Doctoral Students and New Teachers

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The Experience of Being in Graduate School: An Exploration

Book
Anderson, Melissa S.
1998
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2371.4.E86 1998
Topics: Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
There is much at stake in the graduate enterprise. Here students are prepared to become leaders, professionals, researchers, and scholars who will be responsible for the advancement of our knowledge and well-being. But what of the students themselves? What do they go through in graduate school? What is the graduate experience like? This volume of New Directions for Higher Education addresses the graduate experience from the standpoint of the students ...
Additional Info:
There is much at stake in the graduate enterprise. Here students are prepared to become leaders, professionals, researchers, and scholars who will be responsible for the advancement of our knowledge and well-being. But what of the students themselves? What do they go through in graduate school? What is the graduate experience like? This volume of New Directions for Higher Education addresses the graduate experience from the standpoint of the students themselves. From a variety of perspectives and across many fields of study, these chapters present what students have reported about their experience through interviews, surveys, ongoing discussions, and autobiographies. This is the 101st issue of the quarterly journal New Directions for Higher Education. For more information on the series, please see the Journals and Periodicals section. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Reflections on the Graduate Student Experience: An Overview - Melissa Anderson
ch. 2 "Grand Possibilities and Perilous Business": Academic Autobiographers on Graduate Education - Steven Weiland
ch. 3 Survival Skills for Graduate School and Beyond - Beth A. Fischer, Michael J. Zigmond
ch. 4 Developing Self-Authorship in Graduate School - Marcia B. Baxter Magolda
ch. 5 Beginning Graduate School: Explaining First-Year Doctoral Attrition - Chris M. Golde
ch. 6 Students' Perspectives on Their Master's Degree Experiences: Disturbing the Conventional Wisdom - Clifton F. Conrad, Katherine M. Duren, Jennifer Grant Haworth
ch. 7 Preparing College Faculty - Jerry G. Gaff, Anne S. Pruitt-Logan
ch. 8 Best Practices for Enculturation: Collegiality, Mentoring, and Structure - Peg Boyle, Bob Boice
ch. 9 If We Want Things to Stay as They Are, Things Will Have to Change - Jules B. LaPidus
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Supervising the PhD: A Guide to Success

Book
Delamont, Sara, Paul Atkinson, and Odette Parry
1997
Open University Press, Philadelphia, PA
LB2386.D45 1997
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This guide to supervising doctoral research is a practical handbook for both the novice and the experienced higher degree supervisor. It looks at how to get students to produce good PhD theses on time, and how to prevent failed theses. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This guide to supervising doctoral research is a practical handbook for both the novice and the experienced higher degree supervisor. It looks at how to get students to produce good PhD theses on time, and how to prevent failed theses. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface and acknowledgements

ch. 1 A most persuasive piece of argument
ch. 2 Caught and held by a cobweb: getting the student started
ch. 3 The balance between tradition and progress: designing and planning a project
ch. 4 Old manuscripts: the literature review
ch. 5 Heavy and thankless task: overseeing the data collection
ch. 6 Disagreeableness and danger: keeping up the student's motivation
ch. 7 Contorted corkscrew: the getting and giving of judgement
ch. 8 An emotional excitement: writing up the thesis
ch. 9 A lack of genuine interest: choosing the right external and preparing the student for the examination
ch. 10 The brave pretence at confidence: launching the student's career
ch. 11 A rather unpromising consignment: selecting successful students and building a research culture

Appendix: Further reading
References
Index
The Society for Research into Higher Education
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Wabash tree

Teaching American Students: A Guide for International Faculty and Teaching Assistants

Book
Sarkisian, Ellen
1997
Harvard, Derok Bok Center, Cambridge, MA
LB1738.S371 1997
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Many faculty and graduate students from other countries expect language difficulties when they teach, but are unprepared for other surprises: different cultures make different assumptions about the academic background of college students, how students learn, the appropriate roles of teachers and students, and even the fundamental purpose of a college education.

The third edition of Teaching American Students explains the expectations of undergraduates at American colleges and universities ...
Additional Info:
Many faculty and graduate students from other countries expect language difficulties when they teach, but are unprepared for other surprises: different cultures make different assumptions about the academic background of college students, how students learn, the appropriate roles of teachers and students, and even the fundamental purpose of a college education.

The third edition of Teaching American Students explains the expectations of undergraduates at American colleges and universities and offers practical strategies for teaching, including how to give clear presentations, how to teach interactively, and how to communicate effectively. Also included are illustrative examples as well as advice from international faculty and teaching assistants. Appendices offer concrete suggestions on topics from planning the first day of class to grading papers and problem sets. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Starting out : a quick guide for beginning teachers
ch. 2 Assumptions that affect teaching in the American classroom
ch. 3 Bridging the gap : approaching your students and helping them approach you
ch. 4 Giving presentations that students can understand
ch. 5 Leading a discussion : providing direction and continuity
ch. 6 Understanding meanings beyond words
ch. 7 Appendices
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Developing Teaching Style in Adult Education

Book
Heimlich, Joe E., and Emmalou Norland
1994
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC5251.H383 1994
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Presenting numerous activities--for both individuals and groups--designed to foster self-knowledge and growth in teaching, the authors examine the primary elements of the teaching-learning exchange. Valuable special resources, including scales for measuring beliefs and values about teaching describes individual teaching styles. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Presenting numerous activities--for both individuals and groups--designed to foster self-knowledge and growth in teaching, the authors examine the primary elements of the teaching-learning exchange. Valuable special resources, including scales for measuring beliefs and values about teaching describes individual teaching styles. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The Authors

Pt. 1 Exploring the Personal Side of Teaching
ch. 1 Relating Personal Growth and Teaching Style
ch. 2 Understanding Basic Concepts of Teaching and Learning
ch. 3 Analyzing the Instructional Process

Pt. 2 Reflecting on the Teaching and Learning Exchange
ch. 4 Content
ch. 5 Environment
ch. 6 The Teacher
ch. 7 The Learning Community
ch. 8 The Learner

Pt. 3 Integrating Teaching Concepts with Teaching Style
ch. 9 Matching Methods to Teaching Style
ch. 10 Developing a Personal Style

Resource A. The Van Tilburg/Heimlich Teaching Beliefs Scale
Resource B. The Norland/Heimlich Teaching Values Scale
Resource C. Focusing on Culture as a Characteristic of Learners
Resource D. Representative Teaching Methods and Techniques
References

Index
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Handbook for Associate Instructors

Book
Indiana University, Bloomington
1996
Indiana University Press, Bloomington, IN
LB1778.I52 1996
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
"This handbook provides essential information on regulations and procedures. It is a compilation of policy and procedure statements from a variety of the Department, College of Arts and Science, and the University Graduate School documents. It is intended as a guide to fulfilling the responsibilities associated with an appointment as an Associate Instructure"
Additional Info:
"This handbook provides essential information on regulations and procedures. It is a compilation of policy and procedure statements from a variety of the Department, College of Arts and Science, and the University Graduate School documents. It is intended as a guide to fulfilling the responsibilities associated with an appointment as an Associate Instructure"

Table Of Content:
1 Associate Instructor as Teacher
1 Preparing to Teach
2 Your Own Class
4 A Section of a Larger Class
5 The Syllabus
6 Class Rolls and Grade Books
6 Course Packets and Readers
7 Classrooms
7 Office Hours
9 Ideas for Teaching
9 Choosing an Instructional Style
11 First Class Survival Tips
12 Skills of a Good Teacher
12 Show You Care
14 Keep Students Engaged
16 Communication Checklist
20 Using Instructional Media
25 Discussion Sections
25 Preparing for Discussions
27 Facilitating Discussions
28 Problems With Discussions
30 Laboratory Sections
30 Preparing Lab Sections
31 Managing Lab Sections
31 Safety Procedures
31 Student Preparation
32 Supervising the Experiment
32 Refrain from giving outright answers
33 Lecturing
33 Preparing Lectures
36 Questioning in the Classroom
37 Rewarding Student Participation and Providing Feedback
38 Teaching Outside the Field of Specialty
39 Evaluation of Student Performance
39 Determining Evaluative Criteria
40 Test Construction
42 Constructing Writing Assignments
43 Responding to Student Writing
45 Grading
46 Recording and Distribution of Grades
46 Complaints about Grades
47 The University Grading System
48 Evaluation of Instruction
48 Teacher-Course Evaluation Options for AIs
50 Ethics and the Associate Instructor
50 Academic Integrity
50 Academic Misconduct
52 Privacy of Student Records
52 Letters of Recommendation
53 Sexual Harassment
54 Assisting Emotionally Troubled Students
54 Assisting Students with Disabilities
54 Diversity
54 Accomodating Religious Holidays
55 Teachings with Student Diversity in Mind
59 Cultural Differences for International AIs
60 What Help is Available for New Instructors?
61 Sources
62 Bibliography on College Teaching
64 References
Appendix: Instructor's Guide to Student Services
Additional Info:
Each year, hundreds of academics begin new faculty appointments. Some are just launching new careers, while others are advancing to new campuses. As faculty members and their institutions struggle to ease the passage to a new environment, they are faced with critical questions. What are the challenges of the transition process? And how does that process differ for first-time faculty and seasoned faculty?

Drawing on a study conducted ...
Additional Info:
Each year, hundreds of academics begin new faculty appointments. Some are just launching new careers, while others are advancing to new campuses. As faculty members and their institutions struggle to ease the passage to a new environment, they are faced with critical questions. What are the challenges of the transition process? And how does that process differ for first-time faculty and seasoned faculty?

Drawing on a study conducted by researchers at the National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, Faculty in New Jobs shows how faculty and institutions can work together to ease the transition to a new job and facilitate the process of mastering academic work. Robert Menges and his associates offer practical, real-world advice covering all phases of the faculty career--from the difficult early process of settling in, to becoming socially and academically established, to ultimately building the institutional supports necessary for a successful career.

The authors provide newcomers with valuable strategies for adapting to campus culture, building professional relationships, establishing a teaching style, and successfully juggling the diverse responsibilities of the faculty role. They also explain what institutions can do to select, support, and evaluate faculty more effectively. They describe the institutional climate that supports effective faculty transitions into and out of academia. They discuss what administrators can do to help faculty better understand and participate in the institutional culture, while also challenging and changing it in positive ways. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
Contributors
ch. 1 Being a Newcomer
ch. 2 Dilemmas of Newly Hired Faculty
ch. 3 New Faculty Talk About Stress
ch. 4 Experiences of Women, Experiences of Men
ch. 5 Perspectives from Faculty of Color
ch. 6 Mentoring and Collegiality
ch. 7 Learning What Students Understand
ch. 8 Seeking and Using Feedback
ch. 9 Feeling in Control
ch. 10 Faculty Well-Being and Vitality
ch. 11 How Disciplinary Consensus Affects Faculty
ch. 12 Establishing a Teaching Development Culture
ch. 13 Learning from Leavers
ch. 14 Accountability for Faculty Welfare
Index
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Demystifying The Profession: Helping Junior Faculty Succeed

Book
Moody, Joann
1997
University of New Haven Press, West Haven, CT
LB2331.7.M653 1997
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The aims of this publication are:

- Demystify certain parts of the academic careers that typically bewilder or confuse junior faculty as well as graduate students considering such careers

- Coach junior and future faculty in concrete ways so they can increase their likelihood of success in and enjoying of the profession

- Spotlight and tell the truth about the special burdens and 'taxes' ...
Additional Info:
The aims of this publication are:

- Demystify certain parts of the academic careers that typically bewilder or confuse junior faculty as well as graduate students considering such careers

- Coach junior and future faculty in concrete ways so they can increase their likelihood of success in and enjoying of the profession

- Spotlight and tell the truth about the special burdens and 'taxes' imposed on non-majority faculty in majority settings (the burdens and taxes are usually related to perceived differences because of the non-majority person's gender, race, ethnicity, religion, sexual preference, and/or social class)

- Prompt senior faculty, department chairs, deans, provosts, and campus vice presidents and presidents so they better understand the stresses and confusions experienced by majority and non-majority junior faculty; and then, based on that understanding, they take pro-active steps to reduce barriers for newcomers and clue them in to implicit agendas and expectations. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
From the Publisher
Practical, evidence-based tips for balancing teaching, scholarly writing, and service (and a life!) Research on the effects of mentoring is presented. In addition, it presents results of a study on classroom incivilities and ways in which new faculty members minimize their occurence.
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The Next Generation: Preparing Graduate Students for the Professional Responsibilities of College Teachers

Book
Slevin, James F.
1992
Association of American Colleges
LB2331.S53 1992
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This monograph presents results and recommendations from a project designed as a collaborative effort to prepare graduate students in the humanities for careers as scholar-teachers within institutions committed to liberal education. The project's two principle activities are discussed under the following headings: (1) Encountering Campus Cultures: Discovering the Responsibilities of College Teachers; and (2) Seminars: Reflecting on the Responsibilities of College Teachers. The first of these activities involved the Teaching Fellows in ...
Additional Info:
This monograph presents results and recommendations from a project designed as a collaborative effort to prepare graduate students in the humanities for careers as scholar-teachers within institutions committed to liberal education. The project's two principle activities are discussed under the following headings: (1) Encountering Campus Cultures: Discovering the Responsibilities of College Teachers; and (2) Seminars: Reflecting on the Responsibilities of College Teachers. The first of these activities involved the Teaching Fellows in campus visits during which they attended department and faculty meetings, observed and sometimes taught classes, and met with individual faculty members who assumed mentoring roles and with whom every aspect of the campus, cultural, career and professional life of the college teacher could be explored. The second activity provides the Teaching Fellows with an opportunity to reflect on what they learned at the colleges and involves two kinds of seminar: (1) the core seminar, which brings the experience of contact/encounter into the structure of graduate training; and (2) the disciplinary seminar, which focuses on the connection between scholarly work and teaching, helps prepare the graduate students within their disciplines, and serves as a means of reimagining and restructuring the graduate programs themselves. Findings show that doctoral students, if given the chance, are eager to engage in the work of academic leadership, even at the beginning of their careers and that a major factor in enhancing their willingness to assume an active role is their encounters with college faculty members. Several recommendations are offered and discussed for future consideration. These are: (1) that coalitions should be built to promote reform; (2) that graduate training must include preparation for the full range of professional responsibilities, especially teaching; (3) that support and incentives should be built for participation of graduate educators in these reform efforts; and (4) that alternative, especially collaborative, models should be developed for improving graduate preparation. (From the Publisher)
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Developing New and Junior Faculty

Book
Sorcinelli, Mary Deane and Ann E. Austin, eds.
1992
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Teaching and Learning, Number 50)
LB1778.D46 1992
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This volume offers a practical compendium of advice on how to foster the career development of new and junior faculty. It is organized around three main themes: research findings concerning new and junior faculty, model programs and strategies to support faculty development, and organizational factors that affect both the success of the strategies and the experiences of new and junior faculty. Whether readers are junior faculty, senior colleagues, faculty developers, ...
Additional Info:
This volume offers a practical compendium of advice on how to foster the career development of new and junior faculty. It is organized around three main themes: research findings concerning new and junior faculty, model programs and strategies to support faculty development, and organizational factors that affect both the success of the strategies and the experiences of new and junior faculty. Whether readers are junior faculty, senior colleagues, faculty developers, or academic administrators, all can learn how to create more supportive and stimulating environments for the newest members of their academic communities. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors' Notes (Ann E. Austin)
ch. 1 New and Junior Faculty: A Review of the Literature (M.J. Finkelstein, N.W. LaCelle-Peterson)
ch. 2 The Pretenure Years: A Longitudinal Perspective (D. Olsen, M.D. Sorcinelli)
ch. 3 New and Junior Faculty Stress: Research and Responses (M.D. Sorcinelli)
ch. 4 Orientation Programs for New Faculty (D. Fink)
ch. 5 Lessons Learned About Mentoring (R. Boice)
ch. 6 Improving Junior Faculty Scholarship (D.K. Jarvis)
ch. 7 Supporting Junior Faculty Through a Teaching Fellows Program (A.E. Austin)
ch. 8 The Role of the Chairperson in Support of Junior Faculty (D.W. Wheeler)
Summary and Further Reflections
Index
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"Socializing Future Faculty to the Values of Undergraduate Education"

Article
Gaff, Jerry G., and Leo M. Lambert
1996
Article: Change July/Aug (1996): 38-45
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Focuses on socializing future faculty to the values of undergraduate education. Values of hiring colleges and universities; Approaches to graduate preparation; Preparation of future faculty project; Initiatives and strategic benefits. INSET: More about support programs..
Additional Info:
Focuses on socializing future faculty to the values of undergraduate education. Values of hiring colleges and universities; Approaches to graduate preparation; Preparation of future faculty project; Initiatives and strategic benefits. INSET: More about support programs..
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"The Faculty Members of the Future: How Are They Being Shaped?"

Article
Wheeler, Barbara G.
1998
Christian Century (Feb 4-11, 1998): 106-149
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Focuses on the role of faculty members in the career of students. Anxieties expressed by deans and presidents of schools on how faculty members should be trained; How the popularity of religious studies reshaped the training of theological faculty; Capabilities of most theological faculty.
Additional Info:
Focuses on the role of faculty members in the career of students. Anxieties expressed by deans and presidents of schools on how faculty members should be trained; How the popularity of religious studies reshaped the training of theological faculty; Capabilities of most theological faculty.
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The Professional Development of Graduate Teaching Assistants

Book
Marincovich, Michele, Jack Prostko, Frederic Stout, eds.
1998
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2335.4.P765 1998
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
As both the need for and the expectations of teaching assistants in higher education rise, institutions must ensure that graduate TAs provide effective instruction. This comprehensive TA training handbook is an essential resource for those who prepare graduate TAs for their responsibilities in the classroom and for their overall professional development. Written by experts in the field of TA development, this book provides a clear framework for implementing and assessing ...
Additional Info:
As both the need for and the expectations of teaching assistants in higher education rise, institutions must ensure that graduate TAs provide effective instruction. This comprehensive TA training handbook is an essential resource for those who prepare graduate TAs for their responsibilities in the classroom and for their overall professional development. Written by experts in the field of TA development, this book provides a clear framework for implementing and assessing an effective program. It is an ideal resource for all those who are interested in developing or improving TA training programs. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Preparing graduate students to teach: Past, present, and future (Nancy Van Note Chism)
ch. 2 The role of centralized programs in preparing graduate students to teach (Jacqueline Mintz)
ch. 3 The disciplinary/departmental context of TA training (Shirley Ronkowski)
ch. 4 Thinking developmentally about TAs (Jody D. Nyquist)
ch. 5 Creating a foundation for instructional decisions (Marilla D. Svinicki)
ch. 6 Strategies for responding to diversity in the classroom (Mathew L. Ouellett and Mary Deane Sorcinelli)
ch. 7 Getting started with TA training on your campus (Frederic Stout)
ch. 8 Teaching teaching: The importance of courses on teaching in TA training programs (Michele Marincovich)
ch. 9 International TA training and beyond (Ellen Sarkisian & Virginia Maurer)
ch. 10 Helping TAs improve undergraduate writing (Jack Prostko)
ch. 11 Technology and TA training (Michael J. Albright)
ch. 12 Evaluating TA teaching (Beverly Black and Matt Kaplan)
ch. 13 Teaching portfolios as a tool for TA development (Pat Hutchings)
ch. 14 Evaluating TA programs (Nancy Van Note Chism)
ch. 15 TA certificate programs (Stacey Lane Tice, Patricia H. Featherstone and Howard C. Johnson)
ch. 16 Preparing future faculty programs (Stacey Lane Tice, Jerry G. Gaff, and Anne Pruitt-Logan
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The African American Student's Guide to Surviving Graduate School

Book
Isaac, Alicia
1998
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA
LC2781.7.I83 1998
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
What does it take to get into and through graduate school? What special challenges, opportunities, and issues face an African American graduate student? The African American Student's Guide to Surviving Graduate School offers a practical roadmap to help African American students get the most out of their graduate school experience. The book covers a number of issues, including creating a program of study, financial aid, and the dissertation process. Author ...
Additional Info:
What does it take to get into and through graduate school? What special challenges, opportunities, and issues face an African American graduate student? The African American Student's Guide to Surviving Graduate School offers a practical roadmap to help African American students get the most out of their graduate school experience. The book covers a number of issues, including creating a program of study, financial aid, and the dissertation process. Author Alicia Isaac thoroughly covers the entire graduate process, offering case studies, anecdotes, words of wisdom from prominent African Americans, checklists, and self-assessment scales to provide a useful guide for students involved in or considering graduate study. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Graduate School Is...
ch. 2 Making the Right Choice about Where To Go to Graduate School and Getting in with Money
ch. 3 Developing a Master Plan
ch. 4 Staying in the Game
ch. 5 Know When to Leave the Party
ch. 6 A Handbook for Mastering the Moves
ch. 7 Selecting and Managing Your Major Professor and Advisory Committee
ch. 8 Getting Through the Thesis or Dissertation
ch. 9 Surviving the Defense
ch. 10 Looking Back and Moving Forward
ch. 11 When Racism Rears Its Ugly Head
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The New Faculty Member : Supporting and Fostering Professional Development

Book
Boice, Robert
1992
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB1778.2 .B65 1992
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
For the first time in decades, most American campuses are in the midst of hiring large groups of new faculty. As competition for the most qualified candidates increases, institutions must work harder than ever to attract and retain the best and most diverse prospects. This often requires investing considerable resources in recruitment and hiring--and makes it imperative that new hires are not lost to competitors or to unhappy or unproductive ...
Additional Info:
For the first time in decades, most American campuses are in the midst of hiring large groups of new faculty. As competition for the most qualified candidates increases, institutions must work harder than ever to attract and retain the best and most diverse prospects. This often requires investing considerable resources in recruitment and hiring--and makes it imperative that new hires are not lost to competitors or to unhappy or unproductive beginnings. In this book, Robert Boice offers a range of proven support strategies designed to help new faculty thrive--from campuswide programs for nurturing newcomers to projects that help them to help themselves. Boice identifies the major challenges facing most new faculty--teaching, scholarly writing, and simply fitting in as colleagues--and provides tested solutions for helping them cope. He outlines a structured mentoring program to build collegiality through social support networks. And he presents specific techniques for helping new faculty find time, fluency, and balance as writers, including advice on dealing with editorial evaluations or rejections. The author also details a variety of self-help projects, including exercise and mood management groups run largely by new faculty, as well as faculty handbooks and newsletters. And perhaps most important, he tells how to gain the crucial support of department chairs, deans, and other administrators, secure funds to get programs off the ground, and keep new programs manageable and successful. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
The Author
ch. 1 Introduction: New Faculty--A Neglected Resource
Pt. 1 Obstacles Confronting New Faculty Members
ch. 2 Gaining the Acceptance of Colleagues
ch. 3 Establishing Teaching Styles and Skills
ch. 4 Developing Habits of Writing Productivity
Pt. 2 Helping New Faculty Overcome Obstacles
ch. 5 Mentoring to Build Collegiality
ch. 6 Establishing Basic Teaching Skills
ch. 7 Encouraging Scholarly Productivity
ch. 8 Helping New Faculty Help Themselves
Pt. 3 Building an Institutional Support System
ch. 9 Recruitment and Orientation
ch. 10 Retention and Tenure
ch. 11 Tailoring Programs to Special Needs
ch. 12 Enlisting Chairs and Other Administrators
ch. 13 Strategies for Getting Programs Under Way
Resource: Questionnaire Used to Interview New Faculty
References
Index
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Assessment & Learning: The Ice Approach

Book
Young, Sue Fostaty and Robert J. Wilson
2000
Portage and Main Press, Winnipeg, Canada
LB1060.F67 2000
Topics: Course Design   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Assessment and Learning: The ICE Approach shows how to maximize learning potential through an improved understanding and appreciation of the learning process. ICE represents the three stages of learning: Ideas: The building blocks of learning Connections: Establishing and articulating the relationships among Ideas Extensions: Learning is internalized and used in novel ways. The authors show how to recognize the stages of learning development--from a state of beginning to one of ...
Additional Info:
Assessment and Learning: The ICE Approach shows how to maximize learning potential through an improved understanding and appreciation of the learning process. ICE represents the three stages of learning: Ideas: The building blocks of learning Connections: Establishing and articulating the relationships among Ideas Extensions: Learning is internalized and used in novel ways. The authors show how to recognize the stages of learning development--from a state of beginning to one of competence and expertise--and demonstrate how educators can foster that development in their classrooms. ICE is a framework for assessing learning growth--across students, across subjects, across ages, and across levels of schooling. To encourage and assess learning progress, the authors provide comprehensive guidelines for developing effective discussion questions, developing qualitative rubrics, selecting and using experiential learning activities, journals in the classroom, projects, presentations, and assignments, grading and reporting. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
vii Acknowledgments
1 1. Ideas, Connections, and Extensions
1 Introduction to ICE
6 The Theory Behind ICE
9 2. Applying ICE to Teaching and Learning
13 Monitoring Progress in Hard-to-Assess Areas
15 Class Discussions
17 Sample Question Starters
18 Guidelines for Developing Good Discussion Questions
19 Group and Experiential Work
21 Guidelines for Selecting and Using Experiential Learning Activities
23 Journal Assessment
27 Guidelines for Effective Use of Journals
28 Projects, Presentations, and Assignments
29 Guidelines for Successful Use of Projects, Presentations, and Assignments
30 Mapping Progress Through Rubrics
31 Constructing ICE Rubrics
33 Differences Between Quantitative and Qualitative Rubrics
38 Differences Between Checklists and ICE Rubrics
40 Summarizing Progress with Tests
42 Tables of Specifications
47 Grading and Reporting Progress
52 A Final Note About Grading
53 Sharing ICE With Learners
59 A Final Note About Sharing ICE with Learners
60 Students' Reactions to ICE
63 3. The Versatility of ICE
63 Across Curriculum Areas
63 Drama and Music
65 Trades and Technology
67 Sports and Physical Education
68 Across Products of Learning
69 Language Arts
72 Second Language Acquisition
74 Social Studies
75 Sciences
77 Math and Math Readiness
79 Music
81 Conclusion
83 Black Line Masters
85 Bibliography
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"Principles of Good Practice: Supporting Early-Career Faculty"

Article
Sorcinelli, Mary Deane
2000
American Association for Higher Education, Forum on Faculty Roles & Rewards (2000)
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The "Heeding New Voices" study, a year-long series of structured interviews with new faculty and graduate students aspiring to be faculty members around the country, sought both to give voice to those who are just beginning their academic careers and to provide guidance for the senior faculty, chairs, deans, and others in higher education responsible for shaping the professoriate of the future. This booklet, drawn in part from the study's ...
Additional Info:
The "Heeding New Voices" study, a year-long series of structured interviews with new faculty and graduate students aspiring to be faculty members around the country, sought both to give voice to those who are just beginning their academic careers and to provide guidance for the senior faculty, chairs, deans, and others in higher education responsible for shaping the professoriate of the future. This booklet, drawn in part from the study's findings, includes: (1) ten principles of good practice; (2) inventories to prompt department chairs, senior colleagues, and other academic leaders to examine their individual and institutional practices; and (3) examples of concrete and innovative approaches to good practice being tried out now in a variety of institutional settings. The principles reflect the three categories of stated need from the "Heeding New Voices" interviews: improving review and tenure processes (principles 1-4), encouraging positive relations with colleagues and students (principles 5-7), and easing stresses of time and balance (principles 8-10). (Contains 13 references). (EV)
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"Nice Work if We Can Keep It: Confessions of a Junior Professor"

Article
Newman, Kathy
1999
Academe 85, no. 3 (1999): 29-33
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
A junior faculty member reflects on the dilemma of that professional position, noting that its anxieties fall into two categories: "Is this all there is?" and "What if we lose it?" She examines problems with, and prohibitions against, speaking one's mind in that position, sees solutions as being institutional or individual, and examines how concerns are linked to other campus constituencies.
Additional Info:
A junior faculty member reflects on the dilemma of that professional position, noting that its anxieties fall into two categories: "Is this all there is?" and "What if we lose it?" She examines problems with, and prohibitions against, speaking one's mind in that position, sees solutions as being institutional or individual, and examines how concerns are linked to other campus constituencies.
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Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students in Higher Education: A Perilous Passage?

Book
Weidman, John C., Twale, Darla J., Stein, Elizabeth Leahy
2001
ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, New York, NY
LC192.4.S63 2001
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This report on the process of graduate and professional student socialization provides information that can be of use to graduate program faculty and administrators, professional associations, state legislatures, and professional licensing bodies charged with assuring clients that well qualified professional practitioners are being prepared in the nation's universities. It addresses implications of issues raised in current literature for designing more effective graduate programs. Socialization in graduate school refers to the ...
Additional Info:
This report on the process of graduate and professional student socialization provides information that can be of use to graduate program faculty and administrators, professional associations, state legislatures, and professional licensing bodies charged with assuring clients that well qualified professional practitioners are being prepared in the nation's universities. It addresses implications of issues raised in current literature for designing more effective graduate programs. Socialization in graduate school refers to the processes through which individuals gain the knowledge, skills, and values necessary for successful entry into a professional career requiring an advanced level of specialized knowledge and skills. The first two sections, "The Professional and Socialization" and "Conceptualizing Socialization in Graduate and Professional Programs," describe the various elements of this socialization process, drawing from research on adult socialization, role acquisition, and career development. The third section, "A Framework for the Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students," presents a conceptual model of graduate and professional student socialization that assumes socialization occurs through an interactive set of stages. The fourth section, "Institutional Culture: Recurrent Themes," illustrates several changing patterns in graduate education that are exerting pressure for reform. The fifth section, "Institutional Culture and Socialization: Differences among Academic Programs," contrasts socialization processes across academic program goals, faculty expectations, and student peer culture. The final section, "Easing the Perilous Passage," discusses modifying the graduate degree program and faculty and administrator roles, increasing diversity, and offering support to students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Acknowledgments

The Professions and Socialization
The Professions in Society
Characterizing Socialization
Dimensions of Socialization
Conceptualizing Socialization in Graduate and Professional Programs
Stages of Socialization
Core Elements of Socialization
Structural Engagement
A Framework for the Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students
Linear Models of Socialization
Nonlinear Models of Socialization
An Interactive Framework for the Socialization of Graduate and Professional Students
Institutional Culture: Recurrent Themes
Diversity
International Graduate Students
Professionalism
Professionalization
Ethics
Technology and Distance Learning
Institutional Culture and Socialization: Differences Among Academic Programs
Knowledge Acquisition
Investment
Involvement
Structural Engagement
Easing the Perilous Passage
Modifying the Program
Increasing Diversity
Offering Support for Students
Modifying Faculty and Administrative Roles

References
Index
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Wabash tree

Advice for New Faculty Members

Book
Boice, Robert
2000
Allyn & Bacon, Boston, MA
LB1778.2.B63 2000
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Nihil Nimus is a unique and essential guide to the start of a successful academic career. As its title suggests (nothing in excess), it advocates moderation in ways of working, based on the single-most reliable difference between new faculty who thrive and those who struggle. By following its practical, easy-to-use rules, novice faculty can learn to teach with the highest levels of student approval, involvement, and comprehension, with only modest ...
Additional Info:
Nihil Nimus is a unique and essential guide to the start of a successful academic career. As its title suggests (nothing in excess), it advocates moderation in ways of working, based on the single-most reliable difference between new faculty who thrive and those who struggle. By following its practical, easy-to-use rules, novice faculty can learn to teach with the highest levels of student approval, involvement, and comprehension, with only modest preparation times and a greater reliance on spontaneity and student participation. Similarly, new faculty can use its rule-based practices to write with ease, increasing productivity, creativity, and publishability through brief, daily sessions of focused and relaxed work. And they can socialize more successfully by learning about often-misunderstood aspects of academic culture, including mentoring. Each rule in Advice for New Faculty Members has been tested on hundreds of new faculty and proven effective over the long run -- even in attaining permanent appointment. It is the first guidebook to move beyond anecdotes and surmises for its directives, based on the author's extensive experience and solid research in the areas of staff and faculty development. For new teachers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface.
Introduction: Why New Professors Need Timely Advice.

ch. 1 Moderate Work at Teaching
Wait.
Begin Before Feeling Ready.
Prepare and Present in Brief, Regular Sessions.
Stop.
Moderate Over-attachment and Overreaction.
Moderate Negative Thinking and Strong Emotions.
Let Others Do Some of the Work.
Moderate Classroom Incivilities.
Summary and Extension of the Nihil Nimus Approach to Teaching.

ch. 2 Write in Mindful Ways.
Rationale for a Mindful Approach to Writing.
Wait.
Begin Before Feeling Ready.
Prepare and Present in Brief, Regular Sessions.
Stop.
Moderate Over-attachment and Overreaction.
Moderate Negative Thinking and Strong Emotions.
Let Others Do Some of the Work.
Moderate Classroom Incivilities.
A Summary of Chapter 2 and its Mindful Ways of Writing.

ch. 3 Socialize and Serve with Compassion.
Introduction: Why Compassion Is Ultimately Important.
Learn about Academic Culture, Early, Patiently.
Let Others Do Some of Your Work.
Combine Self-Service with Service for Others.

General Summary: Catalog Summary of Nihil Nimus Rules
Sources.
Appendix: Readings by the Numbers.
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So You Want to Be a Professor? A Handbook for Graduate Students

Book
Vesilind, P. Aarne
2000
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB1778.2.V47 2000
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Maybe you'd like to combine the two loves of your life, teaching and scholarship, and perhaps build a satisfying and profitable academic career, but you're not sure if this is really what you want or how to go about it. Or maybe you've made up your mind but need some good advice on how to succeed. If so, this book is written for you. So You Want To Be a ...
Additional Info:
Maybe you'd like to combine the two loves of your life, teaching and scholarship, and perhaps build a satisfying and profitable academic career, but you're not sure if this is really what you want or how to go about it. Or maybe you've made up your mind but need some good advice on how to succeed. If so, this book is written for you. So You Want To Be a Professor begins with a discussion of jobs in academia and how to find them. Chapters cover a wide range of political skills for future academic success, including lecturing, organizing a course, meeting your first class, testing, maintaining a research program, and writing for publication. No other book provides such a practical overview of essential career-building skills. Even junior faculty will benefit from the advice in this engaging, comprehensive book. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Employment Opportunities in Academia
ch. 2 Getting an Academic Job
ch. 3 Learning to Teach
ch. 4 Organizing a Course
ch. 5 Presenting a Course
ch. 6 Meeting Your First Class
ch. 7 Testing and Evaluation
ch. 8 Advising and Mentoring
ch. 9 Research and Scholarship
ch. 10 Publishing
ch. 11 Getting Tenure
ch. 12 Academic Integrity
ch. 13 Getting Fired
ch. 14 The Academic Career
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Working Effectively with Graduate Assistants

Book
Nyquist, Jody D. and Donald H. Wulff
1996
Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA
LB2335.4.N98 1996
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
While graduate assistants are valued as labour savers, they are also a precious resource whose preprofessional training needs careful design. Written by two leading authorities in the field of instructional development, this indispensable guide details the skills necessary for academics dealing with graduate assistants. The authors provide comprehensive coverage of all aspects of assistant preparation and assessment, and a chapter addressing special needs of international graduate assistants is included. (From ...
Additional Info:
While graduate assistants are valued as labour savers, they are also a precious resource whose preprofessional training needs careful design. Written by two leading authorities in the field of instructional development, this indispensable guide details the skills necessary for academics dealing with graduate assistants. The authors provide comprehensive coverage of all aspects of assistant preparation and assessment, and a chapter addressing special needs of international graduate assistants is included. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Understanding the Challenges of Working With Graduate Teaching Assistants and Graduate Research Assistants
ch. 2 Establishing Supervisory Relationships With Graduate Teaching Assistants and Graduate Research Assistants
ch. 3 Recognizing and Adapting to Stages of Graduate Teaching Assistants' and Graduate Research Assistants' Development
ch. 4 Preparing Graduate Teaching Assistants for Special Challenges in Teaching
ch. 5 Preparing Graduate Teaching Assistants for Their Specific Instructional Roles
ch. 6 Preparing Graduate Research Assistants for Their Responsibilities
ch. 7 Addressing Special Considerations When Working With International Teaching Assistants
ch. 8 Assessing the Performance of Graduate Teaching Assistants and Graduate Research Assistants
ch. 9 Designing a Plan of Action
ch. 10 Selected References Useful to Supervisors of Graduate Teaching Assistants and Graduate Research Assistants

References
About the Authors
Article cover image

"Graduate Schools Should Require Internships For Teaching"

Article
Burke, Joseph C.
2001
The Chronicle of Higher Education, 5 October 2001
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Article cover image

"Visualizing Yourself As A Successful College Teacher, Writer, and Colleague"

Article
Moody, JoAnn
1997
in Demystifying the Profession: Helping Junior Faculty Succeed (New Haven, CT: University of New Haven Press, 1997), 1-10
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image

Paths to the Professoriate: Strategies for Enriching the Preparation of Future Faculty

Book
Wulff, Donald H, Ann E. Austin
2004
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LB2331.P3625 2004
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
It has been estimated that in the next ten years, about half of the current higher education faculty will retire. How can we best prepare the next generation of faculty members to fill this tremendous gap in our educational system?

Paths to the Professoriate offers all those involved in higher education—everyone from administrators to scholars to graduate students—a much-needed resource that brings together major research, the ...
Additional Info:
It has been estimated that in the next ten years, about half of the current higher education faculty will retire. How can we best prepare the next generation of faculty members to fill this tremendous gap in our educational system?

Paths to the Professoriate offers all those involved in higher education—everyone from administrators to scholars to graduate students—a much-needed resource that brings together major research, the most important developments in practice, and informed analysis on improving graduate education and preparing the future faculty. This important book includes chapters from some of the best-known researchers, practitioners, and scholars working to prepare the faculty of the future.

In one volume, the authors offer a synthesis of what has been learned about the challenges and concerns in graduate education as preparation for faculty careers, highlight the various projects and approaches for improving graduate education, and identify strategies for institutional leaders, department chairs, faculty advisors, and graduate students. Paths to the Professoriate:

* Presents important reasons for considering ways to improve the preparation of the next generation of faculty
* Describes research studies concerning the graduate school experience
* Highlights illustrative examples of innovative programs and projects
* Provides a synthesis of key lessons from the research and projects addressing the preparation of future faculty

This solidly research-based book covers such vital topics as: the lack of systematic developmentally organized preparation for those aspiring to teaching careers in higher education; graduate students’ perceptions of their graduate experiences and their preparation for faculty work; particular challenges confronting Black doctoral students; reasons students leave doctoral study; programs to prepare graduate students for roles as teaching scholars and engaged citizens; strategies to help graduate students and faculty members identify mutual goals and resolve conflicts; and much more.

Paths to the Professoriate offers all those concerned with the fate of higher education a valuable resource for the future. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
About the Authors

Pt. 1 Introduction
ch. 1 The Challenge to Prepare the Next Generation of Faculty

Pt. 2 The Research
ch. 2 The Survey of Doctoral Education and Career Preparation: The Importance of Disciplinary Contexts
ch. 3 The Development of Graduate Students as Teaching Scholars: A Four-Year Longitudinal Study
ch. 4 The 2000 National Doctoral Program Survey: An On-Line Study of Students' Voices
ch. 5 Theories and Strategies of Academic Career Socialization: Improving Paths to the Professoriate for Black Graduate Students
ch. 6 Research on the Structure and Process of Graduate Education: Retaining Students
ch. 7 "So You Want to Become a Professor!": Lessons for the PhDs - Ten Years Later Study

Pt. 3 Strategies for Reform
ch. 8 The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Contributing to Reform in Graduate Education
ch. 9 Preparing Future Faculty: Changing the Culture of Doctoral Education
ch. 10 Re-envisioning the Ph.D.: A Challenge for the Twenty-First Century
ch. 11 Toward a Responsive Ph.D.: New Partnerships, Paradigms, Practices, and People
ch. 12 The Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate: Creating Stewards of the Discipline
ch. 13 Michigan State University's Conflict Resolution Program: Setting Expectations and Resolving Conflicts

Pt. 4 Synthesis, Lessons, and Future Directions
ch. 14 Future Directions: Strategies to Enhance Paths to the Professoriate

Index
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Preparing for Promotion, Tenure, and Annual Review: A Faculty Guide, Second Edition

Book
Diamond, Robert M.
2004
Anker Publishing, Bolton, MA
LB2335.7 D53 2004
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This practical, best-selling book has guided thousands of faculty through the promotion and tenure process since its publication in 1995. This new edition has been significantly revised and expanded, but has also kept its focus on process—what faculty can do to make a better case for why they should be promoted or tenured.

This new edition of Preparing for Promotion, Tenure, and Annual Review contains a number of ...
Additional Info:
This practical, best-selling book has guided thousands of faculty through the promotion and tenure process since its publication in 1995. This new edition has been significantly revised and expanded, but has also kept its focus on process—what faculty can do to make a better case for why they should be promoted or tenured.

This new edition of Preparing for Promotion, Tenure, and Annual Review contains a number of additional resources not included in the previous version—materials that are designed to help faculty prepare for a major professional review—such as post-tenure review, teaching with technology, dealing with changing guidelines and policies, and suggestions on how annual review materials can be used as a foundation for the promotion and tenure portfolio.

In addition to updated references and resources, there are also expanded sections on scholarship, on teaching and on advising, on how to best document faculty role and impact as part of a team, and on collegiality. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
About the Author
Preface
Acknowledgments.
Introduction
Part I: Process
ch. 1 Planning Ahead
ch. 2 Documenting Your Work
Part II: Resources
ch. 3 Assessing Collegiality: A Faculty Survey
ch. 4 Documenting Effectiveness and Impact as a Member of a Team
ch. 5 Mini-Quest: Questionnaire for Evaluating an Instructional Unit
ch. 6 Documenting an Instructional Innovation or Use of Technology: Guidelines for Faculty
ch. 7 Student Ratings of Faculty: Special Instructions Settings
ch. 8 Evaluating an Advisor: Slelected Items From the ACT Survey of Academic Advising
ch. 9 Documenting and Assessing the Work of Faculty
ch. 10 The Teaching Portfolio: Narrative Guidelines of Faculty
ch. 11 Evaluating Teaching: Selected Additional References
ch. 12 Preparing for Promotion, Tenure, and Annual Review: A Faculty Checklist
Index
Article cover image

"African Students in Theological Doctoral Programs in Christian Institutions of Higher Education"

Article
Starcher, Richard L.
2004
Article: Christian Higher Education 3, no. 3 (2004): 207-222
Topics: Theological Education   |   Diversifying the Faculty   |   Teaching Diverse Students   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Over the years, thousands of students have left Africa to pursue theological doctorates in Christian institutions of higher learning around the world. The study reported in this paper endeavored to understand their experiences and articulate their needs and aspirations. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with 23 African students and were analyzed using grounded theory procedures. The emerging profile revealed African students in pursuit of theological doctorates to be mature in ...
Additional Info:
Over the years, thousands of students have left Africa to pursue theological doctorates in Christian institutions of higher learning around the world. The study reported in this paper endeavored to understand their experiences and articulate their needs and aspirations. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with 23 African students and were analyzed using grounded theory procedures. The emerging profile revealed African students in pursuit of theological doctorates to be mature in age and experience with rich and variegated backgrounds. While a desire for increased competence, access to employment opportunities, and a greater voice in church and society were motivating factors in their educational quests, the dominant motivation expressed by research participants was a passion to help Africa and the African church. Students viewed increased competence and access as enhancing usefulness. Consequently, students preferred doctoral programs perceived as Africa-relevant and internationally credible. Nevertheless, they demonstrated a readiness to compromise the ideal in favor of the achievable, particularly in terms of program affordability. (From the Publisher)
TTR cover image

"Metaphorical Mapping: The Arts in Graduate Theological Education"

TTR
Vann, Jane Rogers
2000
Teaching Theology and Religion 3, no. 2 (2000): 103-107
BL41.T4
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Doctoral students in Bible, theology, ethics, history, preaching, worship, pastoral care, and Christian education come together for a required seminar in teaching. Assignments include reading and discussion, student-led teaching demonstrations, and the 'metaphorical mapping' of each student's field of study. In developing their 'metaphorical maps' students use artistic and expressive media to demonstrate their understanding of their field. The assignment has been successful in establishing an open and mutually respectful ...
Additional Info:
Doctoral students in Bible, theology, ethics, history, preaching, worship, pastoral care, and Christian education come together for a required seminar in teaching. Assignments include reading and discussion, student-led teaching demonstrations, and the 'metaphorical mapping' of each student's field of study. In developing their 'metaphorical maps' students use artistic and expressive media to demonstrate their understanding of their field. The assignment has been successful in establishing an open and mutually respectful climate in the classroom, in fostering a pattern of critical reflection on teaching, and in demonstrating appropriate inclusion of personal experience in the academic classroom.
Cover image

The Role of Self in Teacher Development

Book
Lipka, Richard P., ed.
1999
State University of New York Press, Albany, NY
LB1775.2.R65 1999
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The Role of Self in Teacher Development explores some of the major transition points in becoming a teacher and focuses explicitly on how issues of self and identity bear on these different points. The contributors examine not only pre-service teachers, but also the first years of teaching, the characteristics of the master teacher, and the processes of reexamining and affirming one's identity as a teacher. A recurrent theme throughout the ...
Additional Info:
The Role of Self in Teacher Development explores some of the major transition points in becoming a teacher and focuses explicitly on how issues of self and identity bear on these different points. The contributors examine not only pre-service teachers, but also the first years of teaching, the characteristics of the master teacher, and the processes of reexamining and affirming one's identity as a teacher. A recurrent theme throughout the book is the importance of balancing the personal development of teachers with their professional development. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Balancing the Personal and Professional Development of Teachers

ch. 1 Deciding to Teach (Linda F. Tusin)
ch. 2 Deciding to Teach: Implications of a Self-Development Perspective (Stanley J. Zehm)
ch. 3 Becoming a Teacher: The Person in the Process (S. Vianne McLean)
ch. 4 Dimensions of Self That Influence Effective Teaching (Gary D. Borich)
ch. 5 Teacher Self-Appraisal and Appraisal of Self (Les Tickle)
ch. 6 Identity and Induction: Establishing the Self in the First Years of Teaching (Paul G. Schempp, Andrew C. Sparkes, Thomas J. Templin)
ch. 7 Caring: The Way of the Master Teacher (Karen J. Agne)
ch. 8 Effective Teachers: What They Do, How They Do It, and the Importance of Self-Knowledge (Don Hamachek)

Epilogue: How Can the Balance between the Personal and the Professional Be Achieved?
Indices
Cover image

The Academic Self: An Owner's Manual

Book
Hall, Donald E.
2002
Ohio State University Press, Columbus, OH
LB2331.H3122 2002
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The Academician's guide to career management offers insights on climbing the college career ladder that will benefit grad students and full professors alike. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
The Academician's guide to career management offers insights on climbing the college career ladder that will benefit grad students and full professors alike. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Owning up to Academic Dysfunctions
ch. 1 Self
ch. 2 Profession
ch. 3 Process
ch. 4 Collegiality, Community, and Change
Postscript: Textualizing Success
App Sample Professional Statement
References
Index
Cover image

Envisioning the Future of Doctoral Education: Preparing Stewards of the Discipline Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate

Book
Golde, Chris M., George E. Walker, and Associates, eds.
2006
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2386.G64 2006
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The development of students as “stewards of the discipline” should be the purpose of doctoral education. A steward is a scholar in the fullest sense of the term—someone who can imaginatively generate new knowledge, critically conserve valuable and useful ideas, and responsibly transform those understandings through writing, teaching, and application. Stewardship also has an ethical and moral dimension; it is a role that transcends a collection of accomplishments and ...
Additional Info:
The development of students as “stewards of the discipline” should be the purpose of doctoral education. A steward is a scholar in the fullest sense of the term—someone who can imaginatively generate new knowledge, critically conserve valuable and useful ideas, and responsibly transform those understandings through writing, teaching, and application. Stewardship also has an ethical and moral dimension; it is a role that transcends a collection of accomplishments and skills. A steward is someone to whom the vigor, quality, and integrity of the field can be entrusted. The most important period of a steward’s formation occurs during formal doctoral education.
Envisioning the Future of Doctoral Education is a collection of essays commissioned for the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate. The question posed to the essayists in this volume was, “If you could start de novo, what would be the best way to structure doctoral education in your field to prepare stewards of the discipline?” The authors of the essays are respected thinkers, researchers, and scholars who are experienced with and thoughtful about doctoral education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
The Authors

Part One: Introduction
ch. 1 Preparing Stewards of the Discipline (Chris M. Golde)

Part Two: Commentaries
ch. 2 Who Should Do What: Implications for Institutional and National Leaders (Kenneth Prewitt)
ch. 3 Vectors of Change (David Damrosch)
ch. 4 Heeding the Voices of Graduate Students and Postdocs (Crispin Taylor).

Part Three: The Essays
ch. 5 Unmasking Uncertainties and Embracing Contradictions: Graduate Education in the Sciences (Yehuda Elkana)
Doctoral Education in Mathematics
ch. 6 Developing Scholars and Professionals: The Case of Mathematics (Hyman Bass)
ch. 7 A Time for Change? The Mathematics Doctorate
Doctoral Education in Chemistry (Tony F. Chan)
ch. 8 Time for Reform? (Alvin L. Kwiram)
ch. 9 Developing Breadth and Depth of Knowledge: The Doctorate in Chemistry (Ronald Breslow)
ch. 10 Training Future Leaders (Angelica M. Stacy)
Doctoral Education in Neuroscience
ch. 11 Maintaining Vitality Through Change: Graduate Education in Neuroscience (Zach W. Hall)
ch. 12 The Challenges of Multidisciplinarity: Neuroscience and the Doctorate (Steven E. Hyman)
Doctoral Education in Education
ch. 13 Stewards of a Field, Stewards of an Enterprise: The Doctorate in Education (Virginia Richardson)
ch. 14 Toward a Future as Rich as Our Past (David C. Berliner)
Doctoral Education in History
ch. 15 Expanding the Domain of History (Thomas Bender)
ch. 16 Historians, the Historical Forces They Have Fostered, and the Doctorate in History (Joyce Appleby)
ch. 17 Getting Ready to Do History (William Cronon)
Doctoral Education in English
ch. 18 Rethinking the Ph.D. in English (Andrea Abernethy Lunsford)
ch. 19 Toward a New Consensus: The Ph.D. in English (Gerald Graff)
ch. 20 Words and Responsibilities: Graduate Education and the Humanities (Catharine R. Stimpson)

Part Four: Conclusion
ch. 21 The Questions in the Back of the Book (George E. Walker)

Name Index
Subject Index
Cover image

The Formation of Scholars: Rethinking Doctoral Education for the Twenty-First Century

Book
Walker, George E., Chris M. Golde, Laura Jones, Andrea Conklin Bueschel, Pat Hutchings
2008
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB2386.F67 2008
Topics: Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This groundbreaking book explores the current state of doctoral education in the United States and offers a plan for increasing the effectiveness of doctoral education. Programs must grapple with questions of purpose. The authors examine practices and elements of doctoral programs and show how they can be made more powerful by relying on principles of progressive development, integration, and collaboration. They challenge the traditional apprenticeship model and offer an alternative ...
Additional Info:
This groundbreaking book explores the current state of doctoral education in the United States and offers a plan for increasing the effectiveness of doctoral education. Programs must grapple with questions of purpose. The authors examine practices and elements of doctoral programs and show how they can be made more powerful by relying on principles of progressive development, integration, and collaboration. They challenge the traditional apprenticeship model and offer an alternative in which students learn while apprenticing with several faculty members. The authors persuasively argue that creating intellectual community is essential for high-quality graduate education in every department. Knowledge-centered, multigenerational communities foster the development of new ideas and encourage intellectual risk taking. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
About the Authors
Foreword by Lee S. Shulman

ch. 1. Moving Doctoral Education into the Future
ch. 2. Setting the Stage for Change
ch. 3. Talking About Purpose: Mirrors, Lenses, and Windows
ch. 4. From Experience to Expertise: Principles of Powerful Formation
ch. 5. Apprenticeship Reconsidered
ch. 6. Creating and Sustaining Intellectual Community
ch. 7. A Call to Action

Appendix A: Summary Description of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate
Appendix B: List of Participating Departments
Appendix C: Overview of the Surveys
Appendix D: Graduate Student Survey
Appendix E: Graduate Faculty Survey

References
Name Index
Subject Index
Cover image

Strategies for Teaching Assistant and International Teaching Assistant Development: Beyond Micro Teaching

Book
Ross, Catherine, and Jane Dunphy, eds.
2007
Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Imprint, San Francisco
LB2335.4.R67 2007
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
From the Publisher
Written for anyone who works with graduate students to support their teaching efforts in American research universities, this book draws on the extensive experience of professional educators who represent a variety of programs throughout the United States. They understand the common constraints of many TA development classes, workshops, and programs, as well as the need for motivating and sophisticated techniques that are, at the same time, ...
Additional Info:
From the Publisher
Written for anyone who works with graduate students to support their teaching efforts in American research universities, this book draws on the extensive experience of professional educators who represent a variety of programs throughout the United States. They understand the common constraints of many TA development classes, workshops, and programs, as well as the need for motivating and sophisticated techniques that are, at the same time, practical and focused. Their contributions to this book have proven to be effective in developing the sophisticated communication skills required by TAs across the disciplines.


Table Of Content:
About the Authors
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments

Part I: TA Development
ch. 1 Getting Started
Acknowledging Teaching Fears: The Three-Minute Free Response (Janet Rankin)
An Approach to Successful Collaborative Learning (Nancy C McClure)
Blended Learning: Focusing on Effective Teaching Through Online Discussions and Concept Mapping (Gabriele Bauer)
Diversity in the Classroom: Working Effectively with Undergraduate ESL Students (Shawna Shapiro)
Engaging Students in Active Learning (Shawna Shapiro)
Identity and Authority in the Classroom: An Exercise for New TAs (Mary C Wright)
Planning and Facilitating Discussion (Phillip M Edwards, Stacy Grooters, Margaret Lawrence)
Problems, Pitfalls, and Surprises in Teaching: Mini Cases (Lori Breslow, J Mark Schuster)
Responding to Student Writing (Stacy Grooters, Jennie Dorman)
Stand and Deliver: Developing Impromptu Speaking Skills (Jane Dunphy)
A TA Orientation Plenary Session on University Policies and Resources for Teaching (Derek Bruff)
Teaching in Computer Classrooms (Shaun K Kane, Joe Hannah, Phillip M Edwards, Jennie Dorman)
Teaching in Lab Settings (Jennie Dorman, Michelle Smith, Sara O’Brien, Karen Freisem)

ch. 2 Advanced Skills
Classroom Management Skills: Expanding Your Repertoire (Lee Warren)
Determining Appropriate Course Goalsand Pacing: An Exercise for Advanced TAs (Allyson Polsky McCabe, Lu Zhang)
Developing Effective Consulting Skills (Michele Marincovich, Marcelo Clerici-Arias, Mariatte Denman, Robyn Wright Dunbar)
Interdisciplinary Soapbox (Jill Bible, Robyn Wright Dunbar)
Introduction to Online Teaching and Learning: Using Asynchronous Discussions Effectively (Mary C Wright)
Reaction and Response: Group Problem Solving and Effective Feedback (Jane Dunphy)
Teaching Practice: Emphasis on Active Learning (Tershia Pinder)

ch. 3 Professional Development
ASPECTS: Advancing Students’ Professional Excellence with Certificates in Teaching Series (Mark Decker)
Mock Search Committee: Introduction to the Teaching Philosophy (Judith Gibber)
Teaching Portfolio Overview: Peer and Whole Group Discussion (Gabriele Bauer)

Part II: ITA Development
ch. 4 Culture
Cultural Adjustments (Barbara Gourlay)
Diversity Awareness for ITAs (Doris Yaffe Shiffman)
High-Context Versus Low-Context Culture: Case Studies (Christine Liptak, Colleen Meyers, Kyoung-Ah Nam, Elena Stetsenko)
The High School Visit (Catherine Ross)
Interviews: Surveying College Undergraduates Who Attended High School in the United States (Margo Sampson, Vel Chesser, Stacey Lane Tice)

ch. 5 Pedagogy
American Teaching Performance (Pamela Pollock)
Movie-Based Activities for the ITA Course (Theresa L Pettit)
Pedagogical Uses of Critical Incidents Videos for ITAs (Stacey Lane Tice, Margo Sampson, Vel Chesser)
Practice Identifying and Teaching to a Variety of Learning Styles (Anne Halbert)
Preparing the ITA for Office Hours (Elizabeth Wittner)

ch. 6 Language
Departmental Introduction Speech (Kimberly Kenyon)
Developing Oral Communication Skills (Margaret Lawrence)
Discovering and Teaching the Vocabulary of the Academic Communities (Doris Yaffe Shiffman)
Editorial Jigsaw (Barbara Gourlay)
Fielding Questions: The IgNobel Prizes (Barbara Thompson)
The Fine Art of Q&A (Barbara Gourlay)
The Greek Alphabet: Speaking in Symbols (Barbara Gourlay)
"International Teaching Assistant of the Year" Speech (Kimberly Kenyon)
Mimicking American TA Discourse (Janet Goodwin)
Practicing Communication Strategies (Doris Yaffe Shiffman)
Presentation Summaries—Take Two! (Barbara Thompson)
Working with Authentic TA Discourse (Janet Goodwin)

Resources
Index
Cover image

New Teacher Mentoring: Hopes and Promise for Improving Teacher Effectiveness

Book
Moir, Ellen; Dara Barlin; Janet Gless; and Jan Miles
2009
Harvard Education Press, Cambridge, MA
LB1731.4.N49 2009
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This book is written for K-12 educational contexts, but many of its ideas and analyses can be applied to higher education contexts.
Additional Info:
This book is written for K-12 educational contexts, but many of its ideas and analyses can be applied to higher education contexts.

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I High-Quality New Teacher Mentoring
ch. 1 What We Know and Don't Know About Mentoring and Induction
ch. 2 The Principles of High-Quality Mentoring
ch. 3 Mentor Professional Development

Part II The Case Studies
ch. 4 Durham Public School
ch. 5 Boston Public Schools
ch. 6 New York City Department of Education
ch. 7 Chicago Public Schools

Part III Conclusions and Recommendations
ch. 8 Analyzing Trends: Strategies Honed, Questions Raised, Levers for Change
ch. 9 Implications and Recommendations for Educational Stakeholders

Notes
About the Authors
About the New Teacher Center
Index
Article cover image

"The New Challenges, New Priorities: The Experience of Generation X Faculty: A Study for the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education"

Article
Helms, Robin Matross
2010
COACHE, The Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Faculty Well-Being   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image
Wabash tree

Promotion and Tenure Confidential

Book
Perlmutter, David D.
2010
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2335.7.P47 2010
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Sitting down with a young and brilliant mathematician, I asked what he thought were his biggest problems in working toward tenure. Instead of describing difficulties with his equations or his software programs, he lamented that (a) his graduate assistant wasn’t completing his tasks on time, (b) his department chair didn’t seem to care if junior faculty obtained grants, and (c) a senior professor kept glaring at him in ...
Additional Info:
Sitting down with a young and brilliant mathematician, I asked what he thought were his biggest problems in working toward tenure. Instead of describing difficulties with his equations or his software programs, he lamented that (a) his graduate assistant wasn’t completing his tasks on time, (b) his department chair didn’t seem to care if junior faculty obtained grants, and (c) a senior professor kept glaring at him in faculty meetings. He knew he could handle the intellectual side of being an academic—but what about the people side? ‘Why didn’t they offer

Promotion and Tenure Confidential provides that course in an astute and practical book, which shows that P&T is not just about research, teaching, and service but also about human relations and political good sense. Drawing on research and extensive interviews with junior and senior faculty across many institutions, David D. Perlmutter provides clear-sighted guidance on planning and managing an academic career, from graduate school to tenure and beyond.

Topics include:

Making the transformation from student and protégé to teacher and mentor.

Seeking out and holding onto lifelong allies.

How to manage your online reputation and avoid “death by Google”.

What to say and what not to say to deans and department chairs.

How meeting deadlines wins points with everyone in your life.

How, when, and to whom to say “no”.

When and how to look for a new job when you have a job.

How (and whom) to ask for letters of recommendation.

What to do if you know you’re not going to get tenure.
(From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: Promotion and Tenure Up Close and Personal

ch. 1 The Doctorate and the Career Track

ch. 2 The Academic Job Search

ch. 3 Colleagues and Academic Cultures

ch. 4 The Balancing Act - Self, Family, and Tenure

ch. 5 Student Relations

ch. 6 Steps to Tenure and Promotion and Beyond

Notes

Acknowledgments

Index
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Transforming Graduate Biblical Education: Ethos and Discipline

Book
Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza, author, ed., Kent Harold Richards, ed.
2010
Society of Biblical Literature, Atlanta, GA
BV4020.T73 2010
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This unique collection of essays, originating in seminars held at SBL’s Annual and International Meetings, explores the current ethos and discipline of graduate biblical education from different social locations and academic contexts. It includes international voices of well-established scholars who have urged change for some time alongside younger scholars with new perspectives. The individual contributions emerge from a variegated set of experiences in graduate biblical studies and a critical ...
Additional Info:
This unique collection of essays, originating in seminars held at SBL’s Annual and International Meetings, explores the current ethos and discipline of graduate biblical education from different social locations and academic contexts. It includes international voices of well-established scholars who have urged change for some time alongside younger scholars with new perspectives. The individual contributions emerge from a variegated set of experiences in graduate biblical studies and a critical analysis of those experiences. The volume is divided into four areas of investigation. The first section discusses the ethos of biblical studies and social location, and the second explores different cultural-national formations of the discipline. The third section considers the experiences and visions of graduate biblical studies, while the last section explores how to transform the discipline. All the contributions offer ways to transform graduate biblical education so that it becomes a socializing power that, in turn, can transform the present academic ethos of biblical studies. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Abbreviations
Introduction: Transforming Graduate Biblical Studies: Ethos and Discipline

Part I: Changing The Ethos of Graduate Biblical Studies
ch. 1 From "Mono" - to "Multi" - Culture: Reflections on a Journey (Elaine M. Wainwright)
ch. 2 Cross-Textural Biblical Studies in Multiscriptural Contexts (Archie C. C. Lee)
ch. 3 Social Location: Dis-ease and/or Dis-cover(y) (Yakhwee Tan)
ch. 4 Taking Spaces Seriously: The Politics of Space and the Future of Western Biblical Studies (Abraham Smith)
ch. 5 Biblical Studies and Public Relevance: Hermeneutical and Pedagogical Consideration in Light of the Ethos of the Greater China Region (GCR)
(Phillip Chia)
Part 2: Cultural-National Locations of Graduate Biblical Studies
ch. 6 Graduate Studies Now: Some Reflections from Experience (Athalya Brenner)
ch. 7 Graduate Biblical Studies in India (Monica Jyotsna Melanchthon)
ch. 8 Biblical Study in Korea in the Twenty-First Century (Kyung Sook Lee)
ch. 9 The Practice and Ethos of Postgraduate Biblical Education: A Glance at Europe and in Particular Switzerland (Gabriella Gelardini)

Part 3: New Voices From The Margins
ch. 10 Biblical Studies: A View from the Feminist Margins and the Jewish Fringes (Cynthia M. Baker)
ch. 11 On the Fringes of the "Big Tent" of Graduate New Testament Studies (Thomas Fabisiak)
ch. 12 Giving an Account of a Desirable Subject: Critically Queering Graduate Biblical Education (Joseph A. Marchal)
ch. 13 To a Black Student in First-Year Hebrew (Nyasha Junior)
ch. 14 Intoxicating Teaching as Transformational Pedagogy (Wil Gafney)
ch. 15 Beyond Socialization and Attrition: Border Pedagogy in Biblical Studies (Roberto Mata)

Part 4: Transforming The Curriculum
ch. 16 Redesigning the Biblical Studies Curriculum: Toward a "Radical-Democratic" Teaching Model (Susanne Scholz)
ch. 17 Biblical Studies for Ministry: Critical and Faithful Interpretation of Scripture in an Either/Or World (Cynthia Briggs Kittredge)
ch. 18 Placing Meaning-Making at the Center of New Testament Studies (Hal Taussig, Brigitte Kahl)
ch. 19 Mapping the Field, Shaping the Discipline: Doctoral Education as Rhetorical Formation (Melanie Johnson-DeBaufre)
ch. 20 The Work We Make Scriptures Do for Us: An Argument for Signifying (on) Scriptures as Intellectual Project (Vincent L. Wimbush)
ch. 21 Breadth and Depth: A Hope for Biblical Studies (Kent Harold Richards)

Appendix
Rethinking The Educational Practices of Biblical Doctoral Studies (Elisabeth Schussler Fiorenza)
Contributors
Cover image

Joining the Mission: A Guide for (Mainly) New College Faculty

Book
VanZanten, Susan
2011
William B Eerdmans Publishing Co., Grand Rapids, MI
LC383.V36 2011
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Joining the Mission is a helpful guide for new (and experienced) faculty at religious colleges and universities. Susan VanZanten here provides an orientation to the world of Christian higher education and an introduction to the academic profession of teaching, scholarship, and service, with a special emphasis on opportunities and challenges common to “mission-driven” institutions. From designing a syllabus to dealing with problem students, from working with committees to achieving a ...
Additional Info:
Joining the Mission is a helpful guide for new (and experienced) faculty at religious colleges and universities. Susan VanZanten here provides an orientation to the world of Christian higher education and an introduction to the academic profession of teaching, scholarship, and service, with a special emphasis on opportunities and challenges common to “mission-driven” institutions. From designing a syllabus to dealing with problem students, from working with committees to achieving a balanced life, VanZanten's guidebook will help faculty across the disciplines — Art to Zoology and every subject between — understand better what it means to pursue faithfully a vocation as professor. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface: The Beginning of a Vocation

ch. 1 What Is a Mission-Driven Institution?

ch. 2 A Very Brief History of Western Higher Education

ch. 3 Teaching: Call and Response

ch. 4 Teaching: Brick by Brick

ch. 5 The Faithful Professor: Multiple Paradigms for Faith and Learning

ch. 6 How Outrageous Is Faithful Scholarships?

ch. 7 Beyond Professing Alone: Becoming an Academic Citizen

ch. 8 Composing a Life: Balance and Improvisation

Appendix

Acknowledgments
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A Survival Guide for New Faculty Members: Outlining the Keys to Success for Promotion and Tenure

Book
Bakken, Jeffrey P., and Simpson, Cynthia G.
2011
Charles C. Thomas Publisher Ltd.
LB2844.1.N4 B28 2011
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
The Survival Guide for New Faculty Members: Outlining the Keys to Success for Promotion and Tenure provides new faculty members with practical, down-to-earth wisdom and suggestions for successfully working through to tenure and promotion. The authors—both successful and experienced administrators and experts in higher education—have provided an extremely well-organized and useful guide for new faculty members. It focuses on all aspects of becoming a new faculty member including ...
Additional Info:
The Survival Guide for New Faculty Members: Outlining the Keys to Success for Promotion and Tenure provides new faculty members with practical, down-to-earth wisdom and suggestions for successfully working through to tenure and promotion. The authors—both successful and experienced administrators and experts in higher education—have provided an extremely well-organized and useful guide for new faculty members. It focuses on all aspects of becoming a new faculty member including the various expectations in completing a successful journey toward promotion and tenure. The book underscores the importance of recognizing the three facets of faculty life of teaching, research, and service. This volume clearly sets out, compares, and separates those three components with clarity and provides very useful advice for putting the three together. Taken together with the chapters on “Documenting Your Progress” and “Promotion and Tenure,” new faculty are provided with a solid, practical introduction to building a foundation for success in higher education. Feedback and tips are also provided within each chapter. It is written in a style that readers will be able to easily comprehend and understand and is supported with many examples. In addition, the information can be easily applied to new faculty at various types of institutions of higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface 

Part I: The Basic Fundamentals
ch. 1 Choosing The Right Institution
Searching the Chronicle of Higher Education
Type of University
What to Look for Regarding a Faculty Position
Application Materials 
Phone Interview 
Campus Visit 
Questions to Ask While on Campus
Job Offer/Negotiations
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips on Getting Started 
 
ch. 2 What To Do Prior To Arriving At Your New Institution
Finish Your Dissertation 
What if You Don’t Finish? 
Finding a Place to Live 
School Options 
Transportation 
Athletic Events 
Community and Cultural Events 
Children’s Programs 
Visiting the Community
Shopping
Nightlife 
Parks 
Discuss Class Load 
Faculty Expectations and Support 
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips about Relocating 
 
ch. 3 Learning About Your New Institution Once You Are There
Core Curriculum 
Programs Offered 
New Faculty Training 
Faculty Mentors 
Faculty Evaluations 
Funding Opportunities 
Internal Funding Opportunities 
External Funding Opportunities 
University Culture 
Conclusion
Faculty Tips on Learning about Your Institution
 
Part II: The Nuts and Bolts of Success
ch. 4 Teaching
Class Load and Schedule 
Course Teams 
Syllabus Development 
Assessments 
Teaching Style 
Available Technology and Support 
Being Successful 
Student Issues 
Faculty Expectations 
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips about Teaching 
 
ch. 5 Research and Scholarly Activity
Release Time 
Developing Ideas
Research Agenda 
Human Subjects Process 
Manuscript Preparation 
Presentations 
Grant Funding 
Being Successful 
Collaboration/Outreach 
Faculty Expectations
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips about Scholarly Activity 
 
ch. 6 Service
Department Service
College Service 
University Service 
Public School Service 
Community Organization Service 
Professional Organization Service 
Documentation of Service 
Being Successful 
Faculty Expectations 
Conclusion
Faculty Tips about Service 
 
Part III: The Final Steps
ch. 7 Documenting Your Progress
Keeping Track
Developing a Plan 
Constant Updates 
Documenting your Work 
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips on Documenting your Progress 

ch. 8 Promotion and Tenure
When does Promotion and Tenure Occur? 
Preparation for Promotion and Tenure 
What do you submit for Promotion and Tenure? 
What are the Procedures and Timelines for Promotion and Tenure? What Happens if you are Denied Promotion and Tenure? 
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips about Promotion and Tenure 

ch. 9 Creating A Harmony For Being Successful
Find Your Niche 
Focus on your Strengths 
Be Realistic
Find a Balance 
Conclusion 
Faculty Tips on Being Successful 
 
Appendices
Appendix A: University Research Grant Application 
Appendix B: Sample Undergraduate Syllabus 
Appendix C: Sample Graduate Syllabus 
Appendix D: Sample Human Subjects Proposal Form 
Appendix E: Sample Human Subjects Reviewer Form 
Appendix F: Completed Human Subjects Proposal 
Appendix G: Sample Promotion and Tenure Packet 
Index 
Cover image

Professors Behaving Badly: Faculty Misconduct in Graduate Education

Book
Braxton, John M., Proper, Eve M., and Bayer, Alan E.
2011
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB1779.B74 2011
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
• A faculty member publishes an article without offering coauthorship to a graduate assistant who has made a substantial conceptual or methodological contribution to the article.
• A professor does not permit graduate students to express viewpoints different from her own.
• A graduate student close to finishing his dissertation cannot reach his traveling advisor, a circumstance that jeopardizes his degree.
This book discusses these and other examples of faculty ...
Additional Info:
• A faculty member publishes an article without offering coauthorship to a graduate assistant who has made a substantial conceptual or methodological contribution to the article.
• A professor does not permit graduate students to express viewpoints different from her own.
• A graduate student close to finishing his dissertation cannot reach his traveling advisor, a circumstance that jeopardizes his degree.
This book discusses these and other examples of faculty misconduct—and how to avoid them.

Using data collected through faculty surveys, the authors describe behaviors associated with graduate teaching which are considered inappropriate and in violation of good teaching practices. They derive a normative structure that consists of five inviolable and eight admonitory proscriptive criteria to help graduate faculty make informed and acceptable professional choices.

The authors discuss the various ways in which faculty members acquire the norms of teaching and mentoring, including the graduate school socialization process, role models, disciplinary codes of ethics, and scholarship about the professoriate and professional performance. Analyzing the rich data gleaned from the faculty surveys, they track how these norms are understood and interpreted across academic disciplines and are influenced by such factors as gender, citizenship, age, academic rank, tenure, research activity, and administrative experience. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Tables
Acknowledgments
Introduction - The Critical Role of Norms in Graduate Education

ch. 1 Incidents of Faculty Improprieties in Graduate Training
ch. 2 Study Design
ch. 3 The Normative Structure of Graduate Education
ch. 4 Norm Espousal by Institutional Type and Academic Discipline
ch. 5 Personal Attributes and Norm Espousal
ch. 6 Norm Espousal and Faculty Professional Attainments and Involvement
ch. 7 Core Norms, Differentiated Norms, and Key Differentiating Factors
ch. 8 Graduate School Socialization and the Internalization of the Norms of Graduate Study
ch. 9 The Support of Graduate Teaching Norms by Supporting Organizations
ch. 10 Further Perspectives on the Internalization of the Norms of Graduate Teaching and Mentoring
ch. 11 Conclusion and Recommendations for Research, Policy, and Practice

Appendix A - The Graduate Teaching and Mentoring Behaviors Inventory
Appendix B - Means and Standard Deviations for Behaviors Included in the Graduate Teaching and Mentoring Behaviors Inventory (GTMBI)
Appendix C - Respondent Bias Assessment

References
Index
Cover image

Teachers as Learners

Book
Feiman-Nemser, Sharon
2012
Harvard Educating Publishing Group
LB1025.3.F45 2012
Topics: Writing the Scholarship of Teaching   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
In Teachers as Learners, a collection of landmark essays, noted teacher educator and scholar Sharon Feiman-Nemser shines a light on teacher learning.

Arguing that serious and sustained teacher learning is a necessary condition for ambitious student learning, she examines closely how teachers acquire, generate, and use knowledge about teaching over the trajectory of their careers. Together, these essays bear witness to the evolution and development of a body ...
Additional Info:
In Teachers as Learners, a collection of landmark essays, noted teacher educator and scholar Sharon Feiman-Nemser shines a light on teacher learning.

Arguing that serious and sustained teacher learning is a necessary condition for ambitious student learning, she examines closely how teachers acquire, generate, and use knowledge about teaching over the trajectory of their careers. Together, these essays bear witness to the evolution and development of a body of scholarship about teacher learning in which the author herself played a catalyzing role. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Forward
Introduction - Investigating Teacher Learning: Framing an Inquiry

Part I - Mapping the Field
ch. 1 Learning to Teach
ch. 2 Teacher Preparation
ch. 3 From Preparation to Practice
ch. 4 Multiple Meanings of New Teacher Induction

Part II - Teacher Learning During Teacher Preparation
ch. 5 Pitfalls of Experience in Teacher Preparation
ch. 6 The First Year of Teacher Preparation
ch. 7 When is Student Teaching Teacher Education?

Part III - Mentoring, Induction, and New Teacher Learning
ch. 8 Linking Mentoring and Teacher Learning
ch. 9 Helping Novices Learn to Teach
ch. 10 Mind Activity in Teaching and Mentoring

Acknowledgements
Notes
About the Author
About the Contributors
Index
Cover image

Success on the Tenure Track: Five Keys to Faculty Job Satisfaction

Book
Trower, Cathy Ann
2012
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2335.7.T76 2012
Topics: Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Landing a tenure-track position is no easy task. Achieving tenure is even more difficult. Under what policies and practices do faculty find greater clarity about tenure and experience higher levels of job satisfaction? And what makes an institution a great place to work?

In 2005–2006, the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE) at the Harvard Graduate School of Education surveyed more than 15,000 tenure-track faculty at 200 participating institutions ...
Additional Info:
Landing a tenure-track position is no easy task. Achieving tenure is even more difficult. Under what policies and practices do faculty find greater clarity about tenure and experience higher levels of job satisfaction? And what makes an institution a great place to work?

In 2005–2006, the Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education (COACHE) at the Harvard Graduate School of Education surveyed more than 15,000 tenure-track faculty at 200 participating institutions to assess their job satisfaction. The survey was designed around five key themes for faculty satisfaction: tenure clarity, work-life balance, support for research, collegiality, and leadership.

Success on the Tenure Track positions the survey data in the context of actual colleges and universities and real faculty and administrators who talk about what works and why. Best practices at the highest-rated institutions in the survey—Auburn, Ohio State, North Carolina State, Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Iowa, Kansas, and North Carolina at Pembroke—give administrators practical, proven advice on how to increase their employee satisfaction. Additional chapters discuss faculty demographics, trends in employment practices, what leaders can do to create and sustain a great workplace for faculty, and what the future might hold for tenure.

An actively engaged faculty is crucial for American higher education to retain its global competitiveness. Cathy Ann Trower's analysis provides colleges and universities a considerable inside advantage to get on the right track toward a happy, productive workforce. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Author's Note

ch. 1 Introduction
ch. 2 Study Background and Methodology
ch. 3 Tenure
ch. 4 Work-Life Integration
ch. 5 Support for Research and Teaching
ch. 6 Culture, Climate, and Collegiality
ch. 7 Engaging Leaders across the Campus
ch. 8 The Future of the Tenure Track

Appendixes
A. In-Depth Interview Guide
B. Master List of Interview Categories for Coding
C. University of Iowa College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Faculty Appointments and Review
D. University of Kansas General Principles for Developing Faculty Evaluation Plans
E. Ohio State University Core Dossier Outline (Criteria for Tenure)
F. University of Iowa Tenure Dossier
G. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Dual-Career Academic Couples Program
H. Mentoring at the University of Iowa
I. Ohio State University Academic Plan Scorecard, Update 2006

Notes
References
Index
Cover image

From Dissertation to Book (Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing)

Book
Germano, William
2005
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
PN162.G37 2005
Topics: Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
All new Phd's hope that their dissertations can become books. But a dissertation is written for a committee and a book for the larger world. William Germano's From Dissertation to Book is the essential guide for academic writers who want to revise a doctoral thesis for publication. The author of Getting It Published, Germano draws upon his extensive experience in academic publishing to provide writers with a state-of-the-art view of ...
Additional Info:
All new Phd's hope that their dissertations can become books. But a dissertation is written for a committee and a book for the larger world. William Germano's From Dissertation to Book is the essential guide for academic writers who want to revise a doctoral thesis for publication. The author of Getting It Published, Germano draws upon his extensive experience in academic publishing to provide writers with a state-of-the-art view of how to turn a dissertation into a manuscript that publishers will notice.

Acknowledging first that not all theses can become books, Germano shows how some dissertations might have a better life as one or more journal articles or as chapters in a newly conceived book. But even dissertations strong enough to be published as books first need to become book manuscripts, and at the heart of From Dissertation to Book is the idea that revising the dissertation is a fundamental process of adapting from one genre of writing to another.

Germano offers clear guidance on how to do just this. Writers will find advice on such topics as rethinking the table of contents, taming runaway footnotes, shaping chapter length, and confronting the limitations of jargon, alongside helpful timetables for light or heavy revision. With crisp directives, engaging examples, and a sympathetic eye for the foibles of academic writing, From Dissertation to Book reveals to recent PhD's the process of careful and thoughtful revision—a truly invaluable skill as they grow into their new roles as professional writers. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments

ch. 1 Why This Book
ch. 2 Getting Started, Again
ch. 3 Nagging Doubts
ch. 4 The Basic Options
ch. 5 Reading with an Editor's Eyes
ch. 6 Planning and Doing
ch. 7 Getting into Shape
ch. 8 Making Prose Speak
ch. 9 What Happens Next

Three Checklists For Further Reading Index
Cover image

Context and Content in the Preparation of Future Faculty

Book
Border, Laura L. B.
2010
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2335.4.C65 2010
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This edited book series serves as a guide to the study of improved training, employment and administration of graduate and professional student development programs. A new publication that addresses a critical need in higher education. The series is designed to highlight all aspects of professional development of graduate and professional students. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
This edited book series serves as a guide to the study of improved training, employment and administration of graduate and professional student development programs. A new publication that addresses a critical need in higher education. The series is designed to highlight all aspects of professional development of graduate and professional students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editor’s Introduction

Section 1— How Graduate Students View the Graduate School Experience
ch. 1 Doctoral Students Make Meaning of Their Experience: A Constructivist Inquiry
ch. 2 Instructional Concerns of Kinesiology Basic Instruction Program Graduate Teaching Assistants

Section 2—Educating Graduate Students for Their Roles as College Instructors
ch. 3 A Prep Course for Graduate Teaching Assistants: Building a Community
ch. 4 A Pedagogy Course’s Influence on Graduate Students’ Self-Awareness as Teacher-Scholars

Section 3—The Challenges Involved in the Education of Future Faculty
ch. 5 Student Engagement Challenges in Teaching about Controversial Issues
ch. 6 Students’ Perceptions of Lesson Objectives in Introductory Mathematics Courses Taught by Teaching Assistants
ch. 7 The Effectiveness of Online Case-based Instruction on International Teaching Assistants’ Presentation and Active Listening Strategies

Section 4—Models in Context: Educating Graduate Students for Future Roles as Academics
ch. 8 An Interdisciplinary Approach to Graduate TA Training: A Reflection of Best Practice
ch. 9 One Process, Two Contexts: Collaborating to Design Professional Development for Graduate Student Educators
Cover image

The Elements of Mentoring, Revised Edition

Book
Johnson, W. Brad, and Ridley, Charles R.
2009
Palgrave Macmillan, New York
HF5385.J64 2008
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Patterned after Strunk and White's classic The Elements of Style, this new edition concisely summarizes the substantial existing research on the art and science of mentoring. The Elements of Mentoring reduces this wealth of published material on the topic to the sixty-five most important and pithy truths for supervisors in all fields. These explore what excellent mentors do, what makes an excellent mentor, how to set up a successful mentor-proté...
Additional Info:
Patterned after Strunk and White's classic The Elements of Style, this new edition concisely summarizes the substantial existing research on the art and science of mentoring. The Elements of Mentoring reduces this wealth of published material on the topic to the sixty-five most important and pithy truths for supervisors in all fields. These explore what excellent mentors do, what makes an excellent mentor, how to set up a successful mentor-protégé relationship, how to work through problems that develop between mentor and protégé, what it means to mentor with integrity, and how to end the relationship when it has run its course. Succinct and comprehensive, this is a must-have for any mentor or mentor-to-be. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
What Excellent Mentors Do: Matters of Skill
ch. 1 Select Your Protégés Carefully
ch. 2 Know Your Protégés
ch. 3 Expect Excellence (and Nothing Else) ch. 4 Affirm, Affirm, Affirm, and Then Affirm Some More
ch. 5 Provide Sponsorship
ch. 6 Be a Teacher and a Coach
ch. 7 Encourage and Support
ch. 8 Offer Counsel in Difficult Times
ch. 9 Protect When Necessary
ch. 10 Stimulate Growth with Challenging Assignments
ch. 11 Give Protégés Exposure and Promote Their Visibility
ch. 12 Nurture Creativity
ch. 13 Provide Correction -- Even When Painful
ch. 14 Narrate Growth and Development
ch. 15 Self-Disclose When Appropriate
ch. 16 Accept Increasing Friendship and Mutuality
ch. 17 Teach Faceting ch. 18 Be an Intentional Model
ch. 19 Display Dependability

Traits of Excellent Mentors: Matters of Style and Personality
ch. 20 Exude Warmth
ch. 21 Listen Actively
ch. 22 Show Unconditional Regard
ch. 23 Tolerate Idealization
ch. 24 Embrace Humor
ch. 25 Do Not Expect Perfection
ch. 26 Attend to Interpersonal Cues
ch. 27 Be Trustworthy
ch. 28 Respect Values
ch. 29 Do Not Stoop to Jealousy

Arranging the Mentor Protégé Relationship: Matters of Beginning
ch. 30 Carefully Consider the "Match"
ch. 31 Clarify Expectations
ch. 32 Define Relationship Boundaries
ch. 33 Consider Protégé Relationship Style
ch. 34 Describe Potential Benefits and Risks
ch. 35 Be Sensitive to Gender
ch. 36 Be Sensitive to Race and Ethnicity
ch. 37 Plan for Change at the Outset
ch. 38 Schedule Periodic Review or Evaluations

Knowing Thyself as a Mentor: Matters of Integrity
ch. 39 Consider the Consequences of Being a Mentor
ch. 40 Practice Self-Care
ch. 41 Be Productive
ch. 42 Make Sure You Are Competent
ch. 43 Hold Yourself Accountable
ch. 44 Respect the Power of Attraction
ch. 45 Accept the Burden of Power
ch. 46 Practice Humility
ch. 47 Never Exploit Protégés
ch. 48 Above All, Do No Harm
ch. 49 Slow Down the Process
ch. 50 Tell the Truth
ch. 51 Seek Consultation
ch. 52 Document Carefully
ch. 53 Dispute Your Irrational Thinking

Welcoming Change and Saying Goodbye: Matters of Closure
ch. 54 Welcome Change and Growth
ch. 55 Accept Endings
ch. 56 Find Helpful Ways to Say Goodbye
ch. 57 Mentor as a Way of Life

References
Index
Cover image

Mapping the Range of Graduate Student Professional Development: Studies in Graduate and Professional Student Development, Number 14

Book
Laura L. B. Border
2011
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2371.M37 2011
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This edited book series serves as a guide to the study of improved training, employment and administration of graduate and professional student development programs. A new publication that addresses a critical need in higher education. The series is designed to highlight all aspects of professional development of graduate and professional students. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This edited book series serves as a guide to the study of improved training, employment and administration of graduate and professional student development programs. A new publication that addresses a critical need in higher education. The series is designed to highlight all aspects of professional development of graduate and professional students. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
  
Section 1: Taxonomy of TA Training Programs
ch 1 Graduate Student Professional Development: A Decade after Calls for National Reform

Section 2: Orientations
ch. 2 An Introductory Classification of Graduate Teaching Assistant Orientations

Section 3: Mentor and Lead TA Programs
ch. 3 Assessing Graduate Consultant Programs: Directors’ Perceptions of Rationales, Content, Activities, and Benefits
ch. 4 Teaching Mentorship Programs for Graduate Student Development

Section 4: Teaching Courses
ch. 5 Graduate and Professional Student Development: The Role of the Pedagogy Course
ch. 6 Rethinking Courses in College Pedagogy for the Sciences: An Analysis and Subsequent Model

Section 5: Teaching Certificates
ch. 7 Graduate Student Teaching Certificates: Survey of Current Programs
ch. 8 Leveraging Existing PFF Resources to Create a Certificate of University Teaching

Section 6: Other Programming
ch. 9 A Comparative Study of GTA Development in Japan and the US

Section 7: Conclusion
ch. 10 Steps Toward a Framework for an Intended Curriculum for Graduate and Professional Students: How We Talk about What We Do
Cover image
Wabash tree

Working Theories for Teaching Assistant Development

Book
Gorsuch, Greta
2012
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2335.4.W67 2012
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This extensive, edited volume showcases established and emerging scholars in the field of Teaching Assistant (TA) and International Teaching Assistant (ITA) education. Working Theories goes beyond reporting good practices or program descriptions, which typically comprises many books on TA and ITA development.  Instead, Working Theories places time-tested, robust theories, frameworks, and models of TA and ITA learning and development at the center of graduate student education by providing a scholarly ...
Additional Info:
This extensive, edited volume showcases established and emerging scholars in the field of Teaching Assistant (TA) and International Teaching Assistant (ITA) education. Working Theories goes beyond reporting good practices or program descriptions, which typically comprises many books on TA and ITA development.  Instead, Working Theories places time-tested, robust theories, frameworks, and models of TA and ITA learning and development at the center of graduate student education by providing a scholarly venue for description, explication, and application of these theories. In turn, these theories and models from psychology, sociology, pedagogy, discourse analysis, and second language learning will be presented in such as way as to inform good practice, but above all, motivate future research. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction
Organization of the Volume

Part One - Chapters Focusing on Teaching Assistants in General
ch. 1 Scalable Design Principles for TA Development: Lessons from Research, Theory and Experience
ch. 2 The Role of Theory in TA and ITA Research
ch. 3 Feedback about Graduate Teaching Assistants’ Pedagogical Practices: Content Validation of a Survey Informed from Principles of the “How People Learn” Framework
ch. 4 A Theoretical and Empirical Basis for Studying Student-Instructor Relationships
ch. 5 Teaching Assistant Development Through a Fresh Lens: A Self-determination Framework
ch. 6 Preparing the Future Professoriate in Second Language Acquisition
ch. 7 The Development of Disciplinary Communication Competence Among Teaching Assistants: A Research Agenda
ch. 8 Using Grounded Theory to Develop Emergent Explanations on how Second and Foreign Language TAs Construct Their Teacher Theory
ch. 9 Conceptualizing Graduate Teaching Assistant Development Through Stages of Concern
ch. 10 Appropriating Conceptual and Pedagogical Tools of Literacy
ch. 11 Does Instruction Make a Difference? Concept Development in Applied Linguistics M.A. Students

Part Two - Articles Focusing More Exclusively on International Teaching Assistants
ch. 12 Rapport Management of International Teaching Assistants in Their Teaching
ch. 13 A Microethnographic Case Study of Fulbright Language Teaching Assistants
ch. 14 The Roles of Teacher Theory and Domain Theory in Materials and Research in International Teaching Assistant Education
ch. 15 The Instructional Discourse of Domestic and International Teaching Assistants
ch. 16 Written English into Spoken: A Functional Discourse Analysis of American, Indian, and Chinese TA Presentations
ch. 17 The Washback of a Task-based Test of Spoken Language on the Development of ITAs Strategic Compentence
ch. 18 Chinese International Teaching Assistants and the Essence of Intercultural Competence in University Contexts
ch. 19 Learning to Make Suggestions in a Chemistry Lab
ch. 20 Conversation Analysis of the Classroom Communication of a Math ITA
Article cover image

The Development of Graduate Students as Teaching Scholars: A Four-Year Longitudinal Study

Article
Nyquist, Jody D.; Austin, Ann E.; Sprague, Jo; Wulff, Donald H.; Woodford, Bettina; Fraser, Patricia; and Calcagno, Claire
1999
Interim Report August 31, 1999, Research Supported by the Spencer Foundation
Topics: Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Additional Info:
Cover image
Wabash tree

A TA's Guide to Teaching Writing in All Disciplines

Book
Finch Hedengren, Beth
2004
Bedford/St. Martin's
PE1404.H3955 2004
Topics: Teaching Writing   |   Learning Designs   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Written specifically for teaching assistants responsible for WAC or WID courses, A TA's Guide to Teaching Writing in All Disciplines provides the practical advice that teaching assistants — no matter the discipline — need in order to teach and evaluate writing effectively. This informative text is perfectly suited to a teaching assistants' training course, or it can serve as a reference for teaching assistants to use on their own. (From the Publisher)
Additional Info:
Written specifically for teaching assistants responsible for WAC or WID courses, A TA's Guide to Teaching Writing in All Disciplines provides the practical advice that teaching assistants — no matter the discipline — need in order to teach and evaluate writing effectively. This informative text is perfectly suited to a teaching assistants' training course, or it can serve as a reference for teaching assistants to use on their own. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface for Faculty
Preface for TAs

Part I: What You Teach When You Teach Writing
ch. 1 Getting Started — How to Use This Book
About This Book
Writing Theory
Teaching Techniques
Book Features
Web Site Features
Conclusion

ch. 2 Why (and How) We Teach Writing
Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)
Writing to Learn 10
Writing in the Disciplines (Learning to Write)
The Writing Process
Conclusion

ch. 3 Prewriting
Explaining Writing Assignments
Using Detailed Assignment Instructions and Grading Rubrics
Helping Students Find and Focus Their Topics
Listing
Freewriting
Clustering
Talking
Writing-to-Learn Assignments as Invention
Coaching Related Skills
Research
Reading
Conclusion

ch. 4 Drafting
Getting Ideas Down on Paper
Developing a Controlling Objective or Thesis Statement
Science Writing
Thesis Statements
Finding an Appropriate Structure
Paragraphing
Unity
Development
Coherence
Conclusion

ch. 5 Revising
Global Revision
Peer-Review Groups
Provide Guidelines
Plan and Manage the Process
Hold Students Accountable
Conclusion

ch. 6 Editing
Style
Voice
Specialized Language
Mechanics, Usage, Grammar, Spelling, and Punctuation
Conclusion

ch. 7 Publishing
Classroom Publishing
Oral Presentations
Class Books
Posters
Institutional Publishing
Contests
Symposia
Journals
Conclusion

Part II: Ways to Teach Writing
ch. 8 One-on-One Writing Conferences (Office Hours)
Prepare Carefully
Begin the Conference
Use Questions to Draw the Student Out
Use Activities to Get the Student Involved in Revision
When Appropriate, Teach Skills and Concepts
Use Constructive Praise to Build Students’ Confidence
Conclusion

ch. 9 In-Class Help Sessions and Workshops
Planning a Workshop
Ideas for Workshop Activities
Conclusion

ch. 10 Commenting on Student Writing
Problems in Communicating through Written Commentary
Comments That Promote Improved Writing Skills
Responding as an Audience
Guiding Substantive Thought
Encouraging Skills Improvement
Providing a Positive Environment
Guidelines for Writing Effective Commentary
Read the Paper Once without Marking It
Comment on Substantive Issues
Pick Your Battles
Respond Respectfully as a Reader
Make It Clear That Surface Errors Matter, But Don’t Edit the Paper
Write a Substantive Endnote to Summarize Your Comments
Conclusion
Additional Info:
Provides resources for department chairs, directors of graduate studies, graduate faculty, graduate deans, and others interested in the quality of graduate education. Produced by Vanderbilt University’s Center for Teaching.
Additional Info:
Provides resources for department chairs, directors of graduate studies, graduate faculty, graduate deans, and others interested in the quality of graduate education. Produced by Vanderbilt University’s Center for Teaching.
Additional Info:
A national program with the goal of "transforming the way aspiring faculty members are prepared for their careers,” with programs at more than 45 doctoral degree-granting institutions to help doctoral students understand and prepare for faculty duties (teaching, research, and service). A summary of the experiences of the 45 programs is available as a pdf on their website.
Additional Info:
A national program with the goal of "transforming the way aspiring faculty members are prepared for their careers,” with programs at more than 45 doctoral degree-granting institutions to help doctoral students understand and prepare for faculty duties (teaching, research, and service). A summary of the experiences of the 45 programs is available as a pdf on their website.
Additional Info:
Recommendations from national studies on doctoral education, by Jody Nyquist and Donald H. Wulff -- including links to online resources, books and articles.
Additional Info:
Recommendations from national studies on doctoral education, by Jody Nyquist and Donald H. Wulff -- including links to online resources, books and articles.
Additional Info:
a 34 page booklet prepared by the University of North Carolina's Center for Teaching and Learning, covering topics such as "Defining Tasks," "Providing Feedback and Evaluation," and more than 20 pages of appendices providng sample forms and training programs.
Additional Info:
a 34 page booklet prepared by the University of North Carolina's Center for Teaching and Learning, covering topics such as "Defining Tasks," "Providing Feedback and Evaluation," and more than 20 pages of appendices providng sample forms and training programs.
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, focus on the development of graduate students and programs for teaching assistants preparation.
Additional Info:
Video. Several extended video presentations, from the Merlot Elixer Initiative, focus on the development of graduate students and programs for teaching assistants preparation.
TTR cover image
Wabash tree

The Devil in Mr. Smith: A Conversation with Jonathan Z. Smith

TTR
Smith, Jonathan Z.; Pearson, Thomas; Gallagher, Eugene V.; Jensen, Tim; and Fujiwara, Satoko
2014
Teaching Theology and Religion 17, no. 1 (2014): 61-77
BL41.T4 v.17 no. 1 2014
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Critical Thinking   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
This interview was recorded in November 2012 in Jonathan Z. Smith's Hyde Park graystone. Professor Smith offers insights into how he thinks about his classroom teaching and his students' learning through descriptions of various assignments and classroom activities he has developed over more than forty years of teaching. The discussion ranges broadly over such topics as: how students read, the failure to adequately prepare graduate students as teachers, students' faith commitments, ...
Additional Info:
This interview was recorded in November 2012 in Jonathan Z. Smith's Hyde Park graystone. Professor Smith offers insights into how he thinks about his classroom teaching and his students' learning through descriptions of various assignments and classroom activities he has developed over more than forty years of teaching. The discussion ranges broadly over such topics as: how students read, the failure to adequately prepare graduate students as teachers, students' faith commitments, the use of newspapers (and humor) in the classroom, and the role of definition, de-familiarization, and critique of the study of religion in introductory classes. The discussion presents vivid glimpses into Jonathan Smith's teaching practice and his teaching persona, including the time a student brought a minister to class to do an exorcism because she thought he was the Devil.
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On Becoming a Teacher

Book
Kearney, Edmund M.
2013
Sense Publishers, The Netherlands
LB1025.3.K43 2013
Topics: Vocation of Teaching   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Students deserve great teachers and learning to become a great teacher is a lifelong journey. On Becoming a Teacher guides both the new and experienced teacher through the exhilarating process of learning to educate students in a way that makes a lasting impact on their lives. Dr. Kearney leads the reader through the process of understanding what lies at the foundation of great teaching, loading each essay with ready-for-classroom use ...
Additional Info:
Students deserve great teachers and learning to become a great teacher is a lifelong journey. On Becoming a Teacher guides both the new and experienced teacher through the exhilarating process of learning to educate students in a way that makes a lasting impact on their lives. Dr. Kearney leads the reader through the process of understanding what lies at the foundation of great teaching, loading each essay with ready-for-classroom use applications and challenging ideas. This book is designed to encourage the reader to think deeply about all aspects of education, while instilling, or rekindling, the excitement, enthusiasm, and teaching excellence shared by all great teachers. Written in conversational essay form and supplemented with discussion and reflection questions, this brief book would make an ideal classroom text for student teaching and education seminars. Whether you aspire to teaching excellence at the elementary school, middle school, high school, or collegiate level, On Becoming a Teacher is a must read. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

Part I Beginning the Journey
ch. 1 Choosing Wisely: Your Journey Begins with a Single Choice
ch. 2 Understanding Where You Came From: Appreciating Your Apprenticeship

Part II Being a Teacher
ch. 3 Being Authentic
ch. 4 Being Passonate
ch. 5 Being Zealous
ch. 6 Being Greedy
ch. 7 Being More Than Tolerant: Celebrating Differences

Part III Classroom Culture
ch. 8 Earning Respect
ch. 9 Establishing Rules
ch. 10 Appreciating Group Processes and Dynamics
ch. 11 Creating a Culture of Inquiry

Part IV Knowing Your Students
ch. 12 Getting to Know You . . .
ch. 13 Appreciating Learning Styles
ch. 14 Understanding Standardized Tests
ch. 15 Avoiding Gender, and Other, Biases in the Classroom
ch. 16 Dealing With Disabilities

Part V Teaching
ch. 17 Planning Lessons: Know Your Top Three
ch. 18 Teaching to Mastery
ch. 19 Using Technology
ch. 20 Assessing Learning

Part VI Improving Your Craft
ch. 21 Studying Successful Teachers
ch. 22 Staying Current
ch. 23 Welcoming Feedback I: Stakeholders
ch. 24 Welcoming Feedback II: Managing the Process

Part VII Conclusions
ch. 25 Following the Golden Rule (of Teaching)
ch. 26 Final Words

References
Index
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A Faculty Guide for Succeeding in Academe

Book
Twale, Darla J.
2013
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1778.T87 2013
Topics: Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
All too often a culture of silence permeates academia, where faculty and administrators ignore or misunderstand difficult situations. A Faculty Guide for Succeeding in Academe is a practical guide for prospective and current faculty that addresses real, complex issues that are too often left unexamined. Chapters explore typical aspects of the faculty career and life cycle—such as appointment, tenure, promotion, incivility, plagiarism, teaching, online delivery, interactions with chairs and ...
Additional Info:
All too often a culture of silence permeates academia, where faculty and administrators ignore or misunderstand difficult situations. A Faculty Guide for Succeeding in Academe is a practical guide for prospective and current faculty that addresses real, complex issues that are too often left unexamined. Chapters explore typical aspects of the faculty career and life cycle—such as appointment, tenure, promotion, incivility, plagiarism, teaching, online delivery, interactions with chairs and deans, and performance appraisal—but focuses on the prickly issues as well as the routine.

A Faculty Guide for Succeeding in Academe presents authentic, engaging vignettes that feature faculty and administrators as they maneuver through academe encountering authentic, difficult situations. Focusing on positive outcomes, each case is analyzed and readers are encouraged to reflect about the ways these incidents could have been resolved. Offering concrete suggestions and best-practices, this book provides insights that will help prospective, new, and current faculty maneuver more effectively through academe and their collegial culture. This important resource enhances a culture of openness and will help faculty gain direction and support in their career. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Introduction: The Professoriate, Collegiality, and Academic Culture
ch. 2 Faculty Search Committees--Finding the Correct Match
ch. 3 Classroom Teaching and Evaluation
ch. 4 Teaching Online--Shoot, Aim, Ready
ch. 5 Departmental Culture--Expect the Unexpected
ch. 6 On the Tenure Track
ch. 7 Conferencing and Publishing
ch. 8 Campus Service and Institutional Citizenship
ch. 9 Faculty and Administrator Relationships
ch. 10 Off the Tenure Track with Janice Epstein
ch. 11 Pathways to Full Professor
Additional Info:
Teaching portfolios: formatively, the portfolio helps you reflect systematically and regularly upon your teaching; summatively, portfolios provide a much more comprehensive and accurate picture of your teaching than any other single device.
Additional Info:
Teaching portfolios: formatively, the portfolio helps you reflect systematically and regularly upon your teaching; summatively, portfolios provide a much more comprehensive and accurate picture of your teaching than any other single device.
Additional Info:
More and more, graduate students are seeking quality training in leadership skills as well as in teaching and research.
Additional Info:
More and more, graduate students are seeking quality training in leadership skills as well as in teaching and research.
Cover image

Behind the Academic Curtain: How to Find Success and Happiness with a PhD

Book
Furstenberg, Frank F.
2013
University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL
LB1778.2 F87 2013
Topics: Balancing Teaching and Research   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: More people than ever are going to graduate school to seek a PhD these days. When they get there, they discover a bewildering environment: a rapid immersion in their discipline, a keen competition for resources, and uncertain options for their future, whether inside or outside of academia. Life with a PhD can begin to resemble an unsolvable maze. In Behind the Academic Curtain, ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: More people than ever are going to graduate school to seek a PhD these days. When they get there, they discover a bewildering environment: a rapid immersion in their discipline, a keen competition for resources, and uncertain options for their future, whether inside or outside of academia. Life with a PhD can begin to resemble an unsolvable maze. In Behind the Academic Curtain, Frank F. Furstenberg offers a clear and user-friendly map to this maze. Drawing on decades of experience in academia, he provides a comprehensive, empirically grounded, and, most important of all, practical guide to academic life.

While the greatest anxieties for PhD candidates and postgrads are often centered on getting that tenure-track dream job, each stage of an academic career poses a series of distinctive problems. Furstenberg divides these stages into five chapters that cover the entire trajectory of an academic life, including how to make use of a PhD outside of academia. From finding the right job to earning tenure, from managing teaching loads to conducting research, from working on committees to easing into retirement, he illuminates all the challenges and opportunities an academic can expect to encounter. Each chapter is designed for easy consultation, with copious signposts, helpful suggestions, and a bevy of questions that all academics should ask themselves throughout their career, whether at a major university, junior college, or a nonacademic organization. An honest and up-to-date portrayal of how this life really works, Behind the Academic Curtain is an essential companion for any scholar, at any stage of his or her career. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 Entering Graduate School
ch. 2 An Academic Career or Not?
ch. 3 Being an Assistant Professor
ch. 4 Academic Midlife
ch. 6 The Endgame

Notes
Index
Cover image

Those Who Can, Teach: Teaching as a Christian Vocation

Book
Porter, Stanley E.
2013
Wipf & Stock Publishers, Eugene, OR
BV 1610.T54 2013
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: For many aspiring academics, the transition from doctoral student to classroom teacher is a challenging one. The classroom culture, the needed pedagogical skills, and the expected level and type of work are significantly different in the two environments. Nevertheless, most doctoral students go on to teach in undergraduate or seminary classrooms. To prepare the PhD students at McMaster Divinity College to negotiate this ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: For many aspiring academics, the transition from doctoral student to classroom teacher is a challenging one. The classroom culture, the needed pedagogical skills, and the expected level and type of work are significantly different in the two environments. Nevertheless, most doctoral students go on to teach in undergraduate or seminary classrooms. To prepare the PhD students at McMaster Divinity College to negotiate this transition successfully, the faculty holds a biennial colloquium covering the major dimensions, both theoretical and practical, of a Christian teaching vocation. On the basis of the presentations of the colloquium, the essential topics have been addressed in essays prepared for this volume for the benefit of all who aspire to excellence in their teaching, especially those in Christian higher education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Contributors
Introduction: Teaching as Theological Vocation (Stanley E. Porter)

ch. 1 Developing a Philosophy of Education (Stanley E. Porter)
ch. 2 Pedagogy and Course Objectives (Michael P. Knowles)
ch. 3 Designing and Evaluating Learning Experiences for Courses (Mark J. Boda)
ch. 4 Developing a Syllabus (Cynthia Long Westfall)
ch. 5 Sculpting a Lesson: The Art of Preparing a Classroom Learning Experience (Lee Beach)
ch. 6 Teaching Introductory New Testament Greek (Lois K. Fuller Dow)
ch. 7 Teaching Biblical Hebrew: Practical Strategies for Introductory Courses (Paul Evans)
ch. 8 Leading Intentional Theological Reflection in the Classroom: The Merging of Mind and Heart (Wendy J. Porter)
ch. 9 From Doctoral Program to Classroom (Steven M. Studebaker)
ch. 10 The Upside-Down Professor: The Professor in a Christian Institution (Gordon L. Heath)
ch. 11 Spirituality of Teaching and Theological Integration (Phil C. Zylla)

Modern Authors Index
Additional Info:
We used to worry that an online presence would be perceived in academia as unprofessional. Increasingly, it's not "whether" to have an online profile, but how to manage one's online footprint professionally. The piece offers many annotated links with a variety of perspectives, advice, and how-to's. Comments also lend their own views.
Additional Info:
We used to worry that an online presence would be perceived in academia as unprofessional. Increasingly, it's not "whether" to have an online profile, but how to manage one's online footprint professionally. The piece offers many annotated links with a variety of perspectives, advice, and how-to's. Comments also lend their own views.
Additional Info:
First half of podcast looks at belief identities between the sacred and secular. Second half focuses on how to build an academic career, win research funding, and get articles published.
Additional Info:
First half of podcast looks at belief identities between the sacred and secular. Second half focuses on how to build an academic career, win research funding, and get articles published.
Additional Info:
Topics covered: The importance of publication, and the relative merits of different publications; getting teaching experience; services to the discipline and the community; conferences and networking; what to put in your CV; how to keep up-to-date with your field
Additional Info:
Topics covered: The importance of publication, and the relative merits of different publications; getting teaching experience; services to the discipline and the community; conferences and networking; what to put in your CV; how to keep up-to-date with your field
Additional Info:
Zoe Alderton leads a group of academics with experience of all levels of academic publishing in a discussion which aims to demystify the process.
Additional Info:
Zoe Alderton leads a group of academics with experience of all levels of academic publishing in a discussion which aims to demystify the process.
Additional Info:
The GradHacker podcasters are joined by three guests who discuss the prospect of #altac (alternative academic) careers for today's graduate students preparing to enter the workforce. (The hosts first discuss recent posts relating to grad-student concerns, including "Training grad students for a new scholarly landscape.")
Additional Info:
The GradHacker podcasters are joined by three guests who discuss the prospect of #altac (alternative academic) careers for today's graduate students preparing to enter the workforce. (The hosts first discuss recent posts relating to grad-student concerns, including "Training grad students for a new scholarly landscape.")
Additional Info:
You're dismayed by the job market in higher ed, and have heard of "alt-ac" (alternative academic) careers, but don't know how to begin exploring the possibilities. Sanders offers a practical set of steps toward discerning and researching the possibilities off the beaten, tenure-track, teaching path.
Additional Info:
You're dismayed by the job market in higher ed, and have heard of "alt-ac" (alternative academic) careers, but don't know how to begin exploring the possibilities. Sanders offers a practical set of steps toward discerning and researching the possibilities off the beaten, tenure-track, teaching path.
Additional Info:
An Auburn Studies report on a study of 24 “top supplier” doctoral programs in theology and religion—those that send the most graduates to teach in seminaries and divinity schools. The report raises questions about the practices of programs and the employment prospects of graduates.
Additional Info:
An Auburn Studies report on a study of 24 “top supplier” doctoral programs in theology and religion—those that send the most graduates to teach in seminaries and divinity schools. The report raises questions about the practices of programs and the employment prospects of graduates.
Additional Info:
Surveys recent research in the preparation of future faculty, citing the nearly exclusive emphasis by graduate programs on preparation for positions in research universities, of which there are very few, at the expense of preparing students for the realities of the jobs that will likely begin their careers. Individual faculty choose what to emphasize to their advisees. Centralized standards for teaching education are rare. Also assess the results of directed ...
Additional Info:
Surveys recent research in the preparation of future faculty, citing the nearly exclusive emphasis by graduate programs on preparation for positions in research universities, of which there are very few, at the expense of preparing students for the realities of the jobs that will likely begin their careers. Individual faculty choose what to emphasize to their advisees. Centralized standards for teaching education are rare. Also assess the results of directed programs on preparation for future positions.
Journal cover image

Teaching Religious Studies in Stand-alone MA Programs: Guest Editor's Introduction

Journal Issue
Berkwitz, Stephen C., (Guest Editor)
2012
Spotlight on Teaching, October
BL41.S72
Topics: Doctoral Students and New Teachers   |   Academic Histories and Contexts

Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269
Additional Info:
Journal Issue. Full text is available online, here: http://rsnonline.org/index51c0.html?option=com_content&view=article&id=306&Itemid=269

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Teaching Religious Studies in Stand-alone MA Programs: Guest Editor's Introduction (Stephen C. Berkwitz, Guest Editor)
ch. 2 Context and Conversation in a Stand-alone MA Program (Kent L. Brintnall)
ch. 3 Teaching Split-level Classes (Liz Wilson)
ch. 4 Isolating a Passage from a Reading in “Mixed” or “Split-level” Courses (Carolyn M. Jones Medine)
ch. 5 Climb Up or Dig Down: Reflections on the Capstone Course in a Religious Studies MA Program (William R. Lindsey)
ch. 6 Grappling With Less Commonly Taught Languages in a Stand-alone Master’s Program (Holly Gayley)
ch. 7 Graduate Student Pedagogical Training as a Key Component of Stand-alone MA Programs in Religious Studies (Brian C. Wilson, and Stephen G. Covell)
ch. 8 Integrating Community Engagement and Service Learning into an MA Program (Andrea L. Stanton)
ch. 9 The Master’s Thesis: Overcoming Its Challenges (Martha L. Finch)
ch. 10 Teaching Religious Studies in Stand-alone MA Programs: Suggested Resources
ch. 11 "Go-To" Teaching Resources
Cover image

Beginning a Career in Academia: A Guide for Graduate Students of Color

Book
Mack, Dwayne A.; Watson, Elwood; and Camacho, Michelle Madsen, eds.
2015
Routledge, New York, NY
LC2781.B354 2015
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This practical guide prepares graduate students of color for their first job in academia and offers strategies for succeeding in the early years of a tenure-track position. Through the voices of faculty who have experienced the rigors of the job search and a career in academia, Beginning a Career in Academia offers advice for graduate students of color on how to transition from ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This practical guide prepares graduate students of color for their first job in academia and offers strategies for succeeding in the early years of a tenure-track position. Through the voices of faculty who have experienced the rigors of the job search and a career in academia, Beginning a Career in Academia offers advice for graduate students of color on how to transition from graduate school to an academic position. This inclusive volume shares perspectives that vary based on gender, racial, ethnic, generational, and disciplinary backgrounds, giving readers an opportunity to reflect on successful strategies for career readiness and for dealing with marginalization. The authors provide recommendations and tips to enhance the job search, identify campus fit, prepare for the interview and negotiation process, address dynamics of of racial and gender politics, find work-life balance, and demystify the promotion and tenure process. This must-read provides candid advice and mentorship for any graduate students of color embarking on a carreer in academe. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword by Kerry Ann Rockquemore
Introduction (Michelle Madsen Camacho, Elwood Watson, and Dwayne A. Mack)

Part I: Practical Advice for Finding Success in the Academic Job Market
  ch. 1 The Pitfalls and Pleasures of the Academic Job Market (Michelle Madsen Camacho)
ch. 2 Navigating Professional Conferences: Essential and Effective Job Seeking Strategies (Nadine Finigan-Carr and Natasha A. Brown)
  ch. 3 On the Phone, On Campus, On the Market: Demystifying the Academic Interview Process (Greg Prieto)
ch. 4 When your Race and Ethnicity Shows Up in the Interview: Identifying Search Committee Expectations of Token Hires During the Interview Process (Fawn-Amber Montoya & Jared Montoya)
ch. 5 Negotiating a Job Offer in Academia: ‘Lean In’ or Lay Low? (Rebecca Martinez)
ch. 6 Transitioning Strategies from Graduate School to Early Career Faculty (Tom Otieno)

Part II: Identity, Fit, Collegiality, and Secrets for Thriving in the Ivory Tower
ch. 7 Future Academics of Color in Dialogue: A Candid Q&A on Adjusting to the Cultural, Social and Professional Rigor of Academia (Miroslava Chávez-García, Mayra Avitia & Jorge N. Leal)
ch. 8 Mentoring Junior Faculty of Color: Succeeding at Historically White Colleges and Universities (Torin Dru Alexander)
ch. 9 15 Missteps that Can Derail Faculty Early in a Career: What Graduate Students Need to Know About the Push and Pull of Academia (Elwood Watson)
ch. 10 Staying Awake and Walking all Night: First Generation, Working Class, and Multiracial Latina/o Immigrants Building a Compass to Navigate Academia (Nayeli Y. Chavez-Dueñas and Hector Y. Adames)

Part III: Work-Life Balance: Strategies for Transitioning from Graduate School to the Classroom
ch. 11 LGBTQ Faculty of Color in and Out of the Classroom: Unhinging the Closet Door (Enrique Morales-Diaz)
ch. 12 Transitions to Academic Life for Women of Color: Still Waiting to Exhale (Linda Alexander)
ch. 13 Developing Your Teaching Craft: Observations from the Classroom (Derrick R. Brooms)
ch. 14 Practical Strategies for Achieving a Work-Life Balance: Fired Up? Ready to Go! (Dwayne A. Mack)
ch. 15 If at First You Don’t Succeed: Motivation for Finding the Best Institutional Fit (Sandra E. Weissinger)
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Reading, Writing, and Discussing at the Graduate Level A Guidebook for International Students

Book
Kim, Rina; Ablert, Lillie R.; and Sihn, Hang Gyun
2014
University Press of America, Lanham, MD
LB2371.4.K56 2014
Topics: Diversifying the Faculty   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The purpose of this book is to help international students navigate the academic issues they will encounter while attending graduate school in the United States. This book provides guidelines for conquering the obstacles that international graduate students often face, such as developing independent ideas based on required readings, participating in classroom discussions effectively, organizing academic papers, and effectively managing academic work and social ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: The purpose of this book is to help international students navigate the academic issues they will encounter while attending graduate school in the United States. This book provides guidelines for conquering the obstacles that international graduate students often face, such as developing independent ideas based on required readings, participating in classroom discussions effectively, organizing academic papers, and effectively managing academic work and social relationships. This book is an invaluable tool for international graduate students and their instructors and mentors. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Preface
Introduction

ch. 1 Reading Scholarly Articles With Purpose
ch. 2 Engaging in Academic Discussions
ch. 3 Writing at the Academic Level
ch. 4 Preparing Classroom Presentations
ch. 5 Developing Social and Academic Relationships
Cover image
Wabash tree

Collaborative Futures: Critical Reflections on Publicly Active Graduate Education

Book
Gilvin, Amanda; Roberts, Georgia M.; and Martin, Craig, eds.
2012
Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, New York
LB2371.4.C66 2012
Topics: Critical Pedagogies   |   Mentoring Students   |   Teaching Diversity and Justice   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers   |   Civic Engagement

Additional Info:
Collaborative Futures places graduate education at the center of ongoing efforts to legitimize publicly engaged scholarship within the academic profession. It is indispensable reading not only for graduate students seeking inspiration, resources, and usable frameworks for their engaged scholarship, but for the faculty who are called upon to mentor them and for university administrators seeking encouraging answers to questions about the future of graduate education. Given the erosion of the ...
Additional Info:
Collaborative Futures places graduate education at the center of ongoing efforts to legitimize publicly engaged scholarship within the academic profession. It is indispensable reading not only for graduate students seeking inspiration, resources, and usable frameworks for their engaged scholarship, but for the faculty who are called upon to mentor them and for university administrators seeking encouraging answers to questions about the future of graduate education. Given the erosion of the tenure system and the casualization of teaching labor, graduate programs and professional organizations in many fields now recognize the imperative to prepare doctoral students for careers wholly or partially outside academe. This book powerfully indicates both the need and the means to change institutional cultures and forge a publicly active path for graduate education. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Illustrations
Contributors
Foreword (Kevin Bott)
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Amanda Gilvin)

PART ONE: THEORY IN PRACTICE: Contextualizing Collaboration: Publicly Active Graduate Scholarship in United States Higher Education
ch. 1 The Arc of the Academic Career Bends Toward Publicly Engaged Scholarship (Timothy K. Eatman)
ch. 2 The Land-Grant System and Graduate Education: Reclaiming a Narrative of Engagement (Timothy J. Shaffer)
ch. 3 To Hell With Good Intentions (Ivan Illich)
ch. 4 Publicly Engaged Graduate Research and the Transformation of the American Academy (Susan Curtis, Shirley Rose, and Kristina Bross)
ch. 5 From Returning to Our Roots: The EngagedInstitution; Executive Summary with “Seven-Part Test” (Kellogg Commission on the Future of State and Land-Grant Universities)
ch. 6 Publicly Engaged Scholarship and Academic Freedom: Rights and Responsibilities (Nicholas Behm and Duane Roen)
Interchapter  ~  Statements of the American Association of University Professors
ch. 7 The Scholarship of Engagement (Ernest L. Boyer)
ch. 8 Community (Miranda Joseph)

PART TWO: Programs of Action: Institutionalizing Publicly Active Graduate Education
ch. 9 New Ways of Learning, Knowing, and Working: Diversifying Graduate Student Career Options Through Community Engagement (Kristen Day, Victor Becerra, Vicki L. Ruiz, and Michael Powe)
ch. 10 Getting Outside: Graduate Learning Through Art and Literacy Partnerships with City Schools (Judith E. Meighan)
ch. 11 Crossing Figueroa: The Tangled Web of Diversity and Democracy (George J. Sánchez)
ch. 12 The Engaged Dissertation: Three Points of View (Linda S. Bergmann, Allen Brizee, and Jaclyn M. Wells)
ch. 13 When the Gown Goes to Town: The Reciprocal Rewards of Fieldwork for Artists (Jan Cohen-Cruz)
ch. 14 Reimagining the Links Between Graduate Education and Community Engagement (Marcy Schnitzer and Max Stephenson Jr.)
ch. 15 Graduate Mentoring Against Common Sense (Ron Krabill)
ch. 16 First and Lasts: Lessons from Launching the Patient Voice Project at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop (Austin Bunn)

PART THREE: A Balancing Act: Publicly Active Graduate Students' Reflections and Analyses
ch. 17 Arcs, Checklists, and Charts: The Trajectory of a Public Scholar? (Sylvia Gale)
Interchapter  ~  Specifying the Scholarship of Engagement: Skills for Community-Based Projects in the Arts, Humanities, and Design (Imagining America)
ch. 18 Leveraging the Academy: Suggestions for Radical Grad Students and Radicals Considering Grad School (Chris Dixon and Alexis Shotwell)
ch. 19 Collaboration Conversation: Collaborative Ethnography as Engaged Scholarship (Ali Colleen Neff)
ch. 20 Reality Is Stranger than Fiction: The Politics of Race and Belonging in Los Angeles, California (Damien M. Schnyder)
ch. 21 Participatory Art, Engaged Scholarship: The Embedded Critic in Nadia Myre’s Scar Project (Amanda Jane Graham)

Resources
Index
Additional Info:
The actual program is limited to graduate students at the University of North Texas, but the website provides a helpful description of an online program to prepare graduate students for teaching roles in higher education by equipping them with teaching skills, knowledge about teaching strategies and peer support.
Additional Info:
The actual program is limited to graduate students at the University of North Texas, but the website provides a helpful description of an online program to prepare graduate students for teaching roles in higher education by equipping them with teaching skills, knowledge about teaching strategies and peer support.
Cover image

Navigating the Dissertation: Strategies for New Doctoral Advising Faculty and Their Advisees

Book
Di Pierro, Marianne
2014
New Forums Press, Stillwater, OK
LB2386.D5 2014
Topics: Mentoring Faculty   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book examines the intricacies of the doctoral educational process and delineates a process for continuous improvement that will shape and enhance better professional relationships between dissertation advisors and their advisees and cultivate opportunities for increased retention and graduation. The book includes critical principles, interwoven with students’ real life experiences which serve as illustrative vehicles. Moreover, its innovative approach – a book written for ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: This book examines the intricacies of the doctoral educational process and delineates a process for continuous improvement that will shape and enhance better professional relationships between dissertation advisors and their advisees and cultivate opportunities for increased retention and graduation. The book includes critical principles, interwoven with students’ real life experiences which serve as illustrative vehicles. Moreover, its innovative approach – a book written for new advisors and their advisees or for seasoned advisors seeking new ways to communicate with their advisees – departs from other books that provide generally only a one-dimensional view, usually from the student’s perspective. The titles of many of these are couched in metaphors of survival and overcoming a threat, rather than centered in strong initiatives that will lead to timely graduation in a supportive and encouraging environment. This book offers innovative and pioneering leadership approaches to transport advisors and advisees to a successful outcome. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Preface

ch. 1 Dissertation Advising: The Need for Collaborative Training Models
ch. 2 The Rules of Engagement
ch. 3 Defining Editing Expectations: More Rules of Engagement
ch. 4 The Toxic Committee
ch. 5 Considerations When Forming a Committee: For Advisees
ch. 6 Selection of the Advisee: For Faculty
ch. 7 Other Considerations for the Advisor as Leader
ch. 8 Vetting the Committee
ch. 9 Discovering the Dissertation Topic
ch. 10 The Concept Paper and the Quality Circle Review
ch. 11 Implementation of Editorial Commentary and Technology
ch. 12 Naming Conventions for Maintaining Draft Files
ch. 13 Working Against the Grain: For Advisors
ch. 14 Working Against the Grain: For Advisees
ch. 15 Dissertation Proposal and the Human Subject Institutional Review Board (HSIRB)
Protocol: Symmetry in Design
ch. 16 Preparing for the Oral Defense of the Dissertation: 17 Easy Steps
ch. 17 Bill of Rights for the Advisee/Advisor
ch. 18 Combating the  Dissertation Blues: Comprehensive Examinations - The Prelude
ch. 19 The Dissertation Writing Blues
ch. 20 The Dissertation Aftermath Blues
ch. 21 Debriefing: An Essential Final Step in Doctoral Education
ch. 22 New Forms and New Paradigms
ch. 23 Personalizing Academic Misconduct: An Approach for the Graduate Classroom
ch. 24 The Future of Doctoral Education: A Visionary Perspective
ch. 25 Quick Takes

About the Author
Index of Book
Additional Info:
Indicators of the processes that enhance GTA teaching and professional development: the use of reflective practice, feedback, mentorship, and engagement in teaching practice. Including: online environment,  role-play activity, micro-teaching, and  independent course instruction.
Additional Info:
Indicators of the processes that enhance GTA teaching and professional development: the use of reflective practice, feedback, mentorship, and engagement in teaching practice. Including: online environment,  role-play activity, micro-teaching, and  independent course instruction.

Table Of Content:
Special Issue Introduction
Introduction from Special Issue Editors (Cynthia Korpan, Lianne Fisher, Lorraine Godden, Shaya Golparian, Aisha Haque, Betsy Keating, Suzanne Le-May Sheffield, Annie Riel, Christina Skorobohacz, Roselynn Verwoord, Kim West)

Special Issue Article
Exploring Future Teachers’ Awareness, Competence, Confidence, and Attitudes Regarding Teaching Online: Incorporating Blended/Online Experience into the Teaching and Learning in Higher Education Course for Graduate Students (Suzanne Le-May Sheffield)

Developing Graduate Students' Self-Efficacy with Learner-Centred Lecturing (Meagan A. C. Troop, Lauren E. Wallar, Erin Aspenlieder)

Evaluating the Differential Impact of Teaching Assistant Training Programs on International Graduate Student Teaching (Ken N. Meadows, Karyn C. Olsen, Nanda Dimitrov, Debra L. Dawson)

Strategic Use of Role Playing in a Training Workshop for Chemistry Laboratory Teaching Assistants (Priyanka Lekhi, Sophia Nussbaum )

Addressing the Needs of Doctoral Students as Academic Practitioners: A Collaborative Inquiry on Teaching in Higher Education (Lisa J Starr, Ashley DeMartini)

Good Teaching Starts Here: Applied Learning at the Graduate Teaching Assistant Institute (Michele A. Parker, Diana Ashe, Jess Boersma, Robert Hicks, Victoria Bennett)
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The Graduate School Mess: What Caused It and How We Can Fix It

Book
Cassuto, Leonard
2015
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA
LB2371.4.C27 2015
Topics: Changes in Higher Education   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: It is no secret that American graduate education is in disarray. Graduate students take too long to complete their studies and face a dismal academic job market if they succeed. The Graduate School Mess gets to the root of these problems and offers concrete solutions for revitalizing graduate education in the humanities. Leonard Cassuto, professor and graduate education columnist for The Chronicle of ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: It is no secret that American graduate education is in disarray. Graduate students take too long to complete their studies and face a dismal academic job market if they succeed. The Graduate School Mess gets to the root of these problems and offers concrete solutions for revitalizing graduate education in the humanities. Leonard Cassuto, professor and graduate education columnist for The Chronicle of Higher Education, argues that universities’ heavy emphasis on research comes at the expense of teaching. But teaching is where reforming graduate school must begin.

Cassuto says that graduate education must recover its mission of public service. Professors should revamp the graduate curriculum and broaden its narrow definition of success to allow students to create more fulfilling lives for themselves both inside and outside the academy. Cassuto frames the current situation foremost as a teaching problem: professors rarely prepare graduate students for the demands of the working worlds they will actually join. He gives practical advice about how faculty can teach and advise graduate students by committing to a student-centered approach.

In chapters that follow the career of the graduate student from admissions to the dissertation and placement, Cassuto considers how each stage of graduate education is shaped by unexamined assumptions and ancient prejudices that need to be critically confronted. Written with verve and infused with history, The Graduate School Mess returns our national conversation about graduate study in the humanities to first principles. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Introduction: In Search of a Useable Future

ch. 1 Admissions
ch. 2 Classwork: The Graduate Seminar and Beyond
ch. 3 The Comprehensive Exam: Capstone or Cornerstone?
ch. 4 Advising
ch. 5 Degrees
ch. 6 Professionalization
ch. 7 The Job Market Reconceived

Conclusion: In Search of an Ethic
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index
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The Mentoring Continuum From Graduate School through Tenure

Book
Wright, Glenn, ed.
2015
Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, New York
LB1731.4.M455 2015
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Skill at mentoring has . . . attained a certain cachet among those at all career stages who find in it an alternative way of being in academe-one that tilts away from the endemic competition of the research environment in favor of cooperation and mutual purpose. Part of mentoring’s appeal lies in its ability to gesture in two directions at once: forward . . . to new modalities and more egalitarian relationships, and backward, to ...
Additional Info:
Skill at mentoring has . . . attained a certain cachet among those at all career stages who find in it an alternative way of being in academe-one that tilts away from the endemic competition of the research environment in favor of cooperation and mutual purpose. Part of mentoring’s appeal lies in its ability to gesture in two directions at once: forward . . . to new modalities and more egalitarian relationships, and backward, to a tradition of cross-generational support and identification as old as universities themselves, and that continues to feed the romance of the academic life in the minds of would-be faculty. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Contributors
Acknowledgments
Introduction (Glenn Wright)

Part One: Origins
ch. 1 With a Little Help from My Friends: The Role of Peer Mentoring in Graduate Student Teaching Assistant Development (Michael Amlung, Elizabeth A. Simpson, Melissa Dengler, Brian Stone, Grace Williams, and   Denise P. Domizi)
ch. 2 Graduate School–Facilitated Peer Mentoring for Degree Completion: Dissertation-Writing Boot Camps (Jan Allen)
ch. 3 Subject Matter Plus: Mentoring for Nonacademic Careers (Paula Chambers)
ch. 4 Graduate Mentoring against Common Sense (Ron Krabill)
 
Part Two: Transitions
ch. 5 Mentors’ Conceptions of Mentoring in Formalized Faculty Relationships (Susanna Calkins and Greg Light)
ch. 6 Taking Ownership of Your Mentoring: Lessons Learned from Participating in the Earth Science Women’s Network (Mirjam S. Glessmer, Amanda S. Adams, Meredith G. Hastings, and Rebecca T. Barnes)
ch. 7 “Mentoring Up”: Learning to Manage Your Mentoring Relationships (Steven Paul Lee, Richard McGee, Christine Pfund, and Janet Branchaw)
ch. 8 Shifting Vision: Mentoring as Faculty Development for All Levels of Experience (Jennifer W. Shewmaker and Phyllis Bolin)
ch. 9 Building a Culture of Mentoring via a Faculty Mentoring Portal (Julie Welch, Krista Hoffman-Longtin, Miriam Cohen Dell, Jon Eynon, Daniel Rusyniak, and Mary Dankoski)
 
Part Three: Dialogues and Reflections 
ch. 10 Graduate Student Peer-Mentoring Programs: Benefiting Students, Faculty, and Academic Programs (Beth A. Boehm and Amy J. Lueck)
ch. 11 The Family Plan: A Dialogue about Graduate Students, Babies, and the Unique Demands of the Advisor-Student Relation (Leonard Cassuto and Jane Van Slembrouck)
ch. 12 Cross-Race Faculty Mentoring (Christine A. Stanley and Yvonna S. Lincoln)
ch. 13 Graduate Student ISO a Mentor: A Dialogue about Mentoring (Jan Allen and Kevin Johnston)
ch. 14 Growing into Mentoring, and into the Profession: A Reflection on Intentionally Cultivating Mentoring Communities (Nina B. Namaste)
ch. 15 My Lucky Life and Hard Times (Leonard Cassuto)

Resources
Index
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Reimaging Doctoral Education as Adult Education

Book
Heaney, Tom; and Ramdeholl, Dianne, eds.
2015
John Wiley & Sons, San Francisco, CA (New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, Number 147)
LB2371.R45 2015
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
This volume looks at graduate education, specifically the doctorate, through the lens of adult education practice. Students in doctoral programs are, after all, adults. Building on principles of adult learning, the authors provide examples of academic excellence achieved through the incorporation of best practices in adult education, including:

- practical suggestions for democratically negotiating the curriculum
- best practices for nurturing ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
This volume looks at graduate education, specifically the doctorate, through the lens of adult education practice. Students in doctoral programs are, after all, adults. Building on principles of adult learning, the authors provide examples of academic excellence achieved through the incorporation of best practices in adult education, including:

- practical suggestions for democratically negotiating the curriculum
- best practices for nurturing responsible action for social justice,
- ways of encouraging collaborative and noncompetitive learning and research, and
- support in shifting paradigmatic assumptions beyond the Eurocentric frame.

This is the 147th volume of the Jossey Bass series New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. Noted for its depth of coverage, it explores issues of common interest to instructors, administrators, counselors, and policymakers in a broad range of education settings, such as colleges and universities, extension programs, businesses, libraries, and museums. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Editors’ Notes (Tom Heaney, Dianne Ramdeholl)

ch. 1 Democracy—Unleashing the Power of “We” (Tom Heaney)
In this chapter, the author provides rationales as to why doctoral programs should be grounded in democratic paradigms, discussing democratic governance processes and the impact this shift can have on doctoral studies.

ch. 2 Critical Reflection as Doctoral Education (Stephen D. Brookfield)
Using a variety of concrete strategies, the author offers a vision of doctoral education grounded in utilizing critical reflection strategies as a way of better understanding power and nurturing individual and collective agency among students.

ch. 3 Just the Two of Us ...We Can Make It If We Try: The Relationship Between Social Justice and Doctoral Studies (Dianne Ramdeholl)
Reflecting on her own trajectory from grassroots adult literacy education to academia, the author offers reflections from this journey and outlines some implications for graduate education that are rooted in social/racial justice commitments.

ch. 4 Doctoral Studies: What Has Radical Adult Education Got to Do With It? (Aziz Choudry, D´esir´ee Rochat)
A doctoral student and her adviser discuss their experiences as community activists discussing dilemmas and contradictions between the academy and activist learning; they offer possibilities for doctoral education that preserve emancipatory spaces to nurture and sustain central tenets of radical education.

ch. 5 A Case for Collaborative Inquiry in Doctoral Education (Nadira K. Charaniya, Jane West Walsh)
The authors, collaborators on a joint doctoral dissertation, reflect on their process and the ways in which this process can subvert dominant notions of knowledge production, instead making space for privileging more collective ways of knowing.

ch. 6 Africentrism—Standing on Its Own Cultural Ground (Derise E. Tolliver)
Grounding her practice in Africentrism, the author offers a vision of doctoral education that is centered in that worldview and reflects on the challenges and power of a doctoral model rooted in this paradigm.

ch. 7 You Gotta Be: Embracing Embodied Knowledges in Doctoral Study (Jaye Jones)
Analyzing the literature on embodied education and implications on positionality within the academy, the author outlines visions for doctoral study that make space for groups who have been historically marginalized/traumatized by academia.

ch. 8 Blended Shore Education: Civic Engagement and Competencies in 21st-Century Doctoral Education (Gabriele Strohschen)

Outlining a model of doctoral education that she developed, the author synthesizes important adult education theories along with her own findings, offering a new model for doctoral education.

ch. 9 Into the Future, One Second at a Time (Tom Heaney, Dianne Ramdeholl)
In this chapter, the editors briefly synopsize the chapters in this volume, linking them to visions of critical and emancipatory theories/practices of adult education that continue to inform and guide the field.

Index
Article cover image
Wabash tree

"The Idea of the PhD: The Doctorate in the Twenty-First Century Imagination (Chapter 3)"

Article
Kelly, Frances Jennifer
2017
Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Doctoral Students and New Teachers

Additional Info:
How is PhD pedagogy conceptualised in contemporary discourse? Doctoral pedagogy is usually figured as supervision, often, in particular in literature and popular culture, in the traditional dyadic form. Like other kinds of teachers, supervisors seem to hold a fascination, particularly for writers of novels and television dramas. In research literature, the attention garnered by supervision stems from another goal, a sense of needing to be more reflexive about it as ...
Additional Info:
How is PhD pedagogy conceptualised in contemporary discourse? Doctoral pedagogy is usually figured as supervision, often, in particular in literature and popular culture, in the traditional dyadic form. Like other kinds of teachers, supervisors seem to hold a fascination, particularly for writers of novels and television dramas. In research literature, the attention garnered by supervision stems from another goal, a sense of needing to be more reflexive about it as a form teaching, usually by showing supervision at work through transcripts of supervisory meetings or through student and supervisor accounts of their experience of supervision. This examination of what is (or was) essentially a private form of teaching has operated in tandem with an increased scrutiny on supervision by institutions, as articulated in institutional policies, and a fostering of self-induced scrutiny through manuals on supervision. Both of these trends are suggestive of a perception at the end of the twentieth century, aided by studies showing high attrition rates and lengthy times to submission, that supervision was often not going well.