschological models to understand student motivation / Ann F. Lucas
ch. 10 "Study" your way to better teaching / Maryellen Weimer
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Empowering Education: Critical Teaching for Social Change

Book
Shor, Ira
1992
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LC196.5.U6.S56 1992
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Ira Shor is a pioneer in the field of critical education who ror over twenty years has been experimenting with learning methods. His work creatively adapts the ideas of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire for North American classrooms. In Empowering Education Shor offers a comprehensive theory and practice for critical pedagogy. For Shor, empowering education is a student-centered, critical and democratic pedagogy for studying any subject matter and for self and ...
Additional Info:
Ira Shor is a pioneer in the field of critical education who ror over twenty years has been experimenting with learning methods. His work creatively adapts the ideas of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire for North American classrooms. In Empowering Education Shor offers a comprehensive theory and practice for critical pedagogy. For Shor, empowering education is a student-centered, critical and democratic pedagogy for studying any subject matter and for self and social change. It takes shape as a dialogue in which teachers and students mutually investigate everyday themes, social issues, and academic knowledge. Through dialogue and problem-posing, students become active agents of their learning. This book shows how students can develop as critical thinkers, inspired learners, skilled workers, and involved citizens. Shor carefully analyzes obstacles to and resources for empowering education, suggesting ways for teachers to transform traditional approaches into critical and democratic ones. He offers many examples and applications for the elementary grades through college and adult education.

"One of the most intelligent discussions of the unique function of education in a democratic society since the work of John Dewey. This theoretically compelling and practically useful book addresses the economic, political, and personal needs of students. Shor has emerged as the most reliable discussant of the uses of the work of Paulo Freire in the U.S."--James Berlin, Purdue University Ira Shor, professor of English at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and the College of Staten Island, is author of Critical Teaching and Everyday Life, and Culture Wars: School and Society in the Conservative Restoration, 1969-1984, both published by the University of Chicago Press. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction The First Day of Class: Passing the Test

ch. 1 Education Is Politics: An Agenda for Empowerment
ch. 2 Problem-Posing: Situated and Multicultural Learning
ch. 3 Three Roads to Critical Thought: Generative, Topical, and Academic Themes
ch. 4 Critical Dialogue versus Teacher-Talk: Classroom Discourse and Social Inequality
ch. 5 Rethinking Knowledge and Society: "Desocialization" and "Critical Consciousness"
ch. 6 Democratic Authority: Resistance, Subject Matter, and the Learning Process
ch. 7 Critical Teaching and Classroom Research: An Interdisciplinary Field for Activist Learning
ch. 8 Becoming an Empowering Educator: Obstacles to and Resources for Critical Teaching
ch. 9 The Third Idiom: Inventing a Transformative Discourse for Education

References
Author Index
Subject Index
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Women and Teaching

Book
Harris, Maria
1988
Paulist Press, Mahwah, NJ
HQ1180.H37 1988
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Themes for a Spirituality of Pedagogy (1988 Madeleva Lecture in Spirituality), Maria Harris. An essay that focuses on teaching as a form of spirituality; five different themes that resonate in the lives of women are explored: silence, remembering, ritual mourning, artistry, and birthing. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Themes for a Spirituality of Pedagogy (1988 Madeleva Lecture in Spirituality), Maria Harris. An essay that focuses on teaching as a form of spirituality; five different themes that resonate in the lives of women are explored: silence, remembering, ritual mourning, artistry, and birthing. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Impulses

ch. 1 Silence
ch. 2 Remembering
ch. 3 Ritual Mourning
ch. 4 Artistry
ch. 5 Birthing
ch. 6 Notes

Index
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Teaching from the Heart: Theology and Educational Method

Book
Moore, Mary Elizabeth
1998
Trinity Press, Valley Forge, PA
BT83.6.M66 1998
Topics: Theological Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The author argues for an organic or process approach to religious, moral, and theological education. She takes up five reigning educational methods (case study, gestalt, phenomenological, narrative, conscientizing), gauges their strengths, weaknesses, and theological promise, and offers practical reformulations of each method. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The author argues for an organic or process approach to religious, moral, and theological education. She takes up five reigning educational methods (case study, gestalt, phenomenological, narrative, conscientizing), gauges their strengths, weaknesses, and theological promise, and offers practical reformulations of each method. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Passion about Methodology
ch. 2 Midwife Teaching: Case Study Method
ch. 3 Integrative Teaching: Gestalt Method
ch. 4 Incarnational Teaching: Phenomenological Method
ch. 5 Relational Teaching: Narrative Method
ch. 6 Liberative Teaching: Conscientizing Method
ch. 7 The Art of Teaching from the Heart: The Heart of the Matter

Index
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"Dominance Concealed through Diversity: Implications of Inadequate Perspectives on Cultural Pluralism"

Article
Boyd, Dwight
1996
Harvard Educational Review 66, no. 3 (1996): 609-630
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
In this article, Dwight Boyd focuses on a dilemma that is at the heart of sincere commitments to cultural pluralism. When the moral aspects of cultural diversity are fully appreciated, the "dilemma of diversity" is revealed as the tension point resulting from the acceptance of the fact of "reasonable moral pluralism" conjoined with the perceived need to morally ground prescriptive intentions to promote cultural diversity within a democratic society. After ...
Additional Info:
In this article, Dwight Boyd focuses on a dilemma that is at the heart of sincere commitments to cultural pluralism. When the moral aspects of cultural diversity are fully appreciated, the "dilemma of diversity" is revealed as the tension point resulting from the acceptance of the fact of "reasonable moral pluralism" conjoined with the perceived need to morally ground prescriptive intentions to promote cultural diversity within a democratic society. After discussing this dilemma, Boyd analyzes three perspectives commonly found in response. He argues that each of these perspectives is inadequate by revealing how it fails to come to grips with one or the other side of the dilemma, despite its surface appeal. He then shows how, in each of these perspectives, this failure functions to conceal and protect dominant points of view within the diversity. He concludes by sketching out a positive direction for successfully addressing the dilemma of diversity hinted at in the successes and failures of each of the three perspectives.
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"Education for Freedom of Spirit"

Article
Sloan, Douglas
1991
Fetzer Institute (1991)
Topics: Course Design   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"If Learning Involves Risk-taking, Teaching Involves Trust-building"

Article
Svinicki, Marilla
1990
Teaching Excellence 1, no. 3 (1990)
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
The premise of this article is that learning, like all other creative acts, will flourish in an atmosphere in which the learner is willing to take risks, and it is the task of the instructor to create such an atmosphere for learning. If we accept this view of learning as risk-taking, we can begin to confront the factors that discourage students from taking risks and build a class environment where ...
Additional Info:
The premise of this article is that learning, like all other creative acts, will flourish in an atmosphere in which the learner is willing to take risks, and it is the task of the instructor to create such an atmosphere for learning. If we accept this view of learning as risk-taking, we can begin to confront the factors that discourage students from taking risks and build a class environment where learning becomes less of a risk, or where the risk-taking in learning becomes valued instead of dreaded. Both of these directions require that instructors develop a trusting relationship with students. When students trust an instructor, they will believe in the instructor's ability to turn any situation into a learning opportunity; they will expect the instructor to value their efforts; they will be willing to take the chances that lead to learning and to view failures as learning opportunities. What, then, might be the characteristics of an instructor who would support student risk-taking?
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"Disciplinary Cultures and General Education: What Can We Learn from Our Learners?"

Article
Tobias, Sheila
1992
Teaching Excellence 4, no. 6 (1992)
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Competence is What You Do When You Make a Mistake"

Article
Smith, Ronald A.
1992
Teaching Excellence 4, no. 2 (1992)
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Interactive Phases of Curricular and Personal Re-Vision with Regard to Race"

Article
McIntosh, Peggy
1990
Working Paper no. 219, Center for Research on Women, Wellesley College (1990)
Topics: Course Design   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Most white, middle-class citizens see society from a monocultural perspective, a perspective that assumes, often unconsciously, that persons of all races are in the same cultural system together. This single-system form of seeing the world, is blind to its own cultural specificity. People who see persons of other races monoculturally cannot imagine the reality that those "others" think of themselves not in relation to the majority race but in terms ...
Additional Info:
Most white, middle-class citizens see society from a monocultural perspective, a perspective that assumes, often unconsciously, that persons of all races are in the same cultural system together. This single-system form of seeing the world, is blind to its own cultural specificity. People who see persons of other races monoculturally cannot imagine the reality that those "others" think of themselves not in relation to the majority race but in terms of their own culturally specific identities. This paper presents an "interactive phase theory" with regard to race that is intended to reassess school curricula in terms of heightened levels of consciousness concerning race. In the context of U.S. history courses, five phases are presented: phase one: all-white history; phase two: exceptional minority individuals in U.S. history; phase three: minority issues, or minority groups as problems, anomalies, absences, or victims in U.S. history; phase four: the lives and cultures of people of color everywhere as history; and phase five: history redefined and reconstructed to include all people. (DB)
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"Toward a Pedagogy of Substance"

Article
Shulman, Lee S.
1989
American Association for Higher Education Bulletin ,41 no. 10 (1989): 8-13
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"When the Personal Becomes Problematic: The Ethics of Using Experiential Teaching Methods"

Article
Grauerholz, Elizabeth, and Stacey Copenhaver
1994
Teaching Sociology 22, no. 10 (1994): 319-327
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Experiential methods--that is, methods that rely on students' own life experiences and often involve a high degree of self-disclosure--are becoming increasingly common in sociology courses that deal with difficult and controversial subjects such as gender, race, and sexuality. Yet these methods may be inappropriate and unethical, especially when students are expected to revel very personal, even painful, information about themselves. The benefits and risks involved in using such methods are ...
Additional Info:
Experiential methods--that is, methods that rely on students' own life experiences and often involve a high degree of self-disclosure--are becoming increasingly common in sociology courses that deal with difficult and controversial subjects such as gender, race, and sexuality. Yet these methods may be inappropriate and unethical, especially when students are expected to revel very personal, even painful, information about themselves. The benefits and risks involved in using such methods are presented in this paper in a dialogue between an instructor and a student.
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"Personal Theories of Teaching"

Article
Fox, Dennis
1983
Studies in Higher Education 8, no. 2 (1983): 151-164
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Four theories of teaching are presented based on faculty definitions of teaching: knowledge transfer; shaping students to a predetermined mold; exploratory; and developmental. These theories are related to student attitudes about learning and are offered as a means of resolving misunderstandings among teachers and between teachers and students.
Additional Info:
Four theories of teaching are presented based on faculty definitions of teaching: knowledge transfer; shaping students to a predetermined mold; exploratory; and developmental. These theories are related to student attitudes about learning and are offered as a means of resolving misunderstandings among teachers and between teachers and students.
Article cover image

"The Torpedo's Touch"

Article
Thomas, Donald W.
1985
Harvard Educational Review 55, no. 2 (1985): 220-222
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
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Wabash tree

Engines For Education

Book
Schank, Roger C. and Chip Cleary
1995
Lawrence Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ
LB1028.43.S32 1995
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Most six-year-olds can't wait to go to school on that first day in September. It's a sign of coming of age. They get to go to school like the big kids. For an alarmingly large number of these children, however, boredom, anxiety, and fear of learning quickly set in.

This happens because societies build schools that achieve much less than they promise, are frustrating for students, and generally ...
Additional Info:
Most six-year-olds can't wait to go to school on that first day in September. It's a sign of coming of age. They get to go to school like the big kids. For an alarmingly large number of these children, however, boredom, anxiety, and fear of learning quickly set in.

This happens because societies build schools that achieve much less than they promise, are frustrating for students, and generally fail to help children become adults who can think for themselves. The development of flexible, inquiring minds has rarely been the primary consideration in the design of educational systems. Making students into proper members of society has usually been of much greater concern than developing students who are creative thinkers. Today's schools are organized around yesterday's ideas, needs, and resources.

The purpose of this volume is to raise consciousness about the changes needed in the educational system. It is concerned with what is wrong with the educational system and how to improve it. It presents a pragmatic view of what education could be through the use of computer technology — technology permitting us to pursue the radical notion that children must be allowed to guide their own education because interested learners learn more. Children can and will become voracious learners if they are in charge of their own education. This does not mean letting them play video games all day, but it does mean allowing them to pursue the intellectual goals that interest them, rather than being force-fed knowledge according to someone else's schedule. The school system must face the responsibility of creating learning environments that are so much fun that children cannot wait to get up in the morning and go to school. This volume describes the progress being made at The Institute for the Learning Sciences using computers to provide motivating environments for learning — environments that enable students to explore new worlds, and learn things by doing them. This technology will allow society to support what is one of the most important parts of a good educational system: the cultivation of individual initiative in students. This text documents the authors' work from the cognitive psychology which underlies it on through to guided tours of a number of the software learning environments they've developed. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Colophon
Preface
Acknowledgments
ch. 1 Time for a Change
ch. 2 What Makes People Smart
ch. 3 Cultural Unliteracy
ch. 4 Natural Learning
ch. 5 Learning By Doing
ch. 6 Incidental Learning
ch. 7 Learning By Reflection
ch. 8 Case-Based Teaching
ch. 9 Learning By Exploring
ch. 10 Goal-Directed Learning and Creating the Software We Need
ch. 11 Goal-Based Scenarios and the Open Curriculum
ch. 12 A Look to the Future
Epilogue
References
Author Index
Subject Index
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Coming of Age in Academe: Rekindling Women's Hopes and Reforming the Academy

Book
Martin, Jane Roland
2000
Routledge, New York, NY
Not catalogued
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
At what price entry? Philosopher of education Jane Roland Martin contends that feminist scholars have traded in their idealism for a place in the academy. In Coming of Age in Academe, she looks at the ways that academic feminists have become estranged from women.
Determining that this is the "membership fee" the academy exacts on all its members, she calls for the academy's transformation. Part one explores the chilly ...
Additional Info:
At what price entry? Philosopher of education Jane Roland Martin contends that feminist scholars have traded in their idealism for a place in the academy. In Coming of Age in Academe, she looks at the ways that academic feminists have become estranged from women.
Determining that this is the "membership fee" the academy exacts on all its members, she calls for the academy's transformation. Part one explores the chilly research climate for feminist scholars, the academic traps of essentialism and aerial distance, and the education gap in the feminist text. In part two, Martin likens the behavior of present-day feminist scholars to nineteenth-century immigrants to the United States and examines their assimilation into the world of work, politics and the professions. She finds that when you look at higher education, you see what a brutal filter of women it is. Part three highlights the academy's "brain drain" and its containment of women and then proposes actions both great and small that aim at fundamental change. In this rousing call to action, Martin concludes that the dissociation from women that the academy demands--its "entrance fee"--can only be stopped by radically reforming the gendered system on which the academy is based. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Preface
Pt. 1 What Price Women's Belonging?
Introduction
ch. 1 Estrangement from Each Other
ch. 2 Estrangement from Women's Lived Experience
ch. 3 Estrangement from "Women's" Occupations
Pt. 2 An Immigrant Interpretation
ch. 1 Women as Immigrants
ch. 2 The New Gender Tracking
ch. 3 Higher Education as Filter
ch. 4 Assimilation or Transformation, That Is the Question
Pt. 3 Add Women and Transform
ch. 1 The Brain Drain
ch. 2 Tales of Containment
ch. 3 Actions Great and Small
Conclusion
Notes
Works Cite
d Index
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Wabash tree

The Heart of Learning: Spirituality in Education

Book
Glazer, Steven, ed,
1999
Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam, New York, NY
LB41.H353 1999
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This collection draws together the most important teachers and spiritual figures of our time to help students, teachers, parents, and lifelong learners understand more about why we learn and teach. The Heart of Learning shows how learning can be far more than an intellectual process - that it can be a way to connect with the mysteries and wonders both in ourselves and in the world. The book welcomes the ...
Additional Info:
This collection draws together the most important teachers and spiritual figures of our time to help students, teachers, parents, and lifelong learners understand more about why we learn and teach. The Heart of Learning shows how learning can be far more than an intellectual process - that it can be a way to connect with the mysteries and wonders both in ourselves and in the world. The book welcomes the spirit back into the learning process without dogmatism or exclusion. It provides a unified, inspiring, and immensely practical new paradigm for how learning can mean more, accomplish more, and inspire the best in each of us. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Pt. I Sacredness: The Ground of Learning
ch. 1 The Grace of Great Things: Reclaiming the Sacred in Knowing, Teaching, and Learning
ch. 2 Educating for Mission, Meaning, and Compassion
ch. 3 Buddhist Education: The Path of Wisdom and Knowledge
ch. 4 Unlearning to See the Sacred

Pt. II Identity
ch. 5 Education and the Human Heart
ch. 6 Commitment and Openness: A Contemplative Approach to Pluralism
ch. 7 Embracing Freedom: Spirituality and Liberation

Pt. III Relationship and Community
ch. 8 Reassembling the Pieces: Architecture as Pedagogy
ch. 9 Education and the Western Spiritual Tradition
ch. 10 Learning as Initiation: Not-Knowing, Bearing Witness, and Healing

Pt. IV Tradition and Innovation
ch. 11 Holistic Education for an Emerging Culture
ch. 12 Spirituality and Leadership
ch. 13 Spirituality in Education: A Dialogue
ch. 14 Where Do We Go from Here?

Conclusion: The Heart of Learning
Acknowledgments
Notes and References
Bibliography
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God our Teacher: Theological Basics in Christian Education

Book
Pazmino, Robert W.
2001
Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI
BV1464.P3792 2001
Topics: Religious Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
A topic of frequent discussion in religious education circles is the relationship between theology and practice. How does Christian theology work itself out in the teaching ministries of the church? Noted Christian education thinker Robert Pazmiño contemplates this debate and offers a contemporary overview of the messages theology brings to Christian education.

Sensitive to today s expanding global culture, God Our Teacher reaffirms the essential role theology ...
Additional Info:
A topic of frequent discussion in religious education circles is the relationship between theology and practice. How does Christian theology work itself out in the teaching ministries of the church? Noted Christian education thinker Robert Pazmiño contemplates this debate and offers a contemporary overview of the messages theology brings to Christian education.

Sensitive to today s expanding global culture, God Our Teacher reaffirms the essential role theology plays in developing educational practices and conventions, and carefully fleshes out what it means to use the Trinity as a model for ordering educational thought and practice. This book will be welcomed by all those involved in fostering the growth and development of Christian education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1. God For Us: The Trinity and Teaching
ch. 2. God Despite Us: Sin and Salvation
ch. 3. God With Us: Jesus, the Master Teacher
ch. 4. God In Us: The Holy Spirit and Teaching
ch. 5. God Through Us: The Church and Teaching
ch. 6. God Beyond Us: Our Future in Christian Education

Conclusion
Appendix Crossing Over to Postmodernity: Educational Invitations
Notes
Select Bibliography
Index
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"Toward a Theology of Teaching"

Article
Susan M.
1999
Wabash Consultation on the Vocation of the Teaching Theologian (1999)
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Alternative Frames of Understanding: An Introduction to Five Perspecitives on Teaching"

Article
Pratt, Daniel D.
2000
in Five Perspectives on Teaching in Adult and Higher Education (Malabar, FL: Krieger, 1998)
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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The Intuitive Practitioner: on the value of not always knowing what one is doing

Book
Atkinson, Terry and Guy Claxton, eds.
2000
Open University Press, Philadelphia, PA
LB1025.3.I59 2000
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Much of the time, experienced professionals in both education and other fields cannot explain what they are doing, or tell you what they know; and students cannot articulate their learning. Yet professional development and practice are often discussed as if conscious understanding and deliberation are of the essence. The Intuitive Practitioner tackles this apparent paradox head on, and explores the dynamic relationship between reason and intuition in the context of ...
Additional Info:
Much of the time, experienced professionals in both education and other fields cannot explain what they are doing, or tell you what they know; and students cannot articulate their learning. Yet professional development and practice are often discussed as if conscious understanding and deliberation are of the essence. The Intuitive Practitioner tackles this apparent paradox head on, and explores the dynamic relationship between reason and intuition in the context of professional practice. Focusing mainly on the professional world of the teacher, but with illustrative discussions of medical and business practice, the contributors delicately unpick the vexed and neglected nature of intuition, and demonstrate the vital role it plays in the development of professional judgement and expertise. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Notes on contributors
Introduction (Terry Atkinson and Guy Claxton)

Pt. 1 Perspectives on intuition in professional learning and practice
ch. 1 Intuition and the crisis in teacher professionalism (John Furlong)
ch. 2 The anatomy of intuition (Guy Claxton)
ch. 3 Trusting your own judgement (or allowing yourself to eat the pudding) (Lucy Atkinson)

Pt. 2 Intuition and initial teacher education
ch. 4 Learning to teach: intuitive skills and reasoned objectivity (Terry Atkinson)
ch. 5 Awareness and intuition: how student teachers read their own lessons (Peter John)
ch. 6 The role of intuition in mentoring and supporting beginning teachers (Elisabeth Lazarus)
ch. 7 Elaborated intuition and task-based English language teacher education (Arlene Gilpin and Gerald Clibbon)

Pt. 3 Intuition and continuing professional development
ch. 8 The development of professional intuition (Agnes McMahon)
ch. 9 The formal and the intuitive in science and medicine (Richard Brawn)
ch. 10 Complex decision making in the classroom: the teacher as an intuitive practitioner
ch. 11 Developing intuition through management education

Pt. 4 Intuition and assessment
ch. 12 Assessment and intuition
ch. 13 Measurement, judgement, criteria and expertise: intuition in assessment from three different subject perspectives
ch. 14 Intuition, culture and the development of academic literacy

Pt. 5 The Intuitive Practitioner: a critical overview
ch. 15 The Intuitive Practitioner: a critical overview

Index
Cover image

Educating for Life: Reflections on Christian Teaching and Learning

Book
Wolterstorff, Nicholas P. (edited by Gloria Goris Stronks and Clarence W. Joldersma)
2002
Baker Academic, Grand Rapids, MI
BV1464.W65 2002
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Few people have influenced the development of Christian schools in the Reformed tradition in North America and around the world as much as Nicholas Wolterstorff. As a tribute to his contributions, educators Gloria Goris Stronks and Clarence W. Joldersma have drawn together the world-renowned Christian philosopher's thoughts and reflections on Christian education over the last three decades. The guiding principle in making selections was the inclusion of pieces that discuss ...
Additional Info:
Few people have influenced the development of Christian schools in the Reformed tradition in North America and around the world as much as Nicholas Wolterstorff. As a tribute to his contributions, educators Gloria Goris Stronks and Clarence W. Joldersma have drawn together the world-renowned Christian philosopher's thoughts and reflections on Christian education over the last three decades. The guiding principle in making selections was the inclusion of pieces that discuss what makes education truly Christian. Wolterstorff's writings on education are divided into four sections that focus on the nature of Christian education, the criticisms of Christian education, Christian learning within a pluralistic society, and the goals of Christian education. Of special interest is Wolterstorff's increasing concern with the role of justice in Christian education. Educating for Life portrays Wolterstorff's evolving thinking on education while paying tribute to him as one of the premier Christian philosophers of our day. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part 1 The Nature of Christian Education
ch. 1 Curriculum: By What Standard?
ch. 2 Crucial Curriculum Concerns
ch. 3 A Return to Basic Christian Education
ch. 4 Between Isolation and Accommodation
ch. 5 Beyond 1984 in Philosophy of Christian Education
ch. 6 The School as Educative Agent
ch. 7 Teaching for Tomorrow Today

Part 2 Challenges and Objections to Christian Education
ch. 8 Christ Is Lord
ch. 9 The Christian School and Its Contemporary Challenges
ch. 10 Looking to the Eighties: Do Christian Schools Have a Future?

Part 3 Christian Education in a Pluralistic Society
ch. 11 Religion and the Schools
ch. 12 Human Rights in Education: The Rights of Parents
ch. 13 The Schools We Deserve

Part 4 Educating for Shalom
ch. 14 Task and Invitation
ch. 15 Teaching for Gratitude
ch. 16 Teaching for Justice

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Passion and Pedagogy: Relation, Creation, and Transformation in Teaching

Book
Mirochnik, Elijah and Debora C. Sherman, eds.
2002
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LC196.P37 2002
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
The inaugural title of a series in which faculty members at Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts will address critical issues in arts education for university faculty, classroom teachers, and students of education, based on the innovation programs in the arts there. The 25 contributions discuss creating the teacher and changing the world, collaborative learning and improvisation, constructing a space for creativity in science, and other topics. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The inaugural title of a series in which faculty members at Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts will address critical issues in arts education for university faculty, classroom teachers, and students of education, based on the innovation programs in the arts there. The 25 contributions discuss creating the teacher and changing the world, collaborative learning and improvisation, constructing a space for creativity in science, and other topics. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Co-creators and Contributors
Come to Dinner: An Invitation to a Party (Debora C. Sherman)
The Possibilities of Passion (Elijah Mirochnik)

ch. 1 Creating the Teacher and Changing the World (William Ayers)
ch. 2 The Telling of Racism - Narratives for Healing and Change (Cecelia Baldwin)
ch. 3 Who Cares? A Play about Passion in Teaching and in the Researching of Teaching (Tom Barone)
ch. 4 Experimenting with Postmodernism: The New "Gothic" in Arts-Based Pedagogy, Inquiry, and Teacher Development (C.T. Patrick Diamond and Carol Mullen)
ch. 5 I Teach, Therefore I Am (Mary Aswell Doll)
ch. 6 Beyond Methods? Teaching as an Aesthetic and Spirit-ful Quest (William E. Doll, Jr.)
ch. 7 Constructing the Sacred: Empathic Engagement, Aesthetic Regard, and Discernment in Clinical Teaching (Susan H. Gere, Lisa Tsoi Hoshmand and Rick Reinkraut)
ch. 8 Collaborative Learning and Improvisation: Our Stories Experience (Lynne Hamer, Sandra Spickard Prettyman and Lynette Brown)
ch. 9 The Challenge of Constructivist Teaching (George E. Hein)
ch. 10 Uncovering an Artistic Identity While Learning to Teach Through the Arts (Victoria R. Jacobs, Merryl R. Goldberg and Tom R. Bennett)
ch. 11 Images, Movements, and Sounds: Working Toward Meaning (Patricia James)
ch. 12 Transforming Experience: Readers' Theater as Pedagogy (A Readers' Theater Script in Three Parts) (Jean L. Konzal, Susan Finley and kelli Jo Kerry Moran)
ch. 13 "Taking Care" as a Pedagogue/Actor/Son in a Theater/Drama Process (Warren Linds)
ch. 14 The Breath of Interpreting Movements (Rebecca Luce-Kapler)
ch. 15 The Intertwining of Voice and Structure: Reflections on Teaching and Learning (Susan Martin)
ch. 16 Imagining the New: Constructing a Space for Creativity in Science (Margery D. Osborne and David J. Brady)
ch. 17 Becoming My Own Juliet: Teacher Transformation through Acting Shakespeare (Carol Philips)
ch. 18 Why I Send the Poet to Teach My Courses (Mary Clare Powell)
ch. 19 A Pedagogy that Presupposes Passion (Rosalie M. Romano)
ch. 20 The Dance Critic, the Classroom, and the Re-Education of Perception (Janice Ross)
ch. 21 Reading and Art in the Lives of Teachers (Mary Kay Rummel and Elizabeth P. Quintero)
ch. 22 Multi-Genre Case Studies (Karen Covington Soul)
ch. 23 The Favorite Song (Kim Stafford)
ch. 24 Entertaining Doubts: Enjoyment and Ambiguity in White, Antiracist Classrooms (Audrey Thompson)
ch. 25 Finding Center and Balancing There: Spirals of Change in Art and Testing (Gwendolyn Yoppolo
Article cover image

"What is Feminist Pedagogy?"

Article
Shrewsbury, Carolyn M.
1993
Women's Studies Quarterly 15, no. 3/4 (1987): 6-14
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"How to Make Your Students Cry: Lessons in Atrocity, Pedagogy, and Heightened Emotion"

Article
Friedman, Natalie
2003
Council of Societies for the Study of Religion Bulletin 32, no. 1 (2003): 3-8
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"What's Your Philosophy on Teaching, and Does it Matter?"

Article
Montell, Gabriela
2003
The Chronicle of Higher Education, 27 March 2003
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Four Reasons to be Happy About Internet Plagiarism"

Article
Hunt, Russell
2002
Teaching Perspectives, St. Thomas University
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
A short provocative argument that the issue of internet plagiarism helpfully challenges entrenched but problematic practices of the academy: the term paper, institutional structures around grades, and the tacit assumption that knowledge is stored information.
Additional Info:
A short provocative argument that the issue of internet plagiarism helpfully challenges entrenched but problematic practices of the academy: the term paper, institutional structures around grades, and the tacit assumption that knowledge is stored information.
Cover image

The Peaceable Classroom

Book
O'Reilley, Mary Rose
1993
Boynton/Cook Publishers, Portsmouth, NH
PE68.U5O74 1993
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The Peaceable Classroom first defines a pedagogy of nonviolence and then analyzes certain contemporary approaches to rhetoric and literary studies in light of nonviolent theory. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The Peaceable Classroom first defines a pedagogy of nonviolence and then analyzes certain contemporary approaches to rhetoric and literary studies in light of nonviolent theory. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Preface
Prologue: I Am Not Yet Born
Old Lies
Inner Peace Studies and the World of the Writing Teacher
``Exterminate...the Brutes'' and Other Notes Toward a Spirituality of Teaching
The Force that Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower
Silence and Slow Time
The Dancing Is Difficult
The Retro War
The Sibyl in the Bottle
Epilogue: The Booty of the Dove
One or Two Things
Works Cited
Credits
Cover image

Twenty-First-Century Feminist Classrooms: Pedagogies of Identity and Difference

Book
MacDonald, Amie A. and Susan Sanchez-Casal, eds.
2002
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
LC197 .T94 2002
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This anti-racist feminist anthology brings together diverse and challenging theoretical perspectives on the experiences of radical educators who work to redefine pedagogies for communicating the claims of both insurgent disciplines--Women's Studies, African-American Studies, Latino Studies, Ethnic Studies, Queer Theory, etc.--and radicalized versions of traditional areas of study--History, Sociology, Foreign Languages, Literature, Philosophy. The authors' analyses of where and how feminist teachers stand in the fray of conflictive classroom dynamics ...
Additional Info:
This anti-racist feminist anthology brings together diverse and challenging theoretical perspectives on the experiences of radical educators who work to redefine pedagogies for communicating the claims of both insurgent disciplines--Women's Studies, African-American Studies, Latino Studies, Ethnic Studies, Queer Theory, etc.--and radicalized versions of traditional areas of study--History, Sociology, Foreign Languages, Literature, Philosophy. The authors' analyses of where and how feminist teachers stand in the fray of conflictive classroom dynamics and institutional politics lead them to outline new inquiries into feminist pedagogy highlighted by an intense focus on identity, experience, and difference. In doing so, Twenty-First Century Feminist Classrooms opens a space for engaged feminist self-criticism that seeks to reinvigorate pedagogical practices grounded in multicultural feminist identities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Feminist Reflections on the Pedagogical Relevance of Identity

ch. 1 Toward a Pedagogy of Coalition
ch. 2 Unleashing the Demons of History: White Resistance in the U.S. Latino Studies Classroom
ch. 3 Student Resistance and Nationalism in the Classroom: Reflections on Globalizing the Curriculum
ch. 4 Feminist Pedagogy and the Appeal to Epistemic Privilege
ch. 5 Negotiating Subject Positions in a Service-Learning Context: Toward a Feminist Critique of Experiential Learning
ch. 6 Antiracist Pedagogy and Concientizacion: A Latina Professor's Struggle
ch. 7 Queer Theory and Feminist Pedagogy
ch. 8 "white girls" and "Strong Black Women:" Reflections on a Decade of Teaching Black History at Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs)
ch. 9 Teaching (About) Genocide
ch. 10 Decentering the White and Male Standpoints in Race and Ethnicity Courses
ch. 11 Representation, Entitlement, and Voyeurism: Teaching Across Difference
Contributors

Index
Cover image

"I Won't Learn from You": And Other Thoughts on Creative Maladjustment

Book
Kohl, Herbert R.
1995
New Press, New York, NY
LB1027.K59 1994
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
"I won't learn from you" is Herb Kohl's now-classic essay about the phenomenon of "not-learning," or refusing to learn, which takes place when a student's intelligence, dignity, or integrity is compromised by a teacher, an institution, or a larger social mindset. Available in book form for the first time, "I Won't Learn from You" serves here as a starting point for four new, groundbreaking essays by one of the country's ...
Additional Info:
"I won't learn from you" is Herb Kohl's now-classic essay about the phenomenon of "not-learning," or refusing to learn, which takes place when a student's intelligence, dignity, or integrity is compromised by a teacher, an institution, or a larger social mindset. Available in book form for the first time, "I Won't Learn from You" serves here as a starting point for four new, groundbreaking essays by one of the country's leading thinkers on education. "The Tattooed Man: Confessions of a Hopemonger" is about the importance of teaching hope, and is Kohl's first autobiographical effort to discover in his own ghettoized childhood attitudes that let him recognize "not-learning" when he saw it among his students decades later. "Creative Maladjustment and the Struggle for Public Education" is inspired by Martin Luther King, Jr.'s call for creative maladjustment to an unjust society, and deals with the ways in which one can lead a positive life and learn new ways of maintaining opposition and resistance. "Excellence, Equality, and Equity" explores the relationship between these three crucial - and often confused - concepts. "Uncommon Differences" is about the way in which notions such as political correctness have been used to distract us from the central concerns of public education, including educating the poor, developing cultural diversity within the schools, and undoing the stigmatization of students who do not conform. It is about what public education in America can become. Written in Kohl's hallmark conversational style and employing the case examples that make his writing so compelling, these essays are at the forefront of current thinking on urban education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
I Won't Learn from You
The Tattooed Man: Confessions of a Hopemonger
Excellence, Equality, and Equity
Uncommon Differences: On Political Correctness, Core Curriculum, and Democracy in Education
Creative Maladjustment and the Struggle for Public Education
Cover image

Higher Education for the Public Good: Emerging Voices from a National Movement

Book
Kezar, Adrianna J., Tony C. Chambers, John C. Burkhardt, and Associates, eds.
2005
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC191.94.H54 2005
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This important resource describes how higher education contributes to the public good and offers suggestions for how leaders can enhance their contribution through new policies and practices. Higher Education for the Public Good draws on the experiences of individuals and groups from a wide-variety of campuses throughout the country. The information was gathered at various dialogues hosted by the Kellogg Forum on Higher Education for the Public Good. In addition ...
Additional Info:
This important resource describes how higher education contributes to the public good and offers suggestions for how leaders can enhance their contribution through new policies and practices. Higher Education for the Public Good draws on the experiences of individuals and groups from a wide-variety of campuses throughout the country. The information was gathered at various dialogues hosted by the Kellogg Forum on Higher Education for the Public Good. In addition the book suggest ways that leaders can constructively engage in a debate about the pubic good with the public, legislators, and among institutional members of high education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Authors

Part One: Exploring the Public Good
ch. 1 The Special Role of Higher Education in Society: As a Public Good for the Public Good (Tony C. Chambers)
ch. 2 Challenges for Higher Education in Serving the Public Good (Adrianna J. Kezar)
ch. 3 Creating a Metamovement: A Vision Toward Regaining the Public Social Charter (Adrianna J. Kezar)

Part Two: Public Policy and the Public Good
ch. 4 State Governance and the Public Good (David Longanecker)
ch. 5 Listening to the Public: A New Agenda for Higher Education? (David Mathews)
ch. 6 Trusteeship and the Public Good (Richard Novak, Susan Whealler Johnston)
ch. 7 The Public Good and a Racially Diverse Democracy (Denise O'Neil Green, William T. Trent)

Part Three: Cross-Sector Issues and the Public Good.
ch. 8 Liberal Education and the Civic Engagement Gap (Carol Geary Schneider)
ch. 9 The Disciplines and the Public Good (Edward Zlotkowski)
ch. 10 Scholarship for the Public Good: Living in Pasteur's Quadrant (Judith A. Ramaley)

Part Four: Institutional Governance and Leadership for the Public Good
ch. 11 Integrating a Commitment to the Public Good into the Institutional Fabric (Lee Benson, Ira Harkavy, Matthew Hartley)
ch. 12 Rethinking Faculty Roles and Rewards for the Public Good (Kelly Ward)
ch. 13 Institutional Differences in Pursuing the Public Good (Barbara A. Holland)

Part Five: Individual Leadership for the Public Good
ch. 14 Leading the Engaged Institution (James C. Votruba)
ch. 15 Preparing Doctoral Students for Faculty Careers That Contribute to the Public Good (Ann Austin, Benita J. Barnes)
ch. 16 Let Us Speak: Including Students' Voices in the Public Good of Higher Education (Stephen John Quaye)
ch. 17 Presidential Leadership for the Public Good (Martha W. Gilliland)

Part Six: Concluding Thoughts on the Public Good
ch. 18 Creating Dialogue: A New Charter and Vision of the Public Good (Adrianna J. Kezar)
ch. 19 Pondering the Social Charter: Critical Reflection for Leaders (Tony C. Chambers)

Name Index
Subject Index
Additional Info:
This book records the story of how one professor at a research university used a form of active learning to change the way he taught— from traditional lecture and examinations to cooperative learning and student projects.

Drawn from teaching notes, conversations with students, student evaluations, and annual reports, readers will learn the kinds of risks, assumptions, and decisions they will face as they change their teaching to emphasize ...
Additional Info:
This book records the story of how one professor at a research university used a form of active learning to change the way he taught— from traditional lecture and examinations to cooperative learning and student projects.

Drawn from teaching notes, conversations with students, student evaluations, and annual reports, readers will learn the kinds of risks, assumptions, and decisions they will face as they change their teaching to emphasize student learning, particularly during the critical first days of change.

Engagingly written, Leaving the Lectern offers an honest and insightful look at the challenges and rewards of achieving change in the classroom.

This book:

* Motivates faculty and graduate students to visualize what changing their teaching to enhance student learning will be like by illustrating through narration how a professor much like them made the change
* Provides reflective questions at the end of each chapter to help readers use the information in the chapter
* Enhances the readers' preparation for the change by citing references to pedagogical precepts, strategies, and tools
* Summarizes the seven themes found in the book to help bring about the change (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Before the Change
ch. 2 Change Involves Taking Risks
ch. 3 Change Can Be Piecemeal
ch. 4 Change Is Finding and Sharing Answers to Questions About Student Learning
ch. 5 Change Alters What You Put Into the Course
ch. 6 Change Emphasizes What Students Take Away From the Course
ch. 7 Change Must Be Assessed for Student Learning
ch. 8 Change Must Be Assessed for Teaching
ch. 9 Change Is Hard in Isolation but Facilitated by Connections
ch. 10 Change Means Changing Your Concepts About Education
ch. 11 Change Means Changing Your Concepts About Yourself

Conclusion
Appendix: A Sketch of the National Reform of Undergraduate Education
Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Contemporary Theories & Practice in Education, Second Edition

Book
Bertrand, Yves
2003
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB14.7.B37 2003
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Newly revised and expanded, this ever-popular title serves equally well as a course text or as a professional development tool. Integrating new material, Bertrand has updated and reorganized the text for a more interrelated and functional format.

Theories of education and theories of learning abound. Making sense of these theories and comparing them to one another is an important but difficult task. Here, Bertrand has developed a model ...
Additional Info:
Newly revised and expanded, this ever-popular title serves equally well as a course text or as a professional development tool. Integrating new material, Bertrand has updated and reorganized the text for a more interrelated and functional format.

Theories of education and theories of learning abound. Making sense of these theories and comparing them to one another is an important but difficult task. Here, Bertrand has developed a model for program planning and sound pedagogy which is informed by a deep understanding of the myriad approaches available today.

This book will help you analyze your practice and/or assist your students in developing a coherent theoretical foundation of their own. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Introduction
The Study of Theories and Practice of Education
Classification of Educational Theories
Brief Presentation of Sections and Trends
Educational Situation: The Starting Point
Three Epistemological Options
Other Classifications

Section One: Academic Theories
A Solid Education
Historical Overview
Three Trends

ch. 1: Classical Education
Introduction
Evolution of Ideas and Issues
Characteristics
Practice
Conclusion

ch. 2: Generalist Theories
Introduction
Evolution of Ideas and Issues
Characteristics
Generalist Practice
Conclusion

ch. 3: Functionalist Theories
Introduction
Evolution of Ideas and Issues
Characteristics
Practice of Functionalism
Conclusion

Section Two: Learning Environment Theories
A Matter of Learning
Learning Design and Web-Based Environment: A New Mix
Historical Overview
Three Trends

ch. 4: Cognitive Theories
Introduction: Cognition and Learning
Evolution of Ideas and Issues
Characteristics
Practice 1: Living Knowledge
Practice 2: Learning Structures and Information Processing
Practice 3: Cognitive Multimedia Environment
Conclusion

ch. 5: Social-Cognitive Theories
Introduction
Evolution of Ideas and Issues
Characteristics
Practice 1: Bandura
Practice 2: Social Cognitive Conflict
Practice 3: Cognitive Apprenticeship
Conclusion

ch. 6: Instructional Design Theories
Evolution of Ideas and Issues
Characteristics
Practice 1: Systematic Design
Practice 2: Behavioral Design
Practice 3: Designing E-Learning Environments
Conclusion

Section Three: Social Theories
Reconstructing society
General Historical Perspective
Three Trends

ch. 7: Critical Pedagogy
Introduction
Evolution of Ideas and Issues
Characteristics
Practice 1: Paolo Freire
Practice 2: Grand’Maison: Social Pedagogy for Self-Development
Practice 3: Participation and Dialogue according to Ira Shor
Conclusion

ch. 8: Learning Community Theories
Introduction
Evolution of Ideas and Issues
vCharacteristics
Practice 1: Educational Progressivism
Practice 2: Cooperative Teaching and Learning
Practice 3: McLean’s Cooperative and Socio-Inductive Theory
Conclusion

ch. 9: Eco-Social Theories
Introduction
Evolution of Ideas and Issues
Characteristics
Practice 1: Curriculum for the Future
Practice 2: Systemic Education in An Eco-Society
Experiential Education
Conclusion

Section Four: Humanistic Theories
Introduction
Historical Overview
Different Trends

ch. 10: Self-Actualizing Theories
Introduction
Evolution of Ideas and Issues
Characteristics
Practice 1: Play Mountain Place (Los Angeles)
Practice 2: Life Narratives
Conclusion

ch. 11: Group Dynamics Theories
Introduction
Evolution of Ideas and Issues
Characteristics
Practice 1: The Montessori Schools
Practice 2: Values Clarification and Self-Development Project
Practice 3: Group Method and Psychodrama
Conclusion

ch. 12: Spiritualistic Theories
Introduction
Evolution of Ideas and Issues
Characteristics
Practice 1: Steiner’s Schools
Practice 2: Spiritual Communities and Growth Centers
Practice 3: George Leonard and Ecstasy Education
Practice 3: Krishnamurti Centers of Education
Conclusion

General Conclusion
Questions about Education
The Best Theory
For a New Eco-wisdom

Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Culture and the Arts in Education

Book
Smith, Ralph A.
2005
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
NX303.A1S65 2006
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This collection of Ralph Smith’s writings provides a comprehensive overview of his extraordinary contributions to understanding the importance of aesthetics in education. These essays record his lifelong efforts to construct a defensible rationale for the arts in general education and a workable curriculum for art education in our public schools (K–16). The topics covered range from liberal education to arts education, the relationship of art, aesthetics, and aesthetic education ...
Additional Info:
This collection of Ralph Smith’s writings provides a comprehensive overview of his extraordinary contributions to understanding the importance of aesthetics in education. These essays record his lifelong efforts to construct a defensible rationale for the arts in general education and a workable curriculum for art education in our public schools (K–16). The topics covered range from liberal education to arts education, the relationship of art, aesthetics, and aesthetic education to teaching and curriculum, the arts and the humanities, and cultural diversity. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Arts education as liberal education
ch. 2 Philosophy and theory of aesthetic education
ch. 3 Art, the human career, and aesthetic education
ch. 4 Problems for a philosophy of art education
ch. 5 Concepts, concept learning, and art education
ch. 6 The artworld and aesthetic skills : a context for research and development
ch. 7 Teaching aesthetic criticism in the schools
ch. 8 An excellence curriculum for art education
ch. 9 Aesthetic education : a critical necessity
ch. 10 Toward percipience : a humanities curriculum for arts education
ch. 11 Teaching music as one of the humanities
ch. 12 Remoralization and aesthetic education
ch. 13 The uses of cultural diversity
Cover image

Thinking: the Foundation of Critical and Creative Learning in the Classroom

Book
Boostrom, Robert
2005
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LB14.7 B654 2005
Topics: Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
What might a school that wholeheartedly values thinking look like? How can we encourage students to be active learners instead of passive recipients of knowledge? In this engaging book, Boostrom invites readers to think about the ways in which the practice of teaching unintentionally promotes nonthinking. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
What might a school that wholeheartedly values thinking look like? How can we encourage students to be active learners instead of passive recipients of knowledge? In this engaging book, Boostrom invites readers to think about the ways in which the practice of teaching unintentionally promotes nonthinking. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword

ch. 1 Categories of thinking
ch. 2 Arts and disciplines
ch. 3 The content of stories
ch. 4 Stories in context
ch. 5 The whole truth
ch. 6 Thinking for oneself
TTR cover image

"The Divine Pedagogy as a Model for Online Education"

TTR
Gresham, John
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 1 (2006): 24-28
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
In addition to the pragmatic concerns that often drive the use of technology in theological education, there is a need to develop theological justification and direction for online education. Several Roman Catholic Church documents propose the "divine pedagogy," the manner in which God teaches the human race, as a model for catechesis or religious education. This can provide a rich resource for developing a theological pedagogy for online education. This ...
Additional Info:
In addition to the pragmatic concerns that often drive the use of technology in theological education, there is a need to develop theological justification and direction for online education. Several Roman Catholic Church documents propose the "divine pedagogy," the manner in which God teaches the human race, as a model for catechesis or religious education. This can provide a rich resource for developing a theological pedagogy for online education. This is especially relevant to the justification for online education, because critics sometimes refer to the incarnational character of the divine pedagogy to argue against the disembodied nature of virtual education. This article addresses such criticisms and more constructively, relates several aspects of the divine pedagogy such as adaptation, community, and participation to teaching and learning in the online environment. (This paper was presented at Theology and Pedagogy in Cyberspace II conference in Evanston, Ill. on April 17, 2004.)
TTR cover image

"Four Pedagogical Mistakes: A Mea Culpa"

TTR
Farley, Edward
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 4 (2005): 200-203
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The theological pedagogies which dominate degree-granting schools originated in the courses of study and graduate programs of the teachers. These pedagogies foster a deep rift between theology as an academic or scholarly discipline (science?) and the situations and interests of students. Students are taught to imitate what scholars do: interpreting texts, making formal arguments, and writing essays. Accordingly, theology recedes from the present and future of students including future clergy, ...
Additional Info:
The theological pedagogies which dominate degree-granting schools originated in the courses of study and graduate programs of the teachers. These pedagogies foster a deep rift between theology as an academic or scholarly discipline (science?) and the situations and interests of students. Students are taught to imitate what scholars do: interpreting texts, making formal arguments, and writing essays. Accordingly, theology recedes from the present and future of students including future clergy, having little to do with their religious life or career. By defining theology as scholarship, academic pedagogy obscures its primary meaning, the critical and creative thinking of the situations of life and world under the perspective of the Gospel. If theology's primary meaning is scholarly knowledge and its preoccupation with text interpretation and doctrinal exposition, the result will be to ignore religion's actual practices, especially its idolatrous tendency to literalize its own language and absolutize its institutional mediations. A pedagogy that reflects theology's primary meaning will focus on contemplation, reflection, and thinking and thus order methods, texts, and doctrines to that.
TTR cover image

"Hospitable Kinship in Theological Education: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Teaching and Learning as Gift Exchange"

TTR
Wimberly, Anne E. Streaty
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 1 (2004): 3-12
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Using an autobiographical approach for pedagogical reflection, the author raises questions about how to include "hospitable kinship" and "gift exchange" in teaching and learning. Her experience with a Zimbabwean community circle of hospitable kinship has prompted her to consider how this method of community formation might be employed in classroom situations. Definitions for hospitable kinship and gift exchange are woven throughout the narrative. Attention to the role of the teacher ...
Additional Info:
Using an autobiographical approach for pedagogical reflection, the author raises questions about how to include "hospitable kinship" and "gift exchange" in teaching and learning. Her experience with a Zimbabwean community circle of hospitable kinship has prompted her to consider how this method of community formation might be employed in classroom situations. Definitions for hospitable kinship and gift exchange are woven throughout the narrative. Attention to the role of the teacher as host is provided as well. The essay prompts readers to turn their attention toward specific strategies that will aid in the formation of classroom community.
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"Dancers Exult at the Awakening"

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Smith, W. Alan
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 1 (2004): 20-29
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This article explores the art form of dance as a metaphor for the teaching of theology. Employing the work of Maria Harris, the author contends that there are seven elements of dance than can serve as metaphors for teachers of theology: preparation, rhythm, movement, expectancy, response, embodiment, and performance. Each dance element is described in detail, and the correlations between specific elements of dance and how one might teach theology ...
Additional Info:
This article explores the art form of dance as a metaphor for the teaching of theology. Employing the work of Maria Harris, the author contends that there are seven elements of dance than can serve as metaphors for teachers of theology: preparation, rhythm, movement, expectancy, response, embodiment, and performance. Each dance element is described in detail, and the correlations between specific elements of dance and how one might teach theology are presented as possible methodological steps for teaching.
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"Thirsting for God in the Classroom: A Meditation on Psalm 42:1–8"

TTR
Brown, William P.
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 4 (2003): 187-189
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This brief meditation on teaching was shared at a gathering of mid-career theological school teachers for a retreat in Scottsdale, Arizona. It draws upon the author's familiarity with the desert to provide a metaphoric exploration of the "desiccation and delight" that surprises us repeatedly in our classrooms and instructs us in humility and hope.
Additional Info:
This brief meditation on teaching was shared at a gathering of mid-career theological school teachers for a retreat in Scottsdale, Arizona. It draws upon the author's familiarity with the desert to provide a metaphoric exploration of the "desiccation and delight" that surprises us repeatedly in our classrooms and instructs us in humility and hope.
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"Making the Most of a Good Story: Effective Use of Film as a Teaching Resource for Ethics"

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Marshall, Ellen Ott
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 2 (2003): 93-98
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Using Technology   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Many faculty members reach for powerful clips or entire films to give background information to a topic or to provoke discussion. We do this because we have a sense that such materials engage students in a way that more theoretical texts, speculative discussions, or even case studies do not. In the field of ethics, however, one meets resistance to employing narratives that are too engaging. The wary ethicist doubts that ...
Additional Info:
Many faculty members reach for powerful clips or entire films to give background information to a topic or to provoke discussion. We do this because we have a sense that such materials engage students in a way that more theoretical texts, speculative discussions, or even case studies do not. In the field of ethics, however, one meets resistance to employing narratives that are too engaging. The wary ethicist doubts that a medium that manipulates the viewer, engages the emotions, and elicits a personal connection to the characters is the best resource for ethical reflection. This paper argues that film, like other narrative forms, is indeed an appropriate medium for teaching ethics and suggests methods for doing so effectively.
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"From Pride to Cowardice: Obstacles to the Dialogical Classroom"

TTR
Bain–Selbo, Eric
2003
Teaching Theology and Religion 6, no. 1 (2003): 3-8
BL41.T4
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Drawing on his own work in educational theory as well as his classroom experience, the author identifies important dialogical vices that he finds in his students: pride and cowardice. These vices are put both in the theoretical context of a greater understanding of the role of dialogue in learning and in the social context of the contemporary multicultural ethos from which the students come. In opposition to the vices, the ...
Additional Info:
Drawing on his own work in educational theory as well as his classroom experience, the author identifies important dialogical vices that he finds in his students: pride and cowardice. These vices are put both in the theoretical context of a greater understanding of the role of dialogue in learning and in the social context of the contemporary multicultural ethos from which the students come. In opposition to the vices, the author proposes dialogical virtues (humility, charity, and courage) and a concept of tolerance that help us to avoid pride and cowardice. In this way, we achieve genuine dialogue and multiculturalism and avoid what the author calls a pernicious multiculturalism
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"Practice Talks Back to Theory: A Critical Reflection on Teaching"

TTR
Mahan, Brian J.
2002
Teaching Theology and Religion 5, no. 4 (2002): 201-210
BL41.T4
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The article is a reflection on what I perceive to be a confusion about the relation between theoretical judgments and judgments of pedagogical efficacy. My interest in the issue originated with my own confusion over persistent student resistance to certain assigned texts that I had initially felt confident would prove valuable in the classroom. The essay unfolds in three segments. In the first, I recount how this concern about the ...
Additional Info:
The article is a reflection on what I perceive to be a confusion about the relation between theoretical judgments and judgments of pedagogical efficacy. My interest in the issue originated with my own confusion over persistent student resistance to certain assigned texts that I had initially felt confident would prove valuable in the classroom. The essay unfolds in three segments. In the first, I recount how this concern about the relation between theoretical judgments and judgments of pedagogical efficacy evolved out of my own teaching. I next list three tentative conclusions about the correlation or lack of correlation between theoretical judgments and judgments of pedagogical efficacy. In the concluding segment, I call for concerted resistance to the tendency of pure rationality to colonize the aesthetic and dramatic components of experience so essential to transformative teaching and learning.
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"Educating Through Meeting: Reflections on a Dialogic Pedagogy for Teaching Religious Studies"

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Kramer, Kenneth
2001
Teaching Theology and Religion 4, no. 2 (2001): 64-70
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This article originated as a brief reflection on pedagogical issues intended to catalyze collegial discussions at a meeting of the Comparative Religious Studies faculty at San Jose State University. The author distinguishes four interrelated elements that motivate his own teaching: human meaning, dialogic inter-activity, responsible response, and multi-methodologic study. Dialogic pedagogy is illustrated with concrete examples of how theory fits in the classroom. To further clarify the discussion, Martin Buber's ...
Additional Info:
This article originated as a brief reflection on pedagogical issues intended to catalyze collegial discussions at a meeting of the Comparative Religious Studies faculty at San Jose State University. The author distinguishes four interrelated elements that motivate his own teaching: human meaning, dialogic inter-activity, responsible response, and multi-methodologic study. Dialogic pedagogy is illustrated with concrete examples of how theory fits in the classroom. To further clarify the discussion, Martin Buber's theory of educating is applied to the teaching process, especially his understanding of "one-sided inclusion."
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"Philosophical Hermeneutics and Theological Education"

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Teevan, Donna
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 2 (2000): 62-70
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This article explores the resources that the philosophical hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer can bring to the challenge of teaching theology to undergraduates. The author offers a sympathetic reading of Gadamer but is influenced by the insights of liberation theology. In this interpretation of his work, Gadamer's contribution lies in his emphases on intersubjectivity and on praxis as the goal of historically conscious understanding — and thus of historically conscious theological education. ...
Additional Info:
This article explores the resources that the philosophical hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer can bring to the challenge of teaching theology to undergraduates. The author offers a sympathetic reading of Gadamer but is influenced by the insights of liberation theology. In this interpretation of his work, Gadamer's contribution lies in his emphases on intersubjectivity and on praxis as the goal of historically conscious understanding — and thus of historically conscious theological education. To suggest what philosophical hermeneutics can tell us about the process of teaching and learning in theology, this essay examines Gadamer's approach to historicity, conversation, truth, objectivity, subjectivity, practical wisdom, and praxis.
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"Active Learning for the Kingdom of God"

TTR
Lambert, Lake
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 2 (2000): 71-80
BL41.T4
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
At the same time that teachers in theology and religion have been encouraged to consider how their personal identities affect their teaching, there has also been increased interest in active learning strategies. This essay argues that these two initiatives may be in conflict if the communal commitments of the instructor do not mirror the democratic commitments inherent to most active learning pedagogies. As a teacher of theology and ethics who ...
Additional Info:
At the same time that teachers in theology and religion have been encouraged to consider how their personal identities affect their teaching, there has also been increased interest in active learning strategies. This essay argues that these two initiatives may be in conflict if the communal commitments of the instructor do not mirror the democratic commitments inherent to most active learning pedagogies. As a teacher of theology and ethics who is ultimately not committed to democracy but to the Kingdom of God, I have sought to develop learning strategies which avoid student passivity while focusing on the church as a foretaste to God's Kingdom. My consideration of this dilemma has drawn me to the educational philosophies of both John Dewey and Stanley Hauerwas, and in response to them I outline an active learning strategy which envisions the Christian church as a living tradition with students as dialogue partners and contributors to it.
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"Confessions from the Classroom Teaching with Augustinian Eyes"

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Stimming, Mary T.
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 3 (1999): 137-142
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Through an analysis of Augustine's Confessions, this essay aims to identify the sources, tenets, and implications of the theological anthropology that grounds the author's pedagogy. The author describes classroom dynamics and teaching strategies in terms of the concepts of creation, sin, and redemption found in the Confessions. In relation to Augustine's doctrine of creation, the author argues that a theological anthropology that posits an ineradicable relationship of the human person ...
Additional Info:
Through an analysis of Augustine's Confessions, this essay aims to identify the sources, tenets, and implications of the theological anthropology that grounds the author's pedagogy. The author describes classroom dynamics and teaching strategies in terms of the concepts of creation, sin, and redemption found in the Confessions. In relation to Augustine's doctrine of creation, the author argues that a theological anthropology that posits an ineradicable relationship of the human person to God justifies optimism about student response to the study of theology. It also supports a sacramental understanding of the effectiveness of the teacher. In relation to Augustine's theology of sin, the author reflects on the effects of pride on both teacher and student. The section on redemption acknowledges that although the teacher cannot eradicate sin in the classroom, he or she can counter such effects through the responsible and sensitive exercise of authority. Throughout the essay, the virtues of humility and gratitude in the classroom are highlighted, and concrete pedagogical issues are examined in a theological light.
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"Teaching as Confessing Redeeming a Theological Trope for Pedagogy"

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Webb, Stephen H.
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 3 (1999): 143-153
BL41.T4
Topics: Faith in the Classroom   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
By reclaiming the role of confession in the classroom, we can rethink the fundamental question of what it means to teach religion. That is, the project of thinking about the religious dimension of pedagogy should also force us to rethink religious studies in general. Pedagogy, after all, is not an incidental expression of religious commitments but is instead one significant place where the religious imagination takes shape and form. All ...
Additional Info:
By reclaiming the role of confession in the classroom, we can rethink the fundamental question of what it means to teach religion. That is, the project of thinking about the religious dimension of pedagogy should also force us to rethink religious studies in general. Pedagogy, after all, is not an incidental expression of religious commitments but is instead one significant place where the religious imagination takes shape and form. All religious reflection is confessional, because scholarship is only one form of pedagogy, and teaching is the act of saying who we are, where we are from, and where we are going.
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"Assessment for the Right Reason The Ethics of Outcomes Assessment"

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Glennon, Fred
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 1 (1999): 14-25
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This essay explores and challenges the two primary ethical arguments for assessment, accountability, and professional responsibility, by demonstrating their strengths and exposing their weaknesses, which are rooted in their limited notions of community, contract, and guild respectively. In contrast, I argue for assessment on the basis of an ethic of covenantal obligation which incorporates both accountability and responsibility but grounds them on a broader view of community, a view of ...
Additional Info:
This essay explores and challenges the two primary ethical arguments for assessment, accountability, and professional responsibility, by demonstrating their strengths and exposing their weaknesses, which are rooted in their limited notions of community, contract, and guild respectively. In contrast, I argue for assessment on the basis of an ethic of covenantal obligation which incorporates both accountability and responsibility but grounds them on a broader view of community, a view of the teaching-learning environment as a covenant community replete with mutual obligations and responsibilities, one of which is assessment. While the notion of covenant community has deep roots in American society, its theological underpinnings make the ethic of assessment as covenant obligation most relevant to church-related institutions of higher education, the context in which I teach and learn. I conclude the paper by delineating some principles for ethical assessment practice which follow from a covenantal perspective.
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"The Meaning and the Ends of Teaching Religion"

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Markham, Ian
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 3 (1998): 135-138
BL41.T4
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This paper explores the relationship between assessment and ethical value. It starts by reflecting on the traditional assessment convention that distinguishes strongly between process (the ways in which a student constructs a piece of work) and conclusion. The paper then examines three case studies from Holocaust studies, feminist theology, and Providence. The argument of the paper is that these three case studies illustrate that imparting certain values is part of ...
Additional Info:
This paper explores the relationship between assessment and ethical value. It starts by reflecting on the traditional assessment convention that distinguishes strongly between process (the ways in which a student constructs a piece of work) and conclusion. The paper then examines three case studies from Holocaust studies, feminist theology, and Providence. The argument of the paper is that these three case studies illustrate that imparting certain values is part of the teaching process, and therefore it should not be excluded from assessment.
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"'For Questioning is the Piety of Thought' But, Not Without Consequences in Technocratic Culture"

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Massanari, Ronald L.
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 3 (1998): 154-160
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Using a representative anecdote, insights from Jürgen Habermas, Jacques Ellul, and Ivan Illich, and in the form of a collage, this paper advocates a pedagogy of questioning and explores some of the conflicts and consequences of adopting such a pedagogy in a technocratic culture, especially as related to conventional expectations for education framed by efficiency, practicality, and functionality.
Additional Info:
Using a representative anecdote, insights from Jürgen Habermas, Jacques Ellul, and Ivan Illich, and in the form of a collage, this paper advocates a pedagogy of questioning and explores some of the conflicts and consequences of adopting such a pedagogy in a technocratic culture, especially as related to conventional expectations for education framed by efficiency, practicality, and functionality.
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"Dialogue for Accountability: Pedagogical Proficiency and Religious Scholarship"

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Talvacchia, Kathleen T.
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 2 (1998): 79-86
BL41.T4
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The author believes that the value of teaching in the academy will continue to be diminished as long as teaching and scholarship are viewed as separate and unequal. Thus, pedagogical proficiency is a fundamentally important component of religious and theological scholarship. Pedagogical skills allow scholars to be in dialogue with people outside of their content specialization and outside of the academy; therefore, they enable dialogue with the people of a ...
Additional Info:
The author believes that the value of teaching in the academy will continue to be diminished as long as teaching and scholarship are viewed as separate and unequal. Thus, pedagogical proficiency is a fundamentally important component of religious and theological scholarship. Pedagogical skills allow scholars to be in dialogue with people outside of their content specialization and outside of the academy; therefore, they enable dialogue with the people of a religious tradition who are not scholarly specialists, but who are the living community of the religious tradition. The article seeks first to articulate a clear understanding of teaching competency, drawing on the concept of pedagogical proficiency. The case is then made for the role of teaching in scholarly research and, finally, its specific role in religious and theological research, showing that research accountability to a living religious tradition necessarily demands teaching competency.
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"Joachim Wach's "Master and Disciple" Revisited: A Contemporary Symposium"

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Denny, Frederick M., Margaret R. Miles, Charles Hallisey & Earle H. Waugh
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 1 (1998): 13-19
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Joachim Wach's classic 1924 treatment of two types of teaching and learning relationships is summarized by Professor Denny and commented on from three contemporary perspectives by three teaching scholars who raise the basic question, "Are Wach's models of student and disciple adequate for the nineties?"

Following an introduction by Frederick M. Denny, the contributions presented are: I. Are Wach's Models of Student and disciple Adequate for the Nineties?, by ...
Additional Info:
Joachim Wach's classic 1924 treatment of two types of teaching and learning relationships is summarized by Professor Denny and commented on from three contemporary perspectives by three teaching scholars who raise the basic question, "Are Wach's models of student and disciple adequate for the nineties?"

Following an introduction by Frederick M. Denny, the contributions presented are: I. Are Wach's Models of Student and disciple Adequate for the Nineties?, by Margaret R. Miles, II. Response to Joachim Wach's "Master and Disciple: Two Religio-Sociological Studies": Buddhism, by Charles Hallisey and III. Wach and the Double Truth, by Earle H. Waugh.
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"What is a Seminar? Two Views of the Same Course"

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Holladay, Carl R. and Luke T. Johnson
1998
Teaching Theology and Religion 1, no. 1 (1998): 27-30
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This article presents a methodology for a feminist theology of education based on reflection of women's educational experience in light of historical and contemporary theological works, especially the writing of Julian of Norwich. It argues for hospitality as a metaphor for theological education and suggests an understanding of the student, teacher, and environment of education that can create hospitality in the classroom.
Additional Info:
This article presents a methodology for a feminist theology of education based on reflection of women's educational experience in light of historical and contemporary theological works, especially the writing of Julian of Norwich. It argues for hospitality as a metaphor for theological education and suggests an understanding of the student, teacher, and environment of education that can create hospitality in the classroom.
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"Some Practical Distinctions Between Preaching, Teaching, and Training"

Article
Pestel, Beverly C.
1988
Journal of College Science Teaching 18, no. 1 (1988): 26-31
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Describes some of the teaching techniques found to be effective for educating students and combatting scientific illiteracy. Presents instructional methods developed for implementing learner-oriented educational philosophies and interactive teaching strategies.
Additional Info:
Describes some of the teaching techniques found to be effective for educating students and combatting scientific illiteracy. Presents instructional methods developed for implementing learner-oriented educational philosophies and interactive teaching strategies.
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Education as Transformation: Religious Pluralism, Spirituality, & a New Vision for Higher Education in America

Book
Kazanjian, Victor, Jr., and Peter L. Laurence, eds.
2006
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LB2324.E36 2000
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
Reflecting a national movement that seeks to create a more holistic model of learning and teaching on college and university campuses, Education as Transformation is a collection of twenty-eight essays written by a wide range of educators - including presidents, chancellors, deans, faculty members, administrators, religious life professionals, students, and other leaders in the field of education - on the themes of religious pluralism and spirituality in higher education. These ...
Additional Info:
Reflecting a national movement that seeks to create a more holistic model of learning and teaching on college and university campuses, Education as Transformation is a collection of twenty-eight essays written by a wide range of educators - including presidents, chancellors, deans, faculty members, administrators, religious life professionals, students, and other leaders in the field of education - on the themes of religious pluralism and spirituality in higher education. These essays provide scholarly analysis, practical information, and inspiration for those who agree that higher education can combine both head and heart in the teaching and learning process and in campus and community life. In seeking to articulate a new vision for higher education in America, the authors explore the possibility that both scholarship and spirituality are essential to fostering global learning communities and responsible global citizens who can address the challenges of a diverse world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Victor H. Kazanjian, Jr., and Peter L. Laurence)
Introduction - Transforming Education: An Overview (Diana Chapman Walsh)

ch. 1 A Vision of Education as Transformation (Parker J. Palmer)
ch. 2 Spirituality in an Integrative Age (David K. Scott)
ch. 3 Spiritual Assumptions Undergird Educational Priorities: A Personal Narrative (Cheryl H. Keen)
ch. 4 Spiritual Quest Among Young Adults (Andrés G. Niño)
ch. 5 Molding the Self and the Common Cognitive Sources of Science and Religion (Arthur G. Zajonc)
ch. 6 A Faculty Perspective on Magic, Meaning, and Desire in the Educational Process (Patrick Morton)
ch. 7 Changing Lives, Changing Communities: Building a Capacity for Connection in a Pluralistic Context (Beverly Daniel Tatum)
ch. 8 Education as Transformation: A Bahá'í Model of Education for Unity (Suheil Badi Bushrui, James Malarkey)
ch. 9 The Transformtion of DrowningBear (Brad DrowningBear)
ch. 10 Judaism, Religious Diversity, and the American Academy (Arthur Green)
ch. 11 From Diversity to Pluralism: The Roman Catholic Challenge and the Roman Catholic Opportunity (John W. Healey)
ch. 12 Buddhism as a Pluralistic Tradition (Ji Hyang Sunim)
ch. 13 Pluralism, Awareness, and Mastery of the Mind: A Sikh Imperative for Education (Gurucharan Singh Khalsa)
ch. 14 American Pluralism, Islam, and the Challenges of Interfaith Dialogue for Muslims on the College Campus (Sulayman S. Nyang)
ch. 15 A Hindu Perspective on Moving from Religious Diversity to Religious Pluralism (Anantanand Rambachan)
ch. 16 Religious Pluralism and the Claim to Uniqueness (Krister Stendahl)
ch. 17 Quaker to the Core, Welcoming All (Douglas C. Bennett)
ch. 18 Deep Calls to Deep: Spirituality and Diversity at Goshen College (Shirley Hershey Showalter)
ch. 19 Appreciative Engagement of Diversity: E Pluribus Unum and the 'Education' as Transformation Project (James P. Keen)
ch. 20 Beyond Tolerence: From Mono-religious to Multi-religious Life at Wellesley College (Victor H. Kazanjian, Jr.)
Students of the Wellesley College Multi-Faith Council
ch. 21 The Possibility of Transformation: 25 Years Later (Donna Bivens)
ch. 22 Burn the Ark: Kindling the Sacred at the Heart of American Higher Education (Janet Cooper Nelson)
ch. 23 Building a Multi-faith Center at MIT (Robert M. Randolph)
ch. 24 Notes from a Jewish Dean of Religious Life: On Moving from Religious Diversity to Religious Pluralism (Susan Laemmle)
ch. 25 LINKS: Establishing Communities of Dialogue on Campuses (Frederic Bradford Burnham)
ch. 26 Teacher Formation: Identity, Integrity, and the Heart of a Teacher (Sally Z. Hare, Marcy Jackson, and Rick Jackson)
ch. 27 Teacher Education, Spiritual Transformation, & Child Advocacy (Carol L. Flake) ch. 28 A Walk in the Wilderness (Claudia Horwitz)

Conclusion (Victor H. Kazanjian, Jr., Peter L. Laurence)
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Teaching to Learn, Learning to Teach: Meditations on the Classroom

Book
Dalke, Anne French
2002
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LB2331.D347 2002
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Dalke brings together a collection of accounts written by herself, students and colleagues. These are incorporated into seven chapters corresponding to the seven stages of Dalke's reflection about teaching and learning in the liberal arts classroom. The text explores the evolution of Dalke's approach to teaching; Dalke's decision to redesign her classes using the model of the Quaker Meeting for Business; difficulties she faced when trying to apply such a ...
Additional Info:
Dalke brings together a collection of accounts written by herself, students and colleagues. These are incorporated into seven chapters corresponding to the seven stages of Dalke's reflection about teaching and learning in the liberal arts classroom. The text explores the evolution of Dalke's approach to teaching; Dalke's decision to redesign her classes using the model of the Quaker Meeting for Business; difficulties she faced when trying to apply such a model, including the complexities which silence and desire contribute to the classroom; and Dalke's attempt to describe "a vision of the paradise that my classroom might be as well as the unending labor and prayer needed to maintain such a space." (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Groundings

ch. 1 A Journal of My Instruction: Class as Text
ch. 2 "Outside the Mainstream"/In the "Well of Living Waters": Class as Quaker Meeting for Business
ch. 3 "Shuddering Without End": Class as Dinner Party
ch. 4 "Silence Is So Windowful": Class as Antechamber
ch. 5 "Turtles All the Way Down": Class as Persistent Critique
ch. 6 "The Form of a Longing": Class as Falling in and out of Love
ch. 7 "Fullness of Life": Class as Paradise

Openings
Bibliography
Index
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Education Has Nothing to Do With Technology: James Michael Lee's Social Science Religious Instruction

Book
Newell, Edward J.
2006
Wipf & Stock Publishers, Eugene, OR
BV1464.N49 2006
Topics: Faith in the Classroom   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Does education have any relation to theology? How do the educator's worldview commitments speak to his or her practice of education? James Michael Lee brought a definite answer to these questions -- a firm no to the relations question, and an advocacy for empirical findings over and against any speculative or theoretical positions in reply to the commitments question. Lee claimed to have a universal, neutral metatheory for all religious ...
Additional Info:
Does education have any relation to theology? How do the educator's worldview commitments speak to his or her practice of education? James Michael Lee brought a definite answer to these questions -- a firm no to the relations question, and an advocacy for empirical findings over and against any speculative or theoretical positions in reply to the commitments question. Lee claimed to have a universal, neutral metatheory for all religious education, a theory that would apply to all religious educators in any and every religion. But in proposing his theory he overlooked the way that empirical facts express worldviews. This book is a detective story, tracing commitments that lay underneath empirical "neutrality." In the process the reader will see avenues that unmistakably link education to theology. Education turns out to be a thoroughly worldview - conditioned process. This new work is essential reading for professors and students in both religious and general education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 James Michael Lee's Religious Instruction Theory
ch. 2 Empiricism's Metaphysical Commitments
ch. 3 The Theology of James Michael Lee
ch. 4 Conclusions

Bibliography
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Wabash tree

Teaching To Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom

Book
Bell, Hooks
1994
Routledge, Boston, MA
LC196.H66 1994
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
In this book, bell hooks, one of America's leading black intellectuals, shares her philosophy of the classroom, offering ideas about teaching that fundamentally rethink democratic participation. Hooks advocates the process of teaching students to think critically and raises many concerns central to the field of critical pedagogy, linking them to feminist thought. In the process, these essays face squarely the problems of teachers who do not want to teach, of ...
Additional Info:
In this book, bell hooks, one of America's leading black intellectuals, shares her philosophy of the classroom, offering ideas about teaching that fundamentally rethink democratic participation. Hooks advocates the process of teaching students to think critically and raises many concerns central to the field of critical pedagogy, linking them to feminist thought. In the process, these essays face squarely the problems of teachers who do not want to teach, of students who do not want to learn, of racism and sexism in the classroom, and of the gift of freedom that is, for hooks, the teacher's most important goal. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Teaching to Transgress

ch. 1 Engaged to Pedagogy
ch. 2 A Revolution of Values: The Promise of Multicultural Change
ch. 3 Embracing Change: Teaching in a Multicultural World
ch. 4 Paulo Freire
ch. 5 Theory as Liberatory Practice
ch. 6 Essentialism and Experience
ch. 7 Holding My Sister's Hand: Feminist Solidarity
ch. 8 Feminist Thinking: In the Classroom Right Now
ch. 9 Feminist Scholarship: Black Scholars
ch. 10 Building a Teaching Community: A Dialogue
ch. 11 Language: Teaching New Worlds/New Words
ch. 12 Confronting Class in the Classroom
ch. 13 Eros, Eroticism, and the Pedagogical Process
ch. 14 Ecstasy: Teaching and Learning Without Limits

Index
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"Welcoming the Stranger"

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Gallagher, Eugene V.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 137-142
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Thinking about teaching as an act of intellectual hospitality has the potential to shape productively how teachers conceive of their own roles in the classroom, their interactions with students, and their execution of crucial tasks. It also offers a path to helpful reflection about a persistent issue that arises particularly for the many faculty members who teach in small departments of religion and are therefore called upon to address a ...
Additional Info:
Thinking about teaching as an act of intellectual hospitality has the potential to shape productively how teachers conceive of their own roles in the classroom, their interactions with students, and their execution of crucial tasks. It also offers a path to helpful reflection about a persistent issue that arises particularly for the many faculty members who teach in small departments of religion and are therefore called upon to address a wide range of topics in their teaching. In addition, adopting an ethos of hospitality in the classroom provides a salutary counterpoint to the pervasive and often corrosive academic practices of critique, refutation, and dispute.
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"Hospes: The Wabash Center as a Site of Transformative Hospitality "

TTR
Jones, Carolyn M.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 150-155
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion is a place of hospitality and its staff the epitome of the "good host." This essay explores the meaning of hospitality, including its problematic dimensions, drawing on a number of voices and texts: Jacques Derrida's Of Hospitality; Henri M. Nouwen's Reaching Out: The Three Movements of the Spiritual Life, N. Lynne Westfield's Dear Sisters: A Womanist Practice of Hospitality, ...
Additional Info:
The Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion is a place of hospitality and its staff the epitome of the "good host." This essay explores the meaning of hospitality, including its problematic dimensions, drawing on a number of voices and texts: Jacques Derrida's Of Hospitality; Henri M. Nouwen's Reaching Out: The Three Movements of the Spiritual Life, N. Lynne Westfield's Dear Sisters: A Womanist Practice of Hospitality, Arthur Sutherland's I Was a Stranger: A Christian Theology of Hospitality, and Kathleen Norris's "Hospitality." Beginning with the claim that hospitality is concerned with power and grace, the essay explores the relationship between hospitality and teaching, and the modes by which the Wabash Center helps teachers both find their identities and heal.
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"What Difference Does It Make? "

TTR
Marshall, Joretta
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 158-161
BL41.T4
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion has its most direct influence on faculty members who teach in colleges, universities, and theological schools. These faculty members, in turn, have an impact upon churches through their leadership and teaching in local communities. Wabash workshops encourage faculty to continue to develop four qualities that make a difference in their teaching and scholarship, in the lives of students who ...
Additional Info:
The Wabash Center for Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion has its most direct influence on faculty members who teach in colleges, universities, and theological schools. These faculty members, in turn, have an impact upon churches through their leadership and teaching in local communities. Wabash workshops encourage faculty to continue to develop four qualities that make a difference in their teaching and scholarship, in the lives of students who become community and church leaders, and ultimately in the life of the church: these are the abilities to (1) help pastoral leaders integrate multiple kinds of knowledge, (2) value context and particularity, (3) strengthen their skills as public theologians and community leaders, and (4) cultivate the encouragement to live lives of wholeness. The gift of hospitality at Wabash workshops provides the environment and space for faculty to engage these qualities in their teaching, research, scholarship, and living.
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""The Clearing": Conversations at the Wabash Center "

TTR
Pence, Nadine S.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 161-163
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The study of religion seeks to understand life and life practices, which means that it is internally suited to dynamic teaching-learning methods such as exploration, conversation, and imaginative construction. Wabash Center hospitality enables reflective conversations about the nature of our craft, the shape of our vocation, and the direction of our discipline.
Additional Info:
The study of religion seeks to understand life and life practices, which means that it is internally suited to dynamic teaching-learning methods such as exploration, conversation, and imaginative construction. Wabash Center hospitality enables reflective conversations about the nature of our craft, the shape of our vocation, and the direction of our discipline.
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""Leaven in the Loaf": The Wabash Center and Theological Education"

TTR
Seymour, Jack L.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 167-169
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Assessing the impact of Wabash Center programs on theological education, this article focuses on the vocation of the theological educator, particularly on the impact of theological teaching on faith and on the institutions, values, and practices that shape living. Five contributions of the Wabash Center are highlighted: (1) guiding seminary faculty in the practices of teaching, (2) enhancing the teaching preparation of doctoral students for theological education, (3) linking effective teaching to the ...
Additional Info:
Assessing the impact of Wabash Center programs on theological education, this article focuses on the vocation of the theological educator, particularly on the impact of theological teaching on faith and on the institutions, values, and practices that shape living. Five contributions of the Wabash Center are highlighted: (1) guiding seminary faculty in the practices of teaching, (2) enhancing the teaching preparation of doctoral students for theological education, (3) linking effective teaching to the development of seminary curricula, (4) enlarging the literature on teaching in theological education, and (5) nurturing the vocation of seminary educators.
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"Power and Caution: The Ethics of Self-Disclosure"

TTR
Esjing, Anette
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 4 (2007): 235-243
BL41.T4
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Good teaching is both powerful and cautious. It is powerful insofar as it creates engaged students. Because an engaged mind is particularly receptive, however, good teaching is also cautious insofar as it provides students with focused guidance through the process of appropriating the learning material. This article reflects critically on expressionist pedagogy by evaluating a classroom situation in which students reacted in unexpected ways to the professor's disclosure of a ...
Additional Info:
Good teaching is both powerful and cautious. It is powerful insofar as it creates engaged students. Because an engaged mind is particularly receptive, however, good teaching is also cautious insofar as it provides students with focused guidance through the process of appropriating the learning material. This article reflects critically on expressionist pedagogy by evaluating a classroom situation in which students reacted in unexpected ways to the professor's disclosure of a personal story. It concludes that effective teaching exceeds the goal of merely facilitating student engagement. That is, the use of self-disclosure has the power to create engaged students, but it also requires cautious content consideration when facilitating post-disclosure learning. If, by using the powerful expressionist pedagogy of self-disclosure, we engage students but fail to cautiously guide them through the learning material, we have not taken seriously the ethical responsibility that teaching also implies.
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Education Between Two Worlds

Book
Meiklejohn, Alexander
2005
Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick, NJ
LB41.M485 2005
Topics: Liberal Arts   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This classic and rather poignant argument that education is the answer to the questions posed by Anglo-Saxon cultures was written by Meiklejohn (late president of Amherst College and founder of the U. of Wisconsin's Experimental College) as the horrors of World War II were a daily event. In such a time and with such a background, it is no surprise Meiklejohn freely ties theory to practice, policy, and pedagogy as ...
Additional Info:
This classic and rather poignant argument that education is the answer to the questions posed by Anglo-Saxon cultures was written by Meiklejohn (late president of Amherst College and founder of the U. of Wisconsin's Experimental College) as the horrors of World War II were a daily event. In such a time and with such a background, it is no surprise Meiklejohn freely ties theory to practice, policy, and pedagogy as he describes Protestant-capitalist education, the problem of reconstruction according to Rousseau, pragmatism according to Dewey, and the social contract as the primary basis of a form of education that will result in brotherhood and reasonableness. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Forward
Preface

Book I. Protestant-Capitalist Education
Book II. The Problem of Reconstruction
Book III. The Pragmatic Episode-A Study of John Dewey
Book IV. The Social Contract as Basis for Education

Index
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Taught by God: Teaching and Spiritual Formation

Book
Yust, Karen Marie and E. Byron Anderson
2006
Chalice Press, St. Louis, MO
BV1471.3.Y87 2006
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The history of the Christian spiritual life suggests that those who truly teach the spiritual life have been themselves "taught by God." The phrase "taught by God" occurs in Christian writings across several centuries. This book draws on the teachers and teaching models that animate Christian history, bringing it into conversation with the issues and concerns of contemporary teachers and learners who seek to follow Christ. The authors contend that ...
Additional Info:
The history of the Christian spiritual life suggests that those who truly teach the spiritual life have been themselves "taught by God." The phrase "taught by God" occurs in Christian writings across several centuries. This book draws on the teachers and teaching models that animate Christian history, bringing it into conversation with the issues and concerns of contemporary teachers and learners who seek to follow Christ. The authors contend that the various strands of the Christian spiritual and mystical tradition provide continuing guidance for Christian teachers in the cultivation of their own spiritual lives and the lives of their students. They order this book around four aspects of Christian educational ministries: the identity of the teacher, contexts in which we teach, models for teaching, and evaluation of teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction : something old, something new

ch. 1 The spititual leader as Christian teacher
ch. 2 Teaching from a life of prayer
ch. 3 Life together as teacher and learner
ch. 4 The contemporary search for spirituality
ch. 5 Modes of teaching the spiritual life
ch. 6 Images of the Christian spiritual life
ch. 7 The rule as teacher
ch. 8 The way of return as discipleship method
ch. 9 The cultivation of spiritual knowledge and wisdom
ch. 10 Examination of conscience as evaluative practice
ch. 11 Overcoming obstacles to teaching well

Postscript : something new, something old
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Stories Lives Tell: Narrative and Dialogue in Education

Book
Witherell, Carol, and Nel Noddings, eds.
1991
Teachers College, Columbia University, NY
LB1027.3.S76 1991
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This book speaks of a fresh approach to knowing and teaching. The editors have succeeded in combining a philosophical framework for the centrality of narrative and dialogue in education and human services with lively accounts from practitioners working in a variety of disciplines and levels.
Rich with life histories and stories, this book is organized around three themes: that story and narrative are primary tools in teaching and the ...
Additional Info:
This book speaks of a fresh approach to knowing and teaching. The editors have succeeded in combining a philosophical framework for the centrality of narrative and dialogue in education and human services with lively accounts from practitioners working in a variety of disciplines and levels.
Rich with life histories and stories, this book is organized around three themes: that story and narrative are primary tools in teaching and the helping professions; that education means taking seriously both the quest for life's meaning and the call to care for persons; and that the use of narrative and dialogue can serve as a model for teaching and learning across boundaries of disciplines, professions, and cultures. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Prologue: An Invitation to Our Readers (Carol Witherell and Nel Noddings)

Part 1 - Narrative and Ways of Knowing and Caring
ch. 1 The Story That Saved Life (Kim R. Stafford)
ch. 2 Imagining History : "A Good Story and A Well-Formed Argument" (Andra Makler)
ch. 3 Reading Women's Autobiographies: A Map of Reconstructed Knowing (Anita Plath Helle)
ch. 4 The Politics of Personal Knowledge (Madeleine R. Grumet)

Part 2 - Narrative and Notions of the Self and Other
ch. 5 The Self In Narrative: A Journey into Paradox (Carol Witherell)
ch. 6 Telling Our Own Stories: The Reading and Writing of Journals or Diaries (Joanne E. Cooper)
ch. 7 "According to their feelings": Teaching and Healing With Stories (Kirin Narayan)
ch. 8 The Stranger's Story: Who Calls and Who Answers? (Virginia Shabatay)

Part 3. Narrative and Dialogue as a Paradigm for Teaching and Learning
ch. 9 Stories In Dialogue: Caring and Interpersonal Reasoning (Nel Noddings)
ch. 10 Stories Told and Lessons Learned: Toward A Narrative Approach To Moral Development and Moral Education (Mark B. Tappan and Lyn Mikel Brown)
ch. 11 Moral Fictions: The Dilemma of Theory and Practice (Jo Anne Pagano)
ch. 12 Teacher lore : a basis for understanding praxis / William H. Schubert -- Conversation and narrative in collaborative research : an ethnography of the written literacy forum / Susan Florio-Ruane -- Story and voice in the education of professionals / Celeste M. Brody ... [et al.] --
Epilogue: Themes Remembered and Foreseen
Index
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On Teaching and Learning: Putting the Principles and Practices of Dialogue Education into Action

Book
Vella, Jane
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LC196.V46 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
On Teaching and Learning takes the ideas explored in renowned educator Jane Vella’s best-selling book Learning to Listen, Learning to Teach to the next level and explores how dialogue education has been applied in educational settings around the world. Throughout the book, she shows how to put the principles and practices of dialogue education into action and uses illustrative stories and examples from her extensive travels. Dialogue education values ...
Additional Info:
On Teaching and Learning takes the ideas explored in renowned educator Jane Vella’s best-selling book Learning to Listen, Learning to Teach to the next level and explores how dialogue education has been applied in educational settings around the world. Throughout the book, she shows how to put the principles and practices of dialogue education into action and uses illustrative stories and examples from her extensive travels. Dialogue education values inquiry, integrity, and commitment to equity—values that are also central to democracy. Learners are treated as beings worthy of respect, recognized for the knowledge and experience they bring to the learning experience. Dialogue education emphasizes the importance of safety and belonging. It is an approach that welcomes one’s certainties and one’s questions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Author
Introduction

Part One: Structured
ch. 1 Why Structure?
ch. 2 Learning Needs and Resources Assessment
ch. 3 The Seven Design Steps

Part Two: Social
ch. 4 The Learning Task in a Small Group
ch. 5 Individual Learning Enhanced

Part Three: Sound
ch. 6 Principles and Practices: Current State of the Art
ch. 7 Open Questions Invite Dialogue
ch. 8 The Designer’s Skill: Trust Your Design

Part Four: Sure
ch. 9 Indicators of Learning, Transfer, and Impact
ch. 10 Impact and the Seven Design Steps

Part Five: Synthesis: Putting It All Together
ch. 11 Putting It All Together: Examples of Dialogue Education Designs
ch. 12 An On-Line Course Using Dialogue Education
ch. 13 Dialogue Education in School Leadership
ch. 14 Dialogue Education in Health Care Settings
ch. 15 Dialogue Education in a College Classroom

Appendix A: Glossary of Terms Used in Dialogue Education
Appendix B: Tough Verbs for Learning Tasks

References
Index
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The Living Classroom: Teaching and Collective Consciousness

Book
Christopher M. Bache
2008
State University of New York Press
BF311.B253 2008
Topics: Faith in the Classroom   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Describes the emergence of powerful fields of consciousness that influence students’ learning and personal transformation.
This pioneering work in teaching and transpersonal psychology explores the dynamics of collective consciousness in the classroom. Combining scientific research with personal accounts collected over thirty years, Christopher M. Bache examines the subtle influences that radiate invisibly around teachers as they work—unintended, cognitive resonances that spring up between teachers and students in the ...
Additional Info:
Describes the emergence of powerful fields of consciousness that influence students’ learning and personal transformation.
This pioneering work in teaching and transpersonal psychology explores the dynamics of collective consciousness in the classroom. Combining scientific research with personal accounts collected over thirty years, Christopher M. Bache examines the subtle influences that radiate invisibly around teachers as they work—unintended, cognitive resonances that spring up between teachers and students in the classroom. While these kinds of synchronistic connections are often overlooked by traditional academics, Bache demonstrates that they occur too frequently and are too pointed to be dismissed as mere coincidence. Drawing upon Rupert Sheldrake’s theory of morphic fields, Bache proposes that well-taught courses generate “learning fields” around them, forms of collective consciousness that can trigger new insights and startling personal transformations. Moving beyond theory, this book is rich with student stories and offers practical, hands-on strategies for teachers who want to begin working with these learning fields to take their teaching to a more conscious level. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part I The Emergence of Fields of Consciousness
ch. 1 Resonance in the Classroom
ch. 2 Group Fields, Group Minds
ch. 3 The Science of Fields

Part II Working with Fields of Consciousness
ch. 4 Working with Fields
ch. 5 Cafe Conversations

Part III Teaching in a Living Universe
ch. 6 Waking Up in the Classroom
Student Stories
Introduction
ch. 7 Where We Begin
ch. 8 Healing through Writing
ch. 9 Spiritual Experiences
ch. 10 Conversion Experiences
ch. 11 Touched by Death
ch. 12 Personal Discoveries

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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Beauty for Truth's Sake: On the Re-enchantment of Education

Book
Stratford Caldecott
2009
Brazos Press, Grand Rapids, MI
LB14.7.C34 2009
Topics: Liberal Arts   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Much of the confusion and meaninglessness of the twenty-first century stems from the fragmentation of knowledge. Our postmodern times cry out for a return to wholeness. Enter Stratford Caldecott, who calls for renewal in education in Beauty for Truth's Sake. By reclaiming the classic liberal arts and viewing disciplines such as science and mathematics through a poetic lens, the author explains that unity is present within diversity. Ultimately, God is ...
Additional Info:
Much of the confusion and meaninglessness of the twenty-first century stems from the fragmentation of knowledge. Our postmodern times cry out for a return to wholeness. Enter Stratford Caldecott, who calls for renewal in education in Beauty for Truth's Sake. By reclaiming the classic liberal arts and viewing disciplines such as science and mathematics through a poetic lens, the author explains that unity is present within diversity. Ultimately, God is behind all truth.

This book will benefit parents, homeschoolers, lifelong learners, and readers interested in the history of ideas. It is appropriate for Christian college and university students and will play an especially important role in curriculum development.

EXCERPT
I've heard many exasperated parents say to me, "If I can just get my kid through their teenage years then they'll be okay." There have been many tiring and frustrating days where I could agree with that sentiment. But I think you would agree with me that "just making it through" wouldn't exactly qualify as a lofty goal. As if somehow the goal of parenting is just to protect or tolerate and then hope for the best. That goal doesn't take into account the sponge effect.

Last year, our daughter got a package of animal bathtub sponges as a gift. Each sponge was the size of a large multi-colored vitamin. She dropped one in the sink and we all watched as it started to grow. Within a few minutes it was the size of her hand. The sponge seemed to just keep soaking and soaking. Once it grew to its full size it never shrunk back again. After we drained the basin, we set the sponge animal on a towel and the water slowly seeped out of it. It took a longtime for it to dry out because it had taken in so much.

Teens are like those sponges. They're not just trying to "make it through" these few years. They're soaking up everything in their environment. And they learn first and foremost through their experiences with you. If you have always responded to people in our culture out of fear, your teen will generally tend to do the same. If you respond with anger, so will your teen. If you model a disdain for the people that make up your culture, your teen may also. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: "To Sing with the Universe"

ch. 1. The Tradition of the Four Ways
The Great Tradition
Adapting the Medieval Model
Beauty for Truth's Sake
Beauty on the Cross

ch. 2. Educating the Poetic Imagination
"A Beauty Which Defies Time"
Rediscovering Poetic Knowledge
The Symbolic Cosmos
A Key to the Ancient Mysteries

ch. 3. The Lost Wisdom of the World
Sacred Number
Beyond Pythagoras
Irrational Beauty
Phi and the Natural Numbers
Symmetry

ch. 4. The Golden Circle
A Journey into God
Theology of the Trinity
In Search of the Logos
Geometry as Prophecy
The Goldem Circle

ch. 5. "Quiring to the Young-Eyed Cherubims"
Good Vibrations
Humane Architecture
At Home in the Cosmos
Secrets of the Sky
The End of the Road

ch. 6. The Liturgical Comsummation of Cosmology
The Construction of Modernity
A Sense of the Sacred
Liturgy as Remembering to Give
An Education in Beauty
The Holy City

Conclusion: Beyond Faith and Reason
Bibliiography
Index
Additional Info:
In Teaching Critical Thinking, renowned cultural critic and progressive educator bell hooks addresses some of the most compelling issues facing teaching issues facing teachers in and out of the classroom today.

In a series of short, accessible, and enlightening essays, hooks explores of the confounding and sometimes controversial topics that teachers and students have urged her to address since the publication of the previous best-selling volums in her ...
Additional Info:
In Teaching Critical Thinking, renowned cultural critic and progressive educator bell hooks addresses some of the most compelling issues facing teaching issues facing teachers in and out of the classroom today.

In a series of short, accessible, and enlightening essays, hooks explores of the confounding and sometimes controversial topics that teachers and students have urged her to address since the publication of the previous best-selling volums in her Teaching series, Teaching to Transgress and Teaching Community. The issues are varied and broad, from whether meaningful teaching can take place in a large classroom setting to confronting issues of self-esteem. One professor, for example, asked how black female professors can maintain positive authority in a classroom without being seen through the lens of negative racist, sexist stereotypes. One teacher asked how to handle tears in the classroom. while another wanted to know how to use humor as a tool for learning.

Addressing questions of race, gender, and class in this work, hooks discusses the complex balance that allows us to teach, value, and learn from works written by racist and sexist authors. Highlighting the importance of reading, she insists on the primacy of free speech, a democratic education of literacy. Throughout these essays, she celebrates the transformative power of critical thinking. This is provocative, powerful, and joyful intellectual work. It is a must read for anyone who is at all interested in education today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Critical Thinking
ch. 2 Democratic Education
ch. 3 Engaged Pedaeos
ch. 4 Decolonization
ch. 5 Inteerit
ch. 6 Purpose
ch. 7 Collaboration
ch. 8 Conversation
ch. 9 Telling the Story
ch. 10 Sharing the story
ch. 11 Imagination
ch. 12 To Lecture or Not
ch. 13 Humor in the Classroom
ch. 14 Crying Time
ch. 15 Conflict
ch. 16 Feminist Revolution
ch. 17 Black, Female, and Academic
ch. 18 Learning Past the Hate
ch. 19 Honoring Teachers
ch. 20 Teachers against Teaching
ch. 21 Self-Esteem
ch. 22 The Joy of Reading
ch. 23 Intellectual Life
ch. 24 Writing Books for Children
ch. 25 Spirituality
ch. 26 Touch
ch. 27 To Love Again
ch. 28 Feminist Change
ch. 29 Moving Past Race and Gender
ch. 30 Talking Sex
ch. 31 Teaching as Prophetic Vocation
ch. 32 Practical Wisdom

Index
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"Teaching the Facts, Inculcating Knowledge, or Instilling Wisdom? Rationale for a Textbook in BS101"

TTR
Bulkeley, Tim
2009
Teaching Theology and Religion 12, no. 4 (2009): 352-353
BL41.T4
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
Additional Info:
A 1000 word essay on using textbooks in introductory courses (or not).
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Study, Power and the University

Book
Sarah J. Mann
2008
Open University Press, McGraw-Hill Education, New York
LB2322.2.M355 2008
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This book highlights the effects of power within the higher educational process, and argues that in order to understand the student experience we have to take seriously the institution as a context for learning.

It considers key questions such as:

• Why is the student experience of higher education sometimes negative or restricted?
• How does power operate within the institution?
• What are the forces that ...
Additional Info:
This book highlights the effects of power within the higher educational process, and argues that in order to understand the student experience we have to take seriously the institution as a context for learning.

It considers key questions such as:

• Why is the student experience of higher education sometimes negative or restricted?
• How does power operate within the institution?
• What are the forces that limit or enable student agency?
• How can institutions of higher education create conditions which best support more enabling forces?

Higher Education has its own particular culture, social relations and practices, governed by social and discursive norms. It is always implicated in relations of power through its function in society and its effects on individuals. This book considers how, for the student, these effects can be enabling and engaging, or limiting and diminishing. In exploring the effects of the institutionalization of learning and the workings of power implicated within this, it sets out to add to more cognitive and pedagogic ways of understanding student experience in higher education.

Study, Power and the University provides key reading for educational researchers and developers, academics and higher education managers.

Sarah J. Mann is Senior Lecturer in the Learning and Teaching Centre at the University of Glasgow. She is head of the Academic Development Unit and is responsible for the MEd in Academic Practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures and tables
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction

Part 1 The student experience
ch. 2 Student approaches to learning
ch. 3 The experience of being a student

Part 2 The institution as a context for learning
ch. 4 Context and power
ch. 5 The economic and social functions of higher education
ch. 6 The institutionalisation of time, space, activity and the self
ch. 7 Learning as discursive practice
ch. 8 The special case of assessment

Part 3 Possible futures: concentration or differentiation
ch. 9 Concentration: the self and the limiting forces of the institution
ch. 10 Differentiation: the enabling forces of the institution

Notes
Appendix Table of studies of the student experience
References
Index
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"God's Stuff: The Constructive Powers of Chaos For Teaching Religion"

TTR
Willhauck, Susan
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 1 (2010): 64-70
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Order and organization are valued in the classroom, and there is a prevailing understanding that chaos should be avoided. Yet chaos can also be potent space or a source from which new things spring forth. This article investigates biblical, scientific, and cultural understandings of chaos to discover how these contribute to a revelatory metaphor for teaching. It examines Catherine Keller’s engagement with chaos theory in creation theology for pedagogical ...
Additional Info:
Order and organization are valued in the classroom, and there is a prevailing understanding that chaos should be avoided. Yet chaos can also be potent space or a source from which new things spring forth. This article investigates biblical, scientific, and cultural understandings of chaos to discover how these contribute to a revelatory metaphor for teaching. It examines Catherine Keller’s engagement with chaos theory in creation theology for pedagogical implications. Using a framework suggested in the work of Mary Elizabeth Moore, the author interprets powers and practices of chaos teaching and provides examples of how the metaphor plays out in the teaching of religion and theology.
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Learning through Storytelling in Higher Education: Using Reflection & Experience to Improve Learning

Book
Janice McDrury and Maxine Alterio
2003
Kogan Page Limited, Sterling, VA
LB1042.M33 2003
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
"Learning Through Storytelling in Higher Education" explores ways of using storytelling as a teaching and learning tool. When storytelling is formalized in meaningful ways, it can capture everyday examples of practice and turn them into an opportunity to learn - encouraging both reflection, a deeper understanding of a topic and stimulating critical thinking skills. The technique can accommodate diverse cultural, emotional and experiential incidents, and may be used in many ...
Additional Info:
"Learning Through Storytelling in Higher Education" explores ways of using storytelling as a teaching and learning tool. When storytelling is formalized in meaningful ways, it can capture everyday examples of practice and turn them into an opportunity to learn - encouraging both reflection, a deeper understanding of a topic and stimulating critical thinking skills. The technique can accommodate diverse cultural, emotional and experiential incidents, and may be used in many different contexts eg formal/informal; one-on-one/group setting. The authors outline the different models of storytelling and explain how to make use of this technique and encourage a 'storytelling culture' within the workplace or in tutorial sessions. Academic yet accessible, this book provides a new perspective on learning techniques and will be a great asset to any educator looking to improve reflective practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Storytelling Influences
ch. 3 Storytelling Developments
ch. 4 Storytelling as a Theory of Learning
ch. 5 Finding Stories
ch. 6 Telling Stories about Practice
ch. 7 Expanding Stories through Reflection
ch. 8 Processing Practice Stories
ch. 9 Reconstructing Stories within a Group Setting
ch. 10 Ethical and Assessment Considerations
ch. 11 Reflections

References
Index
Subject Index
Biographical Notes
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Educating for Wisdom and Compassion: Creating Conditions for Timeless Learning

Book
Miller, John P.
2006
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LC1011.M54 2006
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Essential principles of timeless learning include attention, contemplation, connection, participation, and responsibility; helping students achieve a sense of purpose; and improving alertness and mental health. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Essential principles of timeless learning include attention, contemplation, connection, participation, and responsibility; helping students achieve a sense of purpose; and improving alertness and mental health. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
About the Author

Part I Timeless Learning: Definitions and Fundamentals
ch. 1 Timeless Learning
What Is Timeless Learning?
What Are the Characteristics of Timeless Learning?
Holistic/Integrative
Embodied
Connected
Soulful
Transformative
Flow
Participatory
Non-dualistic
Mysterious and unexplainable
Immeasurable
What Does Timeless Learning Bring to Today's Classrooms?
Conclusion
References

ch. 2 The Perennial Philosophy: A Relaxed Universalism
Foundations of the Perennial Philosophy
The interconnected nature of reality and the mysterious unity of the universe
The intimate connection between the individual's inner self, or soul, and the mysterious unity
Wisdom or knowledge of the mysterious unity can be developed through various contemplative practices
Values are derived from seeing and realizing the interconnectedness of reality
Awareness of the mysterious unity of existence leads to social action to counter injustice and human suffering
References

Part II Timeless Learning: Processes and Practices
ch. 3 Letting Go and Becoming Empty
Psychosynthesis and Dis-identification
David Hunt
Krishnamurti
The Bhagavad Gita and Non-Attachment
Spiritual Knowing
Just Let Go
References

ch. 4 Attention and Meditation
Meditation
Forms of Meditation
Intellectual Meditation
Emotional Meditation
Physical Meditation
Action Meditation
Meditation Practices
Insight
Body Scan
Mantra
Visualization
Movement meditation
Getting Started
Meditation With Children
Just One Minute by Naomi Baer
References

ch. 5 Compassion, Caring,and Lovingkindness
Kindness, Empathy, Compassion, and Love
Lovingkindness Practice
Caring in Schools
School with Forest and Meadow (Ojiya School)
Service Learning
Engaged Service
Community-Based Work
To Be and to Have
References

ch. 6 Contemplation, Mindfulness, and Presence
Mindfulness
Presence
Contemplation and Mindfulness in Classrooms
Contemplation and Action
References

Part III Timeless Learning: Perspectives, Examples, and Outcomes
ch. 7 Educational Perspectives on Timeless Learning
Transcendental Education
Emerson
Thoreau
Bronson Alcott
Holistic Education
Linear Thinking and Intuition
Relationship Between Mind and Body
Subject Connections
Community Connections
Earth Connections
Self Connections
Slow Education
Conclusion
References

ch. 8 Examples of Timeless Learning
Krishnamurti Schools
Principles of Learning
The School
The Teacher
Waldorf Education
Steiner's View of Development
Rhythm
Montessori Education
Conclusion
References

ch. 9 Creating Conditions for Timeless Learning in Public Schools
Work on Yourself
Be Fully Present
Recognize the Importance of the Nonverbal
Honor Silence
Develop a Rhythm
Integrate Timeless Learning with other Forms of Learning
Balancing Spontenaity and Planning
Don't Forget the Body
Live Your Own Truth
Acknowledge the Mystery
Let Your Humanity Come Through
References

ch. 10 The Fruits of Timeless Learning
The Present Educational Context
The Results of Timeless Learning
Research on Contemplative Practices
My Own Research
Nature of Mediation Practice
Personal Effects of Meditation Practice
Professional Effects of Meditation Practice
Profiles
Ultimate Outcomes of Timeless Learning
Wisdom and Compassion
Joy: The Singing Soul
Awe and Wonder
Wholeness
Sense of Purpose

References
Bibliography
Index
TTR cover image

"Between Guru and Deceiver? Responding to Unchosen Metaphors in the Religious Studies Classroom"

TTR
Carr, Amy, and Simmons, John K.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 2 (2010): 156-168
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Two troublesome portraits of religious studies professors often exist in the minds of some students at any given time: the Guru, or wise spiritual teacher, and the Deceiver. These metaphors capture student perceptions of us that may be ill-informed and beyond our control. We will examine and compare how our own chosen metaphors for teaching – theological typologist and neutral enthusiast – respond creatively to the unchosen metaphors of guru or deceiver. ...
Additional Info:
Two troublesome portraits of religious studies professors often exist in the minds of some students at any given time: the Guru, or wise spiritual teacher, and the Deceiver. These metaphors capture student perceptions of us that may be ill-informed and beyond our control. We will examine and compare how our own chosen metaphors for teaching – theological typologist and neutral enthusiast – respond creatively to the unchosen metaphors of guru or deceiver. We cannot avoid being cast as gurus/deceivers, but we can discern how our own metaphors for teaching engage "unchosen" student metaphors for us. This exercise can enhance our self-awareness about our own normative agendas in the classroom, and help to sharpen colleagues' conversations about our sometimes differing assumptions regarding the discipline and teaching of religious studies.
Cover image

The Philosophy of Education: An Introduction

Book
Bailey, Richard. ed.
2010
Continuum International London
LB14.7.P543 2010
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This textbook seeks to explore the purpose and values of the philosophy of education, and specific issues of contemporary relevance. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This textbook seeks to explore the purpose and values of the philosophy of education, and specific issues of contemporary relevance. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Contributors
Acknowledgements
Introduction

ch. 1 What Is the Philosophy of Education? (Paul Standish)
ch. 2 Does Education Need Philosophy? (Richard Pring)
ch. 3 What Is Education For? (Roger Marples)
ch. 4 What Should Go on the Curriculum? (Michael Hand)
ch. 5 Can We Teach Ethics? (James C Conroy)
ch. 6 Do Children Have Any Rights? (Harry Brighhose, Paula McAvoy)
ch. 7 Can Schools Make Good Citizens? (Tristan McCowan)
ch. 8 Should the State Control Education? (Judith Suissa)
ch. 9 Educational Opportunities - Who Shall We Leave Out? (CArrie Winstanley)
ch. 10 Should Parents Have a Say in Their Children's Schooling? (Dianne Gereluk)
ch. 11 What's Wrong with Indoctrination and Brainwashing? (Richard Bailey)
ch. 12 Reading the Philosophy of Education (John Gingell)
ch. 13 Writing the Philosophy of Education< (Richard Smith) br>
References
Useful Websites
Index
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Christianity and Moral Identity in Higher Education

Book
Glanzer, Perry L., and Ream, Todd C.
2009
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LB2324.G53 2009
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Many scholarly visions of morality in higher education suggest that moral instruction should deal primarily with a person’s professional or political identity. In contrast, Glanzer and Ream argue that a more wholistic moral education takes place within a university committed to a tradition that can set forth a comprehensive ideal for the school and its students about human well-being. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Many scholarly visions of morality in higher education suggest that moral instruction should deal primarily with a person’s professional or political identity. In contrast, Glanzer and Ream argue that a more wholistic moral education takes place within a university committed to a tradition that can set forth a comprehensive ideal for the school and its students about human well-being. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: The Turn to Less than Human Moral Education: The Moral Reservations of Contemporary Universities

Part. I The Story of Moral Education in Higher Education
ch. 1 Love in the University: Moral Development and Moral Orientation
ch. 2 Searching for a Common, Tradition-Free Approach to Moral Education: The Failed Quest
ch. 3 The Rise of Less than Human Moral Education
ch. 4 The Quandary Facing Contemporary Higher Education: Moral Education in Postmodern Universities

Part II A More Human Education: Moral Identity and Moral Orientation
ch. 5 Who Are We? The Identities Universities Use To Provide Moral Orientation
ch. 6 Searching for a More Human Moral Education: Three Approaches
ch. 7 Moral Education in the Christian Tradition: Contemporary Exemplars
ch. 8 Moral Identity, Moral Autonomy, and Critical Thinking

Part III Strengthening the Moral Tradition of Christian Humanism
ch. 9 Christian Humanism and Christ-Centered Education: The Redemptive Development of Humans and Human Creations
ch. 10 A More Human Christian Education: Cultivating and Ordering the Great Identities

Conclusion: Transforming Human Animals into Saints
Notes
Select Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Contemporary Theories and Practice in Education

Book
Bertrand, Yves
1995
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB14.7.B37 1995
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Contemporary Theories and Practice in Education explores the many lines of thinking that may influence how we teach. Bertrand explains who contributed what to our ways of thinking about learning and teaching - and why those contributions are important.

This book invites you to enrich your teaching through the thoughts, research, and proposals of theorists such as Maslow, Piaget, Rogers, Vygotsky, Adler, Freire, and dozens of others. (From ...
Additional Info:
Contemporary Theories and Practice in Education explores the many lines of thinking that may influence how we teach. Bertrand explains who contributed what to our ways of thinking about learning and teaching - and why those contributions are important.

This book invites you to enrich your teaching through the thoughts, research, and proposals of theorists such as Maslow, Piaget, Rogers, Vygotsky, Adler, Freire, and dozens of others. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Spiritualistic Theories
ch. 2 Personalist Theories
ch. 3 Psychocognitive Theories
ch. 4 Technological Theories
ch. 5 Social Cognitive Theories
ch. 6 Social Theories
ch. 7 Academic Theories
ch. 8 General Conclusion

Contemporary Theories and Practice in Education Matrix
Bibliography
Index
Cover image

The Activities of Teaching

Book
Green, Thomas F.
1998
Educator's International Press, Inc. Troy, New York
LB1025.2.G67 1998
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Written during a time when ordinary language analysis dominated Anglo-American philosophy, The Activities of Teaching ranks among the most thorough and illuminating examinations of the concept of teaching. However, it is more than a text about teaching, ; it is a text that teaches. Written with grace and clarity, the reader is always the author's first consideration. Each chapter contains two parts; the first extends and deepens the analysis of teaching; ...
Additional Info:
Written during a time when ordinary language analysis dominated Anglo-American philosophy, The Activities of Teaching ranks among the most thorough and illuminating examinations of the concept of teaching. However, it is more than a text about teaching, ; it is a text that teaches. Written with grace and clarity, the reader is always the author's first consideration. Each chapter contains two parts; the first extends and deepens the analysis of teaching; the second provides the reader with the background necessary to grasp the increasingly sophisticated argument. Each chapter concludes with a set of questions for further exploration of the ideas presented in the text.

Suitable as a text for graduate courses in foundations and philosophy of education, in teaching and teacher education, or as a reference for those who study teaching, this work remains one of the very best analytical treatments of the concept of teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 The Structure of Teaching
ch. 2 The Modes of Teaching
ch. 3 Teaching And The Formation Of Beliefs
ch. 4 Teaching, Knowing, And The Problem of Certainty
ch. 5 Teaching, Truth, And False Belief
ch. 6 Learning
ch. 7 Teaching, Explaining, and Giving Reasons
ch. 8 Judging
ch. 9 Wondering And The Roots of Motivation
ch. 10 A Nonanalytic Postscript On The Activities of Teaching

Index
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Cultivating the Spirit: How College Can Enhance Students' Inner Lives

Book
Alexander W. Astin, Helen S. Astin, Jennifer A. Lindholm
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB3609.A78 2010
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Praise for Cultivating the Spirit

A groundbreaking study of the spiritual growth of college students.... The spiritual dimension of higher education has been explored from a variety of angles for the past twenty years, but not until now have we had a competent and comprehensive body of data organized around well-defined dimensions of this complex phenomenon. This is an essential book for anyone in academia who cares about ...
Additional Info:
Praise for Cultivating the Spirit

A groundbreaking study of the spiritual growth of college students.... The spiritual dimension of higher education has been explored from a variety of angles for the past twenty years, but not until now have we had a competent and comprehensive body of data organized around well-defined dimensions of this complex phenomenon. This is an essential book for anyone in academia who cares about the education of the whole person.

An extremely important book for layperson and professional alike. A stunning wake-up call for higher education—highly recommended!

Cultivating the Spirit makes a unique and important contribution to one of the least examined yet most fundamental questions about undergraduate education: how students acquire the values and convictions that help to give meaning and purpose to their lives.... The authors provide a wealth of valuable findings about this vital process and its effects on student achievement, well-being, and personal growth in college.

The fruit of a decade of elegantly designed and compelling research, Cultivating the Spirit provides timely and significant data for reorienting the conversation about the relationships among intellectual inquiry, traditional academic values, and the formation of the inner life. Informative, clearly written, essential, and evocative reading for today's faculty across all institutions—public and private, secular and religious. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Why Spirituality Matters
ch. 2 Assessing Spiritual and Religious Qualities
ch. 3 Spiritual Quest: The Search for Meaning and Purpose
ch. 4 Equanimity
ch. 5 Spirituality in Practice: Caring For and About Others
ch. 6 The Religious Life of College Students
ch. 7 Religious Struggle and Skepticism
ch. 8 How Spiritual Growth Affects Educational and Personal Development
ch. 9 Higher Education and the Life of the Spirit

Appendix: Study Methodology
Notes
References
Index
Cover image

Pedagogy of Place: Seeing Space as Cultural Education

Book
Callejo-Perez, David M., Fain, Stephen M., Slater, Judith J., eds.
2003
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LC189.P39 2004
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
From the Pubisher

Pedagogy of Place focuses on the embodiment of purposefully created space resulting from the creation and enactment of its participants' cultural and social conditions. It is also about education, the purposeful creation of spaces that comprise learning environments, and the aesthetic dimensions of the created space called school. The essays present the concept of space - the place where learning happens and where the lives ...
Additional Info:
From the Pubisher

Pedagogy of Place focuses on the embodiment of purposefully created space resulting from the creation and enactment of its participants' cultural and social conditions. It is also about education, the purposeful creation of spaces that comprise learning environments, and the aesthetic dimensions of the created space called school. The essays present the concept of space - the place where learning happens and where the lives of student and teacher can thrive or wither - a place rich in human potential. In an attempt to address the diversity of what we define as space, Pedagogy of Place addresses issues around place and identity in three distinct strands: as social, as aesthetic, and as political and historical. As a collection, these essays are attempts to open conversations with persons interested in what counts as curriculum, teaching, and learning within the spaces and places that release human potential and nurture the human spirit.

Table Of Content:
Foreword: Reflections on the Place of Curriculum
Acknowledgements
Introduction: Understanding Place as a Social Aspect of Education

ch. 1 The Construction of Public Space (Stephen M. Fain)
ch. 2 The Erosion of the Public Space (Judith Slater)
ch. 3 The Fall of the Public Academic (Donna Adair)
ch. 4 Traces, Patterns, Texture: In Search of Aesthetic Teaching/Learning Encounters (Margaret Mcaintyre Latta)
ch. 5 An Environment for Developing Souls: The Ideas of Rudolph Steiner (Bruce Uhrmacher)
ch. 6 School as Parkland: The Re-invention of a "Story of School" (Cheryl Craig)
ch. 7 Away with All Teachers: The Cultural Politics of Home Schooling (Michael Apple)
ch. 8 Identity, Literature, Schools, and Race: Southern Writers and Literature as a Metaphor for Place (David M. Callejo)
ch. 9 Getting from Farmhouse to Schoolhouse: School Consolidation, Pupil Transportation, and the Limits of Educational Reform in Mississippi (Corey Lesseig)

Epilogue
List of Contributors
Article cover image

"Academic Freedom and Liberal Humanism: Invited Replies to Stanley Fish's "When Sauce for the Goose Isn't Sauce for the Gander"

Article
McCutcheon, Russell T.
2000
The Council of Societies For The Study of Religion, Volume 29, Number 2, November 2000
Topics: Liberal Arts   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Teaching, Learning, and the Meditative Mind

Book
Wingerter, J. Richard
2003
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LB1025.3.W55 2003
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Though there is a general awareness of the need for change in education relative to school organization, teaching and learning, curriculum, and school administration; most, if not all, of what is said is only partially processed by the reader's mind. The need for profound, revolutionary change in the way we think about education is highlighted in this work. Author J. Richard Wingerter addresses the natural shortcomings of the mind's thinking ...
Additional Info:
Though there is a general awareness of the need for change in education relative to school organization, teaching and learning, curriculum, and school administration; most, if not all, of what is said is only partially processed by the reader's mind. The need for profound, revolutionary change in the way we think about education is highlighted in this work. Author J. Richard Wingerter addresses the natural shortcomings of the mind's thinking process in an attempt to bring about fresh, new ideas to contemporary education literature. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 A Call for Revolution in EducationTeaching,
ch. 2 Learning, and the Partially Functioning Mind
ch. 3 Teaching, Learning, and the Fully Functioning Meditative Mind: The "How" Question
ch. 4 Schools and the Meditative Mind
ch. 5 The Fully Educated Mind: Observerless Observation and Listenerless Listening
ch. 6 Habitless Living
ch. 7 Freedom From All Psychological and Spiritual Authority
ch. 8 Full Intelligence, Total Love, and Living in Relationship to Complete Order
ch. 9 Right Relationship, Right Behavior, and Selfless Living
ch. 10 Transformation

References
Index
Cover image

Learning in a Musical Key: Insight for Theology in Performative Mode

Book
Hess, Lisa M.
2011
Wipf & Stock Publishers, Eugene, OR
BV4020.H477 2011
Topics: Theological Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Learning in a Musical Key examines the multidimensional problem of the relationship between music and theological education. Lisa Hess argues that, in a delightful and baffling way, musical learning has the potential to significantly alter and inform our conception of the nature and process of theological learning. In exploring this exciting intersection of musical learning and theological training, Hess asks two probing questions. First, What does learning from music in ...
Additional Info:
Learning in a Musical Key examines the multidimensional problem of the relationship between music and theological education. Lisa Hess argues that, in a delightful and baffling way, musical learning has the potential to significantly alter and inform our conception of the nature and process of theological learning. In exploring this exciting intersection of musical learning and theological training, Hess asks two probing questions. First, What does learning from music in a performative mode require? Classical modes of theological education often founder on a dichotomy between theologically musical and educational discourses. It is extremely difficult for many to see how the perceivedly nonmusical learn from music. Is musicality a universally human potential? In exploring this question Hess turns to the music-learning theory of Edwin Gordon, which explores music's unique mode of teaching/learning, its primarily aural-oral mode.

This challenge leads to the study's second question: How does a theologian, in the disciplinary sense, integrate a performative mode into critical discourse? Tracking the critical movements of this problem, Hess provides an inherited, transformational logic as a feasible path for integrating a performative mode into multidimensional learning. This approach emerges as a distinctly relational, embodied, multidimensional, and non-correlational performative-mode theology that breaks new ground in the contemporary theological landscape. As an implicitly trinitarian method, rooted in the relationality of God, this non-correlational method offers a practical theological contribution to the discipline of Christian spirituality, newly claimed here as a discipline of transformative teaching/learning through the highly contextualized and self-implicated scholar into relationally formed communities, and ultimately into the world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Hildegard of Bingen and the Letters to the Prelates at Mainz
ch. 2 Learning and the Conundrum of Aptitude for the Musical/Non-Musical
ch. 3 HowWe Learn Music
ch. 4 Religious Education and the Challenges of Learning in Music
ch. 5 Learning in a Musical Key

Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Article cover image

"Pedagogy with the Repressed: Critical Reflections from a Post-9/11 Biblical Studies Classroom"

Article
Lopez, Davina C.
2011
Faith, Feminism, and Scholarship: The Next Generation, Ch. 10, pp. 163-180, Palgrave Macmillan, New York
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

Pedagogy Beyond Piracy: Un-Learning the White Body to Recreate a Body of Learning

TTR
Perkinson, James W.
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 4 (2012): 323-337
BL.T4 v.15 no. 4 2012
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This essay highlights a range of questions that arise when white suburban students engage urban neighborhoods of poverty and color in the United States. How can involvement in an “other” context move beyond “educational tourism”? The essay presents a pedagogical style that raises questions of the kind of socialized body one inhabits: either one shaped by presumptions of control and rights of academic observation, or one mobilized to risk involvement ...
Additional Info:
This essay highlights a range of questions that arise when white suburban students engage urban neighborhoods of poverty and color in the United States. How can involvement in an “other” context move beyond “educational tourism”? The essay presents a pedagogical style that raises questions of the kind of socialized body one inhabits: either one shaped by presumptions of control and rights of academic observation, or one mobilized to risk involvement in a differently communalized episteme. And while the pedagogy described may not be replicable by faculty who do not share the author's background or cross-cultural orientation, the rhetorical style of the essay itself enacts the tensions that this pedagogy contends with: the efforts of a white male educator – altered by decades of inner city involvement – to open “white” space in the classroom to other norms of embodiment and other modes of learning. Here is the necessity and impossibility of moving beyond “educational tourism.”
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Teaching with Reverence: Reviving an Ancient Virtue for Today's Schools

Book
Rud, A. G., and Garrison, Jim
2012
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LC311.T435 2012
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Reverence is a forgotten virtue in teaching and learning. Indeed, it is a largely forgotten virtue in American society. This book argues that there is much more to teaching students than merely imparting knowledge. Good teaching involves forming character, molding destinies, creating an enduring passion for learning, appreciating beauty, caring for others, and much more. In some sense of the word, teaching is a spiritual, although not necessarily a religious, ...
Additional Info:
Reverence is a forgotten virtue in teaching and learning. Indeed, it is a largely forgotten virtue in American society. This book argues that there is much more to teaching students than merely imparting knowledge. Good teaching involves forming character, molding destinies, creating an enduring passion for learning, appreciating beauty, caring for others, and much more. In some sense of the word, teaching is a spiritual, although not necessarily a religious, activity. When done well, it cultivates human intimacy and allows teachers to find creative self-expression in classroom community. The essays gathered here examine reverence as a way to understand some of the spiritual dimensions of classroom teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Reverence and Teaching: Reviving an Ancient Virtue for Today’s Schools
ch. 2 The Practice of Reverent Teaching
ch. 3 Reverence and Love in Teaching
ch. 4 “To Seek by Way of Silence”
ch. 5 ‘Spots of Time That Glow’--Reverence, Epiphany, and the Teaching Life
ch. 6 Awakening Reverence: The Role of Descriptive Inquiry in Developing Perception and Reverence-The Case of the Prospect School Teacher Education Program
ch. 8 Risking Reverence
ch. 9 Reverence for What? A Teacher’s Quest
ch. 10 Lesson One: Reverence
ch. 11 Quotidian Sublimity
ch. 12 Reverence for Things Not Seen: Implied Creators in Works of Art, Implied Teachers in Creative Pedagogy
TTR cover image

A Wabash Moment, or DeRogatis' Three Tips on Teaching

TTR
DeRogatis, Amy
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 174-175
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

The Wabash Center: A Hospitable Home for Teaching and Learning

TTR
Brown, William P.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 172-173
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

A New Sacred Grove

TTR
Hess, Lisa M.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 177-178
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

Ignatius and “The Wabash Way”

TTR
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 187-188
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

“They looked like sheep without a shepherd”: Hospitality and Adult Learners

TTR
Hotz, Kendra
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 180-181
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

The Artifact Paper: Challenging Moral Dualism

TTR
McNally, Vincent J.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 185-186
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

Hospitality and Courage

TTR
Houck, Anita M.
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 181-182
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

Life in a “Community of Congruence”

TTR
Kirkpatrick, Shane
2007
Teaching Theology and Religion 10, no. 3 (2007): 182-183
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
TTR cover image

The Contemplative Bow in Teaching and Learning Pastoral Care

TTR
Koppel, Michael S.
2013
Teaching Theology and Religion 16, no. 1 (2013): 76-88
BL41.T4 v.16 no. 1
Topics: Theological Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This article elucidates theoretical underpinnings for the use of one’s self in the pastoral theological classroom. The contemplative bow is developed as a capacious metaphor to describe appropriate self use and its necessary importance in the teaching and learning of pastoral arts in a theological curriculum. Central to the argument is the assumption that effective teaching and learning in pastoral care emerges from awareness and knowledge of self as ...
Additional Info:
This article elucidates theoretical underpinnings for the use of one’s self in the pastoral theological classroom. The contemplative bow is developed as a capacious metaphor to describe appropriate self use and its necessary importance in the teaching and learning of pastoral arts in a theological curriculum. Central to the argument is the assumption that effective teaching and learning in pastoral care emerges from awareness and knowledge of self as well as letting go of self in beneficial service with others. Analytical engagement of educational, theological, and psychological theory informs practice for the professional school classroom.
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Turn it and Turn it Again: Studies in the Teaching and Learning of Classical Jewish Texts

Book
Fendrick, Susan P. and Levisohn, Jon A., eds.
2013
Academic Studies Press, Brighton, MA
BM71.T876 2011
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The study of classical Jewish texts is flourishing in day schools and adult education, synagogues and summer camps, universities and yeshivot. But serious inquiry into the practices and purposes of such study is far rarer. In this book, a diverse collection of empirical and conceptual studies illuminates particular aspects of the teaching of Bible and rabbinic literature to, and the learning of, children and adults. In addition to providing specific ...
Additional Info:
The study of classical Jewish texts is flourishing in day schools and adult education, synagogues and summer camps, universities and yeshivot. But serious inquiry into the practices and purposes of such study is far rarer. In this book, a diverse collection of empirical and conceptual studies illuminates particular aspects of the teaching of Bible and rabbinic literature to, and the learning of, children and adults. In addition to providing specific insights into the pedagogy of Jewish texts, these studies serve as models of what the disciplined study of pedagogy can look like. This book will be of interest to teachers of Jewish texts in all contexts, and will be particularly valuable for the professional development of Jewish educators. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Foreword

ch. 1 Cultivating Curiosity about the Teaching of Classical Jewish Texts (Jon A. Levisohn, and Susan P. Fendrick)

Part 1: Focus on Subject Matter
ch. 2 A Map of Orientations to the Teaching of Bible (Barry W. Holtz)
ch. 3 What Are the Orientations to the Teaching of Rabbinic Literature? (Jon A. Levisohn)
ch. 4 Teaching Talmudic Hermeneutics Using a Semiotic Model of Law (Daniel Reifman)
ch. 5 Neusner, Brisk, and the Stam: Significant Methodologies for Meaningful Talmud Teaching and Study (Michael Chernick)

Part 2: Focus on Teaching and Teachers
ch. 6 The Pedagogy of Slowing Down: Teaching Talmud in a Summer Kollel (Jane Kanarek)
ch. 7 Serendipity and Pedagogy: Presenting the Weekly Parashah through Rabbinic Eyes (Carl M. Perkins)
ch. 8 Introducing the Bible: The Comparative Orientation in Practice (Jon A. Levisohn)

Part 3: Focus on Learning and Learners
ch. 9 Teaching Ancient Jewish History: An Experiment in Engaged Learning (Michael Satlow)
ch. 10 "A Judaism That Does Not Hide": Curricular Warrants for the Teaching of the Documentary Hypothesis in Community Jewish High Schools (Susan E. Tanchel)
ch. 11 Developing Student Awareness of the Talmud as an Edited Document: A Pedagogy for the Pluralistic Jewish Day School (Jeffrey Spitzer)
ch. 12 A Theory of Havruta Learning (Orit Kent)

Part 4: Focus on Context
ch. 13 "Torah Talk": Teaching Parashat Ha-shavua to Young Children (Shira Horowitz)
ch. 14 Using the Contextual Orientation to Facilitate the Study of Bible with Generation X (Beth Cousens, Susan P. Fendrick, and Jeremy S. Morrison)
ch. 15 Academic Study of the Talmud as a Spiritual Endeavor in Rabbinic Training: Delights and Dangers (Jonah Chanan Steinberg)
ch. 16 Teaching Rabbinics as an Ethical Endeavor and Teaching Ethics as a Rabbinic Endeavor (Sarra Lev)

List of Contributors
Index of Biblical and Rabbinic Sources
General Index
Cover image

A Curriculum of Imagination in an Era of Standardization: An Imaginative Dialogue with Maxine Greene and Paulo Freire

Book
Lake, Robert
2013
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LB1062.L34 2013
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
From the Publlisher

A Curriculum of Imagination in an Era of Standardization In A Curriculum of Imagination in an Era of Standardization: An Imaginative Dialogue with Maxine Greene and Paulo Freire, explores with the reader what is meant by imagination in the work of Maxine Greene and Paulo Freire and their relevance in an era of increasingly standardized and highly scripted practices in the field of education. The ...
Additional Info:
From the Publlisher

A Curriculum of Imagination in an Era of Standardization In A Curriculum of Imagination in an Era of Standardization: An Imaginative Dialogue with Maxine Greene and Paulo Freire, explores with the reader what is meant by imagination in the work of Maxine Greene and Paulo Freire and their relevance in an era of increasingly standardized and highly scripted practices in the field of education. The author explores how imagination permeates every aspect of life with the intent to develop capacity with the readers to look beyond the taken-for-granted, to question the normal, to develop various ways of knowing, seeing, feeling, and to imagine and act upon possibilities for positive social and educational change. The principal aspect of the work illustrated in this book that distinguishes it from other work is that an “imaginary” dialogue between Maxine Greene and Paulo Freire runs through the book using actual citations from their work. Each chapter starts with such a dialogue interspersed with the works of others and the author’s critical autobiographical reflections. With a brief overview of the socio-cultural evolution of imagination from pre-literate times to the present, the author explores some of the current iterations of imagination including the eugenics movement and “dark” imagination, sensing gaps and creative/critical imagination, metaphors as the language of imagination and empathy as social imagination. Reflecting upon emerging tensions, challenges, and possibilities curriculum workers face in such an era of standardization, the author calls for a curriculum of imagination.

After providing a brief overview of the socio-cultural evolution of imagination from pre-literate times to the present, the author looks at some of the current iterations of imagination, including the eugenics movement and “dark” imagination, sensing gaps and creative/critical imagination, metaphors as the language of the imagination, and empathy as social imagination. All of these ideas are then incorporated in a curriculum of imagination that is envisioned through Joseph Schwab’s four commonplaces of curriculum followed by a discussion of emerging tensions, issues and possibilities for praxis and scholarship in present and future inquiry.

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword: Landscapes of Education
Acknowledgements
Prologue

ch. 1 What is Imagination? An Imaginary Intellectiual Dialogue Between Maxine Greene and Paulo Freire
ch. 2 Walls of Standardization
ch. 3 Metaphor: The Language of the Imagination
ch. 4 Sensing Gaps
ch. 5 Toward Empathic Imagination
ch. 6 A Curriculum of Imagination in the Making

Epilogue
References
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Wabash tree

What Our Stories Teach Us: A Guide to Critical Reflection for College Faculty

Book
Shadlow, Linda K.
2013
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.S4725 2013
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This book encourages and enables faculty to deeply examine their teaching experiences, stories, and choices so real insight results. The author invites faculty to recall stories from their own biographies, demonstrates how to view these stories as critical incidents instead of mere reminiscences, and introduces an approach faculty can undertake to analyze then interpret these stories for the benefit of professional growth in teaching. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book encourages and enables faculty to deeply examine their teaching experiences, stories, and choices so real insight results. The author invites faculty to recall stories from their own biographies, demonstrates how to view these stories as critical incidents instead of mere reminiscences, and introduces an approach faculty can undertake to analyze then interpret these stories for the benefit of professional growth in teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

ch. 1 Storied Contexts
ch. 2 Living Stories
ch. 3 Storied Accounts
ch. 4 Seeking Patterns
ch. 5 Exploring Patterns
ch. 6 Locating Assumptions
ch. 7 Exploring Paradigmatic Assumptions
ch. 8 Storied Teaching

References
Index
Additional Info:
Personal reflection on the importance of informal moments in the education of students, and the implications for our metaphor of teaching.
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Personal reflection on the importance of informal moments in the education of students, and the implications for our metaphor of teaching.
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Teaching portfolios: formatively, the portfolio helps you reflect systematically and regularly upon your teaching; summatively, portfolios provide a much more comprehensive and accurate picture of your teaching than any other single device.
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Teaching portfolios: formatively, the portfolio helps you reflect systematically and regularly upon your teaching; summatively, portfolios provide a much more comprehensive and accurate picture of your teaching than any other single device.
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The discovery that students don't love the new teacher's content area is one of those school of hard knock lessons.
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The discovery that students don't love the new teacher's content area is one of those school of hard knock lessons.
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If you're willing to move outside your familiar and comfortable way of teaching and try team teaching, you'll find many challenges but also many rewards.
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If you're willing to move outside your familiar and comfortable way of teaching and try team teaching, you'll find many challenges but also many rewards.
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Here are the highest teaching goals to remind you that great teaching is more than a handful of teaching tricks strung together with modest aims and sufficient expertise in your field.
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Here are the highest teaching goals to remind you that great teaching is more than a handful of teaching tricks strung together with modest aims and sufficient expertise in your field.
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Link from Ohio State University, University Center for the Advancement of Teaching. Describes purpose and components of a philosophy of teaching statement. Gives formatting suggestions and includes examples from humanities, sciences, and social sciences. Provides links to other sites and hard copy references.
Additional Info:
Link from Ohio State University, University Center for the Advancement of Teaching. Describes purpose and components of a philosophy of teaching statement. Gives formatting suggestions and includes examples from humanities, sciences, and social sciences. Provides links to other sites and hard copy references.
Additional Info:
Link from Washington University in St. Louis, The Teaching Center. Suggests four questions to consider: 1) Why do you teach? 2) What do you teach? 3) How do you teach? 4) How do you measure your effectiveness?. Offers formatting tips and strategies for beginning the first draft of the document.
Additional Info:
Link from Washington University in St. Louis, The Teaching Center. Suggests four questions to consider: 1) Why do you teach? 2) What do you teach? 3) How do you teach? 4) How do you measure your effectiveness?. Offers formatting tips and strategies for beginning the first draft of the document.
Article cover image

"Writing a Statement of Teaching Philosophy for the Academic Job Search" (pdf)

Article
O’Neal, Chris; Meizlish, Deborah; and Kaplan, Matthew
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Link from University of Michigan, Center for Research on Learning and Teaching. Provides suggestions on how to begin drafting document. Includes characteristics of effective statements. Has a rubric with elements that search committee may consider. Addresses questions that job candidates may face relating to the teaching philosophy.
Additional Info:
Link from University of Michigan, Center for Research on Learning and Teaching. Provides suggestions on how to begin drafting document. Includes characteristics of effective statements. Has a rubric with elements that search committee may consider. Addresses questions that job candidates may face relating to the teaching philosophy.
Additional Info:
Link from Portland State University, Center for Academic Excellence. Focuses on PSU tenure and promotion guidelines but samples and suggestions for tailoring the portfolio may be helpful to those without such guidelines. Describes elements of teaching portfolio, community outreach portfolio, research portfolio, and professional development. portfolio.
Additional Info:
Link from Portland State University, Center for Academic Excellence. Focuses on PSU tenure and promotion guidelines but samples and suggestions for tailoring the portfolio may be helpful to those without such guidelines. Describes elements of teaching portfolio, community outreach portfolio, research portfolio, and professional development. portfolio.
Additional Info:
Link from Vanderbilt University, Center for Teaching. Describes purpose and elements of portfolio as well as general guidelines. Includes reflection questions on teaching to jump-start the writer. Has links to other websites with resources and exercises to help with drafting the portfolio.
Additional Info:
Link from Vanderbilt University, Center for Teaching. Describes purpose and elements of portfolio as well as general guidelines. Includes reflection questions on teaching to jump-start the writer. Has links to other websites with resources and exercises to help with drafting the portfolio.
Additional Info:
Article by James M. Lang in the Chronicle of Higher Education. Suggestions ways to create a teaching philosophy that will be remembered by a search committee or a tenure and promotion committee. Recommends: thinking about end goals; distinguishing general and specialized courses; giving specific examples; and citing influential sources.
Additional Info:
Article by James M. Lang in the Chronicle of Higher Education. Suggestions ways to create a teaching philosophy that will be remembered by a search committee or a tenure and promotion committee. Recommends: thinking about end goals; distinguishing general and specialized courses; giving specific examples; and citing influential sources.
Additional Info:
Article by James M. Lang in the Chronicle of Higher Education. Suggestions ways to create a teaching philosophy that will be remembered by a search committee or a tenure and promotion committee. Recommends: thinking about end goals; distinguishing general and specialized courses; giving specific examples; and citing influential sources.
Additional Info:
Article by James M. Lang in the Chronicle of Higher Education. Suggestions ways to create a teaching philosophy that will be remembered by a search committee or a tenure and promotion committee. Recommends: thinking about end goals; distinguishing general and specialized courses; giving specific examples; and citing influential sources.
Additional Info:
This graphic, with relevant links to Wikipedia, attempts to briefly describe all the established learning theories. It also maps the theories graphically 1) to one another, 2) to their key concepts and "world views," 3) to the learning theorists that developed them, and 4) to the scientific disciplines from which they arise.
Additional Info:
This graphic, with relevant links to Wikipedia, attempts to briefly describe all the established learning theories. It also maps the theories graphically 1) to one another, 2) to their key concepts and "world views," 3) to the learning theorists that developed them, and 4) to the scientific disciplines from which they arise.
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Jane Addams in the Classroom: Essays Bringing Jane Addams's Innovative Ideas On Education To The Teachers of Today and Tomorrow

Book
Schaafsma, David, ed.
2014
University of Illinois Press, Urbana, IL
LB875.A332 J36 2014
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Once intent on being good to people, Jane Addams later dedicated herself to the idea of being good with people, establishing mutually-responsive and reciprocal relationships with those she served at Hull House. The essays in Jane Addams in the Classroom explore how Addams's life, work, and philosophy provide invaluable lessons for teachers seeking connection with their students.

Balancing theoretical and practical ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Once intent on being good to people, Jane Addams later dedicated herself to the idea of being good with people, establishing mutually-responsive and reciprocal relationships with those she served at Hull House. The essays in Jane Addams in the Classroom explore how Addams's life, work, and philosophy provide invaluable lessons for teachers seeking connection with their students.

Balancing theoretical and practical considerations, the collection examines Addams's emphasis on listening to and learning from those around her and encourages contemporary educators to connect with students through innovative projects and teaching methods. In the first essays, Addams scholars lay out how her narratives drew on experience, history, and story to explicate theories she intended as guides to practice. Six teacher-scholars then establish Addams's ongoing relevance by connecting her principles to exciting events in their own classrooms. An examination of the Jane Addams Children's Book Award and a fictional essay on Addams's work and ideas round out the volume.

Accessible and wide-ranging, Jane Addams in the Classroom offers inspiration for educators while adding to the ongoing reconsideration of Addams's contributions to American thought.

Contributors include Todd DeStigter, Lanette Grate, Susan Griffith, Lisa Junkin, Jennifer Krikava, Lisa Lee, Petra Munro, Bridget O'Rourke, David Schaafsma, Beth Steffen, Darren Tuggle, Erin Vail, and Ruth Vinz.

"These well-crafted essays continue the conversation about Jane Addams as a distinctive voice in American letters, one that appeals to scholars across academic disciplines. David Schaafsma's collection speaks to a wide variety of readers, particularly those who are themselves teachers."--Katherine Joslin, author of Jane Addams: A Writer's Life

"Jane Addams in the Classroom makes major contributions to scholarship on Jane Addams--but also, more broadly, to educational leadership models and teachers’ own individual avenues to social activism. By connecting with Addams as a theorizing story-teller, as well as with scholarship on Dewey, Freire, and other advocates for progressive pedagogy, this collection provides a useful lens for educators seeking to examine their own teaching practices critically. Given the pivotal role that Addams played in community-based education promoting sustained civic engagement, this book is long overdue."--Sarah R. Robbins, author of Managing Literacy, Mothering America (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction - In Search for a Forum: Jane Addams, Hull-House, and Connecting Learning and Life (David Schaafsma and Todd DeStigter)

ch. 1 In Good Company: Jane Addams’s Democratic Experimentalism (Todd DeStigter)
ch. 2 “To Learn from Life Itself ”: Experience and Education at Hull House” (Bridget K. O’Rourke)
ch. 3 Problems of Memory, History, and Social Change: The Case of Jane Addams (Petra Munro Hendry)
ch. 4 Jane Addams: Citizen Writers and a “Wider Justice” (Lanette Grate)
ch. 5 Student Stories and Jane Addams: Unfolding Reciprocity in an English Classroom (Beth Steffen)
ch. 6 Scaling Fences with Jane, William, and August: Meeting the Objective and Subjective Needs of Future University Students and Future Teachers (D ar ren Tug gle)
ch. 7 A Timeless Problem: Competing Goals (Jennifer Krikava)
ch. 8 Surveying the Territory: The Family and Social Claims (Erin Vail)
ch. 9 Story and the Possibilities of Imagination: Addams’s Legacy and the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award (Susan C. Griffith)
ch. 10 Participating in History: The Museum as a Site for Radical Empathy, Hull-House (Lisa Lee and Lisa Junkin Lopez)
ch. 11 Manifestations of Altruism: Sympathetic Understanding, Narrative, and Democracy (David Schaafsma)

Afterword. The Fire Within: Evocations toward a Committed Life (Ruth Vinz)

Contributors
Index
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The Other Side of Pedagogy: Lacan's Four Discourses and the Development of the Student Writer

Book
Johnson, T. R.
2014
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
PE1404.J647 2014
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Delineates Lacan’s theory of the four discourses as a practical framework through which faculty can reflect on where their students are, developmentally, and where they might go.

University classrooms are increasingly in crisis—though popular demands for accountability grow more insistent, no one seems to know what our teaching should seek to achieve. This book traces how we arrived at ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Delineates Lacan’s theory of the four discourses as a practical framework through which faculty can reflect on where their students are, developmentally, and where they might go.

University classrooms are increasingly in crisis—though popular demands for accountability grow more insistent, no one seems to know what our teaching should seek to achieve. This book traces how we arrived at our current impasse, and it uses Lacan’s theory of the four discourses to chart a path forward via an analysis of the freshman writing class. How did we forfeit a meaningful set of goals for our teaching? T. R. Johnson suggests that, by the 1960s, the work of Bergson and Piaget had led us to see student growth as a journey into more and more abstract thought, a journey that will happen naturally if the teacher knows how to stay out of the way. Since the 1960s, we’ve come to see development, in turn, only as a vague initiation into the academic community. This book, however, offers an alternative tradition, one rooted in Vygotsky and the feminist movement, that defines the developing student writer in terms of a complex, intersubjective ecology, and then, through these precedents, proposes a fully psychoanalytic model of student development. To illustrate his practical use of the four discourses, Johnson draws on a wide array of concepts and a colorful set of examples, including Franz Kafka, Keith Richards, David Foster Wallace, Hannah Arendt, and many others.

“Graceful, provocative, thoughtful, and well researched, The Other Side of Pedagogy connects theory and teaching in compelling ways. This is a groundbreaking book that scholars of writing will want to read, reread, and teach.” — Joseph Harris, author of A Teaching Subject: Composition Since 1966 (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Recovering the Unconscious: Pedagogy’s Other Side

ch. 1 The Crisis: Forfeiting Our Most Valuable Asset
ch. 2 Contemporary Composition Studies: Development Means Joining Our Community, and That’s All There Is to Know
ch. 3 Why the “Growth” Movement Didn’t Grow—And an Alternative
ch. 4 Psychoanalysis and Pedagogy: Some Historical Context and Key Terms for Doing the Impossible
ch. 5 A Perfect Ignorance and Paralysis: The Discourse of the Master
ch. 6 Only Following Directions: The Discourse of the University
ch. 7 “Songs…dripping off my fingers”: The Discourse of Hysteric
ch. 8 Playing by Ear: The Discourse of the Analyst

Works Cited
Index
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Discontinuity in Learning: Dewey, Herbart and Education as Transformation

Book
English, Andrea R.
2014
Cambridge University Press, New York, NY
LB14.7.E565 2013
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In this groundbreaking book, Andrea English challenges common assumptions by arguing that discontinuous experiences, such as uncertainty and struggle, are essential to the learning process. To make this argument, Dr English draws from the works of two seminal thinkers in philosophy of education - nineteenth-century German philosopher J. F. Herbart and American pragmatist John Dewey. English's analysis considers Herbart's influence on Dewey, inverting ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In this groundbreaking book, Andrea English challenges common assumptions by arguing that discontinuous experiences, such as uncertainty and struggle, are essential to the learning process. To make this argument, Dr English draws from the works of two seminal thinkers in philosophy of education - nineteenth-century German philosopher J. F. Herbart and American pragmatist John Dewey. English's analysis considers Herbart's influence on Dewey, inverting the accepted interpretation of Dewey's thought as a dramatic break from modern European understandings of education. Three key concepts - transformational learning, tact in teaching, and perfectibility - emerge from this analysis to revitalize our understanding of education as a transformational process. Dr English's comparative approach interweaves European and Anglo-American traditions of educational thought with a contemporary scholarly perspective, contributing to a work that is both intellectually rewarding and applicable to a classroom setting. The result is a book that is essential reading for philosophers and scholars of education, as well as educators. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Note on the Translation
Note on Usage
Prologue. Why Herbart and Dewey?

Part I. Education, Discontinuity, and Transformation
ch. 1 The Moral Dimension of Education - Herbart
The Moral Individual and the Educational Paradox
The Learning Being: Perfectibility without Perfection (Bildsamkeit)

ch. 2 The Problem of Continuity, the Need for Struggle, the Role of Tact - Herbart
Learning to See Difference without Disruption
The Struggle of Learning, Teacher as Moral Guide
Pedagogical Tact: Teaching as a Theory-Guided Practice
Conclusion: A Look Back and a Look Ahead

ch. 3 Discontinuity and Educational Openings in Learning - Dewey
Pragmatism, Discontinuity, and Learning
Notions of Discontinuity in Peirce, James, and Mead
Learning “In-Between”

ch. 4 Teaching in the Openings of Learning - Dewey
Reflective Practice as Teaching In-Between
The Classroom: A Space for Interrupting Experience
Teaching as a Moral Task
Democracy and the End of Education

ch. 5 Conclusion: Morality, Democracy, and Pluralist Society
Dewey: A Break in the History of Educational Philosophy?
Reading Herbart and Dewey - Reading Dewey with Herbart

Part II. Teaching and Learning Forgotten?:
ch. 6 Revisiting Learning In-Between and Umlernen
Forgetting Learning, or Remembering Plato’s Cave
Remembering Learning as a Transformational Process: On Umlernen
The Inward and Outward Turn of Learning

ch. 7 Pedagogical Tact: Learning to Teach “In-Between”
Improvisation and Risk
Listening and the Voice of the Learner
Reflective Teacher-Learner Engagement

ch. 8 Perfectibility and Recognition of the Other
Learning as Human - Human as Learner
Teaching as Recognition of the Other
Conclusion: Preserving there In-Between of Experience for Education

Epilogue. Should Teachers Think? Re(dis)covering the Meaning of Philosophy for the Education of Teachers
Bibliography
Index
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Vygotsky in 21st Century Society: Advances in Cultural Historical Theory and Praxis with Non-Dominant Communities

Book
Portes, Pedro R.; and Salas Spencer, eds.
2011
Peter Lang, New York, NY
HM1027.R8 V94 2011
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Vygotsky in Twenty-first Century Society is an ensemble of novel perspectives about the legacy of Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria. The book illustrates how well the legacy of their work is being applied and continued in contemporary research, and how cultural historical theory has been constructed and re-constructed. Together, these collected essays inform a broader discussion of how a developmentally-oriented cultural paradigm can guide learning and teaching in social and ...
Additional Info:
Vygotsky in Twenty-first Century Society is an ensemble of novel perspectives about the legacy of Lev Vygotsky and Alexander Luria. The book illustrates how well the legacy of their work is being applied and continued in contemporary research, and how cultural historical theory has been constructed and re-constructed. Together, these collected essays inform a broader discussion of how a developmentally-oriented cultural paradigm can guide learning and teaching in social and educational policy and in group or individual counseling. Readers will find discussions of issues in human development that have previously been overlooked. This book is important and timely in addressing these issues and fault-lines, particularly for advancing both equity and scientific understandings. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One
ch. 1 Dynamics in the “Sabor” of Vygotsky (Joseph Glick)
ch. 2 The Path to Subjectivity: Advancing Alternative Understandings of Vygotsky and the Cultural Historical Legacy (Fernando González Rey)
ch. 3 The Process of Producing Knowledge: Vygotsky Revisited (Guillermo Arias Beatón)
ch. 4 Cognitive Aspects of the Transition from a Traditional to a Modern Technological Society (Alex Kozulin)
ch. 5 Macro Cultural Psychology, the Psychology of Oppression, and Cultural-Psychological Enrichment (Carl Ratner)
ch. 6 Vygotsky’s Significance in Advancing Counseling and Psychotherapy (Pedro R. Portes)
ch. 7 A Cultural-Historical Approach to Neuropsychological Treatment: Understanding Latino and Other Non-Dominant Groups (Jose Dergan)

Part Two
ch. 8 Only Life Educates: Immigrant Families, the Cultivation of Biliteracy, and the Mobility of Knowledge (Luis C. Moll)
ch. 9 Computer-Mediated Learning and Young Latino/a Students’ Developing Expertise (Carmen M. Martínez-Roldán and Peter Smagorinsky)
ch. 10 An Integrated Approach to the Study of Transitions as Learning Activity: Two Cases from Spanish Immersion Classrooms (Patricia Baquedano-López, Ariana Mangual Figueroa, and Sera Jean Hernandez)
ch. 11 Faculty Views of Underrepresented Students in Community College Settings: Cultural Models and Cultural Practices (Leticia Tomas Bustillos, Robert Rueda, and Estela Mara Bensimon)
ch. 12 Praxis in Dis-coordination (Margaret Gallego and Olga A. Vásquez)
ch. 13 Development of Latino Family-School Engagement Programs in U.S. Contexts: Enhancements to Cultural Historical Activity Theory Accounts (Richard Durán)

References
TTR cover image

“Who Am I?”: The Biblical Moses as a Metaphor for Teaching

TTR
Gravett, Emily O.
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 2 (2015): 159-169
BL41.T4 v.18 no.2 2015
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This essay presents Moses, the protagonist of the biblical books of Exodus and Deuteronomy in the Hebrew Bible, as a playful but generative metaphor for current teaching practices and experiences in higher education, including my own. Among numerous similarities (such as the fact that Moses, other teachers, and I are all bound by context), the most humbling insights come from Moses's role as a mediator or intermediary. It is a ...
Additional Info:
This essay presents Moses, the protagonist of the biblical books of Exodus and Deuteronomy in the Hebrew Bible, as a playful but generative metaphor for current teaching practices and experiences in higher education, including my own. Among numerous similarities (such as the fact that Moses, other teachers, and I are all bound by context), the most humbling insights come from Moses's role as a mediator or intermediary. It is a role that we also inhabit – standing, as it were, between our students and the knowledge of our discipline – and that we might consider further, particularly in terms of our responsibilities.
Article cover image

The Empty Chair: Education in an Ethic of Hospitality

Article
Ruitenberg, Claudia W.
2011
Philosophy of Education, 28-36
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This essay examines the gap between the dominant ethical frameworks for education and ideas about subjectivity, and proposes an ethic of hospitality as a framework that assumes a decentered subjectivity. First, I provide a brief overview of the ethics of autonomy, virtue, and care and highlight the conception of the subject that informs each of them. Second, I outline some philosophical critiques of the subject, as well as misunderstandings about ...
Additional Info:
This essay examines the gap between the dominant ethical frameworks for education and ideas about subjectivity, and proposes an ethic of hospitality as a framework that assumes a decentered subjectivity. First, I provide a brief overview of the ethics of autonomy, virtue, and care and highlight the conception of the subject that informs each of them. Second, I outline some philosophical critiques of the subject, as well as misunderstandings about the “death” of the subject. It should then be clear that there is a tension between new ideas about subjectivity and the ethical frameworks of autonomy, virtue, and care. Finally, I propose an ethic of hospitality and make suggestions for how this ethic might inform educational practice. 
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

Learning as Leaving Home: Fear, Empathy and Hospitality in the Theology and Religion Classroom

TTR
Fleming, Daniel and Lovat, Terence
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 207-223
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Mentoring Students   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Teaching for Transformation

Additional Info:
The article is a response to this journal's call for papers on metaphors for teaching, and also draws from a previous publication in which Kent Eilers developed a methodology for teaching global theologies. In this methodology, the ultimate goal was the development of “hermeneutical dispositions of empathy, hospitality, and receptivity toward culturally diverse voices” (2014, 165). This article considers the goals of Eilers' methodology, and others like his, and how it is ...
Additional Info:
The article is a response to this journal's call for papers on metaphors for teaching, and also draws from a previous publication in which Kent Eilers developed a methodology for teaching global theologies. In this methodology, the ultimate goal was the development of “hermeneutical dispositions of empathy, hospitality, and receptivity toward culturally diverse voices” (2014, 165). This article considers the goals of Eilers' methodology, and others like his, and how it is that the metaphors of “leaving home” and “communal imagination” highlight the importance of the ambient and interpersonal features of a classroom and their effect on the attainment of the above goals. In so doing, it extends the conversation beyond content and methodology in teaching theology and religion into the realms of philosophy of education, as well as the fields of moral and values education. It is contended that the metaphors informed by these areas of study facilitate the attainment of such goals, and similar ones, by demonstrating that the cultivation of an ambience of care, trust, and compassion within the classroom constitutes an essential foundation for learning in which students “leave home” and cultivate “communal imagination.” The article finishes with practical suggestions for educators in theology and religion.
TTR cover image

Metaphor for Teaching: Good Teaching is Like Good Sex

TTR
Delgado, Teresa
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 3 (2015): 224-232
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 3 2015
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Based on a real teaching experience in the classroom, the author reflects on the dynamics of gender, race/ethnicity, power, and privilege in the context of an undergraduate course in Christian sexual ethics. Through this analysis of pedagogical style and process initiated by a challenging moment at the midpoint of the semester, the author develops ten guiding principles for good teaching, using the metaphor that “good teaching is like good ...
Additional Info:
Based on a real teaching experience in the classroom, the author reflects on the dynamics of gender, race/ethnicity, power, and privilege in the context of an undergraduate course in Christian sexual ethics. Through this analysis of pedagogical style and process initiated by a challenging moment at the midpoint of the semester, the author develops ten guiding principles for good teaching, using the metaphor that “good teaching is like good sex,” which emphasize the necessary elements and outcomes of a positive learning environment: intimacy, flexibility, creativity, satisfaction, care and attentiveness, vulnerability, fun and playfulness, reciprocity, full engagement, and risk-taking. This experience provided the foundation for planning and assessment for the author's courses since.
TTR cover image

Teaching Elder: Erik H. Erickson

TTR
Myers, William R.
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 4 (2015): 343-358
BL41.T4 v.18 no. 4 2015
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
A renowned child psychoanalyst, Erik H. Erikson (1902–1994) is perhaps best known for his work on developmental theory (Childhood and Society, 1950) and his studies of the lives of Martin Luther (Young Man Luther, 1958) and Gandhi (Gandhi's Truth, 1969). Twice he found himself intensely engaged in the role of teacher – once as a young artist who had been called by a friend to help in the progressive school formed for the children of ...
Additional Info:
A renowned child psychoanalyst, Erik H. Erikson (1902–1994) is perhaps best known for his work on developmental theory (Childhood and Society, 1950) and his studies of the lives of Martin Luther (Young Man Luther, 1958) and Gandhi (Gandhi's Truth, 1969). Twice he found himself intensely engaged in the role of teacher – once as a young artist who had been called by a friend to help in the progressive school formed for the children of Sigmund and Anna Freud's patients in Vienna (1927–1932), and years later (1960–1970) as a tenured professor at Harvard. This essay describes Erickson's teaching experience in both settings and suggests some of the reasons he was honored by Harvard in 1980 as a “humane teacher.” Implications from Erikson's educational practice are drawn that demonstrate how Erikson moved beyond the rote memorization and authoritarian educational practice he experienced as a youth. The essay suggests Erikson's teaching stance at Harvard fits the author's theological tradition's use of the term “teaching elder.”
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Learning, Development and Education: From learning theory to education and practice

Book
Illeris, Knud
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1060.I445 2016
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In the World Library of Educationalists, international experts themselves compile career-long collections of what they judge to be their finest pieces – extracts from books, key articles, salient research findings, major theoretical and practical contributions – so the world can read them in a single manageable volume. Readers will be able to follow the themes and strands and see how their work contributes to the ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: In the World Library of Educationalists, international experts themselves compile career-long collections of what they judge to be their finest pieces – extracts from books, key articles, salient research findings, major theoretical and practical contributions – so the world can read them in a single manageable volume. Readers will be able to follow the themes and strands and see how their work contributes to the development of the field. This volume brings together the selected works of Knud Illeris.

Leaving a promising business career at age 27 to begin his higher education, Knud Illeris exemplifies the true spirit of youth and adult education that has resulted in him having published in almost twenty countries, including the UK, Germany, China, Korea and Brazil. Knud Illeris’ work revolves around the way learning takes place and in some cases does not take palce. Split into five parts;

- Learning Theory
- Lifelong Learning as a Psychological Process
- Special Learning Issues
- Various Learning Approaches to Education
- Learning in Working Life

Learning, Development and Education: From learning theory to education and practice is arranged thematically and examines youth and adult learning through Illeris’ model based on three dimensions of learning and competence development– emotional, cognitive and social, and four kinds of learning.

In this collection of his papers, written over a period of almost five decades, and published in multiple languages, spanning from Faroese to Chinese, some of his most important works are chronicled. This compelling overview of Illeris’ contribution to educational thinking and theory charts the challenges and obstacles faced by disciplination and selection, and offers a genuine impression and understanding of an almost lifelong engagement with a wide range of topics in the field of learning – an engagement which has been the central area of Illeris’ academic life. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Part I - Learning Theory

ch. 1 A Comprehensive Understanding of Human Learning
ch. 2 The Development of a Comprehensive and Coherent Theory of Learning
ch. 3 Learning in the Competition State: Problems and Alternative Perspectives

Part II - Learning and Life Course
ch. 4 Lifelong Learning as a Psychological Process
ch. 5 Learning, Identity and Self-Orientation in Youth
ch. 6 Adult Learning
ch. 7 Lifelong Learning and the Low-Skilled

Part III - Special Learning Issues
ch. 8 Learning and Cognition
ch. 9 Transfer of Learning in the Learning Society
ch. 10 Adult Learning and Responsibility
ch. 11 Adult Education between Emancipation and Control (Annegrethe Ahrenkiel and Knud Illeris)
ch. 12 Mislearning, Defense and Resistance

Part IV - Various Learning Approaches to Education
ch. 13 The Organisation of Studies at Roskilde University: The concept, practice and problems of project organisation
ch. 14 Project Work in University Studies: Background
ch. 15 Learning, Experience and Personal Development
ch. 16 Transformative Learning
ch. 17 Transformative Learning re-defined: as changes in elements of the identity

Part V - Learning in Working Life
ch. 18 Workplaces and Learning
ch. 19 Workplace Learning and Learning Theory
ch. 20 The workplace as a Framework for Learning
ch. 21 Workplace Learning as Competence Development

Index
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Attuned Learning: Rabbinic Texts on Habits of the Heart in Learning Interactions

Book
Holzer, Elie
2016
Academic Studies Press, Brighton, MA
BM509.E3H65 2016
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
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Practice-oriented educational philosopher Elie Holzer invites readers to grow as teachers, students, or co-learners through “attuned learning,” a new paradigm of mindfulness. Groundbreaking interpretations of classical rabbinic texts sharpen attention to our own mental, emotional, and physical workings as well as awareness of others within the complexities of learning interactions. Holzer integrates pedagogical pathways with ethical elements of transformative teaching and learning, the repair ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Practice-oriented educational philosopher Elie Holzer invites readers to grow as teachers, students, or co-learners through “attuned learning,” a new paradigm of mindfulness. Groundbreaking interpretations of classical rabbinic texts sharpen attention to our own mental, emotional, and physical workings as well as awareness of others within the complexities of learning interactions. Holzer integrates pedagogical pathways with ethical elements of transformative teaching and learning, the repair of educational disruptions, the role of the human visage, and the dynamics of argumentative and collaborative learning. Literary analyses reveal that deliberate self-cultivation not only leads to ethical and spiritual growth, but also offers a corrective for the pitfalls of the contemporary calculative modalities in educational thinking. The author speaks to the existential, humanizing art of learning and of teaching. This book can serve as a companion volume for A Philosophy of Havruta: Understanding and Teaching the Art of Text Study in Pairs, adding a new dimension of its model of joint learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Attuned Acknowledgments

Part One: Conceptual Frameworks
ch. 1 The Concept of Attuned Learning
ch. 2 Reading Rabbinic Texts for Education

Part Two: Co-Learners’ Attuned Learning
Introduction: Collaborative Learning in Rabbinic Literature
ch. 3 Self-Refinement in Argumentative Learning
ch. 4 Study Partners’ Learning

Part Three: Teachers and Students’ Attuned Learning
Introduction: Teaching in Rabbinic Literature
ch. 5 Learning Transformations
ch. 6 Disruptions and Repairs
ch. 7 The Visages of Learning Interactions

Part Four: Attuned Learning and Educational Thought
ch. 8 Attuned Learning in Contemporary Contexts

Glossary of Technical and Foreign Terms and Language Usage
Bibliography
Index
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Confronting Orientalism - A Self-Study of Educating through Hindu Dance

Book
MisirHiralall, Sabrina D.
2017
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
BL1108.2.M57 2017
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
The author aims to use Kuchipudi Indian classical Hindu dance to educate non-Hindus about Hinduism with postcolonialism in mind. This goal arises from her dance experiences and the historical era of imperialism. Colonization occurs when those in power believe there is a need to dominate in a manner that subjugates people. Colonizers created colonies as they moved into territory because they felt there was a need to “civilize” the so-called ...
Additional Info:
The author aims to use Kuchipudi Indian classical Hindu dance to educate non-Hindus about Hinduism with postcolonialism in mind. This goal arises from her dance experiences and the historical era of imperialism. Colonization occurs when those in power believe there is a need to dominate in a manner that subjugates people. Colonizers created colonies as they moved into territory because they felt there was a need to “civilize” the so-called savages of the land. Postcolonialism is an intellectual discourse that confronts the legacy of colonialism and attempts to de-colonize. With the legacy of colonialism and a postcolonial lens in mind, some research questions arise. How does she, as a Kuchipudi dancer, use Hindu dance to educate non-Hindus about the Eastern literature of Hinduism? For non-Hindus, she feels the power of the exoticizing gaze when she dances, which might very well block the educational intention of the dance. This exoticizing gaze prevents the understanding of the traditional nature of the dance and the introduction to Hinduism as a world religion. The author’s problem is moving the exotic gaze of non-Hindus to an educational gaze that seeks to learn about the ethics of Hinduism in a manner that takes into consideration the multiple perspectives of the complex society we live in today.

Table Of Content:
Ch 1. Introduction: A Postcolonial Self-Study
Ch 2. De-Orientalized Pedagogical Spaces
Ch 3. The Gazes
Ch 4. Unveiling the Hidden Curriculum of Hindu
Ch 5. Religious Epistemology with a Focus on the Ramayana Ch 6. Conclusion

References

About the Author

Index
Article cover image
Wabash tree

Arts of the Contact Zone (pdf)

Article
Pratt, Mary Louise
1991
Modern Language Association; Profession, (1991), pp. 33-40
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
In "Arts of the Contact Zone, Pratt describes a manuscript from 1613 penned by Andean man named Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala. The manuscript was a letter written to King Phillip III of Spain and was titled The First New Chronicle and Good Government. The manuscript details Spanish conquest in South America. Pratt cites the manuscript as an example of autoethnography. She writes, “Guaman Poma’s New Chronicle is an instance ...
Additional Info:
In "Arts of the Contact Zone, Pratt describes a manuscript from 1613 penned by Andean man named Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala. The manuscript was a letter written to King Phillip III of Spain and was titled The First New Chronicle and Good Government. The manuscript details Spanish conquest in South America. Pratt cites the manuscript as an example of autoethnography. She writes, “Guaman Poma’s New Chronicle is an instance of what I have proposed to call an authethnographic text, by which I mean a text in which people undertake to describe themselves in ways that engage with representations others have made of them”. The New Chronicle ends with a revisionist account of the Spanish conquest. Pratt uses the manuscript as an example of an oppressed person or group resisting hegemony, and she connects the practice of authoethnography, critique and resistance to the creation of contact zones.
TTR cover image

Greenscreen Teaching: Institutional Instability and Classroom Innovation

TTR
Perkins, Miriam Y.
2017
Teaching Theology and Religion 20, no. 4 (2017): 343-355
BL41.T4 v.20 no. 4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
“Greenscreen Teaching” explores how the stresses of institutional and social change impact teaching and learning, and the creative resourcefulness born out of instability. In precarious institutions and social contexts, relevant outcomes for theological learning include developing attentiveness, robust moral discernment, and courageous speech seasoned by maturing convictions and pastoral sensitivities. I utilize greenscreen acting as a suggestive metaphor for describing four creative teaching strategies targeting these outcomes. Subsections gather insights ...
Additional Info:
“Greenscreen Teaching” explores how the stresses of institutional and social change impact teaching and learning, and the creative resourcefulness born out of instability. In precarious institutions and social contexts, relevant outcomes for theological learning include developing attentiveness, robust moral discernment, and courageous speech seasoned by maturing convictions and pastoral sensitivities. I utilize greenscreen acting as a suggestive metaphor for describing four creative teaching strategies targeting these outcomes. Subsections gather insights from:

Etymology of disaster‐related words: Capitalize on the moment and “go big.”
Creative method: Improvise and keep it sharp.
Ritual theory: Creatively repurpose familiar but underutilized traditions.
Service learning: Widen the networks of community connection.

Each subsection also revisits moments and learning activities from a graduate course in feminist theology. Navigating constant transition impacts every aspect of the classroom. Nevertheless, a teaching scholar can resource this precariousness as creative agency for voice, solidarity, and mutual learning. 5/3/2018