Diversifying the Faculty

Scholarship On Teaching - Topic: Diversifying the Faculty - 163 results

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Confronting Diversity Issues on Campus

Book
Bowser, Benjamin, Gale Auletta, Terry Jones
1993
Sage Publications, Newbury Park, CA
LC1099.3.B69 1993
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Controversies about affirmative action hires, admission policies, intercultural relations in the classroom, the role of ethnic studies departments, and changes in course curriculum all seem to swirl around the changing ethnic composition of the campus. How do we all get along? Tackling this question are authors Bowser, Auletta, and Jones, who suggest some practical strategies for dealing with questions of racism, diversity, and intercultural communication. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Controversies about affirmative action hires, admission policies, intercultural relations in the classroom, the role of ethnic studies departments, and changes in course curriculum all seem to swirl around the changing ethnic composition of the campus. How do we all get along? Tackling this question are authors Bowser, Auletta, and Jones, who suggest some practical strategies for dealing with questions of racism, diversity, and intercultural communication. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 The Unwritten Organization
The Unwritten Rules
The Power of Networks
People of Color as Perceived Threats
What Can Be Done?
Ideas for Improving Treatment of Students of Color
Ideas for Improving Treatment of Faculty of Color

ch. 2 What Did You Say You Were? Am I a Racist?
Racism and Self-Identity for Whites
Racism and Self-Identity for People of Color
The Myths and Realities of Racism
What Can Be Done?

ch. 3 Communication, Communication, Communication!
Communication: Racial Dividers and Connectors
Why Race and Power Matter

ch. 4 Dealing With Conflict and Diversity in the Academic Community
The Purpose of Education
Issues of Access and Affirmative Action
Freedom of Speech: Fighting Words
Ethnic Studies and Multicultural Education
Summary

ch. 5 Toward New Racial and Cultural Boundaries in the Academy
Communities of Interest Defined
Redefining Communities of Interests
Models of Success
Selected References and Suggested Readings
About the Authors
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Saving Work: Feminist Practices of Theological Education

Book
Chopp, Rebecca S.
1995
Westminster John Knox, Louisville, KY
BV4020.C48 1995
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
One of the most significant changes in theological education during the past two decades has been a dramatic rise in the enrollment of women in the seminaries. In this ground-breaking book, Rebecca Chopp explores the impact these new voices are having on theological education. She looks at how women and men are actually forming a new Christian praxis through their engagement with feminist practices and thought that often exist outside ...
Additional Info:
One of the most significant changes in theological education during the past two decades has been a dramatic rise in the enrollment of women in the seminaries. In this ground-breaking book, Rebecca Chopp explores the impact these new voices are having on theological education. She looks at how women and men are actually forming a new Christian praxis through their engagement with feminist practices and thought that often exist outside the sphere of official recognition. This important book will be a starting point for dialogue about the role theological education will play as this new Christian praxis emerges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Women as Subjects of Theological Education?
ch. 2 Shaking the Foundations: The Practice of Narrativity
ch. 3 Places of Grace: The Practice of Ekklesia
ch. 4 The Warming Quilt of God: The Practice of Theology
ch. 5 A Particular Vision: New Ways of Thinking about Theological Education

Notes
Index
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Everyday Knowledge and Uncommon Truths: Women of the Academy

Book
Christian-Smith, Linda K. and Kristine S. Kellor
1999
Westview Press, Boulder, CO
LB2332.3.E84 1999
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Everyday Knowledge and Uncommon Truths: Women of the Academy draws on the life experience and varied backgrounds of academic women from the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. To provide diverse perspectives on women's experiences of being and knowing in and outside the academy, contributors draw on a range of critical approaches derived from feminism, post-structuralism, postmodernism, critical education theory, discourse theory and analysis, narrative inquiry, and life histories. (...
Additional Info:
Everyday Knowledge and Uncommon Truths: Women of the Academy draws on the life experience and varied backgrounds of academic women from the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. To provide diverse perspectives on women's experiences of being and knowing in and outside the academy, contributors draw on a range of critical approaches derived from feminism, post-structuralism, postmodernism, critical education theory, discourse theory and analysis, narrative inquiry, and life histories. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editor's Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Feminism in New Times
ch. 2 Unsettling Academic/Feminist Identity
ch. 3 Her-story: Life History as a Strategy of Resistance to Being Constituted Woman in Academe
ch. 4 Strangers in a Strange Land: A Woman Studying Women's Literacies
ch. 5 The Backlash Factor: Women, Intellectual Labour and Student Evaluation of Courses and Teaching
ch. 6 Can Feminist Voices Survive and Transform the Academy?
ch. 7 Deconstructing Feminist Pedagogy: Seeing That Which Is Ordinarily Obscured by the Familiar
ch. 8 Asian Women Leaders of Higher Education: Stories of Strength and Self Discovery
ch. 9 Dancing on the Sharp Edge of the Sword: Women Faculty of Color in White Academe
ch. 10 Negotiating Daily Life in the Academy and at Home
ch. 11 Feeling Blue, Seeing Red, and Turning Fifty: Moving in from the Margins
ch. 12 Against the Grain: Reflections on the Construction of Everyday Knowledge and Uncommon Truths

About the Editors and Contributors
Index
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Calling: Essays on Teaching in the Mother Tongue

Book
Griffin, Gail B.
1992
Trilogy Books, Pasadena, CA
LB2332.3.G75 1992
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
With a mixture of autobiographical facts and literary insights, the author (English, Kalamazoo Coll.) supports her belief that the ``motherheart must be at the center of all teaching.'' Teachers should ``create an environment where human beings can grow in and toward the fullness of themselves.'' This type of teaching is exemplified by the women teachers in higher education of the mid-1800s who, as the author found following ...
Additional Info:
With a mixture of autobiographical facts and literary insights, the author (English, Kalamazoo Coll.) supports her belief that the ``motherheart must be at the center of all teaching.'' Teachers should ``create an environment where human beings can grow in and toward the fullness of themselves.'' This type of teaching is exemplified by the women teachers in higher education of the mid-1800s who, as the author found following her ``calling'' to Kalamazoo College, were the leaders in a profession that often brings teacher and student together in crisis situations, situations that the author believes are better confronted from a feminist perspective. This is a well-written, often humorous account of one woman's entry into the feminist side of academe. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The fortunate fall
The fair arcadian hill, or "Yes there really is"
Alma mater
A rite of passage
Serafina: an angel in my house
A good and worthy voice
Man hating: voices in the dark
Teacher’s pet
Orphans of the storm: the F-word and the post-feminist generation
Vocation
A purple creature
No abstract fires: a new year’s message
Unlearning not to speak, or Why the caged bird sings
A room of one’s own revisited, or, Running away to New Jersey and other holy places
To the land of the dead and back again: my "last lecture."
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Teaching American Students: A Guide for International Faculty and Teaching Assistants

Book
Sarkisian, Ellen
1997
Harvard, Derok Bok Center, Cambridge, MA
LB1738.S371 1997
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Many faculty and graduate students from other countries expect language difficulties when they teach, but are unprepared for other surprises: different cultures make different assumptions about the academic background of college students, how students learn, the appropriate roles of teachers and students, and even the fundamental purpose of a college education.

The third edition of Teaching American Students explains the expectations of undergraduates at American colleges and universities ...
Additional Info:
Many faculty and graduate students from other countries expect language difficulties when they teach, but are unprepared for other surprises: different cultures make different assumptions about the academic background of college students, how students learn, the appropriate roles of teachers and students, and even the fundamental purpose of a college education.

The third edition of Teaching American Students explains the expectations of undergraduates at American colleges and universities and offers practical strategies for teaching, including how to give clear presentations, how to teach interactively, and how to communicate effectively. Also included are illustrative examples as well as advice from international faculty and teaching assistants. Appendices offer concrete suggestions on topics from planning the first day of class to grading papers and problem sets. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Starting out : a quick guide for beginning teachers
ch. 2 Assumptions that affect teaching in the American classroom
ch. 3 Bridging the gap : approaching your students and helping them approach you
ch. 4 Giving presentations that students can understand
ch. 5 Leading a discussion : providing direction and continuity
ch. 6 Understanding meanings beyond words
ch. 7 Appendices
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Teaching What You're Not: Identity Politics in Higher Education

Book
Mayberry, Katherine J., ed.
1996
New York University Press, New York, NY
LB2331.T427 1996
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
There was a time not long ago when the only complaints students levied against professors were that they assigned too much work or that their lectures were delivered in a soporific monotone. Today, radical changes in the composition of the university, the ongoing revision of canons and curricula, and the politicization of knowledge have profoundly altered the landscape, introducing an identity-based definition of credibility as an entirely new precondition of ...
Additional Info:
There was a time not long ago when the only complaints students levied against professors were that they assigned too much work or that their lectures were delivered in a soporific monotone. Today, radical changes in the composition of the university, the ongoing revision of canons and curricula, and the politicization of knowledge have profoundly altered the landscape, introducing an identity-based definition of credibility as an entirely new precondition of authority. As a result, questions that previous generations of educators never considered have taken on a central importance: Can whites teach African American literature effectively and legitimately? What is at issue when a man teaches a women's studies course? How effectively can a straight woman educate students about gay and lesbian history? What are the political implications of the study of the colonizers by the colonized? More generally, how does the identity of an educator affect his or her credibility with students and with other educators? In incident after well-publicized incident, these abstract questions have turned up in America's classrooms and in national media, often trivialized as the latest example of PC excess. Going beyond simplistic headlines, Teaching What You're Not broaches these and many other difficult questions. With contributions from scholars in a variety of disciplines, the book examines the ways in which historical, cultural, and personal identities impact on pedagogy and scholarship. Teaching What You're Not gets at the heart of the ongoing debates about identity politics in the academy, and society at large. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction: Identity Politics in the College Classroom, or Whose Issue Is This, Anyway? (Katherine J. Mayberry)
ch. 2 Redefining America: Literature, Multiculturalism, Pedagogy Nancy J. Peterson)
ch. 3 Straight Teacher/Queer Classroom: Teaching as an Ally Barbara Scott Winkler)
ch. 4 The Outsider's Gaze (Janet M. Powers)
ch. 5 No Middle Ground? Men Teaching Feminism (J. Scott Johnson, Jennifer Kellen, Gret Seibert, Celia Shaughnessy)
ch. 6 The Discipline of History and the Demands of Identity Politics (Christie Farnham)
ch. 7 Teaching What I'm Not: An Able-Bodied Woman Teaches Literature by Women with Disabilities (Barbara Dibernard)
ch. 8 Theory, Practice, and the Battered (Woman) Teacher (Celeste M. Condit)
ch. 9 Teaching What the Truth Compels You to Teach: A Historian's View (Jacqueline Jones)
ch. 10 Pro/(Con)fessing Otherness: Trans(cending)national Identities in the English Classroom (Lavina Dhingra Shankar)
ch. 11 Caliban in the Classroom (Indira Karamcheti)
ch. 12 A Paradox of Silence: Reflections of a Man Who Teaches Women's Studies (Craig W. Heller)
ch. 13 Teaching in the Multiracial Classroom: Reconsidering "Benito Cereno" (Robert S. Levine)
ch. 14 "Young Man, Tell Our Stories of How We Made It Over": Beyond the Politics of Identity (Gary L. Lemons)
ch. 15 Disciplines and Their Discomforts: The Challenges of Study and Service Abroad (Gerard Aching)
ch. 16 Scratching Heads: The Importance of Sensitivity in an Analysis of "Others" Donna J. Watson)
ch. 17 Who Holds the Mirror? Creating "the Consciousness of Others" (Mary Elizabeth Lanser)
ch. 18 Daughters of the Dust, the White Woman Viewer, and the Unborn Child (Renee R. Curry)

Contributors
Index
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God's Fierce Whimsy: Christian Feminism and Theological Education

Book
Mud Flower Collective
1985
Pilgrim Press, Cleveland, OH
BT704.G63 1985
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Theological Education   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
This book is the written record of seven feminists' commitment to practice what they preach-to make incarnate both the fierce and the whimsical character of that which is born in every shared effort to teach and learn with minds set on justice. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This book is the written record of seven feminists' commitment to practice what they preach-to make incarnate both the fierce and the whimsical character of that which is born in every shared effort to teach and learn with minds set on justice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 In Search of Common Ground
ch. 2 Can We Be Different But Not Alienated? An Exchange of Letters
ch. 3 In My Voice You Will Hear Pain
ch. 4 Our God-Stories: Sharing Images
ch. 5 The Shape and Significance of Feminist Theology: A Christian Perspective
ch. 6 Trashing the Terrible, Titillating Lesbian: Dialoguing on Sexuality
ch. 7 The Mud and the Flower

Notes
Selected Bibliography
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Dialogues for Diversity: Community and Ethnicity on Campus

Book
Kramer, Martin and Stephen Weiner
1994
Oryx Press, Phoenix, AZ
LC3727.D53 1994
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Provides organized materials intended to help groups of individuals on campus toward focused discussions of the role of ethnic diversity in the daily life of colleges and universities. The (welcome) aim is to help such groups find their own common ground, not to tell them what that common ground should be. Produced by the Project on Campus Community and Diversity of the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of ...
Additional Info:
Provides organized materials intended to help groups of individuals on campus toward focused discussions of the role of ethnic diversity in the daily life of colleges and universities. The (welcome) aim is to help such groups find their own common ground, not to tell them what that common ground should be. Produced by the Project on Campus Community and Diversity of the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Participants in the Development of Dialogues for Diversity
A Note to Users

Topic One: Mission and Diversity
Topic Two: The Social Context
Topic Three: Diversity and Quality
Topic Four: Community and Campus Climate
Topic Five: Student Development and Ethnic Identity
Topic Six: The Faculty Role
Topic Seven: Leadership for Diversity
Topic Eight: Planning and Conducting

Discussions of Ethnic Diversity
Index
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Multicultural Teaching in the University

Book
Schoem, David, Linda Frankel, Ximena Zuniga
1993
Praeger, Westport, CT
LC1099.3.M86 1993
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This important book includes more than twenty essays by faculty from different disciplines, each articulating the multiple dimensions and components of multicultural teaching. Teachers discuss their own teaching methods and classes in terms of course content, process and discourse, and diversity among faculty and students in the classroom. This volume integrates new scholarship that reflects a more expansive notion of knowledge, and suggests new ways to communicate with diverse populations ...
Additional Info:
This important book includes more than twenty essays by faculty from different disciplines, each articulating the multiple dimensions and components of multicultural teaching. Teachers discuss their own teaching methods and classes in terms of course content, process and discourse, and diversity among faculty and students in the classroom. This volume integrates new scholarship that reflects a more expansive notion of knowledge, and suggests new ways to communicate with diverse populations of students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

Part 1 The Meaning of Multicultural Teaching: An Introduction

Part 2 Courses on Intergroup Relations
ch. 1 Teaching About Ethnic Identity and Intergroup Relations
ch. 2 Continuing the Legacy: On the Importance of Praxis in the Education of Social Work Students and Teachers
ch. 3 Teaching With and About Conflict in the Classroom
ch. 4 Latinos in the United States: A Framework for Teaching
ch. 5 Reflections on the Teaching of Multicultural Courses

Part 3 Courses on Racism, Sexism, and Diversity
ch. 6 Anti-Racism and Multiculturalism in a Law School Class
ch. 7 Our Lives, Our Histories
ch. 8 "A Circle of Learners": Teaching About Gender, Race, and Class ch. 9 Multicultural Teaching in Public Health: A Course on Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Health
ch. 10 The Latina: A Teaching Experience
ch. 11 Lesbian Studies and Multicultural Teaching: A Challenge in Diversity
ch. 12 The 1988 Presidential Campaign and Multicultural Education

Part 4 General Courses Giving Attention to Diversity
ch. 13 Seeing the Whole of the Moon
ch. 14 How I Teach Mathematics to Minorities
ch. 15 Racial Bias in Science Education
ch. 16 Waking Up to the World: A Multicultural Approach to Writing
ch. 17 Should and Can a White, Heterosexual, Middle-Class Man Teach Students About Social Inequality and Oppression? One Person's Experience and Reflections
ch. 18 On Engaging Students in a Multicultural Course on a Global Scale: Risks, Costs, and Rewards
ch. 19 Social Psychology

Part 5 Teacher Training and Nonformal Education
ch. 20 Dialogue Groups: An Innovative Approach to Multicultural Learning
ch. 21 Combating Homophobia Through Education
ch. 22 FAIRteach: Faculty Development on Issues of Racism and Diversity
ch. 23 Constructing a Teaching Assistant Training Program with a Multicultural Emphasis

Part 6 Roundtable Discussion: The Insiders' Critique of Multicultural Teaching

Part 7 Questions and Responses on Multicultural Teaching and Conflict in the Classroom

Part 8 Classroom and Workshop Exercises

Selected Bibliography
Index
About the Contributors
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Teaching the Bible: The Discourses and Politics of Biblical Pedagogy

Book
Segovia, Fernando F. and Mary Ann Tolbert, eds.
1998
Orbis Books, Maryknoll, NY
BS600.2.T44 1998
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
This volume gathers together papers from a broad variety of voices in biblical criticism and theological studies. The papers are divided into four major sections in keeping with their major concerns and aims: Biblical interpretation and theological education, social location and Biblical pedagogy in the US, social location and Biblical pedagogy in global perspective, and Biblical interpretation. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This volume gathers together papers from a broad variety of voices in biblical criticism and theological studies. The papers are divided into four major sections in keeping with their major concerns and aims: Biblical interpretation and theological education, social location and Biblical pedagogy in the US, social location and Biblical pedagogy in global perspective, and Biblical interpretation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Pedagogical Discourse and Practices in Contemporary Biblical Criticism

Part I Biblical Interpretation and Theological Education
ch. 1 Theological Education in a New Context: Reflections from the Perspective of Brazilian Theology (Paulo Fernando Carneiro de Andrade)
ch. 2 Constructive Theology and Biblical Worlds (Peter Hodgson)
ch. 3 Globalization in Theological Education (Joseph C. Hough, Jr.)
ch. 4 Jesus/the Native: Biblical Studies from a Postcolonial Perspective (Kwok Pui-lan)
ch. 5 Four Faces of Theology: Four Johannine Conversations (Jean-Pierre Ruiz)

Part II Social Location and Biblical Pedagogy in the United States
ch. 6 Crossing the Line: Three Scenes of Divine-Human Engagement in the Hebrew Bible (Francisco Garcia-Treto)
ch. 7 Reading from an Indigenous Place (Mark Lewis Taylor)
ch. 8 Pedagogical Discourse and Practices in Cultural Studies: Toward a Contextual Biblical Pedagogy (Fernando F. Segovia)
ch. 9 A New Teaching with Authority: A Re-evaluation of the Authority of the Bible (Mary Ann Tolbert)
ch. 10 A Meeting of Worlds: African Americans and the Bible (Vincent L. Wimbush)

Part III Social Location and Biblical Pedagogy in Global Perspective
ch. 11 A Reading of the Story of the Tower of Babel from the Perspective of Non-Identity: Gen 11:1-9 in the Context of Its Production (J. Severino Croatto)
ch. 12 "Go Therefore and Make Disciples of All Nations" (Matt 28:19a): A Postcolonial Perspective on Biblical Criticism and Pedagogy (Musa W. Duba)
ch. 13 Cross-Textual Interpretation and Its Implications for Biblical Studies (Archie C. C. Lee)
ch. 14 Biblical Exegesis and Its Shortcomings in Theological Education (Temba L. J. Mafico)
ch. 15 The Hermeneutics of Liberation: Theoretical Grounding for the Communitarian Reading of the Bible (Pablo Richard)
ch. 16 Biblical Studies in India: From Imperialistic Scholarship to Postcolonial Interpretation (R.S. Sugirtharajah)

Part IV Biblical Interpretation: Pedagogical Practices
ch. 17 A Rhetorical Paradigm for Pedagogy (Rebecca S. Chopp)
ch. 18 Reading the Bible in the Global Context: Issues in Methodology and Pedagogy (Denise Dombkowski Hopkins, Sharon H. Ringe, and Frederick C. Tiffany)
ch. 19 Crossing Borders: Biblical Studies in a Trans-Cultural World (Kathleen M. O'Connor)
ch. 20 Weaving a New Web of Creative Remembering (Elaine M. Wainwright)
ch. 21 Lessons for North America from a Third-World Seminary (Antoinette Clark Wire)

Contributors
Index
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The Education Feminism Reader

Book
Stone, Lynda, ed.
1994
Routledge, New York, NY
LC197.E37 1994
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
The Education Feminism Reader is an anthology of the most important and influential essays written in feminist education theory since the late seventies. Attentive to the quality and diversity of this growing field, The Reader presents the thinking of traditionally liberal feminists, radical postmodern theorists, women of color and those feminists with psychological, philosophical and political agendas.

Contributors: Maxine Greene, Carol Gilligan, Bonnie Thornton Dill, Valerie Walkerdine, Linda ...
Additional Info:
The Education Feminism Reader is an anthology of the most important and influential essays written in feminist education theory since the late seventies. Attentive to the quality and diversity of this growing field, The Reader presents the thinking of traditionally liberal feminists, radical postmodern theorists, women of color and those feminists with psychological, philosophical and political agendas.

Contributors: Maxine Greene, Carol Gilligan, Bonnie Thornton Dill, Valerie Walkerdine, Linda J. Nicholson, Madeleine Arnot, Jane Roland Martin, Barbara Houston, Ruth E. Zambrana, Madeleine Gramet, Nel Noddings, Patricia J. Thompson, Nona Lyons, Lynda Stone, Barbara McKellar, Patti Lather, Jo Anne Pagano, Sue Middleton, Elizabeth Ellsworth, Dianne Smith, Joyce E. King, Deanne Bogdan. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Notes to the Text
Introducing Education Feminism
ch. 1 The Lived World (1978) (Maxine Greene)
ch. 2 Woman's Place in Man's Life Cycle (1979) (Carol Gilligan)
ch. 3 Race, Class, and Gender: Prospects for an All-Inclusive Sisterhood (1983) (Bonnie Thornton Dill)
ch. 4 Femininity as Performance (1987) (Valerie Walkerdine)
ch. 5 Women and Schooling (1980) (Linda J. Nicholson)
ch. 6 Male Hegemony, Social Class, and Women's Education (1982) (Madeleine Arnot)
ch. 7 Excluding Women from the Educational Realm (1982) (Jane Roland Martin)
ch. 8 Should Public Education be Gender Free? (1985) (Barbara Houston)
ch. 9 Toward Understanding the Educational Trajectory and Socialization of Latina Women (1988) (Ruth E. Zambrana)
ch. 10 Conception, Contradiction, and Curriculum (1988) (Madeleine Gramet)
ch. 11 An Ethic of Caring and its Implications for Instructional Arrangements (1988) (Nel Noddings)
ch. 12 Beyond Gender: Equity Issues for Home Economics Education (1986) (Patricia J. Thompson)
ch. 13 Dilemmas of Knowing: Ethical and Epistemological Dimensions of Teachers' Work and Development (1990) (Nona Lyons)
ch. 14 Toward a Transformational Theory of Teaching (1988) (Lynda Stone)
ch. 15 Only the Fittest of the Fittest Will Survive: Black Women and Education (1989) (Barbara McKellar)
ch. 16 The Absent Presence: Patriarchy, Capitalism, and the Nature of Teacher Work (1987) (Pattie Lather)
ch. 17 Teaching Women (1988) (Jo Anne Pagano)
ch. 18 Schooling and Radicalisation: Life Histories of New Zealand Feminist Teachers (1987) (Sue Middleton)
ch. 19 Why Doesn't this Feel Empowering? Working Through the Repressive Myths of Critical Pedagogy (1989) (Elizabeth Ellsworth)
ch. 20 "Why Do We have to Read About Girls Living in Australia and London?": Reflections from a Womanist Theorist on Critical Education (1991) (Dianne Smith)
ch. 21 Dysconscious Racism: Ideology, Identity, and the Miseducation of Teachers (1991) (Joyce E. King)
ch. 22 When Is a Singing School (Not) a Chorus? The Emancipatory Agenda in Feminist Pedagogy and Literature Education (1993) (Deanne Bogdan)
Index
Contributors
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Empowering Women in Higher Education

Book
Wisker, Gina
1996
Kogan Page, London
LC2046.W57 1996
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
The issue of women's status in higher education continues to be contested. Building on her experience as a teacher in higher education and as a staff developer, the author discusses successful practices which have empowered women, and examines the issues which concern women students and staff in higher education. The first part focuses on women students, their needs and experiences and the changes to courses, teaching and learning practices which ...
Additional Info:
The issue of women's status in higher education continues to be contested. Building on her experience as a teacher in higher education and as a staff developer, the author discusses successful practices which have empowered women, and examines the issues which concern women students and staff in higher education. The first part focuses on women students, their needs and experiences and the changes to courses, teaching and learning practices which encourage women's learning. The second part examines women staff and issues such as recruitment, training, promotion and balancing teaching pressures with family life. Gina Wisker's book is essential reading for all women working in higher education, from graduate students to full professors, for staff development groups and administrators, and men teaching women students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Section A: Towards Women-centred Teaching Strategies
ch. 1 Women Students and Mature Women Returners: Needs and Developments
ch. 2 The Curriculum and Change
ch. 3 Women-centred Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategies
ch. 4 Women's Studies Courses
ch. 5 Women's Studies: Specific Case Studies
Section B: What's So Special About Women in Higher Education?
ch. 6 Pyramids and Glass Ceilings: Women's Positions in Higher Education and the Management House
ch. 7 Women as Managers
ch. 8 Assertiveness, Confidence-building and Positive Interactions
ch. 9 Leadership Issues
ch. 10 Women Chairing Meetings and Supervising Others
ch. 11 Managing the Balancing Act
ch. 12 Conclusion
Index
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Gendered Subjects: The Dynamics of Feminist Teaching

Book
Cully, Margo and Catherine Portuges
1985
Routledge, Boston, MA
LC1756.G46 1985
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Two decades after the first Women's Studies courses appeared on campuses in the US, feminist research and teaching are now thriving around the world. The editors of this book provide a rich sample of theoretical and practical reflections on classroom experience by teachers of Women's Studies over the past ten years, raising provocative questions which apply broadly to many areas of progressive teaching. The collection features new, unpublished and original ...
Additional Info:
Two decades after the first Women's Studies courses appeared on campuses in the US, feminist research and teaching are now thriving around the world. The editors of this book provide a rich sample of theoretical and practical reflections on classroom experience by teachers of Women's Studies over the past ten years, raising provocative questions which apply broadly to many areas of progressive teaching. The collection features new, unpublished and original work as well as a selection of the best articles to have appeared in recent years. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Part one - Frameworks and definitions
ch. 1 The politics of nurturance
ch. 2 Taking women students seriously
ch. 3 Classroom pedagogy and the new scholarship on women
ch. 4 Women's studies - a knowledge of one's own
ch. 5 The educational process of Women's Studies in Argentina - reflections on theory and technique
Part two - Transforming the disciplines
ch. 6 Feminist pedagogy as subversive activity
ch. 7 Teaching mediation - a feminist perspective on the study of law
ch. 8 Staging the feminist classroom - a theoretical model
Part three - Teaching as other
ch. 9 Pink elephants - confessions of a black feminist in an all white, mostly male English department...
ch. 10 Is there room for me in the closet, or my life as the only lesbian professor
ch. 11 A male feminist in a women's college classroom
Part four - Experience as text
ch. 12 Breaking silences - life in the feminist classroom
ch. 13 Black-eyed blues connections - teaching black women
Part five - Theory as text
ch. 14 Suspicious pleasures - on teaching feminist theory
ch. 15 The spectacle of gender - cinema and psyche
ch. 16 Mastery, identity and the politics of work - a feminist teacher in the graduate classroom
Part six - Authority and affect
ch. 17 Authority in the feminist classroom - a contradiction in terms?
ch. 18 Anger and authority in the introductory Women's Studies classroom
Part seven - Communication across differences
ch. 19 How racial differences helped us discover our common ground
ch. 20 Toward a pedagogy of Everywoman's Studies
ch. 21 Combating the marginalization of black women in the classroom
ch. 22 Teaching the feminist minority
Pedagogy of the oppressors?
Bibliography
Index
Article cover image

"Academic Culture: The Hidden Curriculum"

Article
Adams, Maurianne
1991
Teaching Excellence 3, no. 6 (1991)
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Teaching Authority in Cultural Perspective"

Article
Foster, Charles R.
1992
Quarterly Review (Fall 1992): 27-38
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Ethnic Studies, Women's Studies, and Multiculturalism"

Article
Butler, Johnnella, and Betty Schmitz
1992
Change Jan/Feb (1992): 37-41
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
This article discusses the evolution and impact of ethnic and women's studies on college campuses, noting the existence of about 700 ethnic and 620 women's studies programs. It responds to common criticisms (e.g., such programs emphasize differences and thus foster divisiveness) and notes challenges, both personal and institutional, offered by these programs.
Additional Info:
This article discusses the evolution and impact of ethnic and women's studies on college campuses, noting the existence of about 700 ethnic and 620 women's studies programs. It responds to common criticisms (e.g., such programs emphasize differences and thus foster divisiveness) and notes challenges, both personal and institutional, offered by these programs.
Article cover image

"Interactive Phases of Curricular and Personal Re-Vision with Regard to Race"

Article
McIntosh, Peggy
1990
Working Paper no. 219, Center for Research on Women, Wellesley College (1990)
Topics: Course Design   |   Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
Most white, middle-class citizens see society from a monocultural perspective, a perspective that assumes, often unconsciously, that persons of all races are in the same cultural system together. This single-system form of seeing the world, is blind to its own cultural specificity. People who see persons of other races monoculturally cannot imagine the reality that those "others" think of themselves not in relation to the majority race but in terms ...
Additional Info:
Most white, middle-class citizens see society from a monocultural perspective, a perspective that assumes, often unconsciously, that persons of all races are in the same cultural system together. This single-system form of seeing the world, is blind to its own cultural specificity. People who see persons of other races monoculturally cannot imagine the reality that those "others" think of themselves not in relation to the majority race but in terms of their own culturally specific identities. This paper presents an "interactive phase theory" with regard to race that is intended to reassess school curricula in terms of heightened levels of consciousness concerning race. In the context of U.S. history courses, five phases are presented: phase one: all-white history; phase two: exceptional minority individuals in U.S. history; phase three: minority issues, or minority groups as problems, anomalies, absences, or victims in U.S. history; phase four: the lives and cultures of people of color everywhere as history; and phase five: history redefined and reconstructed to include all people. (DB)
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"White Privilege and Male Privilege: A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences Through Work in Women's Studies"

Article
McIntosh, Peggy
1988
Working Paper No. 189, Center for Research on Women, Wellesley College (1988)
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
In much the same way that men are not taught to acknowledge all the ways they are privileged in society, whites are not taught to recognize how their status as white people confers on them many privileges. Arguing that male privilege and white privilege are interrelated, and that both types of privilege are unearned and unjustified, this paper begins by reviewing several layers of denial that men have about their ...
Additional Info:
In much the same way that men are not taught to acknowledge all the ways they are privileged in society, whites are not taught to recognize how their status as white people confers on them many privileges. Arguing that male privilege and white privilege are interrelated, and that both types of privilege are unearned and unjustified, this paper begins by reviewing several layers of denial that men have about their privilege and that work to protect, prevent awareness about, and entrench that privilege. The paper goes on to present parallels from one woman's personal experience, with the denials that veil the facts of white privilege. Forty-six ordinary and daily ways in which this one individual experiences having white privilege within her life situation and its particular social and political frameworks, are listed, and ways in which the list applies equally to heterosexual privilege are also pointed out. It is concluded that all the various interlocking oppressions take two forms: an active form which can be seen; and an embedded form which members of the dominant group are taught not to see. To redesign the social system therefore requires acknowledgement of its colossal unseen dimensions. (DB)
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"Issues in Achieving Pluralism in Faculty Development: The Challenge and Opportunity of Inclusivity"

Article
Berling, Judith
1991
Theological Education 28, no. 1: 47-57
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Berling discusses pluralism as one criterion of excellence for theological schools. She acknowledges the challenge to the very idea of excellence implicit in pluralism and thus the need to define adequate standards of excellence. She also indicates a concern with the education of faculties prepared to deal with issues of pluralism.
Additional Info:
Berling discusses pluralism as one criterion of excellence for theological schools. She acknowledges the challenge to the very idea of excellence implicit in pluralism and thus the need to define adequate standards of excellence. She also indicates a concern with the education of faculties prepared to deal with issues of pluralism.
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"Who Gets Heard?: Talking at Meetings"

Article
Tannen, Deborah
1994
in Talking from 9 to 5 (New York: William Morrow, 1994), 276-304
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Intended to help individuals as well as companies thrive in a working world made up of increasingly diverse work forces and ever more competitive markets, this book addresses the differences in men's and women's speaking styles, without maintaining the superiority of any one style of speaking. Reinforced with extensive examples drawn from research, the book offers new ways of understanding what happens in the workplace, ranging from the simplest exchanges ...
Additional Info:
Intended to help individuals as well as companies thrive in a working world made up of increasingly diverse work forces and ever more competitive markets, this book addresses the differences in men's and women's speaking styles, without maintaining the superiority of any one style of speaking. Reinforced with extensive examples drawn from research, the book offers new ways of understanding what happens in the workplace, ranging from the simplest exchanges to the most complex contemporary issues of the glass ceiling and sexual harassment. The book notes that sex differences exist even in the college classroom, where men and women exhibit different behavior in learning situations--men ask fewer questions but interrupt others more often in traditional classrooms and often find themselves designated as "spokesperson" in small group class discussions even when they are outnumbered by women. Chapters in the book are: (1) Women and Men Talking on the Job; (2) "I'm Sorry, I'm Not Apologizing": Conversational Rituals; (3) "Why Don't You Say What You Mean?": Indirectness at Work; (4) Marked: Women in the Workplace; (5) The Glass Ceiling; (6) "She's the Boss": Women and Authority; (7) Talking Up Close: Status and Connection; (8) What's Sex Got to Do with It?; and (9) Who Gets Heard?: Talking at Meetings. The book includes both a preface and an afterword by the author, as well as extensive notes and references.
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"Diversity and Community: Right Objectives and Wrong Arguments"

Article
Wong, Frank F.
1991
Change July/Aug (1991): 48-54
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Discusses the conflicting arguments among cultural diversity advocates with respect to community. Allegorical tale; Arguments among cultural diversity advocates; Relativism and separatism; Highest vs. lowest common denominator; Three ways in which the sense of community can be claimed by the cause of cultural diversity.
Additional Info:
Discusses the conflicting arguments among cultural diversity advocates with respect to community. Allegorical tale; Arguments among cultural diversity advocates; Relativism and separatism; Highest vs. lowest common denominator; Three ways in which the sense of community can be claimed by the cause of cultural diversity.
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"Educational Process, Feminist Practice"

Article
Chopp, Rebecca S.
1995
Christian Century (Feb 1-8, 1995): 111-115
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Concentrating on the "practices" of Christianity enables us to think about education in new ways. Identifying practices as the sites of learning in theological education allows us to avoid some common "divisions" in thinking about education and calls for the development of new language to name the process of education.
Additional Info:
Concentrating on the "practices" of Christianity enables us to think about education in new ways. Identifying practices as the sites of learning in theological education allows us to avoid some common "divisions" in thinking about education and calls for the development of new language to name the process of education.
Cover image
Wabash tree

The Feminist Teacher Anthology: Pedagogies and Classroom Strategies

Book
Cohee, Gail E., Elisabeth Daumer, Theresa D. Kemp, Paula M. Krebs, Sue Lafky, and Sandra Runzo, eds.
1998
Teachers College Press, New York, NY
LC197.F478 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Learning Designs   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Each selected essay is introduced by its original author who updates the chapter topic. Drawing on examples from their own experiences, the authors provide practical classroom strategies such as readings and resources, writing assignments, classroom exercises, and guidance for using journals, multimedia workshops, and new technologies. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Each selected essay is introduced by its original author who updates the chapter topic. Drawing on examples from their own experiences, the authors provide practical classroom strategies such as readings and resources, writing assignments, classroom exercises, and guidance for using journals, multimedia workshops, and new technologies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Collectively Speaking

Part I - Encountering the Classroom: Developing Feminist Strategies
ch. 1 The Radicalization of a Teacher (Carla Golden)
ch. 2 My Introduction to "Introduction to Women's Studies:" The Role of the Teacher's Authority in the Feminist Classroom (Frances A. Maher)
ch. 3 Warming Up the Classroom Climate for Women (Sue V. Rosser)
ch. 4 Rewriting the Future: The Feminist Challenge to the Malestream Curriculum (Karen J. Warren)
ch. 5 Resistance to Generalizations in the Classroom (Susanne Bohmer)
ch. 6 The Power of No (Martha E. Thompson)
ch. 7 Reflections on Teaching: "Gender, Race, and Class" (Joy James)
ch. 8 Reshaping the Introductory Women's Studies Course: Dealing Up Front with Anger, Resistance, and Reality (Ardeth Deay, and Judith Stitzel)
ch. 9 Enhancing Feminist Pedagogy. Multimedia Workshops on Women's Experience with the Newspaper and Home (Berenice Fisher)
ch. 10 This Class Meets in Cyberspace: Women's Studies via Distance Education (Ellen Cronan Rose)

Part II - Bringing The World Into The Feminist Classroom
ch. 11 Integrating the Study of Race, Gender, and Class: Some Preliminary Observations (Paula Rothenberg)
ch. 12 Homophobia and Sexism as Popular Values (David Bleich)
ch. 13 Breaking the Silence: Sexual Preference in the Composition Classroom (Allison Berg, Jean Kowaleski, Caroline Le Guin, Ellen Weinauer, and Eric A. Wolfe)
ch. 14 A Discourse on the Care and Handling of Feminist Administrators (Lynette Carpenter)
ch. 15 The Hand and the Hammer: A Brief Critique of the Overhead Projector (Eloise Knowlton)
ch. 16 Lesbian Instructor Comes Out: The Personal Is Pedagogy (Janet Wright)
ch. 17 Would You Rather Be a Goddess or a Cyborg? (Suzanne K. Damarin)
ch. 18 Educating the Living, Remembering the Dead: The Montreal Massacre as Metaphor (Jennifer Scanlon)
ch. 19 Gender, Race, and Radicalism: Teaching the Autobiographies of Native and African American Women Activists (Joy James)

Index
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The Multicultural Campus: Strategies for Transforming Higher Education

Book
Valverde, Leonard A. and Louis A. Castenell Jr., eds.
1998
AltaMira Press, Walnut Creek, CA
LC3727.M83 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
The Multicultural Campus brings together administrators, faculty, and students to offer strategies that will alter the academic environment of the future. Hispanic, African, and Asian American educational leaders examine the obstacles they have faced, as minorities, climbing up the predominantly white career ladder in American universities. Firsthand accounts show how change on governance, executive, faculty, and curricula levels will help us better educate all students in our nation's growing pluralistic ...
Additional Info:
The Multicultural Campus brings together administrators, faculty, and students to offer strategies that will alter the academic environment of the future. Hispanic, African, and Asian American educational leaders examine the obstacles they have faced, as minorities, climbing up the predominantly white career ladder in American universities. Firsthand accounts show how change on governance, executive, faculty, and curricula levels will help us better educate all students in our nation's growing pluralistic society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

Part I Introduction and Overview
Introduction: Presenting the Context
ch. 1 Future Strategies and Actions: Creating Multicultural Higher Education Campuses (Leonard A. Valverde)

Part II Administrators' Perspectives
ch. 2 Challenges and Opportunities for Leaders of Color (Chang-Lin Tien)
ch. 3 External Agents Fostering Multiculturalism (Howard L. Simmons)
ch. 4 Race and Ethnicity in Academia (Enrique (Henry) T. Trueba)
ch. 5 Campus Climate and Students of Color (Myrtis H. Powell)

Part III Faculty Perspectives
ch. 6 Career Patterns of People of Color in Academia (Flora Ida Ortiz)
ch. 7 Leading from the Margins in the Ivory Tower (A. Reynaldo Conteras
ch. 8 African American Women Faculty and Administrators: Surviving the Multiple Barriers of Discrimination (Vanessa Allen-Brown

Part IV Student Perspective
ch. 9 An African Student's View of Educational Leadership (Abayomi Adejokun)

About the Authors
Index
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Special Theme Issue: Education and Race

Journal Issue
Teachers College Record
1999
Teachers College Record 100, no. 4, Summer
LC191.2.E3 1999
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 A Movement Against and Beyond Boundaries: Politically Relevant Teaching Among African American Teachers (Tamara Beauboeuf-Lafontant)
ch. 2 How White Teachers Perceive the Problem of Racism in Their Schools: A Case Study in "Liberal" Lakeview (Julie Kailin)
ch. 3 Theorizing Race in the Context of Learning to Teach (Luann M. Duesterberg)
ch. 4 Shifting Identities in Private Education: Reconstructing Race at/in the Cultural Center (Amir Proweller)
ch. 5 Teaching in Tensions: Latino Immigrant Youth, Their Teachers, and the Structures of Schooling (Susan Roberta Katz)
ch. 6 "You Can't Oppress Yourself": Negotiating the Meaning of Opportunity in Post-Apartheid South Africa (Janine Bempechat, and Salie Abrahams)

Essay Review ch. 7 What Is "Racism" in Antiracist Education? (Lawrence Blum)
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The African American Student's Guide to Surviving Graduate School

Book
Isaac, Alicia
1998
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA
LC2781.7.I83 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
What does it take to get into and through graduate school? What special challenges, opportunities, and issues face an African American graduate student? The African American Student's Guide to Surviving Graduate School offers a practical roadmap to help African American students get the most out of their graduate school experience. The book covers a number of issues, including creating a program of study, financial aid, and the dissertation process. Author ...
Additional Info:
What does it take to get into and through graduate school? What special challenges, opportunities, and issues face an African American graduate student? The African American Student's Guide to Surviving Graduate School offers a practical roadmap to help African American students get the most out of their graduate school experience. The book covers a number of issues, including creating a program of study, financial aid, and the dissertation process. Author Alicia Isaac thoroughly covers the entire graduate process, offering case studies, anecdotes, words of wisdom from prominent African Americans, checklists, and self-assessment scales to provide a useful guide for students involved in or considering graduate study. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Graduate School Is...
ch. 2 Making the Right Choice about Where To Go to Graduate School and Getting in with Money
ch. 3 Developing a Master Plan
ch. 4 Staying in the Game
ch. 5 Know When to Leave the Party
ch. 6 A Handbook for Mastering the Moves
ch. 7 Selecting and Managing Your Major Professor and Advisory Committee
ch. 8 Getting Through the Thesis or Dissertation
ch. 9 Surviving the Defense
ch. 10 Looking Back and Moving Forward
ch. 11 When Racism Rears Its Ugly Head
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Wabash tree

Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia

Book
Toth, Emily
1997
University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, PA
LB2332.3.T68 1997
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
In question-and-answer form, Ms. Mentor advises academic women about issues they daren't discuss openly, such as: How does one really clamber onto the tenure track when the job market is so nasty, brutish, and small? Is there such a thing as the perfectly marketable dissertation topic? How does a meek young woman become a tiger of an authority figure in the classroom and get stupendous teaching evaluations? How does one ...
Additional Info:
In question-and-answer form, Ms. Mentor advises academic women about issues they daren't discuss openly, such as: How does one really clamber onto the tenure track when the job market is so nasty, brutish, and small? Is there such a thing as the perfectly marketable dissertation topic? How does a meek young woman become a tiger of an authority figure in the classroom and get stupendous teaching evaluations? How does one cope with sexual harassment, grandiosity, and bizarre behavior from entrenched colleagues? Ms. Mentor's readers will find answers to the secret queries they were afraid to ask anyone else. They'll discover what it really takes to get tenure; what to wear to academic occasions; when to snicker, when to hide, what to eat, and when to sue. They'll find out how to get firmly planted in the rich red earth of tenure. Ms. Mentor's wisdom grows out of many a real-life experience: she guarantees that some readers will squirm. She lavishly dispenses witty advice, and valuable information, while despising psychobabble, postcomprehensible jargon, and pontification by anyone other than herself. She also insists that sisterhood is, and must be, powerful. Readers of Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia are in for an unusual treat. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Graduate School: The Rite of Passage
ch. 2 The Job Hunt
ch. 3 The Conference Scence
ch. 4 First Year on the Job
ch. 5 The Perils and Pleasures of Teaching
ch. 6 When Cultures Collide
ch. 7 Muddles and Puzzles
ch. 8 Slouching Toward Tenure
ch. 9 Post-Tenure
ch. 10 Emerita: The Golden Years
ch. 11 Final Words

Bibliography: Women in Academia and Other Readings Sampled by Ms. Mentor
Index
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Women and Minority Faculty in the Academic Workplace : Recruitment, Retention, and Academic Culture

Book
Aguirre, Adalberto, Jr.
2000
ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report Volume 27, no. 6, George Washington Univ. Press, Washington, D.C.
LB2332.3.A35 2000
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
An ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report. This report's theoretical approach,...argumentation,...and presentation provide valuable insight into one of the major issues facing higher education. The manuscript's strength [lies in the detailed descriptions of the experiences of women and minority faculty. The report will be of great value not only to decision makers on individual campuses, but also for those policy makers at the state level. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
An ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report. This report's theoretical approach,...argumentation,...and presentation provide valuable insight into one of the major issues facing higher education. The manuscript's strength [lies in the detailed descriptions of the experiences of women and minority faculty. The report will be of great value not only to decision makers on individual campuses, but also for those policy makers at the state level. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The Status of Women and Minority Faculty: Changing or Unchanging?
The Academic Workplace
The Academic Workplace for Women and Minority Faculty
Issues Facing Women and Minority Faculty
Summary Observations and Suggestions
Book cover image

Insider, Outsider and Gender Identities in the Religion Classroom

Book
Patton, Laurie L., ed.
1997
Spotlight on Teaching 5, no. 2 November
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Insider, Outsider, and Gender Identities in the Religion Classroom (Laurie L. Patton) ch. 2 Crossovers and Cross-ups: A Cautionary (NancyFalk)
ch. 3 Mindfield or Mindfield: Teaching Religion in a Multicultural Classroom (Zayn R. Kassam)
ch. 4 Taking Myself Seriously: Transformation of a Working Pedagogical Model (Marcia Y. Riggs)
ch. 5 Spotlight on Teaching: Insider/Outsider (Francisca Cho)
ch. 6 Holy Shock at Sacred Cities: "Rocks Are not my Problem" "Why aren't Women Allowed to make the Pilgrimage to Mecca?" (Kimberly Patton)
ch. 7 Teaching Critical Theory (Miriam Peskowitz)
Cover image

Race Matters

Book
West, Cornel
1993
Beacon Press, Boston, MA
E185.615.W43 1993
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
First published in 1993 on the one-year anniversary of the L.A. riots, Race Matters has since become an American classic. Beacon Press is proud to present this hardcover edition with a new introduction by Cornel West. The issues that it addresses are as controversial and urgent as before, and West's insights remain fresh, exciting, and timely. Now more than ever, Race Matters is a book for all Americans—one that ...
Additional Info:
First published in 1993 on the one-year anniversary of the L.A. riots, Race Matters has since become an American classic. Beacon Press is proud to present this hardcover edition with a new introduction by Cornel West. The issues that it addresses are as controversial and urgent as before, and West's insights remain fresh, exciting, and timely. Now more than ever, Race Matters is a book for all Americans—one that will help us build a genuine multiracial democracy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface 1993
Introduction: Race Matters

ch. 1 Nihilism in Black America
ch. 2 The Pitfalls of Racial Reasoning
ch. 3 The Crisis of Black Leadership
ch. 4 Demystifying the New Black Conservatism
ch. 5 Beyond Affirmative Action: Equality and Identity
ch. 6 On Black-Jewish Relations
ch. 7 Black Sexuality: The Taboo Subject
ch. 8 Malcolm X and Black Rage

Epilogue
Article cover image

"Why Doesn't This Feel Empowering? Working Through the Repressive Myths of Critical Pedagogy"

Article
Ellsworth, Elizabeth
1989
Harvard Educational Review 59, no. 3 (1989): 297-324
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Elizabeth Ellsworth finds that critical pedagogy, as represented in her review of the literature, has developed along a highly abstract and Utopian line which does not necessarily sustain the daily workings of the education its supporters advocate. The author maintains that the discourse of critical pedagogy is based on rationalist assumptions that give rise to repressive myths. Ellsworth argues that if these assumptions, goals, implicit power dynamics, and issues of ...
Additional Info:
Elizabeth Ellsworth finds that critical pedagogy, as represented in her review of the literature, has developed along a highly abstract and Utopian line which does not necessarily sustain the daily workings of the education its supporters advocate. The author maintains that the discourse of critical pedagogy is based on rationalist assumptions that give rise to repressive myths. Ellsworth argues that if these assumptions, goals, implicit power dynamics, and issues of who produces valid knowledge remain untheorized and untouched, critical pedagogues will continue to perpetuate relations of domination in their classrooms.

The author paints a complex portrait of the practice of teaching for liberation. She reflects on her own role as a White middle-class woman and professor engaged with a diverse group of students developing an antiracist course. Grounded in a clearly articulated political agenda and her experience as a feminist teacher, Ellsworth provides a critique of "empowerment," "student voice," "dialogue," and "critical reflection" and raises provocative issues about the nature of action for social change and knowledge.
Article cover image

"New Faces, New Knowledge"

Article
Turner, Caroline Sotello Viernes
2000
Academe 86, no. 5 (2000): 34-37
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Explains that diversification of the faculty brings intellectual diversity in scholarship. Importance of ethnic diversity in colleges and universities to the viability of higher education in the United States (U.S.); Status of the recruitment and retention of faculty of color in the U.S.; Advantages of diverse faculty in the academic community; Effects of affirmative actions in higher education to colored people.
Additional Info:
Explains that diversification of the faculty brings intellectual diversity in scholarship. Importance of ethnic diversity in colleges and universities to the viability of higher education in the United States (U.S.); Status of the recruitment and retention of faculty of color in the U.S.; Advantages of diverse faculty in the academic community; Effects of affirmative actions in higher education to colored people.
Article cover image

"Theological Education and Scholarship as Struggle: The Life of Racial/Ethnic Minorities in the Profession"

Article
Segovia, Fernando F.
1994
Journal of Hispanic/Latino Theology 2, no. 2 (1994): 2-25
Topics: Theological Education   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Coming of Age in Academe: Rekindling Women's Hopes and Reforming the Academy

Book
Martin, Jane Roland
2000
Routledge, New York, NY
Not catalogued
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Philosophy of Teaching   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
At what price entry? Philosopher of education Jane Roland Martin contends that feminist scholars have traded in their idealism for a place in the academy. In Coming of Age in Academe, she looks at the ways that academic feminists have become estranged from women.
Determining that this is the "membership fee" the academy exacts on all its members, she calls for the academy's transformation. Part one explores the chilly ...
Additional Info:
At what price entry? Philosopher of education Jane Roland Martin contends that feminist scholars have traded in their idealism for a place in the academy. In Coming of Age in Academe, she looks at the ways that academic feminists have become estranged from women.
Determining that this is the "membership fee" the academy exacts on all its members, she calls for the academy's transformation. Part one explores the chilly research climate for feminist scholars, the academic traps of essentialism and aerial distance, and the education gap in the feminist text. In part two, Martin likens the behavior of present-day feminist scholars to nineteenth-century immigrants to the United States and examines their assimilation into the world of work, politics and the professions. She finds that when you look at higher education, you see what a brutal filter of women it is. Part three highlights the academy's "brain drain" and its containment of women and then proposes actions both great and small that aim at fundamental change. In this rousing call to action, Martin concludes that the dissociation from women that the academy demands--its "entrance fee"--can only be stopped by radically reforming the gendered system on which the academy is based. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Preface
Pt. 1 What Price Women's Belonging?
Introduction
ch. 1 Estrangement from Each Other
ch. 2 Estrangement from Women's Lived Experience
ch. 3 Estrangement from "Women's" Occupations
Pt. 2 An Immigrant Interpretation
ch. 1 Women as Immigrants
ch. 2 The New Gender Tracking
ch. 3 Higher Education as Filter
ch. 4 Assimilation or Transformation, That Is the Question
Pt. 3 Add Women and Transform
ch. 1 The Brain Drain
ch. 2 Tales of Containment
ch. 3 Actions Great and Small
Conclusion
Notes
Works Cite
d Index
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Race, Class, and Gender in the United States

Book
Rothenberg, Paula S.
2001
Worth Publishers, New York, NY
HT1521.R335 2001
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Like its preceding editions, this fourth edition of Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study undertakes a study of race, gender, and sexuality within the context of class. With 28 new readings and 5 revised readings, this edition also contains an entirely new section entitled "'Us' and 'Them': Becoming an American." This section examines the ways in which the concept of "citizen" has been constructed in the United ...
Additional Info:
Like its preceding editions, this fourth edition of Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study undertakes a study of race, gender, and sexuality within the context of class. With 28 new readings and 5 revised readings, this edition also contains an entirely new section entitled "'Us' and 'Them': Becoming an American." This section examines the ways in which the concept of "citizen" has been constructed in the United States over time and studies the role that issues of race, class, and gender have played in determining who is included inand excluded from - this category. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Pt. I The Social Construction of Difference: Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality
Pt. II "Us" and "Them": Becoming an American
Pt. III Understanding Racism, Sexism, and Class Privilege
Pt. IV The Economics of Race, Class, and Gender in the United States
Pt. V Many Voices, Many Lives: Some Consequences of Racial, Gender, and Class Inequality
Pt. VI How it Happened: Race and Gender Issues in U.S. Law
Pt. VII Creating and Maintaining Hierarchies: Stereotypes, Ideology, Language, Violence, and Social Control
Pt. VIII Revisioning the Future

Index
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The Wolf Shall Dwell with the Lamb: A Spirituality for Leadership in a Multicultural Community

Book
Law, Eric H.F.
1993
Chalice Press, St. Louis, MO
BR115.C8L378 1993
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
A multicultural conference has convened. Everything is in place, and the participants arrive brimming with goodwill and even better intentions. Surely this time...! But, no. Halfway through the meetings, communication grinds to a halt, and people retreat to the safety of their own groups. What happened? And how can we keep it from happening again? Those are the questions this book proposes to answer. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
A multicultural conference has convened. Everything is in place, and the participants arrive brimming with goodwill and even better intentions. Surely this time...! But, no. Halfway through the meetings, communication grinds to a halt, and people retreat to the safety of their own groups. What happened? And how can we keep it from happening again? Those are the questions this book proposes to answer. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The “Peaceable Realm” as a Vision of an Ideal Multicultural Community
ch. 2 What Makes a lamb Different from a Wolf? Understanding Cultural Differences in the Perception of Power
ch. 3 Differences in the Perception of Power and Their Consequences for Leadership
ch. 4 What Does the Bible Say to the Powerful and the Powerless?
ch. 5 A Fresh Look at Pentecost as the Beginning of a Multicultural Church Community
ch. 6 Who Has Power and Who Doesn’t?: Power Analysis, an Essential Skill for Leadership in a Multicultural Community
ch. 7 The Wolves Lie Down with the Lambs, a Case Study
ch. 8 Living Out the Fullness of the Gospel in the Peaceable Realm
ch. 9 Mutual Invitation as Mutual Employment
ch. 10 Media as Means of Distributing Power
ch. 11 Liturgy as Spiritual Dscipline for Leadership in a Multicultural Community

Appendix A Mutual Invitation
Appendix B Using Photolanguage in Small Group Communication
Appendix C Community Bible Study
Article cover image

"Blue Collar, Crimson Blazer: Recollections of Class on Campus"

Article
Mar, M. Elaine
1995
Harvard Magazine 98, no. 2 (1995): 47-51
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"A Carpenter's Daughter: A Working Class Woman in Higher Education"

Article
Christopher, Renny
1995
in This Fine Place So Far From Home: Voices of Academics From the Working Class (Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 1995), 137-150
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Outbursts in Academe: Multiculturalism and Other Sources of Conflict

Book
Dixon, Kathleen, ed.
1998
Boynton/Cook Publishers, Portsmouth, NH
LC1099.3.O88 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Outbursts in Academe advances a new theoretical notion in the composition classroom: the concept of "outburst" as a single, researchable moment in the lives of teachers and students. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Outbursts in Academe advances a new theoretical notion in the composition classroom: the concept of "outburst" as a single, researchable moment in the lives of teachers and students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Outbursts: The Theory and a Guide to Reading (K. Dixon & W. Archibald)

ch. 1 Immodest Proposals Cyborg Bodies: Race, Class, Gender, and Communications Technology (C. Winkelmann)
ch. 2 Macho in the Killing Zone or How to Survive Multicultural Reality (B. Davis)
ch. 3 Responses: Whose Icon? (J. Degan)
ch. 4 Beyond Stereotypes: Las Latinas Caught Between Linguas y Culturas (A. Perez)
ch. 5 Inter-view One: Reading Conflict in English Studies (K. Dixon)
ch. 6 Classroom Conflicts
ch. 7 Revisiting White Feminist Authority or Gang Life in the University Classroom (K. Dixon)
ch. 8 Essays That Never Were: Deaf Identity and Resistance in the Mainstream Classroom (J. Anderson)
ch. 9 A Captivity Narrative: Indians, Mixedbloods, and the "White" Academy (S. Lyons)
ch. 10 Responses: "Mixedblood" Rhetorics and the Concept of "Outbursts"(P. Bizzell)
ch. 11 Beyond Liberal and Cultural Approaches to Social Justice (E. Flynn)
ch. 12 Formations of "Multicultural" Selves and Institutions
ch. 13 Inter-view Two: Lost Outbursts (K. Dixon)
ch. 14 Super-Mammy or Super-Sellout? Young, Black, and Female in the Academy (D. Paul)
ch. 15 "Lost and Melted in the Pot": Multicultural Literacy in Predominantly White Classrooms (D. Starke-Meyerring)
ch. 16 Response: Dangerous Critique: Academic Freedom and Institutional Constraint (S. Dilks)
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Wabash tree

Wise Women: Reflections of Teachers at Midlife

Book
Freeman, Phyllis R. and Jan Zlotnik Schmidt, eds.
2000
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2837.W58 2000
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Wise Women is a collection of autobiographical essays by important and renowned teachers at mid-life. The essays, which are deeply personal, will focus on how these women negotiate the psychological, physical, and social changes brought on by menopause and how the aging process affects their lives as professionals, feminists, writers, mentors, and instructors in the academy. The book addresses such questions as the following: What challenges are left for the ...
Additional Info:
Wise Women is a collection of autobiographical essays by important and renowned teachers at mid-life. The essays, which are deeply personal, will focus on how these women negotiate the psychological, physical, and social changes brought on by menopause and how the aging process affects their lives as professionals, feminists, writers, mentors, and instructors in the academy. The book addresses such questions as the following: What challenges are left for the feminists who came of age during the women's movement and now have achieved academic success? How do women teachers experience their aging selves in the classroom? and What legacy will mid-life women leave their younger women colleagues? All of these questions, as well as many others, are covered in this insightful and groundbreaking work. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

Part I Body & Time
ch. 1. Teaching Where I Was Taught: Coming Home (Mary Gordon)
ch. 2. Game Plans (Mimi Schwartz)
ch. 3. "Pregnant with [Myself], at Last": Images of Midlife/A Journal Entry (Jan Zlotnik Schmidt)
ch. 4. "Saturating Language with Love": Variations on a Dream (Marlene A. Schiwy)
ch. 5. The Time of Our Lives: The Public Life of Teaching (Patricia C. Phillips)

Part II Ripening & Rootedness
ch. 6. Reverie (Jane Tompkins)
ch. 7. Goodbye, Ms. Chips (Julia Alvarez)
ch. 8. But Tell Me, Do You Like Teaching? (Patricia Hampl)
ch. 9. Me, Myself, Menopause, and I (Dona Lee Davis)
ch. 10. Reflections on Teaching (and Life in General) Once You've Become a Grandmother (Jean Bethke Elshtain)
ch. 11. Mud Ponies (Diane Glancy)
ch. 12. Unsettled Weather (Gail B. Griffin)

Part III Feisty & Girls
ch. 13. Academic Witchery: Snakes and Snails and Scholarly Tales (Dean Falk)
ch. 14. Choice Points and Courage (Diane F. Halpern)
ch. 15. I Can't Hear ... I Can't See ... I Can't Remember Anything (Lynne Taetzsch)
ch. 16. Memories of a "First Woman" (Tikva Simone Frymer)
ch. 17. Rant for Old Teachers (Paula Gunn Allen)

Part IV Teaching in Time
ch. 18. A Teaching Life (Christa L. Walck)
ch. 19. Too Soon Old, Too Late Smart (Gayle Pemberton)
ch. 20. Ecstasy: Teaching and Learning without Limits (Bell Hooks)
ch. 21. Re-viewing Our Professional Lives: Talking (and Listening) for a Living (Margaret Matlin)
ch. 22. On Statutes and Dogs, Poems and "Regs," and Life inside the Classroom (Judy Scales-Trent)
ch. 23. Exploring Critical Feminist Pedagogy: Revelations and Confessions about Teaching at Midlife (Esther Ngan-ling Chow)

Part V Community & Generativity
ch. 24. Themes That Link through Time (Sue V. Rosser)
ch. 25. Naming, Sharing, Speaking: Teaching in Midlife (Jean F. O'Barr)
ch. 26. "Thinking Back through [My] Mother": Reclaiming Anger, Advocacy, and Pleasure in Teaching (Judith A. Dorney)
ch. 27. Charis = Light = Grace (Phyllis R. Freeman)

Notes and References
Selected Bibliography
Contributors
Acknowledgments
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"Mentoring of Hispanic Persons in Theological Education: Reflections on Distinctives"

Article
Pazmiño, Robert W.
2001
Paper presented at Through Hispanic Eyes - A Conference for Non-Hispanic Faculty, 2001
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Pedagogical Expectations of Hispanic Americans: Insights for Leadership Training"

Article
Wilson, Norman G.
1997
Christian Education Journal 1NS, no. 1 (1997): 65-81
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
A review of the literature on learning and teaching styles, with a primary focus on what constitutes valid learning experiences (pedagogical expectations) among Hispanic-American populations. Implications and recommendations are suggested for the creation of Hispanic-American learning experiences and leadership training.
Additional Info:
A review of the literature on learning and teaching styles, with a primary focus on what constitutes valid learning experiences (pedagogical expectations) among Hispanic-American populations. Implications and recommendations are suggested for the creation of Hispanic-American learning experiences and leadership training.
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Wabash tree

No Angel in the Classroom: Teaching Through Feminist Discourse

Book
Fisher, Berenice Malka
2001
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LC197.F58 2001
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Taking a fresh look at questions that have long troubled teachers committed to social change, No Angel in the Classroom: Feminist Pedagogy as Political Practice provides a richly conceptualized and down-to-earth account of feminist teaching in higher education. Long-time feminist educator, Berenice Malka Fisher, gives a nuanced interpretation of second wave feminist consciousness-raising that bridges the gap between feminist activism and the academy. Candid classroom stories bring out the contradictions ...
Additional Info:
Taking a fresh look at questions that have long troubled teachers committed to social change, No Angel in the Classroom: Feminist Pedagogy as Political Practice provides a richly conceptualized and down-to-earth account of feminist teaching in higher education. Long-time feminist educator, Berenice Malka Fisher, gives a nuanced interpretation of second wave feminist consciousness-raising that bridges the gap between feminist activism and the academy. Candid classroom stories bring out the contradictions embedded in many activist ideals of the 1970s, while Fisher’s informed analysis builds on these tensions, offering a complex account of experience, emotion, thought, and action in feminist teaching. By developing a theory carefully shaped around practice. Fisher presents a thoughtful repsonse to the numerous attacks on “feminist pedagogy” launced in the 1980s and 90s. No Angel in the Classroom does not offer simple solutions, yet it helps politically engaged teachers to think through knotty problems that arise in their work. Can feminist teachers exercise authority without being authoritarian? Should “caring” lie at the core of feminist teaching’? Where does “safety” fit into classes in which teachers and students voice strong opinions and talk about personal matters? How can feminist teaching give serious attention to “differences” such as race, class, and sexual orientation? Intended for both veteran and beginning teachers, as well as others committed to social change, this groundbreaking book provides a pedagogical vision that inspires both passion and critical thinking. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Where I Come From

ch. 1 What Is Feminist Pedagogy?
ch. 2 Is Women's Experience the Best Teacher? Different Ways of Knowing
ch. 3 The Rocky Road to Feminist Empowerment: Questioning Authority
ch. 4 No Angel in the Classroom: Exploring the Ethic of Care
ch. 5 Dangerous Curves: Safety and Self-Disclosure
ch. 6 "Women Do Not Say 'We'": Difference and the Ideal of Community
ch. 7 Innocents and Intellectuals: Is There Hope for Feminist Teaching

Postscript: Where Can I Go from Here?
Notes
Bibliography
Index
About the Author
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"Kitchen Table Banter as Engaged Pedagogy"

Article
Westfield, N. Lynne
2001
Religious Education 96, no. 3 (2001): 423-429
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"The Chilly Climate: Subtle Ways in Which Women are Often Treated Differently at Work and in Classrooms"

Article
Sandler, Bernice R.
1999
About Women on Campus 8, no 3 (1999)
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Women are Teachers, Men are Professors: A Study of Student Perceptions"

Article
Miller, JoAnn and Marilyn Chamberlin
2000
Teaching Sociology 28, no. 4 (2000): 283-298
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Examines sociology student perceptions of faculty and graduate instructor educational attainment as a function of gender. Finds that students misattribute in an upward direction the level of education by male graduate instructors and in a downward direction the level of formal education attained by women, even if the female is a full professor.
Additional Info:
Examines sociology student perceptions of faculty and graduate instructor educational attainment as a function of gender. Finds that students misattribute in an upward direction the level of education by male graduate instructors and in a downward direction the level of formal education attained by women, even if the female is a full professor.
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"The Struggle to Define and Reinvent Whiteness: A Pedagogical Analysis"

Article
Kincheloe, Joe L.
1999
College Literature 26, no. 3 (1999): 162-195
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Hard to Find: Searching For Practical Faculty in the 1990's (pdf)

Journal Issue
2001
Auburn Studies Background Report No. 8, (Auburn Theological Seminary, New York, NY 2002)
BV4030.H37 2001
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
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Gender and Teaching

Book
Maher, Frances A. and Janie Victoria Ward
2002
Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ
LC212.92.M34 2001
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Gender and Teaching provides a vivid, focused, and interactive overview of the important gender issues in education today. This is accomplished through conversations among experts, practitioners, and readers that are informed by representative case studies and by a range of theoretical approaches to the issues. Gender and Teaching is the third volume in the "Reflective Teaching and the Social Conditions of Schooling" series edited by Daniel P. Liston and Kenneth ...
Additional Info:
Gender and Teaching provides a vivid, focused, and interactive overview of the important gender issues in education today. This is accomplished through conversations among experts, practitioners, and readers that are informed by representative case studies and by a range of theoretical approaches to the issues. Gender and Teaching is the third volume in the "Reflective Teaching and the Social Conditions of Schooling" series edited by Daniel P. Liston and Kenneth M. Zeichner. It follows the same format as previous volumes in the series.
Part I includes four cases dealing with related aspects of gendered experiences in schools (nonsexist elementary school curricula, gender and race implications of special education assignment practices, homophobia in high schools and classrooms, and teaching as a woman's profession), followed by a set of teachers', administrators', and professors' reactions to each case.
Part II is an elaboration of four "public arguments"--conservative, liberal, women-centered, and radical multicultural--pertaining to the issues raised in the cases in Part I. These arguments exemplify clusters of orientations, organized around general values rather than hard and fast principles.
Part III presents the authors' own interpretations of the issues raised throughout the work and provides activities and topics for reflection and an annotated bibliography of additional resources.
Content and Pedagogical Features:
*Readers are encouraged throughout to interact with the text. They can respond to each case and compare their responses to those of others in the field.
*The cases and discussions that follow help students begin to evolve their own "practical theories"; explore and perhaps modify some of their basic beliefs and assumptions; become acquainted with other points of view; and look further into the connections and intersections of gender with other structural dynamics and practices--those of race, class, and culture--as intrinsic to their explorations into the social conditions of schooling.
*The major strands in feminist theory about women and education are presented so that students can analyze the differences among them, come up with positions of their own, and learn to defend them.
*Although the authors draw on historical and sociological frameworks that show how women have historically been discriminated against in our schools and in our society, their goal is an education that is equally fair to everyone, boys as well as girls.
Gender and Teaching is pertinent for all prospective and practicing teachers at any stage of their training. It can be used in any undergraduate or graduate course that addresses issues of gender and teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Preface
Preface
I Case Studies and Reactions
Case 1: "Sexism and the Classroom"
Case 2: "Gender, Race, and Teacher Expectations"
Case 3: "Who Gets Hurt?"
Case 4: "A Woman's Career?"
II Public Arguments
A "Conservative View": Upholding Traditional Values and High Standards
A "Liberal-Progressive View": Education for Equality and Democracy
A "Women-Centered View": Celebrating Difference
A "Radical-Multicultural View": Gender, Culture, and Societal Transformation
III Final Arguments, and Some Suggestions and Resources for Further Reflection
The Centrality of Gender for Reflective Teaching and Learning: Understanding the Interplay of Gender, Race, Class, and Culture in Educational Settings
Exercises for Further Reflection
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
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The Promise and Challenge of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Theological Education (pdf)

Journal Issue
2002
Theological Education 38, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47v.38no.2
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2002-theological-education-v38-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
ATS Work on Race and Ethnicity (Daniel Aleshire and Marsha Foster Boyd)
Diversity and Accreditation: A Measure of Quality (Michael Gilligan)
Diversity in Theological Education (Charles R. Foster)
Student Diversity and Theological Education (Barbara Mei Leung Lai, Ruth Vuong, and Francis Lonsway)
Reflections on Institutional Issues Related to Race and Ethnicity in ATS Schools (Julia M. Speller and Jack L. Seymour)
The Theological Education of U.S. Hispanics, Edwin I. Hernández (Kenneth G. Davis, and Catherine Wilson)
Theologies in Dialogue—Building Bridges (Anthony Pinn and Benjamin Valentin)

OPEN FORUM
Cultivating A Culture of the Call: A Model for Lay Theological Education (Susan Willhauck)
Article cover image

"Diversity in Theological Education" (pdf)

Article
Foster, Charles, Julia M Speller and Jack Seymour
2002
Theological Education 38, no. 2: 15-37, 56-70
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Diversity—gender, class, racial, ethnic, theological, sexual orientation as well as personality, learning style, ability, and experience— exists as threat and promise, problem and possibility in theological education. The negotiations of administrators, faculty, students, and school constituencies that make up the dynamics of difference in theological education are particularly intense, and occasionally volatile, in decisions about who should teach, what should be taught, and how we should teach. Reflecting on ...
Additional Info:
Diversity—gender, class, racial, ethnic, theological, sexual orientation as well as personality, learning style, ability, and experience— exists as threat and promise, problem and possibility in theological education. The negotiations of administrators, faculty, students, and school constituencies that make up the dynamics of difference in theological education are particularly intense, and occasionally volatile, in decisions about who should teach, what should be taught, and how we should teach. Reflecting on my conscientization to these dynamics during my own career as theological educator and administrator, I argue that the interdependence of theological school pedagogies of formation and empowerment for ministry must be revisioned. This means, at least, expanding our assumptions about education and teaching by exploring pedagogical possibilities emerging from the embrace of differences among us and by viewing the community of teaching and learning as an ecology of language processes, cultural patterns, and world views. The essay concludes with three suggestions for altering pedagogical practices in the diverse theological education setting: the diversification of assessment patterns; the clear and expansive articulation of guidelines, criteria, and standards for learning; and the establishment of rules of discourse to ensure the participation of all.
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The Majority in the Minority: Expanding the Representation of Latina/o Faculty, Administrators and Students in Higher Education

Book
Castellanos, Jeanett and Lee Jones, eds.
2003
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LC2670.6.M35 2003
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Latinas/os are the largest ethnic minority group in the U.S. They are propelling minority communities to majority status in states as disparate as California, Florida, New Jersey, New York and Texas.

Their growth in the population at large is not reflected in higher education. In fact Latinos are the least represented population in our colleges and universities, whether as administrators, faculty or students; and as students ...
Additional Info:
Latinas/os are the largest ethnic minority group in the U.S. They are propelling minority communities to majority status in states as disparate as California, Florida, New Jersey, New York and Texas.

Their growth in the population at large is not reflected in higher education. In fact Latinos are the least represented population in our colleges and universities, whether as administrators, faculty or students; and as students have one of the highest levels of attrition.

Opening access to Latinas/os, assuring their persistence as students in higher education, and their increased presence in college faculty and governance, is of paramount importance if they are to make essential economic gains and fully to participate in and contribute to American society.

In this ground-breaking book, twenty-four Latina/o scholars provide an historical background; review issues of student access and achievement, and lessons learned; and present the problems of status and barriers faced by administrators and faculty. The book includes narratives by graduate students, administrators and faculty that vividly bring these issues to life.

This is a book that should be read by policy makers, college administrators, student affairs personnel and faculty concerned about shaping the future of higher education -- and constitutes an invaluable resource for all leaders of the Latino community. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Laura I. Rendón)
Preface (Lee Jones and Jeanett Castellanos)
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Latina/o Undergraduate Experiences in American Higher Education (Jeanett Castellanos and Lee Jones)
ch. 2 Historical Perspectives on Latino Access to Higher Education, 1848-1990 (Victoria-Maria MacDonald and Teresa Garcia)
ch. 3 Access to Higher Education for Hispanic Students: Real or illusory? (Amaury Nora)
ch. 4 Latina/o and African American Students and Predominantly White Institutions: A Psychosociocultural Perspective of Cultural Congruity, Campus Climate, and Academic Persistence (Alberta M. Gloria and Jeanett Castellanos)
ch. 5 Active Faculty Involvement: Maximizing Student Achievement Efforts (Guadalupe Anaya and Darnell G. Cole)
ch. 6 Notes from a Latino Graduate Student at a Predominantly White University (Raymond "Ramón" Herrera)
ch. 7 Latins and the Undergraduate Experience: No Estamos Solas! (Veronica Orozco)
ch. 8 Latina/o Retention in Four-Year Institutions (Sylvia Hurtado and Mark Kamimura)
ch. 9 Latinos and Administrative Positions in American Higher Education (Roberto Haro and Juan Francisco Lara)
ch. 10 Latina/o Cultural Values and the Academy: Latinas Navigating through the Administrative Role (Kathleen Harris Canul)
ch. 11 Barriers to Accessing the Professoriate (Raymond V. Padilla)
ch. 12 Latina/o Faculty and the Tenure Process in Cultural Context (Robeto A. Ibarra)
ch. 13 Latinas and the Professoriate: An Interview with Patricia Arredondo (Patricia Arredondo and Jeanett Castellanos)
ch. 14 Discrimination and Merit in Higher Education: The Hispanic Professoriate (Richard R. Verdugo)
ch. 15 Developmental Career Challenges for Latina/o Faculty in Higher Education (Edward A. Delgado-Romero, Lisa Y. Flores, Alberta M. Gloria, Patricia Arredondo, and Jeanett Castellanos)
ch. 16 An Infrastructure that Facilitates the Retention of Latina/os in Higher Education (Jeanett Castellanos and Lee Jones)

Index
Article cover image

"Faculty Diversity: Too Little For Too Long"

Article
Trower, Cathy A., and Richard P. Chait
2002
Harvard Magazine 104, no. 4 (2002): 33-38
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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Twenty-First-Century Feminist Classrooms: Pedagogies of Identity and Difference

Book
MacDonald, Amie A. and Susan Sanchez-Casal, eds.
2002
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
LC197 .T94 2002
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Philosophy of Teaching

Additional Info:
This anti-racist feminist anthology brings together diverse and challenging theoretical perspectives on the experiences of radical educators who work to redefine pedagogies for communicating the claims of both insurgent disciplines--Women's Studies, African-American Studies, Latino Studies, Ethnic Studies, Queer Theory, etc.--and radicalized versions of traditional areas of study--History, Sociology, Foreign Languages, Literature, Philosophy. The authors' analyses of where and how feminist teachers stand in the fray of conflictive classroom dynamics ...
Additional Info:
This anti-racist feminist anthology brings together diverse and challenging theoretical perspectives on the experiences of radical educators who work to redefine pedagogies for communicating the claims of both insurgent disciplines--Women's Studies, African-American Studies, Latino Studies, Ethnic Studies, Queer Theory, etc.--and radicalized versions of traditional areas of study--History, Sociology, Foreign Languages, Literature, Philosophy. The authors' analyses of where and how feminist teachers stand in the fray of conflictive classroom dynamics and institutional politics lead them to outline new inquiries into feminist pedagogy highlighted by an intense focus on identity, experience, and difference. In doing so, Twenty-First Century Feminist Classrooms opens a space for engaged feminist self-criticism that seeks to reinvigorate pedagogical practices grounded in multicultural feminist identities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Feminist Reflections on the Pedagogical Relevance of Identity

ch. 1 Toward a Pedagogy of Coalition
ch. 2 Unleashing the Demons of History: White Resistance in the U.S. Latino Studies Classroom
ch. 3 Student Resistance and Nationalism in the Classroom: Reflections on Globalizing the Curriculum
ch. 4 Feminist Pedagogy and the Appeal to Epistemic Privilege
ch. 5 Negotiating Subject Positions in a Service-Learning Context: Toward a Feminist Critique of Experiential Learning
ch. 6 Antiracist Pedagogy and Concientizacion: A Latina Professor's Struggle
ch. 7 Queer Theory and Feminist Pedagogy
ch. 8 "white girls" and "Strong Black Women:" Reflections on a Decade of Teaching Black History at Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs)
ch. 9 Teaching (About) Genocide
ch. 10 Decentering the White and Male Standpoints in Race and Ethnicity Courses
ch. 11 Representation, Entitlement, and Voyeurism: Teaching Across Difference
Contributors

Index
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Faculty of Color in Academe: Bittersweet Success

Book
Turner, Caroline Sotello Viernes and Samuel L.Myers, Jr.
2000
Allyn & Bacon, Boston, MA
LB2332.72.T87 2000
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Key Benefits: Faculty of Color in Academe focuses on inequities based on racial and ethnic differences within the professional workplace in higher education. This book draws on a comprehensive study of African American, Asian, Pacific American, American Indian, and Latino faculty in eight mid-western states. By using both narrative and statistical data, this book provides an in-depth view of the issues surrounding the successful recruitment, retention, and development of faculty ...
Additional Info:
Key Benefits: Faculty of Color in Academe focuses on inequities based on racial and ethnic differences within the professional workplace in higher education. This book draws on a comprehensive study of African American, Asian, Pacific American, American Indian, and Latino faculty in eight mid-western states. By using both narrative and statistical data, this book provides an in-depth view of the issues surrounding the successful recruitment, retention, and development of faculty of color.

Key Topics: The authors attempt to capture and describe some of the similarities and differences experienced by faculty among each of the above mentioned racial/ethnic groups. Includes a comprehensive discussion of what needs to be done in order to achieve diversity in the teaching profession. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Faculty of Color in Academe: On the Brink of the Twenty-First Century.
Structure of the Book.
Some Preliminary Matters for the Reader.

ch. 2 Snapshots from the Literature: Elements Influencing the Workplace Environment.
Historical Legacy.
Faculty Diversity and Affirmative Action: Continued Resistance.
Some Common Themes and Recommendations.
A Bird's-Eye View — Literature on Faculty of Color by Racial and Ethnic Group: Findings and Recommendations.

ch. 3 The Nature and Extent of Minority Faculty Underrepresentation.
The Nature of Underrepresentation.
Patterns of Underrepresentation.
Explaining the Underrepresentation.

ch. 4 A Chill in the Air: In the Words of Faculty of Color.
Revisiting the Literature.
Description of the Study.
Overview of the Responses.
Chilly Climate: What Our Respondents Have to Say.
Themes of Special Significance to Each of Our Groups.
Manifestations of Interlocking Race and Gender Bias.
A Fine Balance.
Conclusion: Why We Must Listen.

ch. 5 Minority Faculty Hiring: Equality of Opportunity?
Faculty Development Programs: In General and for Minorities.
What Affects Minority Faculty Hiring? Hypothesized Determinants.
Achieving Parity: Effects of Hiring versus Turnover.
Factors Contributing to Increased Minority Faculty Hiring.
Implications.

ch. 6 Why Stay? Current Rewards and Promising Efforts.
Current Rewards and Satisfactions.
Recommendations from the Field: Accentuating the Positive.
Suggested Strategies.
Exemplary Programs.
Learning from Mistakes.

ch. 7 Market Forces: Ph.D. Pipelines versus Competitive Wages.
Summary of Results.
Details of the Analysis.
Appendix: The Data.

ch. 8 Moving beyond Myths and toward Community Diversity: Conclusions and Reflections.
Fresh Approaches.
Minority Faculty in Higher Education: Academic Angst Compounded.
Strategies for Improving the Representation and Circumstances of Faculty of Color.
The Role of Affirmative Action.
Organizational Change Process.
Diversifying Academia: Need for “Extramural” Support.
Myths as Barriers to Problem Solving.
The Importance of Acknowledgment: The Privilege of Ignorance, the Ignorance of Privilege.
Institutional Efforts.
Business as Unusual Not Business as Usual.

Bibliography.
Index
Article cover image

"The Predicament of Nepantla: Chicana/o Religions into the 21st Century"

Article
Busto, Rudy
1998
Perspectivas: Hispanic Theological Institute Occasional Papers Series 1 (Fall 1998): 7-21
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

I've Got a Story to Tell: Identity and Place in the Academy

Book
Jackson, Sandra, and Jose Solis Jordan, eds.
1999
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LC3731.I94 1999
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Conventional wisdom has it that education is the great equalizer in a society. Notwithstanding, access to higher education and terminal degrees have not proven synonymous with the establishment of legitimacy for many voices. Academics and scholars of color continue to confront barriers constituent of the racialized, gendered, and class(ed) baggage characterizing dominant social relations. In I've Got a Story to Tell different members of academe struggle with the institutionalized ...
Additional Info:
Conventional wisdom has it that education is the great equalizer in a society. Notwithstanding, access to higher education and terminal degrees have not proven synonymous with the establishment of legitimacy for many voices. Academics and scholars of color continue to confront barriers constituent of the racialized, gendered, and class(ed) baggage characterizing dominant social relations. In I've Got a Story to Tell different members of academe struggle with the institutionalized constructs that pose real challenges to the transformation and democratization of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Being in Higher Education: Negotiating Identity and Place (Sandra Jackson and Jose Solis Jordan)

ch. 1 Why Are You So Afraid, Guero? (Jose Solis Jordan)
ch. 2 I Don't Do Dis Here Dat Dere: A Subtext of Authority in Teaching and Learning (Sandra Jackson)
ch. 3 Acaso No Soy Maestra Tambien? (Ain't I a Teacher Too?)(Marisa Alicea)
ch. 4 Race, Nationality, Gender, and the Space of the Classroom: Writing a Pedagogical Story (K.E. Supriya)
ch. 5 "Leaving Normal": Transcending Normativity Within the Feminist/Women's History Classroom (Gladys M. Jimenez-Munoz)
ch. 6 Identity Negotiation in the Classroom (Xing (Lucy)Lu)
ch. 7 "Travelin' a long way on a Broken Road" (Nathan Haymes)
ch. 8 A Cubana in the Classroom: The Experiences of One Latina in Academia (Maria R. Vidal)
ch. 9 Processing (Aminah B. McCloud)
ch. 10 "Have YOU Ever Lived on Brewster Place?": Teaching African-American Literature in a Predominantly White Institution (Clare Oberon Garcia)
ch. 11 Native(s) in the Classroom: Displacement and Cultural Politics (Fassil Demissie)
ch. 12 Ni Eres Ni Te Pareces: Academia as Rapture and Alienation (Alicia Chavira-Prado)
ch. 13 Doing Battle Inside the Beast (Luis Ortiz-Franco)

Notes on Contributors
Cover image

Yellow: Race in America Beyond Black and White

Book
Wu, Frank H.
2002
Basic Books, New York, NY
E184.06W84 2003
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This explosive book examines the current state of civil rights in the U.S. through the unique experiences of Asian Americans. In the tradition of W.E.B. Du Bois, Cornel West, and other public intellectuals who have confronted the "color line" of the twentieth century, journalist, scholar, and activist Frank H. Wu offers a unique perspective on how changing ideas of racial identity will affect race relations in the ...
Additional Info:
This explosive book examines the current state of civil rights in the U.S. through the unique experiences of Asian Americans. In the tradition of W.E.B. Du Bois, Cornel West, and other public intellectuals who have confronted the "color line" of the twentieth century, journalist, scholar, and activist Frank H. Wu offers a unique perspective on how changing ideas of racial identity will affect race relations in the new century.

Often provocative and always thoughtful, this book addresses some of the most controversial contemporary issues: discrimination, immigration, diversity, globalization, and the mixed race movement, introducing the example of Asian Americans to shed new light on the current debates. Mixing personal anecdotes, social science research, legal cases, history, and original journalistic reporting, Wu tackles Asian American stereotypes like "the model minority" and "the perpetual foreigner," and shows how these seemingly innocuous concepts have harmed individuals and damaged relations between communities. By offering new ways of thinking about race in American society, Wu's work challenges us to make good on our great democratic experiment. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 East Is East, East Is West: Asians as Americans
ch. 2 The Model Minority: Asian American "Success" as a Race Relations Failure
ch. 3 The Perpetual Foreigner: Yellow Peril in the Pacific Century
ch. 4 Neither Black Nor White: Affirmative Action and Asian Americans
ch. 5 True But Wrong: New Arguments Against New Discrimination
ch. 6 The Best "Chink" Food: Dog-Eating and the Dilemma of Diversity
ch. 7 The Changing Face of America: Intermarriage and the Mixed Race Movement
ch. 8 The Power of Coalitions: Why I Teach at Howard

Epilogue: Deep Springs
References
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
About the Author
Cover image

Perspectivas: Occasional Papers Winter 1999

Journal Issue
Perspectivas
1999
Hispanic Theological Initiative, Atlanta, GA
BR563.H57P47 1999
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue
Additional Info:
Journal Issue

Table Of Content:
Forward
Race Matters in More than Black and White (Harold J. Recinos)
U.S. Hispanics/Latinos and the Field of Graduate Theological Education (Manuel Jesus Mejido)
Cover image

Perspectivas: Occasional papers Fall 2000

Journal Issue
Furst-Lambert, Renata, ed.
2000
Hispanic Theological Initiative, Atlanta, GA
BR563.H57P47 2000
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The Impact of Pluralism on Trends in Lain American and U.S. Latino Religions and Society (Gastón Espinosa)
ch. 2 A Spirituality for a Multicultural Ministry (Elizabeth Conde-Frazier)
ch. 3 Response to Elizabeth Conde-Frazier (Gabriel Salguero)
ch. 4 U.S. Hispanic/Latino Identity and Protestant Experience: A Brief Introduction for the Seminarian (Zaida Maldonado Pérez)
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Faculty Diversity: Problems and Solutions

Book
Moody, JoAnn
2004
RoutledgeFalmer, New York, NY
LB2332.6.M66 2004
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
JoAnn Moody shows majority campuses, faculty, and administrators how to dismantle the high barriers that block women and especially minorities from entry and advancement in the professoriate. Good practices for improving recruitment, evaluation, mentorship, and retention are offered. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
JoAnn Moody shows majority campuses, faculty, and administrators how to dismantle the high barriers that block women and especially minorities from entry and advancement in the professoriate. Good practices for improving recruitment, evaluation, mentorship, and retention are offered. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction and Organization of the Book

ch. 1 Succeeding as a Professor on a Majority Campus: Disadvantages versus Advantages
ch. 2 Succeeding Outside the Ivy Walls: Disadvantages versus Advantages
ch. 3 Extra Disadvantages for Colonized Minorities
ch. 4 Good Practices in Recruitment
ch. 5 Good Practices in Retention
ch. 6 Good Practices in Mentoring
ch. 7 Other Remedies: Macrocosmic and Microcosmic
ch. 8 Minority and Majority Faculty Speak
ch. 9 Bad Practices: Scenarios for Discussion and Application (with Discussion Guides)

Conclusion
Bibliography
App.: Checklist of Chapter Contents
Index
Biography
Cover image
Wabash tree

This Fine Place So Far From Home: Voices of Academics from the Working Class

Book
Dews, C.L. Barney and Carolyn Leste Law, eds.
1995
Temple University Press, Philadelphia, PA
LC5051.T45 1995
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
These autobiographical and analytical essays by a diverse group of professors and graduate students from working-class families reveal an academic world in which "blue-collar work is invisible." Describing conflict and frustration, the contributors expose a divisive middle-class bias in the university setting. Many talk openly about how little they understood about the hierarchy and processes of higher education, while others explore how their experiences now affect their relationships with their ...
Additional Info:
These autobiographical and analytical essays by a diverse group of professors and graduate students from working-class families reveal an academic world in which "blue-collar work is invisible." Describing conflict and frustration, the contributors expose a divisive middle-class bias in the university setting. Many talk openly about how little they understood about the hierarchy and processes of higher education, while others explore how their experiences now affect their relationships with their own students. They all have in common the anguish of choosing to hide their working-class background, to keep the language of home out of the classroom and the ideas of school away from home. These startlingly personal stories highlight the fissure between a working-class upbringing and the more privileged values of the institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Carolyn Leste Law)

ch. 1 Stupid Rich Bastards (Laurel Johnson Black)
ch. 2 A Real Class Act: Searching for Identity in the "Classless" Society (Julie A. Charlip)
ch. 3 Bronx Syndrome (Stephen Garger)
ch. 4 The Screenwriter's Tale (Jennifer Lawler)
ch. 5 You Were Raised Better Than That (Naton Leslie)
ch. 6 In the Shadow of My Old Kentucky Home (George T. Martin Jr.)
ch. 7 Todos Vuelven: From Potrero Hill to UCLA (Rosa María Pegueros)
ch. 8 Another Day's Journey: An African American in Higher Education (Gloria D. Warren)
ch. 9 Useful Knowledge (Mary Cappello)
ch. 10 A Carpenter's Daughter (Renny Christopher)
ch. 11 Paper Mills (Heather J. Hicks)
ch. 12 The Social Construction of a Working-Class Academic (Dwight Lang)
ch. 13 Working-Class Women as Academics: Seeing in Two Directions, Awkwardly (Nancy LaPaglia)
ch. 14 Ambivalent Maybe (Wilson J. Moses)
ch. 15 Class Matters: Symbolic Boundaries and Cultural Exclusion (Sharon O'Dair)
ch. 16 Nowhere at Home: Toward a Phenomenology of Working-Class Consciousness (Christine Overall)
ch. 17 Past Voices, Present Speakers (Donna Burns Phillips)
ch. 18 Workin' at the U. (Milan Kovacovic)
ch. 19 Class, Composition, and Reform in Departments of English: A Personal Account (Raymond A. Mazurek)
ch. 20 Complicity in Class Codes: the Exclusionary Function of Education (Irvin Peckham)
ch. 21 Is There a Working-Class History?(William A. Pelz)
ch. 22 Psychology's Class Blindness: Investment in the Status Quo (Deborah Piper)
ch. 23 Working It Out: Values, Perspectives, and Autobiography (John Sumser)
ch. 24 The Work of Professing (A Letter to Home) (Michael Schalbe)

Afterword (C.L. Barney Dews)
About the Contributors
Cover image

Working-Class Women in the Academy: Laborers in the Knowledge Factory

Book
Tokarczyk, Michelle M. and Elizabeth A. Fay, eds.
1993
University of Massachusetts Press, Amherst, MA
LB2332.3.W68 1993
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
"My mother still wants me to get a 'real' job. My father, who is retired after forty-four years in the merchant marine, has never read my work. When I visited recently, the only book in his house was the telephone book." "I do not know that my mother's mother ever acknowledged my college education except to ask me once, 'How can you live so far away from your people?'. ...
Additional Info:
"My mother still wants me to get a 'real' job. My father, who is retired after forty-four years in the merchant marine, has never read my work. When I visited recently, the only book in his house was the telephone book." "I do not know that my mother's mother ever acknowledged my college education except to ask me once, 'How can you live so far away from your people?'. Thus write two of the twenty women from working-class backgrounds whose voices are heard in this unique collection of essays. Each of the women has lived through the process of academic socialization - as both student and teacher - and each has thought long and deeply about her experience from an explicitly feminist perspective. Among the questions the contributors explore, What are the issues - pedagogical, theoretical, and personal - that affect the professional and private lives of these women? How do they resolve tensions between their roles as middle-class professionals and their roots in working-class families? How do class and gender intersect in the academy? (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction(Tokarczyk, Michelle M. and Elizabeth A. Fay)
Class Discussion (Lillian S. Robinson)

Pt. 1 Belonging
ch. 1 "What's a Nice Working-Class Girl Like You Doing in a Place Like This?" (Saundra Gardner)
ch. 2 Who Am I Now? The Politics of Class Identity (Donna Langston)
ch. 3 Writing and Teaching with Class (Valerie Miner)
ch. 4 A Question of Belonging (Joanna Kadi)

Pt. 2 Pockets of Experience
ch. 5 Keeping Close to Home: Class and Education (Bell Hooks)
ch. 6 A Mennonite "Hard Worker" Moves from the Working Class and the Religious/Ethnic Community to Academia: A Conflict between Two Definitions of Work (Laura H. Weaver)
ch. 7 Grandma Went to Smith, All Right, but She Went from Nine to Five: A Memoir (Patricia Clark Smith)
ch. 8 A Farmer's Daughter in Academia (Jacqueline Burnside)
ch. 9 Yer Own Motha Wouldna Reckanized Ya: Surviving an Apprenticeship in the "Knowledge Factory" (Suzanne Sowinska)

Pt. 3 Going to Class
ch. 10 Pass the Cake: The Politics of Gender, Class, and Text in the Academic Workplace (Pam Annas)
ch. 11 "Someone to Watch Over Me": Politics and Paradoxes in Academic Mentoring (Cheryl Fish)
ch. 12 Working-Class Women as Students and Teachers (Elisabeth Johnson)
ch. 13 Teaching the Working Woman (Rose Zimbardo)

Pt. 4 Ways in and Ways Out
ch. 14 Recasting the "Politics of Truth": Thoughts on Class, Gender, and the Role of Intellectuals (Pamela A. Fox)
ch. 15 Vestments and Vested Interests: Academia, the Working Class, and Affirmative Action (Sharon O'Dair)
ch. 16 Language: Closings and Openings (Pat Belanoff)
ch. 17 Dissent in the Field; or, a New Type of Intellectual? (Elizabeth A. Fay)
ch. 18 Telling Tales in School: A Redneck Daughter in the Academy (Hephzibah Roskelly)

Epilogue: By the Rivers of Babylon (Michelle M. Tokarczyk)
Bibliography
Contributors' Notes
Index
Cover image

This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color

Book
Moraga, Cherrie, and Gloria Anzaldua, eds.
1983
Kitchen Table Press, Latham, New York
Not catalogued
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
The long-awaited reprint of one of SPD's most popular titleS, this book features a new foreword by Gloria E. Anzaldua, as well as an updated bibliography. It also includes the original 1981 foreword (Toni Cade Bambara), the original preface (Cherrie L. Moraga) and the original introduction (Anzaldua & Moraga). (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The long-awaited reprint of one of SPD's most popular titleS, this book features a new foreword by Gloria E. Anzaldua, as well as an updated bibliography. It also includes the original 1981 foreword (Toni Cade Bambara), the original preface (Cherrie L. Moraga) and the original introduction (Anzaldua & Moraga). (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword, (Toni Cade Bambara)
Preface, (Cherrie Moraga)
The Bridge Poem, (Donna Kate Rushin)
Introduction, (Cherrie Moraga and Gloria Anzaldua)
Children Passing in the Streets
The Roots of Our Radicalism
When I Was Growing Up, (Nellie Wong)
on not bein, mary hope lee
For the Color of My Mother, (Cherrie Moraga)
I Am What I Am, (Rosario Morales)
Dreams of Violence, (Naomi Littlebear)
He Saw Chrystos
Entering the Lives of Others
Theory in the Flesh
Wonder Woman, (Genny Lim)
LaGuera, (Cherrie Moraga)
Invisibility is an Unnatural Disaster: Reflections of an Asian American Woman, (Mitsuye Yamada)
It's In My Blood, My Face -My Mother's Voice, The Way I Sweat, (Anita Valerio)
"Gee, You Don't Seem Like An Indian From the Reservation", (Barbara Cameron)
"... And Even Fidel Can't Change That!" (Aurora Levins Morales )
I Walk in the History of My People, (Chrystos)
And When You Leave, Take Your Pictures With You Racism in the Women's Movement And When You Leave, Take Your Pictures With You, (Jo Carrillo)
Beyond the Cliffs of Abiquiu, (Jo Carrillo)
I Don't Understand Those Who Have Turned Away From Me, (Chrystos)
Asian Pacific American Women and Feminism, (Mitsuye Yamada, Millicent Fredericks, Gabrielle Daniels)
"— But I Know You, American Woman", (Judii Moschkovich)
The Pathology of Racism: A Conversation with Third World Wimmin, (doris davenport)
We're All in the Same Boat, (Rosario Morales)
An Open Letter to Mary Daly, (Audre Lorde)
The Master's Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master's House, (Audre Lorde)
Between the Lines On Culture, Class, and Homophobia
The Other Heritage, (Rosario Morales)
billie lives! billie lives!, (hattie gossett)
Across the Kitchen Table: A Sister-to-Sister Dialogue, (Barbara Smith and Beverly Smith)
Lesbianism: An Act of Resistance, (Cheryl Clarke)
Lowriding Through the Women's Movement, (Barbara Noda)
Letter to Ma, (Merle Woo)
I Come With No Illusions, (Mirtha Quintanales)
I Paid Very Hard for My Immigrant Ignorance, (Mirtha Quintanales)
Earth-Lover, Survivor, Musician, (Naomi Littlebear)
Speaking in Tongues
The Third World Woman Writer
Speaking in Tongues: A Letter To Third World Women Writers, (Gloria Anzaldua)
who told you anybody wants to hear from you? you ain't nothing but a black woman!, (hattie gossett)
In Search of the Self as Hero: Confetti of Voices on New Year's Night, (Nellie Wong)
Chicana's Feminist Literature: A Re-vision Through Malintzin/or Malintzin: Putting Flesh Back on the Object, (Norma Alarcon)
Ceremony for Completing a Poetry Reading, (Chrystos)
El Mundo Zurdo
The Vision
Give Me Back, (Chrystos)
LaPrieta, (Gloria Anzaldua)
A Black Feminist Statement
Combahee River Collective The Welder, (Cherrie Moraga)
O.K. Momma, Who the Hell Am I?: An Interview with Luisah Teish, (Gloria Anzaldua)
Brownness, (Andrea Canaan)
Revolution: It's Not Neat or Pretty or Quick, Pat Parker
No Rock Scorns Me as Whore, (Chrystos)
Biographies of the Contributors
Third World Women in the United States - By and About Us: A Selected Bibliography (Cherrie Moraga)
Cover image

Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism

Book
Collins, Patricia Hill
2004
Routledge, New York, NY
E185.86.C58167 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
In Black Sexual Politics, one of America's most influential writers on race and gender explores how images of Black sexuality have been used to maintain the color line and how they threaten to spread a new brand of racism around the world today. In the tradition of her award-winning book, Black Feminist Thought, Patricia Hill Collins now turns her critical eye to race, gender, and sexuality in relation to black ...
Additional Info:
In Black Sexual Politics, one of America's most influential writers on race and gender explores how images of Black sexuality have been used to maintain the color line and how they threaten to spread a new brand of racism around the world today. In the tradition of her award-winning book, Black Feminist Thought, Patricia Hill Collins now turns her critical eye to race, gender, and sexuality in relation to black men and women. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: No Turning Back

Part I African Americans and the New Racism
ch. 1 Why Black Sexual Politics?
ch. 2 The Past Is Ever Present: Recognizing the New Racism
ch. 3 Prisons for Our Bodies, Closets for Our Minds: Racism, Heterosexism, and Black Sexuality

Part II Rethinking Black Gender Ideology
ch. 4 Get Your Freak On: Sex, Babies, and Images of Black Femininity
ch. 5 Booty Call: Sex, Violence, and Images of Black Masculinity
ch. 6 Very Necessary: Redefining Black Gender Ideology

Part III Toward a Progressive Black Sexual Politics
ch. 7 Assume the Position: The Changing Contours of Sexual Violence
ch. 8 No Storybook Romance: How Race and Gender Matter
ch. 9 Why We Can't Wait: Black Sexual Politics and the Challenge of HIV/AIDS

Afterword: The Power of a Free Mind
Notes
Glossary
Bibliography
Index
Cover image

What White Looks Like: African-American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question

Book
Yancy, George, ed.
2004
Routledge, New York, NY
E185.615.W438 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
In the burgeoning field of whiteness studies, What White Looks Like takes a unique approach to the subject by collecting the ideas of African-American philosophers. George Yancy has brought together a group of thinkers who address the problematic issues of whiteness as a category requiring serious analysis. What does white look like when viewed through philosophical training and African-American experience?
In this volume, Robert Birt asks if whites can "...
Additional Info:
In the burgeoning field of whiteness studies, What White Looks Like takes a unique approach to the subject by collecting the ideas of African-American philosophers. George Yancy has brought together a group of thinkers who address the problematic issues of whiteness as a category requiring serious analysis. What does white look like when viewed through philosophical training and African-American experience?
In this volume, Robert Birt asks if whites can "live whiteness authentically." Janine Jones examines what it means to be a "goodwill white." Joy James tells of beating her "addiction" to white supremacy, while Arnold Farr writes on making whiteness visible in Western philosophy. What White Looks Like brings a badly needed critique and philosophically sophisticated perspective to central issue of contemporary society. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Contributors
Introduction: Fragments of a Social Ontology of Whiteness
ch. 1 Racial Exploitation and the Wages of Whiteness
ch. 2 The Bad Faith of Whiteness
ch. 3 The Impairment of Empathy in Goodwill Whites for African Americans
ch. 4 Deligitimizing the Normativity of "Whiteness": A Critical Africana Philosophical Study of the Metaphoricity of "Whiteness"
ch. 5 A Foucauldian (Genealogical) Reading of Whiteness: The Production of the Black Body/Self and the Racial Deformation of Pecola Breedlove in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye
ch. 6 Whiteness Visible: Enlightenment Racism and the Structure of Racialized Consciousness
ch. 7 Rahabilitate Racial Whiteness?
ch. 8 Critical Reflections on Three Popular Tropes in the Study of Whiteness
ch. 9 Whiteness and Africana Phenomenology
ch. 10 On the Nature of Whiteness and the Ontology of Race: Toward a Dialectical Materialist Analysis
ch. 11 Silence and Sympathy: Dewey's Whiteness
ch. 12 Whiteness and Feminism: Deja Vu Discourses, What's Next?
ch. 13 The Academic Addict: Mainlining (& Kicking) White Supremacy (WS)
Index
Cover image

Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States

Book
Bonilla-Silva, Eduardo
2003
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
E184.A1B597 2003
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Racism is alive and well although it has changed its clothes. Color-blind racism combines elements of liberalism in the abstract with anti-minority views to justify contemporary racial inequality. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Racism is alive and well although it has changed its clothes. Color-blind racism combines elements of liberalism in the abstract with anti-minority views to justify contemporary racial inequality. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 The strange enigma of race in contemporary America
ch. 2 The central frames of color-blind racism
ch. 3 The style of color blindness : how to talk nasty about minorities without sounding racist
ch. 4 "I didn't get that job because of a black man": color-blind racism's racial stories
ch. 5 Peeking inside the (white) house of color blindness : the significance of whites' segregation
ch. 6 Are all whites refined Archie Bunkers? : an examination of white racial progressives
ch. 7 Are blacks color blind, too?
ch. 8 E Pluribus Unum or the same old perfume in a new bottle? : on the future of racial stratification in the United States
ch. 9 Conclusion : "the (color-blind) emperor has no clothes" : exposing the whiteness of color blindness
ch. 10 Queries : answers to questions from concerned readers
Postscript : what is to be done (for real)?
App In-depth interview schedule DAS 98-form B
Cover image
Wabash tree

Teaching Inclusively: Resources for Course, Department & Institutional Change in Higher Education

Book
Ouellett, Mathew L., ed.
2005
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LC1099.3.T436 2005
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Teaching Inclusively brings together a broad array of current "best practices" in the design, implementation, and assessment of multicultural change initiatives on college and university campuses. Readers will find that this volume advocates for more transparent connections between change initiatives at individual, departmental, and college-wide levels by highlighting the ways in which such practices and change goals can relate to and support each other, thus addressing a noticeable absence in ...
Additional Info:
Teaching Inclusively brings together a broad array of current "best practices" in the design, implementation, and assessment of multicultural change initiatives on college and university campuses. Readers will find that this volume advocates for more transparent connections between change initiatives at individual, departmental, and college-wide levels by highlighting the ways in which such practices and change goals can relate to and support each other, thus addressing a noticeable absence in the current available literature.

The contributors to this volume present readers with a balance between theoretical models and demonstration projects that address change processes at three levels: individual courses, programs and departments, and across schools and institutions. In addition, there are descriptions of current, multi-year or multi-phase efforts at both departmental and organizational levels. Whenever possible, the contributors include their perspectives on important lessons learned from their efforts. Finally, we offer resource materials that promise concrete support for applications.

Part I addresses models and perspectives that help to conceptualize, implement and assess diversity-related instructional and faculty development programs at the systemic level. Contributors offer models and descriptions of practices aimed at making transparent the values, beliefs, and goals that shape institutional and classroom climates. Note that in the context of this volume, "diversity" is deliberately defined broadly to encourage a more systemic approach to the analyses of and response to diversity-related issues. For many readers, this may offer new dimensions and greater texture to their current conceptualization of diversity. This section reflects the contributors’ interests in analytical tools and organizational frameworks useful in addressing individual, departmental, and institutional changes. Whenever appropriate, authors in this section identify a range of practical applications, such as course-based efforts in the major to courses that fulfill general education requirements.

In Part II, contributors describe change initiatives that use departments (or programs) as the unit of analysis for diversity-related change efforts. In this section, readers will benefit from the descriptions and assessments of programs designed specifically to bring faculty and academic administrators together in cohorts to address diversity and teaching development goals within the disciplines in a sustained dialogue on diversity. Assessment of current efforts indicate that such initiatives illuminate the content, skills, and values necessary for sustained change and that such experiences can become important models for broader institutional change efforts.

In Part III, the contributors discuss multicultural change efforts at the college or institutional level directed at creating and sustaining more inclusive teaching and learning communities. Additionally, contributors describe programs and practices useful in addressing diversity issues across the disciplines as well as within discipline-specific contexts. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding how can systematic multicultural organization change initiatives can support a departmental or campus-wide emphasis on teaching inclusively. These chapters offer rich descriptions of efforts at institutions learning how to address diversity-related initiatives in a sustainable, comprehensive manner. Such efforts can help others determine how best to assess their organization’s needs and strengths, and to determine what is needed in the larger environment to initiate and sustain successful pro-equity organizational change and innovations.

Finally, Part IV pays particular attention to resources and program models particularly useful for faculty developers and centers. Contributors to this section provide a rich set of tools for self and course assessment, planning for new or revised programs, and suggesting well-proven strategies for approaches to diversity-related teaching development and organizational change initiatives. These include descriptions of specific, "hands on" consultation practices, workshop exercises, resource materials, and design elements (e.g., use of writing prompts) proven effective across the disciplines in engaging faculty in reflection, analysis, dialogue and innovation related to diversity-related teaching development goals. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
About the Editor

I. Theoretical Frameworks and Useful Models
ch. 1 The Theory and Practice of Multicultural Organization Development in Education (Bailey W. Jackson)
ch. 2 Letting the Hydra Roam: Attending to Diverse Forms of Diversity in Liberal Arts Education (Sammy Basu)
ch. 3 It Takes a Campus: Situating Professional Development Efforts Within a Campus Diversity Program (Nancy Chism , and Karen Whitney)
ch. 4 Defining the Shape of Diversity Pedagogy (Lynn Leonard, Sue Akersten, Stephen Adkison, and Edward Nuhfer)
ch. 5 Transcultural Issues in Teaching and Learning (Bland Tomkinson)
ch. 6 Building Multiculturalism into Teaching Development Programs (Constance Ewing Cook, and Mary Deane Sorcinelli)
ch. 7 Warming Up the Chill: Teaching Against Structures (Audrey Kleinsasser, and Jane Nelson)
ch. 8 Enhancing the Climate for Diversity in the Classroom: An Experiment in Campus Transformation (Richard C. Turner, Gina Sanchez Gibau, Monica M. Medina, and Sherree A. Wilson)
ch. 9 Positionality and Authority in Curriculum Transformation: Faculty/Student Collaboration in Course Design (Betty Schmitz, and Anupama Taranath)
ch. 10 Teaching and Diversity: Collaborative Lessons Learned (Pamela Ashmore, Kathleen Sullivan Brown, G. O. Akura, and Carole Murphy)
ch. 11 Teaching Inclusively: The Whole Is Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts (Christine Martin)
ch. 12 Renewing Diversity Initiatives Within an English Department (Anne J. Herrington)
ch. 13 Teaching Diversity and Fostering Inclusivity at the University: A Collaborative Approach (Abby L. Ferber, and Andrea O'Reilly Herrera)
ch. 14 Speaking a New Language: An Innovative Program Promotes Discussions in Diversity With Foreign Language Learners (Lisa Calvin)
ch. 15 Transforming Teacher Preparation: Changing Cultures Through Constructivism and Reflective Practices (Miguel Licona)

II. Departmental or Program-Based Change Initiatives
ch. 16 Teaching Together: Interracial Teams (Mathew L. Ouellett, and Edith C. Fraser)
ch. 17 Confronting Issues of Oppression in the University: Creating a Space for Faculty Dialogue, Reflection, and Action (Peter T. Wilson)
ch. 18 Breaking the Silence: Innovative Approaches for Promoting Dialogue About Diversity Issues Within a Communication Disorders Department (Maria Diana Gonzales and Jane A. Baran)
ch. 19 Transforming Higher Education Institutions Using Multicultural Organizational Development: A Case Study of a Large Northeastern University (Linda S. Marchesani and Bailey W. Jackson)
ch. 20 Institutional Transformation to Support Inclusive Teaching Initiatives (Murali Krishnamurthi)
ch. 21 Cultivating Global Understanding Through Campus-Wide Learning Communities (Bonnie B. Mullinix, Rekha Datta and Morris Saldov)

III. Systemic Change Initiatives
ch. 22 Moving the Mountain: Social Justice Education at the University (Julie Andrzejewski and John Alessio)
ch. 23 Multicultural Transformation at Macalester College (Roxane Harvey Gudeman)
ch. 24 Making the Campus Community a Safe and Affirming Space for All (Robert S. Haynor, and Susan A Holton)
ch. 25 Critical Moments: A Case-Based Diversity Project That Engages and Enlivens Campus-Wide Efforts to Teach and Work Inclusively (Diane Gillespie, Gillies Malnarich, and Tina Young)
ch. 26 From Reading Group to Faculty Change Team: The Hamline University Lido Group (James Francisco Bonilla)
ch. 27 But How Can I Talk With Faculty About That? Approaches to Consulting Around Multicultural Issues (Matthew Kaplan, and Beth Glover Reed)
ch. 28 Mainstreaming Feminist Perspectives (Carol Lauer and Lynda M. Glennon)
ch. 29 Faculty Development and Students With Disabilities: Accommodations and Universal Design (Sheryl Burgstahler)
ch. 30 A Catwalk for Kitano: Highlighting Kitano's Paradigm for Multicultural Course Transformation in Consultations With Individual Faculty (Natasha Flowers)
ch. 31 Proving Diversity Classes Make a Difference: Effective Assessment of Students' Learning (Sherwood Smith)
ch. 32 A Framework for Inclusive Teaching in STEM Disciplines (Lois A. Reddick, Wayne Jacobson Angela Linse, and Darryl Yong)
ch. 33 The Multicultural Lab: Diversity Issues in STEM Classes (A.T. Miller)
ch. 34 Science in the Interest of Social Justice: Untangling the Biological Realities of Race and Gender (Leslie S. Jones)
ch. 35 Faculty Development and Organizational Change: Moving From "Minority Relevant" to Intersectionality and Social Justice (Beth Glover Reed, and Melissa R. Peet)
ch. 36 Interactive Theater as a Multicultural Change Agent in Faculty Development (Diana Kardia, A.T. Miller, and Jeffrey Steiger)
ch. 37 Dissemination of Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) and Formation of a National Network: Embracing a Common Pedagogy (Pratibha Varma-Nelson, and David Gosser)
ch. 38 Service Learning, Study Circles, and Problem-Based Learning: Student-Initiated Efforts to Confront the Concept of Race (Larry E. Greeson)

IV. Best Practices and Methods
ch. 39 Developing Diversity Management Skills in a University Context: A Direct or Indirect Approach? (Philip Frame, and Jennifer O’Connor)
ch. 40 Creating Inclusive Classrooms: A View Through the Student Lens (James Greenberg and Andre Perry)
ch. 41 Multicultural Course Transformation (Christine A. Stanley, Shari Saunders, and Jamie M. Hart)
ch 42 Teaching With a Social Justice Perspective: A Model for Faculty Seminars Across Academic Disciplines (Maurianne Adams, and Barbara J. Love)
ch. 43 Strategic Action in Hot Moments (Lee Warren)
ch. 44 Inclusive Teaching for Our Queer Students: A Workshop (Michele DiPietro)
ch. 45 Key Resources on Diversity for Faculty Developers: An Idiosyncratic Annotated Bibliography (Stephanie Nickerson)
ch. 46 Multicultural Online Resources: What Are They, Where Are They, and Are They Bias-Free? (Denise C. Camin)
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"African Students in Theological Doctoral Programs in Christian Institutions of Higher Education"

Article
Starcher, Richard L.
2004
Article: Christian Higher Education 3, no. 3 (2004): 207-222
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Over the years, thousands of students have left Africa to pursue theological doctorates in Christian institutions of higher learning around the world. The study reported in this paper endeavored to understand their experiences and articulate their needs and aspirations. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with 23 African students and were analyzed using grounded theory procedures. The emerging profile revealed African students in pursuit of theological doctorates to be mature in ...
Additional Info:
Over the years, thousands of students have left Africa to pursue theological doctorates in Christian institutions of higher learning around the world. The study reported in this paper endeavored to understand their experiences and articulate their needs and aspirations. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with 23 African students and were analyzed using grounded theory procedures. The emerging profile revealed African students in pursuit of theological doctorates to be mature in age and experience with rich and variegated backgrounds. While a desire for increased competence, access to employment opportunities, and a greater voice in church and society were motivating factors in their educational quests, the dominant motivation expressed by research participants was a passion to help Africa and the African church. Students viewed increased competence and access as enhancing usefulness. Consequently, students preferred doctoral programs perceived as Africa-relevant and internationally credible. Nevertheless, they demonstrated a readiness to compromise the ideal in favor of the achievable, particularly in terms of program affordability. (From the Publisher)
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"Realities, Visions, and Promises of a Multicultural Future"

Article
Moore, Mary Elizabeth, Boyung Lee, Katherine Turpin, Ralph Casas, Lynn Bridgers and Veronica Miles
2004
Religious Education 99, no. 3 (2004): 287-315
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image
Wabash tree

Making Diversity Work on Campus: A Research-Based Perspective

Book
Milem, Jeffrey F., Mitchell J. Chang, and Anthony Lising Antonio
2005
Association of American Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C.
LC1099.3.M544 2005
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
The authors discuss recent empirical evidence, gathered on behalf of the University of Michigan Supreme Court defense, demonstrating the educational benefits of diverse learning environments. These are environments that must be intentionally planned and nurtured, where diversity is conceived of as a process toward better learning and not merely an outcome that one can check off a list. Included are numerous suggestions for how to engage diversity in the service ...
Additional Info:
The authors discuss recent empirical evidence, gathered on behalf of the University of Michigan Supreme Court defense, demonstrating the educational benefits of diverse learning environments. These are environments that must be intentionally planned and nurtured, where diversity is conceived of as a process toward better learning and not merely an outcome that one can check off a list. Included are numerous suggestions for how to engage diversity in the service of learning, ranging from recruiting a compositionally diverse student body, faculty, and staff to transforming curriculum, co-curriculum, and pedagogy to reflect and support goals for inclusion and excellence. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction to the series
Making Diversity Work on Campus: A Research Based Perspectives
ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Defining Diversity as Engagement
ch. 3 Research Synthesis
ch. 4 Concluding Thoughts about the Research on Divinity
ch. 5 Understanding the Campus Racial Climate
ch. 6 Engaging Diversity on Campus
ch. 7 The diveristy Agenda: The Time is Now
References
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"ATS Folio: Diversity in Theological Education" (pdf)

Journal Issue
Seymour, Jack L.; Speller, Julia M.; Liew, Tat-siong Benny; and Aleshire, Daniel, eds.
2003
ATS Folio (Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh 2003)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Five perspectives on diversity are provided here for reflection and discussion in your institution. Jack Seymour and Julia Speller offer observations drawn from discussions at the March 2002 ATS Workshop on Diversity. Two fictional cases explore negotiating cultural differences from a faculty member's and a dean's perspectives. Daniel Aleshire's column on "Good Work" is reprinted from the ATS newsletter, Colloquy (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Five perspectives on diversity are provided here for reflection and discussion in your institution. Jack Seymour and Julia Speller offer observations drawn from discussions at the March 2002 ATS Workshop on Diversity. Two fictional cases explore negotiating cultural differences from a faculty member's and a dean's perspectives. Daniel Aleshire's column on "Good Work" is reprinted from the ATS newsletter, Colloquy (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Using The Folio - Suggests ways in which the various contents of this folio might be used in a range of institutional settings.
ch. 2 Perspectives on Diversity - Presents, in a newsletter format, several short essays on diversity in theology education.
ch. 3 Faculty Member Profiles - Provide specific, personal locations for entry into issues of diversity within theological institutions: Asian Faculty Member Profile, African American Faculty Member Profile, Hispanic Faculty Member Profile
ch. 4 Statistics on Race and Ethnicity - Provides data on racial/ethnic diversity within ATS schools and within the general populace.
ch. 5 Issue - Sheets are designed to be short, provocative entry points into discussion of issues related to tenure, hospitality, isolation, hiring, and curriculum revision.
ch. 6 Seven Cases - Illustrate ways in which institutions have come to work through issues of diversity.
ch. 7 The Do's and Don'ts - Sheet identified a number of concerns regarding diversity and institutional change.
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Building Bridges for Women of Color in Higher Education: A Practical Guide for Success

Book
Battle, Conchita and Chrontrese M. Doswell, eds.
2004
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LB2332.32.B85 2004
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Building Bridges for Women of Color in Higher Education is designed to create a forum for synthesizing collective voices from women of color in academia. This book will serve as a professional development tool for academicians, both embarking upon and maintaining careers in higher education. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Building Bridges for Women of Color in Higher Education is designed to create a forum for synthesizing collective voices from women of color in academia. This book will serve as a professional development tool for academicians, both embarking upon and maintaining careers in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction : building bridges

ch. 1 Road to the presidency : women of color assuming leadership roles in the academy
African-American female college presidents' career paths (Anna L. Waring)
The road less traveled (Dolores M. Fernández)
From sorrow valley to the presidency (Algeania Warren Freeman)
The accidental president (Glenda D. Price)
Road to the presidency (Trudie Kibbe Reed)

ch. 2 Climatizing faculty and administrative roles : exploring the nuances of minority serving institutions and predominately white institutions
Black for 31 years : nuances (Cheryl Clarke)
Perceptions of minority women employed by a state system of higher education (Carole Anderson and Brenda Sanders Dédé)
Burning the candle at both ends : managing work-family conflict (Jeycelyn Finley-Hervey and Lynn Perry Wooten)
Black women in higher education : negotiating the cultural workplace (Deborah L. Owens)
European academies, African academics : "sistah-scholars" as a model for survival (Evangeline A. Wheeler)
"White" water challenges : navigating the college climate with well-chosen oars (Ann Janette Alejano-Steele)

ch. 3 The department chair dichotomy : balancing faculty and administration
Confessions of an acting chair (Judi Moore Latta)
In the middle of the vanguard : women of color bridging roles as faculty (Emma T. Lucas)
The challenges of chairing the academic department (Gladys J. Willis)

ch. 4 Wading in the water : negotiating the tenure process
The slippery slope of student evaluations for black women faculty (Beverly A. Davis)
Negotiating the tenure process (Julie E. Stokes)
Lessons from African American faculty women : practical strategies to securing tenure (Sheila T. Gregory)
Finding calm waters during the tenure process : a dozen anchors for success (Cheryl Evans Green and rebekah McCloud)
ch. 5 Putting our words to practice
Using competitive strategic planning to guide you on the higher education ladder of success (Conchita Y. Battle)
Conclusion : coming together to build this bridge (Conchita Y. Battle)
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Women in Theological Education: Past, Present, and Future

Journal Issue
1972
Theological Education 8, no. 4 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
Editorial Introduction (Emily C. Hewitt)
Women with a Past: A New Look at the History of Theological Education (Dorothy Bass Fraser)
An Advocate’s Guide to Seminary Discussions of “The Woman Question” (Beverly Harrison)
Women’s Rising Consciousness: Implications for the Curriculum (Karen L. Bloomquist)
The Women’s Movement and Men in Seminary (Lynn S. Larson)
Woman Minister? (Sarah Bently-Doely)
The Invisible Women: Workers and Wives (Virginia Lieson Bereton)
Going Back to Seminary: An Old Wife’s Tale (Marna McKenzie)
To Catholic Women Contemplating Theological Education: “Que Vadis?” (Margaret N. Maxey)
Visions of Possibility: Women for Theological Education (Peggy Ann Way)
Women in Theological Education: Selected Resources (Betty S. Pagett)
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Women in Theological Education: An Issue Reexamined

Journal Issue
1975
Theological Education 11, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Journal Issue.
Additional Info:
Journal Issue.

Table Of Content:
The Seminary Quarter for Women at Grailville: Toward a Feminist Approach to Theological Education (Murphy Davis)
Women Theologizing: Naming and Claiming our Style (Susan Ross Clewell, Anita Herrick, Susan Haverstadt, Susan Vogel, and Susan Thorton)
A Survey of Interests and Agendas of Women in U.S. Church Denominations (Linda J. Hanson)
Women in the Seminary: A Roman Catholic Perspective (Joseph P. Brennan)
Association of Theological Schools Affirmative Action Plan (Arabella Meadows-Rogers)
A Modest Proposal (Fay Hollingshead Ellison)
Men in Conversation About Men (James W. Bergland, Tom F. Driver, Marvin Ellison, Bruce Robbins, Sidney D. Skirvin, and Arabella Meadows-Rogers)
Doctoral Placement Service for Women in Religion
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Building Theological Faculties of the Future (pdf)

Journal Issue
1991
Theological Education 28, no. 1 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1991-theological-education-v28-n1.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here:http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/1991-theological-education-v28-n1.pdf

Table Of Content:
Editorial Preface (Gail Buchwalter King)
Introduction: Who Shall Teach in a Theological School? (Joseph C. Hough, Jr.)
Thinking About Theological Education: The Implications of “Issues Research” for Criteria of Faculty Excellence (David H. Kelsey)
Faculty Development: A Shared Responsibility (Jane D. Douglass)
A Faculty Which Develop Themselves (Thomas F. Gleeson)
Issues in Achieving Pluralism in Faculty Development: The Challenge and Opportunity of Inclusivity (Judith A. Berling)
“Pluralism” as a Criterion for Excellence in Faculty Development (Walter C. Kaiser, Jr.)
The Faculty as Mentor and Model (Max L. Stackhouse)
Faculty as Mentors and Models (Frederick H. Borsch)
Faculty as Scholars and Teachers (Richard Mouw)
Faculty as Scholars and Teachers (Barbara Brown Zikmund)
The Graduate Education of Future Theological Facilities: A Catholic Perspective (Richard P. McBrien)
Looking Ahead at Theological Education (Craig Dykstra)
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From Oppression to Grace: Women of Color and Their Dilemmas within the Academy

Book
Berry, Theodorea Regina and Nathalie D. Mizelle, eds.
2006
Stylus, Sterling
LC212.82.F76 2006
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
From the Publisher
This book gives voice to the experiences of women of color - women of African, Native American, Latina, East Indian, Korean and Japanese descent - as students in pursuing terminal degrees and as faculty members navigating the Academy, grappling with the dilemmas encountered by others and themselves as they exist at the intersections of their work and identities.
Women of color are frequently relegated - ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher
This book gives voice to the experiences of women of color - women of African, Native American, Latina, East Indian, Korean and Japanese descent - as students in pursuing terminal degrees and as faculty members navigating the Academy, grappling with the dilemmas encountered by others and themselves as they exist at the intersections of their work and identities.
Women of color are frequently relegated - on account both of race and womanhood - into monolithic categories that perpetuate oppression, subdue and suppress conflict, and silence voices. This book uses critical race feminism (CRF) to place women of color in the center, rather than the margins, of the discussion, theorizing, research and praxis of their lives as they co-exist in the dominant culture.
This book makes salient three characteristics of critical race feminism. Just as it is places emphasis on the application of theory to real life issues, the authors' narratives address concerns about the academic community, home, and family. Just as CRF supports a discourse of resistance, the book provides a forum for different voices as multi-representations of the counterstories against the acceptance of the dominant culture and the status quo. And, finally, the contributors' stories reflect CRF's emphasis on narrative to deepen the understanding of their lives as women of color.
The first part of the book addresses the issues faced on the way to achieving a terminal degree: the struggles encountered and the lessons learned along the way. Part Two, Pride and Prejudice Finding Your Place After the Degree, describes the complexity of lives of women with multiple identities as scholars with family, friends,and lives at home and at work. The book concludes with the voices of senior faculty sharing their journeys and their paths to growth as scholars and individuals.
This book is for all women of color growing up in the academy, learning to stand on their own, taking first steps, mastering the language, walking, running, falling and getting up to run again, and illuminates the process of self-definition that is essential to their growth as scholars and individuals.

Table Of Content:
Introduction : what the fuck, now what? : the social and psychological dilemmas of multidimensional being as a woman of color in the academy

Part 1 Move on up a little higher : completing the terminal degree
ch. 1 The journey of an African American female chemist-scholar (Amanda C. Bryant-Friedrich)
ch. 2 My skin is brown and I do not wear a tie : exploring my selves as a southern, black, educated, Christian woman (Menthia P. Clark)
ch. 3 Bridging identities : making sense of who we are becoming to be (Aki Murata)
ch. 4 Watching, my other education : vicarious learning about gender and race in the professorate (M. Francyne Huckaby)
ch. 5 Balancing the margin is my center : a Navajo woman's navigations through the academy and her community (Tiffany S. Lee)
ch. 6 Transitions : finding my voice (Tinaya Webb)
ch. 7 In between China and North America (Ming Fang He)
ch. 8 Both oppressor and oppressed : an Asian Indian woman's experience within the academy (Kiran Katira)
ch. 9 Mentoring and its role in scholarly development (Beatrice Bridglall)

Part 2 Pride and prejudice : finding your place after the degree
ch. 10 Being all things to all people : expectations of and demands on women of color in the legal academy (Danielle Conway-Jones)
ch. 11 The "intercultural space" where worlds collide (Amanda Kim)
ch. 12 Sides of the tenure and promotion process : can I be a parental figure, scholar, and spouse? (Cassandra Sligh Dewalt)
ch. 13 Perspectives on negotiating identity and profession at a historically black college or university (Cassandra Slight Dewalt and Cheryl Thompkins Horton)
ch. 14 Choosing my best thing : black motherhood and academica (Kaavonia Hinton-Jonson)
ch. 15 Seen, not heard : a conversation on what it means to be black and female in the academy (Lavada Taylor Brandon)
ch. 16 In this place where I don't quite belong : claiming the ontoepistemological in-between (Ddenise Taliaferro Baszile)
ch. 17 Una Lucha de Fronteras (a struggle of borders) : women of color in the academy (Maria V. Balderrama, Mary T. Texeira and Elsa Valdez)

Part 3 Words of womanhood wisdom : voices of senior faculty who are women of color
ch. 18 Critical race feminist foremothering : multiplicities in the post 9/11 world
ch. 19 A Nuyorican in the academy : lessons learned
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Confucian Tradition and Global Education

Book
de Bary, Wm. Theodore, ed.
2007
Columbia University Press, New York, NY
LC1090.D35 2007
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Religion and Academia   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Drawn from a series of lectures that Wm. Theodore de Bary delivered in honor of the Chinese philosopher Tang Junyi, Confucian Tradition is a unique synthesis of essay and debate concerning the future of Chinese education and the potential political uses of Confucianism in the contemporary world. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Drawn from a series of lectures that Wm. Theodore de Bary delivered in honor of the Chinese philosopher Tang Junyi, Confucian Tradition is a unique synthesis of essay and debate concerning the future of Chinese education and the potential political uses of Confucianism in the contemporary world. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Confucian education and the "point of democracy"
ch. 2 Asian classics and global education
ch. 3 Translating the classics
ch. 4 Tang Junyi and the philosophy of "general education" ( Cheung Chan-fai )
ch. 5 The over dominance of English in global education : a global response ( Kwan Tze-wan )

App. 1 Life chronology of Tang Junyi ( Lau Kwok-keung )
App. 2 The Chinese at Columbia : a personal testament
Article cover image

"Descriptions of a Tree Outside the Forest"

Article
Lacourt, Jeanne, A.
2003
American Indian Quarterly 27, no 1 & 2 (2003): 296-307
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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The Sista' Network: African-American Women Faculty Successfully Negotiating the Road to Tenure

Book
Cooper, Tuesday L.
2006
Anker Publishing Company, Bolton, MA
LB2335.7.C66 2006
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
The “Sista’ Network"”is a term used to describe the relationships between and among professional African-American women which enable them to assist one another in learning the unwritten rules and protocols of various professions. In the context of higher education, the Sista' Network can help new African-American women faculty learn the rules to “the Tenure Game.”
A qualitative inquiry into the lives and experiences of nine African-American women during ...
Additional Info:
The “Sista’ Network"”is a term used to describe the relationships between and among professional African-American women which enable them to assist one another in learning the unwritten rules and protocols of various professions. In the context of higher education, the Sista' Network can help new African-American women faculty learn the rules to “the Tenure Game.”
A qualitative inquiry into the lives and experiences of nine African-American women during various stages of the tenure process, this book partly explores general, practical considerations such as the tenure process; requirements for tenure; and negotiating the balance among teaching, research, service, and collegiality. Yet it delves further into the statistics of African-American women faculty in the academy; issues of isolation, mentoring, and networking; African-American women faculty and the tenure process; African-American feminist thought; and racism, sexism, and the politics of singularity.
Also included are 12 guiding principles for new African-American women faculty members embarking upon the tenure process. Carefully weaving African-American feminist thought with the literature on academic tenure and minority along with stories of women faculty’s experiences in the academy, the author creates an effective and engaging account for minority women embarking on the tenure journey themselves. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Preface
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction:The Challenges of African-American Women Faculty

ch. 2 Tenure
The Tenure Process
Requirements for Tenure

ch. 3 African-American Women Faculty in the Academy
The Statistics
Isolation, Mentoring, and Networking
The Tenure Process
African-American Feminist Thought

ch. 4 The Research Results
The Methodology and Structure
A Roundtable Discussion
The Tenure Process
Collegiality
Service and Mentoring
Isolation
Networking
Highlights and Lessons Learned

ch. 5 The Game of Tenure
Learning the Rules of the Tenure Game
Negotiating the Balance Among Teaching, Research, and Service
Collegiality as the Fourth Category of the Tenure Process
Finding a Mentor
The Trilogy: Racism, Sexism, and the Politics of Singularity
The Sista’ Network
Guiding Principles for African-American Women Faculty

ch. 6 Conclusion: Six Years Later

Appendix A: Research Design and Methods
Appendix B: Sample Interview Questions
Bibliography
Index
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Faculty of Color: Teaching in Predominantly White Colleges and Universities

Book
Stanley, Christine A., ed.
2006
Anker Publishing Company, Inc., Boston, MA
LB2332.6.F33 2006
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Combining an overview of current research literature and 23 engaging narratives, Faculty of Color invites deeper dialogue on the experiences of faculty of color teaching in predominantly white institutions. By raising issues for commentary and investigation, the book challenges its readers to adopt effective strategies for the recruitment and retention of faculty of color in higher education.

The authors represent a variety of disciplines and share firsthand experiences that ...
Additional Info:
Combining an overview of current research literature and 23 engaging narratives, Faculty of Color invites deeper dialogue on the experiences of faculty of color teaching in predominantly white institutions. By raising issues for commentary and investigation, the book challenges its readers to adopt effective strategies for the recruitment and retention of faculty of color in higher education.

The authors represent a variety of disciplines and share firsthand experiences that range from teaching, recruitment, research, mentoring, institutional climate, and administration, to relationships with colleagues as well as students. Through their stories, they are able to offer useful insights into

* Teaching styles and how they affect promotion decisions
* The impact of mentoring relationships
* Collegiality in the campus and university setting
* Separating self-identity from group membership
* Managing service activities
* Understanding and dealing with racism

Faculty of Color is intended for senior administrators and policymakers, faculty development professionals, current faculty, and future faculty of color who are contemplating academia. Each chapter offers a variety of recommendations designed to guide predominantly white colleges and universities in working to ensure that their institutions continue to change in substantive ways. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Preface
Acknowledgments
An Overview of the Literature (Christine A. Stanley)
Succeeding in the Face of Doubt (Stephanie G. Adams)
Do I Have to Be Black or Brown to Count? An Appeal for Broad Appreciation and Understanding of Diversity (Karla Anhalt)
Free to Be the Me You See: Discovering the Joy of Teaching (K. Denise Bane)
"Are You Here to Move the Piano?" A Latino Reflects on Twenty Years in the Academy (James F. Bonilla)
The Temple of My Unfamiliar (Fred A. Bonner, II)
Racism Will Not Go Away and Neither Will We: Two Scholars of Color Examine Multicultural Education Courses (Bryan Brayboy, Maria C. Estsrada)
In Search of Community: The Challenges and Successes of an Isolated Engineer (Karen Butler-Purry)
Solitary Sojourn: An American Indian Faculty Members' Journey in Academe (Karen Sunday Cockrell)
Putting the Color in Colorado: On Being Black and Teaching Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado-Boulder (Adrian Gaskins)
Living, Breathing, Teaching Sociology: Using the Micro to Illuminate the Macro (Sarah N. Gatson)
Can a Brotha' Get a Break? Teaching on a Majority White Research University Campus (Jeffrey J. Guidry)
Just Because I Choose to Be Me (Reem Haj-Ali)
Anatomy of "Difference": The Meaning of Diversity and the Diversity of Meaning (Rashmi Jaipal)
Color in the Interstice, or, What Color, This Faculty of Color? (Leswin Laubscher)
Reflections From a Minority Faculty in a Majority Institution (Cheryl B. Leggon)
Tenure on My Terms(Antoinette Halsell Miranda)
Teaching and Researching "The Politics of Race" in a Majority White Institution (Byron D'Andra Orey)
Negotiating Identity and Learning From a Native Pacific Perspective: Contradictions of Higher Learning in Cultural Diversity Classes (Michael P. Perez)
Learning to Play the Game (Anthony D. Ross)
I'm Just a Black Woman Troubling the Status Quo (Shari Saunders)
Challenging Racial Battle Fatigue on Historically White Campuses: A Critical Race Examination of Race-Related Stress (William A. Smith, Tara J. Yosso, Daniel G. Solórzano)
Walking Between Two Cultures: The Often Misunderstood Jamaican Woman (Christine A. Stanley)
Institutional Barriers and Myths to Recruitment and Retention of Faculty of Color: An Administrator's Perspective (Christine Yoshinaga-Itano)
Summary and Key Recommendations for the Recruitment and Retention of Faculty of Color (Christine A. Stanley)
Cover image

Being Black Teaching Black: Politics and Pedagogy in Religious Studies

Book
Westfield, Nancy Lynne, ed.
2008
Abingdon Press, Nashville, TN
BT82.7.B45 2007
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
A group of eminent African American scholars of religoius and theological studies examines the problems and prospects of Black scholarhip in the theological academy. They assess the role that prominent African American scholars have played in transforming the study and teaching of religion and theology, the need for a more thorough-going incorporation of the fruits of black scholarship into the mainstream of the academic study of religion, and the challenges ...
Additional Info:
A group of eminent African American scholars of religoius and theological studies examines the problems and prospects of Black scholarhip in the theological academy. They assess the role that prominent African American scholars have played in transforming the study and teaching of religion and theology, the need for a more thorough-going incorporation of the fruits of black scholarship into the mainstream of the academic study of religion, and the challenges and opportunities of bringing black art, black intellectual thought, and black culture into predominantly white classrooms and institutions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction (Nancy Lynne Westfield)
Views

ch. 1 Visible/Invisible: Teaching Popular Culture and the Vulgar Body in Black Religious Studies (Carol B. Duncan)
ch. 2 Using Novels of Resistance to Teach Intercultural Empathy and Cultural Analysis (Arthur L. Pressley)
ch. 3 E-Racing While Black (Stephen G. Ray, Jr.)
ch. 4 Called Out My Name, or Had I Known You Were Somebody: The Pain of Fending Off Stereotypes (Nancy Lynne Westfield)
ch. 5 Reading the Signs: The Body as Non-Written Text (Anthony B. Pinn)
ch. 6 Emancipatory Historiography as Pedagogical Praxis: The Blessing and the Curse of Theological Education for the Black Self and Subject (Juan M. Floyd-Thomas and Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas)
ch. 7 Black Rhythms and Consciousness: Authentic Being and Pedagogy (Lincoln E. Galloway)
ch. 8 From Embodied Theodicy to Embodied Theos (Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas)
ch. 9 Teaching Black: God-Talk with Black Thinkers (Arthur L. Pressley and Nancy Lynne Westfield)

Responses
ch. 10 Teaching Black, Talking Back (Carolyn M. Jones)
ch. 11 Together in Solidarity: An Asian American Feminist's Response (Boyung Lee)
ch. 12 Influences of "Being Black, Teaching Black" On Theological Education (Charles R. Foster)

Notes
Select Bibliography
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Making a Real Difference with Diversity: A Guide to Institutional Change

Book
Clayton-Pedersen, Alma R.; Parker, Sharon; Smith, Daryl G.; Moreno, Jose F.; and Teraguchi, Daniel Hiroyuki
2007
Association of American Colleges and Universities
LC1099.4.C2M34 2007
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Curriculum Design and Assessment

Additional Info:
Making a Real Difference with Diversity provides readers with a step-by-step guide for implementing, evaluating, and sustaining comprehensive diversity work on campus. Drawn from a six-year diversity initiative involving twenty-eight independent California colleges and universities, the monograph offers a set of promising practices and selected quantitative and qualitative findings pertaining to efforts to enhance college access and success for underrepresented students, increase the presence of underrepresented minority faculty, and strengthen ...
Additional Info:
Making a Real Difference with Diversity provides readers with a step-by-step guide for implementing, evaluating, and sustaining comprehensive diversity work on campus. Drawn from a six-year diversity initiative involving twenty-eight independent California colleges and universities, the monograph offers a set of promising practices and selected quantitative and qualitative findings pertaining to efforts to enhance college access and success for underrepresented students, increase the presence of underrepresented minority faculty, and strengthen overall institutional functioning regarding diversity. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 The Journey from "Project-itis" to Coordinated Action
ch. 2 Quantitative Findings
ch. 3 Qualitative Findings
ch. 4 Promising Practices
ch. 5 A Guide to Comprehensive Diversity Work

Conclusion
References
Appendices
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Pedagogies of Crossing: Meditations on Feminism, Sexual Politics, Memory, and the Sacred

Book
M. Jacqui Alexander
2005
Duke University Press, Durham, NC
HM821.A49 2005
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
M. Jacqui Alexander is one of the most important theorists of transnational feminism working today. Pedagogies of Crossing brings together essays she has written over the past decade, uniting her incisive critiques, which have had such a profound impact on feminist, queer, and critical race theories, with some of her more recent work. In this landmark interdisciplinary volume, Alexander points to a number of critical imperatives made all the more ...
Additional Info:
M. Jacqui Alexander is one of the most important theorists of transnational feminism working today. Pedagogies of Crossing brings together essays she has written over the past decade, uniting her incisive critiques, which have had such a profound impact on feminist, queer, and critical race theories, with some of her more recent work. In this landmark interdisciplinary volume, Alexander points to a number of critical imperatives made all the more urgent by contemporary manifestations of neoimperialism and neocolonialism. Among these are the need for North American feminism and queer studies to take up transnational frameworks that foreground questions of colonialism, political economy, and racial formation; for a thorough re-conceptualization of modernity to account for the heteronormative regulatory practices of modern state formations; and for feminists to wrestle with the spiritual dimensions of experience and the meaning of sacred subjectivity.

In these meditations, Alexander deftly unites large, often contradictory, historical processes across time and space. She focuses on the criminalization of queer communities in both the United States and the Caribbean in ways that prompt us to rethink how modernity invents its own traditions; she juxtaposes the political organizing and consciousness of women workers in global factories in Mexico, the Caribbean, and Canada with the pressing need for those in the academic factory to teach for social justice; she reflects on the limits and failures of liberal pluralism; and she presents original and compelling arguments that show how and why transgenerational memory is an indispensable spiritual practice within differently constituted women-of-color communities as it operates as a powerful antidote to oppression. In this multifaceted, visionary book, Alexander maps the terrain of alternative histories and offers new forms of knowledge with which to mold alternative futures. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

I Transnational erotics: state, capital, and the decolonization of desire
ch. 1 Erotic autonomy as a politics of decolonization : feminism, tourism, and the state in the Bahamas
ch. 2 Imperial desire/sexual utopias : white gay capital and transnational tourism

II Maps of empire, old and new
ch. 3 Whose new world order? : teaching for justice
ch. 4 Anatomy of a mobilization
ch. 5 Transnationalism, sexuality, and the state : modernity's traditions at the height of empire

III Dangerous memory : secular acts, sacred possession
ch. 6 Remembering This bridge called my back, remembering ourselves
ch. 7 Pedagogies of the sacred : making the invisible tangible

Notes
Bibliography
Index
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How Professors Think: Inside the Curious World of Academic Judgment

Book
Michele Lamont
2009
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2333.L36 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Excellence. Originality. Intelligence. Everyone in academia stresses quality. But what exactly is it, and how do professors identify it?
In the academic evaluation system known as “peer review,” highly respected professors pass judgment, usually confidentially, on the work of others. But only those present in the deliberative chambers know exactly what is said. Michèle Lamont observed deliberations for fellowships and research grants, and interviewed panel members at length. ...
Additional Info:
Excellence. Originality. Intelligence. Everyone in academia stresses quality. But what exactly is it, and how do professors identify it?
In the academic evaluation system known as “peer review,” highly respected professors pass judgment, usually confidentially, on the work of others. But only those present in the deliberative chambers know exactly what is said. Michèle Lamont observed deliberations for fellowships and research grants, and interviewed panel members at length. In How Professors Think, she reveals what she discovered about this secretive, powerful, peculiar world.

Anthropologists, political scientists, literary scholars, economists, historians, and philosophers don’t share the same standards. Economists prefer mathematical models, historians favor different kinds of evidence, and philosophers don’t care much if only other philosophers understand them. But when they come together for peer assessment, academics are expected to explain their criteria, respect each other’s expertise, and guard against admiring only work that resembles their own. They must decide: Is the research original and important? Brave, or glib? Timely, or merely trendy? Pro-diversity or interdisciplinary enough?

Judging quality isn’t robotically rational; it’s emotional, cognitive, and social, too. Yet most academics’ self-respect is rooted in their ability to analyze complexity and recognize quality, in order to come to the fairest decisions about that elusive god, “excellence.” In How Professors Think, Lamont aims to illuminate the confidential process of evaluation and to push thegatekeepers to both better understand and perform their role. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contents

ch. 1 Opening the Black Box of Peer Review
ch. 2 How Panels Work
ch. 3 On Disciplinary Cultures
ch. 4 Pragmatic Fairness: Customary Rules of Deliberation
ch. 5 Recognizing Various Kinds of Excellence
ch. 6 Considering Interdisciplinarity and Diversity
ch. 7 Implications in the United States and Abroad

Appendix: Methods and Data Analysis
Notes
References
Acknowledgments
Index
Additional Info:
In Teaching Critical Thinking, renowned cultural critic and progressive educator bell hooks addresses some of the most compelling issues facing teaching issues facing teachers in and out of the classroom today.

In a series of short, accessible, and enlightening essays, hooks explores of the confounding and sometimes controversial topics that teachers and students have urged her to address since the publication of the previous best-selling volums in her ...
Additional Info:
In Teaching Critical Thinking, renowned cultural critic and progressive educator bell hooks addresses some of the most compelling issues facing teaching issues facing teachers in and out of the classroom today.

In a series of short, accessible, and enlightening essays, hooks explores of the confounding and sometimes controversial topics that teachers and students have urged her to address since the publication of the previous best-selling volums in her Teaching series, Teaching to Transgress and Teaching Community. The issues are varied and broad, from whether meaningful teaching can take place in a large classroom setting to confronting issues of self-esteem. One professor, for example, asked how black female professors can maintain positive authority in a classroom without being seen through the lens of negative racist, sexist stereotypes. One teacher asked how to handle tears in the classroom. while another wanted to know how to use humor as a tool for learning.

Addressing questions of race, gender, and class in this work, hooks discusses the complex balance that allows us to teach, value, and learn from works written by racist and sexist authors. Highlighting the importance of reading, she insists on the primacy of free speech, a democratic education of literacy. Throughout these essays, she celebrates the transformative power of critical thinking. This is provocative, powerful, and joyful intellectual work. It is a must read for anyone who is at all interested in education today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Critical Thinking
ch. 2 Democratic Education
ch. 3 Engaged Pedaeos
ch. 4 Decolonization
ch. 5 Inteerit
ch. 6 Purpose
ch. 7 Collaboration
ch. 8 Conversation
ch. 9 Telling the Story
ch. 10 Sharing the story
ch. 11 Imagination
ch. 12 To Lecture or Not
ch. 13 Humor in the Classroom
ch. 14 Crying Time
ch. 15 Conflict
ch. 16 Feminist Revolution
ch. 17 Black, Female, and Academic
ch. 18 Learning Past the Hate
ch. 19 Honoring Teachers
ch. 20 Teachers against Teaching
ch. 21 Self-Esteem
ch. 22 The Joy of Reading
ch. 23 Intellectual Life
ch. 24 Writing Books for Children
ch. 25 Spirituality
ch. 26 Touch
ch. 27 To Love Again
ch. 28 Feminist Change
ch. 29 Moving Past Race and Gender
ch. 30 Talking Sex
ch. 31 Teaching as Prophetic Vocation
ch. 32 Practical Wisdom

Index
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Breaking into the All-Male Club: Female Professors of Educational Administration

Book
Mertz, Norma T., ed.
2009
State University of New York Press, Albany
LC212.862.B74 2009
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Women professors of educational administration share their personal stories of being female firsts. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Women professors of educational administration share their personal stories of being female firsts. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

ch. 1 Framing the Stories (Norma T. Mertz)
ch. 2 A First Woman with Clout (Edith A. Rusch and Barbara L. Jackson)
ch. 3 Breaking Through (Martha McCarthy)
ch. 4 Nothing Except a Battle Lost Can Be Half So Melancholy as a Battle Won: A Fight for Tenure (Carolyn J. Wood)
ch. 5 Traversing the Fault Line (Ellen V. Bueschel)
ch. 6 Where the Boys Were...With Apologies to Connie Francis (Norma T. Mertz)
ch. 7 Goodness of Fit (Diana G. Pounder)
ch. 8 First Ladies in the Academy (Deborah A. Verstegen)
ch. 9 From School Administrator to University Professor (Betty Malen)
ch. 10 The "Accidental" Professor (Non A. Prestine)
ch. 11 Resistance and Determination: Faculty Experiences of a Women Religious (Patricia A. Bauch, O.P.)
ch. 12 From the Bush to the Ivory Tower (Mary Gardiner)
ch. 13 One Woman's Struggle to Include and Be Included(Carolyn M. Keeler)
ch. 14 Being First: Stories of Social Complexities (Paula Myrick Short)
ch. 15 My Life as a Trophy (Edith A. Rusch)
ch. 16 Making Meaning of the Stories (Norma T. Mertz)

Unfinished, Uncertain Chronology of Women's Entry into the All-Male Educational Administration Professoriate
Contributors
Cover image

Resilience: Queer Professors from the Working Class

Book
Oldfield, Kenneth and Richard Greggory Johnson III, eds.
2008
State University of New York Press, Albany
LC5051.R47 2008
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
First collection of essays by queer scholars with working- class backgrounds. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
First collection of essays by queer scholars with working- class backgrounds. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction (Kenneth Wendell Oldfield, Richard Greggory Johnson III)
ch. 2 Class, Sexuality, and Academia (Andrea R. Lehrermeier)
ch. 3 Middle-Class (Renny Christopher)
ch. 4 From the Altar Boy's Robes to the Professor's Cap and Gown: The Journey of a Gay, Working-Class Academic (Timothy J. Quain)
ch. 5 One in Ten: Teaching Tolerance for (Class) Difference, Ambiguity, and Queerness in the Culture Classroom (Denis M. Provenher)
ch. 6 Flying the Coop: Liberation through Learning (Nancy Clucevich Story)
ch. 7 No More Rented Rooms (Bonnie R. Strickland)
ch. 8 Escape from the Bronx: The Making of an Unlikely Leader (Richard Greggory Johnson III)
ch. 9 My First Closet Was the Class Closet (Felice Yeskel)
ch. 10 One Bad Lecture Away from Guarding a Bank: Identity as a Process (Michallene McDaniel)
ch. 11 Becoming (Almost) One of Those "Damn, New York, Pinko Intellectuals" (Donald C. Barrett)
ch. 12 Weaving the Self with Gender: Uniting Race, Sexual Orientation, and Social Class (Terell P. Lasane)
ch. 13 Possibilities (Angelia R. Wilson)
ch. 14 Hate Is Not a Family Value (Susan E. Borrego)

Index
Cover image

Women in Leadership (pdf)

Journal Issue
2010
Theological Education 45, no. 2 (The Association of Theological Schools, Pittsburgh)
BV4019.T47 v. 45 no. 2 2010
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2010-theological-education-v45-n2.pdf
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://www.ats.edu/uploads/resources/publications-presentations/theological-education/2010-theological-education-v45-n2.pdf

Table Of Content:
Three Coins in the Fountain: Female Leadership in Theological Education (Barbara Brown Zikmund)
Response to Personal Realities: Who is she? How did she get there? What does she think? How does she cope? (Sharon Henderson Callahan)
Better than Gold: Reflections on Section Two: Professional Relationships and Institutional Factors (Sandra Beardsall)
Systematic Challenges: One Dean's Response (Annie B. Yardley)
A Tragedy of Women's Leadership in Theological Education (Michelle Sungshin Lim)
Women in Leadership in North American Theological Education (Eleanor Moody Sheperd)
Women and Men in Leadership in Theological Education (Barbara G. Wheeler and Sharon L. Miller)
Women's Well-Being in Seminary: A Qualitative Study (Mary L. Jensen, Mary Sanders, and Steven J. Sandage)
Leadership Success Strategies for Women (Diane Kennedy)
Cover image

Gender and Higher Education

Book
Bank, Barbara J., ed.
2011
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LC213.2.G44 2011
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
This comprehensive, encyclopedic review explores gender and its impact on American higher education across historical and cultural contexts. Challenging recent claims that gender inequities in U.S. higher education no longer exist, the contributors—leading experts in the field—reveal the many ways in which gender is embedded in the educational practices, curriculum, institutional structures, and governance of colleges and universities.

This work features the latest theories, scholarship, ...
Additional Info:
This comprehensive, encyclopedic review explores gender and its impact on American higher education across historical and cultural contexts. Challenging recent claims that gender inequities in U.S. higher education no longer exist, the contributors—leading experts in the field—reveal the many ways in which gender is embedded in the educational practices, curriculum, institutional structures, and governance of colleges and universities.

This work features the latest theories, scholarship, research, and debates related to gender and higher education, including institutional diversity; academic majors and programs; extracurricular organizations such as sororities, fraternities, and women's centers; affirmative action and other higher educational policies; and a range of theories—from liberal feminism to postmodern queer theory—that have been used to analyze and explain the ways in which gender in academe is constructed.

Theoretically grounded and based on the newest research, Gender and Higher Education provides an excellent overview for students of higher education, gender studies, and sociology, as well as for anyone interested in the current state of scholarship and practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Introduction

I: Theoretical Perspectives and Educational Research

ch. 1 Academic Capitalism (Amy Scott Metcalfe, Sheila Slaughter)
ch. 2 Black Feminism, Womanism, and Standpoint Theories (Evangeline A. Wheeler)
ch. 3 College Student Development (Tiffani A. Riggers, Linda J. Sax)
ch. 4 Feminist Critiques of Educational Research and Practices (Lucy E. Bailey)
ch. 5 Feminist Reproduction Theory (Jo-anne Dillabough)
ch. 6 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Identity Development Theories (Kristen A. Renn, Brent L. Bilodeau)
ch. 7 Liberal and Radical Feminisms (Chris Weedon)
ch. 8 Multicultural and Global Feminisms (Rosemarie Tong)
ch. 9 Postmodern and Poststructural Theories (Becky Francis)
ch. 10 Queer Theory (Susan Talburt)

II: Institutional Structures and Contexts

ch. 11 Coeducational Colleges and Universities (Barbara J. Bank)
ch. 12 Community Colleges (Barbara K. Townsend)
ch. 13 Distance Education (Christine von Prummer)
ch. 14 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Maybeth Gasman)
ch. 15 Men's Colleges and Universities (Leslie Miller-Bernal)
ch. 16 Military Colleges and Academies (Diane Diamond)
ch. 17 Tribal Colleges and Universities (Wayne J. Stein)
ch. 18 Women's Colleges and Universities (Lisa Wolf-Wendel, Becky Eason)

III: Gender Constructions and Controversies in the Academic Curriculum

ch. 19 Academic Programs: Undergraduate, Graduate, and Professional (Stephanie Woodham Burge)
ch. 20 Biological and Physical Sciences (Sue V. Rosser)
ch. 21 Black Studies and Black Women's Studies (Maulana Karenga)
ch. 22 Engineering (Susan Staffin Metz)
ch. 23 Feminist Pedagogy (Berenice Malka Fisher)
ch. 24 From Home Economics to Family and Consumer Sciences (Virginia B. Vincenti)
ch. 25 History (Mary E. Frederickson)
ch. 26 Literacy Studies (Annette Kolodny)
ch. 27 Mathematics (Abbe Herzig)
ch. 28 Men's Studies (Robert Heasley)
ch. 29 Multicultural Education (Renee J. Martin)
ch. 30 Teaching Education (Peggy Placier)
ch. 31 Technology and Computer Science (Ronald E. Anderson)
ch. 32 Women's and Gender Studies (Jean C. Robinson)

IV: Gender Constructions in the Extracurriculum

ch. 33 Campus Resources and Support for LGBTQQIA Students, Faculty, and Staff (Christian Matheis)
ch. 34 Fraternities (Edward G. Whipple, Keith B. O'Neil)
ch. 35 Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) (Jennifer M. Silva)
ch. 36 Service Learning and Activism (Karen Bojar)
ch. 37 Sororities
ch. 38 Women's Centers (Charlotte A. Kunkel)

V: Gendered Faculty and Administration

ch. 39 Academic Career Patterns (Mary Ann Danowitz, Lyndsay J. Agans)
ch. 40 Administrative Leadership Styles (Margaret E. Madden)
ch. 41 Advising and Mentoring Graduate Students (Sandra Acker)
ch. 42 Faculty Workloads (Sarah E. Winslow-Bowe, Jerry A. Jacobs)
ch. 43 Mentoring Women Faculty (Jill M. Hermsen, Jacquelyn S. Litt, Jeni Hart, Sheryl Ann Tucker)

VI: Gender and Higher Education Policies

ch. 44 Affirmative Action (Judith Glazer-Raymo)
ch. 45 Evaluation Policies for Academics (Sandra Harding)
ch. 46 Sexual Harassment Policies and Practices (Michele Paludi)
ch. 47 Student's Rights
ch. 48 Title IX and College Athletics (Cynthia Fabrizio Pelak)
ch. 49 University Women's Commissions and Policy Discourses (Elizabeth J. Allan, Lisa Plume Hallen)
ch. 50 Work-Family Conflicts and Policies (Rachel E. Hile)

Contributors

Index
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We Can't Teach What We Don't Know: White Teachers, Multiracial Schools, Second Edition

Book
Howard, Gary R.
2006
Teachers College Press, New York
LC212.2.H68 2006
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
With lively stories and compelling analysis, Gary Howard takes his readers on a journey of personal and professional transformation. From his 25 years of experience as a multicultural educator, he looks deeply into the mirror of his own racial identity to discover what it means to be a culturally competent White teacher in racially diverse schools. Inspired by his extensive travel and collaboration with students and colleagues from many different cultures, ...
Additional Info:
With lively stories and compelling analysis, Gary Howard takes his readers on a journey of personal and professional transformation. From his 25 years of experience as a multicultural educator, he looks deeply into the mirror of his own racial identity to discover what it means to be a culturally competent White teacher in racially diverse schools. Inspired by his extensive travel and collaboration with students and colleagues from many different cultures, We Can't Teach What We Don't Know offers a healing vision for the future of education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 White man dancing : a story of personal transformation

ch. 2 White dominance and the weight of the West

ch. 3 Decoding the dominance paradigm

ch. 4 White educators and the river of change

ch. 5 Mapping the journey of white identity development

ch. 6 Ways of being white : a practitioner's approach to multicultural growth

ch. 7 White teachers and school reform : toward a transformationist pedagogy

ch. 8 Our unfinished work : white educators and La Tierra Transformativa
Cover image

Women Faculty of Color in the White Classroom

Book
Vargas, Lucila, ed.
2002
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LB2332.32.W66 2002
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
What is it like for women of color to teach in predominantly white college classrooms? This anthology is about the pedagogical implications of diversifying the faculty of higher education. It compiles narratives by women professors of color who interrogate their classroom experiences in predominantly white U.S. campuses to examine the impact of their social positions upon their classroom practices and their teaching-learning selves. The authors reflect upon their unique ...
Additional Info:
What is it like for women of color to teach in predominantly white college classrooms? This anthology is about the pedagogical implications of diversifying the faculty of higher education. It compiles narratives by women professors of color who interrogate their classroom experiences in predominantly white U.S. campuses to examine the impact of their social positions upon their classroom practices and their teaching-learning selves. The authors reflect upon their unique classroom challenges and talk about the teaching-learning strategies they use to find rewards in their interactions with students. This anthology explores the larger question of how social distinctions shape classroom social life and will be a resource for those concerned with enabling the diversification of the faculty of institutions of higher learning. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Introduction (Lucila Vargas)
ch. 2 Why Are We Still so Few and Why Has Our Progress Been So Slow? (Lucila Vargas)
ch. 3 My Classroom in Its Context: The Struggle for Multiculturalism (Lucila Vargas)
ch. 4 "Passing/Out" in the Classroom: Eradicating Binaries of Identity (Giselle Liza Anatol)
ch. 5 Reading the Body Indian: A Chicana Mestiza's Experience Teaching Literature (Lisa D. Chavez)
ch. 6 Useful Anger: Confrontation and Challenge in the Teaching of Gender, Race, and Violence (Kimberly Nichele Brown)
ch. 7 Negotiating Minefield: Practicing Transformative Pedagogy as a Teacher of Color in a Classroom Climate of Suspicion (Rashmi Luthra)
ch. 8 Teaching with Differences and for Differences: Reflections of a Chinese American Teacher Educator (Xue Lang Rong)
ch. 9 A Foreign Woman Faculty's Multiple Whammies (Cecilia G. Manrique)
ch. 10 The Pacific Asianized Other: Teaching Unlearning among Midwestern Students (Fay Yokomizo Akindes)
ch. 11 Contradictions in the Classroom: Reflections of an Okanogan-Colville Professor (Delores Black-Connor Cleary)
ch. 12 Pushing Beyond the Sterotypes and Fostering Collaboration: One Sistuh's Approach to Teaching Media Production (Zeinabu Irene Davis)
ch. 13 "Results Matter": When the Other Teacher Teaches English in the Bluegrass State (Lou-Ann Crouther)
ch. 14 Guess Who's Coming to Class: Teaching through the Politics of Race, Class, and Gender Anne B. Onyekuluje)
ch. 15 A U.S.-Born Latina Professor: Cultural Stranger in My Own Classroom (Diana I. Rios)
ch. 16 Yellow Lotus in White Lily Pond: An Asian American Woman Teaching in Utah (Priti Kumar)
ch. 17 Marginality as an Asset: Toward at Counter-Hegemonic Pedagogy for Diversity (Ryuko Kubota)
ch. 18 We Do Not Want You to Be Human, We Want You to Be Right: Dilemmas of Legitimacy in Environments of Privilege Fredi Avalos-C'deBaca)
ch. 19 Opening a Dialogue: From a White Student's Perspective (Kristina Casto)

Index
Cover image

Asians in the Ivory Tower: Dilemmas of Racial Inequality in American Higher Education

Book
Teranishi, Robert T.
2010
Teachers College Press, New York
LC2633.6.T47 2010
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This timely and compelling examination of the experience of Asian Americans in higher education explores why and how Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are important to our nation's higher education priorities and places the study of AAPI college participation within a broad set of conditions through which all students must navigate as they pursue higher education. Teranishi captures the intersections of individual agency, social conditions, and organizational structures as ...
Additional Info:
This timely and compelling examination of the experience of Asian Americans in higher education explores why and how Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are important to our nation's higher education priorities and places the study of AAPI college participation within a broad set of conditions through which all students must navigate as they pursue higher education. Teranishi captures the intersections of individual agency, social conditions, and organizational structures as synergetic forces that result in a range of postsecondary outcomes for subpopulations within the larger body of AAPIs.

Table Of Content:
Series Foreword
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction

What's Wrong With a Positive Stereotype?
Purpose of the Book
Organization of the Book
Data Sources and Methodology

ch. 1 Transcending Conceptual Blockages
AAPIs and America's Equity Agenda
Race in Comparative Research
Destabilizing Conceptual Blockages

ch. 2 Students, Families, and the Pursuit of College
The Demography of the AAPI Population
Perceptions of Opportunities and Challenges

ch. 3 The Community Context
Portraits of AAPI Communities
Segregated or Integrated?
Hmong and The "Outside World"
"For Chinese, It's Subliminal: It's All About College"

ch. 4 Secondary Schools and Postsecondary Opportunities
Race, Class, and School Inequality
Access to Quality Schooling for AAPI Students
Wilson High School, San Francisco
Hoovet High School, Vallejo
Hancock High School, Sacramento

ch. 5 Predictors of College Participation
Trends in AAPI College Enrollment
Beyond a Single Story: AAPI Precollege Postsecondary Preparation
AAPI College Enrollment Disaggregated

ch. 6 AAPI Degree Attainment and Field Representation
Degree Attainment Among AAPIs
"We're Not All Science Majors"
AAPIs in the Education Sector
Strategies to Improve the AAPI Education Pipeline
Conclusion: Beyond a Single Story
Transcending Categories and Boundaries
The Need for More and Better Research
An Essential Missing Link

Appendix A Data Sources and Methodology
Appendix B Data Instruments: Individual and Group Interview Protocol
Appendix C Languages Spoken in Asian Countries

Notes
References
Index
About the Author
Cover image

"Interrupting Bias in the Faculty Search Process: A Film and Facilitation Guide"

Journal Issue
University of Washington Center for Institutional Change
2010
University of Washington Center for Institutional Change
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
A tool to facilitate discussion about diversity in hiring at colleges and universities. The website includes a study guide and order form for a free live action film in which a search committee debates candidate qualifications for an open position.This web site will prepare you to show the film and help your audience to demystify subtle discrimination, examine assumptions, and become change-agents.
Additional Info:
A tool to facilitate discussion about diversity in hiring at colleges and universities. The website includes a study guide and order form for a free live action film in which a search committee debates candidate qualifications for an open position.This web site will prepare you to show the film and help your audience to demystify subtle discrimination, examine assumptions, and become change-agents.

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 How To Use This Film: Facilitation Guidelines
ch. 2 Key Concepts
ch. 3 Research on Bias
ch. 4 Common Shortcuts
ch. 5 Frequently Asked Questions
ch. 6 Best Practices for Search Committees
ch. 7 Further Reading
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Asian Pacific American Women in Higher Education:Claiming Visibility & Voice

Book
Hune, Shirley
1998
Association of American Colleges and Universities
LC2633.6.H85 1998
Topics: Identity, Society, and Church   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:


Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part I: An Overview of Asian Pacific Americans
Part II: Stereotypes, Biases, and Obstacles
Part III: Asian Pacific American Women and the Academy

Notes
Selected Readings
Selected Asian Pacific American Organizations
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Empowering Women in Higher Education and Student Affairs: Theory, Research, Narratives, and Practice From Feminist Perspectives

Book
Pasque, Penny A., and Nicholson, Shelley Errington, eds.
2011
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LC1567.E47 2011
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
How do we interrupt the current paradigms of sexism in the academy? How do we construct a new and inclusive gender paradigm that resists the dominant values of the patriarchy? And why are these agendas important not just for women, but for higher education as a whole?

These are the questions that these extensive and rich analyses of the historical and contemporary roles of women in higher education— ...
Additional Info:
How do we interrupt the current paradigms of sexism in the academy? How do we construct a new and inclusive gender paradigm that resists the dominant values of the patriarchy? And why are these agendas important not just for women, but for higher education as a whole?

These are the questions that these extensive and rich analyses of the historical and contemporary roles of women in higher education— as administrators, faculty, students, and student affairs professionals—seek constructively to answer. In doing so they address the intersection of gender and women’s other social identities, such as of race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, class, and ability.

This book addresses the experiences and position of women students, from application to college through graduate school, and the barriers they encounter; the continuing inequalities in the rates of promotion and progression of women and other marginalized groups to positions of authority, and the gap in earnings between men and women; and pays particular attention to how race and other social markers impact such disparities, contextualizing them across all institutional types.

Written collaboratively by an intergenerational group of women, men, and transgender people with different social identities, feminist perspectives, and professional identities— and who, in the process, built upon each other’s work—this volume constitutes a call to educators and scholars to work toward centering feminist and other marginalized perspectives in their practice and research in order to equitably address the evolving complexities of college and university life. Employing a wide range of theoretical lenses, examining a variety of models of practice, and giving voice to a diversity of personal experiences through narrative, this is a major contribution to the scholarship on women in higher education.

This is a book for all women in the academy who want to better understand their experience, and to dismantle the remaining barriers of sexism and oppression—for themselves, and future generations of students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface

Section I: Setting the Context: A Contemporary (Re)Examination of Women in Higher Education and Student Affairs
ch. 1 An Introduction to Feminism and Feminist Perspectives in Higher Education (Shelley Errington Nicholson and Penny A. Pasque)
ch. 2 Reflections From "Professional Feminists" in Higher Education (Susan Marine)
ch. 3 "Each Generation of Women had to Start Anew" (Jennifer LeeHoffman)
ch. 4 The Powerful Collaborations Between Deans of Women and Directors of Physical Education (Thalia Mulvihill)

Section II: Considering Experiences of Women throughout the Academy: An Exploration of Undergraduates, Graduate Students and Administrators
ch. 5 Female Graduate Students Work-Life Balance and the Student Affairs Professional (Rachael L. Simpson and Kim L. Filer)
ch. 6 High Achieving Women (Monica Marcelis Fochtman)
ch. 7 Toward Self-Investment (Annemarie Vaccaro)
ch. 8 The Influence of Gender (Jennifer Sader)

Section III: Exploring Identity Contexts: The Intersections of Class, Gender, Race, and Sexual Orientation for Faculty, Administrators, and Students
ch. 9 How Race Matters: Race as an Instrument for Institutional Transformations, a Study of Tenured Black Female Faculty (Venice Thandi Sule)
ch. 10 Life Stories From the Daughter of First-Generation Italian Immigrants: Gender, Ethnicity, Culture, and Class Intertwine to Form an Italian American Feminist (Florence Guido DiBrito)
ch. 11 Economically Disadvantaged Women in Higher Education: Hearing Their Stories and Striving for Social Justice (Penny J. Rice)
ch. 12 Sister Circles: A Dialogue on the Intersections of Gender, Race, and Student Affairs (Mariama Boney; Linda Contreras Bullock; Cie Cochran; Irene Kao; and Amanda Suniti Niskode-Dossett)
ch. 13 Using Queer Theory to Explore Lesbian College Students’ Multiple Dimensions of Identity (Elisa Abes, and David Kasch)
ch. 14 Identity Development in College Women (Amy Stalzer Sengupta and Yvette Loury Upton)

Section IV: Advancing the Future: Strategies for Changing Dominant Paradigms
ch. 15 The Campus Women’s Center as Classroom: A Model for Thinking and Action (Jennifer R. Wies )
ch. 16 In (Re)Search of Women in Student Affairs Administration (Tamara Yakaboski and Saran Donahoo)
ch. 17 Campus-Based Sexual Assault Prevention: Perspectives and Recommendations From Program Facilitators (Lindsay M. Orchowski, Eric Zimak, Troy Robison, Justin Reeder, Ryan Rhoades, Christine A. Gidycz and Alan Berkowitz )
ch. 18 Learning and Leading Together: A Cohort-Based Model for Women’s Advancement (Lee S. Hawthorne Calizo)

Section V: Envisioning and Acting on a Feminist Future
ch. 19 Envisioning A New Future With Feminist Voices (Amanda Suniti Niskode-Dossett, Shelley Errington Nicholson, and Penny A. Pasque)

About the Contributors
Index
Article cover image

"Pushed to the Margins: Sources of Stress for African America College and University Faculty"

Article
Thompson, Carolyn, and Dey, Eric
1998
The Journal of Higher Education, Columbus OH, Vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 324-45
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Spirit and Nature in Everyday Life: Reflections of a Mestiza in Higher Education"

Article
Chavez, Alcia Fedelina
2001
New Directions For Student Services, No. 96, pp. 69-79, Fall 2001
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Analyzes the spiritual journey of a student affairs practitioner and scholar. Experience gained by the practitioner in educating graduate students; Description of spiritual principles that guided the life of the practitioner; Contribution of the practitioner to student development.
Additional Info:
Analyzes the spiritual journey of a student affairs practitioner and scholar. Experience gained by the practitioner in educating graduate students; Description of spiritual principles that guided the life of the practitioner; Contribution of the practitioner to student development.
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A Guide to Surviving a Career in Academia: Navigating the Rites of Passage

Book
Lenning, Emily; Brightman, Sara; Caringella, Susan, eds.
2011
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1778.2.G84 2011
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Navigating an academic career is a complex process – to be successful requires mastering several 'rites of passage.' This comprehensive guide takes academics at all stages of their career through a journey, beginning at graduate school and ending with retirement.

A Guide to Surviving a Career in Academia is written from a feminist perspective, and draws on the information offered in workshops conducted at national meetings like the ...
Additional Info:
Navigating an academic career is a complex process – to be successful requires mastering several 'rites of passage.' This comprehensive guide takes academics at all stages of their career through a journey, beginning at graduate school and ending with retirement.

A Guide to Surviving a Career in Academia is written from a feminist perspective, and draws on the information offered in workshops conducted at national meetings like the American Society of Criminology and the Society for the Study of Social Problems. Through the course of the book, an expert team of authors guide you through the obstacle course of finding effective mentors during graduate school, finding a job, negotiating a salary, teaching, collaborating with practitioners, successfully publishing, earning tenure and redressing denial and, finally, retirement.

This collection is a must read for all academics, but especially women just beginning their careers, who face unique challenges when navigating through these age-old rites of passage. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: The Journey

ch. 1 Surviving Graduate School (Sara Brightman & Emily Lenning)
ch. 2 Strategies for Success on the Job Market (Kate Luther & Nancy A. Wonders)
ch. 3 Money Matters: The Art of Negotiating for Women Faculty (Suzanna Rose & Mona Danner)
ch. 4 Being a New Faculty (Angie M. Moe & Lisa M. Murphy)
ch. 5 Teaching with Intention: Technique, Innovation and Change in Criminal Justice Education (Kristi Holsinger)
ch. 6 A Brief Guide to Academic Publishing (Claire Renzetti)
ch. 7 Collaborating with Practitioners (Carolyn Rebecca Block, Deshonna Collier-Goubil, Angela Moore Parmley & Winnifred L. Reed)
ch. 8 Getting Tenure and Redressing (Kristine Mullendore)
ch. 9 Retirement: Another Frontier (Susan F. Sharp)

Conclusion: And the Journey Continues (Emily Lenning, Sara Brightman & Susan Caringella)
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Not Drowning But Waving: Women, Feminism and the Liberal Arts

Book
Brown, Susan; Perreault, Jeanne; Wallace, Jo-Ann; and Zwicker, Heather, eds.
2011
University of Alberta Press Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
AZ515.N68 2011
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Twenty-two essays explore topics such as feminism in the liberal arts disciplines; the relationship of the liberal arts to the larger university; the costs and rewards for women in administration; the corporatization of university campuses; intergenerational and transcultural tensions within feminist communities; balancing personal life with professional aspirations; the relationship of feminism to cultural studies; women, social justice, and the liberal arts. Not Drowning But Waving is a welcome progress ...
Additional Info:
Twenty-two essays explore topics such as feminism in the liberal arts disciplines; the relationship of the liberal arts to the larger university; the costs and rewards for women in administration; the corporatization of university campuses; intergenerational and transcultural tensions within feminist communities; balancing personal life with professional aspirations; the relationship of feminism to cultural studies; women, social justice, and the liberal arts. Not Drowning But Waving is a welcome progress report on the variety of feminisms at work in academe and beyond. It provides crucial insights for university administrators, faculty, and literate non-specialists interested in the Arts and Humanities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Not Drowning
ch. 1 "My World as in My Time" - Living in the History of Equity and Backlash (Patricia Clements)
ch. 2 "I forgot the attachment" - and Other Casualties of Academic Labour at the Present Time (Donna Palmateer Pennee)
ch. 3 School/work, Home/work - Academic Mothering and the Unfinished Work of Feminism (Susan Brown)
ch. 4 What to Expect When You're Not Expecting - The Place of Women in the Academy (Cecily Devereux)
ch. 5 Things We Gained in the Fire - Burnout, Feminism, and Radical Collegiality (Heather Zwicker)
ch. 6 On Justice, Exhaustion, Apology, Alienation (Aruna Srivastava)
ch. 7 Feverish Future (Erin Wunker)
ch. 8 What I Learned in Dreamland - Or The Adventures of a (Female) Associate Dean (Christine Overall)
ch. 9 Western Feminism, the Multicultural University, and Institutional Branding - Lessons for Libertarians Now (L.M. Findlay)
ch. 10 Desperately Seeking Equity - Systemic Discrimination and the Canada (Louise H. Forsyth)

Waving
ch. 11 Drowning in Bathtubs (Aritha van Herk)

History/Temporality/Generations
ch. 12 Postsecondary Pyramid - Equity Audit 2010
ch. 13 Waves, Tangles, Archaeologies, and Loops - Historicizing the Second Wave of the Women's Movement (Tessa Elizabeth Jordan, Jo-AnnWallace)
ch. 14 A Vindication and the Imperative of History - Reviving Wollstonecraft for Future Feminisms (Katherine Binhammer, Ann B. Shteir)
ch. 15 The Way They Stayed - The United Alumnae Association and Women's Co-Education at Toronto (Heather Murray)
ch. 16 "Not a Postfeminism Feminist" Feminism's Third Wave (Elizabeth Groeneveld)
ch. 17 Between the Waves - Two Perspectives (Phil Okeke-Ihejirika, Julie Rak)
ch. 18 Mentoring (Isobel Grundy)
ch. 19 Knitters and Night Cleaners - Feminist Alliances in the Academy (Ann Wilson)

Activism
ch. 20 Who Benefits? (Christine Bold)
ch. 21 Inheriting What Lives on from Vancouver's Disappeared Women (Amber Dean)
ch. 22 On Denunciations and Disavowals - Feminism, Trans inclusion, and Nixon v. Vancouver Rape Relief (Lisa Gotell)
ch. 23 Guerrilla Grrris and Sex Trafficking - Activism, Agency, Feminist Debates, and Feminist Oversights (Majorie Stone)

Contributors
Bibliography
Index
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Faculty Diversity: Removing the Barriers, 2nd Edition

Book
Moody, JoAnn
2012
Routledge, New York, NY
LB2332.6.M66 2012
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Why do we see so little progress in diversifying faculty at America’s colleges, universities, and professional schools? This book explores this important question and provides steps for hastening faculty diversity. Drawing on her extensive consultant practice and expertise as well as research and scholarship from several fields, Dr. Moody provides practical and feasible ways to improve faculty recruitment, retention, and mentorship, especially of under-represented women in science-related fields and ...
Additional Info:
Why do we see so little progress in diversifying faculty at America’s colleges, universities, and professional schools? This book explores this important question and provides steps for hastening faculty diversity. Drawing on her extensive consultant practice and expertise as well as research and scholarship from several fields, Dr. Moody provides practical and feasible ways to improve faculty recruitment, retention, and mentorship, especially of under-represented women in science-related fields and non-immigrant minorities in all fields. The second edition of Faculty Diversity offers new insights, strategies, and caveats to the current state of faculty diversity.

This revised edition includes:

• New strategies to prevent unintended cognitive bias and errors that damage faculty recruitment and retention

• Expanded discussion on the importance of different cultural contexts, political, and historical experiences inhabited and inherited by non-immigrant faculty and students

• Increased testimonials and on-the-ground reflections from faculty, administrators, and leaders in higher education, with new attention to medical and other professional schools

• Updated Appendix with Discussion Scenarios and Practice Exercises useful to search and evaluation committees, department chairs, deans, faculty senates, and diversity councils

• Expanded chapter on mentoring that dispels myths about informal mentoring and underlines essential components for formal programs.

Moody provides an essential, reliable, and eye-opening guide for colleges, medical, and other professional schools that are frustrated in their efforts to diversify their faculty. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

Part One: The Barriers To Faculty Diversity
ch. 1 Cognitive Errors that Contaminate Academic Evaluations and Block Faculty Diversity
ch. 2 Negative Bias and Positive Bias: Two Powerful Cognitive Errors that Impede the Advancement of Some Faculty and speed the Advancement of Others
ch. 3 Disadvantages for Non-Immigrant Groups but Advantages for Immigrant and "Honorary White" Groups

Part Two: Removing the Barriers To Faculty Diversity
ch. 4 Faculty Recruitment: Replacing Dysfunctional Practices with Good Practices
ch. 5 Faculty Retention: Replacing Dysfunctional Practices with Good Practices
ch. 6 Faculty Mentoring: Replacing Dysfunctional Practices with Good Practices

Conclusion

Appendix A: A Colonized Group in Another Country: The Same Caste-Like Pattern
Appendix B: Imprisonment of African-American Men: A New Caste-System Invented in 1980
Appendix C: Caste Systems
Appendix D: Reproduction of Group Inequalities by Standardized and High-Stakes Testing
Appendix E: Discussion Scenarios—Practice Exercises

References
Article cover image

"Inappropriate Challenges to Professional Authority"

Article
Moore, Valerie Ann
1996
Teaching Sociology, Vol. 24, No. 2 (Apr., 1996), pp. 202-206
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Race and Gender Oppression in the Classroom: The Experiences of Women Faculty of Color with White Male Students"

Article
Pittman, Chavellal T.
2010
Teaching Sociology 2010 30:183
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Research shows that an oppressive classroom environment impairs learning and academic performance for students with oppressed identities. Less research examines faculty perceptions of their classroom, but such research could reveal whether an oppressive environment impairs teaching effectiveness Although the literature shows that women faculty of color spend a disproportionate amount of time teaching, researchers have not systematically examined their classroom experiences. My study relies on transcripts of 17 in-depth interviews with ...
Additional Info:
Research shows that an oppressive classroom environment impairs learning and academic performance for students with oppressed identities. Less research examines faculty perceptions of their classroom, but such research could reveal whether an oppressive environment impairs teaching effectiveness Although the literature shows that women faculty of color spend a disproportionate amount of time teaching, researchers have not systematically examined their classroom experiences. My study relies on transcripts of 17 in-depth interviews with women faculty of color at a large, predominantly white research institution. Despite their legitimate authority as professors, these women describe gendered racism in their classroom interactions with students. Specifically, they depict white male students as challenging their authority, teaching competency, and scholarly expertise, as well as offering subtle and not so subtle threats to their persons and their careers
Article cover image

"Pedagogy and Social Justice: Race and Gender Bias In Higher Education: Could Faculty Course Evaluations Impede Further Progress Toward Parity?"

Article
Huston, Therese A.
2006
Seattle Journal for Social Justice, Spring/Summer 2006
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Race Doesn't Matter, But . . .": The Effect of Race on Professors' Experiences and Emotion Management in the Undergraduate College Classroom"

Article
Harlow, Roxanna
2003
Social Psychology Quarterly 2003, Vol. 66, No. 4, 348-363
Topics: Classroom Management   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Faculty of Color in Academe: What 20 Years of Literature Tells Us"

Article
Turner, Caroline Sotello Viernes, and Gonzales, Juan Carlos
2008
Journal of Diversity in Higher Education 2008, Vol. 1 No. 3, 139-168
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
To better prepare students for an increasingly diverse society, campuses across the country remain engaged in efforts to diversify the racial and ethnic makeup of their faculties. However, faculty of color remain seriously underrepresented, making up 17% of total full-time faculty. In the past 20 years, more than 300 authors have addressed the status and experience of faculty of color in academe. From 1988 to 2007, there was a continued rise in publications addressing the ...
Additional Info:
To better prepare students for an increasingly diverse society, campuses across the country remain engaged in efforts to diversify the racial and ethnic makeup of their faculties. However, faculty of color remain seriously underrepresented, making up 17% of total full-time faculty. In the past 20 years, more than 300 authors have addressed the status and experience of faculty of color in academe. From 1988 to 2007, there was a continued rise in publications addressing the issue of the low representation of faculty of color. This article presents a literature review and synthesis of 252 publications, with the goal of informing scholars and practitioners of the current state of the field. Themes emerging from these publications and an interpretive model through which findings can be viewed are presented. The analysis, with a focus on the departmental, institutional, and national contexts, documents supports, challenges, and recommendations to address barriers and build on successes within these 3 contexts. The authors hope that this article informs researchers and practitioners as they continue their work to understand and promote the increased representation of faculty of color.
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"Introduction: The Pedagogy of the Teacher's Body"

Article
Cooks, Leda M., and LeBesco Kathleen
2006
The Review of Education, Pedagogy and Cultural Studies, 28, 233-238, 2006
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
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"Womanist Wholeness and Community"

Article
Harris, Melanie L.
2011
Faith, Feminism, and Scholarship: The Next Generation, Ch. 8, pp. 129-141, Palgrave Macmillan, New York
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Crafting the Ground as We Go: "White" Feminism and the College Classroom"

Article
Harvey, Jennifer
2011
Faith, Feminism, and Scholarship: The Next Generation, Ch. 9, pp. 143-161, Palgrave Macmillan, New York
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Vocational Journeys: Moving Toward a Creative and Disruptive Womanist Pedgogy"

Article
Buchanan, Deborah
2011
Faith, Feminism, and Scholarship: The Next Generation, Ch. 11, pp. 181-196, Palgrave Macmillan, New York
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
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Mama, PhD: Women Write About Motherhood and Academic

Book
Evans, Elrena, Grant, Caroline, and Peskowtiz, Miriam, eds.
2008
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
LC1568.M35 2008
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Every year, American universities publish glowing reports stating their commitment to diversity, often showing statistics of female hires as proof of success. Yet, although women make up increasing numbers of graduate students, graduate degree recipients, and even new hires, academic life remains overwhelmingly a man's world. The reality that the statistics fail to highlight is that the presence of women, specifically those with children, in the ranks of tenured faculty ...
Additional Info:
Every year, American universities publish glowing reports stating their commitment to diversity, often showing statistics of female hires as proof of success. Yet, although women make up increasing numbers of graduate students, graduate degree recipients, and even new hires, academic life remains overwhelmingly a man's world. The reality that the statistics fail to highlight is that the presence of women, specifically those with children, in the ranks of tenured faculty has not increased in a generation. Further, those women who do achieve tenure track placement tend to report slow advancement, income disparity, and lack of job satisfaction compared to their male colleagues.

Amid these disadvantages, what is a Mama, PhD to do? This literary anthology brings together a selection of deeply felt personal narratives by smart, interesting women who explore the continued inequality of the sexes in higher education and suggest changes that could make universities more family-friendly workplaces. The contributors hail from a wide array of disciplines and bring with them a variety of perspectives, including those of single and adoptive parents. They address topics that range from the level of policy to practical day-to-day concerns, including caring for a child with special needs, breastfeeding on campus, negotiating viable maternity and family leave policies, job-sharing and telecommuting options, and fitting into desk/chair combinations while eight months pregnant.

Candid, provocative, and sometimes with a wry sense of humor, the thirty-five essays in this anthology speak to and offer support for any woman attempting to combine work and family, as well as anyone who is interested in improving the university's ability to live up to its reputation to be among the most progressive of American institutions. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part One: The Conversation
ch. 1 The Conversation (Jamie Warner)
ch. 2 In Medias Res (Sonya Huber)
ch. 3 Scholar, Negated (Jessica Smartt Gullion)
ch. 4 Student/Body
ch. 5 On Being Phyllis's Daughter: Thoughts on Academic Intimacy (Laura Levitt)
ch. 6 Engineering Motherhood (Jennifer Eyre White)
ch. 7 The Wire Mother (Susan O'Doherty)
ch. 8 Fitting In (Elrena Evans)
ch. 9 Motherhood after Tenure: Confessions of a Late Bloomer (Aeron Haynie)

Part Two: That Mommy Thing
ch. 10 First Day of School (Amy Hudock)
ch. 11 Two Boards and a Passion: On Theater, Academia, and the Art of Failure (Anjalee Deshpande Nadkarmi)
ch. 12 Living(!) A Life I Never Planned
ch. 13 Coming to Termas A Full Term (Natalie Kertes Weaver)
ch. 14 One Mams's Dispensable Myths and Indispensable Machines (Angelica Duran)
ch. 15 That Mommy Thing (Alissa McElreath)
ch. 16 Failure to Progress: What Having a Baby Taught Me about Aristotle, Advanced Degrees, Developmental Delays, and Other Natural Disasters (Irena Auerbuch Smith)
ch. 17 Infinite Calculations (Della Fenster)
ch. 18 The Fact, the Stories (Leah Bradshaw)
ch. 19 I Am Not a Head on a Stick: On Being a Teacher and a Doctor and a Mommy (Elisabeth Rose Gruner)
ch. 20 Lip Service (Jennifer Cognard-Black)
ch. 21 Body Double (Leslie Leyland Fields)

Part Three: Recovering Academic
ch. 22 The Long and Winding Road (Jean Kazez)
ch. 23 The Bags I carried (Caroline Grant)
ch. 24 One of the Boys (Martha Ellis Crone)
ch. 25 Free to Be . . . Mom and Me: Finding My Complicated Truth as a Academic Daughter (Megan Pincus Kajitani)
ch. 26 Nontraditional Academics: At Home with Children and a PhD (Susan Bassow, Dana Campbell, Liz Stockwell)
ch. 27 A Great Place to Have a Baby (Rebecca Steinitz)
ch. 28 Recovering Academic (Jeenifer Margulis)

Part Four: Momifesto
ch. 29 The Orange Kangaroo (Julia Spicher Kasdorf)
ch. 30 Ideal Mama, Idea Worker: Negotiating Guilt and Shame in Academe (Jean-Anne Sutherlan)
ch. 31 In Theory/In Practice: On Choosing Children and the Academy (Lisa Harper_
ch. 32 Motherhood Is Easy: Graduate School is Hard (Tedra Osell)
ch. 33 Momifesto: Affirmations for the Academic Mother (Cynthia Kuhn, Josie Mills, Christy Rowe, Erin Webster Garrett)
ch. 34 In Dreams Begin Possibilities - Or, Anybody Have Time for a Change? (Judith Sanders)

Contributors
Article cover image
Wabash tree

Evaluating Gender Bias in Ratings of University Instructor's Teaching Effectiveness

Article
Young, Suzanne, Rush, Leslie, and Shaw, Dale
2009
International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Vol. 3, No. 2, July 2009
Topics: Assessing Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
The purpose of this study was to examine the gender bias in student ratings of effective teaching. Students in five colleges were invited to rate instructors on three factors: interpersonal characteristics, pedagogical characteristics, and course content characteristics. We analyzed group differences based on student gender, instructor gender, and student level. Ratings of pedagogical characteristics and course content characteristics yielded significant interactions between student gender and instructor gender, but no differences ...
Additional Info:
The purpose of this study was to examine the gender bias in student ratings of effective teaching. Students in five colleges were invited to rate instructors on three factors: interpersonal characteristics, pedagogical characteristics, and course content characteristics. We analyzed group differences based on student gender, instructor gender, and student level. Ratings of pedagogical characteristics and course content characteristics yielded significant interactions between student gender and instructor gender, but no differences were found among groups on interpersonal characteristics. We concluded that gender bias plays a role in students’ views of effective teaching in terms of how students evaluate pedagogical and content characteristics and that this bias generalizes across student levels.
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Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia

Book
Muhs, Gabriella Gutiérrez y; Niemann, Yolanda Flores; González, Carmen G.; and Harris, Angela P., eds.
2012
Utah State University Press, Boulder, CO
LB2332.3.P74 2012
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Presumed Incompetent is a pathbreaking account of the intersecting roles of race, gender, and class in the working lives of women faculty of color. Through personal narratives and qualitative empirical studies, more than 40 authors expose the daunting challenges faced by academic women of color as they navigate the often hostile terrain of higher education, including hiring, promotion, tenure, and relations with students, colleagues, and administrators. The narratives are filled with ...
Additional Info:
Presumed Incompetent is a pathbreaking account of the intersecting roles of race, gender, and class in the working lives of women faculty of color. Through personal narratives and qualitative empirical studies, more than 40 authors expose the daunting challenges faced by academic women of color as they navigate the often hostile terrain of higher education, including hiring, promotion, tenure, and relations with students, colleagues, and administrators. The narratives are filled with wit, wisdom, and concrete recommendations, and provide a window into the struggles of professional women in a racially stratified but increasingly multicultural America. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword
Introduction

Part I: General Campus Climate
Introduction
ch. 1 Facing Down the Spooks (Angela Mae Kupenda)
ch. 2 Waking Up to Privilege: Intersectionality and Opportunity (Stephanie A. Shields)
ch. 3 A Prostitute, a Servant, and a Customer-Service Representative: A Latina in Academia (Carmen K Lugo-Lugo)
ch. 4 Black/Out: The White Face of Multiculturalism and the Violence of the Canadian Academic Imperial Project (Delia D. Douglas)
ch. 5 They Forgot Mammy Had a Brain (Sherree Wilson)
ch. 6 Present and Unequal: A Third-Wave Approach to Voice Parallel Experiences in Managing Oppression and Bias in the Academy (Kimberly R. Moffitt, Heather E. Harris, Diane A. Forbes Berthoud)
ch. 7 Navigating the Academic Terrain: The Racial and Gender Politics of Elusive Belonging (Elusive Belonging Linda Trinh Vo)

Part II: Faculty/Student Relationships
Introduction
ch. 8 Visibly Invisible: The Burden of Race and Gender for Female Students of Color Striving for an Academic Career in the Sciences (Deirdre M. Bowen)
ch. 9 Stepping in and Stepping out: Examining the Way Anticipatory Career Socialization Impacts Identity Negotiation of African American Women in Academia (Cerise L. Glenn)
ch. 10 Silence of the Lambs (Angela Onwuachi-Willig)
ch. 11 On Being Special (Serena Easton)
ch. 12 Are Student Teaching Evaluations Holding Back Women and Minorities? The Perils of "Doing" Gender and Race in the Classroom (Sylvia R Lazos)
ch. 13 Notes toward Racial and Gender Justice Ally Practice in Legal Academia (Dean Spade)
ch. 14 Where's the Violence? The Promise and Perils of Teaching Women of Color Studies (Grace Chang)

Part III: Networks of Allies
ch. 15 Working across Racial Lines in a Not-So-Post-Racial World (Margalynne J. Armstrong, Stephanie M. Wildman)
ch. 16 Native Women Maintaining Their Culture in the White Academy (Michelle M. Jacob)
ch. 17 Dis/Jointed Appointments: Solidarity amidst Inequity, Tokenism, and Marginalization (Michelle A. Holling, May C. fu, Roe Bubar)
ch. 18 What's Love Got to Do with It? Life Teachings from Multiracial Feminism (Karl Lerum)
ch. 19 Sharing Our Gifts (Beth A. Boyd)

Part IV: Social Class in Academia
ch. 20 Igualadas ( Franciscaa de la Riva-Holly)
ch. 21 The Port Hueneme of My Mind: The Geography of Working-Class Consciousness in Our Academic Career
ch. 22 On Community in the Midst of Hierarchy (and Hierarchy in the Midst of Community) (Ruth Gordon)

Part V: Tenure and Promotion
ch. 23 The Making of a Token: A Case Study of Stereotype Threat, Stigma, Racism, and Tokenism in Academe (Yolanda flores Niemann)
ch. 24 Lessons from a Portrait: Keep Calm and Carry On (Andrien Katherine Wing)
ch. 25 "No hay mal que por bien no venga": A Journey to Healing as a Latina, Lesbian Law Professor< (Elvia R. Arriola) br> ch. 26 La Lucha: Latinas Surviving Political Science (Jessica Lavariega Monforti)
ch. 27 Free at Last! No More Performance Anxieties in the Academy 'cause Stepin Fetchit Has Left the Building (Mary-Antoinette Smith)
ch. 28 African American Women in the Academy: Quelling the Myth of Presumed Incompetence (Sherri L. Wallace, Sharon E. Moore, Linda L. Wilson, Brenda G. Hart)
ch. 29 The Experiences of an Academic "Misfit" (Kelly Ervin)
ch. 30 Lessons from the Experiences of Women of Color Working in Academia (Yolanda flores Niemann)

Afterword
References
Contributors
Index
Cover image

Mothers in Academia

Book
Castañeda, Mari; and Isgro, Kirsten, eds.
2013
Columbia University Press, New York, NY
LC1567.M68 2013
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Featuring forthright testimonials by women who are or have been mothers as undergraduates, graduate students, academic staff, administrators, and professors, Mothers in Academia intimately portrays the experiences of women at various stages of motherhood while theoretically and empirically considering the conditions of working motherhood as academic life has become more laborious. As higher learning institutions have moved toward more corporate-based models of teaching, immense structural and cultural changes have transformed ...
Additional Info:
Featuring forthright testimonials by women who are or have been mothers as undergraduates, graduate students, academic staff, administrators, and professors, Mothers in Academia intimately portrays the experiences of women at various stages of motherhood while theoretically and empirically considering the conditions of working motherhood as academic life has become more laborious. As higher learning institutions have moved toward more corporate-based models of teaching, immense structural and cultural changes have transformed women’s academic lives and, by extension, their families. Hoping to push reform as well as build recognition and a sense of community, this collection offers several potential solutions for integrating female scholars more wholly into academic life. Essays also reveal the often stark differences between women’s encounters with the academy and the disparities among various ranks of women working in academia. Contributors—including many women of color—call attention to tokenism, scarce valuable networks, and the persistent burden to prove academic credentials. They also explore gendered parenting within the contexts of colonialism, racism, sexism, ethnocentrism, ageism, and heterosexism. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Speaking Truth to Power to Change the Ivory Tower

Part I. Working/Learning in the Academy While Working/Learning as a Mom
ch. 1 How We Learned to Stop Worrying and to Enjoy Having It All (Michelle Kuhl, Michelle Mouton, Margaret Hostetler, Druscilla Scribner, Tracy Slagter, and Orlee Hauser)
ch. 2 Academia or Bust: Feeding the Hungry Mouths of the University, Babies, and Ourselves (Larissa M. Mercado-López)
ch. 3 Diverse Academic Support for an Employee, Mother, and Nontraditional Student (Wendy K. Wilde)
ch. 4 Breaking the Glass Ceiling While Being a Mother: Parenting, Teaching, Research, and Administration (Kim Powell)
ch. 5 To Tell or Not to Tell: Single Motherhood and the Academic Job Market (Virginia L. Lewis)
ch. 6 Class, Race, and Motherhood: Raising Children of Color in a Space of Privilege (Irene Mata)

Part II. Unexpected Challenges and Momentous Revelations
ch. 7 Four Kids and a Dissertation: Queering the Balance Between Family and Academia (Vanessa Adel)
ch. 8 “Tía María de la Maternity Leave”: Reflections on Race, Class, and the Natural-Birth Experience (Susana L. Gallardo)
ch. 9 Threads That Bind: A Testimonio to Puerto Rican Working Mothers (Maura I. Toro-Morn)
ch. 10 Parenting Within the Nexus of Race, Class, and Gender Oppression in Graduate School at a Historically Black College/University (Olivia Perlow)
ch. 11 Sobreviviendo (and Thriving) in the Academy: My Tías’ Counterconsejos and Advice (J. Estrella Torrez)
ch. 12 Revolving Doors: Mother-Woman Rhythms in Academic Spaces (Allia A. Matta)

Part III. Creating More Parent-Friendly Institutions of Higher Learning
ch. 13 Academic Library Policies: Advocating for Mothers’ Research and Service Needs (Gilda Baeza Ortego)
ch. 14 Reimagining the Fairytale of Motherhood in the Academy (Barbara A. W. Eversole, Darlene M. Hantzis, and Mandy A. Reid)
ch. 15 Tales from the Tenure Track: The Necessity of Social Support in Balancing the Challenges of Tenure and Motherhood (Sandra L. French and Lisa Baker-Webster)
ch. 16 How Higher Education Became Accessible to Single Mothers: An Unfinished Story (Summer R. Cunningham)
ch. 17 Making It Work: Success Strategies for Graduate Student Mothers (Erynn Masi de Casanova and Tamara Mose Brown)
ch. 18 Academic Mothers on Leave (but on the Clock), on the Line (and off the Record): Toward Improving Parental-Leave Policies and Practices (Colleen S. Conley and Devin C. Carey)
ch. 19 Supporting Academic Mothers: Creating a Work Environment with Choices (Brenda K. Bushouse)

Epilogue: Final Reflections
References
List of Contributors
Index
Cover image

Teaching, Learning and Intersecting Identities in Higher Education

Book
Pliner, Susan M.; and Banks, Cerri A., eds.
2012
Peter Lang, New York, NY
LC191.94.T43 2012
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
This book utilizes the theory of intersectionality to focus on the divergent identities and experiences of marginalized groups and to analyze the ways these experiences infiltrate the classroom. It examines teaching and learning as integrated and synergistic practices and highlights the personal and institutional power dynamics existing between scholars and students.

Starting with the premise that institutions of higher education must pay attention to the ways intersecting identities ...
Additional Info:
This book utilizes the theory of intersectionality to focus on the divergent identities and experiences of marginalized groups and to analyze the ways these experiences infiltrate the classroom. It examines teaching and learning as integrated and synergistic practices and highlights the personal and institutional power dynamics existing between scholars and students.

Starting with the premise that institutions of higher education must pay attention to the ways intersecting identities and structures of privilege and disadvantage enter all educational settings, the contributors to this text represent a range of academic disciplines and they are both scholars and students. This approach demonstrates that ideas related to teaching and learning should not follow models that separate teachers, students, and disciplines, but rather that significant learning occurs in the areas where they overlap. Each chapter provides pedagogical strategies and methods for classroom practice that facilitate student learning, equitable classroom environments, and a social justice agenda. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 Integrating Intersectionality, Transforming Learning (Kim A. Case, angela R. Miller, Sharpie Bambacigno Jackson)
ch. 2 "We Talk about Race Too Much in This Class!" Complicating the Essentialized Woman through Intersectional Pedagogy (Leah Wing)
ch. 3 Conflict Resolution Education and Intersectionality (Anna Creadick, Jalisa Whitley, Patrice Thomas, Amber Jackson, Katy Wolfe, Martin Quigley, Reina Apraez)
ch. 4 "Check Your Head" (Linda McCarthy/Laura M. Larson)
ch. 5 Using a Pedagogy of Intersectionality in the Community College Classroom (Neeta Bhasin)
ch. 6 The Rhetorical Nature of Intersecting Identities: Actualizing Intersectionality in the Classroom (Lesley Bogad/Ibilolia Holder/Juanita Montes de Oca/Andres Ramirez/Chris Susi)
ch. 7 A.L.L.I.E.D. Across Our Differences: Blogging and the (Un)Reconciled Politics of Intersectionality
ch. 8 Oprah and Obama Made It, Why Can’t Everyone Else? Utilizing Intersectional Pedagogy to Challenge Post-racial Ideologies within the Higher Education Classroom (Susan M. Pliner/Cerri A. Banks/Ashley M. Tapscot)
ch. 9 Intersectional Pedagogy and Transformative Learning (Jennifer Bowen)
ch. 10 Intersectionality and My Practice of Teaching Mathematics (Julia R. Johnson/Mary González/Cris Ray/Jessica Hager/Diana Leon/Sally Spalding/Tiffany Brigham)
ch. 11 Daring Pedagogy: Dialoguing about Intersectionality and Social Justice (Liz Braun)
ch. 12 Reframing "Diversity" in Higher Education: An Argument for an Intersectional Approach (Cerri A. Banks/Susan M. Pliner: Afterword)

Afterword: Final Thoughts
Contributors
Index
Additional Info:
An interactive resource hub for higher education, created by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, to illuminate the scope, accomplishments, and educational value of the campus diversity movement, and to help practitioners learn to effectively articulate and communicate the education value.
Additional Info:
An interactive resource hub for higher education, created by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, to illuminate the scope, accomplishments, and educational value of the campus diversity movement, and to help practitioners learn to effectively articulate and communicate the education value.
Additional Info:
Looks at some of the roles that cultural context plays in developing and using various teaching and learning styles. Re-print of chapter 7 of “Teaching, Testing, and Measuring Intelligence” (University of Wisconsin Press).
Additional Info:
Looks at some of the roles that cultural context plays in developing and using various teaching and learning styles. Re-print of chapter 7 of “Teaching, Testing, and Measuring Intelligence” (University of Wisconsin Press).
Additional Info:
An e-book with chapters on various stages of the academic career (graduate school, job search, alternative career options), as well as a chapter on "Dealing with Difficult Issues" and suggested resources.
Additional Info:
An e-book with chapters on various stages of the academic career (graduate school, job search, alternative career options), as well as a chapter on "Dealing with Difficult Issues" and suggested resources.
Additional Info:
Professional advice from colleagues on AAR's LGBTIQ Persons in the Profession Committee about graduate school, career development, teaching, etc. Questions can be submitted anonymously through an online form.
Additional Info:
Professional advice from colleagues on AAR's LGBTIQ Persons in the Profession Committee about graduate school, career development, teaching, etc. Questions can be submitted anonymously through an online form.
Additional Info:
Professional advice from colleagues on AAR's Stauts of Women in the Frofession Committee: from dealing with faculty dilemmas, to tenure issues, to work/life balance troubles. Questions can be submitted anonymously through an online form.
Additional Info:
Professional advice from colleagues on AAR's Stauts of Women in the Frofession Committee: from dealing with faculty dilemmas, to tenure issues, to work/life balance troubles. Questions can be submitted anonymously through an online form.
Cover image

Academic Motherhood: How Faculty Manage Work and Family

Book
Ward, Kelly; and Wolf-Wendel, Lisa
2012
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
LB 2332.3.W37 2012
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Academic Motherhood tells the story of over one hundred women who are both professors and mothers and examines how they navigated their professional lives at different career stages. Kelly Ward and Lisa Wolf-Wendel base their findings on a longitudinal study that asks how women faculty on the tenure track manage work and family in their early careers (pre-tenure) when their children are young (under the age of five), and then ...
Additional Info:
Academic Motherhood tells the story of over one hundred women who are both professors and mothers and examines how they navigated their professional lives at different career stages. Kelly Ward and Lisa Wolf-Wendel base their findings on a longitudinal study that asks how women faculty on the tenure track manage work and family in their early careers (pre-tenure) when their children are young (under the age of five), and then again in mid-career (post-tenure) when their children are older. The women studied work in a range of institutional settings—research universities, comprehensive universities, liberal arts colleges, and community colleges—and in a variety of disciplines, including the sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences.

Much of the existing literature on balancing work and family presents a pessimistic view and offers cautionary tales of what to avoid and how to avoid it. In contrast, the goal of Academic Motherhood is to help tenure track faculty and the institutions at which they are employed “make it work.” Writing for administrators, prospective and current faculty as well as scholars, Ward and Wolf-Wendel bring an element of hope and optimism to the topic of work and family in academe. They provide insight and policy recommendations that support faculty with children and offer mechanisms for problem-solving at personal, departmental, institutional, and national levels. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Motherhood and an Academic Career: A Negotiable Road
ch. 2 Origins of the Study
ch. 3 Understanding the Existing Narratives and Counternarratives
ch. 4 Managing Work and Family in the Early Career
ch. 5 Mid-Career Perspectives on Work and Family
ch. 6 The Role of Disciplinary and Departmental Contexts
ch. 7 Institutional Type Differences
ch. 8 Social Capital and Dual Careers
ch. 9 Leaving the Tenure Track
ch. 10 Policy Perspectives
ch. 11 Conclusions, Recommendations, and Parting Thoughts

References
Index
Cover image
Wabash tree

Do Babies Matter?: Gender and Family in the Ivory Tower

Book
Mason, Mary Ann; Wolfinger, Nicholas H.; and Goulden, Marc
2013
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
LC212.862.M33 2013
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The new generation of scholars differs in many ways from its predecessor of just a few decades ago. Academia once consisted largely of men in traditional single-earner families. Today, men and women fill the doctoral student ranks in nearly equal numbers and most will experience both the benefits and challenges of living in dual-income households. This generation also has new expectations and values, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The new generation of scholars differs in many ways from its predecessor of just a few decades ago. Academia once consisted largely of men in traditional single-earner families. Today, men and women fill the doctoral student ranks in nearly equal numbers and most will experience both the benefits and challenges of living in dual-income households. This generation also has new expectations and values, notably the desire for flexibility and balance between careers and other life goals. However, changes to the structure and culture of academia have not kept pace with young scholars’ desires for work-family balance.

Do Babies Matter? is the first comprehensive examination of the relationship between family formation and the academic careers of men and women. The book begins with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, moves on to early and mid-career years, and ends with retirement. Individual chapters examine graduate school, how recent PhD recipients get into the academic game, the tenure process, and life after tenure. The authors explore the family sacrifices women often have to make to get ahead in academia and consider how gender and family interact to affect promotion to full professor, salaries, and retirement. Concrete strategies are suggested for transforming the university into a family-friendly environment at every career stage.

The book draws on over a decade of research using unprecedented data resources, including the Survey of Doctorate Recipients, a nationally representative panel survey of PhDs in America, and multiple surveys of faculty and graduate students at the ten-campus University of California system. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures and Tables
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1. The Graduate School Years: New Demographics, Old Thinking
ch. 2. Getting into the Game
ch. 3. Capturing the Golden Ring of Tenure
ch. 4. Alone in the Ivory Tower
ch. 5. Life after Tenure
ch. 6. Toward a Better Model

Appendix: Data and Analysis
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Cover image

Faculty Identities and the Challenge of Diversity: Reflections on Teaching in Higher Education

Book
Chester, Mark; and Young, Jr., Alford A., eds.
2012
Paradigm Publishers, Boulder, CO
LB2331.C516 2012
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book examines the undergraduate teaching experiences and collegial relationships of university faculty who hold appointments in social science, humanities, or natural science and engineering, and who have received undergraduate teaching or service-to-diversity nominations and awards. Documenting and interpreting faculty members’ social identities and pedagogical practices, Faculty Identities and the Challenge of Diversity explores how professors address the diverse racial, ethnic, gender, and ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book examines the undergraduate teaching experiences and collegial relationships of university faculty who hold appointments in social science, humanities, or natural science and engineering, and who have received undergraduate teaching or service-to-diversity nominations and awards. Documenting and interpreting faculty members’ social identities and pedagogical practices, Faculty Identities and the Challenge of Diversity explores how professors address the diverse racial, ethnic, gender, and sexual identities of their students. By carefully considering how this unique group of faculty makes sense of their instruction and classrooms, this book provides practical advice that will prove beneficial to both experienced and new teachers looking to improve their practice in a changing educational landscape. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface

Part I – Background and Contexts
ch. 1 The State of Research with Faculty Identities in Higher Educational Classrooms and Institutional Contexts (Mark A. Chesler)
ch. 2 Issues of Research Design and Reflexivity (Penny A. Pasque, Mark A. Chesler, and Alford A. Young Jr.)
ch. 3 A Schematic for Analyzing Conflict in the University Classrooom (Alford A. Young, Jr.)

Part II – Diffeence and Diversity in Classroom Interactions
ch. 4 How Race and Gener Shape Perceived Challenges to Classroom Authority and Expertise (Alford A. Young, Jr., Megan Furhman, and Mark A. Chesler)
ch. 5 Identity, Power, and Conflict: Pedagogical Strategies for Successful Classroom Peer Dynamics (Kristie A. Ford, and Kelly Maxwell)
ch. 6 Responding to “Hot Button Issues”: Pedagogical Approaches to Racial Conflict in the Classroom (Penny A. Pasque, Jessica Charbeneau, Mark A. Chesler, and Corissa Carlson)

Part III – Examinations of the Role of Identity
ch. 7 Racial Practices in the Classroom: White Faculty’s Pedagogical Enactments That Reproduce and/or Transform White Dominance (Jessica Charbeneau, and Mark A. Chesler)
ch. 8 Race, Gender, and Bodily (Mis)Recognitions: Women of Color Faculty Experiences with White Students (Kristie A. Ford)
ch. 9 Putting Their Bodies Off the Line: The Response of Men Faculty of Color to Classroom-Based Conflict (Alford A. Young, Jr.

Part IV – Larger Contexts . . . and Change
ch. 10 “Why Don’t You Get Somebody New to Do It?”: Race, Gender, and Identity Taxation in the Academy (Tiffany Joseph, and Laura Hirshfield)
ch. 11 Advocates for Diversity . . . Or Not: Faculty Members as Change-Agents? (Ruby Beale, Mark A. Chesler, and Elizabeth Ramus)
ch. 12 Challenge, Advocacy, and Change (Mark A. Chesler, and Alford A. Young, Jr.

Reference
Index
About the Editors and Contributors
Cover image

Women Leaders in Higher Education: Shattering The Myths

Book
Fitzgerald, Tanya
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LC 1567.F57 2014
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Leadership in universities is physically, intellectually and emotionally demanding work. It involves multiple and complex tasks and responsibilities such as staff management, strategic management, operational planning, financial and resources management, policy development, quality assurance processes, improving student outcomes, and engaging with community and the professions/industry. Leadership is not simply the act of being a leader, it is the act of leadership that ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Leadership in universities is physically, intellectually and emotionally demanding work. It involves multiple and complex tasks and responsibilities such as staff management, strategic management, operational planning, financial and resources management, policy development, quality assurance processes, improving student outcomes, and engaging with community and the professions/industry. Leadership is not simply the act of being a leader, it is the act of leadership that projects ‘success’ and ‘desirable’ attributes. Leadership has the capacity to be deeply seductive yet it is not an immediately attractive option for women, particularly for those who carry the burden of family and domestic responsibilities, for whom finding a space for leading is no easy task. Yet despite the almost pessimistic research evidence, women are in senior leadership positions in higher education, however precarious their numbers. There can be little doubt that universities benefit from diversity in their student and staff population This book addresses the central questions; Who are the women who survive and occupy elite leadership roles in universities? How might their leadership be shaped by and a consequence of institutional climate? What strategies do they learn and adopt and how do they lead and manage their female colleagues? What about those women who do not ‘fit’ the gender script? The chapters overview the changing policy landscape in higher education; provide a critical commentary on the interplay between gender, leadership, higher education, and organisational diversity, and draw on education and critical management literatures in order to offer a broader understanding of gender and elite leadership;

This book will be essential reading for anyone involved or interested in higher education policy and management, academic leadership, organisational diversity and gender studies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Series Editors’ Introduction
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Telling Lives
ch. 2 Troubling Myths
ch. 3 Patterns and Pathways
ch. 4 Women Leading
ch. 5 Dangerous Terrain
ch. 6 Whispers of Change

References
Index
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Education article (May 2013). Discusses experiences of an openly gay professor teaching a year-long first-year core course. He struggles with fear of teaching a text that dealt with issues of homosexuality while also allowing an open forum for discussion.
Additional Info:
Chronicle of Higher Education article (May 2013). Discusses experiences of an openly gay professor teaching a year-long first-year core course. He struggles with fear of teaching a text that dealt with issues of homosexuality while also allowing an open forum for discussion.
Additional Info:
Extensive bibliography for mentoring women and faculty of color.
Additional Info:
Extensive bibliography for mentoring women and faculty of color.
Additional Info:
Extensive Bibliography for Mentoring Faculty of Color
Additional Info:
Extensive Bibliography for Mentoring Faculty of Color
Additional Info:
Describes “mentoring across differences,” to address relationships in which the two parties are different in ways such as race, culture, and gender but also is ways such as learning and communication styles, life experiences, and personal interests.
Additional Info:
Describes “mentoring across differences,” to address relationships in which the two parties are different in ways such as race, culture, and gender but also is ways such as learning and communication styles, life experiences, and personal interests.
Additional Info:
The OpEd Project scouts and trains  under-represented experts to take thought leadership positions in their fields, connecting them with a national network of high-level media mentors, and channeling the best new experts and ideas directly to media gatekeepers who need them, across all platforms.
Additional Info:
The OpEd Project scouts and trains  under-represented experts to take thought leadership positions in their fields, connecting them with a national network of high-level media mentors, and channeling the best new experts and ideas directly to media gatekeepers who need them, across all platforms.
Cover image

Confronting Racism in Higher Education: Problems and Possibilities for Fighting Ignorance, Bigotry and Isolation

Book
Brooks, Jeffrey S.; and Witherspoon-Arnold, Noelle, eds.
2013
Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC
LC212.2. C667 2013
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Racism and ignorance churn on college campuses as surely as they do in society at large. Over the past fifteen years there have been many discussions regarding racism and higher education. Some of these focus on formal policies and dynamics such as Affirmative Action or The Dream Act, while many more discussions are happening in classrooms, dorm rooms and in campus communities. Of course, corollary to these conversations, some of ...
Additional Info:
Racism and ignorance churn on college campuses as surely as they do in society at large. Over the past fifteen years there have been many discussions regarding racism and higher education. Some of these focus on formal policies and dynamics such as Affirmative Action or The Dream Act, while many more discussions are happening in classrooms, dorm rooms and in campus communities. Of course, corollary to these conversations, some of which are generative and some of which are degenerative, is a deafening silence around how individuals and institutions can actually understand, engage and change issues related to racism in higher education. This lack of dialogue and action speaks volumes about individuals and organizations, and suggests a complicit acceptance, tolerance or even support for institutional and individual racism. There is much work to be done if we are to improve the situation around race and race relation in institutions of higher education.

There is still much work to be done in unpacking and addressing the educational realities of those who are economically, socially, and politically underserved and oppressed by implicit and overt racism. These realities manifest in ways such as lack of access to and within higher education, in equitable outcomes and in a disparity of the quality of education as a student matriculates through the system. While there are occasional diversity and inclusion efforts made in higher education, institutions still largely address them as quotas, and not as paradigmatic changes. This focus on “counting toward equity rather” than “creating a culture of equity” is basically a form of white privilege that allows administrators and policymakers to show incremental “progress” and avoid more substantive action toward real equity that changes the culture(s) of institutions with longstanding racial histories that marginalize some and privilege others.

Issues in higher education are still raced from white perspectives and suffer from a view that race and racism occur in a vacuum. Some literature suggests that racism begins very early in the student experience and continues all the way to college (Berlak & Moyenda). This mis-education, mislabeling and mistreatment based on race often develops as early as five to ten years old and “follows” them to postgraduate education and beyond. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Confronting Racism in Higher Education. Problems and Possibilities for Fighting Ignorance, Bigotry and Isolation, (Noelle Witherspoon Arnold and Jeffrey S. Brooks)

ch. 1 Examining the Blockages of Race-Related Conversations in the Classroom: From Recognition to Action, (Sarah Diem and Bradley W. Carpenter)
ch. 2 Persistence is Chess, Not Checkers: A Counterstory on the Lives and Strategies of Six African American Administrators at One Predominantly White Institution, (Brandon L. Wolfe)
ch. 3 Combat in the Academy: Racial Battle Fatigue, Role Strain, and African American Faculty at Public Community Colleges, (Tamara Nichele Stevenson)
ch. 4 Critical Race Theory and College Readiness: A Review of the Literature, (Chad Everett Kee)
ch. 5 An Overview of the History, Research, and Culture of Historically Black Greek Letter Organizations, (Andre Brown)
ch. 6 Legal and Educational Foundations in Critical Race Theory, (Evelyn Y. Young)
ch. 7 Critical Race Theory and Its Viability as a Tool for Critiquing Current Theoretical Leadership: Constructions of African American Women, (Collette Madeleine Bloom)
ch. 8 Re(thinking) Race: Positioning Multiracial Representations within Critical Pedagogy, (Claire Peinado Fraczek)
ch. 9 Who’s Zoomin’ Who?: A Critical Race Analysis of Florida’s Public High School Graduates, (Terri Watson and Jennifer Sughrue)
ch. 10 Neither Latino nor White Enough: Educational Experiences of Meso Hispanic, Meso American, Urban, and Suburban Public High School Students, (Paula Marie Gallegos)

About the Contributors
Cover image

Wise Latinas: Writers on Higher Education

Book
Leon, Jennifer De, ed.
2014
University of Nebraska Books, Lincoln, NE
LC2670.6.W57 2014
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: College can be a complex time for Latinas, who are traditionally expected to leave home when they get married. In her essay “Only Daughter,” author Sandra Cisneros remarks, “After four years in college and two more in graduate school, and still no husband, my father shakes his head even now and says I wasted all that education.”

Wise Latinas is a ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: College can be a complex time for Latinas, who are traditionally expected to leave home when they get married. In her essay “Only Daughter,” author Sandra Cisneros remarks, “After four years in college and two more in graduate school, and still no husband, my father shakes his head even now and says I wasted all that education.”

Wise Latinas is a collection of personal essays addressing the varied landscape of the Latina experience in higher education. For some Latinas, college, where they are vastly underrepresented, is the first time they are immersed in American culture outside their homes—and where the values of two cultures often clash. Wise Latinas is in part a response to this widening gap.

Featuring acclaimed writers such as Sandra Cisneros, Norma Cantú, and Julia Alvarez, to name a few, Wise Latinas shows that there is no one Latina college experience. With thoughtful and engaging pieces, Wise Latinas provides a platform for Latina writers to share their experiences in higher education and gives a voice to the many Latina women who have taken risks; embraced the new, confronted change; and maintained (and in some cases found) their roots. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Source Acknowledgments
Introduction (Jennifer De Leon)

I - Worlds Apart
ch. 1 Going the Distance (Blanca Torres)
ch. 2 Scrambled Channels (Yalitza Ferreras)
ch. 3 WhiteGirlColorlessAfriPana (Gail M. Dottin)
ch. 3 Nomadic (Ingrid Rojas Contreras)
ch. 4 Leaving Miami (Chantel Acevedo)

II - Rooms of Our Own
ch. 5 Las Otras (Celeste Guzman Mendoza)
ch. 6 Pancakes at 2 a.m. (Stephanie Elizondo Griest)
ch. 7 Independence (Iris Gomez)
ch. 8 Stories She Told Us (Daisy Hernández)
ch. 9 Who Goes to College? (Cecilia Rodriguez Milanés)
ch. 10 I’m Living in a Foreign Country (Toni Margarita Plummer)
ch. 11 My Stalker (Lorriane M. López)

III - Inside These Academic Walls
ch. 12 Rapunzel’s Ladder (Julia Alvarez)
ch. 13 Derrumbando Muros along an Academic Path (Norma Elia Cantú)
ch. 14 On Becoming Educated (Joy Castro)
ch. 15 La Silla (Ruth Behar)

IV - In Tribute, In Time
ch. 16 The Weight of Paper (Beatriz Terrazas)
ch. 17 To My Young Self (Erika Martinez)
ch. 18 After Yale (Li Yun Alvarado)
ch. 19 How to Leave Hialeah (Jennine Capó Crucet)
ch. 20 Only Daughter (Sandra Cisneros)

Contributors
Cover image
Wabash tree

Culturally Proficient Instruction: A Guide for People Who Teach, Third Edition

Book
Robins, Kikanza J. Nuri; Lindsey, Delores B.; Lindsey, Randall B.; and Terrell, Raymond D.
2011
Corwin Press, Thousand Oaks, CA
LC1099.3 C845 2012
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Are you doing all you can to improve teaching and learning?

Culturally proficient instruction is the result of an inside-out journey of teaching and learning during which you explore your values and behaviors while evaluating the policies and practices of your workplace. The journey deepens your understanding of yourself and your community of practice. In the newest version of their best-selling book, the authors invite you to reflect ...
Additional Info:
Are you doing all you can to improve teaching and learning?

Culturally proficient instruction is the result of an inside-out journey of teaching and learning during which you explore your values and behaviors while evaluating the policies and practices of your workplace. The journey deepens your understanding of yourself and your community of practice. In the newest version of their best-selling book, the authors invite you to reflect on how you engage with your students and your colleagues as a community of learners. The third edition features a case study to show cultural proficiency in practice and:

• An updated discussion of standards-based education guidelines
• A conceptual framework for the tools of cultural proficiency
• New language for understanding the microaggressions of dominant cultures
• An integrated guide for use with study groups

Each chapter contains reflective activities and group work conducive to collaborative professional development. Culturally Proficient Instruction is invaluable for anyone dedicated to creating an environment in which all learners can succeed. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forewords
Introduction
About the Authors
How to Use This Book

Part I: An Introduction to Cultural Proficiency
ch. 1 What Is Cultural Proficiency?
ch. 2 The Case for Cultural Proficiency
ch. 3 Culturally Proficient Standards

Part II: The Tools of Cultural Proficiency
ch. 4 Guiding Principles
ch. 5 Barriers to Cultural Proficiency
ch. 6 The Cultural Proficiency Continuum

Part III: The Essential Elements
ch. 7 Assessing Your Culture
ch. 8 Valuing Diversity
ch. 9 Managing the Dynamics of Difference
ch. 10 Adapting to Diversity
ch. 11 Institutionalizing Cultural Knowledge
ch. 12 Your Action Plan

References
Index
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A Guide for Women in Religion, Revised Edition: Making Your Way from A-Z

Book
Hunt, Mary E.; Ali, Kecia; and Moultrie, Monique
2014
Palgrave Macmillan, New York, NY
BL41.G84 2014
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The Guide is a welcome companion for women in religious studies. From undergraduates to retired professors, this distilled wisdom of several generations of colleagues is an important book to have handy. Whether seeking a job, preparing for tenure, working at a non-profit organization, entering the publishing world, figuring finances, mentoring or being mentored, the reader will find just what she (or he—men ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The Guide is a welcome companion for women in religious studies. From undergraduates to retired professors, this distilled wisdom of several generations of colleagues is an important book to have handy. Whether seeking a job, preparing for tenure, working at a non-profit organization, entering the publishing world, figuring finances, mentoring or being mentored, the reader will find just what she (or he—men find it useful too) needs to know. This volume reflects the diversity of women's experiences, the range of opportunities, the pitfalls and promises of religious studies that span ministry, academia, and activism. It is a good investment for one's future career and a welcome gift for students. This second edition is updated to reflect the rapidly changing field, especially technological innovations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Part I - The Guide from A to Z
Part II - Appendices
Appendix I: American Academy of Religion Sexual Harassment Policy
Appendix II: American Academy of Religion Sexual Harassment Grievance Procedure
Appendix III: Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) Ethics Statement
Appendix IV: Making Your Presentations Disability Friendly
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Beginning a Career in Academia: A Guide for Graduate Students of Color

Book
Mack, Dwayne A.; Watson, Elwood; and Camacho, Michelle Madsen, eds.
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
LC2781.B354 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This practical guide prepares graduate students of color for their first job in academia and offers strategies for succeeding in the early years of a tenure-track position. Through the voices of faculty who have experienced the rigors of the job search and a career in academia, Beginning a Career in Academia offers advice for graduate students of color on how to transition from ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This practical guide prepares graduate students of color for their first job in academia and offers strategies for succeeding in the early years of a tenure-track position. Through the voices of faculty who have experienced the rigors of the job search and a career in academia, Beginning a Career in Academia offers advice for graduate students of color on how to transition from graduate school to an academic position. This inclusive volume shares perspectives that vary based on gender, racial, ethnic, generational, and disciplinary backgrounds, giving readers an opportunity to reflect on successful strategies for career readiness and for dealing with marginalization. The authors provide recommendations and tips to enhance the job search, identify campus fit, prepare for the interview and negotiation process, address dynamics of of racial and gender politics, find work-life balance, and demystify the promotion and tenure process. This must-read provides candid advice and mentorship for any graduate students of color embarking on a carreer in academe. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by Kerry Ann Rockquemore
Introduction (Michelle Madsen Camacho, Elwood Watson, and Dwayne A. Mack)

Part I: Practical Advice for Finding Success in the Academic Job Market
  ch. 1 The Pitfalls and Pleasures of the Academic Job Market (Michelle Madsen Camacho)
ch. 2 Navigating Professional Conferences: Essential and Effective Job Seeking Strategies (Nadine Finigan-Carr and Natasha A. Brown)
  ch. 3 On the Phone, On Campus, On the Market: Demystifying the Academic Interview Process (Greg Prieto)
ch. 4 When your Race and Ethnicity Shows Up in the Interview: Identifying Search Committee Expectations of Token Hires During the Interview Process (Fawn-Amber Montoya & Jared Montoya)
ch. 5 Negotiating a Job Offer in Academia: ‘Lean In’ or Lay Low? (Rebecca Martinez)
ch. 6 Transitioning Strategies from Graduate School to Early Career Faculty (Tom Otieno)

Part II: Identity, Fit, Collegiality, and Secrets for Thriving in the Ivory Tower
ch. 7 Future Academics of Color in Dialogue: A Candid Q&A on Adjusting to the Cultural, Social and Professional Rigor of Academia (Miroslava Chávez-García, Mayra Avitia & Jorge N. Leal)
ch. 8 Mentoring Junior Faculty of Color: Succeeding at Historically White Colleges and Universities (Torin Dru Alexander)
ch. 9 15 Missteps that Can Derail Faculty Early in a Career: What Graduate Students Need to Know About the Push and Pull of Academia (Elwood Watson)
ch. 10 Staying Awake and Walking all Night: First Generation, Working Class, and Multiracial Latina/o Immigrants Building a Compass to Navigate Academia (Nayeli Y. Chavez-Dueñas and Hector Y. Adames)

Part III: Work-Life Balance: Strategies for Transitioning from Graduate School to the Classroom
ch. 11 LGBTQ Faculty of Color in and Out of the Classroom: Unhinging the Closet Door (Enrique Morales-Diaz)
ch. 12 Transitions to Academic Life for Women of Color: Still Waiting to Exhale (Linda Alexander)
ch. 13 Developing Your Teaching Craft: Observations from the Classroom (Derrick R. Brooms)
ch. 14 Practical Strategies for Achieving a Work-Life Balance: Fired Up? Ready to Go! (Dwayne A. Mack)
ch. 15 If at First You Don’t Succeed: Motivation for Finding the Best Institutional Fit (Sandra E. Weissinger)
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Faculty Fathers: Toward a New Ideal in the Research University

Book
Sallee, Margaret W.
2014
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
LB2335.8.S35 2014
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Explores the challenges faculty fathers face in navigating the demands of work and family.

For the past two decades, colleges and universities have focused significant attention on helping female faculty balance work and family by implementing a series of family-friendly policies. Although most policies were targeted at men and women alike, women were intended as the primary targets and recipients. This groundbreaking book makes clear that including faculty ...
Additional Info:
Explores the challenges faculty fathers face in navigating the demands of work and family.

For the past two decades, colleges and universities have focused significant attention on helping female faculty balance work and family by implementing a series of family-friendly policies. Although most policies were targeted at men and women alike, women were intended as the primary targets and recipients. This groundbreaking book makes clear that including faculty fathers in institutional efforts is necessary for campuses to attain gender equity. Based on interviews with seventy faculty fathers at four research universities around the United States, this book explores the challenges faculty fathers—from assistant professors to endowed chairs—face in finding a work/life balance. Margaret W. Sallee shows how universities frequently punish men who want to be involved fathers and suggests that cultural change is necessary—not only to help men who wish to take a greater role with their children, but also to help women and spouses who are expected to do the same. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Conflicting Roles: The Ideal Worker or the Ideal Father?
ch. 3 Family-Friendly or Father-Friendly: Institutional Culture and the Ideal Worker
ch. 4 Disciplinary Culture and the Ideal Worker
ch. 5 How Family Life Affects Faculty Life
ch. 6 The Ideal Worker Inside or Outside the Home?
ch. 7 Tenure versus Fatherhood: How Generation X Faculty Eschew the Ideal Worker
ch. 8 Redefining the Ideal

References
Index
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Overcoming Adversity in Academia Stories from Generation X Faculty

Book
Watson, Elwood, ed.
2014
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
LC2331.094 2014
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
This collection of essays written by seventeen Generation X academics passionately, provocatively, and eloquently demonstrates the personal issues, conflicts, and triumphs that are definitive of this generation. These essays define the voice of an often overlooked and ignored demographic. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This collection of essays written by seventeen Generation X academics passionately, provocatively, and eloquently demonstrates the personal issues, conflicts, and triumphs that are definitive of this generation. These essays define the voice of an often overlooked and ignored demographic. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface (Elwood Watson)

ch. 1 Only Human: My Experience in Higher Education (Martha Diede)
ch. 2 Confessions of a Bakke Baby: Race, Academia, and the “Joshua Generation” (Terrance Tucker)
ch. 3 Taking Chances: Gay, Male and Feminist in the Academy (Daniel Farr)
ch. 4 Tenured To Contingent: Life Choices and the Academic Career (Annemarie Hamlin)
ch. 5 The Evolution of Tolerance: Growing Up as a White Southerner in the Aftermath of Desegregation (Andria J. Woodell)
ch. 6 Reflections on Navigating Invisibility and the Consequences of Being Black and Gay in the Academy (Darryl Holloman)
ch. 7 Reflections Upon One Experience Leading To a Career in Academia (Douglas Mikutel)
ch. 8 Living Beyond The Dream Deferred: An Auto-Ethnography of My Experiences in the Academy (Antonio C. Cuyler)
ch. 9 In Search of the Abyss: Negotiating Xtra-Academic Potential (David Prescott-Steed)
ch. 10 Team Mollick: Our Two-For-One Academic Journey (Kathleen and George Mollick)
ch. 11 My Ongoing Journey: A Black Generation X Professor’s Story In Appalachia (Elwood Watson)
ch. 12 Leaving the Popular Culture Classroom: Why I’d Rather Keep My Fandom to Myself... (Kristi Key)
ch. 13 Doogie Howser, Ph.D. in Identity Crisis (Zachary Snider)
ch. 14 Changing the State of Tomorrow Today: One Generation Xer’s Journey to End Racism and White Supremacy in the Academy and Beyond (Aimee Glocke)
ch. 15 Hopefully Drifting (Lance Alexis)
ch. 16 The Aftermath of Admission (Jenny R. Sadre-Orafai)
ch. 17 Notes From An In-Betweener (Daryl A. Carter)

Contributors
Index
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Modeling Mentoring Across Race/Ethnicity and Gender: Practices to Cultivate the Next Generation of Diverse Faculty

Book
Turner, Caroline Sotello Viernes; and González, Juan Carlos, eds.
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2371.4.M63 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Mentoring Faculty

Additional Info:
While mentorship has been shown to be critical in helping graduate students persist and complete their studies, and enter upon and succeed in their academic careers, the under-representation of faculty of color and women in higher education greatly reduces the opportunities for graduate students from these selfsame groups to find mentors of their race, ethnicity or gender.

Recognizing that mentoring across gender, race and ethnicity inserts levels of ...
Additional Info:
While mentorship has been shown to be critical in helping graduate students persist and complete their studies, and enter upon and succeed in their academic careers, the under-representation of faculty of color and women in higher education greatly reduces the opportunities for graduate students from these selfsame groups to find mentors of their race, ethnicity or gender.

Recognizing that mentoring across gender, race and ethnicity inserts levels of complexity to this important process, this book both fills a major gap in the literature and provides an in-depth look at successful mentorships between senior white and under-represented scholars and emerging women scholars and scholars of color.

Following a comprehensive review of the literature, this book presents chapters written by scholars who share in-depth descriptions of their cross-gender and/or cross-race/ethnicity mentoring relationships. Each article is co-authored by mentors who are established senior scholars and their former protégés with whom they have continuing collegial relationships. Their descriptions provide rich insights into the importance of these relationships, and for developing the academic pipeline for women scholars and scholars of color.

Drawing on a comparative analysis of the literature and of the narrative chapters, the editors conclude by identifying the key characteristics and pathways for developing successful mentoring relationships across race, ethnicity or gender, and by offering recommendations for institutional policy and individual mentoring practice. For administrators and faculty concerned about diversity in graduate programs and academic departments, they offer clear models of how to nurture the productive scholars and teachers needed for tomorrow’s demographic of students; for under-represented students, they offer compelling narratives about the rewards and challenges of good mentorship to inform their expectations and the relationships they will develop as protégés. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Christine A. Stanley)
Preface (Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner)

ch. 1 What Does The Literature Tell Us About Mentoring Across Race/Ethnicity and Gender? (Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner and Juan Carlos González)
ch. 2 Building Cross-Gender Mentorship in Academe: A Chicano-Latina/Filipina Relationship Built on Common Scholarly Commitments (Juan Carlos González and Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner)
ch. 3 Socialization in Academe: Reflections on Mentoring by a Latina-Filipina Mentor and an African American Male Protégé (J. Luke Wood and Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner)
ch. 4 Breaking Through Racial and Gender Barriers: Reflections on Dissertation Mentorship and Peer Support (Edward P. St. John, O. Cleveland Hill, Ontario S. Wooden, and Penny A. Pasque)
ch. 5 Latina Faculty and Latino Male Student Mentorship Processes: Aprendiendo y Compartiendo Juntos (Jeanett Castellanos and Mark A. Kamimura-Jiménez)
ch. 6 A Critical Race Journey of Mentoring (Dimpal Jain and Daniel Solorzano)
ch. 7 Cross-Gender Mentoring From a Caribbean Perspective (Christine A. Stanley and Dave A. Louis)
ch. 8 Autoethnography/Testimonio, Common Sense Racism, and the Politics of Cross-Gender Mentoring (Elvia Romero and Alfredo Mirandé)
ch. 9 Anaalysis of the Mentor-Protégé Narratives: Reflecting The Literature (Juan Carlos González and Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner)
ch. 10 Analysis of the Mentor-Protégé Narratives: Contributing To The Literature and Emerging Mentoring Model for Practice (Caroline Sotello Viernes Turner and Juan Carlos González)

About the Editors
About the Authors
Index
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Black Faculty in the Academy: Narratives for Negotiating Identity and Achieving Career Success

Book
Bonner, II, Fred A.; Marbley, Aretha Faye; Tuitt, Frank; Robinson, Petra A.; Banda, Rosa M.; and Hughes, Robin L., eds.
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
LC2781.5.B528 2014
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Through candid discussions and personal counter-narrative stories, Black Faculty in the Academy explores the experiences and challenges faced by faculty of color in academe. Black faculty in predominantly White college and university settings must negotiate multiple and competing identities while struggling with issues of marginality, otherness, and invisible barriers. This important book illuminates how faculty can develop a professional identity that leads to ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Through candid discussions and personal counter-narrative stories, Black Faculty in the Academy explores the experiences and challenges faced by faculty of color in academe. Black faculty in predominantly White college and university settings must negotiate multiple and competing identities while struggling with issues of marginality, otherness, and invisible barriers. This important book illuminates how faculty can develop a professional identity that leads to success in academe, while at the same time remaining true to cultural and personal identities. Through rich narratives, chapter authors situate race-related encounters at the center of their experience in an effort to deconstruct and challenge commonly held assumptions about life in academe. They also provide key recommendations and strategies to help faculty of color ensure their continued professional success. Framed by critical race theory, these stories show how faculty can successfully maneuver through all stages of a career in academe, including tenure and promotion, publication, mentoring, networking, teaching, and dealing with institutional climate issues. This valuable book is for faculty and administrators seeking to create an environment that nurtures professional growth and fosters success among Black faculty. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction (Fred A. Bonner II and Frank Tuitt)

I. Black Faculty: Navigating Daily Encounters with Racism
ch. 1 Acclimating to the institutional climate: There’s a "chill" in the air (Mark Giles)
ch. 2 The Life of A Black Male Scholar: Contesting Racial Microaggressions in Academe (Ariel William Moore*) *Denotes pen name used at author’s request
ch. 3 Social networking and support: No, I don’t know how to play golf (Anton Lewis & Katherine Helm)
ch. 4 Cultural Taxation and The Over Commitment of Service at Predominantly White Institutions (Marjorie Shavers, J. Yasmine Butler, & James L. Moore III)

II. Black Faculty: Meaning Making through Multidisciplinary and Intersectional Approaches
ch. 5 Black Faculty Negotiating the Microaggressions in Scholarship (Aretha Faye Marbley, Leon Rouson, Jiaqi Li, Shih-Han Huang, Colette M. Taylor)
ch. 6 Using Endarkened and Critical Race Feminist Perspectives To Question and Analyze Knowledge Production Narratives (Natasha N. Croom, Lori D. Patton)
ch. 7 Navigating Race-Gendered Microaggressions: The Experiences of a Tenure-Track Black Female Scholar (Dorinda Carter Andrews)
ch. 8 Black Queer (Re)presentation in (White) Academe: I am the Hell and the High Water (Dafina-Lazarus Stewart)

III. Black Faculty: Finding Strength through Critical Mentoring Relationships
ch. 9 Self-Reflection as a Critical Tool in the Life of an Early Career African American Male Scholar (Alonzo M. Flowers)
ch. 10 Engaging Mentoring Relationships in Academia: Hard Lessons Learned (Buffy Smith)
ch. 11 The critical need for faculty mentoring: Say brother, can you spare the time? (Fred A. Bonner)
ch. 12 Establishing critical relationships with students: That’s not what white professor "X" told us (Saundra Tomlinson-Clarke)
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This Is Not a Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education

Book
Vilson, Jose Luis
2014
Haymarket Books, Chicago, IL
LC196.5.U6 V55 2014
Topics: Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Graduating from Syracuse University with a degree in computer science, Jose Vilson left campus with no job and a few hundred dollars to his name, propelling him (eventually) to his calling: teaching middle school children math in a public school in Washington Heights / Inwood, Manhattan. From his own background as a boy growing up on the drug-tainted, community-centered projects of the Lower East ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Graduating from Syracuse University with a degree in computer science, Jose Vilson left campus with no job and a few hundred dollars to his name, propelling him (eventually) to his calling: teaching middle school children math in a public school in Washington Heights / Inwood, Manhattan. From his own background as a boy growing up on the drug-tainted, community-centered projects of the Lower East Side of Manhattan, this book takes the reader on the coming-of-age story of a naïve young man struggling to mature through the first few years of his career, balancing the lows of murder, poverty, and academic failure to the highs of growth and eventual triumph.

His career takes a twist when he starts a blog with incisive commentary on the state of education on his eponymous blog TheJoseVilson.com, taking prominent figures and institutions like NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, and The New York Times to task. (As of this letter, the site is banned from most NYC Department of Education computers, yet read by central offices.) In his collection of multifaceted essays, he provokes discussion on issues of race, gentrification, and the teaching profession from the eyes of a Black-Latino educator with a mix of research and first-hand experience.

This education book is not to be missed! (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by Karen Lewis
On Perspetive: An Introduction

Part One
ch. 1 Please Put Your Pencils Down
ch. 2 Can It Be That It Was All So Simple Then?
ch. 3 Band of Brothers
ch. 4 What Happened
ch. 5 Negotiating My Own Skin
ch. 6 It’s Not About A Salary

Part Two
ch. 7 The Post-TFA Assessment
ch. 8 Blue Magic
ch. 9 The Homeroom Is A Home
ch. 10 White Noise (On Behalf of Ruben Redman)
ch. 11 Where the Hustle Comes From
ch. 12 The World Is Yours, The Works Is Yours
ch. 13 Yes, I Still Want To Teach
ch. 14 Safer Spaces
ch. 15 Snitches Open Stiches
ch. 16 God Got Jokes, Son
ch. 17 “I Don’t Want To Talk About Privilege. Now Here’s My Good Glass.”
ch. 18 We Don’t Need No Education

Part Three
ch. 19 What You Post-Racialists Get It Wrong . . . Again
ch. 20 How To Drop The Mic
ch. 21 To Make Sure It’s Broke (On Teacher Voice)
ch. 22 Getting Less Than You Give (On Common Core State Standards)
ch. 23 The Eagle Versus The Hummingbird: A Cautionary Note To Burgeoning Teacher Leaders
ch. 24 Every Day Above Ground It A Good One
ch. 25 Why Teach?
ch. 26 Conclusion: A Note From This Native Son

Afterword by Pedro Noguera
Acknowledgments
Index
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Reading, Writing, and Discussing at the Graduate Level A Guidebook for International Students

Book
Kim, Rina; Ablert, Lillie R.; and Sihn, Hang Gyun
2014
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LB2371.4.K56 2014
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The purpose of this book is to help international students navigate the academic issues they will encounter while attending graduate school in the United States. This book provides guidelines for conquering the obstacles that international graduate students often face, such as developing independent ideas based on required readings, participating in classroom discussions effectively, organizing academic papers, and effectively managing academic work and social ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The purpose of this book is to help international students navigate the academic issues they will encounter while attending graduate school in the United States. This book provides guidelines for conquering the obstacles that international graduate students often face, such as developing independent ideas based on required readings, participating in classroom discussions effectively, organizing academic papers, and effectively managing academic work and social relationships. This book is an invaluable tool for international graduate students and their instructors and mentors. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Reading Scholarly Articles With Purpose
ch. 2 Engaging in Academic Discussions
ch. 3 Writing at the Academic Level
ch. 4 Preparing Classroom Presentations
ch. 5 Developing Social and Academic Relationships
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Disrupting the Culture of Silence Confronting Gender Inequality and Making Change in Higher Education

Book
De Welde, Kristine; and Stepnick, Andi, eds.
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2332.32.D57 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: What do women academics classify as challenging, inequitable, or “hostile” work environments and experiences? How do these vary by women’s race/ethnicity, rank, sexual orientation, or other social locations?

How do academic cultures and organizational structures work independently and in tandem to foster or challenge such work climates?

What actions can institutions and individuals–independently and collectively–take ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: What do women academics classify as challenging, inequitable, or “hostile” work environments and experiences? How do these vary by women’s race/ethnicity, rank, sexual orientation, or other social locations?

How do academic cultures and organizational structures work independently and in tandem to foster or challenge such work climates?

What actions can institutions and individuals–independently and collectively–take toward equity in the academy?

Despite tremendous progress toward gender equality and equity in institutions of higher education, deep patterns of discrimination against women in the academy persist. From the “chilly climate” to the “old boys’ club,” women academics must navigate structures and cultures that continue to marginalize, penalize, and undermine their success.

This book is a “tool kit” for advancing greater gender equality and equity in higher education. It presents the latest research on issues of concern to them, and to anyone interested in a more equitable academy. It documents the challenging, sometimes hostile experiences of women academics through feminist analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, including narratives from women of different races and ethnicities across disciplines, ranks, and university types.

The contributors’ research draws upon the experiences of women academics including those with under-examined identities such as lesbian, feminist, married or unmarried, and contingent faculty. And, it offers new perspectives on persistent issues such as family policies, pay and promotion inequalities, and disproportionate service burdens. The editors provide case studies of women who have encountered antagonistic workplaces, and offer action steps, best practices, and more than 100 online resources for individuals navigating similar situations.

Beyond women in academe, this book is for their allies and for administrators interested in changing the climates, cultures, and policies that allow gender inequality to exist on their campuses, and to researchers/scholars investigating these phenomena. It aims to disrupt complacency amongst those who claim that things are “better” or “good enough” and to provide readers with strategies and resources to counter barriers created by culture, climate, or institutional structures. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Penny A. Pasque)
Acknowledgments
Introduction - From People to Policies: Enduring Inequalities and Inequities for Women Academics (Kris De Welde and Andi Stepnick)

Part One - The Structure
ch. 1 Glass Ceilings and Gated Communities in Higher Education (Robert J. Hironimus-Wendt and Doreen A. Dedjoe)
ch. 2 Challenges of Race and Gender For Black Women in the Academy (Candice P. Baldwin and Monica D. Griffin)
ch. 3 Contingent Appointments and the Diminishing Voice, Agency, and Professionalism of Women (Cecile H. Sam and Adrianna Kezar)
ch. 4 Faculty Gender Inequity and the “Just Say No To Service” Fairy Tale (Karen Pyke)
Case Study: Lecturer Barnes: Long-Term Contingent Faculty

Part Two: Structure Meets Culture
ch. 5 The Influence of Departmental Culture on Academic Parents’ Pro-Work Behaviors (Julie A. Kmec, Shanyuan Foo, and Amy S. Wharton)
ch. 6 Assimilating To the Norm - Academic Women’s Experiences With Work-Family Policies (Catherine Richards Solomon)
ch. 7 The Eldercare Crisis and Implications for Women Faculty (Gretal Leibnitz and Briana Morrison)

Case Study: Graduate Student Chastain: Navigating Gendered Family-Work Expectations

Part Three - Exclusionary Cultures
ch. 8 Perpetuating Inequity Through The Canons of Disciplinary Knowledge (Barret Katuna)
ch. 9 Characteristics and Perceptions of Women of Color Faculty Nationally (Corinne Castro)
ch. 10 Women Sociologists and the Question of Inclusion in the Academy (Kristin Marsh)
ch. 11 Not the Ideal Professor - Gender in the Academy (Laura Hirshfield)
ch. 12 Intersectional Invisibility and the Academic Work Experiences of Lesbian Faculty (Diana Bilimoria and Abigail J. Stewart)
Case Study - Professor Liu - The Multiple Challenges for an Asian Woman Professor in the Social Science Field

Part Four - Hostile Climates
ch. 13 Gender Differences in Faculty Responses to Contrapower Harassment (Claudia Lampman)
ch. 14 Confronting Faculty Incivility and Mobbing (Susan K. Gardner and Amy Blackstone)
ch. 15 Women of Color in the Academy - From Trauma to Transformation (Molly Everett Davis, Halaevalu F. Ofahengaue Vakalahi, and Renay Scales)
Case Study - Professor Smith - Early-Career Mobbing and Student HostilitiesC

Part Five - Tools for Changing the Academy
ch. 16 Multiple Perspectives for Creating Change in the Academy (Elizabeth J. Allan)
ch. 17 With so Many Problems, Where Do We Begin? Building a Toolbox for Change (Abby L. Ferber)
Case Studies of Resistance and Feminist Change

Online Resources
About the Contributors
Index
TTR cover image

Founders, Finding, Being Found: Women’s Wisdom in Teaching and Learning in Theology and Religion

TTR
Hess, Lisa M.; Brosmer, Mary Pierce; and Moore, Mary Elizabeth Mullino
2015
Teaching Theology and Religion 18, no. 2 (2015): 170-185
BL41.T4 v.18 no.2 2015
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
This is an edited transcript of a conversation between two founding women on the delights and demands of teaching and learning within and beyond traditional institutional life, facilitated by Lisa M. Hess of the journal's Editorial Board. The conscious feminine practices of a women's writing school, Women Writing for (a) Change (Cincinnati, Ohio), created the circle-container for the sharing of words and wisdom. Narrative, pedagogical, and organizational issues arose as ...
Additional Info:
This is an edited transcript of a conversation between two founding women on the delights and demands of teaching and learning within and beyond traditional institutional life, facilitated by Lisa M. Hess of the journal's Editorial Board. The conscious feminine practices of a women's writing school, Women Writing for (a) Change (Cincinnati, Ohio), created the circle-container for the sharing of words and wisdom. Narrative, pedagogical, and organizational issues arose as the circle listened and examined the realities of contributing as a woman in higher education, yesterday and today.
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A forum on race and teaching theology and religion, launched in the wake of the August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and police response in Ferguson, Missouri, but framed more broadly to encompass teaching for racial and social justice, dismantling the structures of white privilege in academia, and diversifying the faculty, the students, and the canon.
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A forum on race and teaching theology and religion, launched in the wake of the August 2014 shooting of Michael Brown and subsequent protests and police response in Ferguson, Missouri, but framed more broadly to encompass teaching for racial and social justice, dismantling the structures of white privilege in academia, and diversifying the faculty, the students, and the canon.
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Gender, Experience, and Knowledge in Adult Learning: Alisoun's Daughters

Book
Michelson, Elana
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
BF318.5.M54 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Adult Learners   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
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Abstract: In this wide-ranging book, Elana Michelson invites us to revisit basic understandings of the 'experiential learner'. How does experience come to be seen as the basis of knowledge? How do gender, class, and race enter into the ways in which knowledge is valued? What political and cultural belief systems underlie such practices as the assessment of prior learning and the writing of life ...
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Abstract: In this wide-ranging book, Elana Michelson invites us to revisit basic understandings of the 'experiential learner'. How does experience come to be seen as the basis of knowledge? How do gender, class, and race enter into the ways in which knowledge is valued? What political and cultural belief systems underlie such practices as the assessment of prior learning and the writing of life narratives?

Drawing on a range of disciplines, from feminist theory and the politics of knowledge to literary criticism, Michelson argues that particular understandings of `experiential learning’ have been central to modern Western cultures and the power relationships that underlie them. Presented in four parts, this challenging and lively book asks educators of adults to think in new ways about their assumptions, theories, and practices:

- Part I provides readers with a short history of the notion of experiential learning.

- Part II brings the insights and concerns of feminist theory to bear on mainstream theories of experiential learning.

- Part III examines the assessment of prior experiential learning for academic credit and/or professional credentials.

- Part IV addresses a second pedagogical practice that is ubiquitous in adult learning, namely, the assigning of life narratives.

Gender, Experience, and Knowledge in Adult Learning will be of value to scholars and graduate students exploring adult and experiential learning, as well as academics wishing to introduce students to a broad range of feminist, critical-race, materialist and postmodernist thinking in the field. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures
Acknowledgements
Credit list
Introduction

Part I - The politics of experience
ch. 1 Purging the transgressive from experiential learning
ch. 2 Gender, reason, and the universal knower
ch. 3 Othering rationality

Part II - Gender, experience, and the body
ch. 4 Body, culture, and the feminist claims for experience
ch. 5 The body in question
ch. 6 Mind and matter: Dewey, Kolb, and embodied knowing

Part III - Power and the assessment of experiential learning
ch. 7 Conservatism and transgression in the assessment of experiential learning
ch. 8 Queering the assessment of experiential learning
ch. 9 Practice studies, complexity, and the assessment of experiential learning

Part IV - Narrating the self
ch. 10 Autobiography and adult learning
ch. 11 Textualizing the self: genre, experience, and adult learning
ch. 12 The ghosts of war: trauma, narrative, and adult learning

Conclusion
Bibliograpy
Index
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Those Good Gertrudes: A Social History of Women Teachers in America

Book
Clifford, Geraldine J.
2014
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2837.C59 2014
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Those Good Gertrudes explores the professional, civic, and personal roles of women teachers. Its voice, themes, and findings build from the mostly unpublished writings of many women and their families, colleagues, and pupils. Geraldine J. Clifford studied personal history manuscripts in archives and consulted printed autobiographies, diaries, correspondence, oral histories, interviews—even film and fiction—to probe the multifaceted imagery that has surrounded teaching.

This work stands alone: ...
Additional Info:
Those Good Gertrudes explores the professional, civic, and personal roles of women teachers. Its voice, themes, and findings build from the mostly unpublished writings of many women and their families, colleagues, and pupils. Geraldine J. Clifford studied personal history manuscripts in archives and consulted printed autobiographies, diaries, correspondence, oral histories, interviews—even film and fiction—to probe the multifaceted imagery that has surrounded teaching.

This work stands alone: it is broad ranging, inclusive, and comparative. It surveys a long past where schoolteaching was essentially men's work, with women relegated to restricted niches such as teaching rudiments of the vernacular language to young children and socializing girls for traditional gender roles. Clifford documents and explains the emergence of women as the prototypical schoolteachers in the United States, a process apparent in the late colonial period and continuing through the nineteenth century, when they became the majority of American public and private schoolteachers. She finds that this trend continues in the twenty-first century, despite the diversion of women to competing professions, a precipitous reduction in the number of Roman Catholic nuns, and repeated efforts and incentives to recruit and retain male teachers.

Cross-national comparisons suggest that America's early reliance on women teachers quickened and extended the reach of schools across the nation’s social classes, religious and ethnic groupings, and cultural and physical landscapes.

The capstone of Clifford’s distinguished career, Those Good Gertrudes will engage scholars in the history of education and women’s history, teachers past, present, and future, and readers with vivid memories of their own teachers.

The first woman to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for research in education, Geraldine J. Clifford is professor emerita at the University of California, Berkeley. Her previous books include Ed School: A Brief for Professional Education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction

ch. 1 “It Is Well That Women Should Be Unlettered”: Before Teaching School Was “Women’s Work”
ch. 2 “School Dames in Each Quarter”: America’s Army of Gertrudes
ch. 3 “A Sisterhood of Instruction, Essential to the World’s Progress”: Societal Pressures and Women’s Opportunities, 1700-1900
ch. 4 “Overflowing from the Domestic Circle”: Individual and Family Factors in Choosing to Teach
ch. 5 “An Honorable Breadwinning Weapon”: Who Became Teachers?
ch. 6 “The Presiding Genius of His Home and Heart”: Her Marital Status and Domestic Arrangements
ch. 7 “In the Mind’s Eye”: Images and Expectations of the Teacher
ch. 8 “Higher Prospects for a Useful Life”: The Teacher as Trained Professional
ch. 9 “Laboring Conscientiously, Though Perhaps Obscurely”: Certain Realities of Being a Teacher
ch. 10 “The Great Perplexities of the Teacher-Life”: Gertrudes Talk and Their Pupils Reminisce
ch. 11 “That Our Daughters May Be as Cornerstones”: Women Teachers and Messianic America
ch. 12 “The Feast of Reason and Flow of Soul”: The Political Rights and Civic Duties of Women
ch. 13 “A Lady Well Qualified to Show the Way”: Widening Women’s Work

Notes
An Essential Reference Guide
Archives Consulted for the Good Gertrudes Project
Index
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Wabash tree

Teaching Global Theologies: Power and Praxis

Book
Pui-lan, Kwok; González-Andrieu, Cecilia; and Hopkins, Dwight N., eds.
2015
Baylor University Press, Waco, TX
BR118.T43 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Identity, Society, and Church   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

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Abstract: Theological education, like theology itself, is becoming a truly a global enterprise. As such, theological education has to form, teach, and train leaders of faith communities prepared to lead in a transnational world. The teaching of theology with a global awareness has to wrestle with the nature and scope of the theological curriculum, teaching methods, and the context of learning. Teaching Global Theologies ...
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Abstract: Theological education, like theology itself, is becoming a truly a global enterprise. As such, theological education has to form, teach, and train leaders of faith communities prepared to lead in a transnational world. The teaching of theology with a global awareness has to wrestle with the nature and scope of the theological curriculum, teaching methods, and the context of learning. Teaching Global Theologies directly addresses both method and content by identifying local resources, successful pedagogies of inclusion, and best practices for teaching theology in a global context. The contributors to Teaching Global Theologies are Catholic, mainline Protestant, and evangelical scholars from different racial and ethnic backgrounds, each with sustained connections with other parts of the world. Teaching Global Theologies capitalizes on this diversity to uncover neglected sources for a global theology even as it does so in constructive conversation with the long tradition of Christian thought. Bringing missing voices and neglected theological sources into conversation with the historical tradition enriches that tradition even as it uncovers questions of power, race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality. Teachers are offered successful pedagogies for bringing these questions into the classroom and best practices to promote students’ global consciousness, shape them as ecclesial leaders, and form them as global citizens. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part I - Global Theology and Why It Matters
ch. 1 Teaching Theology from a Global Perspective (Kwok Pui-lan)
ch. 2 Listening for Fresh Voices in the History of the Church (William A. Dyrness)
ch. 3 Teaching Global Theology in a Comparative Mode (Veli-Matti Kärkkäinen)

Part II - Identity, Power, and Pedagogy
ch. 4 The Good of Education: Accessibility, Economy, Class, and Power (Cecilia González-Andrieu)
ch. 5 Identity Cross-Dressing while Teaching in a Global Context (Miguel A. Del La Torre)
ch. 6 Teaching Global Theology with Local Resources: A Chinese Theologian’s Strategies (Lai Pan-chiu)
ch. 7 Pedagogy for Being Human in Global Comparison (Dwight N. Hopkins)

Part III - Praxis and Responsibility
ch. 8 Teaching to Transform: Theological Education, Global Consciousness, and the Making of Global Citizens (Teresia Hinga)
ch. 9 Hablando Se Entiende la Gente: Tower of Babble or Gift of Tongues? (Loida I. Martell-Otero)
ch. 10 The Geopolitical and the Glocal: Situating Global Theological Voices in Theological Education (Eleazar S. Fernandez)

Notes
List of Contributors
Index
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Becoming Critical: The Emergence of Social Justice Scholars

Book
Briscoe, Felecia M.; and Khalifa, Muhammad A., eds.
2015
SUNY Press, Albany, NY
HM671.B44 2015
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
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Abstract: Presents the key experiences of a diverse group of teachers and students in their journeys of becoming social justice educator/scholars.

This innovative book is a collection of autoethnographies by a diverse group of contributors who describe and theorize about the critical moments in their development as social justice educator/scholars in the face of colonizing forces. Using a rhizomatic approach, ...
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Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Presents the key experiences of a diverse group of teachers and students in their journeys of becoming social justice educator/scholars.

This innovative book is a collection of autoethnographies by a diverse group of contributors who describe and theorize about the critical moments in their development as social justice educator/scholars in the face of colonizing forces. Using a rhizomatic approach, the editors’ meta-analysis identifies patterns of similarity and differences and theorizes about the exercise of agency in resistance and identity formation. In our increasingly diverse society, Becoming Critical is a wonderful resource for teacher education and sociology of education as it presents an alternative methodological approach for qualitative inquiry. The book contributes to students’ understanding of the development of critical theories—especially as they pertain to identities. The contributors make use of the work of critical scholars such as Collins, hooks, Weber, Foucault, and others relevant to the lives of students and educators today. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Section I: Introduction and Overview of Book
ch. 1 Introduction and Conceptual Framework: Critical Theory, Social Justice, Power, and Autoethnography (Felecia M. Briscoe and Muhammad A. Khalifa)

Section II: Critical Race Autoethnographic Case Studies
Section II Introduction: Authoethnography and Critical Race Theory (Muhammad A. Khalifa)
ch. 2 Auditioning for Whiteness: Autoethnography and Critical Race Theory in the Early Schooling Experiences of an African-American Man (Michael E. Jennings)
ch. 3 To Keep It Real or Not to Keep It Real: The Dialectics of the Chapellian Contradiction (Nosakhere Griffin-EL)
ch. 4 Blue Collar Scholar: Social Class, Race, and Life as a Black Man in Academe (Mark S. Giles)
ch. 5 Too Black, Yet Not Black Enough: Challenging White Supremacy in U.S. Teacher Education and the Making of Two Radical Social Misfits (Brenda G. Juárez and Cleveland Hayes)
ch. 6 Unbecoming … Responding to Colorblindness: An Autoethnography (Joy Howard)

Section III: Critical Feminist Autoethnographic Case Studies
Section III Introduction: Critical Feminisms: Gendered Experiences of Oppression and Resistance (Felecia M. Briscoe)
ch. 7 From Fundamentalist Mormon to the Academy: A “Plyg” Girl’s Experiences with the Evolving Sexist Double-Blind (Felecia M. Briscoe)
ch. 8 Where Did the Girls Go?: The Role of Socialization and Institutions in Silencing Female Voices (Damaris Moraa Choti)

Section IV: Critical Intersectional Autoethnographic Case Studies
Section IV Introduction: Intersecting Dimensions of Identity, Oppression, and Resistance (Felecia M. Briscoe)
ch. 9 “You Look Like a Wetback; You Shouldn’t Have Any Trouble”: Deals We Make with the Devil on the Road Less Traveled (Elizabeth de la Portilla)
ch. 10 A Critical Autoethnography of a Black Man from Detroit: Resisting the White Imaginative’s Criminalization of Black Men (Muhammad A. Khalifa)
ch. 11 Working the Hyphens: Ethnographic Snapshots in Becoming Critical-Female-Black-Scholars (Aisha El-Amin, B. Genise Henry, and Crystal T. Laura)
ch. 12 We’re All Half-Breeds Now … in a Not so Ivory Tower (Miguel de Oliver)

Section V: Advances in Rhizomatic Understanding
ch. 13 Autoethnographic Sensemaking: What Does Our Criticality Mean? Patterns and Divergences (Muhammad A. Khalifa and Felecia M. Briscoe)
ch. 14 Rage, Love, Transcendence in the the Co-Construction of Critical Scholars Identities: Escaping the Iron Cage of Technical-Rationality (Felecia M. Briscoe and Muhammad A. Khalifa)

References
Contributors’ Professional Biographies
Index
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The Coach's Guide for Women Professors: Who Want a Successful Career and a Well-Balanced Life

Book
Seltzer, Rena
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2332.3.S45 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Balancing Teaching and Research

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: If you find yourself thinking or saying any of the following, this is a book you need to pick up.

I know or suspect that I am underpaid, but I hate negotiating.

I do everything else first and then write in the time left over.

I’m not sure exactly what the promotion requirements are in my ...
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Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: If you find yourself thinking or saying any of the following, this is a book you need to pick up.

I know or suspect that I am underpaid, but I hate negotiating.

I do everything else first and then write in the time left over.

I’m not sure exactly what the promotion requirements are in my department.

Since earning tenure, my service load has increased and my research is suffering.

I don’t get enough time with my family.

This is a practical guide for women in academe – whether adjuncts, professors or administrators – who often encounter barriers and hostility, especially if women of color, and generally carry a heavier load of service, as well as household and care responsibilities, than their male colleagues. Rena Seltzer, a respected life coach and trainer who has worked with women professors and academic leaders for many years, offers succinct advice on how you can prioritize the multiplicity of demands on your life, negotiate better, create support networks, and move your career forward.

Using telling but disguised vignettes of the experiences of women she has mentored, Rena Seltzer offers insights and strategies for managing the situations that all women face – such as challenges to their authority – while also paying attention to how they often play out differently for Latinas, Black and Asian women. She covers issues that arise from early career to senior administrator positions.

This is a book you can read cover to cover or dip into as you encounter concerns about time management; your authority and influence; work/life balance; problems with teaching; leadership; negotiating better; finding time to write; developing your networks and social support; or navigating tenure and promotion and your career beyond. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Frances Rosenbluth)
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 How to Have More Time
ch. 2 Authority, Voice, and Influence
ch. 3 Work/Life Balance
ch. 4 Teaching
ch. 5 Establishing a Productive Writing Practice
ch. 6 Networking and Social Support
ch. 7 Tenure and Promotion & The Academic Job Market
ch. 8 Negotiation
ch. 9 Life after Tenure
ch. 10 Leadership

Conclusion
References
Index
About the Author
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On Being Included: Racism and Diversity in Institutional Life

Book
Ahmed, Sara
2012
Duke University Press, Durham, NC
LC212.4.A398 2012
Topics: Diversifying the Curriculum   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: What does diversity do? What are we doing when we use the language of diversity? Sara Ahmed offers an account of the diversity world based on interviews with diversity practitioners in higher education, as well as her own experience of doing diversity work. Diversity is an ordinary, even unremarkable, feature of institutional life. Yet diversity practitioners often experience institutions as resistant to their ...
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Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: What does diversity do? What are we doing when we use the language of diversity? Sara Ahmed offers an account of the diversity world based on interviews with diversity practitioners in higher education, as well as her own experience of doing diversity work. Diversity is an ordinary, even unremarkable, feature of institutional life. Yet diversity practitioners often experience institutions as resistant to their work, as captured through their use of the metaphor of the "brick wall." On Being Included offers an explanation of this apparent paradox. It explores the gap between symbolic commitments to diversity and the experience of those who embody diversity. Commitments to diversity are understood as "non-performatives" that do not bring about what they name. The book provides an account of institutional whiteness and shows how racism can be obscured by the institutionalization of diversity. Diversity is used as evidence that institutions do not have a problem with racism. On Being Included offers a critique of what happens when diversity is offered as a solution. It also shows how diversity workers generate knowledge of institutions in attempting to transform them. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction On Arrival

ch. 1 Institutional Life
ch. 2 The Language of Diversity
ch. 3 Equality and Performance Culture
ch. 4 Commitment as a Non-performative
ch. 5 Speaking about Racism

Conclusion A Phenomenological Practice
Notes
References
Index
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Critical Race Theory in Higher Education: 20 Years of Theoretical and Research Innovations: ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 41, Number 3

Book
McCoy, Dorian L.; and Rodricks, Dirk J.
2015
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC212.2.C655 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
">Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Critical race theory (CRT) was introduced in 1995 and for almost twenty years, the theory has been used as a tool to examine People of Color’s experiences with racism in higher education. This monograph reviews the critical race literature with a focus on race and racism’s continued role and presence in higher education, including:

• legal studies and history,
• methodology ...
Additional Info:
">Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Critical race theory (CRT) was introduced in 1995 and for almost twenty years, the theory has been used as a tool to examine People of Color’s experiences with racism in higher education. This monograph reviews the critical race literature with a focus on race and racism’s continued role and presence in higher education, including:

• legal studies and history,
• methodology and student development theory,
• the use of storytelling and counterstories, and
• the types of and research on microaggressions.

The goal of the editors is to illuminate CRT as a theoretical framework, analytical tool, and research methodology in higher education. As part of critical race theory, scholars and educators are called upon to extend their commitment to social justice and to the eradication of racism and other forms of oppression.

This is the 3rd issue of the 41st volume of the Jossey-Bass series ASHE Higher Education Report. Each monograph is the definitive analysis of a tough higher education issue, based on thorough research of pertinent literature and institutional experiences. Topics are identified by a national survey. Noted practitioners and scholars are then commissioned to write the reports, with experts providing critical reviews of each manuscript before publication. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Executive Summary
Foreword
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Critical Race Theory
Critical Race Theory in Higher Education
Critical Legal Studies
The Origins of Critical Race Theory
Critical Race Theory
Key Tenets of Critical Race Theory
Critical Race Theory in Higher Education: 20 Years of Theoretical and Research Innovations

ch. 2 Critical Race Theory in Higher Education
Tensions and Possibilities
Race and Racism on the U.S. University Campus
Engaging with Students of Color’s Experiences
Understanding Faculty of Color’s Experiences
Critical Race Theory, Higher Education Policy, and the Law
Conclusion

ch. 3 Critical Race as a Methodology
A Critical Race Methodology
Elements of a Critical Race Methodology
Providing Voice and Legitimizing People of Color’s Experiences
Master Narrative/Majoritarian Stories
Storytelling
Counterstories
Functions of the Counterstory
Types of Counterstories
Descendant Theories of Critical Race Theory
Growing the Counterstory?
Positionality
Conclusion

ch. 4 Critical Race Theory as a (Student) Development Theory
Centering Race in Student Development
Critical Race Theory and Intersectionality
Critical Race Theory and Campus Environments
The Ecological Perspective of Campus Space
Impact to Student Development
Toward a Critical Race Theory of (Student) Leadership
Conclusion: The Educator as Architect

ch. 5 Racial Microaggressions
Racial Microaggressions in Scholarship
Contextualizing Microaggressions
Types of Microaggressions
Research on Microaggressions
Microaggressions and Critical Race Theory
Decolonizing Microaggressions: A Concluding Thought

ch. 6 Critical Race Theory and the Next 20 Years
Reflexivity and Listening
Call to Praxis

Glossary
Notes
References
Name Index
Subject Index
About the Authors
Article cover image

"cs"

Article
Harris, Melanie L.; Jones, Carolyn M.; and Rhee, Helen
2016
Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion Volume 32, Number 1, Spring
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
In May 2008, a group of women of color who teach religious studies in predominantly white colleges and universities came together at Texas Christian University in a Wabash Center for Teaching Theology and Religion consultation. The group examined what happens, both to them and with students, when women of color enter the space of the religion classroom, how their presence affects teaching and learning, and what strategies we might employ to ...
Additional Info:
In May 2008, a group of women of color who teach religious studies in predominantly white colleges and universities came together at Texas Christian University in a Wabash Center for Teaching Theology and Religion consultation. The group examined what happens, both to them and with students, when women of color enter the space of the religion classroom, how their presence affects teaching and learning, and what strategies we might employ to ease interactions among students and teachers. This essay is a reflection on a crucial theme that we discovered in the consultation: authority.
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Graduate Education at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs): A Student Perspective

Book
Palmer, Robert T.; Walker, Larry J.; Goings, Ramon B.; Troy, Charmaine; Gipson, Chaz T.; Commodore, Felecia, eds.
2016
Routledge, New York, NY
LC2781.G68 2016
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Highlighting the voices and experiences of Black graduate students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), this book features the perspectives of students from a variety of academic backgrounds and institutional settings. Contributors discuss their motivation to attend an HBCU for graduate studies, their experiences, and how these helped prepare them for their career. To be prepared to serve the increasing number of Black students with access to graduate programs ...
Additional Info:
Highlighting the voices and experiences of Black graduate students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), this book features the perspectives of students from a variety of academic backgrounds and institutional settings. Contributors discuss their motivation to attend an HBCU for graduate studies, their experiences, and how these helped prepare them for their career. To be prepared to serve the increasing number of Black students with access to graduate programs at HBCUs, university administrators, faculty, and staff require a better understanding of these students’ needs and how to meet them. Addressing some of today’s most urgent issues and educational challenges, this book expands the literature on HBCUs and provides insight into the role their graduate schools play in building a diverse academic and professional community. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Terence Hicks)
Acknowledgments
Introduction

ch. 1 Contextualizing Graduate Education at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Robert T. Palmer, Larry J. Walker, Ramon B. Goings, Charmaine Troy, Chaz T. Gipson, and Felecia Commodore)
ch. 2 A Strange Song in a Familiar Land (Lamar Hylton)
ch. 3 Journey to the PhD: A Personal Narrative of Doctoral Studies at an HBCU (Tiffany F. Boykin)
ch. 4 Graduate Level Education at Historically Black Colleges and Universities: A Three Part Qualitative Exposition (Antonio L. Ellis, Christopher N. Smith, and Janatus A. Barnett)
ch. 5 Back to the Roots (Sheree Alexander)
ch. 6 Praise for the Bridge: My Doctoral Journey at Morgan State University (Kimberly Hardy)
ch. 7 Free to Conduct Research of Race and Racism in My West Baltimore Community (Julius Davis)
ch. 8 The Historically Black College and University Family: A Perspective on a Graduate Level Online Accelerated Cohort Program (Kimberly R. Eldridge)
ch. 9 Twice the Experiences: Graduate School at Two Comprehensive Public HBCUs (Stevie L. Lawrence II)
ch. 10 The Significant Value of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Tara D. Miller)
ch. 11 A Liberating Spirituality: Evaluating Theological Education at a Black Graduate School (Herbert Robinson Marbury)
ch. 12 Strange Fruit: The Contribution of the Historically Black College and University (HBCU) to the Development of the Black Intelligentsia (F. Abron Franklin)

About the Editors
About the Contributors
Index
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Indigenous Leadership in Higher Education

Book
Minthorn, Robin; and Chavez, Alicia Fedelina, eds.
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
E97.55.I53 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This volume offers new perspectives from Indigenous leaders in academic affairs, student affairs and central administration to improve colleges and universities in service to Indigenous students and professionals. It discusses and illustrates ways that leadership norms, values, assumptions and behaviors can often find their origins in cultural identities, and how such assumptions can affect the evolvement of colleges and universities in serving Indigenous ...
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Abstract: This volume offers new perspectives from Indigenous leaders in academic affairs, student affairs and central administration to improve colleges and universities in service to Indigenous students and professionals. It discusses and illustrates ways that leadership norms, values, assumptions and behaviors can often find their origins in cultural identities, and how such assumptions can affect the evolvement of colleges and universities in serving Indigenous Peoples. It contributes to leadership development and reflection among novice, experienced, and emerging leaders in higher education and provides key recommendations for transforming higher education.

This book introduces readers to relationships between Indigenous identities and leadership in diverse educational environments and institutions and will benefit policy makers in education, student affairs professionals, scholars, faculty and students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
List of Tables
Preface

Part I: Gathering Wisdom: Indigenous Leadership in Higher Education
ch. 1 Indigenous Leadership in Higher Education
ch. 2 Collected Insights on Indigenous Leadership

Part II: Indigenous Leadership Essays
ch. 3 Views on Indigenous Leadership (Bryan Brayboy)
ch. 4 Designing Tribal Educational Leadership (Cheryl Crazy Bull)
ch. 5 Indigenous Leadership (Cornel Pewewardy)
ch. 6 American Indian Leadership (Ange Bunner)
ch. 7 Educational Warrior (Ferlin Clark)
ch. 8 Indigenous Dissidence: Cultivating a Leadership Politic of Hózhó (Charlotte Davidson)
ch. 9 The Leadership Tree: The Emergence of Indigenous Well-Being Factors in Rural Leadership (Shawn Secatero)
ch. 10 Kuleana Acts: Identity in Action (Erin Kahunawaika’ala Wright)
ch. 11 Identify Yourself (Melvin Monette)
ch. 12 Being of Service to Our People (Heather Shotton)
ch. 13 To Be Mestiza: Blending Leadership Traditions (Alicia Fedelina Chávez)
ch. 14 My Climb to the Highest Rung (Cassandra Manuelito Kerkvliet)
ch. 15 Diary of a Professional Indian (Michael Hanitchak)
ch. 16 Consciously Leading with Ancestors Prayers and Community in the Heart (Robin Starr "Zape-tah-hol-ah" Minthorn)
ch. 17 Leadership Found (Carolyn Kenny)
ch. 18 Path of a Modern Warrior: Leadership Perspectives through Cultural Teachings (Corey Still)
ch. 19 For the Native American Student: Take Opportunities and Don’t be Afraid to Take Leadership Head On…Tips for Success in Higher Education (Jessica Harjo)
ch. 20 Ma Ke Ala Pono: A Journey through My Leadership (Kamakana Aquino)
ch. 21 Aspiring for Something Greater than Myself (Natalie Becenti)
ch. 22 The Seven Teachings: A Full Circle of Support (Tyler Parisien)
ch. 23 Living My Dream, Off the Rez (Shoni Schimmel)

Part III: Recommendations for Higher Education
ch. 24 Toward an Indigenous Transformation of Higher Education

Index
Cover image

Increasing Diversity in Doctoral Education: Implications for Theory and Practice

Book
Holley, Karri A. and Joseph, Joretta, eds.
2013
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 163)
LC3727.I6 2013
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Diversity is defined as those numerous elements of difference between groups of people that play significant roles in social institutions, including (but not limited to) race and ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic class, sexual orientation, and culture. Since doctoral degree recipients go on to assume roles as faculty and educators, diversity in doctoral programs is significant. By supporting graduate diversity across the academic disciplines, universities ensure that the nation’s intellectual capacities ...
Additional Info:
Diversity is defined as those numerous elements of difference between groups of people that play significant roles in social institutions, including (but not limited to) race and ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic class, sexual orientation, and culture. Since doctoral degree recipients go on to assume roles as faculty and educators, diversity in doctoral programs is significant. By supporting graduate diversity across the academic disciplines, universities ensure that the nation’s intellectual capacities and opportunities are fully realized.

The authors consider diversity broadly from multiple perspectives, from race and ethnicity to institutional type, academic discipline, and national origin. They demonstrate how diversity operates through these venues and definitions, and hope to stimulate a conversation about a key aspect of American higher education.

This volume is the 163rd volume of the Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Higher Education. Addressed to presidents, vice presidents, deans, and other higher education decision makers on all kinds of campuses, New Directions for Higher Education provides timely information and authoritative advice about major issues and administrative problems confronting every institution. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors’ Note (Karri A. Holley, Joretta Joseph)

ch. 1 Increasing the Visibility of Women of Color in Academic Science and Engineering: Professional Society Data (Lisa M. Frehill, Rachel Ivie)
Professional societies collect a wealth of data on underrepresented scholars in specific disciplines that can be used to understand minority experiences throughout different stages of academia.

ch. 2 From Graduate School to the STEM Workforce: An Entropic Approach to Career Identity Development for STEM Women of Color (Kelly Mack, Claudia Rankins, Kamilah Woodson)
Career development programs for graduate students should acknowledge the multiple and often conflicting demands placed on underrepresented scholars.

ch. 3 Motivating Latina Doctoral Students in STEM Disciplines (Elsa C. Ruiz)
Latina students who enter higher education and aspire to graduate degrees encounter numerous obstacles along the academic pipeline that ultimately shape their graduate school perspectives.

ch. 4 The Challenges of First-Generation Doctoral Students (Susan K. Gardner)
Students who are the first in their families to graduate from college have significant challenges and yet comprise a significant percentage of the number of awarded doctorates in the United States.

ch. 5 Family-Friendly Policies for Doctoral Students (Jaime Lester)
Doctoral students can face unique obstacles in terms of balancing the demands of a graduate program with personal obligations.

ch. 6 The Impact of Historically Black Colleges and Universities on Doctoral Students (Joretta Joseph)
Historically Black colleges and universities have long served as an important source for minority undergraduates who later go on to receive a doctoral degree.

ch. 7 The Experiences of Minority Doctoral Students at Elite Research Institutions (Eva Graham)
Minority doctoral students at elite and highly competitive private research universities encounter distinctive challenges that can impact persistence, time to degree, and professional outcomes.

ch. 8 Contributions of Foreign-Born Faculty to Doctoral Education and Research (Ketevan Mamiseishvili)
Foreign-born faculty play an important role in American doctoral education, contributing to the processes of internationalization and global collaboration.

ch. 9 How Diversity Influences Knowledge, Identity, and Doctoral Education (Karri A. Holley)
Diversity contributes to the development of an academic identity as well as the production of knowledge, both essential components of doctoral education.

Index
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Diversity's Promise for Higher Education: Making It Work, 2nd Edition

Book
Smith, Daryl G.
2015
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LC3727.S65 2015
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Daryl G. Smith has devoted her career to studying and fostering diversity in higher education. She has witnessed and encouraged the evolution of diversity from an issue addressed sporadically on college campuses to a reality of the modern university experience. In Diversity’s Promise for Higher Education, Smith brings together scholarly and field research relevant to the next generation of diversity work. The book argues that achieving excellence in a ...
Additional Info:
Daryl G. Smith has devoted her career to studying and fostering diversity in higher education. She has witnessed and encouraged the evolution of diversity from an issue addressed sporadically on college campuses to a reality of the modern university experience. In Diversity’s Promise for Higher Education, Smith brings together scholarly and field research relevant to the next generation of diversity work. The book argues that achieving excellence in a diverse society requires increasing the institutional capacity for diversity while simultaneously working to understand how diversity is tied to better leadership, positive change, research in virtually every field, student success, accountability, and more equitable hiring practices.

To become more relevant to society, the nation, and the world while remaining true to their core missions, colleges and universities must continue to see diversity—like technology—as central, not parallel, to their work. In Diversity’s Promise for Higher Education, Smith proposes a set of clear and realistic practices that will help colleges and universities locate diversity as a strategic imperative and pursue diversity efforts that are inclusive of the varied—and growing—issues apparent on campuses without losing focus on the critical unfinished business of the past.

In this edition, which is aimed at administrators, faculty, researchers, and students of higher education, Smith emphasizes a transdisciplinary approach to the topic of diversity, drawing on an updated list of sources from a wealth of literatures and fields. The tables have been refreshed to include data on faculty diversity over a twenty-year period and the book includes new information about gender identity, stereotype threat, student success, the growing role of chief diversity officers, the international emergence of diversity issues, faculty hiring, and implicit bias. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I The Diversity Imperative
ch. 1 The National and Global Context for Diversity in Higher Education
ch. 2 The Role of Identity in Diversity

Part II Reframing Diversity
ch. 3 A Diversity Framework for Higher Education
ch. 4 The Past Fifty Years

Part III Building Capacity by Interrupting the Usual
ch. 5 Identifying and Retaining Talent
ch. 6 Working with and across Differences
ch. 7 Student Learning and Success

Part IV What Will It Take?
ch. 8 Monitoring Progress on Diversity
ch. 9 Making Diversity Work

References
Index
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Start Talking: A Handbook for Engaging Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education

Book
Landis, Kay; Jenkins, Patricia; and Roderick, Libby
2008
University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK
LB2331.S73 2008
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
The University of Alaska Anchorage and Alaska Pacific University created Start Talking: A Handbook for Engaging Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education, a field manual for professors who wish to engage their students more effectively in conversations about the most important issues of our time. The book addresses themes of academic freedom; classroom safety; rhetoric and debate; race, class and culture; science and religion; and ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
The University of Alaska Anchorage and Alaska Pacific University created Start Talking: A Handbook for Engaging Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education, a field manual for professors who wish to engage their students more effectively in conversations about the most important issues of our time. The book addresses themes of academic freedom; classroom safety; rhetoric and debate; race, class and culture; science and religion; and business, politics and social justice. For information about the project, including faculty intensives on difficult dialogues and indigenous ways of teaching and learning, see UAA Initiatives. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Who We Are

ch. 1 Ground Rules
ch. 2 Rhetoric, Debate
ch. 3 Race, Class, Culture
ch. 4 Science, Religion
ch. 5 Business, Politics, Social Justice
ch. 6 Outcomes
ch. 7 Keep Talking

References
Index of Contributors Index of Techniques
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Stop Talking: Indigenous Ways of Teaching and Learning and Difficult Dialogues in Higher Education

Book
Merculieff, Ilarion and Roderick, Libby
2013
University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK
LB2331.M47 2013
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

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Click Here for Book Review
For 10,000 years, Alaska’s Native peoples have survived and thrived in some of the harshest conditions in the world. During that time, they perfected teaching and learning practices that ensured the survival of their communities and the wellbeing of their natural environments. Those ancient practices offer fresh insights for educators who care about the state of our world and seek ways to make education ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
For 10,000 years, Alaska’s Native peoples have survived and thrived in some of the harshest conditions in the world. During that time, they perfected teaching and learning practices that ensured the survival of their communities and the wellbeing of their natural environments. Those ancient practices offer fresh insights for educators who care about the state of our world and seek ways to make education more relevant and engaging.

This book describes a unique higher education project that broke some difficult silences between academic and Native communities by introducing a small group of non-Native faculty members to traditional Alaska Native ways of teaching and learning. It presents a model for a Native-designed and run faculty development intensive, strategies for applying indigenous pedagogies in western learning environments, reflection on education by Alaska Native Elders, and reports from participants on what they learned and what they tried in their classrooms. It is intended to stimulate discussion and reflection about best practices in higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Foreword
Who we are

ch. 1 Ground Rules
ch. 2 Indigenizing Education
ch. 3 Difficult Dialogues
ch. 4 One Day with Elders on the Land
ch. 5 Into Our Classrooms
ch. 6 Assessment
ch. 7 Pausing for Reflection

References and Recommended Reading
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Hidden Roads: Nonnative English-Speaking International Professors in the Classroom

Book
Hendrix, Katherine Grace; and Hebbani, Aparna, eds.
2014
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 138)
LB1778.2.H533 2014
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
This issue uses the powerful narrative of autoethnography to make visible the existence of international professors and teaching assistants who speak English as a Second Language. These important, but often invisible, individuals contribute daily to the education of students within the US postsecondary educational system.

This volume covers a variety of experiences, such as:
- Faculty of color teaching intercultural communication
- International teaching assistants’ attitudes ...
Additional Info:
This issue uses the powerful narrative of autoethnography to make visible the existence of international professors and teaching assistants who speak English as a Second Language. These important, but often invisible, individuals contribute daily to the education of students within the US postsecondary educational system.

This volume covers a variety of experiences, such as:
- Faculty of color teaching intercultural communication
- International teaching assistants’ attitudes toward their US students
- The challenges to existing cultural assumptions in the US classroom.

These experiences - in the form of challenges and contributions - are foregrounded and highlighted in their own right.

This is the 138th volume of the quarterly Jossey-Bass higher education series New Directions for Teaching and Learning. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Notes (Katherine Grace Hendrix, Aparna Hebbani)

ch. 1 “Are You an Immigrant?”: Identity-Based Critical Reflections of Teaching Intercultural Communication (Yea-Wen Chen)
This chapter examines the identity negotiations of a female international faculty of color teaching an intercultural communication course.

ch. 2 College Is Not a Restaurant: Challenging Cultural Hegemony in the US Classroom (Juraj Kittler)
The author offers an experience of a professor who sees his nonnative status as an opportunity to challenge existing cultural assumptions in the US classroom.

ch. 3 Rapport and Knowledge: Enhancing Foreign Instructor Credibility in the Classroom (Mei Zhang)
This chapter emphasizes rapport and knowledge to build instructor credibility in the oral communication class.

ch. 4 Open and Positive Attitudes toward Teaching (Chia-Fang (Sandy) Hsu)
A teacher’s willingness to work out problems with individual students, coupled with openness to students’ ideas and criticism, should help improve students’ negative attitudes toward the teacher. Better learning outcomes and teaching evaluations can also follow.

ch. 5 Opposite Worlds, Singular Mission: Teaching as an ITA (Consolata Nthemba Mutua)
Teaching in a new pedagogical context and cultural milieu offers unique challenges and insight that can enhance our understanding of the American classroom experience.

ch. 6 Capturing the Experiences of International Teaching Assistants in the US American Classroom (Aparna Hebbani, Katherine Grace Hendrix)
The perceptions of PhD- and MA-level international teaching assistants toward their US American undergraduates are investigated. The findings of these ITAs teaching communication courses are discussed and one coauthor provides her reflexive voice as a nonnative English speaker teaching American students.

ch. 7 International Instructor Preparing Teachers for Multicultural Classrooms in the United States: Teaching Intercultural Communication Competence Online (Claudia L. McCalman)
Recent demographic changes in the United States contribute to our increasing number of multicultural classrooms. Some teachers feel they need to be further prepared to effectively teach and understand challenges of multicultural classrooms. This chapter addresses perceptions and reflections of such teachers while receiving intercultural training, part of their ESL (English as a Second Language) certification. The instructor’s reflections close the chapter.

ch. 8 Talking Back: Shifting the Discourse of Deficit to a Pedagogy of Cultural Wealth of International Instructors in US Classrooms (Gust A. Yep)

In addition to highlighting the importance of the voices of international instructors in US classrooms, this chapter proposes a shift from the current discourse of deficit to one of cultural wealth and explores some directions for future research with this population.

Index
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Transforming the Academy: Faculty Perspectives on Diversity and Pedagogy

Book
Willie-LeBreton, Sarah, ed.
2016
Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ
LB2331.T727 2016
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
In recent decades, American universities have begun to tout the “diversity” of their faculty and student bodies. But what kinds of diversity are being championed in their admissions and hiring practices, and what kinds are being neglected? Is diversity enough to solve the structural inequalities that plague our universities? And how might we articulate the value of diversity in the first place?

...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
In recent decades, American universities have begun to tout the “diversity” of their faculty and student bodies. But what kinds of diversity are being championed in their admissions and hiring practices, and what kinds are being neglected? Is diversity enough to solve the structural inequalities that plague our universities? And how might we articulate the value of diversity in the first place?

Transforming the Academy begins to answer these questions by bringing together a mix of faculty—male and female, cisgender and queer, immigrant and native-born, tenured and contingent, white, black, multiracial, and other—from public and private universities across the United States. Whether describing contentious power dynamics within their classrooms or recounting protests that occurred on their campuses, the book’s contributors offer bracingly honest inside accounts of both the conflicts and the learning experiences that can emerge from being a representative of diversity.

The collection’s authors are united by their commitment to an ideal of the American university as an inclusive and transformative space, one where students from all backgrounds can simultaneously feel intellectually challenged and personally supported. Yet Transforming the Academy also offers a wide range of perspectives on how to best achieve these goals, a diversity of opinion that is sure to inspire lively debate. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements

Introduction - Full Steps Forward, Half Steps Back - The Diversity Challenge of Pedagogy (Sarah Willie-LeBreton)
Part I: Challenging Classrooms
ch. 1 Decentering Whiteness: Teaching Anti-racism on a Predominantly White Campus (Michael D. Smith and Eve Tuck)
ch. 2 Is there a Silver Lining? The Experiences of a Black female Teaching Assistant (Dela Kusi-Appouh)
ch. 3 Radical Leftist or Objective Practitioner? Perceptions of a Black Male Professor (H. Mark Ellis)
ch. 4 Teaching Difference in Multiple Ways: Through Content and Presence (Cheryl Jones-Walker)
ch. 5 What You May Not See: The Oscillating Critique (Pato Hebert)
ch. 6 The Professor, Her Colleague, and Her Student: Two Race-Related Stories (Sarah Willie-LeBreton)
ch. 7 Challenging Oppression in Moderation? Student Feedback in Diversity Courses (Anita Chikkatur)

Part II: Witnessing Protest
ch. 8 The (S)paces of Academic Work: Disability, Access, and Higher Education (Kristin Lindgren)
ch. 9 Queer Affects/Queer Access (Anna Ward)
ch. 10 Geographies of Difference: From Unity to Solidarity (Betty Sasaki)
ch. 11 La Promesa: Working with Latina/o Students in an Elite Liberal Arts College (Aurora Camacho de Schmidt)
ch. 12 Passing Strange: Embodying and Negotiating Difference in Academia (Daphne Lamothe)
ch. 13 A Dean’s Week: “Trap Doors and Glass Ceilings” (Theresa Tensuan)

Conclusion - Theorizing the Transformation of the 21st Century Campus (Sarah Willie-LeBreton)
Bibliography
About the Contributors
End Notes
Index
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Spanning the Divide Latinos/as in Theological Education

Book
Hernández, Edwin I.; Peña, Milagros; Turner, Caroline Sotelo Viernes; and Salazar, Ariana Monque
2016
AETH, Orlando, FL
BV4030.H47 2016
Topics: Theological Education   |   Changes in Higher Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
This book provides a detailed look at the current state of Latino/a theological education in the United States. This includes consideration of the career development and opinions of Latinos/as in seminary education, as well attention to other important modes of Latino/a theological education, like non-degree programs and Hispanic-serving organizations like the HTI and HSP. Another goal of this project was to ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
This book provides a detailed look at the current state of Latino/a theological education in the United States. This includes consideration of the career development and opinions of Latinos/as in seminary education, as well attention to other important modes of Latino/a theological education, like non-degree programs and Hispanic-serving organizations like the HTI and HSP. Another goal of this project was to make recommendations for ways in which schools of theology can do a better job preparing the next generation of Latino/a religious leaders to serve as bridge builders for the future. Thus, we paid special attention to how hospitable theological educational institus are to Hispanics.

This book also offers recommendations on improving Latino/a recruitment, revamping the curriculum and Hispanic ministry education, tending better to the sense of community on campuses, and so much more. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables and Figures
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part One - Overview
Introduction
ch. 1 Lifting the Veil: A Look Inside Theological Educational Institutions

Part Two - Latino/a Seminary Students
ch. 2 Taking Roll: What Are Latino/a Seminary Students
ch. 3 Hearing the Call: Latinto/a Seminarians Vocational Motivations and Views about the Church’s Role in Society
ch. 4 Finding the Right Fit: How Latino/a Seminarians Choose Their Schools
ch. 5 Bringing Their Gifts: Experience and Education of Latino/a Seminarians
ch. 6 Facing the Gap: How Latino/a Seminarians Evaluate Their Institution’s Quality and Commitment to Diversity
ch. 7 Serving Their Own: What Seminaries Can Do to Help Latinos/as Prepare for Ministry to the Hispanic Community

Part Three - The World of Latino/a Faculty in Theological Education
ch. 8 Latino/a Theological Faculty: A Close Look
ch. 9 Latino/a Theological Faculty: A Cross-Racial Comparison
ch. 10 Faculty Diversity in Theological Education: The Continuous Challenge of Inclusion with Justice

Part Four - Alternative Pathways and Best Practices in Latino/a Theological Education
ch. 11 Making Progress: How One Institution is Successfully Improving Its Approach to Training Latino/a Religious Leaders
ch. 12 Empowering Hispanic Ministry in Greater Grand Rapids: A Case Study
ch. 13 The Alternative Path and Latino/a Concerns: The AETH Study of Bible Institutes
ch. 14 Caring For Their Own: Latino/a Theological Education As Done By HTI/HTIC and HSP

Conclusion - Spanning The Divide
Bibliography
The Authors
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Teacher, Scholar, Mother: Re-Envisioning Motherhood in the Academy

Book
Young, Anna M., ed.
2015
Rowman & Littlefield, Publishers, Lanham, MD
HQ759.48.T43 2015
Topics: Faculty Well-Being   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Teacher, Scholar, Mother advances a more productive conversation across disciplines on motherhood through its discussion on intersecting axes of power and privilege. This multi- and trans-disciplinary book features mother scholars who bring their theoretical and disciplinary lenses to bear on questions of identity, practice, policy, institutional memory, progress, and the gendered notion of parenting that still pervades the modern academy. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Teacher, Scholar, Mother advances a more productive conversation across disciplines on motherhood through its discussion on intersecting axes of power and privilege. This multi- and trans-disciplinary book features mother scholars who bring their theoretical and disciplinary lenses to bear on questions of identity, practice, policy, institutional memory, progress, and the gendered notion of parenting that still pervades the modern academy. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Section One: Approaches to Motherhood, Feminism and Gendered Work
ch. 1 The Role of Theory in Understanding the Lived Experiences of Mothering in the Academy (Andrea N. Hunt)
ch. 2 Crying over “Split Milk”: How Divisive Language on Infant Feeding Leads to Stress, Confusion and Anxiety for Mothers (Tracy Rundstrom Williams)
ch. 3 Mama’s Boy: Feminist Mothering, Masculinity, and White Privilege (Catherine A.F. MacGillivray)
ch. 4 Encountering Others: Reading, Writing, Teaching, Parenting (Erin Tremblay Ponnou-Delaffon)
ch. 5 A Qualitative Study of Academic Mothers’ Sabbatical Experiences: Considering Disciplinary Differences (Susan V. Iverson, Christin Seher)
ch. 6 Motherhood: Reflection, Design, and Self-Authorship (Brook Sattler, Jennifer Turns, Cynthia J. Atman)
ch. 7 Confessions of a Buzzkill: Critical Feminist Parenting in the Age of Omnipresent Media (Dustin Harp)

Section Two: Identity and Performance in Academic Motherhood
ch. 8 More Mother than Others: Disorientations, Motherscholars, and Objects in Becoming (Sara M. Childers)
ch. 9 Doing Research and Teaching on Masculinities and Violence: One Mother of Sons’ Perspective (M. Cristine Alcalde)
ch. 10 Cultural Border Crossings between Science, Science Pedagogy & Parenting (Allison Antink-Meyer)
ch. 11 “You Must be Superwoman!”: How Graduate Student Mothers Negotiate Conflicting Roles (Erin Graybill Ellis, Jessica Smartt Gullion)
ch. 12 “There’s a Monster Growing in our Heads”: Mad Men’s Betty Draper, Fan Reaction, and Twenty-First Century Anxiety about Motherhood (Caroline Smith, Celeste Hanna)

Section Three: Bringing it to Light: Giving Voice to Motherhood’s Challenges
ch. 13 Silence and the Stillbirth Narrative: Stories Worth Telling (Elisabeth G. Kraus)
ch. 14 S/m/othering (Marissa McClure)
ch. 15 A Tapestry of Sweet Mother(hood): African Scholar, Mother, and Performer? (Ama Oforiwaa Aduonum)
ch. 16 Dropped Stitches: Classrooms, Caregiving, and Cancer (Martha Kalnin Diede)
ch. 17 The Other Female Complaint: Online Narratives of Assisted Reproductive Therapy as Sentimental Literature (Layne Craig)
ch. 18 Mama’s Boy Part II: Feminism, Masculinity, and Life in an Interracial Family (Catherine A.F. MacGillivray)
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Insider, Outsider and Gender Identities in the Religion Classroom

Journal Issue
Patton, Laurie L., ed.
1997
Spotlight on Teaching 5, no. 2 November
BL41.S72
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Critical Pedagogies   |   Diversifying the Faculty

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. (This issue, and all "Spotlight on Teaching" issues prior to 1999, are not available on the AAR website.)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Insider, Outsider, and Gender Identities in the Religion Classroom (Laurie L. Patton) ch. 2 Crossovers and Cross-ups: A Cautionary (NancyFalk)
ch. 3 Mindfield or Mindfield: Teaching Religion in a Multicultural Classroom (Zayn R. Kassam)
ch. 4 Taking Myself Seriously: Transformation of a Working Pedagogical Model (Marcia Y. Riggs)
ch. 5 Spotlight on Teaching: Insider/Outsider (Francisca Cho)
ch. 6 Holy Shock at Sacred Cities: "Rocks Are not my Problem" "Why aren't Women Allowed to make the Pilgrimage to Mecca?" (Kimberly Patton)
ch. 7 Teaching Critical Theory (Miriam Peskowitz)
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The Dean's Demise: Sexual Harassment in a Divinity School

Book
Fletcher, Richard
2016
Wipf & Stock Publishers, Eugene, OR
PS3606.L48D4 2016
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Not everyone is surprised at the rumor suggesting that Karl Wolfe, Dean of The University School, recently told Rebecca Swingle, new professor at the school, that a promotion could be more easily attained were she to sleep with him. Certainly those least surprised were several female students who had been the target of the Dean's amorous behavior. But the question remains--who might stand and ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Not everyone is surprised at the rumor suggesting that Karl Wolfe, Dean of The University School, recently told Rebecca Swingle, new professor at the school, that a promotion could be more easily attained were she to sleep with him. Certainly those least surprised were several female students who had been the target of the Dean's amorous behavior. But the question remains--who might stand and suggest that such behavior should not occur in a divinity school, of all places?

The Dean's Demise offers readers a fictional case study in how something like sexual harassment impacts a divinity school's educational vision, its theological understanding of community, and the practical issues of governance.

Table Of Content:
Prologue: 1979
Ten Years Later, 1989,
Fall Academic Quarter
Ch. One
Ch. Two
Ch. Three
Ch. Four
Ch. Five Ch. Six
Ch. Seven
Ch. Eight
Winter Quarter 1989/1990
Ch. Nine
Ch. Ten
Ch. Eleven
Ch. Twelve
Ch. Thirteen
Ch. Fourteen
Ch. Fifteen
Ch. Sixteen
Ch. Seventeen
Ch. Eighteen
Ch. Nineteen
Ch. Twenty
Ch. Twenty-One
Ch. Twenty-Two
Ch. Twenty-Three
Ch. Twenty-Four
Spring Quarter 1990
Ch. Twenty-Five
Ch. Twenty-Six
Ch. Twenty-Seven
Early Summer 1993
Ch. Twenty-Eight