Curriculum Design and Assessment

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Assessment for Excellence: The Philosophy and Practice of Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education

Book
Astin, Alexander W.
1993
Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LB2366.2.A89 1993
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In this detailed study, Astin examines why assessment activity has produced such meager results and, just as important, how existing activities can be improved. The author also discusses what new assessment practices can be implemented and shares specific and sometimes startling ideas on: How assessment information can most effectively be used for evaluation How results can be used to enlighten and inform the practitioner How practical, technical, and political problems ...
Additional Info:
In this detailed study, Astin examines why assessment activity has produced such meager results and, just as important, how existing activities can be improved. The author also discusses what new assessment practices can be implemented and shares specific and sometimes startling ideas on: How assessment information can most effectively be used for evaluation How results can be used to enlighten and inform the practitioner How practical, technical, and political problems can be overcome when building an assessment database from student and faculty input How the movement of externally mandated assessments in various states is having a negative impact on higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 The Philosophy and Logic of Assessment
ch. 2 A Conceptual Model for Assessment
ch. 3 Assessing Outcomes
ch. 4 Assessing Student Inputs
ch. 5 Assessing the Environment
ch. 6 Analyzing Assessment Data
ch. 7 Use of Assessment Results
ch. 8 Building a Data Base
ch. 9 Assessment as Direct Feedback to the Learner
ch. 10 Assessment and Equity
ch. 11 Assessment and Public Policy
ch. 12 The Future of Assessment

Appendix
Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data
References
Index
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Assessment in Practice: Putting Principles to Work on College Campuses

Book
Banta, Trudy W., Jon P. Lund, Karen E. Black, and Frances W. Oblander
1996
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2366.2.A88 1996
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Good practice in assessment is taking place on hundreds of campuses across the country, yet much of this work goes unreported. Now, Assessment in Practice brings together in one volume the best current knowledge of assessment methods that work and principles that should be incorporated into all effective assessment efforts - whether at institutional, program, or departmental levels.

Drawing from 165 actual cases-and reporting 86 of them in their entirety, ...
Additional Info:
Good practice in assessment is taking place on hundreds of campuses across the country, yet much of this work goes unreported. Now, Assessment in Practice brings together in one volume the best current knowledge of assessment methods that work and principles that should be incorporated into all effective assessment efforts - whether at institutional, program, or departmental levels.

Drawing from 165 actual cases-and reporting 86 of them in their entirety, in the words of those who developed them-the authors illustrate methods and techniques covering a wide range of assessment objectives in diverse types of institutions. Classroom assessment topics include mathematics, foreign language, technology, and more. Topics on overall institutional effectiveness range from student motivation in standardized testing to a multiple-campus, course-embedded approach to assessment of general education. A helpful cross-referencing system that enables readers to access cases by assessment objective, institutional type, and measurement method is included. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1 - Identifying Principles of Good Practice In Assessment
ch. 1 Assessment: It Starts with What Matters Most.
ch. 2 An Imaginative Consideration of Learning.
ch. 3 The Road to Success Is Paved with Goals.
ch. 4 It's Not Only Where They End Up, But How They Get There.
ch 5. Assessment Doesn't Just Happen, It Evolves.
ch. 6 Involvement in Assessment: A Collaborative Endeavor.
ch. 7 Making Data Meaningful.
ch. 8 The Important Part Is What You Do With It.
ch. 9 The Train Is Leaving the Station.
ch. 10 Perhaps There Are Ten?

Part 2 - Examples of Effective Assessment Practices
ch. 11 Assessing Student Achievement in the Major.
ch. 12 Assessing Student Achievement in General Education.
ch. 13 Assessing Student Development and Progress.
ch. 14 Assessment at the Classroom Level.
ch. 15 Faculty Development to Promote Assessment.
ch. 16 Developing a Campus-Wide Approach to the Assessment.
ch. 17 Has Assessment Made a Difference?

Resources:
A. Carnegie Classification Code Definitions
B. List of Contributors.
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Assessing Faculty Work: Enhancing Individual and Institutional Performance

Book
Braskamp, Larry A. and John C. Ory
1994
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2333.B68 1994
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Today's faculty members, like other professionals, find themselves caught between the pursuit of individual gain and the common good. Society is increasingly demanding that faculty demonstrate social responsibility toward both the institution and the larger community. This book is a practical resource for fostering and assessing faculty achievements in all aspects of their work: teaching, research, practice, and citizenship. Larry A. Braskamp and John C. Ory show that the assessment ...
Additional Info:
Today's faculty members, like other professionals, find themselves caught between the pursuit of individual gain and the common good. Society is increasingly demanding that faculty demonstrate social responsibility toward both the institution and the larger community. This book is a practical resource for fostering and assessing faculty achievements in all aspects of their work: teaching, research, practice, and citizenship. Larry A. Braskamp and John C. Ory show that the assessment process can and must be tied to faculty development, and they explain how collegial activity and continuous improvement are important to strong performance. They identify three major elements of faculty assessment - setting expectations, collecting and organizing evidence, and using evidence - and suggest several key goals for the assessment process. The authors also show how multiple perspectives enhance the credibility of assessment, and they describe sources of evidence, including faculty members themselves, faculty colleagues, students, and experts. Specific techniques used to collect evidence are provided, as well as summaries of research on the effectiveness of each procedure. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Authors
Pt. 1 Expanding the Purposes and Goals of Faculty Assessment
ch. 1 The Current Status of Faculty Assessment
ch. 2 A New Perspective on Faculty Assessment and Development
Pt. 2 Setting Expectations
ch. 3 Defining Faculty Work
ch. 4 Discussing Expectations
Pt. 3 Collecting and Organizing Evidence
ch. 5 Gathering Acceptable and Trustworthy Evidence
ch. 6 Establishing the Credibility of the Evidence
ch. 7 Constructing a Full Portrayal of Faculty Work
Pt. 4 Using Evidence in Faculty Assessment
ch. 8 Clarifying Appropriate Uses of Assessment Evidence
ch. 9 Enhancing Assessment's Value to Individual Faculty Members
ch. 10 Enhancing Institutional Uses
Pt. 5 Methods of Collecting Evidence
ch. 11 Written Appraisals
ch. 12 Rating Scales and Checklists
ch. 13 Interviews
ch. 14 Observations and Videotaping
ch. 15 Indicators of Eminence, Quality, and Impact
ch. 16 Achievement and Outcome Measures
ch. 17 Records and Portfolios
Epilogue
Resources
A Faculty Development Plan
B Two by Two: Colleagues as Partners in Faculty Assessment
C Campus Guidelines for Assessing Faculty
D Student Course Evaluation Research Form
E IDEA Student Survey Form
F Sample ICES Form
G Advising Survey
H Sample Form for Performance Review by a Colleague
I Sample Evaluation Form for Self-Review
J Classroom Observation Rating Form
K Sample Approach to Explaining Terms Used in Assessment
L Evaluation of Quality of Research
M Sample Questions for Evaluation of Course Material
References
Name Index
Subject Index
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Wabash tree

Designing & Assessing Courses & Curricula: A Practical Guide

Book
Diamond, Robert M.
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2361.5.D5 1998
Topics: Course Design   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Designing and Assessing Courses and Curricula reflects the best current knowledge and practice in course and curriculum design and connects this knowledge with the critical task of assessing and learning outcomes at both course and curricular levels. Tested and refined through long-term use and study, the change model presented in this book shows how to move from concept to actualization, from theory to practice. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Designing and Assessing Courses and Curricula reflects the best current knowledge and practice in course and curriculum design and connects this knowledge with the critical task of assessing and learning outcomes at both course and curricular levels. Tested and refined through long-term use and study, the change model presented in this book shows how to move from concept to actualization, from theory to practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author

ch. 1 A Learning-Centered Approach to Course and Curriculum Design
ch. 2 Systematic Design: Model and Benefits
ch. 3 Making the Decision to Go Ahead
ch. 4 Getting Started
ch. 5 Linking Goals, Courses, and Curricula
ch. 6 Gathering and Analyzing Essential Data
ch. 7 Developing a Design for an Ideal Course or Curriculum
ch. 8 Adjusting from the Ideal to the Possible
ch. 9 Clarifying Instructional Goals and Objectives
ch. 10 Designing Assessment Instruments and Procedures
ch. 11 Designing the Learning Experience
ch. 12 Selecting and Using Technology
ch. 13 Developing a Learning-Centered Syllabus
ch. 14 Cultivating a Respect for Diversity
ch. 15 Implementing, Evaluating, and Refining the Course or Curriculum
ch. 16 Learning from Experience

Resource A Questions for Evaluating a College Course
Resource B Case Studies in Developing Learning Outcomes
Resource C Mathematics Prerequisites and Student Success in Introductory Courses: Final Report
Resource D Sample Alumni Survey for Evaluating Program Effectiveness and Needs
Resource E Additional Case Studies in Course Design
Resource F Developing an Institutional Assessment Culture at Truman State University
Resource G Qualities of the Liberally Educated Person: A Description of Important Competencies
Resource H Sample Copyright Agreement
Resource I Teaching Goals Inventory: Self-Scorable Version

References
Name Index
Subject Index
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Improving the Environment for Learning

Book
Donald, Janet
1997
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2341.D66 1997
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This book identifies optimal practices or "benchmarks" for creating a quality learning environment within higher education and outlines steps faculty and administrators can take to improve student learning. Author Janet Donald integrates extensive research on teaching and learning with findings from her in-depth interviews with faculty and administrators at four of America's premier research institutions. She focuses on key factors influencing learning, identifies practices and policies central to effectiveness, and ...
Additional Info:
This book identifies optimal practices or "benchmarks" for creating a quality learning environment within higher education and outlines steps faculty and administrators can take to improve student learning. Author Janet Donald integrates extensive research on teaching and learning with findings from her in-depth interviews with faculty and administrators at four of America's premier research institutions. She focuses on key factors influencing learning, identifies practices and policies central to effectiveness, and offers timely and feasible solutions for meeting student learning challenges. Using the voices of faculty, administrators, and members of higher education centers, Donald investigates institutional missions and priorities. She examines how learning goals vary across the disciplines and what this means in terms of student outcomes. She also describes practices that support the improvement of teaching and she discusses classroom assessment techniques that measure learning and teaching. Donald examines student selection and access - especially questions of quality and diversity - and discusses how to foster motivation for learning. In addition, she provides strategies for recognizing teaching in tenure and reward systems and points out the importance of academic leadership. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author
ch. 1 Frameworks for Improving Learning
ch. 2 The Role of the Disciplines in the Quality of Learning
ch. 3 Student Selection and Access
ch. 4 Fostering Students' Motivation for Learning
ch. 5 Improving Instruction by Focusing on Learning
ch. 6 Providing Institutional Support for the Improvement of Teaching
ch. 7 Using Assessment of Define Tasks and Measure Learning
ch. 8 Faculty Responsibilities, Rewards, and Assessment
ch. 9 Institutional Assessment to Improve Learning
References <
Index
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Planning and Implementing Assessment

Book
Freeman, Richard, and Roger Lewis
1998
Kogan Page, London
LB3051.F74 1998
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The authors provide a set of timeless principles and analytical methods that can be adapted to a variety of assessment scenarios, and which individual teachers can use to construct their own effective methods for assessment. They provide college, university teachers, and faculty development staff with clear guidelines for design, and methods of planning, choosing and implementing assessment. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The authors provide a set of timeless principles and analytical methods that can be adapted to a variety of assessment scenarios, and which individual teachers can use to construct their own effective methods for assessment. They provide college, university teachers, and faculty development staff with clear guidelines for design, and methods of planning, choosing and implementing assessment. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1: Principles of assessment
ch. 1 The purposes of assessment
ch. 2 Norm- and cirterion-referenced, and ipsative, or self-referenced, assessment
ch. 3 Reliability and validity
ch. 4 Assessment modes and sources
ch. 5 Assessment criteria
ch. 6 Feedback
ch. 7 The proactive learner
ch. 8 Describing the learning

Part 2: The methods toolbox
ch. 9 Methods and their characteristics
ch. 10 Choosing methods

Part 3: Sources of assessment
ch. 11 Self-assessment
ch. 12 Peer assessment
ch. 13 Using computers in assessment

Part 4: Using assessment methods
ch. 14 Objective tests
ch. 15 Short answer questions
ch. 16 Exams and tests
ch. 17 Extended written work
ch. 18 Assessment of oral work and class presentation
ch. 19 Performance tests
ch. 20 Projects
ch. 21 Assessing problem solving

Part 5: Recording and reporting
ch. 22 Recording, collecting and presenting evidence
ch. 23 Reporting Achievement
ch. 24 Portfolios

Part 6: Assessment issues
ch. 25 Helping learners prepare for assessment
ch. 26 Marking group work
ch. 27 Workload
ch. 28 Cheating, fairness, bias
ch. 29 Making changes

Glossary
Index
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The Digital University: Reinventing the Academy

Book
Hazemi, Reza, Stephen Hailes, Steve Wilbur, eds.
1998
Springer-Verlag, London, UK
LB2395.7.D54 1998
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Examining the rapidly growing field of remote computer-based learning, this title discusses how to use and create a Web-based system for teaching and learning, using groupware for collaboration, multimedia, distance learning, and much more. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Examining the rapidly growing field of remote computer-based learning, this title discusses how to use and create a Web-based system for teaching and learning, using groupware for collaboration, multimedia, distance learning, and much more. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The Contributors
Foreword

ch. 1 Introduction (Reza Hazemi, Stephen Hailes, Steve Wilbur)
ch. 2 Reinventing the Academy (Stephen Hailes, Reza Hazemi)
ch. 3 Managing Distance Learning - New Challenges for Faculty (Lisa Kimball)
ch. 4 Collaborative Interactions in Support of Learning: Models, Metaphors and Management (Kent Norman)
ch. 5 Towards the Virtual Class: On-Line Hypermedia in Higher Education (Philip Uys)
ch. 6 Creating a Community of Learning using Web-Based Tools (Sylvia Wilbur)
ch. 7 Using the WWW for Teaching and Learning: Raising Awareness within University College London (Kim Issroff, Reza Hazemi)
ch. 8 An Asynchronous Collaborative Learning System on the Web (Claude Viéville)
ch. 9 Modifying Multi-User Discussion Systems to Support Text-Based Virtual Learning Environments on the Web - The Comentor Experience (Graham R. Gibbs)
ch. 10 A Server for the Joint Production of Documents on the World Wide Web (Alain Karsenty, Bernard Merialdo)
ch. 11 Support for Authoring and Managing Web-Based Coursework: The Taco Project (Martina Angela Sasse, Christopher Harris, Ismail Ismail, Peter Monthienvichienchai )
ch. 12 Groupware Support for Asynchronous Collaborative Knowledge Work (Peter J. H. Hinssen)
ch. 13 Using Lotus Notes for Asynchronous, Collaborative Learning and Research (Susan Armitage, Mark Bryson)
ch. 14 Supporting Asynchronous Collaboration in Academia (Reza Hazemi, Stephen Hailes, Steve Wilbur)
ch. 15 Using Asynchronous Computer-Conferencing to Encourage Interaction in Seminar Discussions (Jacqueline Taylor)
ch. 16 Quality of use of Multimedia Learning Systems: Practical Considerations (J. Kirakowski)
ch. 17 Groupware and Software Engineering Criteria for Success (Linda Macaulay, A. N. Shaikh, Roger Young)
ch. 18 The Application of Intranet and Business Groupware Technologies to Support Collaborative Learning with Face-to-Face Students (Clive Holtham, Mark D’Cruz, Ashok Tiwari)
ch. 19 The Relevance and Impact of Collaborative Working for Management in a Digital University (Brian R. Mitchell)

Index
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Wabash tree

Student Assessment in Higher Education: A Handbook for Assessing Performance

Book
Miller, Allen H., Bradford W. Imrie, Kevin Cox
1999
Kogan Page, London
LB2368.M55 1999
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This comprehensive overview of higher educational assessment features a guide to setting, marking and reviewing the coursework, assignments, tests and examinations used in higher education. In addition, the authors examine the various programs for certificates, diplomas, first degrees as well as higher degrees. The strong influence that assessment has on the way students approach their learning is also discussed.

Truly international in focus, this book features authors with ...
Additional Info:
This comprehensive overview of higher educational assessment features a guide to setting, marking and reviewing the coursework, assignments, tests and examinations used in higher education. In addition, the authors examine the various programs for certificates, diplomas, first degrees as well as higher degrees. The strong influence that assessment has on the way students approach their learning is also discussed.

Truly international in focus, this book features authors with higher education experience in Australia, New Zealand, Scotland, England, Canada, Hong Kong, USA, and Thailand. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part 1 The place of assessment in higher education
ch. 1 Purposes of higher education
ch. 2 Functions of assessment
ch. 3 Cognitive educational objectives, learning outcomes and levels of testing
ch. 4 Measuring the outcomes of non-cognitive educational objectives
ch. 5 Stages of intellectual and ethical development

Part 2 Some assessment methods
ch. 6 Timing of assessment tasks
ch. 7 Essays
ch. 8 Theses
ch. 9 Objective tests
ch. 10 Assessing group projects
ch. 11 Practical skills and field work
ch. 12 Designing a final examination

Part 3 Examining assessment
ch. 13 Reporting on assessment
ch. 14 Evaluation of assessment procedures
ch. 15 Academic (dis)honesty
ch. 16 Current and future developments

References
Index
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Assessment Essentials: Planning, Implementing, and Improving Assessment in Higher Education

Book
Palomba, Catherine A. and Trudy W. Banta
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2366.2.P35 1999
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Assessment Clear and Simple is "Assessment 101" in a book -- a concise, step-by-step guide written for everyone who participates in the assessment process. This practical book helps to make assessment simple, cost-efficient, and useful to the institution, while at the same time meeting the requirements of accreditation agencies, legislatures, review boards, and others. Assessment Clear and Simple can help your institution employ assessment as a powerful instrument for improvement and ...
Additional Info:
Assessment Clear and Simple is "Assessment 101" in a book -- a concise, step-by-step guide written for everyone who participates in the assessment process. This practical book helps to make assessment simple, cost-efficient, and useful to the institution, while at the same time meeting the requirements of accreditation agencies, legislatures, review boards, and others. Assessment Clear and Simple can help your institution employ assessment as a powerful instrument for improvement and provide a basis for wiser planning, budgeting, and change in curriculum, pedagogy, staffing, programming, and student support. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Authors

ch. 1 The Essentials of Successful Assessment
ch. 2 Developing Definitions, Goals, and Plans
ch. 3 Encouraging Involvement in Assessment
ch. 4 Selecting Methods and Approaches
ch. 5 Using Performance Measures and Portfolios for Assessment
ch. 6 Using Tests, Classroom Assignments, and Classroom Assessment
ch. 7 Listening to Students' Voices
ch. 8 Relating Assessment to the World of Work
ch. 9 Assessing General Education
ch. 10 Assessing Campus Environments and Student Experiences
ch. 11 Reporting and Using Assessment Results
ch. 12 A Matter of Choices

References
Name Index
Subject Index
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Proclaiming and Sustaining Excellence: Assessment as a Faculty Role

Book
Schilling, Karen Maitland and Karl L. Schilling
1998
George Washington University, Washington, DC
LB2331.S345 1998
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This book provides a brief history of the most recent wave of assessment in higher education, particularly focused on the faculty role in assessment. It traces major conceptual, methodological, political and policy advances in assessment over the past decade. The authors suggest some ways of thinking about assessment, strategies, and next steps which they view as necessary for more clearly envisioning assessment as a faculty role. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book provides a brief history of the most recent wave of assessment in higher education, particularly focused on the faculty role in assessment. It traces major conceptual, methodological, political and policy advances in assessment over the past decade. The authors suggest some ways of thinking about assessment, strategies, and next steps which they view as necessary for more clearly envisioning assessment as a faculty role. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
ch. 1 Conceptual or theoretical advances such as the talent-development or value-added perspective
ch. 2 Methodological advances such as multiple measures of performance
ch. 3 Policy advances, including changing notions of accountability
ch. 4 The faculty's involvement in assessments, with examples
ch. 5 Envisioning assessment as a faculty role in a supportive fiscal and policy context
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Curriculum, Religion, and Public Education: Conversations for an Enlarging Public Square

Book
Sears, James T., ed.
1998
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC111.C844 1998
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Along the fault line of public education and conservative religious beliefs, this break-through volume explores five curriculum arenas that have been "ground zero" in community debate—science and human evolution, textbook selection, sexuality instruction, character development, and outcome-based education. Curriculum, Religion, and Public Education will assist educators, parents, and community leaders in crossing boundaries to communicate with "the others," and in the process transform schools—and ourselves. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Along the fault line of public education and conservative religious beliefs, this break-through volume explores five curriculum arenas that have been "ground zero" in community debate—science and human evolution, textbook selection, sexuality instruction, character development, and outcome-based education. Curriculum, Religion, and Public Education will assist educators, parents, and community leaders in crossing boundaries to communicate with "the others," and in the process transform schools—and ourselves. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (James T. Sears)

Pt. I Foundations for Conversations
ch. 1 History, Religion, and Schooling: A Context for Conversation (James C. Carper)
ch. 2 Encounters in Law, Philosophy, Religion, and Education Commentary (Richard John Neuhaus, Martin E. Marty, Maxine Greens, George Marsden, and Michael W. McConnell)
ch. 3 Crossing Boundaries and Becoming the Other: Voices Across Borders (James T. Sears)
ch. 4 Dialogue, Religion, and Tolerance: How to Talk to People Who Are Wrong About (Almost) Everything (Kenneth A. Strike)

Pt. II Textbooks: Whose Stories are to be Told?
ch. 5 Religion and the Textbooks (Gilbert T. Sewall)
ch. 6 It's Not About the Books: Textbook Controversies and the Need for Uncertain Conversations (J. Dan Marshall)
Suggested Additional Readings on Textbooks (Elaine Lindsey, and James T. Sears)

Pt. III Values in the Public Schools: What and Whose Values Should be Taught?
ch. 7 Why a Functional Definition of Religion Is Necessary If Justice Is to Be Achieved in Public Education (Richard A. Baer, Jr.
ch. 8 Moral Education as a Form of Life (Nel Noddings)
Community Dialogue: Is There a Common Moral Framework That Schools Can Embrace? (Carolyn Murphy, James T. Sears, and Bob Shearer et al.)
Suggested Additional Readings on Values (Elaine Lindsey, and James T. Sears)

Pt. IV Sexuality Education: What Does Teaching Sexual Responsibility Mean?
ch. 9 Sex Education Should Exclusively Endorse Abstinence... (George A. Rekers, and Richard C. Hohn)
ch. 10 Teaching and Researching Sexualities in a Socially Responsible Manner (James T. Sears)
Community Dialogue: Sexual Behaviors and Sexual Cultures (Carolyn Murphy, Bob Shearer, Gary Burgess, et al.)
Suggested Additional Readings on Sexuality Education (Elaine Lindsey, and James T. Sears)

Pt. V Outcome-Based Education: Who Should Set the Standards?
ch. 11 The Fundamentalist Right, the "New Paradigm," and Outcome-Based Education (Dennis Carlson)
ch. 12 Outcome-Based Education: Can It Be Redeemed? (Charles L. Glenn)
Community Dialogue: A Matter of Fairness and Equity (Carolyn Murphy, James T. Sears, and Bob Shearer et al.)
Suggested Additional Readings on Outcome-Based Education (Elaine Lindsey, and James T. Sears)

Pt. VI Science: Who and What are we?
ch. 13 The Problem of Dogmatism in Science Education (Nancy W. Brickhouse, and William J. Letts, IV)
ch. 14 The Two Controversies over Evolution (Phillip E. Johnson)
Community Dialogue: From Six Days to 4.6 Billion Years (Carolyn Murphy, James T. Sears, Bob Shearer et al.)
Suggested Additional Readings on Science (Elaine Lindsey, and James T. Sears)

Pt. VII A Concluding Conversation Among Education Scholars (James T. Sears, Richard Baer, and Paul S. Brantley et al.)
Index

About the Editor and the Contributors
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Enhancing Student Learning: Setting the Campus Context

Book
Stage, Frances K., Watson, Lemuel W. and Terrell, Melvin
1999
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LB2343.4.E54 1999
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In this important volume, the authors focus on the connections between academic learning and student affairs. Beginning with the premise that academic learning is a critical part of the overall personal development of each student, the authors show how student affairs professionals can work in harmony with their academic colleagues to create a campus milieu that is truly conducive to that development. Such a milieu would offer a rich array ...
Additional Info:
In this important volume, the authors focus on the connections between academic learning and student affairs. Beginning with the premise that academic learning is a critical part of the overall personal development of each student, the authors show how student affairs professionals can work in harmony with their academic colleagues to create a campus milieu that is truly conducive to that development. Such a milieu would offer a rich array of social, athletic, academic, and artistic events, all of which would enrich, enhance, and give deeper meaning to the learning that occurs in the classroom. With its emphasis upon partnership building and interdisciplinary collaboration, this work will be extremely useful to student affairs professionals, college administrators, and faculty members as they work together to design courses and programs that will optimize student learning. Co-published with American College Personnel Association. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Enhancing Student Learning

ch. 1 A Framework to Enhance Student Learning
ch. 2 Theories of Learning for College Students
ch. 3 Cultural Differences in Student Learning and Development
ch. 4 Learning and Development from Theory to Practice
ch. 5 Student Affairs and Learning in the Community College
ch. 6 Service-Learning: Exemplifying the Connections between Theory and Practice
ch. 7 Assessing Student Learning
ch. 8 Setting a New Context for Student Learning

About the Contributors
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Quality and Accreditation: Final Report on the Redeveloped Accrediting Standards (pdf)

Journal Issue
1996
Theological Education 32, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.32no.2
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1996-theological-education-v32-n2.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1996-theological-education-v32-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Introduction (James L. Waits)
The Quality and Accreditation Project (Steering Committee for the Quality and Accreditation Project Katarina Schuth, Chair)
Recommendations of the Quality and Accreditation Project Steering Committee and the ATS Commission on Accrediting and Plan of Implementation (Steering Committee, Commission on Accrediting)
Standards of Accreditation: Outline of Draft Three of the Redeveloped Accrediting Standards
General Institutional Standards
Degree Program Standards
Recommended Changes to the ATS Policies and Procedures for Accreditation
Current Procedures Related to Membership, Bulletin 41, Part 3
Proposed Accrediting Policies and Procedures
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Wabash tree

Designing Courses for Higher Education

Book
Toohey, Susan
1999
Open University Press, Philadelphia, PA
LB2361.T56 1999
Topics: Course Design   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Susan Toohey focuses not on teaching techniques but on the strategic decisions which must be made before a course begins. She provides realistic advice for university and college teachers on how to design more effective courses without underestimating the complexity of the task facing course developers. In particular, she examines fully the challenges involved in leading course design teams, getting agreement among teaching staff and managing organizational politics. (From the ...
Additional Info:
Susan Toohey focuses not on teaching techniques but on the strategic decisions which must be made before a course begins. She provides realistic advice for university and college teachers on how to design more effective courses without underestimating the complexity of the task facing course developers. In particular, she examines fully the challenges involved in leading course design teams, getting agreement among teaching staff and managing organizational politics. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

ch. 1 Pressures for Change
ch. 2 The Course Design Process
ch. 3 Beliefs, Values and Ideologies in Course Design
ch. 4 Thinking about Goals and Content
ch. 5 The Structure of the Course
ch. 6 Making Learning Opportunities More Flexible
ch. 7 Deciding on Goals and Objectives for Units of Study
ch. 8 Choosing Teaching Strategies
ch. 9 Assessment
ch. 10 Implementing the New Course

References
Index
The Society for Research into Higher Education
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Improving College Teaching: Strategies for Developing Instructional Effectiveness

Book
Weimer, Maryellen
1990
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.W37
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
This book shows college administrators, deans, department heads, and faculty development professionals how to improve the instructional performance of faculty members. It offers strategies for overcoming resistance and motivating faculty members to improve their teaching--and identifies the resources, activities, and services that will help them to succeed. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book shows college administrators, deans, department heads, and faculty development professionals how to improve the instructional performance of faculty members. It offers strategies for overcoming resistance and motivating faculty members to improve their teaching--and identifies the resources, activities, and services that will help them to succeed. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part One: Removing Barriers to Teaching Improvement
ch. 1. What Makes the Improvement of College Teaching Difficult?
ch. 2. Overcoming Faculty Resistance and Encouraging Participation
ch. 3. Improving Teaching: A Five-Step Process
Part Two: Key Elements of Successful Instructional Development
ch. 4. Ongoing Assessment and Feedback
ch. 5. A Flexible Mix of Improvement Activities
ch. 6. Colleagues Assisting Colleagues
ch. 7. Supportive Academic Leaders
Part Three: Institutional Options for Improving College Teaching
ch. 8. Organizational and Administrative Approaches
ch. 9. Profiles of Teaching Improvement Programs
ch. 10. Closing Advice on Improving College Teaching
Resources: A. How Do You Teach? A Checklist for Developing Instructional
Awareness B. Guidelines for Classroom Observation
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A Practical Guide to Alternative Assessment

Book
Herman, Joan L., Pamela R. Aschbacher, Lynn Winters
1992
Assn. for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, VA
LB3051.H45 1992
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Joan Herman, Pamela Aschbacher, and Lynn Winters offer cogent guidance on the creation and use of alternative measures of student achievement. They present a systemic and iterative process model that links assessment with decisions affecting curriculum and instruction, according to developmental theories of learning and cognition.
The authors review the purposes of assessment and provide a substantive rationale for alternative structures. The heart of the book is the illumination ...
Additional Info:
Joan Herman, Pamela Aschbacher, and Lynn Winters offer cogent guidance on the creation and use of alternative measures of student achievement. They present a systemic and iterative process model that links assessment with decisions affecting curriculum and instruction, according to developmental theories of learning and cognition.
The authors review the purposes of assessment and provide a substantive rationale for alternative structures. The heart of the book is the illumination of several key assessment issues that reaffirm our knowledge that assessment tasks must be informed by the most important elements of instructional practice.
Includes sample forms and figures to help readers begin revamping their assessment programs. (From the Publisher)
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Christian Identity and Theological Education

Book
Hough, Joseph C. Jr. and John B. Cobb
1985
Scholars Press, Chico, CA
BV4030.H68 1985
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This book is the result of a study conducted by the Association of Theological Schools with the support of the Lilly Endowment, which investigates the "multifaceted study of theological education." The purpose of the study is to engage in pragmatic ways to revise theological curricula in light of the present global situation. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book is the result of a study conducted by the Association of Theological Schools with the support of the Lilly Endowment, which investigates the "multifaceted study of theological education." The purpose of the study is to engage in pragmatic ways to revise theological curricula in light of the present global situation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
ch. 1 The Problematic of Theological Education
ch. 2 The Identity of the Church
ch. 3 The Practice of the Christian Community
ch. 4 Professional Church Leadership
ch. 5 The Education of Practical Theologians
Author Index
Article cover image

"Department Level Assessment: Promoting Continuous Improvement"

Article
Hatfield, Susan R.
1999
Idea Paper No. 35, IDEA Center, Kansas State University (1999)
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Applies the quality concept of continuous improvement to academic departments. The goal of a continuous improvement initiative is for a department to become self-regarding, self-monitoring and self correcting – confident of the quality of their graduates’ knowledge. Idea Paper no. 35, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Additional Info:
Applies the quality concept of continuous improvement to academic departments. The goal of a continuous improvement initiative is for a department to become self-regarding, self-monitoring and self correcting – confident of the quality of their graduates’ knowledge. Idea Paper no. 35, from the series developed by the Center for Faculty Evaluation and Development, Kansas State University.
Article cover image

"Feet Partly of Iron and Partly of Clay: Pedagogy and the Curriculum of Theological Education"

Article
Cram, Ronald H. and Stanley P. Saunders
1992
Theological Education 28, no. 2: 21-50
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Cram and Saunders utilize biblical studies and Christian religious educational praxis to clarify the dimensions of the crisis in theological education, and argue for a practice of teaching which is communal and theological education which is formative, critical and most of all, public. They propose a new concept of theological education built on models of early Christian communities.
Additional Info:
Cram and Saunders utilize biblical studies and Christian religious educational praxis to clarify the dimensions of the crisis in theological education, and argue for a practice of teaching which is communal and theological education which is formative, critical and most of all, public. They propose a new concept of theological education built on models of early Christian communities.
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Wabash tree

Models of Assessing Institutional and Educational Effectiveness: The Pilot School Project (pdf)

Journal Issue
1998
Theological Education 35, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.35no.1
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1998-theological-education-v35-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Developing New Evaluative Structures and Procedures (Susan E. Davies, Bangor Theological Seminary)
Evaluation: Context, Lessons, and Methods (James A. Meek, Covenant Theological Seminary)
Assessment and Institutional Improvement: A Case Study (David Hogue, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary)
Under Review: Comments on the Reaccreditation Process Using the New ATS Accrediting Standards (William H. Brackney and R.E. Vosburgh, McMaster Divinity College)
Set in Motion: The Story of Transitions at Memphis Theological Seminary (Mary Lin Hudson, Memphis Theological Seminary)
Evaluation and the Educational Effectiveness Circle (Sarah Ann Sharkey, O.P., Oblate School of Theology)
Assessment and Planning in a University-Related Theological School (Dale Launderville, O.S.B., Saint John’s University School of Theology)
Mission-Focused Evaluation: A Work in Progress (Duane A. Priebe and Kathleen L. Priebe, Wartburg Theological Seminary)
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Creating Learning Communities: A Practical Guide to Winning Support, Organizing for Change, and Implementing Programs

Book
Shapiro, Nancy S. and Jodi H. Levine
1999
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.S473 1999
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In recent years, learning communities - a curricular instructional innovation that integrates different facets of the undergraduate experience to enhance and enrich learning - have become the most promising new strategy for promoting student success and satisfaction in college. Learning communities give students the chance to deepen and diversify their education, connect with others who share their interests, and actively participate in the educational process.. "Creating Learning Communities is a ...
Additional Info:
In recent years, learning communities - a curricular instructional innovation that integrates different facets of the undergraduate experience to enhance and enrich learning - have become the most promising new strategy for promoting student success and satisfaction in college. Learning communities give students the chance to deepen and diversify their education, connect with others who share their interests, and actively participate in the educational process.. "Creating Learning Communities is a guide to the essentials of this rewarding new program area, including how to design, fund, staff, manage, and integrate learning communities into different campuses. Drawing from their own experience, as well as from experiences of campuses around the country, Nancy S. Shapiro and Jodi H. Levine provide both a sound theoretical rationale and nuts-and-bolts advice on the logistical, administrative, financial, and turf-related issues of creating an effective learning community. And perhaps most important, they show how to ensure that such communities embody and fulfill the objectives for which they were established. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Authors

ch. 1 Introduction: Why Learning Communities?
ch. 2 Types and Models of Learning Communities
ch. 3 Creating a Campus Culture for Learning Communities
ch. 4 Developing the Curricula
ch. 5 Recasting Faculty Roles and Rewards
ch. 6 Building Administrative Partnerships
ch. 7 Putting Administrative Structures in Place
ch. 8 Evaluating and Assessing Learning Communities
ch. 9 How Learning Communities Affect Students, Faculty, and the Institution
ch. 10 Concluding Advice and Reflections on Creating Learning Communities

App Learning Communities Contacts
References
Index
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"Formed for Ministry: A Program in Spiritual Formation"

Article
Jones, L. Gregory, and Willie James Jennings
2000
Christian Century (Feb 2-9, 2000): 124-128
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Stresses that the knowledge and the love of God should be central to theological education. Information on the program of spiritual formation developed by Duke Divinity School; How the program works.
Additional Info:
Stresses that the knowledge and the love of God should be central to theological education. Information on the program of spiritual formation developed by Duke Divinity School; How the program works.
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Wabash tree

Learning That Lasts: Integrating Learning, Development, and Performance in College and Beyond

Book
Mentkowski, Marcia
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1060.M464 2000
Topics: Student Learning Goals   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Today's colleges and universities face increasing pressure to develop programs and curricula that will teach students how to handle life's unexpected challenges and events. For educators and policymakers, this urgency will only grow as new global trends emerge and social expectations change. This timely book explores what it means for learners to transform themselves and for educators to foster essential skills for learning, leading, teamwork, and adapting with integrity in ...
Additional Info:
Today's colleges and universities face increasing pressure to develop programs and curricula that will teach students how to handle life's unexpected challenges and events. For educators and policymakers, this urgency will only grow as new global trends emerge and social expectations change. This timely book explores what it means for learners to transform themselves and for educators to foster essential skills for learning, leading, teamwork, and adapting with integrity in college and beyond.

The authors begin by defining "learning that lasts" as the successful integration of learning, development, and performance. Drawing on two decades of longitudinal studies of student learning in the highly acclaimed curriculum at Alverno College and on leading educational theories, Marcia Mentkowski and her associates set forth a theory of deep and durable learning that includes practical strategies for enabling a wide range of students to cultivate integrative and expansive capabilities across a lifetime. They present concrete suggestions on the ways that faculty and academic staff can work together to forge effective curricula, design innovative programs, implement key institutional goals, and renegotiate the college culture. They analyze compelling research results, collaborative inquiry by consortia of institutions, and twenty-five years of experience to illuminate what educators and administrators must achieve so that increasingly varied learners can realize their goals and potential.

Learning That Lasts intertwines educational theory, practice, and research by demonstrating how learning frameworks can shape curricula, teaching strategy, and assessment. It presents core curriculumprinciples for practice and it also systematically tests assumptions about student learning, development, and performance. This landmark volume provides a detailed blueprint for understanding and promoting purposeful, responsible contribution to work, personal, and civic life. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Themes and Purposes
Educators' Ways of Knowing About Learning
Exploring Learning in College and Beyond
Student as Learner
Learner as Developing Person
Graduate as Performer and Contributor
Interpreting and Envisioning Learning That Lasts
Integrating Domains of Growth Through Transformative Learning
Creating the Learning-to-Teaching Connection
Fostering Learning That Lasts
Integrating Theory, Research, and Practice
Thinking Through a Curriculum for Learning That Lasts
Rethinking Inquiry That Improves Teaching and Learning
Transforming the College Culture Toward Learning That Lasts.
Looking Ahead
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Academic Leadership: A Practical Guide to Chairing the Department

Book
Leaming, Deryl R.
1998
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2341.L269 1998
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Dr. Leaming's book provides a comforting reminder that we need not waste time and energy reinventing the wheel. New and veteran administrators, particularly at the academic departmental level, can gain invaluable guidance by taking advantage of Dean Leaming's 30-plus years of experience. Whatever they are experiencing, he has already been through numerous times. He knows their challenges and anxieties, and, more importantly, the solutions to them. His book is written ...
Additional Info:
Dr. Leaming's book provides a comforting reminder that we need not waste time and energy reinventing the wheel. New and veteran administrators, particularly at the academic departmental level, can gain invaluable guidance by taking advantage of Dean Leaming's 30-plus years of experience. Whatever they are experiencing, he has already been through numerous times. He knows their challenges and anxieties, and, more importantly, the solutions to them. His book is written in plain, easy-to-understand language. It deals with everyday duties from attracting and hiring the most qualified people to dismissing those who don't work out, and from encouraging good teaching and research to dealing with difficult faculty members. The book also includes helpful summaries, checklists, tables and sample forms. Academic Leadership: A Practical Guide to Chairing the Department is a must-have resource book for the newly appointed department head that wants to avoid the trial-and-error management method. Dr. Leaming has been a department head at five universities and a dean at two. And he has laid out a roadmap that will come in handy continually for even the experienced person who still has a distance to travel down the administrative highway. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword.
Preface.
Part I: Leadership.
1. Advice for New Chairpersons.
2. Seven Habits of Successful Chairpersons.
3. Providing Leadership.
4. Duties and Responsibilities of Chairpersons.
5. Timesaving Tips for Effective Chairpersons.
6. Communicating.
Part II: Department.
7. Developing a Departmental Vision.
8. Improving Your Department.
9. Developing Outcome Assessment Programs.
10. Managing Change.
11. Building and Maintaining Morale.
12. Managing Conflict.
13. Working With Constituents.
14. Working With Your Dean.
15. Dealing With Curriculum Matters.
16. Conducting Effective Meetings.
17. Budget and Financial Management.
Part III: Legal Issues.
18. Avoiding Legal Problems.
19. Understanding Sexual Harassment and the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Part IV: Faculty.
20. Recruiting and Hiring Faculty.
21. Retaining, Mentoring, and Terminating Faculty.
22. Strategies for Faculty Development.
23. Evaluating Faculty Performance.
24. Handling Promotion and Tenure Issues.
25. Dealing With Chronic Low Achievers.
26. Dealing With Difficult Faculty.
Part V: Students.
27. Recruiting and Retaining Students.
28. Dealing With Emotional and Disrespectful Student Behavior.
Part VI: Looking Ahead.
29. Moving Up the Administrative Ladder.
30. Where Do You Go From Here?
Appendixes.
Index.
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Reforming the Higher Education Curriculum: Internationalizing the Campus

Book
Mestenhauser, Josef A. and Brenda J. Ellingboe, eds.
1998
Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LB2361.5.R43 1998
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
With the concept of a global village now a reality, institutions of higher learning must broaden their thinking beyond American social, cultural, and economic borders. Reforming the Higher Education Curriculum is a collection of papers that explores how a college or university can plan and implement a systemwide program for internationalizing the curriculum throughout the entire university. The contributors argue that a thorough overhaul of the higher education curriculum is ...
Additional Info:
With the concept of a global village now a reality, institutions of higher learning must broaden their thinking beyond American social, cultural, and economic borders. Reforming the Higher Education Curriculum is a collection of papers that explores how a college or university can plan and implement a systemwide program for internationalizing the curriculum throughout the entire university. The contributors argue that a thorough overhaul of the higher education curriculum is necessary to turn out graduates with true international skills and perspectives. Among the strategies recommended are courses and programs that involve study abroad, intensive study of foreign languages, and opportunities to cultivate intellectual, professional, and personal associations with people from other cultures. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributor Biographies
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Portraits of an International Curriculum: An Uncommon Multidimensional Perspective (Josef A. Mestenhauser)
ch. 2 Culture in Curriculum: Internationalizing Learning by Design (Kerry Freedman)
ch. 3 The Impossibility of Internationalizing Students by Adding Materials to Courses (Marion L. Lundy Dobbert)
ch. 4 Global Academies as Strategic Self-Organizing "Think Tanks"(Athur M. Harkins)
ch. 5 The Role of Foreign Languages in the Internationalization of the Curriculum (Michael F. Metcalf)
ch. 6 Teaching about Cognition and Cognitive Development: How to Internationalize the Topic (Herbert L. Pick, Jr.)
ch. 7 Internationalization through Networking and Curricular Infusion (John J. Cogan)
ch. 8 Mind Opening through Music: An Internationalized Music Curriculum (C. Victor Fung)
ch. 9 Internationalization of Course Work in Soil Science and Agronomy (Peter Graham)
ch. 10 Explaining Ourselves through Others' Cultural Visions: A Mini Course on America (Harvey B. Sarles)
ch. 11 Curriculum by Bytes - Using Technology to Enhance International Education (R. Michael Philson)
ch. 12 Internationalization through the Lens of Evaluation (Susan Lewis English)
ch. 13 Divisional Strategies to Internationalize a Campus Portrait: Results, Resistance, and Recommendations from a Case Study at a U.S. University (Brenda J. Ellinghoe)

Index
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Interdisciplinary Courses and Team Teaching: New Arrangements for Learning

Book
Davis, James R.
1995
American Council on Education and the Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LB2361.5.D38 1995
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
James Davis offers a realistic and stimulating examination of interdisciplinary theory and practice. In addition to providing specific tips on successful team teaching, the book features information drawn from the professional literature, survey results, and useful examples from the author's personal experience. It also includes a listing of nearly 100 interdisciplinary, team-taught courses currently being offered at colleges and universities throughout North America. The book demonstrates that team teaching, when effectively ...
Additional Info:
James Davis offers a realistic and stimulating examination of interdisciplinary theory and practice. In addition to providing specific tips on successful team teaching, the book features information drawn from the professional literature, survey results, and useful examples from the author's personal experience. It also includes a listing of nearly 100 interdisciplinary, team-taught courses currently being offered at colleges and universities throughout North America. The book demonstrates that team teaching, when effectively implemented, is fulfilling for both educator and student. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

Part I Structure and Delivery of Courses
ch. 1 Interdisciplinary Courses and Team Teaching: Definitions and Examples
ch. 2 The Rationale for Interdisciplinary Courses: The Problem of Specialization
ch. 3 Structuring and Delivering Interdisciplinary Courses: Approximating the Ideal
ch. 4 When Faculty Work in Teams: Learning from the Research on Groups and Teams
ch. 5 Faculty and Student Perceptions of Team Teaching: Satisfactions and Frustrations
ch. 6 Future Prospects for Interdisciplinary Courses: Issues and Problems

Part II Selected Examples of Courses
ch. 7 Examples of Interdisciplinary Courses and Programs

Conclusion
Notes
Index
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Reinventing Ourselves: Interdisciplinary Education, Collaborative Learning, and Experimentation in Higher Education

Book
Smith, Barbar Leigh and John McCann, eds.
2001
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2361.5.R437 2001
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Reinventing Ourselves examines the experiences of and lessons learned from a variety of institutions that pioneered new approaches for more effective teaching and learning. Many of the colleges included in this volume began as both educational and social experiments, representing new ways of thinking about educational goals, curricular organization, institutional governance, and faculty roles and rewards. With new calls for both rethinking our approaches to teaching and learning, and for ...
Additional Info:
Reinventing Ourselves examines the experiences of and lessons learned from a variety of institutions that pioneered new approaches for more effective teaching and learning. Many of the colleges included in this volume began as both educational and social experiments, representing new ways of thinking about educational goals, curricular organization, institutional governance, and faculty roles and rewards. With new calls for both rethinking our approaches to teaching and learning, and for reviewing the traditional boundaries within institutions and between disciplines, this book offers a rich store of ideas from which to draw. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Editors
About the Contributors
Preface
Foreword

Section I: Historical Perspectives and Institutional Examples
ch. 1 Dangerous Outposts: Progressive Experiments in Higher Education in the 1920s and 1930s (Steven R. Coleman)
ch. 2 The Innovative Colleges and Universities of the 1960s and 1970s: Lessons from Six Alternative Institutions (Joy Rosenzweig Kliewer)
ch. 3 Interdisciplinary Education at Hampshire College: Bringing People Together Around Ideas (Ann P. McNeal, and Frederick Stirton Weaver)
ch. 4 Evergreen at Twenty-Five: Sustaining Long-Term Innovation (Barbara Leigh Smith)
ch. 5 Bridging Theory and Practice: Public Service at The Evergreen State College (Magda Costantino, Emily Decker, Jeanine L. Elliott, Tina Kuckkahn, and Helen Lee)

Section II: Powerful Pedagogies
Part One: Learning Communities
ch. 6 Learning Communities: A Convergence Zone for Statewide Educational Reform (Barbara Leigh Smith)
ch. 7 Integration and Assessment of Service-Learning in Learning Communities (Karen Kashmanian Oates, and Laura Gaither)
ch. 8 Uncommon Sense: Liberal Education, Learning Communities, and the Transformative Quest (Les K. Adler)
ch. 9 Toward an Interdisciplinary Epistemology: Faculty Culture and Institutional Change (Grant H. Cornwell, and Eve W. Stoddard)
ch. 10 Voices in Seminar: Ideologies and Identities (Susan Fiksdal)

Part Two: Rethinking Teaching and Learning
ch. 11 Powerful Pedagogies (William H. Newell)
ch. 12 Should the Teacher Know the Answer? Two Ways to Organize Interdisciplinary Study Around Inquiry (Donald L. Finkel)
ch. 13 Jenny's Painting: Multiple Forms of Communication in the Classroom (Mark Pedelty)
ch. 14 Student-Active Science in Interdisciplinary Studies: Problems and Solutions (Janet F. Ott)
ch. 15 Increasing Access in the Sciences Through Interdisciplinary Feminist Perspectives (Gary L. Bornzin)
ch. 16 Building an Organization that Reflects Interdiscplinarity (Anne G. Scott, and Celestino Fernández)
ch. 17 The Academic Department in a Multidisciplinary Context: An Argument for the Administrative Holding Company Amidst Communities of Learners (Joseph J. Comprone)
ch. 18 Alternative Ways of Organizing: The Importance of Organizational Culture (Sandra J. Sarkela)
ch. 19 Reconceptualizing the Faculty Role: Alternative Models (James R. Chen, Michael V. Fortunato, Alan Mandell, Susan Oaks, and Ducan RyanMann)

Section III: Taking Stock and Looking Ahead
ch. 20 Interdisciplinary Assessment for Interdisciplinary Programs (Karl L. Schilling)v ch. 21 Students on Interdisciplinary Education: How They Learn and What They Learn (John McCann)
ch. 22 Learning to See Academic Culture Through the Eyes of the Participants: An Ethnographic/Folkloristic Approach to Analyzing and Assessing the Cultures of Alternative Institutions (Peter Tommerup)
ch. 23 The Interdisciplinary Variable: Then and Now (Julie Thompson Klein)
ch. 24 Joining the Conversation: An Essay in Guiding Images for College Teaching and Learning (Robert H. Knapp, Jr.)
ch. 25 After the Revolution: New Directions for Alternative Education (Robert Benedetti)
ch. 26 Knowledge, Politics, and Interdisciplinary Education (Charles W. Anderson)

Index
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Assessment Matters in Higher Education: Choosing and Using Diverse Approaches

Book
Brown, Sally and Angela Glasner, eds.
1999
Society for Research into Higher Education & Open University Press, Philadelphia, PA
LB2366.A77 1999
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Provides both theoretical perspectives and pragmatic advice on how to conduct effective assessment in higher education, drawing on relevant research and contributors' first-hand experience. Contains sections on a systems approach to assessment, the effectiveness of innovative assessment, assessing practice, and autonomous assessment, peer assessment, and self-assessment. Material is oriented toward the UK and New Zealand experience. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Provides both theoretical perspectives and pragmatic advice on how to conduct effective assessment in higher education, drawing on relevant research and contributors' first-hand experience. Contains sections on a systems approach to assessment, the effectiveness of innovative assessment, assessing practice, and autonomous assessment, peer assessment, and self-assessment. Material is oriented toward the UK and New Zealand experience. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Notes on Contributors

ch. 1 Institutional Strategies for Assessment (Sally Brown)
ch. 2 Innovations in Student Assessment: A System-wide Perspective (Angela Glasner)
ch. 3 Assessment and Evaluation: A Systems Approach for their Utilization (T. Dary Erwin)
ch. 4 Using Assessment Strategically to Change the Way Students Learn (Graham Gibbs)
ch. 5 Why Assess Innovatively? (Phil Race)
ch. 6 The Experience of Innovative Assessment: Student Perspectives (Liz McDowell and Kay Sambell)
ch. 7 Biases in Marking Students' Written Work: Quality?
ch. 8 Assessing Practice (Neil D. Fleming)
ch. 9 Assessment of Key Skills (Garth Rhodes and Fred Tallantyre)
ch. 10 Using Portfolios for Assessment in Teacher Preparation and Health Sciences (Gill Young)
ch. 11 Group-based Assessment: An Evaluation of the Use of Assessed Tasks as a Method of Fostering Higher Quality Learning (Mike Heathford)
ch. 12 Dimensions of Oral Assessment and Student Approaches to Learning (Gordon Joughin)
ch. 13 Towards Autonomous Assessment: Using Self-Assessment and Peer Assessment (Angela Brew)
ch. 14 Self-Assessment and Peer Assessment (Shirley Jordan)
ch. 15 Peer Assessment of Undergraduate Seminar Presentations: Motivations, Reflection and Future Directions (Andy Lapham and Ray Webster)
ch. 16 Using Peer Assessment and Self-Assessment for the First Time (Paul Roach)

Conclusion
Index
The Society for Research into Higher Education
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Wabash tree

Teaching from a Multicultural Perspective

Book
Roberts, Helen, Juan C. Gonzales, Olita D. Harris, Delores J. Huff, Ann M. Johns, Ray Lou, Otis L. Scott
1994
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA
LC1099.3.T435 1994
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The authors of this volume, all experienced teachers and administrators, outline how to teach in a multicultural environment. They suggest classroom strategies, curriculum reforms and assessment tools that work for all students. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The authors of this volume, all experienced teachers and administrators, outline how to teach in a multicultural environment. They suggest classroom strategies, curriculum reforms and assessment tools that work for all students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Once You Accept, Then You Can Teach (Juan C. Gonzalez)
ch. 2 Diversity and Change on Campus (Helen R. Roberts)
ch. 3 Teaching All Students Equally (Ray Lou)
ch. 4 Including Multicultural Content and Perspectives in Your Courses (Otis Scott)
ch. 5 Languages and Cultures in the Classroom (Ann Johns)
ch. 6 Equity in Classroom Assessment (Olita Harris)
ch. 7 On Becoming a Mensch or a Mentor (Delores Huff)

Appendix: A Student Profile Questionnaire
About the Authors
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The Future Compatible Campus: Planning, Designing, and Implementing Information Technology in the Academy

Book
Oblinger, Diana G. and Sean C. Rush, eds.
1998
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB1028.3.F86 1998
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The Future Compatible Campus can assist all of us in framing a workable plan and translating that plan into action. We know that we must prepare for the future; Oblinger and Rush help us do so with intelligence and forethought. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The Future Compatible Campus can assist all of us in framing a workable plan and translating that plan into action. We know that we must prepare for the future; Oblinger and Rush help us do so with intelligence and forethought. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Preface and Chapter Summary
Acknowledgments

Part 1: The Rationale for the Future Compatible Campus
ch. 1 Transforming the Academy (Kristine A. Hafner and Diana G. Oblinger)

Part 2: Planning for the Future
ch. 2 A Strategy for I/T Investments (William H. Graves)
ch. 3 Strategic Information Technology Planning in Higher Education (Charles R. Moran)
ch. 4 Staging for the Launch: An Implementation Planning Framework (Thomas C. Wunderle)
ch. 5 Student Services for the 21st Century: Creating the Student-Centered Environment (Martha A. Beede and Darlene J. Burnett)

Part 3: Moving Toward the Future in Teaching and Learning
ch. 6 Student Mobile Computing (Diana G. Oblinger, Mark Resmer, and James R. Mingle)
ch. 7 Wake Forest University's Strategic Plan for Technology (David G. Brown)
ch. 8 Collaborative Learning (Edwin J. Pinheiro)
ch. 9 Instructional Technology and the Mainstream: The Risks of Success (William H. Geoghegan)
ch. 10 Making Ends Meet: A Faculty Perspective on Computing and Scholarship (James S. Noblitt)

Part 4: Developing the Infrastructure
ch. 11 The Importance of the Campus Network Infrastructure (Richard Nichols)
ch. 12 Planning for Success: Are You Ready for Clent/Server? (David L. Bellamy and Danuta C. McCall)
ch. 13 Designing Classrooms for the 21st Century (Kathryn L. Conway)
ch. 14 Prepare Today for the Digital Library of Tomorrow (Richard P. Hulser)
ch. 15 Managing Innovation: Project Implementation in Higher Education (D. Lawrence Bivins)

Part 5: Measuring Success
ch. 16 Knowing How It Is All Working: The Role of Performance Measurements (James W. Cortada)

Index
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Transforming the City: Reframing Education for Urban Ministry

Book
Villafane, Eldin, Bruce W. Jackson, Robert A. Evans, and Alice Frazer Evans
2002
Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, MI
BV637.5.R44 2002
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Experience teaches that traditional approaches to ministry education do not work well in the ever-changing climate of the city. The dynamic, complex nature of inner-city life demands that we begin to think differently about urban ministry and how we develop leaders. Transforming the City offers a new way to look at ministry training and presents a number of informative case studies that can help in equipping people to minister effectively ...
Additional Info:
Experience teaches that traditional approaches to ministry education do not work well in the ever-changing climate of the city. The dynamic, complex nature of inner-city life demands that we begin to think differently about urban ministry and how we develop leaders. Transforming the City offers a new way to look at ministry training and presents a number of informative case studies that can help in equipping people to minister effectively in the urban context.

The book is built around six case studies that chronicle very different examples of urban theological education and that highlight both the challenge and the promise of creative approaches to education for ministry in multicultural urban locales. Commentaries by noted urban educators and church leaders point to the pitfalls and opportunities of urban ministry. Also included are helpful background notes and suggestions for how to teach each case study. Purposely designed for a variety of educational settings, Transforming the City is the best resource now available for exploring the task of urban ministry. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction
Invitation to Dialogue
How Did We Get Here? A Survey of Important Historical, Social, and Theological Issues That Occasioned the Rise of Urban Theological Education
Using Case Studies in Urban Theological Education
Cases Studies and Commentaries on Critical Issues Facing Urban Theological Education<
Case Study: Another World
Case Study: Setting the Captives Free
Case Study: Service and Survival
Case Study: A Shifting of Paradigms
Case Study: Whose Program Is It?
Case Study: A Metro Strategy

Paradigms for Urban Transformation
Authors and Contributors
Cover image

Transforming the Curriculum for Multicultural Understandings: A Practitioner's Handbook

Book
Boyer, James B. and H. Prentice Baptiste, Jr.
1996
Caddo Gap Press, San Francisco, CA
LC1099.3.B48 1996
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This book's basic premise is that present demographics suggest concepts of inclusion and cultural reflection are essential to any academic endeavor. Teachers and future teachers need to be aware of the emergence of multicultural education and how that plays out in the classroom. The volume presents a historical overview of the concept and stresses the need for greater awareness. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book's basic premise is that present demographics suggest concepts of inclusion and cultural reflection are essential to any academic endeavor. Teachers and future teachers need to be aware of the emergence of multicultural education and how that plays out in the classroom. The volume presents a historical overview of the concept and stresses the need for greater awareness. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 "Rationale for a Multicultural Curriculum"
ch. 2 "Historical Look at the Emergence of Diversity"
ch. 3 "A Transformation of the Curriculum"
ch. 4 "Boyer's Stages of Ethnic Growth"
ch. 5 "Institutionalizing a Multicultural Curriculum"
ch. 6 "Baptiste's Typology of Multiculturalism"
ch. 7 "Moving the Environment toward Multiculturalism"
ch. 8 "Cross-Racial, Cross-Ethnic Teaching and Learning"
ch. 9 "Critical Issues for Practitioners"
ch. 10 "Relationships of Poverty and Learning"
ch. 11 "Instruction with a Multicultural Philosophy"
ch. 12 "Diversity Issues in Educational Research"
ch. 13 "Questions about Multicultural Education."

app.1 "The King Holiday"
app.2 "Administrator's Checklist"
app.3 "Boyer's Elementary-Secondary Inventory"
app.4 "Basic Administrative Competencies"

Bibliography
Cover image

E-Moderating: The Key to Teaching and Learning Online

Book
Salmon, Gilly
2000
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1044.87.S26 2000
Topics: Online Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This groundbreaking new book considers what is required of good moderators and presents practical information for their training and development, set in the context of the rapid development and combination of Information and Communications Technologies and the wide impact these are having in open and distance learning.In addition, this highly topical and forward looking book introduces the reader to the latest thinking in online computer mediated education, and explores ...
Additional Info:
This groundbreaking new book considers what is required of good moderators and presents practical information for their training and development, set in the context of the rapid development and combination of Information and Communications Technologies and the wide impact these are having in open and distance learning.In addition, this highly topical and forward looking book introduces the reader to the latest thinking in online computer mediated education, and explores the key role of the trainer, teacher or tutor as moderator. Tried and tested techniques are outlined and the book explains how to set up an online environment that will maximize the success of the moderator when working with students. Moderators, trainers, lecturers, academics, and course developers currently working in or planning to move towards online teaching will benefit from this book. E-Moderating is a new addition to the leading edge Open and Distance Learning series. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series editor's foreword
Preface
Acknowledgements

Part 1 Concepts and cases
ch. 1 What is e-moderating?
ch. 2 A model for CMC in education and training
ch. 3 E-Moderating qualities and roles
ch. 4 Training e-moderators
ch. 5 E-moderators and the participants' experience
ch. 6 E-moderating: the key to the future of online teaching and learning

Part 2 Resources for practitioners
ch. 1 Choosing a software system for CMC
ch. 2 Are you ready to work online?
ch. 3 Keeping e-moderating costs down
ch. 4 CMC users with disabilities
ch. 5 Online participant induction
ch. 6 Supporting and developing CMC novices
ch. 7 Using the five-stage model
ch. 8 Evaluating participation on CMC
ch. 9 Training e-moderators
ch. 10 E-moderation principles for productive conferencing
ch. 11 Techniques for CMC structures
ch. 12 Conference housekeeping
ch. 13 Understanding lurkers
ch. 14 Boosting CMC participation
ch. 15 Knowledge sharing and construction
ch. 16 Conference text examples
ch. 17 Monitoring e-moderating
ch. 18 Communicating online
ch. 19 Valuing online diversity
ch. 20 A future scenario
ch. 21 Exploring CMC on the World Wide Web
ch. 22 What will we call ourselves?

References
Index
Cover image

Developing and Implementing Service-Learning Programs

Book
Canada, Marc and Bruce W. Speck, eds.
2001
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC221.D48 2001
Topics: Service Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
A relative newcomer in higher education, service-learning nevertheless has caught on at campuses across the country. While thousands of students, teachers, and community partners are realizing the benefits of this experiential form of education, many others still have questions, particularly, "What exactly is service-learning?" and "How can I do it effectively?" This volume of New Directions for Higher Education answers both questions, beginning with a brief overview and then presenting ...
Additional Info:
A relative newcomer in higher education, service-learning nevertheless has caught on at campuses across the country. While thousands of students, teachers, and community partners are realizing the benefits of this experiential form of education, many others still have questions, particularly, "What exactly is service-learning?" and "How can I do it effectively?" This volume of New Directions for Higher Education answers both questions, beginning with a brief overview and then presenting a series of chapters on getting started, promoting reflection, and otherwise making service-learning work effectively in a variety of settings, from liberal arts colleges to research institutions. Both newcomers and veterans will appreciate the clear, practical advice on such matters as finding community partners, reaching diverse populations, and integrating service-learning and research. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Why Service-Learning? (Bruce W. Speck)
ch. 2 A Smart Start to Service-Learning (Maureen Shubow Rubin)
ch. 3 Service-Learning Is for Everybody (Robert Shumer)
ch. 4 Creating Your Reflection Map (Janet Eyler )
ch. 5 The Internet in Service-Learning (Mark Canada)
ch. 6 A Comprehensive Model for Assessing Service-Learning and Community-University Partnerships (Barbara A. Holland)
ch. 7 The National Society for Experiential Education in Service-Learning (Lawrence Neil Bailis)
ch. 8 Advancing Service-Learning at Research Universities (Andrew Furco)
ch. 9 How Professors Can Promote Service-Learning in a Teaching Institution (Kathy O'Byrne)
ch. 10 Humanistic Learning and Service-Learning at the Liberal Arts College (Edward Zlotkowski)
ch. 11 Additional Resources (Elaine K. Ikeda)

Index
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Electronic Portfolios: Emerging Practices in Student, Faculty, and Institutional Learning

Book
Cambridge, Barbara L., ed.
2001
American Association for Higher Education, Washington, D.C.
LB1029.P67E45 2001
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Assessing Students   |   Student Portfolios   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The portfolio is a powerful tool for learning and assessment. Introducing the electronic into the mix increases its power, especially through the key feature of interactive hyperlinks and the potential to promote continuous reflection on, and updating of, learning. This introduction examines the potential of electronic portfolios by addressing: rationales for creating an electronic portfolio; possible features of the portfolio; examples of current practice; cautions; and recommendations. Chapters by nineteen ...
Additional Info:
The portfolio is a powerful tool for learning and assessment. Introducing the electronic into the mix increases its power, especially through the key feature of interactive hyperlinks and the potential to promote continuous reflection on, and updating of, learning. This introduction examines the potential of electronic portfolios by addressing: rationales for creating an electronic portfolio; possible features of the portfolio; examples of current practice; cautions; and recommendations. Chapters by nineteen portfolio practitioners from a range of disciplines and institutions describe the construction and use of electronic portfolios. They describe the uses:

* By students to display and reflect on work for a specific course or program

* By faculty to document and reflect on their classroom practice and allow comment by colleagues or others

* By institutions to demonstrate accountability to their stakeholders and as a vehicle for institution-wide reflection, learning, and improvement. The section on institutional portfolios includes chapters on the incorporation of institutional research and data, and the potential role for such portfolios in accreditation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Yolanda T. Moses)
Preface

ch. 1 Electronic Portfolios as Knowledge Builders (Barbara L. Cambridge)

ch. 2 Student Portfolios
Introduction: Digitized Student Portfolios (Kathleen Blake Yancey)
Reflective Webfolios in a Humanities Course (Donna Reiss)
Composing the Intranet-Based Electronic Portfolio Using ``Common'' Tools (Rich Rice)
Electronic Portfolios in a Management Major Curriculum (Katrina A. Zalatan)
A Major Redesign of the Kalamazoo Portfolio (Emily Springfield)
Using On-Line Portfolios to Assess English Majors at Utah State University (Christine Hult)
Development of Electronic Portfolios for Nursing Students (Peggy Jenkins)
Comparing Electronic and Paper Portfolios (Emily Springfield)
Conclusion: General Patterns and the Future (Kathleen Blake Yancey)

ch. 3 Faculty Portfolios
Introduction: Ambassadors With Portfolios: Electronic Portfolios and the Improvement of Teaching (Daniel P. Tompkins)
Teaching Great Books on the Web (Marc Stier)
Electronic Portfolios = Multimedia Development + Portfolio Development: The Electronic Portfolio Development Process (Helen Barrett)
From Bach to Tupac: Using an Electronic Course Portfolio to Analyze a Curricular Transformation (Elizabeth F. Barkley)
Wired for Trouble? Creating a Hypermedia Course Portfolio (T. Mills Kelly)
Conclusion: Ambassadors With Portfolios: Recommendations (Daniel P. Tompkins)

ch. 4 Institutional Portfolios
Linking Learning, Improvement, and Accountability: An Introduction to Electronic Institutional Portfolios (Susan Kahn)
Snake Pit in Cyberspace: The 1UPU1 Institutional Portfolio (Sharon J. Hamilton)
Portland State University's Electronic Institutional Portfolio: Strategy, Planning, and Assessment (Kathi A. Ketcheson)
The Role of Institutional Research and Data in Institutional Portfolios (Victor M.H. Borden)
Electronic Department Portfolios: A New Tool for Departmental Learning and Improvement (Dean S. Dorn)
The Role of Institutional Portfolios in the Revised WASC Accreditation Process (Judie Gaffin Wexler)

Conclusion: Recommendations (Susan Kahn)
Index
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Organizing to Collaborate: A Taxonomy of Higher Education Practices for Promoting Interdependence Within the Classroom, Across the Campus, and Beyond the College

Book
Cuseo, Joseph B.
2002
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB1032.C872 2002
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This book focuses on the terms "collaborative learning," "cooperative learning," and "learning community" in which they have been bandied about in American higher education with great frequency and enthusiasm. One primary purpose of this monograph is to provide a more precise delineation of postsecondary practices that are subsumed or assumed to be embraced by the umbrella terms, collaborative learning, cooperative learning, and learning community, and organize these practices into a ...
Additional Info:
This book focuses on the terms "collaborative learning," "cooperative learning," and "learning community" in which they have been bandied about in American higher education with great frequency and enthusiasm. One primary purpose of this monograph is to provide a more precise delineation of postsecondary practices that are subsumed or assumed to be embraced by the umbrella terms, collaborative learning, cooperative learning, and learning community, and organize these practices into a coherent classification system or taxonomy. Other major objectives of the taxonomy are to: (a) create a common language for improving the clarity of communication and discourse about diverse forms of collaboration in higher education; (b) articulate a strong, research-based rationale for greater use of collaboration practices in postsecondary education, (c) provide a panoramic overview of, and a convenient catalogue for, the wide range of collaborative initiatives that have been imp! lemented at colleges and universities; and (d) serve as a stimulus for triggering wider use of collaborative practices in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Section I: Introduction to the Taxonomy
ch. 1 Purposes and Organization of the Taxonomy
ch. 2 Organization of Taxonomy
ch. 3 Limitations of Taxonomy
ch. 4 Rationale of Taxonomy
Conclusion

Section II: A Taxonomy of Collaborative Practices in Higher Education
Introduction
ch. 5 Collaboration between Students
ch. 6 Collaboration between Faculty
ch. 7 Faculty-Student Collaboration
ch. 8 Cross-Functional Teams
ch. 9 Inter-Institutional Collaboration
ch. 10 Inter-Segmental Collaboration
ch. 11 College-Community Collaboration

Conclusion
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching College in An Age of Accountability

Book
Lyons, Richard E., Meggin McIntosh and Marcella L.Kysilka
2003
Allyn & Bacon, Boston, MA
LB2331.L96 2003
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Teaching College in an Age of Accountability provides professors with the insights and tools necessary to achieve higher levels on accountability assessment outcomes while preparing students for enhancing their own career success in a more complex future. In recent years, many initiatives have been implemented by a number of state legislatures and boards of trustees to increase "institutional effectiveness." These measures have made colleges and universities aware that practices once ...
Additional Info:
Teaching College in an Age of Accountability provides professors with the insights and tools necessary to achieve higher levels on accountability assessment outcomes while preparing students for enhancing their own career success in a more complex future. In recent years, many initiatives have been implemented by a number of state legislatures and boards of trustees to increase "institutional effectiveness." These measures have made colleges and universities aware that practices once accepted as sacrosanct within the culture will, from this time forward, be assessed regularly for their contribution to achieving more accountable outcomes. Teaching College in an Age of Accountability is the first book that focuses exclusively on the implications of this trend on the work of individual professors. Accountability proponents generally call for increased access to higher education for all citizens, improved retention of students once they are enrolled, and graduation and placement rates that recognize the investment of tax and institutional funds in students' success. This book equips professors to address each of these outcome goals in a proactive manner. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 The Rise of Accountability in Higher Education
ch. 2 Implications of Accountability on Your Teaching
ch. 3 Today's College Students
ch. 4 Strategic Course Planning
ch. 5 Launching Your Course Effectively
ch. 6 Managing the Context of Your Course
ch. 7 Instructor-Directed Learning Methods
ch. 8 Student-Driven Learning Methods
ch. 9 Infusing Technology into Your Teaching
ch. 10 Managing the Examination Process
ch. 11 Alternative Methods of Assessing Student Learning
ch. 12 Bringing Your Course to an Effective Conclusion
ch. 13 Evaluating the Effectiveness of Your Teaching
ch. 14 Maintaining Your Edge

References
Index
Cover image

How Minority Students Experience College: Implications for Planning and Policy

Book
Watson, Lemuel W.
2002
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC3727.H66 2002
Topics: Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Have three decades of integration and multicultural initiatives in higher education delivered a better education to all students? Are majority and minority students reaping similar benefits, specifically in predominantly white colleges? Do we know what a multicultural campus should look like, and how to design one that is welcoming to all students and promotes a learning environment?

Through a unique qualitative study involving seven colleges and universities considered ...
Additional Info:
Have three decades of integration and multicultural initiatives in higher education delivered a better education to all students? Are majority and minority students reaping similar benefits, specifically in predominantly white colleges? Do we know what a multicultural campus should look like, and how to design one that is welcoming to all students and promotes a learning environment?

Through a unique qualitative study involving seven colleges and universities considered national models of commitment to diversity, this book presents the views and voices of minority students on what has been achieved and what remains to be done.

The direct quotations that form the core of this book give voice to Black, Hispanic, Asian, Native American and bi-racial students. They offer in their own words their perceptions of their campus cultures and practices, the tensions they encounter and what works for them.

Rather than elaborating or recommending specific models or solutions, this book aims to provide insights that will enable the reader better to understand and articulate the issues that need to be addressed to achieve a well-adapted multicultural campus.

Presidents, academic affairs professionals, student affairs personnel and faculty concerned with equity and diversity will find this book helpful and enlightening. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Authors
Introduction

ch. 1 Defining Multiculturalism
ch. 2 Institutional Characteristics and Profiles
ch. 3 Research Methods and Procedures for Inquiry
ch. 4 Reality of Campus Culture
ch. 5 The Lack of Multiculturalism and How It Affects Students
ch. 6 Coping: Involvement, Identity, and Educational Outcomes
ch. 7 Discussions, Conclusions, and Suggestions

App. A General Assurances
App. B Consent Form
App. C Demographic Form
App. D Facilitator Form
App. E Interview Protocol
App. F Content Areas

References
Index
Cover image

A Post-Modern Perspective on Curriculum

Book
Doll, William E., Jr.
1993
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LB1570.D616 1993
Topics: Course Design   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Doll offers a post-modernist, process-oriented vision of teaching and curriculum built from the base of a constructivist and experiential epistemology where we engage ourselves in a conversation with each other in the context of our collective history and seek meaning through alternative interpretations and transformations. In this book he ably demonstrates the power of historical reflection to illuminate our present position on the cusp of change, and he provides a ...
Additional Info:
Doll offers a post-modernist, process-oriented vision of teaching and curriculum built from the base of a constructivist and experiential epistemology where we engage ourselves in a conversation with each other in the context of our collective history and seek meaning through alternative interpretations and transformations. In this book he ably demonstrates the power of historical reflection to illuminate our present position on the cusp of change, and he provides a powerful vision of what might be. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Introduction

Part I The Modern Paradigm: A Closed Vision
ch. 1 Descartes' and Newton's World Views
Pre-Modern Order
Descartes' Method
Newton's Stable Universe
ch. 2 Curriculum Carryovers
America and Technology
The Scientific Curriculum
The Tyler Rationale

Part II The Post-Modern Paradigm: An Open Vision
ch. 3 Piaget and Living Systems
The Biological World-View
Evolution and Entropy - Problems and Promises
Piaget's Equilibrium Model
ch. 4 Prigogine and Chaotic Order
Concepts of Chaos
Ilya Prigogine, Self-Organization, and Dissipative Structures
ch. 5 The Cognitive Revolution, Bruner, and a New Epistemology
Concepts of Cognition
Bruner
A New Epistemology
ch. 6 Dewey, Whitehead, and Process Thought
Traditions of Permanence, Change, and Interpretation
John Dewey and the Concept of Process
Alfred North Whitehead and the Concept of Process
Process Thought Beyond Dewey and Whitehead

Part III An Educational Vision
ch. 7 Constructing a Curriculum Matrix
Curriculum Concepts
The Four R's - An Alternative to the Tyler Rationale

References
Index
About the Author
Article cover image

"A Middle Way for Religious Studies?"

Article
Cohen, Charles
2003
Council of Societies for the Study of Religion Bulletin 32, no. 1 (2003): 11-13
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Interdisciplinary Studies Today

Book
Klein, Julie Thompson and William G. Doty, eds.
1994
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 58)
LB2361.5.I68 1994
Topics: Course Design   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning is a practical compendium of advice and information on the development, administration, and assessment of interdisciplinary studies programs and schools. A bibliographic orientation to hands-on access, including electronic retrieval of information, precedes chapters reviewing the design of interdisciplinary courses, and how the role of administrators in interdisciplinary programs can further institutitonal goals. The final chapter looks beyond the local campus to ...
Additional Info:
This volume of New Directions for Teaching and Learning is a practical compendium of advice and information on the development, administration, and assessment of interdisciplinary studies programs and schools. A bibliographic orientation to hands-on access, including electronic retrieval of information, precedes chapters reviewing the design of interdisciplinary courses, and how the role of administrators in interdisciplinary programs can further institutitonal goals. The final chapter looks beyond the local campus to national and international support networks. The contributors, who share their extensive experience in the teaching and administration of interdisciplinary studies, provide many examples of good (and bad) praxis. This is the 58th issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Teaching and Learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes

ch. 1 Finding Interdisciplinary Knowledge and Information (Julie Thompson Klein)
ch. 2 Designing Interdisciplinary Courses (William H. Newell)
ch. 3 The Administration and Governance of Interdisciplinary Programs (Beth A. Casey)
ch. 4 Assessing Interdisciplinary Learning (Michael Field, Russell Lee, Mary Lee Field)
ch. 5 Organizational Networking: Taking the Next Step (Nelson E. Bingham)

Index
Cover image

The Character and Assessment of Learning for Religious Vocation (pdf)

Journal Issue
2003
Theological Education 39, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v.39 no.1 2003
Topics: Theological Education   |   Ministerial Formation   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2003-theological-education-v39-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
The Character and Assessment of Learning for Religious Vocation: M.Div. Education and Numbering the Levites (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Learning Goals and the Assessment of Learning in Theological Schools: A Preliminary Survey (Gordon T. Smith and Charles M. Wood)
Knowing and Caring (Charles M. Wood)
Getting to the Question: Assessment and the Professional Character of Ministry (Victor J. Klimoski)
What is the Literature Saying about Learning and Assessment in Higher Education? (Carolyn M. Jurkowitz)
Exploring the Process of Learning and Assessment: Report on the ATS Workshop on Assessing Theological Learning (Eleanor A. Daniel)
Assessing Assessment: An Accreditation Visitor’s View of ATS Outcome-Oriented Standards (Loyde H. Hartley)

OPEN FORUM
Worship and Learning, E. Byron Anderson
Infusing the Graduate Theological Curriculum with Education about Disability (Robert C. Anderson)
Judicatory-Based Theological Education (Lance R. Barker and B. Edmon Martin)
Cover image

Redesigning Higher Education: Producing Dramatic Gains in Student Learning

Book
Gardiner, Lion F.
1994
ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report 7, George Washington Univ. Press, Washington, D.C.
LB2822.75.G37 1994
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Scrutinizes the theoretical links between critique and prescription. Examines the growing wisdom on student learning, college outcomes, and different options for instruction and assessment. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Scrutinizes the theoretical links between critique and prescription. Examines the growing wisdom on student learning, college outcomes, and different options for instruction and assessment. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 What is student development and how does it happen?
ch. 2 The curriculum: framework for development
ch. 3 Instruction: teaching, testing, and communicating outcomes
ch. 4 The campus climate: context for development
ch. 5 Academic advising: guiding development
ch. 6 Can today's students learn? Achieving success with high standards for all
ch. 7 Improving quality: the need for a sea change
ch. 8 Producing results: leadership for quality
ch. 9 A call to action: a new kind of community
Article cover image

"An Assessment Riddle"

Article
Walvoord, Barbara E., and Anderson, Virginia
1993
Assessment Update 7, no. 6 (1993): 8-9, 11
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"A Curriculum Journey: Problematic: A Traveler's Tale"

Article
Moore, Mary Elizabeth Mullino
in Curriculum Visions (New York: Peter Lang, 2002): 218
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Evaluation as Collaborative Inquiry"

Article
Dykstra, Craig
1993
Initiatives in Religion 2, no. 4, 1-2,
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Evaluation has little to do with grading, scoring, and classifying and everything to do with gaining better insight into what one is doing and with finding ways to improve it or extend it in worthwhile directions. Reflective practitioners build self-evaluation into the very warp and woof of their endeavors.
Additional Info:
Evaluation has little to do with grading, scoring, and classifying and everything to do with gaining better insight into what one is doing and with finding ways to improve it or extend it in worthwhile directions. Reflective practitioners build self-evaluation into the very warp and woof of their endeavors.
Cover image

The Ideal Seminary: Pursuing Excellence in Theological Education

Book
Calian, Carnegie Samuel
2002
Westminster John Knox, Louisville, KY
BV4020.C35 2002
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The president of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary addresses everyone who has a stake in theological schools and education: educators, administrators, students, and donors. He discusses institutional challenges, program challenges, and student concerns. Each chapter ends with an issue for discussion. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The president of Pittsburgh Theological Seminary addresses everyone who has a stake in theological schools and education: educators, administrators, students, and donors. He discusses institutional challenges, program challenges, and student concerns. Each chapter ends with an issue for discussion. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction: Why Seminary Education?

Part I. Institutional Challenges
Seminary Education and Leadership
The Search for Excellence among Theological Schools
Academic Freedom and Seminary Education
) Who Owns the Seminary?

Part II. Program Challenges
Tomorrow's Seminary Curriculum
Making the World Your Classroom
The Globalization and Multiculturalization of Theological Education
Expanding the Horizons of Seminary Education

Part III. Student Concerns
Who Is Qualified to Minister?
Going through Seminary without Losing Your Faith
The Place of Prayer in Seminary Education
Toward the Ideal Seminary

Afterword: Developing a Strategy for Financial Stability
(7) Notes
Bibliography
Acknowledgments
Index
Cover image

"Guide For Reviewing Programs in Religion & Theology"

Article
AAR Academic Relations Task Force
1999
American Academy of Religion
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Modeled on guides produced for other fields, this document is intended to provide department chairs and deans with a set of strategic questions and suggested steps for conducing a review of their program. We intend this document to be helpful for chairs undertaking annual reviews and reviews for accrediting agencies. It contains an introductory statement on the study of religion; a discussion of the preliminary steps in constructing a successful ...
Additional Info:
Modeled on guides produced for other fields, this document is intended to provide department chairs and deans with a set of strategic questions and suggested steps for conducing a review of their program. We intend this document to be helpful for chairs undertaking annual reviews and reviews for accrediting agencies. It contains an introductory statement on the study of religion; a discussion of the preliminary steps in constructing a successful review; a step-by-step description of their review process, and a description of how to conceptualized the write an effective “self-study narrative.” (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface. The Study of Religion Today and in the Past
Strengthening Your Program and the Field
Purpose of the Guide
Accreditation
What's At Stake
The Review Process
Step 1. The Decision to Conduct the Review
Step 2. Preliminary Preparation for the Review
Step 3. Self-Study
Writing the Evaluative Narrative
List of Sections and Topics for the Narrative
History of the Program
Goals and Defining Characteristics of the Program
Curriculum
Advising System
Resources for Undergraduate Program–faculty, TAs, etc.
Other Program Features
Faculty
Relations with Other Departments and Programs
Governance Structure
Degree to Which Program Seeks Advice and Participation From Other Faculty
Quality and Stability of Leadership
Staff
Funding
Other Local Program Issues
Graduate Program
Overview: General Quality, Trends, Reputation, etc.
Students
Requirements
Curriculum
Advising System
Qualifying Examinations
Master's Theses and/or Dissertations
Time to Degree
Teaching Experience and Training
Financial Support
Summary of Planned Changes in Program
Appendices
Data
Checklist of Documents to Include as Appendices in Self-Study
Table of Contents of Documents Included in the Self-Study
Evaluative Narrative
Descriptive and Quantitative Appendices
Step 4. The External Review
Identifying External Reviewers
Organizing Participants for External Reviewers' Interviews and Meetings
Interacting with the External Reviewers
Being Clear about Priorities
Following up on the External Review
Step 5. Response to the External Review Report
Step 6. Administration Response
Appendix A. Writing the Self-Study Narrative
Introductory Sections of the Self-Study
History of the Program
Program Goals and Definition
Program Structure
Strategic Sections of the Self-Study
The Undergraduate Program
Overview
Students
Requirements
Curriculum
Other Aspects of the Undergraduate Program
Advising
Resources
The Graduate Program
Overview
Students
Requirements
Curriculum
Advising
Qualifying Examination
Master's Theses; Dissertations
Time to Degree
Teaching Experience and Training
Financial Support
Other Program Features
Faculty
Relations with Other Departments and Programs
Governance Structure
Staff
Funding
Space, Equipment, Library Resources, and Other Resources
Other Local Issues
Concluding Sections of the Self-Study
Summary of Planned Changes in the Program
Concluding Flourish
Cover image

Navigating The Currents Of Certification: A Case Study Of Hispanic Baptist Theological School

Journal Issue
2004
Christian Higher Education Volume 3 Number 1
LC368.C46v.3no.1
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 NAVIGATING THE CURRENTS OF CERTIFICATION: A CASE STUDY OF HISPANIC BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL

ch. 2 INSTITUTIONAL TYPES, ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURES, AND INNOVATION IN CHRISTIAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

ch. 3 DIAPERS, DISSERTATIONS, AND OTHER HOLY THINGS: THE EXPERIENCES OF MOTHERS WORKING IN CHRISTIAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

ch. 4 SPIRITUAL PERSPECTIVE AND NEEDS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF NURSING FACULTY IN A CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY AND A STATE UNIVERSITY

ch. 5 PERSONAL AND ACADEMIC BACKGROUNDS OF FEMALE CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICERS in EVANGELICAL CHRISTIAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
Cover image

Building a Scholarship of Assessment

Book
Banta, Trudy W. and Associates
2002
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2366 .B85 2002
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In this book, leading experts in the field examine the current state of assessment practice and scholarship, explore what the future holds for assessment, and offer guidance to help educators meet these new challenges. The contributors root assessment squarely in several related disciplines to provide an overview of assessment practice and scholarship that will prove useful to both the seasoned educator and those new to assessment practice. Ultimately, Building a ...
Additional Info:
In this book, leading experts in the field examine the current state of assessment practice and scholarship, explore what the future holds for assessment, and offer guidance to help educators meet these new challenges. The contributors root assessment squarely in several related disciplines to provide an overview of assessment practice and scholarship that will prove useful to both the seasoned educator and those new to assessment practice. Ultimately, Building a Scholarship of Assessment will help convince skeptics who still believe outcomes assessment is a fad and will soon fade away that this is an interdisciplinary area with deep roots and an exciting future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Authors
Pt. 1 History and Current Status of Assessment
ch. 1 An Emerging Scholarship: A Brief History of Assessment
ch. 2 Promoting Academic Improvement: Organizational and Administrative Dynamics That Support Student Assessment
Pt. 2 Theoretical-Foundations of Assessment
ch. 3 The Roots of Assessment: Tensions, Solutions, and Research Directions
ch. 4 A Scholar-Practitioner Model for Assessment
ch. 5 Enacting a Collaborative Scholarship of Assessment
ch. 6 The Scholarly Assessment of Student Development
Pt. 3 Methods of Assessment
ch. 7 Measurement Issues in Outcomes Assessment
ch. 8 Web Applications in Assessment
ch. 9 Information Support for Assessment
Pt. 4 Scholarly Assessment
ch. 10 Engaging and Supporting Faculty in the Scholarship of Assessment: Guidelines from Research and Best Practice
ch. 11 Scholarly Assessment of Student Learning in the Major and General Education
ch. 12 Program Review: A Spectrum of Perspectives and Practices
ch. 13 Accreditation and the Scholarship of Assessment
Pt. 5 Toward a Scholarship of Assessment
ch. 14 Characteristics of Effective Outcomes Assessment: Foundations and Examples
ch. 15 A Call for Transformation
References
Name Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning: Leading and Supporting the Transformation on Your Campus

Book
Barone, Carole A. and Paul R. Hagner, eds.
2001
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2395.7 .T43 2001
Topics: Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The ability of the Internet and the World Wide Web to provide a wealth of on-line information that can be easily accessed at any time is changing the basic structure and operations of organizations, especially educational institutions.

Written by a blue-ribbon panel of contributors -- thirteen experts in various fields of educational technology and teaching and learning -- Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning: Leading and Supporting the Transformation on ...
Additional Info:
The ability of the Internet and the World Wide Web to provide a wealth of on-line information that can be easily accessed at any time is changing the basic structure and operations of organizations, especially educational institutions.

Written by a blue-ribbon panel of contributors -- thirteen experts in various fields of educational technology and teaching and learning -- Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning: Leading and Supporting the Transformation on Your Campus offers academic leaders the advice they need to help their institutions initiate, implement, and manage the transformation in order to become Internet-based communication and learning environments. The authors show how leaders can meet the challenge of the information age and the student demand for interactive learning by creating supportive environments that allow faculty to adapt to and sustain this sweeping institutional transformation. This book offers the insights, practical suggestions, and strategies that are essential for engaging the campus community in the transformation process. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Authors

ch. 1. Engaging the Faculty (Paul R. Hagner, Charles A. Schneebeck)
ch. 2. Creating a Context for Consensus (David G. Brown, Sally Jackson)
ch. 3. Managing Complexity in a Transforming Environmen (Vicki N. Suter)
ch. 4. Transforming Traditional Faculty Roles (William H. Graves)
ch. 5. The Holy Grail: Developing Scalable and Sustainable Support Solutions (Joel L. Hartman, Barbara Truman-Davis)
ch. 6. Designing and Delivering Instructional Technology: A Team Approach (Gerard L. Hanley)
ch. 7. Responding to Intellectual Property and Legal Issues (James L. Hilton, James G. Neal )
ch. 8. Form Follows Function: Establishing the Necessary Infrastructure (Bret L. Ingerman)
ch. 9. Assessing Conditions for Campus Transformation (Carole A. Barone, Paul R. Hagner)

Index
Cover image

Teaching With Technology

Book
Lloyd, Les, ed.
1997
Information Today, Medford, NJ
LB2395.7 .T425 1997
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Higher education faculty detail techniques used to enhance the classroom experience with multimedia technology, offering case studies of actual programs at institutions including Wellesley College, Washington State University, City University Business School, and New England Conservatory. Topics include the affect of computers on college writing, integrating electronic media into the art and design classroom and into the health information management curriculum, developing a multimedia computer/video environment in a community ...
Additional Info:
Higher education faculty detail techniques used to enhance the classroom experience with multimedia technology, offering case studies of actual programs at institutions including Wellesley College, Washington State University, City University Business School, and New England Conservatory. Topics include the affect of computers on college writing, integrating electronic media into the art and design classroom and into the health information management curriculum, developing a multimedia computer/video environment in a community college, and establishing a networked lab. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 When everyone buys in : a case study of technological change (Carole Carmody)
ch. 2 The affect of computers on college writing : a view from the field (Jo Ellen Winters)
ch. 3 A professional development needs-assessment of computing and information technology : a case study at Lock Haven University (Punnipa Hossain, Robert O. Little)
ch/ 4 Computing in the curriculum at Wellesley College (Alan Shuchat)
ch. 5 Some experiences integrating electronic media into the art and design curriculum (Wayne Draznin)
ch. 6 Developing a multimedia computer/video environment in a comprehensive community college (S. James Corvey)
ch. 7 MacCycle : an extensible multimedia for teaching the physiology and histology of the menstrual cycle (James F. Aiton, Susan Whiten, Nils S. Peterson)
ch. 8 Multimedia : a systematic approach to its placement in education (Robert A. Saldarini)
ch. 9 Software for sociology : a tool for a more effective learning paradigm (Christopher Sullivan)
ch. 10 DATASIM : a general purpose data simulator (Drake R. Bradley)
ch. 11 An integrative approach to writing with computers (W. Brett McKenzie)
ch. 12 Chronicles from a U.S. Department of Education Title III grant (Jeanne Buckley, Marilyn Puchalski)
ch. 13 Learning information systems through a mail-enabled business simulation : the case of Trent Engineering (Clive Holtham, Martin Rich)
ch. 14 Integrating technology into the health information management curriculum (Dorine Bennett, Paulette Wiesen)
ch. 15 The computer-mediated English department (Patricia Ericsson, Eric Johnson)
ch. 16 Using technology in a computer concepts course (James S. McKeown, Lynette Molstad)
ch. 17 Energies Plus, Inc. (N. Faye Angel)
ch. 18 TransIT and refocused strategies in teaching advanced translation (Doug Thompson)
ch. 19 Chemistry and art : developing a new course with NSF grants (John L. Bordley, Jr.)
ch. 20 Evolution of the classroom with new technology (Abigail M. Thomas)
ch. 21 CAL heuristics in the United Kingdom's UMIST (Marie C. Hayet)
ch. 22 Medaille College : integrating computers into course syllabi (Donna Marie Kaputa in collaboration with Douglas Anderson, Carol Harrison, and Janice Schlegel)
ch. 23 Computer information systems and art : the development of a symbiotic relationship (Ellen M. Dauwer)
ch. 24 Student Information Skills Project (Susan P. Fowell)
ch. 25 A case study in the use of Union College's Teagle Writing Lab (Najmuddin Shaik, Dianne Ferris)
ch. 26 Using computer software in a literature class : rereading a text with SEEN by Conduit (Nancy Enright)
ch. 27 Professors as developers : exploiting the NeXTstep environment (Joel M. Smith)
ch. 28 Establishing a networked lab with focus on integrating computers into the writing curriculum (Constance Chismar)
ch. 29 The value of portable computers in the classroom (Garrett Bozylinsky, William Creighton)
ch. 30 Music, computers, and learning at New England Conservatory (Paul Burdick, Lyle Davidson)
ch. 31 Academic computing case history : establishment of microcomputer access at a community college (Dick W. Birkholz)
ch. 32 Development of an advanced technology classroom (Eugene P. Buccini, Ronald G. Benson)
ch. 33 The advanced technology classroom (Marla J. Fischer)
ch. 34 A syllabus for a World Wide Web writing workshop (Jack R. Kayser)
Cover image

Student Learning Outside the Classroom: Transcending Artificial Boundaries

Book
Kuh, George D.; Douglas, Katie Branch; Lund, Jon P.; and Ramin-Gyurnek, Jackie
1994
Graduate School of Education and Human Development, George Washington University, Washington, DC
LA229 .S748 1994
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Explores the issue of institutional productivity and student learning outside the classroom. Reviews the conditions that can foster a climate where out-of-classroom experiences can contribute to greater educational productivity. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Explores the issue of institutional productivity and student learning outside the classroom. Reviews the conditions that can foster a climate where out-of-classroom experiences can contribute to greater educational productivity. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Jonathan D. Fife)
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Warrant, Purpose, and Overview
Enhancing Institutional Productivity
Purpose
Overview and Scope

ch. 2 What the Literature Says about Life Outside the Classroom and Desired Outcomes of College
Guiding Frameworks
Educational Attainment
Outcomes Clusters
Summary

ch. 3 Conditions That Foster Involvement in Educationally Purposed Out-of-Class Activities
Clear, Coherent, and Consistently Expressed Educational Purposes
An Institutional Philosophy that Embraces a Holistic View of Talent Development
Complementary Institutional Policies and Practices Congruent with Students' Characteristics and Needs
High, Clear Expectations for Student Performance
Use of Effective Teaching Approaches
Systematic Assessment of Institutional Practices and Student Performance
Ample Opportunities for Student Involvement in Educationally Purposeful Out-of-Class Activities
Human Scale Settings Characterized by Ethics of Membership and Care
An Ethos of Learning that Pervades All Aspects of the Institution

ch. 4 Implications
General Recommendations
Recommendations for Various Groups
The Key Tasks
Need for Additional Research

Conclusion
References
Index
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Reshaping Teaching in Higher Education: Linking Teaching with Research

Book
Jenkins, Alan, Rosanna Breen, and Roger Lindsay
2003
Taylor & Francis, Inc.
LB2326.3.R49 2003
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
* Do students gain when they are taught by active researchers?
* Should all faculty be involved in research?
* What are the benefits students (and their parents) should get from studying at an elite research university – and paying higher fees for the privilege?

In Scholarship Re-Considered, Ernest Boyer challenged US universities to "break out of the tired old teaching versus research debate." This book provides an international perspective ...
Additional Info:
* Do students gain when they are taught by active researchers?
* Should all faculty be involved in research?
* What are the benefits students (and their parents) should get from studying at an elite research university – and paying higher fees for the privilege?

In Scholarship Re-Considered, Ernest Boyer challenged US universities to "break out of the tired old teaching versus research debate." This book provides an international perspective on how universities, departments and individual faculty have successfully sought to connect their research to the benefit of student learning and institutional mission. It directly addresses the ways teaching-research links can be developed.

Building on research, the literature and wide practical experience, the authors show how academic research activity can be connected to academic teaching activity in such a way as to ensure that neither operates in a vacuum and, most importantly, that each can be enhanced by the other.

The book addresses the issues at the individual, course and institutional levels, as well as at the level of public policy. An important work for faculty, faculty developers and administrators. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Notes on the authors
Preface
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Overview: reshaping teaching in higher education to support the links between teaching and research
ch. 2 What research and scholarship tell us about teaching-research relationships in higher education
ch. 3 Academic research and student motivation in higher education
ch. 4 Designing the curriculum to link teaching and research
ch. 5 Organizing the institution to link teaching and research
ch. 6 Organizing the department to link teaching and research
ch. 7 Organizing the national and international administration of higher education to link teaching and research

References
Further reading
Index
Cover image

Making the Most of College: Students Speak Their Minds

Book
Light, Richard J.
2001
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LD2160.L54 2001
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Why Do Some Students make the most of college, while others struggle and look back on years of missed deadlines and missed opportunities? What choices can students make, and what can teachers and university leaders do, to improve more students' experiences and help them achieve the most from their time and money? Most important, how is the increasing diversity on campus -- cultural, racial, and religious -- affecting education? What ...
Additional Info:
Why Do Some Students make the most of college, while others struggle and look back on years of missed deadlines and missed opportunities? What choices can students make, and what can teachers and university leaders do, to improve more students' experiences and help them achieve the most from their time and money? Most important, how is the increasing diversity on campus -- cultural, racial, and religious -- affecting education? What can students and faculty do to benefit from differences, and even learn from the inevitable moments of misunderstanding and awkwardness?

From his ten years of interviews with Harvard seniors, Richard Light distills encouraging -- and surprisingly practical -- answers to fundamental questions. How can you choose classes wisely? What's the best way to study? Why do some professors inspire and others leave you cold? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Powerful Connections
ch. 3 Suggestions from Students
ch. 4 The Most Effective Classes
ch. 5 Good Mentoring and Advising
ch. 6 Faculty Who Make a Difference
ch. 7 Diversity on Campus
ch. 8 Learning from Differences
ch. 9 What College Leaders Can Do

The Assessment Project
References
Acknowledgments
Index
Cover image

Assessing Student Learning: A Common Sense Guide

Book
Suskie, Linda
2004
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Suskie (Towson U.) believes in developing an assessment culture in schools and universities. She describes assessment as a four-step continuous cycle of establishing learning goals, providing learning opportunities, assessing student learning, and making good use of results. She provides rubrics for evaluating a variety of learning opportunities and media, and supplies model examinations, surveys, checklists, and reports for publication. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Suskie (Towson U.) believes in developing an assessment culture in schools and universities. She describes assessment as a four-step continuous cycle of establishing learning goals, providing learning opportunities, assessing student learning, and making good use of results. She provides rubrics for evaluating a variety of learning opportunities and media, and supplies model examinations, surveys, checklists, and reports for publication. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part I - Laying A Foundation For Assessment
ch. 1 What Is Assessment? Why Assess?
ch. 2 What Are Good Assessment Practices?
ch. 3 Promoting an Assessment Culture

Part II - Planning For Assessment Success
ch. 4 Creating an Assessment Plan
ch. 5 Developing Learning Goals
ch. 6 Choosing an Assessment Strategy

Part III - The Assessment Toolbox
ch. 7 Using a Scoring Guide to Plan and Evaluate an Assignment
ch. 8 Creating an Effective Assignment
ch. 9 Encouraging Student Reflection
ch. 10 Assembling Assessment Information Into Portfolios
ch. 11 Writing a Traditional Objective Test
ch. 12 Conducting Surveys, Focus Groups, and Interviews
ch. 13 Selecting a Published Instrument

Part IV. Putting Assessment Results To Good and Appropriate Use
ch. 14 Summarizing and Analyzing Assessment Results
ch. 15 Sharing Assessment Results
ch. 16 Using Assessment Findings Effectively and Appropriately

Appendix - Key Resources on Assessing Student Learning
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Building and Sustaining Learning Communities: The Syracuse University Experience

Book
Hurd, Sandra N. and Ruth Federman Stein
2004
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB1032.H85 2004
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Learning communities are small groups of students who come together with faculty and student affairs professionals to engage in common learning experiences. In Building and Sustaining Learning Communities, the authors, along with many of their colleagues, describe the rationale for learning communities, particularly in a large university; the process for setting them up; and reflections on these unique environments. After reading this book, administrators and faculty members will know precisely ...
Additional Info:
Learning communities are small groups of students who come together with faculty and student affairs professionals to engage in common learning experiences. In Building and Sustaining Learning Communities, the authors, along with many of their colleagues, describe the rationale for learning communities, particularly in a large university; the process for setting them up; and reflections on these unique environments. After reading this book, administrators and faculty members will know precisely why they are worth considering and how to successfully create them. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I: Learning Community Research,, Theory, and Practice
ch. 1 Learning Communities: An Overview
ch. 2 Learning Communities at Syracuse University: A Strategy for Collaboration and Joint Responsibility
ch. 3 Strategies for Building Learning Community Relationships
ch. 4 Roles of and Structures for Writing Courses in Learning Communities
ch. 5 Using Grids to Develop a Learning Community Curriculum
ch. 6 The Power of Faculty-Student Affairs for Promoting Integrative Learning Experiences in Learning Communities
ch. 7 The Challenge of Assessing Learning Communities in a Collaborative Environment
ch. 8 Institutional Challenges

Part II: Learning Community Profiles
ch. 9 The Management Learning Community: A Lesson in Innovation
ch. 10 Leading for Change
ch. 11 Multicultural Living/Learning Community: By the Students, for the Students
ch. 12 Amazing Growth at SUNY ESF
ch. 13 Constructing Concentric Communities
ch. 14 From Theme Floor to Learning Community: The Wellness Experience
ch. 15 Arts Adventure: A Work in Progress
ch. 16 A Lesson in Citizenship: The Maxwell CitizenEducation Learning Community
ch. 17 The Education Living Learning Community
ch. 18 Creating an Online Learning Community
ch. 19 Interprofessional Learning Community
ch. 20 Lessons Learned: A Summary of the Learning Communities' Experiences

Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Disciplines as Frameworks for Student Learning: Teaching the Practice of the Disciplines

Book
Riordan, Tim and James Roth, eds.
2005
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2331.D544 2005
Topics: Course Design   |   Teaching Religion   |   Liberal Arts   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Creating ways to make a discipline come alive for those who are not experts - even for students who may not take more than one or two courses in the disciplines they study - requires rigorous thought about what really matters in a field and how to engage students in its practice.

Faculty from Alverno College representing a range of liberal arts disciplines - chemistry, economics, history, literature, ...
Additional Info:
Creating ways to make a discipline come alive for those who are not experts - even for students who may not take more than one or two courses in the disciplines they study - requires rigorous thought about what really matters in a field and how to engage students in its practice.

Faculty from Alverno College representing a range of liberal arts disciplines - chemistry, economics, history, literature, mathematics and philosophy - here reflect on what it has meant for them to approach their disciplines as frameworks for student learning.

The authors all demonstrate how the ways of thinking they have identified as significant for their students in their respective disciplines have affected the way they design learning experiences. They show how they have shaped their teaching around the ways of thinking they want their students to develop within and across their disciplines; and what that means in terms of designing assessments that require students to demonstrate their thinking and understanding through application and use. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Common ground : how history professors and undergraduate students learn through history (James Roth)
ch. 2 Learning to think mathematically (Susan Pustejovsky)
ch. 3 Teaching students to practice philosophy (Donna Englemann)
ch. 4 Making economics matter to students (Zohreh Emami)
ch. 5 Reading and responding to literature: developing critical perspectives (Lucy Cromwell)
ch. 6 Articulating the cognitive processes at the heart of chemistry (Ann van Heerden)
ch. 7 Because Hester Prynne was an existentialist, or why using disciplines as frameworks for learning clarifies life (Rebecca Valentine)
Additional Info:
Assessment Clear and Simple is "Assessment 101" in a book -- a concise, step-by-step guide written for everyone who participates in the assessment process. This practical book helps to make assessment simple, cost-efficient, and useful to the institution, while at the same time meeting the requirements of accreditation agencies, legislatures, review boards, and others. Assessment Clear and Simple can help your institution employ assessment as a powerful instrument for improvement and ...
Additional Info:
Assessment Clear and Simple is "Assessment 101" in a book -- a concise, step-by-step guide written for everyone who participates in the assessment process. This practical book helps to make assessment simple, cost-efficient, and useful to the institution, while at the same time meeting the requirements of accreditation agencies, legislatures, review boards, and others. Assessment Clear and Simple can help your institution employ assessment as a powerful instrument for improvement and provide a basis for wiser planning, budgeting, and change in curriculum, pedagogy, staffing, programming, and student support. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
About the Author
ch. 1 For Everyone: The Basics of Assessment
ch. 2 For Institution-Wide Planners
ch. 3 For Departments and Programs
ch. 4 For General Education
App. A Sample Rubrics for Evaluating Student Classroom Work
App. B Guidelines for Program Review of Departments, Incorporating Assessment
App. C Guidelines for the Evaluations of Teaching, Incorporating Assessment of Learning
App. D Sample Analysis of Audiences and Purposes for Assessment
App. E Institution-Wide Data to Assess Institution-Wide Goals
App. F Departmental Assessment Reports
App. G Matrix for Analyzing Professional Accreditation
App. H Matrix for Analyzing Institution-Wide Departmental Assessment Information
App. I Analysis of Assessment in Institution, Departments, and General Education
App. J Departmental Learning Goals
App. K Identifying Classroom Assessment in the Department
App. L Sample General Education Assessment Matrix
Resources: A Short List
References
Index
Cover image

Learning Communities: Reforming Undergraduate Education

Book
Smith, Barbara Leigh, Jean MacGregor, Roberta Matthews and Faith Gabelnick
2004
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.L392 2004
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Learning Communities is a groundbreaking book that shows how learning communities (LCs) can be a flexible and effective approach to enhancing student learning, promoting curricular coherence, and revitalizing faculty. Written by Barbara Leigh Smith, Jean MacGregor, Roberta S. Matthews, and Faith Gabelnick¾acclaimed national leaders in the learning communities movement¾this important book provides the historical, conceptual, and philosophical context for LCs and clearly demonstrates that they can be a ...
Additional Info:
Learning Communities is a groundbreaking book that shows how learning communities (LCs) can be a flexible and effective approach to enhancing student learning, promoting curricular coherence, and revitalizing faculty. Written by Barbara Leigh Smith, Jean MacGregor, Roberta S. Matthews, and Faith Gabelnick¾acclaimed national leaders in the learning communities movement¾this important book provides the historical, conceptual, and philosophical context for LCs and clearly demonstrates that they can be a key element in institutional transformation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Learning communities and undergraduate education reform
ch. 2 Learning community history : education for what? : education for whom
ch. 3 Learning community curricular structures
ch. 4 Core practices in learning communities
ch. 5 General education, the first year of college, and learning communities
ch. 6 Success for all : learning communities in basic skills and English as a second language settings
ch. 7 Information and feedback : using assessment to strengthen and sustain learning communities
ch. 8 Recruiting and supporting learning community teachers
ch. 9 Initiating and sustaining learning communities
ch. 10 The future of learning communities
Cover image
Wabash tree

Sustaining & Improving Learning Communities

Book
Laufgraben, Jodi Levine, Nancy S. Shapiro and Associates
2004
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2341.L245 2004
Topics: Collaborative Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In this new book, the authors of Creating Learning Communities advance the exploration of this important innovation in undergraduate education. They address issues involved in enhancing, sustaining and expanding learning communities, such as campus culture, curriculum, pedagogies, and faculty development. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
In this new book, the authors of Creating Learning Communities advance the exploration of this important innovation in undergraduate education. They address issues involved in enhancing, sustaining and expanding learning communities, such as campus culture, curriculum, pedagogies, and faculty development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction : the what and why of learning communities
ch. 2 A campus culture for sustaining learning communities
ch. 3 Planning and assessing the curriculum
ch. 4 Pedagogy that builds community
ch. 5 Faculty development
ch. 6 Developing purposeful and focused assessment
ch. 7 Approaching diversity through learning communities
ch. 8 Sustaining living-learning programs
ch. 9 Next steps : expanding our understanding of communities of learning
Cover image

Learning Partnerships: Theory and Models of Practice to Educate for Self-Authorship

Book
Magolda, Marcia Baxter and Patricia M. King, eds.
2004
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2331.L393 2004
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
While a common goal of higher education is to improve student learning to prepare young adults for the professional, civic and personal challenges of their lives, few institutions have a model to facilitate these outcomes. Learning Partnerships offers a grounded theory and practical examples of how these objectives can be achieved at the college course, program, and institutional levels. The book takes as its foundation Marcia Baxter Magolda's Learning Partnerships ...
Additional Info:
While a common goal of higher education is to improve student learning to prepare young adults for the professional, civic and personal challenges of their lives, few institutions have a model to facilitate these outcomes. Learning Partnerships offers a grounded theory and practical examples of how these objectives can be achieved at the college course, program, and institutional levels. The book takes as its foundation Marcia Baxter Magolda's Learning Partnerships Model, based on her seventeen-year longitudinal study of young adults' learning and development from their undergraduate years through their thirties. Based on nearly a thousand participant narratives, the model offers an empirically grounded yet flexible approach to promote "self-authorship." Marcia Baxter Magolda describes the nature of self-authorship -- its centrality to the learning goals of cognitive maturity, an integrated identity, mature relationships, and effective citizenship -- and the Model. The book then documents examples of actual practice and the learning outcomes they have yielded. The settings include community college and undergraduate courses, exchange and internship programs, residential life, a Masters' program, faculty development and student affairs organization. Learning Partnerships offers models for all educators -- faculty and student affairs staff alike -- who work to balance guidance and learner responsibility to prepare students for the complexity of the twenty-first century. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Table of Illustrations
List of Contributors
Acknowledgements
Preface

Part One: A Theoretical Framework to Educate for Self-Authorship
ch. 1. Self-Authorship as the Common Goal of 21st Century Education
(Marcia B. Baxter Magolda)
ch. 2. Learning Partnerships Model: A Framework for Promoting Self-Authorship
(Marcia B. Baxter Magolda)

Part Two: Models of Educational Practice to Promote Self-Authorship
ch. 3. Promoting Self-Authorship Through an Interdisciplinary Writing Curriculum
(Carolyn Haynes)
ch. 4. Creating a Context to Promote Diversity Education and Self-Authorship among Community College Students
(Anne M. Hornak and Anna M. Ortiz)
ch. 5. An Urban Leadership Internship Program: Implementing Learning Partnerships "Unplugged' from Campus Structures
(Katie Egart and Melissa P. Healy)
ch. 6. A Learning Partnership: U. S. College Students and the Poor in El Salvador
(Kevin Yonkers Talz)
ch. 7. Community Standards Model: Developing Learning Partnerships in Campus Housing
(Terry D. Piper and Jennifer A. Buckley)
ch. 8. A Community of Scholars: Enacting the Learning Partnerships Model in Graduate Education
(Judy L. Rogers, Peter M. Magolda, Marcia B. Baxter Magolda, and Kathleen Knight Abowitz)

Part Three: Implications of Implementing the Learning Partnerships Model
ch. 9. The Learning Partnerships Model: Framing Faculty and Institutional Development
(Terry M. Wildman)
ch. 10. Organizing for Learning in a Division of Student Affairs
(Rebecca Mills and Karen L. Strong)

Part Four: Designing Learning Partnerships
Creating Learning Partnerships in Higher Education: Modeling the Shape, Shaping the Model
(Patricia M. King and Marcia B. Baxter Magolda)
Cover image
Wabash tree

Making Their Own Way: Narratives for Transforming Higher Education to Promote Self-Development

Book
Magolda, Marcia B. Baxter
2001
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2424.B39 2004
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Student Learning Goals   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
What impact does a college education have on students' careers and personal lives after they graduate? Do they consider themselves well prepared for the complexities, demands and ambiguities of contemporary society? What can we learn from their stories to improve the college learning experience?

This ground-breaking book extends a unique longitudinal study of 101 male and female college students started by the author in 1986, and reported in her highly ...
Additional Info:
What impact does a college education have on students' careers and personal lives after they graduate? Do they consider themselves well prepared for the complexities, demands and ambiguities of contemporary society? What can we learn from their stories to improve the college learning experience?

This ground-breaking book extends a unique longitudinal study of 101 male and female college students started by the author in 1986, and reported in her highly successful and influential book, Knowing and Reasoning in College (1992). This book follows the journeys of the young adults remaining in the study -- drawing on over 300 new interviews -- from graduation to their early thirties.

Through the students' own stories, Marcia Baxter Magolda allows us to follow their journeys to an internally-authored sense of identity and belief systems, and in many cases to witness the development of the complex ways of making meaning that are needed for fulfilling participation in modern society.

From her observation and analysis, she derives a new framework for higher education to achieve better stewarding and fostering of its students' crucial journeys of transformation. She develops the concept of providing "good company" -- through the shaping of curriculum and co-curriculum, advising, leadership opportunities, campus work settings, collaboration, diversity and community building -- that young adults need along the way to finding and to taking their place as citizens and leaders in the twenty-first century.

This is an important book for all teachers and leaders in higher education who are concerned with the holistic development of students, and with higher education's responsibility to foster critical thinking, citizenship and leadership. It has particular relevance for student affairs educators and professionals; as well as for graduate, professional school and continuing education faculty who seek insight into young adult development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Table of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Preface

Part 1 The Journey Toward Self-Authorship
ch. 1 Complex Lives
ch. 2 Pathways Into Young Adulthood
ch. 3 Following External Formulas
ch. 4 The Crossroads
ch. 5 Becoming The Author of One's Life
ch. 6 The Internal Foundation

Part 2 Promoting Self-Authorship in Higher Education
ch. 7 Creating Contexts for Self-Authorship in Academic Affairs
ch. 8 Creating Contexts for Self-Authorship in Campus Work Settings
ch. 9 Creating Contexts for Self-Authorship in the Cocurriculum

Epilogue
References
Longitudinal Study Methodology and Methods
Index
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Promoting Reasonable Expectations: Aligning Student and Institutional Views of the College Experience

Book
Miller, Thomas E., Barbara E. Bender, John H. Schuh, and Associates
2005
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2343.4.M55 2005
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In this important resource, leading figures in the field of student affairs examine the key issue of student expectations of college, then contrast them with the real experiences of students. The book identifies strategies for addressing the disjunctions between expectation and experience. Sponsored by the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, the book is intended as the starting point for campus discussions and will undoubtedly spark similar conversations across higher ...
Additional Info:
In this important resource, leading figures in the field of student affairs examine the key issue of student expectations of college, then contrast them with the real experiences of students. The book identifies strategies for addressing the disjunctions between expectation and experience. Sponsored by the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, the book is intended as the starting point for campus discussions and will undoubtedly spark similar conversations across higher education leadership, and perhaps even among parents and students as well. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Why should we care about student expectations?
ch. 3 What students expect from college and what they get
ch. 4 When expectations and realities collide : environmental influences on student expectations and student experiences
ch. 5 Campus services : what do students expect?
ch. 6 Student expectations about paying for college : are they reasonable
ch. 7 Student persistence and degree attainment
ch. 8 Life after college
ch. 9 The influence of selected students; characteristics on their expectations of college
ch. 10 Institutional type and students' expectations
ch. 11 Expectations of multiple publics
ch. 12 Perspectives from the field
ch. 13 Conclusion
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Wabash tree

Teaching Inclusively: Resources for Course, Department & Institutional Change in Higher Education

Book
Ouellett, Mathew L., ed.
2005
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LC1099.3.T436 2005
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Teaching Inclusively brings together a broad array of current "best practices" in the design, implementation, and assessment of multicultural change initiatives on college and university campuses. Readers will find that this volume advocates for more transparent connections between change initiatives at individual, departmental, and college-wide levels by highlighting the ways in which such practices and change goals can relate to and support each other, thus addressing a noticeable absence in ...
Additional Info:
Teaching Inclusively brings together a broad array of current "best practices" in the design, implementation, and assessment of multicultural change initiatives on college and university campuses. Readers will find that this volume advocates for more transparent connections between change initiatives at individual, departmental, and college-wide levels by highlighting the ways in which such practices and change goals can relate to and support each other, thus addressing a noticeable absence in the current available literature.

The contributors to this volume present readers with a balance between theoretical models and demonstration projects that address change processes at three levels: individual courses, programs and departments, and across schools and institutions. In addition, there are descriptions of current, multi-year or multi-phase efforts at both departmental and organizational levels. Whenever possible, the contributors include their perspectives on important lessons learned from their efforts. Finally, we offer resource materials that promise concrete support for applications.

Part I addresses models and perspectives that help to conceptualize, implement and assess diversity-related instructional and faculty development programs at the systemic level. Contributors offer models and descriptions of practices aimed at making transparent the values, beliefs, and goals that shape institutional and classroom climates. Note that in the context of this volume, "diversity" is deliberately defined broadly to encourage a more systemic approach to the analyses of and response to diversity-related issues. For many readers, this may offer new dimensions and greater texture to their current conceptualization of diversity. This section reflects the contributors’ interests in analytical tools and organizational frameworks useful in addressing individual, departmental, and institutional changes. Whenever appropriate, authors in this section identify a range of practical applications, such as course-based efforts in the major to courses that fulfill general education requirements.

In Part II, contributors describe change initiatives that use departments (or programs) as the unit of analysis for diversity-related change efforts. In this section, readers will benefit from the descriptions and assessments of programs designed specifically to bring faculty and academic administrators together in cohorts to address diversity and teaching development goals within the disciplines in a sustained dialogue on diversity. Assessment of current efforts indicate that such initiatives illuminate the content, skills, and values necessary for sustained change and that such experiences can become important models for broader institutional change efforts.

In Part III, the contributors discuss multicultural change efforts at the college or institutional level directed at creating and sustaining more inclusive teaching and learning communities. Additionally, contributors describe programs and practices useful in addressing diversity issues across the disciplines as well as within discipline-specific contexts. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding how can systematic multicultural organization change initiatives can support a departmental or campus-wide emphasis on teaching inclusively. These chapters offer rich descriptions of efforts at institutions learning how to address diversity-related initiatives in a sustainable, comprehensive manner. Such efforts can help others determine how best to assess their organization’s needs and strengths, and to determine what is needed in the larger environment to initiate and sustain successful pro-equity organizational change and innovations.

Finally, Part IV pays particular attention to resources and program models particularly useful for faculty developers and centers. Contributors to this section provide a rich set of tools for self and course assessment, planning for new or revised programs, and suggesting well-proven strategies for approaches to diversity-related teaching development and organizational change initiatives. These include descriptions of specific, "hands on" consultation practices, workshop exercises, resource materials, and design elements (e.g., use of writing prompts) proven effective across the disciplines in engaging faculty in reflection, analysis, dialogue and innovation related to diversity-related teaching development goals. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
About the Editor

I. Theoretical Frameworks and Useful Models
ch. 1 The Theory and Practice of Multicultural Organization Development in Education (Bailey W. Jackson)
ch. 2 Letting the Hydra Roam: Attending to Diverse Forms of Diversity in Liberal Arts Education (Sammy Basu)
ch. 3 It Takes a Campus: Situating Professional Development Efforts Within a Campus Diversity Program (Nancy Chism , and Karen Whitney)
ch. 4 Defining the Shape of Diversity Pedagogy (Lynn Leonard, Sue Akersten, Stephen Adkison, and Edward Nuhfer)
ch. 5 Transcultural Issues in Teaching and Learning (Bland Tomkinson)
ch. 6 Building Multiculturalism into Teaching Development Programs (Constance Ewing Cook, and Mary Deane Sorcinelli)
ch. 7 Warming Up the Chill: Teaching Against Structures (Audrey Kleinsasser, and Jane Nelson)
ch. 8 Enhancing the Climate for Diversity in the Classroom: An Experiment in Campus Transformation (Richard C. Turner, Gina Sanchez Gibau, Monica M. Medina, and Sherree A. Wilson)
ch. 9 Positionality and Authority in Curriculum Transformation: Faculty/Student Collaboration in Course Design (Betty Schmitz, and Anupama Taranath)
ch. 10 Teaching and Diversity: Collaborative Lessons Learned (Pamela Ashmore, Kathleen Sullivan Brown, G. O. Akura, and Carole Murphy)
ch. 11 Teaching Inclusively: The Whole Is Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts (Christine Martin)
ch. 12 Renewing Diversity Initiatives Within an English Department (Anne J. Herrington)
ch. 13 Teaching Diversity and Fostering Inclusivity at the University: A Collaborative Approach (Abby L. Ferber, and Andrea O'Reilly Herrera)
ch. 14 Speaking a New Language: An Innovative Program Promotes Discussions in Diversity With Foreign Language Learners (Lisa Calvin)
ch. 15 Transforming Teacher Preparation: Changing Cultures Through Constructivism and Reflective Practices (Miguel Licona)

II. Departmental or Program-Based Change Initiatives
ch. 16 Teaching Together: Interracial Teams (Mathew L. Ouellett, and Edith C. Fraser)
ch. 17 Confronting Issues of Oppression in the University: Creating a Space for Faculty Dialogue, Reflection, and Action (Peter T. Wilson)
ch. 18 Breaking the Silence: Innovative Approaches for Promoting Dialogue About Diversity Issues Within a Communication Disorders Department (Maria Diana Gonzales and Jane A. Baran)
ch. 19 Transforming Higher Education Institutions Using Multicultural Organizational Development: A Case Study of a Large Northeastern University (Linda S. Marchesani and Bailey W. Jackson)
ch. 20 Institutional Transformation to Support Inclusive Teaching Initiatives (Murali Krishnamurthi)
ch. 21 Cultivating Global Understanding Through Campus-Wide Learning Communities (Bonnie B. Mullinix, Rekha Datta and Morris Saldov)

III. Systemic Change Initiatives
ch. 22 Moving the Mountain: Social Justice Education at the University (Julie Andrzejewski and John Alessio)
ch. 23 Multicultural Transformation at Macalester College (Roxane Harvey Gudeman)
ch. 24 Making the Campus Community a Safe and Affirming Space for All (Robert S. Haynor, and Susan A Holton)
ch. 25 Critical Moments: A Case-Based Diversity Project That Engages and Enlivens Campus-Wide Efforts to Teach and Work Inclusively (Diane Gillespie, Gillies Malnarich, and Tina Young)
ch. 26 From Reading Group to Faculty Change Team: The Hamline University Lido Group (James Francisco Bonilla)
ch. 27 But How Can I Talk With Faculty About That? Approaches to Consulting Around Multicultural Issues (Matthew Kaplan, and Beth Glover Reed)
ch. 28 Mainstreaming Feminist Perspectives (Carol Lauer and Lynda M. Glennon)
ch. 29 Faculty Development and Students With Disabilities: Accommodations and Universal Design (Sheryl Burgstahler)
ch. 30 A Catwalk for Kitano: Highlighting Kitano's Paradigm for Multicultural Course Transformation in Consultations With Individual Faculty (Natasha Flowers)
ch. 31 Proving Diversity Classes Make a Difference: Effective Assessment of Students' Learning (Sherwood Smith)
ch. 32 A Framework for Inclusive Teaching in STEM Disciplines (Lois A. Reddick, Wayne Jacobson Angela Linse, and Darryl Yong)
ch. 33 The Multicultural Lab: Diversity Issues in STEM Classes (A.T. Miller)
ch. 34 Science in the Interest of Social Justice: Untangling the Biological Realities of Race and Gender (Leslie S. Jones)
ch. 35 Faculty Development and Organizational Change: Moving From "Minority Relevant" to Intersectionality and Social Justice (Beth Glover Reed, and Melissa R. Peet)
ch. 36 Interactive Theater as a Multicultural Change Agent in Faculty Development (Diana Kardia, A.T. Miller, and Jeffrey Steiger)
ch. 37 Dissemination of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) and Formation of a National Network: Embracing a Common Pedagogy (Pratibha Varma-Nelson, and David Gosser)
ch. 38 Service Learning, Study Circles, and Problem-Based Learning: Student-Initiated Efforts to Confront the Concept of Race (Larry E. Greeson)

IV. Best Practices and Methods
ch. 39 Developing Diversity Management Skills in a University Context: A Direct or Indirect Approach? (Philip Frame, and Jennifer O’Connor)
ch. 40 Creating Inclusive Classrooms: A View Through the Student Lens (James Greenberg and Andre Perry)
ch. 41 Multicultural Course Transformation (Christine A. Stanley, Shari Saunders, and Jamie M. Hart)
ch 42 Teaching With a Social Justice Perspective: A Model for Faculty Seminars Across Academic Disciplines (Maurianne Adams, and Barbara J. Love)
ch. 43 Strategic Action in Hot Moments (Lee Warren)
ch. 44 Inclusive Teaching for Our Queer Students: A Workshop (Michele DiPietro)
ch. 45 Key Resources on Diversity for Faculty Developers: An Idiosyncratic Annotated Bibliography (Stephanie Nickerson)
ch. 46 Multicultural Online Resources: What Are They, Where Are They, and Are They Bias-Free? (Denise C. Camin)
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"Spirituality and Pedagogy: Faith and Reason in the Age of Assessment"

Article
Houck, Anita
2002
Spiritus 2, no. 1 (2002): 50-63
Topics: Religion and Academia   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"How Can Assessment Work for Us?"

Article
Linkon, Sherry Lee
2005
Academe 91, no. 4 (2005): 28-32
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
An article published in “Academe” on the AAUP website, arguing that we should embrace the responsibility for critically evaluating our work as teachers – assessment should be the “property” of faculty, it should work for us rather than against us.
Additional Info:
An article published in “Academe” on the AAUP website, arguing that we should embrace the responsibility for critically evaluating our work as teachers – assessment should be the “property” of faculty, it should work for us rather than against us.
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General Education and the Assessment Reform Agenda

Article
Ewell, Peter
2004
Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C.
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Written by national expert on assessment, Peter Ewell, this paper reflects on the challenges of general education and assessment reform in the context of recent calls for accountability in higher education. The author argues that by focusing on abilities, alignment, assessment, and action, campuses can both improve general education programs and demonstrate student achievement of learning outcomes key to success in the 21st century. This book is ideal for general ...
Additional Info:
Written by national expert on assessment, Peter Ewell, this paper reflects on the challenges of general education and assessment reform in the context of recent calls for accountability in higher education. The author argues that by focusing on abilities, alignment, assessment, and action, campuses can both improve general education programs and demonstrate student achievement of learning outcomes key to success in the 21st century. This book is ideal for general education or curricular reform committees and campus discussions about assessment, general education, and accountability. (From the Publisher)
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Our Underachieving Colleges: A Candid Look at How Much Students Learn and Why They Should Be Learning More

Book
Bok, Derek
2006
Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ
LB2322.2.B65 2006
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Drawing on a large body of empirical evidence, former Harvard President Derek Bok examines how much progress college students actually make toward widely accepted goals of undergraduate education. His conclusions are sobering. Although most students make gains in many important respects, they improve much less than they should in such important areas as writing, critical thinking, quantitative skills, and moral reasoning. Large majorities of college seniors do not feel that ...
Additional Info:
Drawing on a large body of empirical evidence, former Harvard President Derek Bok examines how much progress college students actually make toward widely accepted goals of undergraduate education. His conclusions are sobering. Although most students make gains in many important respects, they improve much less than they should in such important areas as writing, critical thinking, quantitative skills, and moral reasoning. Large majorities of college seniors do not feel that they have made substantial progress in speaking a foreign language, acquiring cultural and aesthetic interests, or learning what they need to know to become active and informed citizens. Overall, despite their vastly increased resources, more powerful technology, and hundreds of new courses, colleges cannot be confident that students are learning more than they did fifty years ago.

Looking further, Bok finds that many important college courses are left to the least experienced teachers and that most professors continue to teach in ways that have proven to be less effective than other available methods. In reviewing their educational programs, however, faculties typically ignore this evidence. Instead, they spend most of their time discussing what courses to require, although the lasting impact of college will almost certainly depend much more on how the courses are taught.

In his final chapter, Bok describes the changes that faculties and academic leaders can make to help students accomplish more. Without ignoring the contributions that America's colleges have made, Bok delivers a powerful critique--one that educators will ignore at their peril. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The evolution of American colleges
ch. 2 Faculty attitudes toward undergraduate education
ch. 3 Purposes
ch. 4 Learning to communicate
ch. 5 Learning to think
ch. 6 Building character
ch. 7 Preparation for citizenship
ch. 8 Living with diversity
ch. 9 Preparing for a global society
ch. 10 Acquiring broader interests
ch. 11 Preparing for a career
ch. 12 Improving the quality of undergraduate education
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Making Diversity Work on Campus: A Research-Based Perspective

Book
Milem, Jeffrey F., Mitchell J. Chang, and Anthony Lising Antonio
2005
Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C.
LC1099.3.M544 2005
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The authors discuss recent empirical evidence, gathered on behalf of the University of Michigan Supreme Court defense, demonstrating the educational benefits of diverse learning environments. These are environments that must be intentionally planned and nurtured, where diversity is conceived of as a process toward better learning and not merely an outcome that one can check off a list. Included are numerous suggestions for how to engage diversity in the service ...
Additional Info:
The authors discuss recent empirical evidence, gathered on behalf of the University of Michigan Supreme Court defense, demonstrating the educational benefits of diverse learning environments. These are environments that must be intentionally planned and nurtured, where diversity is conceived of as a process toward better learning and not merely an outcome that one can check off a list. Included are numerous suggestions for how to engage diversity in the service of learning, ranging from recruiting a compositionally diverse student body, faculty, and staff to transforming curriculum, co-curriculum, and pedagogy to reflect and support goals for inclusion and excellence. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction to the series
Making Diversity Work on Campus: A Research Based Perspectives
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Defining Diversity as Engagement
ch. 3 Research Synthesis
ch. 4 Concluding Thoughts about the Research on Divinity
ch. 5 Understanding the Campus Racial Climate
ch. 6 Engaging Diversity on Campus
ch. 7 The diveristy Agenda: The Time is Now
References
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The Art & Science of Assessing General Education Outcomes: A Practical Guide

Book
Leskes, Andrea
2005
Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C.
LB2331.63.L47 2005
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This guide offers practical recommendations for individuals involved with the assessment of general education programs and outcomes on campus. It includes a step-by-step assessment checklist, tips for better assessment, and examples of assessment tools, methods, and rubrics for assessing a variety of key outcomes of a quality general education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This guide offers practical recommendations for individuals involved with the assessment of general education programs and outcomes on campus. It includes a step-by-step assessment checklist, tips for better assessment, and examples of assessment tools, methods, and rubrics for assessing a variety of key outcomes of a quality general education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
ch. 1 The Contemporary Context
ch. 2 An Introduction to the Assessment Process
ch. 3 Assessment, Step-by-Step
ch. 4 Ten Tips for Better Assessment
ch. 5 The Public Interest in Liberal Learning
ch. 6 Assessment Methods Close-Up
Appendix-- Practical Tools
References
About the Authors
TTR cover image

"Strategic Planning to Enhance Teaching and Learning with Technology"

TTR
Delamarter, Steve
2006
Teaching Theology and Religion 9, no. 1 (2006): 9-23
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Seminaries across North America are continuing to expand their use of technology for theological education. This article explores eight issues surrounding the strategic planning process when it comes to technology. These have to do with the obstacles to fresh thinking, the current best practices in strategic planning processes, detailed discussions of the impact of various models of technology for theological education on faculty, Information Technology personnel, and students as well ...
Additional Info:
Seminaries across North America are continuing to expand their use of technology for theological education. This article explores eight issues surrounding the strategic planning process when it comes to technology. These have to do with the obstacles to fresh thinking, the current best practices in strategic planning processes, detailed discussions of the impact of various models of technology for theological education on faculty, Information Technology personnel, and students as well as the issues surrounding delivery system models and the issue of sustainability.
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"Theological Educators and their Concerns about Technology"

TTR
Delamarter, Steve
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 3 (2005): 131-143
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Based on results from interviews with theological educators at forty-five seminaries in North America, the author begins by listing twenty-six concerns expressed about technology in theological education, particularly the concerns about electronically mediated distance education. These concerns are categorized loosely under three headings: Practical and Personal Concerns, Pedagogical and Educational Concerns, and Philosophical and Theological Concerns. More important than the list is the sociology of decision-making surrounding technology among theological ...
Additional Info:
Based on results from interviews with theological educators at forty-five seminaries in North America, the author begins by listing twenty-six concerns expressed about technology in theological education, particularly the concerns about electronically mediated distance education. These concerns are categorized loosely under three headings: Practical and Personal Concerns, Pedagogical and Educational Concerns, and Philosophical and Theological Concerns. More important than the list is the sociology of decision-making surrounding technology among theological educators. In the final section of the article entitled, "how concerns about technology function within institutions," the author discusses how it is that these concerns are allowed to function in very different ways across the spectrum of theological education today.
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"On the Teaching of Islam at Luther Seminary"

TTR
Swanson, Mark N.
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 3 (2005): 172-175
BL41.T4
Topics: Student Learning Goals   |   Religious Diversity   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In a brief essay originally presented as part of a panel discussion with Christian and Muslim teachers of Islam in the university setting, the author describes the distinctive characteristics of the Islamic Studies Program at Luther Seminary (St. Paul, Minnesota). While the program allows Islamic studies "majors" to earn a degree (M.A. or M.Th.) or certificate in the field, it also aims to be accessible to students in ...
Additional Info:
In a brief essay originally presented as part of a panel discussion with Christian and Muslim teachers of Islam in the university setting, the author describes the distinctive characteristics of the Islamic Studies Program at Luther Seminary (St. Paul, Minnesota). While the program allows Islamic studies "majors" to earn a degree (M.A. or M.Th.) or certificate in the field, it also aims to be accessible to students in all degree and non-degree programs of the seminary. The author names three sets of issues that result from the determination, at one and the same time, to be faithful Christian theologians and to honor Muslims and their traditions: the hermeneutical issues arising when Christians attempt to read Muslims' sacred scripture; the challenges of developing a dialogical theology in relation to Islam; and questions about the character and practice of Christian witness in a world shared with Muslims, themselves called to da'wah.
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"Assessment and Good Teaching"

TTR
Klimoski, Victor
2005
Teaching Theology and Religion 8, no. 2 (2005): 69-77
BL41.T4
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This article has three purposes. First, it makes the case for assessment as an educational practice that flows from the core concerns of a school, in this piece particularly seminaries and theological schools. Second, it describes practices that enable assessment to be a resource for achieving the quality everyone wants from an educational and formational program. Finally, it concludes with comments about building a "culture for assessment" so that it ...
Additional Info:
This article has three purposes. First, it makes the case for assessment as an educational practice that flows from the core concerns of a school, in this piece particularly seminaries and theological schools. Second, it describes practices that enable assessment to be a resource for achieving the quality everyone wants from an educational and formational program. Finally, it concludes with comments about building a "culture for assessment" so that it becomes a normative practice in how a school goes about the work of education and formation. This article will appear as a chapter in the forthcoming book Educating Leaders for Ministry, which is a collection of essays from the work of the 1996–2000 Keystone Conferences of Roman Catholic seminaries, funded by Lilly Endowment Inc.
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"Funding and Assessment in British Universities: Impact on Theology and Religious Studies"

TTR
Hinnells, John R.
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 3 (2004): 124-133
BL41.T4
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This article looks at policies of the British Government relating to teaching, the curriculum, and research and how they impact Theology and Religious Studies (TRS). It reflects on the use of Government funding to steer research outputs and to focus such activity on a small number of selected institutions. It further discusses Government attempts to define degree standards and "the boundaries and the internal geography" of the subject by producing "...
Additional Info:
This article looks at policies of the British Government relating to teaching, the curriculum, and research and how they impact Theology and Religious Studies (TRS). It reflects on the use of Government funding to steer research outputs and to focus such activity on a small number of selected institutions. It further discusses Government attempts to define degree standards and "the boundaries and the internal geography" of the subject by producing "benchmarking guidelines" to which each department must adhere. The paper concludes with reflections on the fears of Government control of the curriculum. Underlying much of the discussion is a sense of the differences between Theology and Religious Studies in North America and Britain.

To emphasize the point that this paper expresses personal views based on my own experience I have used a more informal and personal style than is my custom in publications. It is relevant to outline the experience which has fashioned my views. Prior to moving to Liverpool I have held Chairs at Manchester in Comparative Religion, where I also served as Dean of the Faculty of Theology, and London University's School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) where I started the Department for the Study of Religion. I have served as President of the national body for the subject, the Association of University Departments of Theology and Religious Studies (AUDTRS) for three years; on the research panels of the two main bodies to which people in Theology and Religious Studies apply for research grants (the British Academy and the Arts and Humanities Research Board); on two national research assessment panels and co-chaired the Benchmarking Panel for Theology and Religious Studies (the work of the panels is outlined below). I was a member of a team funded by the Home Office to produce a report to inform Government policy on possible legislation on Religious Discrimination. The relevance of each of these will become clear in the course of the article.
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"A Typology of the Use of Technology in Theological Education"

TTR
Delamarter, Steve
2004
Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 3 (2004): 134-140
BL41.T4
Topics: Online Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This essay explores the terrain of technology in theological education and offers a typology for how technology is used in seminary contexts. The author surveys 43 seminaries in North America to gain insight into the attitudes of faculty toward the use of technology in their teaching and for use in the preparation of ministers. Reflections on the typology in the concluding section offer fuel for subsequent work on the topic.
Additional Info:
This essay explores the terrain of technology in theological education and offers a typology for how technology is used in seminary contexts. The author surveys 43 seminaries in North America to gain insight into the attitudes of faculty toward the use of technology in their teaching and for use in the preparation of ministers. Reflections on the typology in the concluding section offer fuel for subsequent work on the topic.
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"Writing Discernment in Theological Education"

TTR
McAvoy, Jane and Deborah Core
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 1 (2000): 47-53
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
How can we best address writing improvement for seminary students? This article describes the implementation of a Writing Assistance Program that teaches remedial skills in grammar structure and paper organization as well as mentors all students to develop their fullest writing potential. Four models of writing instruction are discussed and examples are given of the best use of each. The article concludes with lessons learned from the experience and tips ...
Additional Info:
How can we best address writing improvement for seminary students? This article describes the implementation of a Writing Assistance Program that teaches remedial skills in grammar structure and paper organization as well as mentors all students to develop their fullest writing potential. Four models of writing instruction are discussed and examples are given of the best use of each. The article concludes with lessons learned from the experience and tips for other seminaries.
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"Assessment for the Right Reason The Ethics of Outcomes Assessment"

TTR
Glennon, Fred
1999
Teaching Theology and Religion 2, no. 1 (1999): 14-25
BL41.T4
Topics: Philosophy of Teaching   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This essay explores and challenges the two primary ethical arguments for assessment, accountability, and professional responsibility, by demonstrating their strengths and exposing their weaknesses, which are rooted in their limited notions of community, contract, and guild respectively. In contrast, I argue for assessment on the basis of an ethic of covenantal obligation which incorporates both accountability and responsibility but grounds them on a broader view of community, a view of ...
Additional Info:
This essay explores and challenges the two primary ethical arguments for assessment, accountability, and professional responsibility, by demonstrating their strengths and exposing their weaknesses, which are rooted in their limited notions of community, contract, and guild respectively. In contrast, I argue for assessment on the basis of an ethic of covenantal obligation which incorporates both accountability and responsibility but grounds them on a broader view of community, a view of the teaching-learning environment as a covenant community replete with mutual obligations and responsibilities, one of which is assessment. While the notion of covenant community has deep roots in American society, its theological underpinnings make the ethic of assessment as covenant obligation most relevant to church-related institutions of higher education, the context in which I teach and learn. I conclude the paper by delineating some principles for ethical assessment practice which follow from a covenantal perspective.
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Projects That Matter : Successful Planning and Evaluation for Religious Organizations

Book
Cahalan, Kathleen A.
2003
The Alban Institute, Herndon, VA
BV652.C16 2003
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Projects That Matter introduces project leaders and teams to the five basic elements of project design and describes in detail a six-step process for designing and implementing a project evaluation and disseminating evaluation findings. Written for the nonexpert, leaders in religious settings will find Cahalan's guidance clear and invaluable.
Presenting evaluation as a form of collaborative inquiry, Cahalan show how leaders can use evaluation design to develop effective project ...
Additional Info:
Projects That Matter introduces project leaders and teams to the five basic elements of project design and describes in detail a six-step process for designing and implementing a project evaluation and disseminating evaluation findings. Written for the nonexpert, leaders in religious settings will find Cahalan's guidance clear and invaluable.
Presenting evaluation as a form of collaborative inquiry, Cahalan show how leaders can use evaluation design to develop effective project plans and prepare case statements for donors or grant proposals for foundations. She introduces project planning and evaluation as mission-related practices and invites leaders to consider how their tradition's particular mission and beliefs influence the way they plan and evaluate. Cahalan concludes the book by making explicit her own theological presuppositions—that the virtues of discernment, stewardship, and prudence are essential for good project planning and evaluation.
About the Author
Kathleen A. Cahalan is assistant professor of Pastoral Theology and Ministry at St. John's University School of Theology & Seminary in Collegeville, Minnesota. She served as evaluation coordinator for Lilly Endowment's religion division from 1996 to 2000. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by Craig Dykstra
Preface
Part One
Project Planning: Five Elements of Project Design
Element 1: Assess the Organization's Mission and Capacities
Element 2: Identify the Purpose: Conditions and Goals
Element 3: Explain Activities and Resources
Element 4: Define Results and Impact
Element 5: State the Rationale
Part Two
Evaluation as Collaborative Inquiry: Six Steps to Effective Evaluation
Step 1: Focus the Evaluation
Step 2: Create an Evaluation Design
Step 3: Collect and Record Data
Step 4: Analyze and Interpret Information
Step 5: Report and Disseminate Findings
Step 6: Revise the Project's Rationale
Conclusion
Discerning and Prudent Stewards: Theological Perspectives on Planning and Evaluation
Bibliography
Appendix
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Institutional Assessment and Theological Education: “Navigating Our Way” (pdf)

Journal Issue
2003
Theological Education 39, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.39no.2
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2003-theological-education-v39-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Issue Focus
Introduction (Jeremiah J. McCarthy)
Holding Itself Accountable: The Board’s Responsibility for Self-Assessment (Rebekah Burch Basinger)
Presidential Assessment: The Delicate Balance (Vincent Cushing, O.F.M.)
Faculty Evaluation: Conversations with Colleagues (Richard Benson, C.M.)
Assessing Spiritual Formation in Christian Seminary Communities (H. Frederick Reisz, Jr.)
Student Evaluation at Kenrick School of Theology (Lawrence C. Brennan, S.T.D.)
Formational Initiatives at Wycliffe College (Merv Mercer)
A Call to Growth: The Potential of the Profiles of Ministry Program (Francis A. Lonsway)
The Pragmatics of Assessing Master of Divinity Students (William R. Myers)
Assessing a Doctor of Ministry Program (Barbara Horkoff Mutch)
Serendipity or Grace? What Evaluation Has Taught Us about Education and Ecclesiology in Distance Learning (Charles E. Bouchard, O.P.)
Assessment of Student Learning: Some Perspectives (John H. Erickson)
Assessment of Ministry Preparation to Increase Understanding (John Harris)

Open Forum
The Quality of Doctor of Ministry Education in 2002: What Program Directors Think (Timothy D. Lincoln)
Weaving Garments of Grace: En-Gendering a Theology of the Call to Ordained Ministry for Women Today (Joy Ann McDougall)
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Listening to Theological Students and Scholars: Implications for the Character and Assessment of Learning for Religious Vocation (pdf)

Journal Issue
2005
Theological Education 40, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v.40 no.2 2005
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2005-theological-education-v40-n2.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2005-theological-education-v40-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Issue Focus
Interview Study of Roman Catholic Students (Frederic Maples and Katarina Schuth)
Interpreting Protestant Student Voices (Yau Man Siew and Gary Peluso-Verdend)
Learning from the First Years: Noteworthy conclusions from the Parish Experience of Recent Graduates of ATS Schools (Michael I. N. Dash, Jimmy Dukes, and Gordon T. Smith)
To Theologians: From One Who Cares about Theology but is Not One of You (Nicholas Wolterstorff)
ATS Luce Consultation on Theological Scholarship, May 2003, The Association of Theological Schools
Crafting Research that Will Contribute to Theological Education (Mark G. Toulouse)

Open Forum
Academic Challenges for “Equipping the [new diverse] Saints for Ministry” (Kathryn Mapes)
Theological Education and Hybrid Models of Distance Learning (Steve Delamarter and Daniel L. Brunner)
A Response Regarding ATS Standard 10: Multiple Locations and Distance Education (Louis Charles Willard)
Theological Education Index: 1964–2004
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Curriculum of a Theological School, I

Journal Issue
1966
Theological Education 2, no. 3 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Theological Education: A Canadian Minister’s View (George M. Birtch)
A Critical Look at Seminary Curriculum by a U.S. Pastor (Beverly A. Asbury)
From Purpose to Curriculum (Louis H. Gunnemann)
Theological Education for Ministry: Central Issues in Curriculum Construction (Gibson Winter)
Functional Roles, Professional Identity, and Theological Curricula (Walter L. Holcomb and John L. Maes)
Two Kinds of Learning in Theological Education (James A. Ashbrook)
The Seminary as Participant Observer (Calvin Redekop)
Research in Medical Education—Participation of Faculty and Students (Thomas Hale Ham)
Notes to:
Administrators (Herman J. Riddler)
Trustees (Ennis B. Hill)
Seminary Staff Officers (Paul R. Dunn)
Librarians (James J. Michael)
Professors (Jesse H. Ziegler)
Lecturer Clearinghouse (Aute L. Carr)
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Theological Curriculum for the 1970s

Journal Issue
1968
Theological Education 4, no. 3 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
I. Part I: Theological Education at Level II
A. Introduction
B. Entrance and Graduation Requirements
C. Orientation
D. The Core of the Curriculum
E. The Historical and Theoretical Resources for Theological Instruction
F. Common Life
G. Personnel
H. Physical Facilities
II. Part II: Theological Education at Level IIIA
A. Introduction
B. Relation of the Centers to the Level II Nuclei
C. Types of Centers
D. Areas of Instruction and Field Experience
E. The Education Process
F. Faculty, Administration, and Student Body
G. Physical Facilities and Cost Estimates
H. Application of Level IIIA Model Theory to Three Types of Centers
1. Family Life Cycle Center
2. Center for Business and Industrial Ministry
3. A Center in Theology and the Arts
III. Part III: Theological Education at Level IIIB
A. Introduction
B. The Academy Residency
C. Doctoral Programs
IV. Appendices
A. Organizational Chart for Cluster, Nucleus, and Centers
B. Job Descriptions for Organizational Chart
C. Distribution of Faculty within a Nucleus by Fields
D. Personnel for Orientation Programs
E. Continuum of Types of IIA Centers
F. Description of Metropolitan Intern Program
G. Description of Intensive Course in Christian Existence
V. Planning for the Future: A Key Question
Jeral C. Brauer
VI. A Response
Edward F. Malone
Notes to:
Administrators—Gordon E. Jackson
Trustees—George T. Peters
Seminary Staff Officers—Milton May
Professors—David S. Schuller
Librarians—Calvin Klemt
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Theological Education in the 1970s: Redeployment of Resources

Journal Issue
1968
Theological Education 4, no. 4 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Theological Education in the 1970s: The Problem of Strategy
ch. 2 Objectives and Resources for Theological Education
ch. 3 Obstacles to Change
ch. 4 Opportunities and Resources for Change
Recommendations
Exhibits 1–11
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Cooperative Structures for Theological Education

Journal Issue
1968
Theological Education 4, no. 4, supp. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Graduate Theological Union (Berkeley) (David S. Schuller)
The Association of Theological Facilities in Iowa (Dubuque) (David S. Schuller)
The Interdenominational Theological Center (Atlanta) (Aute L. Carr)
The Toronto Graduate School of Theological Studies (David S. Schuller)
The Federal Theological Facility of the University of Chicago (Aute L. Carr)
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Responses to Proposals re Resources Planning

Journal Issue
1969
Theological Education 5, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Resources Planning in Theological Education: A Response and an Offer (Robert H. Bonthius)
What’s Really Avant-Garde? Clustered Seminaries? No! Ecumenical School of Theology? Yes! (Luther A. Gotwald, Jr.)
The Place and Value of Laymen in Theological Education (Winston Paul)
Restudy of Possible Cluster Areas Required (William E. Tucker)
Serious Questions About the RPC Report (Albert Curry Winn)
A Continuation of the Dialogue on Facilities Planning (Jesse H. Ziegler)
Another Word on Library Planning (Warren H. Deem)
Theological Curriculum for the 1970s: A Critique (James N. Lapsley)
Theological Curriculum for the 1970s: A Dean’s Evaluation (David M. Murphy)
A Plea for Multiple Strategies in Theological Education
Phillips Graduate Seminary Faculty
Notes to:
Presidents (Charles M. Cooper)
Trustees (Albert O. Wilson, Jr.)
Professors (David S. Schuller)
Librarians (Maria Grossman)
Seminary Staff Officers (Edward B. Lindaman)
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Issues in Accrediting

Journal Issue
1977
Theological Education 14, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
The Accreditation Complex (Marvin J. Taylor)
Non-Governmental Accreditation—Threats and Opportunities (Kenneth E. Young)
The U.S. Office of Education’s Role in Supporting Accreditation in the United States (John R. Proffitt and Barbara J. Blinker)
The ATS and the Regional Accrediting Commissions (Marvin J. Taylor)
Accreditation’s Responsibility to Education Consumers (Elaine H. El-Knawas)
The States and Accreditation: A Case Study (William L. Baumgaertner)
Future Pressures in Accrediting Affecting ATS (Jesse H. Ziegler)
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Evaluation in Theological Education

Journal Issue
1985
Theological Education 22, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
A Theological Evaluation of Evaluations: The Evangelicals (Bill J. Leonard)
Measuring-Up for Ministry in the Roman Catholic Tradition (James A. Coriden)
A Theological Analysis of Evaluation within Protestantism (Grayson L. Tucker, Jr.)
The Evaluation of People in Theological Schools (Daniel O. Aleshire)
Program Evaluation: Some Practical Guidelines (Barbara G. Wheeler)
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The Doctor of Ministry Program in the Context of Theological Education

Journal Issue
1987
Theological Education 23, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial Introduction (David S. Schuller)
Doctor of Ministry Program: History, Summary of Findings, and Recommendations (Jackson W. Carroll and Barbara G. Wheeler)
Financial Issues Related to Director of Ministry Program (Badgett L. Dillard and Anthony T. Ruger)
Responses: (Faith E. Burgess, William E. Lesher, J. Randall Nichols, and Ray S. Anderson)
The Case for an Alternative Reading (Walter A. Brueggemann)
Journal cover image

Curriculum Development in Multicultural Theological Education

Journal Issue
1989
Theological Education 26, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial Introduction (Toinette M. Eugene)
Teaching Theology from an Intercultural Perspective (Robert J. Schreiter)
A Reflection on “Teaching Theology from an Intercultural Perspective” (Fumitaka Matsuoka)
The Case for Social Ethics: Lessons from the Civil Rights Movement (Robert Michael Franklin)
Revisioning the Preaching Curriculum (Edwina Hunter)
Teaching the New Testament from a Feminist Perspective (Joanna Dewey)
Reading Recommendations:
New Testament (Susan R. Garrett; Vincent L. Wimbush; and Daniel J. Harrington)
Old Testament (Joseph Blenkinsopp; Donna Runnalls; and Douglas A. Knight)
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Religious Education

Journal Issue
2006
Religious Education 101, no. 1 (Religious Education Association, Atlanta, GA 2006)
BV1460.R3V.101NO.1
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Curriculum Design and Children's Learning at Church
The Gender Question and the Study of Jewish Children
Jewish Youth in Texas: Toward a Multi-Methodological Approach to Minority Identity
Children's Interpretations of Biblical Meal Stories: Ethnographic Intertextual Voicing as the Practice of Hospitable Pedagogy
Young Children's God Concepts: Influences of Attachment and Religious Socialization in a Family and School Context
The Ministering Community as Context for Religious Education: A Case Study of St. Gabriel's Catholic Parish
The Brain and Learning: Resources for Religious Educators
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In the Long Run: A Study of Faculty in Three Writing-Across-the-Curriculum Programs

Book
Walvoord, Barbara E., Linda Lawrence Hunt, H. Fil Dowling Jr., Joan D. McMahon, eds.
1997
National Council of Teachers of Education, Urbana Il.
PE1404.I4 1997
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This volume allows both those teachers immersed in WAC programs and those still contemplating increasing the use of writing in their courses to peer into classrooms of those that have participated in such programs for years. Walvoord et al. report the long-term impact upon faculty of writing-across-the-curriculum programs, collecting interviews, questionnaires, classroom observations, student evaluations, and course documents from more than 700 faculty, one to fifteen years after their first WAC ...
Additional Info:
This volume allows both those teachers immersed in WAC programs and those still contemplating increasing the use of writing in their courses to peer into classrooms of those that have participated in such programs for years. Walvoord et al. report the long-term impact upon faculty of writing-across-the-curriculum programs, collecting interviews, questionnaires, classroom observations, student evaluations, and course documents from more than 700 faculty, one to fifteen years after their first WAC experiences. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Context and Methods for Study
ch. 3 Detailed Reports: The Institutions, Their WAC Programs, Their Research Methods
University of Cincinnati (Barbara E. Walvoord, Virginia Slachman, and Lisa Udel)
Townson State University(H. Fil Dowling Jr., Joan D. McMahon, and Barbara E. Walvoord)
Whitworth College (Linda Lawrence Hunt)
ch. 4 What Did Faculty Expect from WAC?
ch. 5 What did WAC Experiences mean to faculty?
ch. 6 How did WAC Affect Philosophies and Attitudes about Teaching?
ch. 7 WAC Teaching Strategies
ch. 8 WAC and Faculty Career patterns
ch. 9 Conclusions

Appendix
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Inside the Undergraduate Experience: The University of Washington's Study of Undergraduate Learning

Book
Beyer, Catharine Hoffman, Gerald M. Gillmore and Andrew T. Fisher
2007
Anker Publishing Company, Inc., now part of Jossey-Bass, an imprint of Wiley, San Francisco, CA
LD5753.B49 2007
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The University of Washington’s Study of Undergraduate Learning (UW SOUL) tracked 304 entering freshmen and transfer students as they moved through their college experience from fall 1999 to spring 2003. Unparalleled in its scope, this longitudinal study focused on six areas of learning: writing, critical thinking/problem solving, quantitative reasoning, information literacy, understanding and appreciating diversity, and personal growth. This book provides faculty, staff, and administrators at two- and four-year institutions with ...
Additional Info:
The University of Washington’s Study of Undergraduate Learning (UW SOUL) tracked 304 entering freshmen and transfer students as they moved through their college experience from fall 1999 to spring 2003. Unparalleled in its scope, this longitudinal study focused on six areas of learning: writing, critical thinking/problem solving, quantitative reasoning, information literacy, understanding and appreciating diversity, and personal growth. This book provides faculty, staff, and administrators at two- and four-year institutions with a model of assessment that both captures the complexity of the undergraduate experience and offers practical information about how to improve teaching and learning. Data from surveys, open-ended email questions, interviews, focus groups, and portfolios make it possible for the authors to create case studies of individual learning paths over time, as well as to report the group’s aggregate experience. Honoring the authenticity of student voices, this book illuminates the central roles played by the academic disciplines and by faculty in undergraduate learning, offering powerful evidence for the argument that assessment of student learning is most complete and most useful when conducted at the department level. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword.
Acknowledgments.

ch. 1 Introduction.
ch. 2 Reserach Process.
ch. 3 Personal Growth.
ch. 4 Understanding and Appreciating Diversity.
ch. 5 Critical Thinking and Problem Solving.
ch. 6 Writing.
ch. 7 Quantitative Reasoning.
ch. 8 Information Technology and Literacy.
ch. 9 General Learning.
ch. 10 Summary and Last Words.

Bibliography.
Index.
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How Are We Doing? The Effectiveness of Theological Schools as Measured by the Vocations and Views of Graduates

Journal Issue
Wheeler, Barbara G., Sharon L. Miller and Daniel O. Aleshire
2007
Auburn Studies, No. 13 (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY 2007)
BV4070.A8 A1 2007 no. 13
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This study reports the results of the first-ever survey of graduates of theological and rabbinical schools in North America. The survey was sent to graduates from Protestant, Catholic and Jewish institutions who earned M.Div., M.A., Rabbinical or comparable degrees in 1995 and 2000. In addition, the Association of Theological Schools, the accrediting body for schools in the U.S. and Canada, provided data from their Entering and Graduating Student Questionnaires (...
Additional Info:
This study reports the results of the first-ever survey of graduates of theological and rabbinical schools in North America. The survey was sent to graduates from Protestant, Catholic and Jewish institutions who earned M.Div., M.A., Rabbinical or comparable degrees in 1995 and 2000. In addition, the Association of Theological Schools, the accrediting body for schools in the U.S. and Canada, provided data from their Entering and Graduating Student Questionnaires (ESQ and GSQ). In combination, these data provide answers to two crucial questions: 1) What do graduates do in the years after they complete their education and 2) How well do they think their theological training prepared them for their work?
Generally, the news from this study is good. Large percentages of graduates assume the primary professional role for which their education prepares: leadership in a congregation or other religious organization. Attrition is fairly low. There are, however, causes for concern. Women graduates do not fare as well as men, and interest in congregational ministry is decreasing among recent graduates, especially among the growing population of younger students. Other positive findings include high ratings by graduates of their theological education, though practical training is not as highly rated as academic preparation. (From the Publisher)
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Master of Divinity Curriculum Revision (pdf)

Journal Issue
2007
Theological Education 43, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v. 43 no. 1 2007
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2007-theological-education-v43-n1.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2007-theological-education-v43-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Reflections of an "Investigative Journalist" on the Four Content Areas of the MDiv (Robert T. O'Gorman)
Curriculum Revision - Ongoing or Sporadic (Shawn L. Oliver)
For Such a Time as This: Why We Use an Outcomes-Based Model (J. Dorcas Gordon)
Mission Possible: Making Use of the School's Mission Statement (Michael Jinkins)
Curriculum Revision and Assessment: Do Your Degree Requirements Still Make Sense the Day After Graduation (Richard Benson)
Best Practices in Master of Divinity Curriculum Revision: A Research Project (Jack L. Seymour)
The Common Vocation of Curriculum Building (David C. Hester)
OPEN FORUM
Problem-Based Learning and the Master of Divinity Program (Hans Madueme and Linda Cannell)
Consortia Redux (William R. Myers)
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Faculty Development for Student Achievement: The QUE Project

Book
Henry, Ronald J., ed.
2006
Anker Publishing Co., Bolton, MA
LB1778.2.F319 2006
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This book describes a seven-year project—Quality in Undergraduate Education (QUE)—that produced important changes in departments and in the teaching of individual faculty in 21 two- and four-year institutions across four states. Rather than a blow-by-blow report of the project, it focuses on the problems that led to the development of QUE: concern about low levels of student learning in postsecondary institutions and demands by state legislatures that funds for ...
Additional Info:
This book describes a seven-year project—Quality in Undergraduate Education (QUE)—that produced important changes in departments and in the teaching of individual faculty in 21 two- and four-year institutions across four states. Rather than a blow-by-blow report of the project, it focuses on the problems that led to the development of QUE: concern about low levels of student learning in postsecondary institutions and demands by state legislatures that funds for postsecondary institutions be tied to assessment of student learning.
The story is told first from the organizational perspective in national and local campus meetings, and then from the point of view of faculty in five chapters, one for each discipline of biology, chemistry, English, history, and mathematics. This description of QUE is intended as a model for administrators and faculty seeking to meet the challenges of increasingly diverse students as well as the increasingly divergent ways to earn a degree. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction (Ronald J. Henry )
ch. 2 The Que Process at the National Level (Ruth Mitchell)
ch. 3 The Que Process at the Local Level (Gloria John, Ruth Mitchell)
ch. 4 Wandering Through the World of Standards: Evolution of a Biologist’s Perspective (Barbara Baumstark)
ch. 5 Chemical Education Today (Jerry Sarquis)
ch. 6 The English Chair’s Guide to a Learning-Centured Curriculum (Susan Albertine)
ch. 7 The QUE Project and History Learning and Teaching: The Case of Long Beach State (Tim Keirn, Brett Mizelle)
ch. 8 Mathematics and Que: Oil and Water? (Bernard L. Madison, Susan L. Ganter)
ch. 9 Reflections on Success and Recommendations to Ensure It (Ruth Mitchell, Ronald J. Henry)

Appendix A: A Brief Chronological History of QUE
Appendix B: Outcomes at Level 14 and Level 16 in Biology, Chemistry, English, History, and Mathematics
Appendix C: Constructing Effective Rubrics
Appendix D: Publications and Conference Presentations
Appendix E: QUE Personnel: Cluster Coordinators, Staff, and Consultants

Index
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Promoting Integrated and Transformative Assessment: A Deeper Focus on Student Learning

Book
Wehlburg, Catherine M.
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2822.75.W445 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Assessment plays a key role in institutions of higher education. However, many colleges and universities simply add their assessment plans onto other teaching, learning, service, and research activities in order to prepare for an impending accreditation visit. In this important resource, Catherine M. Wehlburg outlines an integrated and ongoing system for assessment that both prepares for an accreditation visit and truly enhances student learning. This innovative approach can be adapted ...
Additional Info:
Assessment plays a key role in institutions of higher education. However, many colleges and universities simply add their assessment plans onto other teaching, learning, service, and research activities in order to prepare for an impending accreditation visit. In this important resource, Catherine M. Wehlburg outlines an integrated and ongoing system for assessment that both prepares for an accreditation visit and truly enhances student learning. This innovative approach can be adapted for use in a wide variety of situations to transform a department or an entire institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 What Is Transformative Assessment?
ch. 2 Transformative Assessment: A Historical Perspective
ch. 3 Institutional Dynamics: Using Organizational Structure and Campus Climate
ch. 4 Encouraging Faculty Support for Transformative Assessment
ch. 5 Transformative Assessment Across Student and Academic Affairs
ch. 6 Aligning Institutional Mission with Assessment: Elements of a Meaningful Institutional Effectiveness Program
ch. 7 Institutional Implementation of Transformative Assessment
ch. 8 Embedding Transformative Assessment Activities Across the Institution
ch. 9 Transformative Assessment as a Method to Support Ongoing Accreditation and Accountability
ch. 10 The Future of Transformative Assessment in Higher Education
References
Index
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Wabash tree

Designing and Assessing Courses and Curricula: A Practical Guide, Third Edition

Book
Diamond, Robert M.
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2361.5.D5 2008
Topics: Course Design   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Designing and Assessing Courses and Curricula reflects the most current knowledge and practice in course and curriculum design and connects this knowledge with the critical task of assessing learning outcomes at both course and curricular levels. This thoroughly revised and expanded third edition of the best-selling book positions course design as a tool for educational change and contains a wealth of new material including new chapters, case examples, and resources. (...
Additional Info:
Designing and Assessing Courses and Curricula reflects the most current knowledge and practice in course and curriculum design and connects this knowledge with the critical task of assessing learning outcomes at both course and curricular levels. This thoroughly revised and expanded third edition of the best-selling book positions course design as a tool for educational change and contains a wealth of new material including new chapters, case examples, and resources. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1 A Frame of Reference
ch. 1 A Learning-Centered Approach to Course and Curriculum Design
ch. 2 The Expanding Role of Faculty in Accreditation and Accountability
ch. 3 Staying Informed
ch. 4 Scholarship and Faculty Rewards
ch. 5 An Introduction to the Model and Its Benefits
ch. 6 Diagramming

Part 2 The Process
ch. 7 Making the Decision to Go Ahead
ch. 8 Getting Started
ch. 9 Linking Goals, Courses, and Curricula
ch. 10 Gathering and Analyzing Essential Data
ch. 11 Thinking in the Ideal
ch. 12 Adjusting from the Ideal to the Possible
ch. 13 Clarifying Instructional Goals and Learning Outcomes
ch. 14 Designing and Implementing Your Assessment Plan: Overview and Assessing a Curriculum
ch. 15 Designing and Implementing Your Assessment Plan: Assessing a Course

Part 3 Designing, Implementing, and Assessing the Learning Experience
ch. 16 Designing the Learning Experience: The Research on Teaching and Learning
ch. 17 Designing the Learning Experience: Your Instructional Options
ch. 18 Using Technology to Support Learning Wallace Hannum
ch. 19 Distance Learning Wallace Hannum
ch. 20 Meeting the Needs of Adult Learners G. Roger Sell
ch. 21 Addressing Diversity G. Roger Sell
ch. 22 Developing a Learning-Centered Syllabus

Part 4 Your Next Steps
ch. 23 Using Your Data: Curriculum and Course Revision
ch. 24 Learning from Experience

Resources
Case Studies
References
Index
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Making a Real Difference with Diversity: A Guide to Institutional Change

Book
Clayton-Pedersen, Alma R.; Parker, Sharon; Smith, Daryl G.; Moreno, Jose F.; and Teraguchi, Daniel Hiroyuki
2007
Association of American Colleges and Universities
LC1099.4.C2M34 2007
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Making a Real Difference with Diversity provides readers with a step-by-step guide for implementing, evaluating, and sustaining comprehensive diversity work on campus. Drawn from a six-year diversity initiative involving twenty-eight independent California colleges and universities, the monograph offers a set of promising practices and selected quantitative and qualitative findings pertaining to efforts to enhance college access and success for underrepresented students, increase the presence of underrepresented minority faculty, and strengthen ...
Additional Info:
Making a Real Difference with Diversity provides readers with a step-by-step guide for implementing, evaluating, and sustaining comprehensive diversity work on campus. Drawn from a six-year diversity initiative involving twenty-eight independent California colleges and universities, the monograph offers a set of promising practices and selected quantitative and qualitative findings pertaining to efforts to enhance college access and success for underrepresented students, increase the presence of underrepresented minority faculty, and strengthen overall institutional functioning regarding diversity. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Journey from "Project-itis" to Coordinated Action
ch. 2 Quantitative Findings
ch. 3 Qualitative Findings
ch. 4 Promising Practices
ch. 5 A Guide to Comprehensive Diversity Work

Conclusion
References
Appendices
Cover image

Electronic Portfolios 2.0: Emergent Research on Implementation and Impact

Book
Darren Cambridge, Barbara Cambridge, and Kthleen Yancey, eds.
2009
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1029.P67E43 2009
Topics: Online Learning   |   Assessing Students   |   Student Portfolios   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Higher education institutions of all kinds—across the United States and around the world—have rapidly expanded the use of electronic portfolios in a broad range of applications including general education, the major, personal planning, freshman learning communities, advising, assessing, and career planning.

Widespread use creates an urgent need to evaluate the implementation and impact of eportfolios. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, the contributors to this book—all ...
Additional Info:
Higher education institutions of all kinds—across the United States and around the world—have rapidly expanded the use of electronic portfolios in a broad range of applications including general education, the major, personal planning, freshman learning communities, advising, assessing, and career planning.

Widespread use creates an urgent need to evaluate the implementation and impact of eportfolios. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, the contributors to this book—all of whom have been engaged with the Inter/National Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research—have undertaken research on how eportfolios influence learning and the learning environment for students, faculty members, and institutions.

This book features emergent results of studies from 20 institutions that have examined effects on student reflection, integrative learning, establishing identity, organizational learning, and designs for learning supported by technology. It also describes how institutions have responded to multiple challenges in eportfolio development, from engaging faculty to going to scale.

These studies exemplify how eportfolios can spark disciplinary identity, increase retention, address accountability, improve writing, and contribute to accreditation. The chapters demonstrate the applications of eportfolios at community colleges, small private colleges, comprehensive universities, research universities, and a state system. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction: On Transitions: Past to Present

Section One - Introduction: Reflection In Electronic Portfolio Practice
ch. 1 Reflection and Electronic Portfolios: Inventing the Self and Reinventing the University (Kathleen Blake Yancey)
ch. 2 Studying Student Reflection in an Electronic Portfolio Environment: An Inquiry in the Context of Practice (W.H. Rickards and Lauralee Guilbault)
ch. 3 Using ePortfolios to Support Lifelong and Lifewide Learning (Helen L. Chen)

Section Two - Integrative Learning
ch. 4 Two Faces of Integrative Learning Online (Darren Cambridge)
ch. 5 Becoming ePortfolio Learners and Teachers (Julie Huges)
ch. 6 Making Connections: The LaGuardia ePortfolio (Bret Eynon)
ch. 7 Connecting Contexts and Competencies: Using ePortfolios for Integrative Learning (Tracy Penny Light, Bob Sproule and Katherine Lithgow)

Section Three - Establishing Indentities: Roles, Competencies, Values, and Outcomes
ch. 8 Influencing Learning Through Faculty- and Student-Generated Outcome Assessment Michael Day)
ch. 9 The Promise of E-Portfolios for Institutional Assessment (Thomas S. Ewards and Colleen Burnham)
ch. 10 Demonstrating Intellectual Growth and Development: The IUPUI ePort (Sharon Hamilton and Susan Kahn)
ch. 11 A Values-Driven ePortfolio Journey: Na Wa‘a (Judith Kirkpatrick)
ch. 12 E-Portfolios in an Undergraduate Psychology Research Experiences Program Benjamin R. Stephens)
ch. 13 Perceptions of Teacher Candidates on ePortfolio Use(Neil W. Topp and Robert L. Goeman)

Section Four - Organizational Learning
ch. 14 Diffusing ePortfolios in Organizational Settings (Stephen R. Acker)
ch. 15 A Catalyst Without a Mandate: Building an ePortfolio Culture at the University of Washington (Tom Lewis and Janice Fournier)
ch. 16 Documenting the Outcomes of Learning (Milton D. Hakel and Erin N. Smith)
ch. 17 Sustaining Change through Student, Departmental, and Institutional Portfolios (Kathi A. Ketcheson)

Section Five - Electronic Portfolio Technology and Design For Learning
ch. 18 Technology and Change (Cara Lane)
ch. 19 Re-visioning Revision with ePortfolios in the University of Georgia First-year Composition Program (Christy Desmet, June Griffin, Deborah Church Miller, Ron Balthazor, and Robert Cummings)
ch. 20 Moving eFolio Minnesota to the Next Generation: From Individual Portfolios to an Integrated Institutional Mode (Lynette Olson, Lori Schroeder, and Paul Wakso
ch. 21 Assessing the Learning Potential of E-Portfolio Through Thinking Sheets (Mary Zamon and Debra Sprague)
ch. 22 The Maed English Education Electronic Portfolio Experience: What Preservice English Teachers Have to Teach Us About Eps and Reflection (Carl Young)

Conclusion: Moving Into The Future (Barbara Cambridge, Darren Cambridge, and Kathleen Yancey)
Index
Additional Info:
If we are all becoming global citizens, what then are our civic responsibilities? Colleges and universities across the United States have responded to this question by making the development of global citizens part of their core mission. A key strategy for realizing this goal is study abroad. After all, there may be no better way for students to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to become effective change-agents in ...
Additional Info:
If we are all becoming global citizens, what then are our civic responsibilities? Colleges and universities across the United States have responded to this question by making the development of global citizens part of their core mission. A key strategy for realizing this goal is study abroad. After all, there may be no better way for students to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to become effective change-agents in international contexts.

The Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad is a comprehensive survey of the field. Each chapter eloquently conveys an enthusiasm for study abroad alongside a critical assessment of the most up-to-date research, theory and practice. This contributed volume brings together expert academics, senior administrators, practitioners of study abroad, and policy makers from across the United States, Canada and other part of the world, who meticulously address the following questions:

What do we mean by global citizenship and global competence?

What are the philosophical, pedagogical and practical challenges facing institutions as they endeavor to create global citizens?

How is study abroad and global citizenship compatible with the role of the academy?

What are the institutional challenges to study abroad, including those related to ethics, infrastructure, finances, accessibility, and quality control?

Which study abroad programs can be called successful?

The Handbook of Practice and Research in Study Abroad is an indispensable reference volume for scholars, higher education faculty, study abroad professionals, policy makers, and the academic libraries that serve these audiences. It is also appropriate for a wide range of courses in Higher Education Master’s and Ph.D. Programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part 1 Defining Global Citizenship in Study Abroad
ch. 1 Global Citizenship in Theory and Practice (Hans Schattle)
ch. 2 Fostering Engagement: The Role of International Education in the Development of Global Civil Society (James M. Skelly)
ch. 3 Global Learning and the Making of Citizen Diplomats (Rebecca Hovey and Adam Weinberg)
ch. 4 International Studies and Foreign Languages: A Critical American Priority (Charles Kolb)
ch. 5 Global Citizenship Education: Challenges and Possibilities (Ian Davies and Graham Pike)

Part 2 Aligning Global Citizenship and Study Abroad With the MIssion of the Academy
ch. 6 Study Abroad and Language: From Maximal to Realistic Models (Dieter Wanner)
ch. 7 Constructive Disequilibrium: Cognitive and Emotional Development through Dissonant Experiences in Less Familiar Destinations (S. Megan Che, Mindy Spearman, and Agida Manizade)
ch. 8 The Liberal Arts and Global Citizenship: Fostering Intercultural Engagement Through Integrative Experiences and Structured Reflection ((Joseph L. Brockington and Margarete D. Wiedenhoeft)
ch. 9 Study Abroad and Nursing: From Cultural to Global Competence (Connie Currier, et. al)
ch. 10 The Role of Study Abroad in Preparing Globally Responsible Teachers (Kenneth Cushner)
ch. 11 Democratizing Study Abroad: Challenges of Open Access, Local Commitments, and Global Competence in Community Colleges (Robert A. Frost and Rosalind Latiner Raby)
ch. 12 North of 49: Global Citizenship a la canadienne (Roopa Desai Trilokekar and Adrian Shubert)
ch. 13 Global Citizenship and Study Abroad: A European Comparative Perspective (Hans de Wit)
ch. 14 Strategy for the Development of a Global City: Study Abroad in Singapore (Peter Pang)

Part 3 Institutional Challenges and Strategies for Fostering Global Citizenship Study Abroad
ch. 15 It Takes an Entire Institution: A Blueprint for the Global University (William Brustein)
ch. 16 Turning Our Back on the World: Study Abroad and the Purpose of U.S. Higher Education (Riall W. Nolan)
ch. 17 Faculty Beliefs and Institutional Values: Identifying and Overcoming These Obstacles to Education Abroad Growth (Joan Elias Gore)
ch. 18 Selling the World: Study Abroad Marketing and the Privatization of Global Citizenship (Talya Zemach-Bersin)
ch. 19 Global Citizenship for All: Low Minority Study Participation in Study Abroad - Seeking Strategies for Success (Earl Picard, Farrah Bernardino, and Kike Ehigiator)
ch. 20 Understanding the Challenges of Assessing Global Citizenship (Darla K. Deardorff)
ch. 21 Here to Stay: Increasing Acceptance of Short-Term Study Abroad Programs (Lisa Chieffor and Lesa Grifiths)
ch. 22 Going Global in the Sciences: A Case Study at Emory University (Philip Wainwright, et al.)
ch. 23 Undergraduate Research During Study Abroad: Scope, Meaning, and Potential (Bernhard T. Streitwieser)

Part 4 Innovative Global Citizenship Study Abroad Program Models
ch. 24 Georgia Tech's Comprehensive and Integrated Approach to Developing Global Competence (Howard Rollins)
ch. 25 Holistic Student Learning and Development Abroad: The IES 3-D Program Model (Joan Gillespie, Larry Braskamp, and Mary Dwyer)
ch. 26 It Takes a Curriculum: Bringing Global Mindedness Home (Kevin Hovland)
ch. 27 Educating Globally Competent Citizens through International Service Learning (William M. Plater, et al.)
ch. 28 Creating Deep Partnerships with Institutions Abroad: Bard College as Global Citizen (Susan H. Gillespie, et al.)
ch. 29 Creating Study Abroad Opportunities for First-Generation College Students (Maria D. Martinez, Bidya Ranjeet, and Helen A. Marx)
ch. 30 It's Not about You: The UConn Social Entrepreneur Corps Global Commonwealth Study Abroad Model (Ross Lewin and Greg Van Kirk)

Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
A key monograph investigating the research, development, policy and practice of teaching and learning in Higher Education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A key monograph investigating the research, development, policy and practice of teaching and learning in Higher Education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Conceptualizing Structure and Agency in Relation to Teaching-Learning Interactions in Higher Education
ch. 3 Current Ways of Analysing the Relations between Structural-Agentic Processes and Teaching-Learning Interactions in Higher Education
ch. 4 Analysing the Relations between Teaching-Learning Environments and Teaching-Learning Interactions in Higher Education
ch. 5 Analysing the Relations between Student and Academic Identities and Teaching-Learning Interactions in Higher Education
ch. 6 Analysing the Relations between Disciplinary Knowledge Practices and Teaching-Learning Interactions in Higher Education
ch. 7 Analysing the Relations between Institutional Cultures and Teaching-Learning Interactions in Higher Education
ch. 8 Implications for Researching Teaching-Learning Interactions in Higher Education

References
Index
Cover image

Outcomes-Based Academic and Co-Curricular Program Review: A Compilation of Institutional Good Practices

Book
Marilee J. Bresciani
2009
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB3051.B693 2009
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This book offers far more than an introduction to the principles of assessment of student learning outcomes in the context of program review.

Within a clearly structured framework, it systematically shares the good practices of some forty institutions recognized by independent scholars for their improvements in teaching/learning, research, and service, to offer examples and ideas for others to learn from and adapt. While the book focuses on ...
Additional Info:
This book offers far more than an introduction to the principles of assessment of student learning outcomes in the context of program review.

Within a clearly structured framework, it systematically shares the good practices of some forty institutions recognized by independent scholars for their improvements in teaching/learning, research, and service, to offer examples and ideas for others to learn from and adapt. While the book focuses on assessment of the teaching mission, these same practices apply equally to student affairs, service and research activities.

This book is intended for faculty, administrators and staff responsible for implementing and sustaining outcomes-based assessment program review. It aims to help them understand the "what", "why" and "how" of outcomes-based assessment program review. Rather than adopting a prescriptive approach, it provides a rich array of case studies and ideas as a basis for reflection and discussion to help institutions develop solutions that are appropriate to their own missions and cultures.

This book answers such questions as what does good outcomes-based assessment program review practice look like from an institutional perspective? How have others initiated and conducted the process? Why did they choose their particular approaches; and who is doing replicable work? It links effective assessment practices with cyclical program review so that the single process of outcomes-based assessment informs many purposes: program review, strategic planning, professional accreditation, institutional accreditation, and possibly even the assessment of general education.

This book illustrates the components ofoutcomes-based assessment program review, presents the criteria for identifying good practices and suggests steps for implementing a sustainable outcomes-based assessment program—and does so in a way that will engage readers in critical inquiry about what works well and what needs to be improved. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Understandings of Assessment and the Scope of this Book
ch. 2 Why Outcomes-Based Undergraduate Academic Assessment Program Review is so important to the Future of Higher Education
ch. 3 Overview of Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review
ch. 4 Criteria for Good Practices of Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review
ch. 5 Key Questions to Consider when Implementing Good Practice Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review
ch. 6 Overcoming Barriers to Implementing Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review
ch. 7 Recommendations for Future Considerations for Implementing Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review Components and Evaluating their Effectiveness

Appendices
Appendix A: General Descriptions of Each Good Practice Institution
Appendix B: Definitions of Outcomes Based Assessment
Appendix C: Conceptual Frameworks for Outcomes-Based Program Review
Appendix D: Common Operational Language for Outcomes-Based Assessment
Appendix E: Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review Guidelines
Appendix F: Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review Example Templates
Appendix G-1: Hampden-Sydney College Primary Trait Analysis of Rhetoric 102 Portfolios
Appendix G-2: Hampden-Sydney College Rhetoric Proficient Exam Primary Trait Analysis Scoring Guide
Appendix H: Matrix for Aligning Accreditation with Program Review Deadlines
Appendix I: Example of a Concept Map
Appendix J: A Description of Alverno College's Outcomes-Based Assessment Program Review
Appendix K: Sample Meta-Assessment Rubrics

References
About the Author
Index
Cover image

Designing Effective Assessment: Principles and Profiles of Good Practice

Book
Banta, Trudy W.; Jones, Elizabeth A.; and Black, Karen E.
2009
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2366.2.B36 2009
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Fifteen years ago Trudy Banta and her colleagues surveyed the national landscape for the campus examples that were published in the classic work Assessment in Practice. Since then, significant advances have occurred, including the use of technology to organize and manage the assessment process and increased reliance on assessment findings to make key decisions aimed at enhancing student learning. Trudy Banta, Elizabeth Jones, and Karen Black offer 49 detailed current examples ...
Additional Info:
Fifteen years ago Trudy Banta and her colleagues surveyed the national landscape for the campus examples that were published in the classic work Assessment in Practice. Since then, significant advances have occurred, including the use of technology to organize and manage the assessment process and increased reliance on assessment findings to make key decisions aimed at enhancing student learning. Trudy Banta, Elizabeth Jones, and Karen Black offer 49 detailed current examples of good practice in planning, implementing, and sustaining assessment that are practical and ready to apply in new settings. This important resource can help educators put in place an effective process for determining what works and which improvements will have the most impact in improving curriculum, methods of instruction, and student services on college and university campuses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

The Authors

Part 1 Principles Of Good Practice In Outcomes Assessment

ch. 1 Planning Effective Assessment
ch. 2 Implementing Effective Assessment
ch. 3 Improving and Sustaining Effective Assessment

Part 2 Profiles Of Good Practice In Outcomes Assessment

ch. 4 Good Practice in Implementing Assessment Planning
ch. 5 General Education Profiles
ch. 6 Undergraduate Academic Majors Profiles
ch. 7 Faculty and Staff Development Profiles
ch. 8 Use of Technology Profiles
ch. 9 Program Review Profiles
ch. 10 First-Year Experiences, Civic Engagement Opportunities, and International Learning Experiences Profiles
ch. 11 Student Affairs Profiles
ch. 12 Community Colleges Profiles
ch. 13 Graduate Programs Profiles
ch. 14 Good Practice in Improving and Sustaining Assessment

Resources

A Institutional Profiles by Institution
B Institutional Profiles by Category
C Profiled Institutions by Carnegie Classification
D Contributors of Profiles Included in Their Entirety

References

Index
Cover image

Understanding Interdisciplinary Challenges and Opportunities in Higher Education

Book
Holley, Karri A.
2009
Wiley Periodicals, Inc., San Francisco
LB2361.5.H644 2009
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Interdisciplinary teaching, learning, and research are often heralded as necessary responses to the many pressures facing contemporary higher education. Defined as the integration of knowledge from two or more disciplines, interdisciplinary work requires a change in the boundaries and norms that have long defined the academy. Through examples from a range of disciplines and institutional types, this volume considers how successful interdisciplinary engagement necessitates a focus on the structure and ...
Additional Info:
Interdisciplinary teaching, learning, and research are often heralded as necessary responses to the many pressures facing contemporary higher education. Defined as the integration of knowledge from two or more disciplines, interdisciplinary work requires a change in the boundaries and norms that have long defined the academy. Through examples from a range of disciplines and institutional types, this volume considers how successful interdisciplinary engagement necessitates a focus on the structure and rewards of academic behavior. This change is an intensely social process, involving dialogue and interation among diverse ideas, individuals, learning environments, and bodies of knowledge. It is this diversity that enables the rich potential of interdisciplinary engagement but also presents the greatest challenges for institutions. This volume considers the obstacles and opportunities inherent in interdisciplinary initiatives.

Academic administrators, faculty, and graduate students interested in understanding the disciplinary norms of higher education and cultivating interdisciplinary engagement will benefit from this volume. The author provides theoretical perspectives and practical applications for advancing interdisciplinarity in the classroom, the research laboratory, across the university campus, and outside institutional boundaries. Such endeavors entail not only interaction between scholars and professionals from normally distinct disciplines but also articulation of shared problems or topics that underscore the integration of disciplinary bodies of knowledge.

This is the second issue in the 35th volume of the Jossey-Bass series ASHE Higher Education Report. Each monograph in the series is the definitive analysis of a tough higher education problem, based on thorough research of pertinent literature and institutional experiences. Topics are identified by a national survey. Noted practitioners and scholars are then commissioned to write the reports, with experts providing critical reviews of each manuscript before publication. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Executive Summary
Foreword

Overview
Defining Interdisciplinarity
The Disciplines, Interdisciplinary, and the University
Interdisciplinary, Learning, and Cognition
Interdisciplinary and the Practice of Research
Faculty and Institutional Structure: The Conflict of Interdisciplinary
Best Practices Related to Interdisciplinary Education
Implications for Practice and the Future of Interdisciplinarity

Defining Interdisciplinarity
Conceptualizing the Disciplines
Conceptualizing Interdisciplinary Knowledge
Conclusion

The Disciplines, Interdisciplinarity, and the University
The Historical Influence of the Disciplines on Teaching and Learning
Interdisciplinary Initiatives in Twentieth-Century American Higher Education
Conclusion

Interdisciplinarity, Learning, and Congition
The Disciplinary Basis of College Student Learning
Defining Interdisciplinary Curricula in Higher Education
Conclusion

Interdisciplinarity and the Practice of Research
Challenges to the Practice of Interdisciplinary Research
Facilitating Interdisciplinary Research in Higher Education
Conclusion

Faculty and Institutional Structure: The Conflict of Interdisciplinarity
Interdisciplinarity: Faculty, and Change in Higher Education
Achieving Institutional Goals and Interdisciplinary Faculty Engagement
Fostering Faculty Connections Across Institutional Boundaries
Modifying Activity Systems to Encourage Interdisciplinarity
Conclusion

Best Practices Related to Interdisciplinary Education
Dedicated Organizational and Physical Space
Student-Centered Pedagogy
Focus on Problem- or Theme-Based Learning
Curriculum Shaped Through a Variety of Interdisciplinary Learning Experiences
Culminating Capstone Project or Student Portfolio
Focus on Collaborative Learning Rather Than Mastery of a Particular Content
Use of Independent Study, Internships, and Experiential Learning
Goal of Preparing Students for a Complex, Modern Interdisciplinary Future

Conclusion
References
Name Index
Subject Index
About the Author
Cover image

Enhancing Learning, Teaching, Assessment and Curriculum in Higher Education: Theory, Cases, Practices

Book
Bamber, Veronica; Trowler, Paul; Saunders, Murray; and Knight, Peter
2009
Open University Press, McGraw-Hill Education, New York
LB1060.E54 2009
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Higher education is a particularly complex site for enhancement initiatives. This book offers those involved in change a coherent conceptual overview of enhancement approaches, of the change context, and of the probable interactions between them.

The book sets enhancement within a particular type of change dynamic which focuses on social practices. The aim is to base innovation and change on the probabilities of desired outcomes materializing, rather than ...
Additional Info:
Higher education is a particularly complex site for enhancement initiatives. This book offers those involved in change a coherent conceptual overview of enhancement approaches, of the change context, and of the probable interactions between them.

The book sets enhancement within a particular type of change dynamic which focuses on social practices. The aim is to base innovation and change on the probabilities of desired outcomes materializing, rather than on the romanticism of policies that underestimate the sheer difficulty of making a difference. Following a theoretical introduction to these ideas, there are case studies (from the UK, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Norway) at the national, institutional, departmental and individual levels, illustrating the argument that enhancement is best achieved when it works with social practices in real institutional and organizational settings.

In a final section, the authors link the case examples and theoretical frameworks, inviting readers to consider their own enhancement situations and apply the 'frameworks for action' offered in earlier sections of the book. The book doesn’t offer quick-fix solutions but aims to support change with practical examples, conceptual tools and reflexive questions for those involved in change at all levels. It is key reading for higher education lecturers, managers, educational developers and policy makers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures
List of tables
List of contributors
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction - Continuities, Enhancement and Higher Education
ch. 2 Enhancement Theories Theme 1: Influencing the Disciplines

Theme 1 Influencing the disciplines
ch. 3 Introduction
ch. 4 Changing the Rules of Engagement: down the Disciplinary Road
ch. 5 Layers of the Onion: a Subject Centre in its Institutional Context
ch. 6 Talking the Talk, Walking the Walk: the Work of an LTSN Subject Centre
ch. 7 Against the Grain: e-Assessment in the Physical Sciences
ch. 8 Commentary on the Cases Theme 2: The Scottish Way: a Distinctive Approach to Enhancement

Theme 2 The Scottish way: a distinctive approach to enhancement
ch. 9 Introduction
ch. 10 Up and Down the Implementation Staircase: a Focus on Thematic Approaches to Change
ch. 11 Carrots but no Sticks: Resource-led Enhancement
ch. 12 PASS the Word
ch. 13 Exchange and Art: Intradisciplinary Learning
ch. 14 Commentary on the Cases

Theme 3 Developing frameworks for action
ch. 15 Introduction
ch. 16 Strong Vision, Low Prescription: Compulsory Lecturer Training
ch. 17 Rehearsing the Realities of Management: Making the Tacit Explicit
ch. 18 Changing Learning Architectures, Shifting Practices
ch. 19 Bringing New Learning to Old Cultures
ch. 20 Teaching, Assessment and Curriculum

Theme 4 Challenging practicers in learning, teaching, assessment and curriculum
ch. 21 Introduction
ch. 22 Contesting discourses in higher education curriculum
ch. 23 Academic Development as Changing Social Practice: The Generic Attributes Project
ch. 24 Frustrated Aspirations - Discovering the Limits of a Virtual Learning Environment
ch. 25 Freedom to Innovate, Freedom to Resist
ch. 26 Commentary on the Cases
ch. 27 Making Practical Sense of Enhancing Learning, Teaching, Assessment and Curriculum

References
Index
Cover image

Curriculum Development for Adult Learners in the Global Community, Volume 1, Strategic Approaches

Book
Victor C.X. Wang, ed.
2008
Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, FL
LC5219.C87 2008 v.1
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Adult and continuing education continues to evolve as both a strong discipline and a professional field of practice throughout the global community. Both adult educators and adult learners require a common and informed conceptual and theoretical framework to assist them in developing meaningful curricula for adult learners. This book, in a collective and unified manner, describes innovative strategies for developing curricula for adult learners in diverse social, cultural, and economic ...
Additional Info:
Adult and continuing education continues to evolve as both a strong discipline and a professional field of practice throughout the global community. Both adult educators and adult learners require a common and informed conceptual and theoretical framework to assist them in developing meaningful curricula for adult learners. This book, in a collective and unified manner, describes innovative strategies for developing curricula for adult learners in diverse social, cultural, and economic contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
The Editor
The Contributors
Introduction (Victor C. X. Wang)

ch. 1 Principles of Instructional Design and Adult Learners (Laura L. Bierema)
ch. 2 Andragogy: An Introduction and Implications for Curriculum and Instruction (Lisa M. Baumgartner)
ch. 3 Learner-Derived Curriculum Development (Vivian W. Mott)
ch. 4 Designing Meaningful Curriculum for Disadvantaged Learners (Claretha H. Banks and Fredrick M. Nafukho)
ch. 5 Sequencing Instruction in Global Learning Communities (Rene L. Cambiano)
ch. 6 Expanding Curriculum Development Models (Mary Ziegler)
ch. 7 Developing Curriculum for Policy Officers and Firefighters: Tips to Follow and Pitfalls to Avoid (Sandra R. Daffron, Gail M. Goulet, John L. Gray, and Jason X Viada)
ch. 8 A New Model for Effective Learning: Moving Beyond Analysis, Development, Design, Implementation and Evaluation (ADDIE) (Judith A. Cochran)

Appendix: Volume II Information
Index
Cover image

Curriculum Development for Adult Learners in the Global Community, Volume II, Teaching and Learning

Book
Victor C.X. Wang, ed.
2009
Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, FL
LC5219.C87 2008 v.2
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Adult and continuing education continues to evolve as both a strong discipline and a professional field of practice throughout the global community. Both adult educators and adult learners require a common and informed conceptual and theoretical framework to assist them in developing meaningful curricula for adult learners. This book, in a collective and unified manner, describes innovative strategies for developing curricula for adult learners in diverse social, cultural, and economic ...
Additional Info:
Adult and continuing education continues to evolve as both a strong discipline and a professional field of practice throughout the global community. Both adult educators and adult learners require a common and informed conceptual and theoretical framework to assist them in developing meaningful curricula for adult learners. This book, in a collective and unified manner, describes innovative strategies for developing curricula for adult learners in diverse social, cultural, and economic contexts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
The Editor
The Contributors
Introduction

Part I Curriculum Development in the Global Context
ch. 1 Culturally Relevant Curriculum Development for Teachers of Adults: The Importance of Identity, Positionality, and Classroom Dynamics (Talmadge C. Guy)
ch. 2 Transnational Identities and Instructional Designs in Adult Education (Mary V. Alfred)
ch. 3 Impact of English-Language Education of Adult Learners in China on Curriculum Development (Wei Zheng)

Part II Teaching and Learning in the Global Community
ch. 4 Teachers of Adults in the Global Community (Kathleen P. King)
ch. 5 Helping Adults Learn in the 21st Century with Information Literacy (Barbara P. Heuer)
ch. 6 Design, Implementation and Assessment of E-Learning Curriculum for Adults with Diverse Learning Needs (Fredrick M. Nafukho)
ch. 7 Implementing Andragogy in China (Victor C.X. Wang)

Appendix: Volume I Information
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Holy Clarity: The Practice of Planning and Evaluation

Book
Drummond, Sarah B.
2009
The Alban Institute, Herndon, VA
BV652.1.D745 2009
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In Holy Clarity, Sarah Drummond explores the most basic reason leaders of religious organizations conduct evaluations: To find and create God-pleasing clarity regarding the organization's purpose and the impact of its activities. Leadership and evaluation are not separate disciplines, she argues. Effective leaders evaluate because they need to know what is happening in their organizations and how those activities are effecting change. Drummond first describes the way in which our ...
Additional Info:
In Holy Clarity, Sarah Drummond explores the most basic reason leaders of religious organizations conduct evaluations: To find and create God-pleasing clarity regarding the organization's purpose and the impact of its activities. Leadership and evaluation are not separate disciplines, she argues. Effective leaders evaluate because they need to know what is happening in their organizations and how those activities are effecting change. Drummond first describes the way in which our postmodern culture makes clarity difficult to obtain. She then looks at holy clarity from a biblical and theological perspective and make the case that it is a spiritual discipline that can stand on its own theological merits. She presents four approaches to evaluation that can help a leader to guide a community toward greater clarity, both when evaluating or analyzing programs and when planning and starting programs. Finally, she considers the work of clarification as a faith practice, one that can make a pastor or layperson not just a better leader, but a better Christian who is more firmly grounded in God. Each chapter concludes with a fictional case study that provides a jumping-off point for discussion and helps bring her theory to life. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward
ch. 1 Looking for Clarity in a Murky World: The Dilemma of Ministerial Leadership
ch. 2 The Holiness of Clarity: Why does Clarity matter to God?
ch. 3 Getting Leaders Thinking: Finding and Fostering Clarity
ch. 4 Planning and Restructuring Programs: Bringing in the Light
ch. 5 Backing In: A practices Approach
ch. 6 Turning the Lens on Ourselves: Our lives as Programs we Leed
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching, Learning and Research in Higher Education: A Critical Approach

Book
Mark Tennant, Cathi McMullen and Dan Kaczynski
2010
Routledge, New York
LB2331.T4295 2010
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Teaching, Learning and Research in Higher Education offers a combination of critical perspectives and practical advice that is ideally suited for individuals interested in enhancing their practice through analysis and critique. The aim is to promote a critical understanding of one's own practices: to foster personal and professional formation through a reflexive engagement with one's environment and circumstances. At a practical level this means to continuously think about how to ...
Additional Info:
Teaching, Learning and Research in Higher Education offers a combination of critical perspectives and practical advice that is ideally suited for individuals interested in enhancing their practice through analysis and critique. The aim is to promote a critical understanding of one's own practices: to foster personal and professional formation through a reflexive engagement with one's environment and circumstances. At a practical level this means to continuously think about how to adjust practice rather than following a formulaic approach derived from any particular educational theory.

Teaching, Learning and Research in Higher Education argues that academics can find space for their own agency in the midst of institutional policies and practices that serve to frame, as well as delimit and constrain, what counts as good academic work in teaching and research. This text bridges a gap between those books that provide a high-level analysis of contemporary higher education, the more practical texts on how to be a good teacher in higher education, and those texts which aim to improve teaching through better understanding of the learning process.

Topical chapters include:

Teacher-learner relationship, Learning groups, Practice-oriented learning, Teaching for diversity, e-learning, Assessment, Approaches to Staff Development, Quality assurance, Supervision and Research education, Doing research, and Teaching & Research.

A must-have resource for higher education professions, academic developers, professionals, and anyone looking to improve their teaching and learning practices, Teaching,Learning and Research in Higher Education is also appropriate for continuing and professional development courses in the UK and teaching and learning courses in the US.

Mark Tennant is Dean of the University Graduate School, University of Technology, Sydney.

Cathi McMullen is Lecturer in the School of Marketing and Management at Charles Sturt University.

Dan Kaczynski is Professor in the Educational Leadership department at Central Michigan University. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Illustrations
Preface

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Perspectives on Quality Teaching
ch. 3 Reconceptualising the Development of University Teaching Expertise
ch. 4 Framing Teacher-Learner Relationships
ch. 5 Learning Groups
ch. 6 Teaching for Diversity
ch. 7 Assessment
ch. 8 Promoting Workplace-Oriented Learning
ch. 9 Learning in the Digital Age
ch. 10 Postgraduate Research Education
ch. 11 Teaching and Research

Reference
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Taking Stock: Research on Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Book
Julia Christensen Hughes and Joy Mighty, eds.
2010
McGill-Queen's University Press, Montreal
LB2322.T25 2010
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Arguing for an enhanced commitment to evidence-based practice, Taking Stock offers concrete suggestions for changes on a systemic level in support of student learning and calls on all those working in higher education - faculty, educational developers, administrators, and government officials - to work together to bring about these changes. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Arguing for an enhanced commitment to evidence-based practice, Taking Stock offers concrete suggestions for changes on a systemic level in support of student learning and calls on all those working in higher education - faculty, educational developers, administrators, and government officials - to work together to bring about these changes. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Foreword

Section I Taking Stock: Setting the Stage
ch. 1 Practices of Convenience: Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (Julia Christersen Hughes, Joy Mighty)
ch. 2 Taking Stock: An Overview of Key Research Findings (Noel Entwhistle)

Section II What We Know About Student Learning
ch. 3 Students' Approaches to Learning and Their Perceptions of the Teaching-Learning Environment (Sari Lindblom-Yianne)
ch. 4 Taking Stock of What Faculty Know About Student Learning (Maryellen Weimer)
ch. 5 Research on Student Learning: Converging and Diverging Messages (Alenoush Saroyan)

Section III What We Know About How Teaching and Learning Impact One Another
ch. 6 Teaching and Learning: A Relational View (Keith Trigwell)
ch. 7 Faculty Research and Teaching Approaches: Exploring the Relationship (Michael Prosser)
ch. 8 Student Engagement and Learning Experiences that Matter (Jillian Kinzie)
ch. 9 Mind the Gap: Aligning Research and Practice in Teaching, Learning, and Educational Development (W. Allen Wright)

Section IV What We Know About Exemplary Teaching Practices
ch. 10 Why Not Try a Scientific Approach to Science Education? (Carl Weiman)
ch. 11 Helping Our Students: Learning, Metalearning, and Threshold Concepts (Jan Meyer)
ch. 12 Three Perspectives and Teaching Knowledge: Craft, Professional, and Scientific (Tom Carey)

Section V Towards Evidence-Based Practice
ch. 13 Changing Teaching Practice: Barriers and Strategies (Christopher Knapper)
ch. 14 Pressures for Change and the Future of University (Alistair Simmerlee, Julia Christensen Hughes)
ch. 15 A Call to Action: Barriers to Pedagogical Innovation and How to Overcome Them (Julia Christensen Hughes, Joy Mighty)
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Distance Learning in Higher Education: A Programmatic Approach to Planning, Design, Instruction, Evaluation, and Accreditation

Book
Rovai, Alfred P.; Ponton, Michael K.; and Baker, Jason D.
2008
Teachers College Press, New York
LC5805.R68 2008
Topics: Online Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This useful resource describes best practices for designing online programs and courses. Translating research on the learning characteristics of adult university students and their experiences with online learning into practical guidelines, the authors address topics such as: program and course planning, design and delivery; multicultural and gender issues; program evaluation; student evaluation of online teaching, and institutional and program accreditation. The text includes resources such as online course materials and ...
Additional Info:
This useful resource describes best practices for designing online programs and courses. Translating research on the learning characteristics of adult university students and their experiences with online learning into practical guidelines, the authors address topics such as: program and course planning, design and delivery; multicultural and gender issues; program evaluation; student evaluation of online teaching, and institutional and program accreditation. The text includes resources such as online course materials and assessment tasks that are culturally responsive and implement the strategies presented in the book. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Purpose and Organization
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Concepts of Distance Learning
ch. 2 Gender
ch. 3 Culture
ch. 4 Strategic Planning
ch. 5 Program and Course Design
ch. 6 Assessment of Student Learning
ch. 7 Online Discussions
ch. 8 Program Evaluation
ch. 9 Institution and Program Accreditation
ch. 10 Course Evaluation
ch. 11 Summary and Conclusion

App. A Example Extract from a Strategic Plan
App. B Analytic Participation Rubric
App. C Evidence of Quality Distance Learning Programs

Glossary
References
Index
Additional Info:
University teaching and learning take place within ever more specialized disciplinary settings, each characterized by its unique traditions, concepts, practices and procedures. It is now widely recognized that support for teaching and learning needs to take this discipline-specificity into account. However, in a world characterized by rapid change, complexity and uncertainty, problems do not present themselves as distinct subjects but increasingly within trans-disciplinary contexts calling for graduate outcomes that go ...
Additional Info:
University teaching and learning take place within ever more specialized disciplinary settings, each characterized by its unique traditions, concepts, practices and procedures. It is now widely recognized that support for teaching and learning needs to take this discipline-specificity into account. However, in a world characterized by rapid change, complexity and uncertainty, problems do not present themselves as distinct subjects but increasingly within trans-disciplinary contexts calling for graduate outcomes that go beyond specialized knowledge and skills. This ground-breaking book highlights the important interplay between context-specific and context-transcendent aspects of teaching, learning and assessment. It explores critical questions, such as:

What are the ‘ways of thinking and practicing’ characteristic of particular disciplines? How can students be supported in becoming participants of particular disciplinary discourse communities?

Can the diversity in teaching, learning and assessment practices that we observe across departments be attributed exclusively to disciplinary structure?

To what extent do the disciplines prepare students for the complexities and uncertainties that characterize their later professional, civic and personal lives?

Written for university teachers, educational developers as well as new and experienced researchers of Higher Education, this highly-anticipated first edition offers innovative perspectives from leading Canadian, US and UK scholars on how academic learning within particular disciplines can help students acquire the skills, abilities and dispositions they need to succeed academically and also post graduation.

Carolin Kreber is Professor of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education and the Director of the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Assessment at the University of Edinburgh (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Figures and tables
Contributors
Forword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I: Introduction - Setting The Context
ch. 1 Supporting Student Learning in the Context of Diversity, Complexity and Uncertanity
ch. 2 The Modern Research University and its Disciplines: The Interplay between Contextual and Context-transcendent Influences on Teaching

Part II: Disciplines and Their Epistemological Structure
ch. 3 (research-based) The Commons: Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Encounters
ch. 4 (reactive) Academic Disciplines: Homes or Barricades?
ch. 5 (reactive) Hard and Soft - A Useful Way of Thinking about Disciplines? Reflections from Engineering Education on Disciplinary Identities

Part III: Ways of Thinking and Practicing
ch. 6 (researched-based) Ways of Thinking and Practicing in Biology and History: Disciplinary Aspects of Teaching and Learning Environments
ch. 7 (reactive) Exploring Disciplinary in Academic Development: Do Ways of Thinking and Practicing Help Faculty to Think about Learning and Teaching?
ch. 8 (reactive) Opening History's Black Boxes: Decoding the Disciplinary Unconscious of Historians

Part IV: Exploring Disciplinary Teaching and Learning From a Socio-Cultural Perspective
ch. 9 (research-based) Guiding Students into a Discipline: The Significance of the Teacher
ch. 10 (reactive) Diverse Student Voices within Disciplinary Discourses
ch. 11 (reactive) Guiding Students into a Discipline: The Significance of the Student's View

Part V: Learning Partnerships In Disciplinary Learning
ch. 12 (research-based) Educating Students for Self-Authorship: Learning Partnerships to Achieve Complex Outcomes
ch. 13 (reactive) Supporting Student Development In and Beyond the Disciplines: The Role of the Curriculum
ch. 14 (reactive) Constraints to Implementing Learning Partnership Models and Self-Authorship in the Arts and Humanities

Part VI: Disciplines And Their Interactions With Teaching And Learning Regimes
ch. 15 (research-based) Beyond Epistemological Essentialism: Academic Tribes in the Twenty-First Century
ch. 16 (reactive) Exploring Teaching and Learning Regimes in Higher Education Settings
ch. 17 (reactive) Teaching and Learning Regimes from Within: Significant Networks as a Locus for the Social Construction of Teaching and Learning

Part VII: General Observations On Previous Themes
ch. 18 Assessment for Career and Citizenship
ch. 19 Teaching Within and Beyond the Disciplines: The Challenge for Faculty

Index
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"How Master of Divinity Education Changes Students: A Research-Based Model "

TTR
Lincoln, Timothy D.
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 3 (2010): 208-222
BL41.T4
Topics: Theological Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
To increase understanding of how Master of Divinity education actually functions and to respond to accreditors' emphasis on the outcomes of learning, this paper presents a research-based model that focuses on how M.Div. education transforms students. The students-in-seminary model is conceptually undergirded by life course theory. In the model, students attending seminary engage in a messy process in which they respond to competing demands of school, church, and family. ...
Additional Info:
To increase understanding of how Master of Divinity education actually functions and to respond to accreditors' emphasis on the outcomes of learning, this paper presents a research-based model that focuses on how M.Div. education transforms students. The students-in-seminary model is conceptually undergirded by life course theory. In the model, students attending seminary engage in a messy process in which they respond to competing demands of school, church, and family. The author compares the students-in-seminary model with the dominant message model for theological education articulated by Carroll et al. (1997) and argues that the students-in-seminary model more adequately describes the process of theological education. The author calls for further research to study how seminaries promote key messages to their students, the plasticity of students' sense of calling, the impact of church requirements on M.Div. students, and the complexity of life for multiple-role students.
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Making Learning Happen: A Guide for Post-Compulsory Education

Book
Race, Phil
2010
Sage Publication, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB2331.R272 2010
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Making Learning Happen provides an accessible and practical discussion of teaching and learning for the post-compulsorysector of higher and further education. Much of the existing educational literature on 'learning' is written in language which makes it inaccessible to the people most directly involved in learning: learners and their teachers. This book avoids the unnecessary jargon and elitist language which has too often hitherto hindered teachers and learners alike in thinking ...
Additional Info:
Making Learning Happen provides an accessible and practical discussion of teaching and learning for the post-compulsorysector of higher and further education. Much of the existing educational literature on 'learning' is written in language which makes it inaccessible to the people most directly involved in learning: learners and their teachers. This book avoids the unnecessary jargon and elitist language which has too often hitherto hindered teachers and learners alike in thinking about how best to make learning happen.

This book will help staff in higher and further education increase the 'learning payoff' which their students derive from a wide range of educational contexts, at all levels in post-compulsory education.

The book is centred around Phil Race's well-known 'ripples on a pond' model of learning, which has identified five fundamental factors underpinning successful learning:

'wanting' to learn

'needing' to learn

'learning by doing'

'feedback'

'digesting - making sense of what has been learned'.

This text will allow teachers and students to address these factors head-on in a wide range of contexts, including large-group teaching, small-group work, online learning, and in their use of formative feedback to help their students.

Included in the book is a self-analysis questionnaire to enable learners to reflect on how these factors contribute to their own approaches to learning.

Making Learning Happen is a valuable resource for Postgraduate students on PGD higher and further education courses, staff development courses in all Bristish universities, and is a helpful tool for lecturers and tutors in higher and further education, post-16 teachers in secondary education, educational managers, and students themselves. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Setting the scene
ch. 2 Five factors underpinning successful learning
ch. 3 Beyond learning styles?
ch. 4 Assessment driving learning
ch. 5 Learning through feedback
ch. 6 Making learning happen in large groups
ch. 7 Making learning happen in small groups
ch. 8 Responding to diversity and widening participation
ch. 9 Addressing employability
ch. 10 Putting the learning into e-learning
ch. 11 Making workshops work
TTR cover image

"No Preacher Left Behind: A New Prerequisite for the Introductory Preaching Course"

TTR
Resner, Andre
2010
Teaching Theology and Religion 13, no. 4 (2010): 339-349
BL41.T4
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
M.Div. programs sequence curriculum in order to cumulatively build competencies for wise, faithful, reflective, appropriate and effective ministerial practices. That is why the introductory preaching course typically is positioned somewhere near the middle of the program. The author of this article discovered that students who, in the semester immediately preceding the introductory preaching course, were apprenticed in the art of critical theological reflection on previously preached sermons entered the ...
Additional Info:
M.Div. programs sequence curriculum in order to cumulatively build competencies for wise, faithful, reflective, appropriate and effective ministerial practices. That is why the introductory preaching course typically is positioned somewhere near the middle of the program. The author of this article discovered that students who, in the semester immediately preceding the introductory preaching course, were apprenticed in the art of critical theological reflection on previously preached sermons entered the introductory course more eager, with more finely attuned expectation levels, and with anxiety levels that promoted rather than hampered learning.
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Teaching on Solid Ground: Using Scholarship to Improve Practice

Book
Menges, Robert J., Maryellen Weimer
1996
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.T418 1996
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Teaching on Solid Ground gives practitioners more complete understanding of students and learning. It presents new ways of thinking about instruction, and it explores the issues - including faculty motivation and quality of teaching - that demand faculty attention at the institutional and professional level. Underlying Teaching on Solid Ground is the critical premise that educational researchers and teachers must become partners in the ongoing task of teaching improvement. (From ...
Additional Info:
Teaching on Solid Ground gives practitioners more complete understanding of students and learning. It presents new ways of thinking about instruction, and it explores the issues - including faculty motivation and quality of teaching - that demand faculty attention at the institutional and professional level. Underlying Teaching on Solid Ground is the critical premise that educational researchers and teachers must become partners in the ongoing task of teaching improvement. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Authors

ch. 1 Why Scholarship Is the Bedrock of Good Teaching
ch. 2 Teaching and Today's College Students
ch. 3 Making the Transition to College
ch. 4 Student Motivation from the Teacher's Perspective
ch. 5 Collaborative Learning: Creating Knowledge with Students
ch. 6 Assessing Student Involvement in Learning
ch. 7 New Roles for Teachers in Today's Classrooms
ch. 8 Planning and Developing Effective Courses
ch. 9 Assignments That Promote and Integrate Learning
ch. 10 Feedback for Enhanced Teaching and Learning
ch. 11 How Research on Learning Strengthens Instruction
ch. 12 What College Teachers Need to Know
ch. 13 Fostering Instructional Vitality and Motivation
ch. 14 Supporting Diversity Through Campus Culture
ch. 15 Using Assessment to Improve Instruction

Name Index
Subject Index
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Five High-Impact Practices: Research on Learning Outcomes, Completion, and Quality

Book
Jayne E. Brownell and Lynn E. Swaner
2010
Association of American Colleges and Universities
LA227.4.B76 2010
Topics: Service Learning   |   Theological Education   |   Liberal Arts   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
This monograph examines what educational research reveals about five educational practices: first-year seminars, learning communities, service learning, undergraduate research, and capstone experiences. The authors explore questions such as: What is the impact on students who participate in these practices? Is the impact the same for both traditional students and those who come from historically underserved student populations? The monograph includes a foreword by George D. Kuh, High-Impact Practices: Retrospective and ...
Additional Info:
This monograph examines what educational research reveals about five educational practices: first-year seminars, learning communities, service learning, undergraduate research, and capstone experiences. The authors explore questions such as: What is the impact on students who participate in these practices? Is the impact the same for both traditional students and those who come from historically underserved student populations? The monograph includes a foreword by George D. Kuh, High-Impact Practices: Retrospective and Prospective, and recommendations for how to improve the quality of high-impact practices. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 First Year Seminars
ch. 2 Learning Communities
ch. 3 Service Learning
ch. 4 Undergraduate Research
ch. 5 Capstone Courses and Projects
ch. 6 Integrated Approaches
ch. 7 Discussion

Afterword
References
About the Authors
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Interdisciplinary Higher Education: Perspectives and Practicalities

Book
Davies, Martin, author, ed.; Devlin, Marica, ed.; and Tight, Malcolm, ed.
2010
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
LB2361.I56 2010 v.5
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In an age of pressing global issues such as climate change, the necessity for countries to work together to resolve problems affecting multiple nations has never been more important. Interdisciplinarity in higher education is a key to meeting these challenges. Universities need to produce graduates, and leaders, who understand issues from different perspectives, and who can communicate with others outside the confines of their own disciplines.

Drawing on ...
Additional Info:
In an age of pressing global issues such as climate change, the necessity for countries to work together to resolve problems affecting multiple nations has never been more important. Interdisciplinarity in higher education is a key to meeting these challenges. Universities need to produce graduates, and leaders, who understand issues from different perspectives, and who can communicate with others outside the confines of their own disciplines.

Drawing on contributions from 37 scholars from Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Malaysia, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, this volume examines issues inherent in providing interdisciplinary education within the structures of universities and proposes ways in which these issues might be best managed.

The book has a dual focus on perspectives and practicalities. Themes covered include: the need for graduates who can work within and across multi-disciplinary and multi-professional teams; interdisciplinary leadership; the critical importance of interdisciplinary thinking to meet global challenges; collaboration in interdisciplinary approaches to teaching and learning; the role of institutional and other systems to support interdisciplinary endeavours; the centrality of disciplines; balancing disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity; and the place of interdisciplinarity in graduate outcomes and attributes. Definitional aspects of interdisciplinary higher education and current interdisciplinary practice across a range of contexts are also examined.

Contributors represent a wide range of discipline areas, including accounting, academic development, agriculture, food and wine science, biotechnology, employment relations, environmental science, the health sciences, higher education, land and environment, languages and cultures, occupational therapy, science communication, social work and social policy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Contributors
Introduction

Part I: Theoretical Perspectives On Interdisciplinarity
ch. 1 Interdisciplinary Higher Education (Martin Davies, Marcia Devlin)
ch. 2 Complexity and Mastery in Shaping Interdisciplinarity (Philip MacKinnon, William D. Rifkin, Damian Hine, Ross Barnard)
ch. 3 Interdisciplinary Leadership and Learning (Paul Blackmore, Camille Kandiko)
ch. 4 Working Successfully in University Interdisciplinary Teams: Learning From Embedded Intergroup Relations Theory (Meaghan Botterill, Barbara de la Harpe)
ch. 5 What Kind of Interdisciplinary Space Is Academic Development? (Tai Peseta, Catherine Manathunga, Anna Jones)

Part II: Vignettes of Interdisciplinary Practice
Vignette 1 (Inter)disciplinary Dublin Descriptors? Implementation of the Bologna Process in a Dutch University (Ellen Jansen, Martin Goedhart)
Vignette 2 Facing the Realities of Implementing an Interdisciplinary Approach in Institutions of Higher Learning in Malaysia (Sarjit Kaur, Gurnam Kaur Sidhu)
Vignette 3 Interdisciplinary Survival: The Case of Murdoch University (Lorraine Marshall)
Vignette 4 Explicating Interdisciplinarity in a Postgraduate Materials Conversation Programme (Marcelle Scott)
Vignette 5 The Getting of Interdisciplinarity: The Everyday Practice of Environmental Curriculum Design (Ruth Beilin, Helena Bender)
Vignette 6 Pluridisciplinary Learning and Assessment: Reflections on Practice (Sandra Jones, Kim Watty)
Vignette 7 Many Disciplines - Common Approach: Experiences in the Development and Delivery of an Interprofessional Health Subject (Helen Cleak, Dianne Williamson, Glenys French)
Vignette 8 Revisiting Higher Eduction's Heartland: (Inter)Disciplinary Ways of Knowing and Doing For Sustainability Education (Kathryn Hegarty, Barbara de la Harpe )
Vignette 9 Interdisciplinary Scholarship For Novice Students (Charlotte Brack, Lisa Schmidt, Philip MacKinnon)
Vignette 10 The Role of Inter-Faculty Relationships in Special Project Collaborations: A Distinctly New Zealand Experience (Cath Fraser, Lin Ayo)
Vignette 11 Developing Students' Academic Skills: An Interdisciplinary Approach (Kate Chanock)
Vignette 12 Structuring Interdisciplinary Collaboration to Develop Research Students' Skills For Publishing Research Internationally: Lessons From Implementation (Margaret Cargill, Patrick O’Conno)
Vignette 13 Promoting Interdisciplinary Practices Through ePortolios (Juliana Chau)

References Contributors
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A Guide to Building Education Partnerships: Navigating Diverse Cultural Contexts to Turn Challenge into Promise

Book
Hora, Matthew T., and Miller, Susan B.
2011
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB1775.2.H67 2011
Topics: Service Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Alternative Classrooms

Additional Info:
Education partnerships are central to – and often a requirement of – most education reform initiatives promoted by state and local governments, by foundations, and by business funders. Many fail for failure to understand the dynamics of their complex relationships.

This book provides insights and guidance to enable prospective and existing education partners to develop answers to the questions that are critical to success: Why engage in this partnership? How ...
Additional Info:
Education partnerships are central to – and often a requirement of – most education reform initiatives promoted by state and local governments, by foundations, and by business funders. Many fail for failure to understand the dynamics of their complex relationships.

This book provides insights and guidance to enable prospective and existing education partners to develop answers to the questions that are critical to success: Why engage in this partnership? How can you communicate the potential benefits of partnership to motivate teachers, faculty, administrators, and community members? How do you select the best organizational structure and procedures for a partnership? How can you maintain open, deliberative discussion while respecting different histories and cultures? How can you produce compelling evidence that the partnership is worthwhile?

Based on their observation of a five-year-long publicly funded partnership, research data, and the literature, the authors identify the principles that they consider critical to answering these questions. The authors do not minimize the differences and complexities inherent in partnership work, because they believe that doing so would be to present coherence and homogeneity where none exists. Instead, they seek to make evident how these principles underlie many different partnership situations. Thus, rather than presenting a package of best practices, or a cookie-cutter approach, this book presents the organizational principles for planning and implementing education partnerships, along with sets of strategies for working through them.

The authors present the diagnostic tools for undertaking a deliberate and research-based approach to planning, designing, and managing a partnership. By surfacing participants’ often-differing motivations, and the practices and assumptions they bring to the table, the book provides the foundation for developing a constructive relationship. In scope, the book extends beyond school-university partnerships to include schools’ collaboration with state and local governments, nonprofit organizations, and the business sector. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: The Challenge and Promise of Education Partnerships

Part One: Getting Ready for Partnership
ch. 1 Shall We Dance? Convening a Pre-Partnership Planning Group
ch. 2 Sizing Up Organizational Aspirations and Attributes
ch. 3 Understanding Cultural Dynamics
ch. 4 Crossing Organizational and Cultural Boundaries

Part Two: Designing A Partnership
ch. 5 Types of Organizational Structures for Partnership
ch. 6 Administration and Leadership
ch. 7 Effective communication systems

Part Three Implementing Partnerships
ch. 8 Designing the work
ch. 9 Developing and Managing Working Groups
ch. 10 The Key Roles of Trust and Managing Conflict

Appendix A: Methodology
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Assessing for Learning: Building a Sustainable Commitment Across the Institution Second Edition

Book
Maki, Peggy L.
2010
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB2366.2.M35 2004
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
While there is consensus that institutions need to represent their educational effectiveness through documentation of student learning, the higher education community is divided between those who support national standardized tests to compare institutions’ educational effectiveness, and those who believe that valid assessment of student achievement is based on assessing the work that students produce along and at the end of their educational journeys.

This book espouses the latter ...
Additional Info:
While there is consensus that institutions need to represent their educational effectiveness through documentation of student learning, the higher education community is divided between those who support national standardized tests to compare institutions’ educational effectiveness, and those who believe that valid assessment of student achievement is based on assessing the work that students produce along and at the end of their educational journeys.

This book espouses the latter philosophy—what Peggy Maki sees as an integrated and authentic approach to providing evidence of student learning based on the work that students produce along the chronology of their learning. She believes that assessment needs to be humanized, as opposed to standardized, to take into account the demographics of institutions, as students do not all start at the same place in their learning. Students also need the tools to assess their own progress.

In addition to updating and expanding the contents of her first edition to reflect changes in assessment practices and developments over the last seven years, such as the development of technology-enabled assessment methods and the national need for institutions to demonstrate that they are using results to improve student learning, Maki focuses on ways to deepen program and institution-level assessment within the context of collective inquiry about student learning.

Recognizing that assessment is not initially a linear start-up process or even necessarily sequential, and recognizing that institutions develop processes appropriate for their mission and culture, this book does not take a prescriptive or formulaic approach to building this commitment. What it does present is a framework, with examples of processes and strategies, to assist faculty, staff, administrators, and campus leaders to develop a sustainable and shared core institutional process that deepens inquiry into what and how students learn to identify and improve patterns of weakness that inhibit learning.

This book is designed to assist colleges and universities build a sustainable commitment to assessing student learning at both the institution and program levels. It provides the tools for collective inquiry among faculty, staff, administrators and students to develop evidence of students’ abilities to integrate, apply and transfer learning, as well as to construct their own meaning. Each chapter also concludes with (1) an Additional Resources section that includes references to meta-sites with further resources, so users can pursue particular issues in greater depth and detail and (2) worksheets, guides, and exercises designed to build collaborative ownership of assessment. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Preface to the Second Edition

ch. 1 Developing a Collective Institutional Commitment
ch. 2 Beginning with Dialogue about Teaching and Learning
ch. 3 Making Claims about Student Learning within Contexts for Learning
ch. 4 Raising and Pursuing Open-Ended Research or Study Questions to Deepen Inquiry Into and Improve Student Learning
ch. 5 Identifying or Designing Tasks to Assess the Dimensions of Learning
ch. 6 Reaching Consensus about Criteria and Standards of Judgment
ch. 7 Designing a Cycle of Inquiry
ch. 8 Building a Core Institutional Process of Inquiry over Time

Appendix A: Institutional Example: University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Appendix B: Descriptions of Some Representative Commercially Designed Assessment Management Systems
Appendix C: Consent Form
TTR cover image

"An 8-Week Online Capstone Experience"

TTR
Spencer, James
2012
Teaching Theology and Religion 15, no. 2 (2012): 184-185
BL.T4 v.15 no. 2 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   18-22 Year Olds   |   Liberal Arts   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
Additional Info:
Effective pedagogy in the capstone course or integrative seminar — a 1000 word response to a Call for Papers.
Cover image

The Mobile Academy: mLearning for Higher Education

Book
Quinn, Clark N.
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2395.7.Q56 2012
Topics: Course Design   |   Online Learning   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
In MindMeld, Jon D. Aleckson and Penny Ralston-Berg draw on a great many years of experience in educational technology to describe how the benefits of learning from an accomplished expert (a professor, for instance) can be translated into an online format. Industry professionals know that the online format presents an opportunity for highly interactive pedagogy, a pedagogy by which students synchronize learning with doing, replicating the information-processing habits that come ...
Additional Info:
In MindMeld, Jon D. Aleckson and Penny Ralston-Berg draw on a great many years of experience in educational technology to describe how the benefits of learning from an accomplished expert (a professor, for instance) can be translated into an online format. Industry professionals know that the online format presents an opportunity for highly interactive pedagogy, a pedagogy by which students synchronize learning with doing, replicating the information-processing habits that come from real-life work in the field. According to Aleckson, the key to creating an ideal eLearning product is to meet the challenge of micro-collaboration.

In order to develop sophisticated online learning activities, we must find a way to convey the tacit knowledge of someone with real-life experience using the tools of software design. This requires us to micro-collaborate: individuals with very different backgrounds and very different skills sets have to work in harmony to achieve a common goal. It may sound simple, but anyone who has labored on an eLearning project knows otherwise. In MindMeld, Aleckson and Ralston-Berg take us step by step through the leadership, management, and communication strategies that make effective micro-collaboration possible, using stories of actual projects to illustrate his points. In addition, they provide a collection of documentation tools to assist in keeping an eLearning project on spec, on time, and on budget.

This concise, readable volume contextualizes each aspect of eLearning development and highlights the ways in which different team members interact. It will prove invaluable to readers in both the business and academic worlds.

As a bonus to readers, the authors have created an exciting set of "tools" for helping conceptualize and implement the process. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

ch. 1 TheMobile Revolution
Context
Related Experiences
Why Higher Education Needs to Pay Attention
The Rest of This Book
Practice

ch. 2 Foundations: Mobile
Devices
Of Platforms and Processing Power
Four C’S and Thinking Differently
Definition
Summary
Practice

ch. 3 Foundations: Learning
Making Learning Work
Beyond the Basics
Summary
Practice

ch. 4 Administration ‘‘To Go’’
Principles
Delivery
Summary
Practice
Task Checklist

ch. 5 Content Is King
Media
Media Specifics
Accessing
Summary
Practice
Content Form

ch. 6 Practice: Interactivity and Assessment
Design
Interactions
Meta-learning
Summary
Practice
Category Checklist

ch. 7 Going Social
Learning Interactions
Social Media
Meta-learning
Summary
Practice
Channel Checklist

ch. 8 Going Beyond
Augmented Reality
Alternate Reality
Adaptive Delivery
Moving Forward
Practice

ch. 9 Getting Going: Organizational Issues
Design
Development
Implementation
Policies
You Gotta Be in It to Get It
Practice

Bibliography
Index
Cover image

The Learner-Centered Curriculum: Design and Implementation

Book
Cullen, Roxanne; Harris, Michael; Hill, Reinhold R.; and Weimer, Maryellen
2012
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2361.5.C85 2012
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Most of the scholarship on learner-centeredness is focused on individual classroom pedagogy, but this book takes learner-centeredness beyond the classroom and asks academic leaders to consider the broader implications of making their institutions fully learner-centered. Systemic change is needed, and curriculum is at the heart of what higher education does. To truly effect change, the curriculum needs to be examined and aligned with learner-centered practices. In this book the authors ...
Additional Info:
Most of the scholarship on learner-centeredness is focused on individual classroom pedagogy, but this book takes learner-centeredness beyond the classroom and asks academic leaders to consider the broader implications of making their institutions fully learner-centered. Systemic change is needed, and curriculum is at the heart of what higher education does. To truly effect change, the curriculum needs to be examined and aligned with learner-centered practices. In this book the authors offer both design specifications for a learner-centered approach to curriculum as well as practical recommendations for implementation and assessment. The book covers the need for redesigning curriculum, curriculum design in the instructional paradigm, learner-centered design in practice, implementation, program assessment (including a helpful rubric for this), innovating through technology, and learning spaces that support learner-centered curricula. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Authors

ch. 1 Why Redesign Curriculum?
ch. 2 Curriculum Design in the Instructional Paradigm
ch. 3 The Learner-Centered Curriculum
ch. 4 Leading Curricular Implementation
ch. 5 Learner-Centered Design in Practice
ch. 6 Assessment Aimed at Learner Autonomy
ch. 7 Innovating Through Technology
ch. 8 Learning Spaces That Support Learner-Centered Curricula

Closing Thoughts
References
Index
Cover image

Dimensions of Expertise: A Conceptual Exploration of Vocational Knowledge

Book
Winch, Christopher
2012
Continuum International Publishing Group, New York
LC1042.W55 2012
Topics: Ministerial Formation   |   Adult Learners   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
A detailed philosophical debate on the nature of expertise is long overdue and Dimensions of Expertise opens up that debate. Christopher Winch firstly explores an account of know-how, derived primarily from the pioneering work of Gilbert Ryle, and moves on to relate this epistemological debate to discussions concerning the nature of expertise in vocational and professional education, including attempts to provide a theory of expertise. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A detailed philosophical debate on the nature of expertise is long overdue and Dimensions of Expertise opens up that debate. Christopher Winch firstly explores an account of know-how, derived primarily from the pioneering work of Gilbert Ryle, and moves on to relate this epistemological debate to discussions concerning the nature of expertise in vocational and professional education, including attempts to provide a theory of expertise. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1. The Two Faces of Expertise 
ch. 2. Current Philosophical Debates about Knowing How
ch. 3.  Skills and Their Discontents
ch. 4.  Beyond Skill: The Complexities of Competence
ch. 5. To Follow a Rule…: The Normative Basis of Practical Knowledge
ch. 6. Theory, Underpinning Knowledge and Practice
ch. 7. Tacit Knowledge
ch. 8. Can There be a Theory of Expertise? 
ch. 9. Novice, Journeyman, Expert
ch. 10.  Vocational Education and the Development of Expertise

Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Assessing 21st Century Skills: A Guide to Evaluating Mastery and Authentic Learning

Book
Greenstein, Laura
2012
Corwin Press, A SAGE Publications Company, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB3051.G715 2012
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Liberal Arts   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The Common Core State Standards clearly define the skills students need for success in college and the 21st century workplace. The question is, how can you measure student mastery of skills like creativity, problem solving, and use of technology? Laura Greenstein demonstrates how teachers can teach and assess 21st century skills using authentic learning experiences and rigorous, varied assessment strategies. Based on the best ideas of renowned experts in education, ...
Additional Info:
The Common Core State Standards clearly define the skills students need for success in college and the 21st century workplace. The question is, how can you measure student mastery of skills like creativity, problem solving, and use of technology? Laura Greenstein demonstrates how teachers can teach and assess 21st century skills using authentic learning experiences and rigorous, varied assessment strategies. Based on the best ideas of renowned experts in education, this book provides a framework and practical ideas for measuring

• Thinking skills: critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, and metacognition
• Actions: communication, collaboration, digital and technological literacy
• Living skills: citizenship, global understanding, leadership, college and career readiness

Included are numerous rubrics and checklists, a step-by-step model for developing your own classroom assessments, a lesson planning template, and sample completed lesson plans. Assessing 21st Century Skills gives you the tools and strategies you need to prepare students to succeed in a rapidly changing world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
Preface
Acknowledgments
About the Author

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 A Synthesis of 21st Century Skills
ch. 3 Assessment Fundamentalsv ch. 4 Assessment Strategies
ch. 5 Assessing Thinking Skills
ch. 6 Assessing Actions
ch. 7 Assessing Skills for Living in the World
ch. 8 Multipurpose Assessments
ch. 9 Moving Assessment Into the 21st Century

Appendices
References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Assessing Student Learning: A Common Sense Guide, 2nd Edition

Book
Suskie, Linda, and Banta, Trudy W.
2009
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2336.S87 2009
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The first edition of Assessing Student Learning has become the standard reference for college faculty and administrators who are charged with the task of assessing student learning within their institutions. The second edition of this landmark book offers the same practical guidance and is designed to meet ever-increasing demands for improvement and accountability. This edition includes expanded coverage of vital assessment topics such as promoting an assessment culture, characteristics of ...
Additional Info:
The first edition of Assessing Student Learning has become the standard reference for college faculty and administrators who are charged with the task of assessing student learning within their institutions. The second edition of this landmark book offers the same practical guidance and is designed to meet ever-increasing demands for improvement and accountability. This edition includes expanded coverage of vital assessment topics such as promoting an assessment culture, characteristics of good assessment, audiences for assessment, organizing and coordinating assessment, assessing attitudes and values, setting benchmarks and standards, and using results to inform and improve teaching, learning, planning, and decision making. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One: Understanding Assessment
ch. 1 What Is Assessment?
ch. 2 How Can Student Learning Be Assessed?
ch. 3 What Is Good Assessment?

Part Two: Planning For Assessment Success
ch. 4 Why Are You Assessing Student Learning?
ch. 5 The Keys to a Culture of Assessment: Tangible Value and Respect
ch. 6 Supporting Assessment Efforts with Time, Infrastructure, and Resources
ch. 7 Organizing an Assessment Process
ch. 8 Developing Learning Goals

Part Three: The Assessment Toolbox
ch. 9 Using a Scoring Guide or Rubric to Plan and Evaluate an Assignment
ch. 10 Creating an Effective Assignment
ch. 11 Writing a Traditional Test
ch. 12 Assessing Values, Attitudes, Dispositions, and Habits of Mind
ch. 13 Assembling Assessment Information into Portfolios
ch. 14 Selecting a Published Test or Survey

Part Four: Understanding and Using Assessment Results
ch. 15 Setting Benchmarks or Standards
ch. 16 Summarizing and Analyzing Assessment Results
ch. 17 Sharing Assessment Results with Internal and External Audiences
ch. 18 Using Assessment Results Effectively and Appropriately
ch. 19 Keeping the Momentum Going

References
Recommended Readings
Assessment Resources
Index
Cover image

Cloud Computing for Teaching and Learning: Strategies for Design and Implementation

Book
Chao, Lee
2012
IGI Global, Hershey, PA
QA76.9.C58 C585 2012
Topics: Online Learning   |   Using Technology   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
With its cost efficiency, enabling of collaboration and sharing of resources, and its ability to improve access, cloud computing is likely to play a big role in the classrooms of tomorrow.

Cloud Computing for Teaching and Learning: Strategies for Design and Implementation provides the latest information about cloud development and cloud applications in teaching and learning. The book alsos include empirical research findings in these areas for professionals ...
Additional Info:
With its cost efficiency, enabling of collaboration and sharing of resources, and its ability to improve access, cloud computing is likely to play a big role in the classrooms of tomorrow.

Cloud Computing for Teaching and Learning: Strategies for Design and Implementation provides the latest information about cloud development and cloud applications in teaching and learning. The book alsos include empirical research findings in these areas for professionals and researchers working in the field of e-learning who want to implement teaching and learning with cloud computing, as well as provide insights and support to executives concerned with cloud development and cloud applications in e-learning communities and environments. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Section 1 - Education and Research in Cloud Computing Environments
ch. 1 Overview of Cloud Computing and its Application in E-Learning
ch. 2 A Semantic Framework for Cloud Learning Environments
ch. 3 Utilizing Open Source Cloud Computing Environments to Provide Cost Effective Support for University Education and Research
ch. 4 Conducting Research in the Cloud
ch. 5 Cloud Computing for Education and Research in Developing Countries

Section 2 - Teaching and Learning with Cloud
ch. 6 Teaching Clouds: Lessons Taught and Lessons Learnt
ch. 7 Implement Virtual Programming Lab with Cloud Computing for Web-Based Distance Education
ch. 8 Cloud Computing for On-Demand Virtual Desktops and Labs
ch. 9 Developing a Private Cloud Based IP Telephony Laboratory and Curriculum

Section 3 - Policies and Legal Issues in Education Cloud
ch. 10 Harnessing the Potential of Cloud Computing to Transform Higher Education
ch. 11 Mobile Cloud Services as Catalysts for Pedagogical Change
ch. 12 Cloud Computing: Next Generation Education
ch. 13 Legal and Contractual Issues of Cloud Computing for Educational Institutions
ch. 14 Security Issues in Cloud Computing

Section 4 - Cloud Computing and its Technical Foundation
ch. 15 Cloud Computing Solution for Internet Based Teaching and Learning
ch. 16 Data Partitioning for Highly Scalable Cloud Applications
ch. 17 Intelligent Clouds: By Means of Using Multi-Agent Systems Environments
ch. 18 Large-Scale Systems and Society

Compilation of References
About the Contributors
Index
Cover image

The Engaged Campus: Certificates, Minors, and Majors as the New Community Engagement

Book
Butin, Dan W., and Seider, Scott, eds.
2012
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
LC221.E52 2012
Topics: Service Learning   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Alternative Classrooms   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
The Engaged Campus offers a set of emerging best practices and articulation of critical issues for faculty and administrators committed to developing, strengthening, or expanding majors or minors in community engagement at their respective institutions. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The Engaged Campus offers a set of emerging best practices and articulation of critical issues for faculty and administrators committed to developing, strengthening, or expanding majors or minors in community engagement at their respective institutions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I Engagement in Action
ch. 1 Theory Matters: Articulating a Theoretical Framework for Civic Engagement (Tracey Burke, Tara Palmer Smith, and Diane Hirshberg)
ch. 2 Creating the Character, Culture, and Craft of Engagement (Sandra L. Enos)
ch. 3 Negotiating the Boundary between the Academy and the Community (Hollyce (Sherry) Giles)
ch. 4 Contending with Political and Cultural Campus Challenges ( Arthur S. Keene and John Reiff)
ch. 5 Process, Content, and Community Building (Keith Morton)
ch. 6 The Politics of Engagement (Mary Beth Pudup)
ch. 7 Measuring the Impact of Community Service Learning (Scott Seider and Sarah Novick)
ch. 8 Building in Place (Talmage A. Stanley)

Part II Reflecting on the Future of Community Engagement
ch. 9 A New Hull House? The Monumental Challenge of Service-Learning and Community Engagement (Peter Levine)
ch. 10 Disciplining Higher Education for Democratic Community Engagement (Ariane Hoy, Mathew Johnson, and Robert Hackett)
ch. 11 De Tocqueville Rediscovered: Community-Based Civic Engagement (Elizabeth L. Hollander)

List of Contributors
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Learning Paradigm College

Book
Tagg, John; and Ewell, Peter T.
2003
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.T24 2003
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
In The Learning Paradigm College, John Tagg builds on the ground-breaking Change magazine article he coauthored with Robert Barr in 1995, “From Teaching to Learning; A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education.” That piece defined a paradigm shift happening in American higher education, placing more importance on learning outcomes and less on the quantity of instruction. As Tagg defines it, “Where the Instruction Paradigm highlights formal processes, the Learning Paradigm emphasizes results ...
Additional Info:
In The Learning Paradigm College, John Tagg builds on the ground-breaking Change magazine article he coauthored with Robert Barr in 1995, “From Teaching to Learning; A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education.” That piece defined a paradigm shift happening in American higher education, placing more importance on learning outcomes and less on the quantity of instruction. As Tagg defines it, “Where the Instruction Paradigm highlights formal processes, the Learning Paradigm emphasizes results or outcomes. Where the Instruction Paradigm attends to classes, the Learning Paradigm attends to students.” (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Dedication
About the Author
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I. A New Paradigm?
ch. 1 The Challenge
ch. 2 The Problem of Scale: Why Innovations Don’t Transform Colleges
ch. 3 The Instruction Paradigm: Process Before Purpose
ch. 4 The Route to Transformation: The Learning Paradigm, Old and New

Part II. The Foundation: The Learners and the Learning
ch. 5 The Learners
ch. 6 Self-Theories and Academic Motivation
ch. 7 Approaches to Learning

Part III. The Learning Environment of the College
ch. 8 The Whole That Determines the Parts
ch. 9 The Cognitive Economy of the Instruction Paradigm College

Part IV. A Design for Learning
ch. 10 The Cognitive Economy of the Learning Paradigm College
ch. 11 A Learning Paradigm College Promotes Intrinsically Rewarding Goals
ch. 12 A Learning Paradigm College Requires Frequent, Continual, Connected, and Authentic Student Performances
ch. 13 A Learning Paradigm College Provides Consistent, Continual, Interactive Feedback to Students
ch. 14 A Learning Paradigm College Provides a Long Time Horizon for Learning
ch. 15 A Learning Paradigm College Creates Purposeful Communities of Practice
ch. 16 A Learning Paradigm College Aligns All of Its Activities Around the Mission of Producing Student Learning

Part V. Transforming the College
ch. 17 Barriers to Transformation
ch. 18 Scaffolding for Change
ch. 19 The Golden Rule

References
Index
Cover image

Research Perspectives and Best Practices in Educational Technology Integration

Book
Keengwe, Jared, ed.
2013
IGI Global, Hershey PA
LB1028.3.R463 2013
Topics: Using Technology   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: With advancements in technology continuing to influence all areas of society, students in current classrooms have a different understanding and perspective of learning than the educational system has been designed to teach.

Research Perspectives and Best Practices in Educational Technology Integration highlights the emerging digital age, its complex transformation of the current educational system, and the integration of educational technologies into ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: With advancements in technology continuing to influence all areas of society, students in current classrooms have a different understanding and perspective of learning than the educational system has been designed to teach.

Research Perspectives and Best Practices in Educational Technology Integration highlights the emerging digital age, its complex transformation of the current educational system, and the integration of educational technologies into teaching strategies. This book offers best practices in the process of incorporating learning technologies into instruction and is an essential resource for academicians, professionals, educational researchers in education and educational-related fields. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgment

ch. 1 Pedagogical and Technological Considerations Designing Collaborative Learning Using Educational Technologies
ch. 2 Integrating Technology in Teacher Education Programs
ch. 3 Increasing Student Engagement and Extending the Walls of Classroom with Emerging Technologies
ch. 4 Technology Expanding Horizons in Teacher Education: Transformative Learning Experiences
ch. 5 A State of the Art Cart: Visual Arts and Technology Integration in Teacher Education
ch. 6 Media and Technology Integration through Media Literacy Education
ch. 7 Librarians' Roles in Informatics to Support Classroom Incorporation of Technology
ch. 8 Employing Emerging Technologies in Educational Settings: Issues and Challenges
ch. 9 Internet Technology Levels in a Higher Education Teaching and Learning Environment: Discriminant Function Analysis Approach
ch. 10 Integration of the Computer Games into Early Childhood Education Pre-Service Teachers' Mathematics Teaching
ch. 11 A Case Study i Online Delivery: Boarding the Bullet Train to an Online Music Degree
ch. 12 Using Social Media to Enhance Instruction in Higher Education
ch. 13 A TPACK Course for Developing Pre-Service Teachers' Technology Integration Competencies: From Design and Application to Evaluation
ch. 14 Changing the Face of ELA Classrooms: A Case Study of TPACK Professional Development
ch. 15 Integrating Technology into Mathematics Teaching: A TPACK (Technological, Pedagogical, Content Knowledge)-Based Course Design for College Students
ch. 16 Privacy and Identity Management in Social Media: Driving Factors for Identity Hiding

Compilation of References
About the Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
Self-assessment of instructional goals to help faculty become more aware of what they want to accomplish in individual courses, locate Classroom Assessment Techniques they can adapt and use to assess how well they are achieving these goals, and provide a starting point for discussion of teaching and learning goals among colleagues.
Additional Info:
Self-assessment of instructional goals to help faculty become more aware of what they want to accomplish in individual courses, locate Classroom Assessment Techniques they can adapt and use to assess how well they are achieving these goals, and provide a starting point for discussion of teaching and learning goals among colleagues.
Cover image

Linked Courses for General Education and Integrative Learning: A Guide for Faculty and Administrators

Book
Soven, Margot; Lehr, Dolores; Naynaha, Siskanna; and Olson, Wendy, eds.
2013
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB2361.5.L55 2013
Topics: Curriculum Design and Assessment   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Research indicates that of the pedagogies recognized as “high impact”, learning communities – one approach to which, the linked course, is the subject of this book – lead to an increased level of student engagement in the freshman year that persists through the senior year, and improve retention.

This book focuses on the learning community model that is the most flexible to implement ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Research indicates that of the pedagogies recognized as “high impact”, learning communities – one approach to which, the linked course, is the subject of this book – lead to an increased level of student engagement in the freshman year that persists through the senior year, and improve retention.

This book focuses on the learning community model that is the most flexible to implement in terms of scheduling, teacher collaboration, and design: the linked course. The faculty may teach independently or together, coordinating syllabi and assignments so that the classes complement each other, and often these courses are linked around a particular interdisciplinary theme. Creating a cohort that works together for two paired courses motivates students, while the course structure promotes integrative learning as students make connections between disciplines.

This volume covers both “linked courses” in which faculty may work to coordinate syllabi and assignments, but teach most of their courses separately, as well as well as “paired courses” in which two or more courses are team taught in an integrated program in which faculty participate as learners as well as teachers.

Part One, Linked Course Pedagogies, includes several case studies of specific linked courses, including a study skills course paired with a worldview course; a community college course that challenges students’ compartmentalized thinking; and a paired course whose outcomes can be directly compared to parallel stand-alone courses.

Part Two, Linked Course Programs, includes a description of several institutional programs representing a variety of linked course program models. Each chapter includes information about program implementation, staffing logistics and concerns, curriculum development, pedagogical strategies, and faculty development.

Part Three, Assessing Linked Courses, highlights the role of assessment in supporting, maintaining, and improving linked course programs by sharing assessment models and describing how faculty and administrators have used particular assessment practices in order to improve their linked course programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Introduction: Why the Need for Learning Communities Now

Part One: Linked Course Pedagogies
ch. 1 Pairing Courses to Benefit Student Learning (Scott E. Gaier)
ch. 2 Linked Content Courses: A World Civilizations–World Religions Case Study (Jeffrey LaMonica)
ch. 3 Double Entry: Linking Introductory Financial Accounting and English Composition (Bruce A. Leauby and Mary C. Robertson)
ch. 4 Multiple Majors, One Writing Class: Discovering Commonalities Through Problematization (Irene Clark)

Part Two: Linked Course Programs
ch. 5 The Science of First-Year Learning Communities (Brandi Kutil)
ch. 6 Implementing a Linked Course Requirement in the Core Curriculum (Margot Soven)
ch. 7 Academic Partnerships with Residential Learning Communities (Maggie C. Parker and Alex Kappus)
ch. 8 Learning Communities in the New University (Siskanna Naynaha and Wendy Olson)

Part Three: Assessing Linked Courses
ch. 9 The Nuts and Bolts of Evaluating Linked Courses (Michael Roszkowski)
ch. 10 Using Program Assessments and Faculty Development to Deepen Student Learning (Lynn Dunlap and Maureen Pettitt)
ch. 11 Linked Course Assessment: The Problem With Quantitative Data (Bethany Blankenship)
ch. 12 Constant Reconnaissance: Assessment for Validation and Change (Greg Smith and Geoffrey Mamerow)

Editors and Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
Don't wait for an end-term course evaluation. Find out how your course is working in time to make improvements.
Additional Info:
Don't wait for an end-term course evaluation. Find out how your course is working in time to make improvements.
Additional Info:
A helpful checklist of good teaching practices, organized around Stanford University's standard course evaluation questions.
Additional Info:
A helpful checklist of good teaching practices, organized around Stanford University's standard course evaluation questions.
Additional Info:
Short accessbile overview, with several ideas to try.
Additional Info:
Short accessbile overview, with several ideas to try.
Additional Info:
Papers, projects, and presentations are excellent opportunities for students to demonstrate their learning and investment in a course.
Additional Info:
Papers, projects, and presentations are excellent opportunities for students to demonstrate their learning and investment in a course.
Additional Info:
Short checklist of good practices.
Additional Info:
Short checklist of good practices.
Additional Info:
Info page, with files and web links, on Understanding by Design, and approach to "backward course design" developed by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe.
Additional Info:
Info page, with files and web links, on Understanding by Design, and approach to "backward course design" developed by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe.
Additional Info:
Info page on Understanding by Design, on a site to which one of the developers of UbD (Grant Wiggins) contributes.
Additional Info:
Info page on Understanding by Design, on a site to which one of the developers of UbD (Grant Wiggins) contributes.
Additional Info:
Grant Wiggins, one of the developers of "Understanding by Design," proposes standards for course design and offers "prompts" toward a purposefully-designed course. Part of a series of blog posts on the topic.
Additional Info:
Grant Wiggins, one of the developers of "Understanding by Design," proposes standards for course design and offers "prompts" toward a purposefully-designed course. Part of a series of blog posts on the topic.
Additional Info:
This piece describes the peculiar origins of the "credit hour" and argues against its relevance as a measure of learning. In an outcome-based approach to curriculum design, "where and how" learners spend their time is less important than what they can learn and do.
Additional Info:
This piece describes the peculiar origins of the "credit hour" and argues against its relevance as a measure of learning. In an outcome-based approach to curriculum design, "where and how" learners spend their time is less important than what they can learn and do.
Additional Info:
In an attempt to build a better "intensive course," Torma "does the math" on credit hours, student-directed learning, and instructor-directed learning. This piece provides a helpful framework for anyone working through "seat hour" issues regarding fully online courses, blended/hybrid courses, face-to-face "intensives," or other game-changing learning contexts.
Additional Info:
In an attempt to build a better "intensive course," Torma "does the math" on credit hours, student-directed learning, and instructor-directed learning. This piece provides a helpful framework for anyone working through "seat hour" issues regarding fully online courses, blended/hybrid courses, face-to-face "intensives," or other game-changing learning contexts.
Additional Info:
The Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement has collected examples of policies, programs, surveys, and other resources according to the six aspects of the CIGE Model for Comprehensive Internationalization, and are provided as models for other colleges and universities as they pursue their internationalization goals.
Additional Info:
The Center for Internationalization and Global Engagement has collected examples of policies, programs, surveys, and other resources according to the six aspects of the CIGE Model for Comprehensive Internationalization, and are provided as models for other colleges and universities as they pursue their internationalization goals.
Cover image

Finding the Why: Personalizing Learning in Higher Education: New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 145

Book
Watts, Margit Misangyi
2016
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LA227.4.F56 2016
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This volume addresses how we might help students find the “why” of their educational endeavors. The ideas found in this volume range from:

- changing the perceptions and attitudes of whole communities toward education,
- retuning the first year experience to give students more opportunities to find meaning in their learning,
- suggesting new ways of integrating students’ experiences ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This volume addresses how we might help students find the “why” of their educational endeavors. The ideas found in this volume range from:

- changing the perceptions and attitudes of whole communities toward education,
- retuning the first year experience to give students more opportunities to find meaning in their learning,
- suggesting new ways of integrating students’ experiences with their learning in core courses, and
- connecting major initiatives already in place to demonstrate how we might restructure undergraduate education through the content of the curriculum, the way we teach, and our curricular learning experiences.

This is the 145th volume of this Jossey-Bass higher education series. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (margit misangyi watts)
Foreword (John N. Gardner)

ch. 1 Personalizing Learning (margit misangyi watts)
The editor offers a personal account of how she came to embrace the “why” as being important to address, as well as giving an overview of changes that have not occurred yet should.

ch. 2 Educational Success and Surrounding Culture (Garrison Walters)
Highlighting the need for a change in attitudes toward education, this author finds that students’ perceptions about their ability to learn matters a lot, and that often this perception is a response to other influences.

ch. 3 Integrative Learning: Making Liberal Education Purposeful, Personal, and Practical (Ann S. Ferren, Chad B. Anderson)
This chapter focuses on learning as a way to construct personal meaning. The authors argue for teaching in such a manner that students receive a holistic perspective on their education.

ch. 4 Project-Based Learning in Colleges of Business: Is it Enough to Develop Educated Graduates? (Penny Pence Smith, Lindsey A. Gibson)
Though project-based learning is heralded as an excellent way to engage students in learning, this chapter suggests that perhaps new ways might be better suited to at least some business students.

ch. 5 Making Learning Meaningful: Engaging Students in Ways That Matter to Them (George D. Kuh)
In order to raise our national retention rates, this author is convinced that students need to connect what they are learning to their lives. He suggests focusing on what he calls “goal realization” as a way to help students find their studies to be personally meaningful.

ch. 6 Challenging the First Year of College: Old Models and New Imperatives (Shala A. Mills, George L. Mehaffy)
This chapter describes how the AASCU is experimenting with new blended courses in which the content transcends the typical general education courses and invites students to create solutions to global challenges.

ch. 7 After the Doors Opened: Asking Why at a New Community College (Scott Evenbeck, Linda E. Merians)
These authors detail the founding of Guttman Community College and how the programs put in place were focused on helping students discover the “why” of their educational pursuits.

ch. 8 The Undergraduate Learning Community: A Bridge to Understanding Why (Stephen J. Romanoff)
This chapter describes the Russell Scholars Program and how well it has accomplished meaning for students who participate. The foundation of the program is clearly personalizing education.

ch. 9 Why Higher Education: Lessons Learned in a Learner-Centered College (Sandford C. Shugart)
Valencia College is a national leader in showing successful outcomes for students. This author shares key lessons learned that could extend beyond the world of community colleges.

ch. 10 Concluding Remarks (margit misangyi watts)

Index
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"Making the Case for Reforming the U.S. Credentialing System" (pdf)

Article
Lumina Foundation
2015
Lumina Foundation, Indianapolis, IN
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The Lumina Foundation has been at the forefront of increasing the number of adults in higher education fro the past few years. This report discusses the merits and drawbacks of credentialing systems. 
Additional Info:
The Lumina Foundation has been at the forefront of increasing the number of adults in higher education fro the past few years. This report discusses the merits and drawbacks of credentialing systems. 
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Competency-Based Education Publications

Web
CAEL
2016
The Council for Adult & Experiential Learning
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
CAEL is a nonprofit that works at all levels within the higher education, public, and private sectors to make it easier for people to get the education and training they need. Competency-Based Education suggests various alternative enrollment, assessment, and credentialing processes. 
Additional Info:
CAEL is a nonprofit that works at all levels within the higher education, public, and private sectors to make it easier for people to get the education and training they need. Competency-Based Education suggests various alternative enrollment, assessment, and credentialing processes. 
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Sample Syllabi (and Other Resources) in Interfaith and Interreligious Studies

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Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC)
Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC), Chicago, IL
Topics: Course Design   |   Religious Diversity   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Syllabi of five courses taught within new interfaith and interreligious studies programs. Also  model student learning outcomes and curricular programs. 
Additional Info:
Syllabi of five courses taught within new interfaith and interreligious studies programs. Also  model student learning outcomes and curricular programs.