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Annotating a text can be a powerful strategy to comprehend difficult material and encourage active reading. High school teacher Carol Porter-O’Donnell provides several activities and tools to help students learn to purposefully mark up what they read.
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Annotating a text can be a powerful strategy to comprehend difficult material and encourage active reading. High school teacher Carol Porter-O’Donnell provides several activities and tools to help students learn to purposefully mark up what they read.
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An essential lifelong skill for students is to think about their learning, or be metacognitive about it. Karen M. Kortz, Ph.D., shares three activities that help students practice this important skill.
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An essential lifelong skill for students is to think about their learning, or be metacognitive about it. Karen M. Kortz, Ph.D., shares three activities that help students practice this important skill.
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A Concise Guide to Improving Student Learning: Six Evidence-Based Principles and How to Apply Them

Book
Persellin, Diane Cummings; and Daniels, Mary Blythe
2014
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2331.P425 2014
Topics: General Overviews

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Abstract: This concise guidebook is intended for faculty who are interested in engaging their students and developing deep and lasting learning, but do not have the time to immerse themselves in the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Acknowledging the growing body of peer-reviewed literature on practices that can dramatically impact ...
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Abstract: This concise guidebook is intended for faculty who are interested in engaging their students and developing deep and lasting learning, but do not have the time to immerse themselves in the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Acknowledging the growing body of peer-reviewed literature on practices that can dramatically impact teaching, this intentionally brief book:

* Summarizes recent research on six of the most compelling principles in learning and teaching
* Describes their application to the college classroom
* Presents teaching strategies that are based on pragmatic practices
* Provides annotated bibliographies and important citations for faculty who want to explore these topics further

This guidebook begins with an overview of how we learn, covering such topics such as the distinction between expert and novice learners, memory, prior learning, and metacognition. The body of the book is divided into three main sections each of which includes teaching principles, applications, and related strategies – most of which can be implemented without extensive preparation.

The applications sections present examples of practice across a diverse range of disciplines including the sciences, humanities, arts, and pre-professional programs.

This book provides a foundation for the reader explore these approaches and methods in his or her teaching. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Michael Reder)
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction - Knowing About Learning Informs Our Teaching

ch. 1 Deeper Learning and Better Retention
Principle 1 - Desirable Difficulties Increase Long-Term Retention
Workshop 1.1 - Concept Maps
Principle 2 - Meaningful and Spaced Repetition Increases Retention
Principle 3 - Emotion and Relevance Deepen Learning
Workshop 3.1 - Community-Based Learning

ch. 2 Actively Engaged Learning
Principle 4 - Multisensory Instruction Deepens Learning
Workshop 4.1 - The Flipped Classroom
Principle 5 - Small Groups Engage Students
Workshop 5.1 - Problem-Based Learning
Workshop 5.2 - Process-Oriented Guided-Inquiry Learning

ch. 3 Assessment
Principle 6 - Formative Assessment or Low-Stakes
Evaluation Strengthens Retention
Workshop 6.1 - Grading, Summative Assessment, and High-Stakes Evaluation
Workshop 6.1A - Creating Assessment Tools
Workshop 6.1B - Constructing Rubrics
Workshop 6.1C - Tips for Grading Papers and Essay Exams
Workshop 6.2 - Soliciting Midsemester Student Feedback to Improve a Course

Appendix A - Course Design Workshops Workshop A.1 - The Syllabus
Workshop A.2 - Strategies for the First and Last Days of Class
Appendix B - Workshop on Lectures and Mini-Lectures
Workshop B.1 - Planning and Delivery
Appendix C - Workshop on Classroom Discussions
Workshop C.1 - Classroom Discussions
Bibliography
Index
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Adult Learning and Development: Perspectives from Educational Psychology

Book
Smith, M. Cecil and Thomas Pourchot
1998
Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah, NJ
LC5225.P78A48 1998
Topics: Adult Learners   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Adult education occurs whenever individuals engage in sustained, systematic learning in order to affect changes in their attitudes, knowledge, skills, or belief systems. Learning, instruction, and developmental processes are the primary foci of educational psychology research and theorizing, but educational psychologists' work in these domains has centered primarily on the childhood and adolescent school years. More recently, however, a number of educational psychologists have studied learning and development in adulthood. ...
Additional Info:
Adult education occurs whenever individuals engage in sustained, systematic learning in order to affect changes in their attitudes, knowledge, skills, or belief systems. Learning, instruction, and developmental processes are the primary foci of educational psychology research and theorizing, but educational psychologists' work in these domains has centered primarily on the childhood and adolescent school years. More recently, however, a number of educational psychologists have studied learning and development in adulthood. The results of these efforts have resulted in what is now called adult educational psychology.
The purpose of this volume is to introduce this new subfield within educational psychology. Section 1 focuses on the interplay between learning and development in adulthood, how various forms of instruction lead to different learning outcomes for adults, description of the diverse social contexts in which adult learning takes place, and the development of metacognitive knowledge across the life span. Section 2 describes both research and theory pertaining to adult intellectual functioning, thinking, and problem-solving skills within various contexts. Section 3 describes research in a variety of adult learning domains; discusses the cognitive and behavioral dimensions of reading in adulthood and the applications of reading in real-life circumstances; examines an educational intervention developed to promote forgiveness; and relates the outcomes of an intervention designed to educate parents about their children's mathematics learning. Section 4 summarizes the themes and issues running throughout this, the first book that has sought to span the gulf betweenadult education, adult development, and educational psychology. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword
Preface
ch. 1 What Does Educational Psychology Know About Adult Learning and Development?
ch. 2 We Learn, Therefore We Develop: Learning Versus Development - or Developing Learning?
ch. 3 Abstraction, the Will, the Self, and Models of Learning in Adulthood
ch. 4 Extending Sociocultural Theory to Adult Learning
ch. 5 On the Development of Adult Metacognition
ch. 6 Changing Mind, Changing World: Practical Intelligence and Tacit Knowledge in Adult Learning
ch. 7 The Role of Adults' Beliefs About Knowledge in School, Work, and Everyday Life
ch. 8 Adult Intelligence: Sketch of a Theory and Applications to Learning and Education
ch. 9 Mnemonic Strategies for Adult Learner
ch. 10 Adult Age Differences in Reading and Remembering Text and Using This Information to Make Decisions in Everyday Life
ch. 11 The Educational Psychology of Reading in Adulthood
ch. 12 Forgiveness Education With Adult Learners
ch. 13 Contributions of Parent Education to Adult Development
ch. 14 Toward an Adult Educational Psychology
Author Index
Subject Index
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Big Questions, Worthy Dreams: Mentoring Young Adults in Their Search For Meaning,Purpose, and Faith

Book
Daloz Parks, Sharon
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
BL42.P37 2000
Topics: Mentoring Students   |   Faith in the Classroom

Additional Info:
A smart, compassionate look at the important and often bewildering questions young adults face in their search for purpose, meaning and faith, and a clarion call to concerned adults to actively mentor the next generation. (From the Publisher)
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A smart, compassionate look at the important and often bewildering questions young adults face in their search for purpose, meaning and faith, and a clarion call to concerned adults to actively mentor the next generation. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
ch. 1 Young Adulthood in a Changing World: Promise and Vulnerability.
ch. 2 Meaning and Faith.
ch. 3 Becoming at Home in the Universe.
ch. 4 It Matters How We Think.
ch. 5 It All DepAnds . . . . On Belonging.
ch. 6 Imagination: The Power of Adult Faith.
ch. 7 The Gifts of a Mentoring Environment.
ch. 8 Mentoring Communities: Higher Education: A Community of Imagination
ch. 9 Culture as Mentor.

Notes.
The Author.
Index.
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Creating Self-Regulated Learners: Strategies to Strengthen Students’ Self-Awareness and Learning Skills

Book
Nilson, Linda
2013
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1060.N55 2013
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Most of our students neither know how learning works nor what they have to do to ensure it, to the detriment both of their studies and their development as lifelong learners.

The point of departure for this book is the literature on self-regulated learning that tells us that deep, lasting, independent learning requires learners to bring into play a range of cognitive skills, affective attitudes, and even physical ...
Additional Info:
Most of our students neither know how learning works nor what they have to do to ensure it, to the detriment both of their studies and their development as lifelong learners.

The point of departure for this book is the literature on self-regulated learning that tells us that deep, lasting, independent learning requires learners to bring into play a range of cognitive skills, affective attitudes, and even physical activities – about which most students are wholly unaware; and that self-regulation, which has little to do with measured intelligence, can be developed by just about anyone and is a fundamental prerequisite of academic success.

Linda Nilson provides the theoretical background to student self-regulation,the evidence that it enhances achievement, and the strategies to help students develop it. She presents an array of tested activities and assignments through which students can progressively reflect on, monitor and improve their learning skills; describes how they can be integrated with different course components and on various schedules; and elucidates how to intentionally and seamlessly incorporate them into course design to effectively meet disciplinary and student development objectives. Recognizing that most faculty are unfamiliar with these strategies, she also recommends how to prepare for introducing them into the classroom and adding more as instructors become more confident using them.

The book concludes with descriptions of courses from different fields to offer models and ideas for implementation.

At a time of so much concern about what our students are learning in college and how well prepared they are for the challenges of tomorrow’s economy and society, self-regulated learning provides a reassuring solution, particularly as studies indicate that struggling students benefit the most from practicing it. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Barry J. Zimmerman)
Preface
Acknowledgements

ch. 1 What Is Self-Regulated Learning and How Does It Enhance Learning?
ch. 2 Fostering Self-Regulated Learning from the Start
ch. 3 Self-Regulated Reading, Watching, and Listening
ch. 4 Self-Regulated Learning from Live Lectures
ch. 5 Self-Regulated Learning from Meta-Assignments
ch. 6 Self-Regulated Learning from Exams and Quizzes
ch. 7 Frequent or Occasional Self-Regulated Learning Activities
ch. 8 Fostering Self-Regulated Behavior
ch. 9 Closing a Course with Self-Regulated Learning
ch. 10 To Grade or Not to Grade? Or to Grade a Different Way?
ch. 11 Planning to Integrate Self-Regulated Learning into Course Design
ch. 12 Models of Integrated Courses and Their Impact on Students

References
About the Author
Index
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Wabash tree

Critical Thinking and the Academic Study of Religion

Book
Penaskovic, Richard
1997
Scholars Press, Atlanta, GA
BL41.P464 1997
Topics: Teaching Religion   |   Teaching Critical Thinking

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This work responds to a renewed emphasis on teaching in the academy. Written from the perspective of a classroom teacher, it is a practical application of the principles behind the Critical Thinking movement to the study of religion. Emphasizing that the acquisition of critical thinking depends less on what is taught than on how it is taught, the author presents concrete examples from his own experience to illustrate a student ...
Additional Info:
This work responds to a renewed emphasis on teaching in the academy. Written from the perspective of a classroom teacher, it is a practical application of the principles behind the Critical Thinking movement to the study of religion. Emphasizing that the acquisition of critical thinking depends less on what is taught than on how it is taught, the author presents concrete examples from his own experience to illustrate a student centered approach to teaching. By demonstrating how the study of religion contributes to the development of critical thinking - through the acquisition of problem-solving, decision-making, and metacognitive skills - Penaskovic suggests its value to a broader liberal arts curriculum as well. Both a theoretical review of Critical Thinking and a "nuts-and-bolts" manual on how it can be used and assessed in the classroom, this work will challenge new and veteran teachers alike to re-examine and renew what they do in the classroom. The book includes a selected, annotated bibliography on Critical Thinking. Every teacher of religion will want to read this book. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgements
Preface

ch. 1 What Is Critical Thinking?
ch. 2 Barriers to Critical Thinking?
ch. 3 The Three Levels of Learning
ch. 4 Teaching in the Active Mode
ch. 5 Cooperative Learning
ch. 6 Critical Thinking and Creativity
ch. 7 The Assessment of Critical Thinking
ch. 8 Unsolved Mysteries

Appendix A: Glossary of Terms
Select Annotated Bibliography
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How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching

Book
Ambrose, Susan; Bridges, Michael W.; DiPietro, Michele; Lovett, Marsha C; Norman, Marie K., and Mayer, Richard E.
2010
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco
LB1025.3.H68 2010
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   General Overviews

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Praise for How Learning Works

How Learning Works is the perfect title for this excellent book. Drawing upon new research in psychology, education, and cognitive science, the authors have demystified a complex topic into clear explanations of seven powerful learning principles. Full of great ideas and practical suggestions, all based on solid research evidence, this book is essential reading ...
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Click Here for Book Review
Praise for How Learning Works

How Learning Works is the perfect title for this excellent book. Drawing upon new research in psychology, education, and cognitive science, the authors have demystified a complex topic into clear explanations of seven powerful learning principles. Full of great ideas and practical suggestions, all based on solid research evidence, this book is essential reading for instructors at all levels who wish to improve their students' learning.

This book is a must-read for every instructor, new or experienced. Although I have been teaching for almost thirty years, as I read this book I found myself resonating with many of its ideas, and I discovered new ways of thinking about teaching.

Thank you Carnegie Mellon for making accessible what has previously been inaccessible to those of us who are not learning scientists. Your focus on the essence of learning combined with concrete examples of the daily challenges of teaching and clear tactical strategies for faculty to consider is a welcome work. I will recommend this book to all my colleagues.

As you read about each of the seven basic learning principles in this book, you will find advice that is grounded in learning theory, based on research evidence, relevant to college teaching, and easy to understand. The authors have extensive knowledge and experience in applying the science of learning to college teaching, and they graciously share it with you in this organized and readable book. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures, Tables, and Exhibits
Foreword
Acknowledgments
About the Authors

Introduction Bridging Learning Research and Teaching Practice
ch. 1 How Does Students' Prior Knowledge Affect Their Learning?
ch. 2 How Does the Way Students Organize Knowledge Affect Their Learning?
ch. 3 What Factors Motivate Students to Learn?
ch. 4 How Do Students Develop Mastery?
ch. 5 What Kinds of Practice and Feedback Enhance Learning?
ch. 6 Why Do Student Development and Course Climate Matter for Student Learning?
ch. 7 How Do Students Become Self-Directed Learners?

Conclusion Applying the Seven Principles to Ourselves
Appendices
Appendix A What Is Student Self-Assessment and How Can We Use It?
Appendix B What Are Concept Maps and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix C What Are Rubrics and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix D What Are Learning Objectives and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix E What Are Ground Rules and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix F What Are Exam Wrappers and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix G What Are Checklists and How Can We Use Them?
Appendix H What Is Reader Response/Peer Review and How Can We Use It?

References
Name Index
Subject Index
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A blog and resources, for both students and faculty — to help students to become aware of what they have learned and how they have learned it.
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A blog and resources, for both students and faculty — to help students to become aware of what they have learned and how they have learned it.
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Students learn better and retain more when they are directly involved in their learning, not just sitting back and being lectured. Usually, they also prefer active learning. Discover ways to help students learn in a more hands-on environment.
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Students learn better and retain more when they are directly involved in their learning, not just sitting back and being lectured. Usually, they also prefer active learning. Discover ways to help students learn in a more hands-on environment.
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Learning Patterns in Higher Education: Dimensions and research perspectives

Book
Gijbels, David; Donche, Vincent; Richardson, John T. E.; and Vermunt, Jan D., eds.
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LB 1060.L42446 2013
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Learning Patterns in Higher Education brings together a cutting edge international team of contributors to critically review our current understanding of how students and adults learn, how differences and changes in the way students learn can be measured in a valid and reliable way, and how the quality of student learning ...
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Abstract: Learning Patterns in Higher Education brings together a cutting edge international team of contributors to critically review our current understanding of how students and adults learn, how differences and changes in the way students learn can be measured in a valid and reliable way, and how the quality of student learning may be enhanced.

There is substantial evidence that students in higher education have a characteristic way of learning, sometimes called their learning orientation (Biggs 1988), learning style (Evans et al. 2010) or learning pattern (Vermunt and Vermetten 2004). However, recent research in the field of student learning has resulted in multi-faceted and sometimes contradictory results which may reflect conceptual differences and differences in measurement of student learning in each of the studies. This book deals with the need for further clarification of how students learn in higher education in the 21st century and to what extent the measurements often used in learning pattern studies are still up to date or can be advanced with present methodological and statistical insights to capture the most important differences and changes in student learning.

The contributions in the book are organized in two parts: a first conceptual and psychological part in which the dimensions of student learning in the 21st century are discussed and a second empirical part in which questions related to how students’ learning can be measured and how it develops are considered.

Areas covered include:

Cultural influences on learning patterns
Predicting learning outcomes
Student centred learning environments and self-directed learning
Mathematics learning

This indispensable book covers multiple conceptual perspectives on how learning patterns can be described and effects and developments can be measured, and will not only be helpful for ‘learning researchers’ as such but also for educational researchers from the broad domain of educational psychology, motivation psychology and instructional sciences, who are interested in student motivation, self-regulated learning, effectiveness of innovative learning environments, as well as assessment and evaluation of student characteristics and learning process variables. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of Figures
List of Tables
List of Contributors

List of Authors: David Gijbels, Vincent Donche, John T. E. Richardson
ch. 1 Students’ Learning Patterns in Higher Education and Beyond: Moving Forward (David Gijbels, Vincent Donche, John T.E Richardson)
ch. 2. (Dis)similarities In Research On Learning Approaches and Learning Patterns (Gert Vanthournout, Vincent Donche, David Gijbels, Peter Van Petegem)
ch. 3 The Dimensionality In Student Learning Patterns In Different Cultures (Jan D. Vermunt, Larike H. Bronkhorst, J. Reinaldo Martinez-Fernandez)
ch. 4 Modelling Factors For Predicting Student Learning Outcomes In Higher Education (Linda Price)
ch. 5 Exploring The Concept of `Self-Directedness In Learning` - Theoretical Approaches and Measurement In Adult Education Literature (Isabel Raemdonck, CAroline Meurant, Julien Balasse, Anne Jacot and Mariane Frenay)
ch. 6 Student Teachers’ Learning Patterns In School-Based Teacher Education Programmes - The Influence of Person, Context and Time ( Maaike D. Endijk, Vincent Donche and IDA Oosterheert)
ch. 7 Achievement Goals, Approaches To Studying and Academic Attainment (John T. E Richardson and Richard Remedios)
ch. 8 Learning Processes In Higher Education - Providing New Insights To Understand The Effects of Motivation and Cognition On Specific and Global Measures of Achievement (Mikael De Cler CQ. Benot Galand and Mariane Frenay)
ch. 9 University Students’ Achievement Goals and Approaches To Learning In Mathematics - A Re-Analysis Investigating ‘Learning Patterns’ (Francisco Cano and Ana Belen Garcia Berben)
ch. 10 Exploring The Use of A Deep Approach To Learning With Students In The Process of Learning To Teach (Carol Evans)
ch. 11 Understanding Differences In Student Learning and Academic Achievement In First Year Higher Education - An Integrated Research Perspective (Vincent Donche. Liesje Coertjens, Tine Van Daal, Sven De Maeyer and Peter Van Petegem)
ch. 12 Challenges In Analysing Change In Students’ Approaches To Learning (Sari Lindblom-Ylanne, Anna Parpala and Lisa Postareff)
ch. 13 Students’ Approaches To Learning In Higher Education - The Interplay Between Context and Student (Eva Kyndy, Filip Douchy and Eduardo Cascallar)
ch. 14 Do Case-Based Learning Environments Matter? Research Into Their Effects On Students’ Approaches To Learning, Motivation and Achievement (Marlies Baten, Katrien Struyven and Flilip Douchy)
ch. 15 Learning Patterns In Transition: Reflections and Prospects (Jan D. Vermunt. John T.E. Richardson, Vincent Donche and David Gijbels)

Index
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Learning to Learn: International Perspectives From Theory and Practice

Book
Crick, Ruth Deakin; Stringher, Cristina; and Ren, Kai, eds.
2014
Routledge, New York, NY
LB1060.L43 2014
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
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Abstract: Learning to Learn provides a much needed overview and international guide to the field of learning to learn from a multidisciplinary lifelong and lifewide perspective. A wealth of research has been flourishing on this key educational goal in recent years. Internationally, it is considered to be one of the key competencies ...
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Abstract: Learning to Learn provides a much needed overview and international guide to the field of learning to learn from a multidisciplinary lifelong and lifewide perspective. A wealth of research has been flourishing on this key educational goal in recent years. Internationally, it is considered to be one of the key competencies needed to compete in the global economy, but also a crucial factor for individual and social well-being. This book draws on leading international contributors to provide a cutting-edge overview of current thinking on learning to learn research, policy, and implementation in both formal and informal learning environments.

But what learning to learn is exactly, and what its constituting elements are, are much debated issues. These seem to be the crucial questions if assessment and development of this 'malleable side of intelligence' are to be accomplished. The approach of this volume is to consider a broad conception of learning to learn, not confined to only study strategies or metacognition, yet acknowledging the importance of such elements.

The book sets out to answer five main questions:
• What is learning to learn?
• What are its functions and how do we assess it?
• What does it promise to the individual and society at large?
• How is it conceived in national curricula internationally?
• How can it be developed in a variety of contexts?

The text is organized into two parts: the first addresses the core question of the nature of learning to learn from a theoretical and policy viewpoint, and the second presents recent research carried out in several educational systems, with special attention to assessment and curriculum. It gives an account of pedagogical practices of learning to learn and its role in individual empowerment from childhood to adulthood.

Contributors also highlight the potential use of learning to learn as an organizing concept for lifelong learning, school improvement, and teacher training along with potential conflicts with existing incentive practices and policies.

This book is a vital starting point and guide for any advanced student or researcher looking to understand this important area of research. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
List of figures, tables, and boxes
List of Contributors
Forward
Acknowledgements
Introduction (Ruth Deakin Crick, Kai Ren, and Cristina Stringher)

Part I - Theory
ch. 1 What is learning to learn? A learning to learn proces and output model (Cristina Stringher)
ch. 2 Learning to learn, know, and reason (Andreas Demetriou)
ch. 3 Learning to learn: a complex systems perspective (Ruth Deakin Crick)
ch. 4 Learning to learn for the individual and society (Aureliana Alberici, and Paolo Di Rienzo)
ch. 5 Learning to learn from a Confucian perspective: insight from China (Kai Ren)

Part II - International Research and Practice
ch. 6 Learning to learn in early childhood: home and preschool influence on Chinese learners (Nirmala Rao, Jin Sun, and Li Zhang)
ch. 7 Learning to learn at a whole-system level: development of the South Australian Teaching for Effective Learning Framework (Chris Goldspink, and Margot Foster)
ch. 8 Learning to learn in Finland: theory and policy, research and practice (Jarkko Hautamaki, and Sirkku Kuplainen)
ch. 9 The Spanish approach to learning to learn (Amparo Moreno, and Elena Martin)
ch. 10 School improvement for learning: principles for a theoretically oriented practice (Cristina Stringher)
ch. 11 Using a 360 degree assessment model to support learning to learn (Barbara L. McCombs)
ch. 12 Learning to learn in practice in non-formal education (Paul Kloosterman)
ch. 13 Learning to learn, lifewide and lifelong learning: reflections on the New Zealand experience (Rosemary Hipkins, and Bronwen Cowie)
ch. 14 Learning to learn with Indigenous Austsralians (Julianne Willis)

Index
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Learning to Read Talmud: What It Looks Like and How It Happens

Book
Kanarek, Jane L. and Lehman, Marjorie, eds.
2016
Academic Studies Press, Brighton, MA
BM71.L43 2016
Topics: Teaching Religion

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Learning to Read Talmud is the first book-length study of how teachers teach and how students learn to read Talmud. Through a series of studies conducted by scholars of Talmud in classrooms that range from seminaries to secular universities and with students from novice to advanced, this book elucidates a broad range ...
Additional Info:
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Learning to Read Talmud is the first book-length study of how teachers teach and how students learn to read Talmud. Through a series of studies conducted by scholars of Talmud in classrooms that range from seminaries to secular universities and with students from novice to advanced, this book elucidates a broad range of ideas about what it means to learn to read Talmud and tools for how to achieve that goal. Bridging the study of Talmud and the study of pedagogy, this book is an essential resource for scholars, curriculum writers, and classroom teachers of Talmud. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction - Learning to Read Talmud: What It Looks Like and How It Happens (Jane L. Kanarek and Marjorie Lehman)

ch. 1 Stop Making Sense: Using Text Guides to Help Students Learn to Read Talmud (Beth A. Berkowitz)
ch. 2 Looking for Problems: A Pedagogic Quest for Difficulties (Ethan M. Tucker)
ch. 3 What Others Have to Say: Secondary Readings in Learning to Read Talmud (Jane L. Kanarek)
ch. 4 And No One Gave the Torah to the Priests: Reading the Mishnah’s References to the Priests and the Temple (Marjorie Lehman)
ch. 5 Talmud for Non-Rabbis: Teaching Graduate Students in the Academy (Gregg E. Gardner)
ch. 6 When Cultural Assumptions about Texts and Reading Fail: Teaching Talmud as Liberal Arts (Elizabeth Shanks Alexander)
ch. 7 Talmud in the Mouth: Oral Recitation and Repetition through the Ages and in Today’s Classroom (Jonathan S. Milgram)
ch. 8 Talmud that Works Your Heart: New Approaches to Reading (Sarra Lev)

Postscript - What We Have Learned About Learning to Read Talmud (Jon A. Levisohn)
Contributors
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Leveraging the ePortfolio for Integrative Learning: A Faculty Guide to Classroom Practices for Transforming Student Learning

Book
Reynolds, Candyce; and Patton, Judith
2014
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1029.P67R46 2014
Topics: Using Technology   |   Assessing Students

Additional Info:
The fruit of the authors’ more than 15 years of using and writing about ePortfolios in general education and disciplinary programs and courses, this book is a comprehensive and practical guide to the use of the ePortfolio as a pedagogy that facilitates the integrative learning that is a central goal of higher education.

Faculty and administrators of programs using ePortfolios can use this guide to help their students work ...
Additional Info:
The fruit of the authors’ more than 15 years of using and writing about ePortfolios in general education and disciplinary programs and courses, this book is a comprehensive and practical guide to the use of the ePortfolio as a pedagogy that facilitates the integrative learning that is a central goal of higher education.

Faculty and administrators of programs using ePortfolios can use this guide to help their students work individually on an ePortfolio or as part of a class or program requirement. Readers will discover through examples of student portfolios and targeted exercises how to assist students in making their learning visible to themselves, their peers, their instructors and their future employers.

While interest in ePortfolios has exploded—because they provide an easier and more comprehensive ways to assess student learning than traditional portfolios, and because they have the potential to transformatively develop students’ ability to connect and apply their knowledge—faculty and administrators all too often are disappointed by the lackluster ePortfolios that students submit. Reynolds and Patton demonstrate how systematically embedding practices in the classroom that engage students in integrative learning practices dramatically improves outcomes. The authors describe easy to use and practical strategies for faculty to incorporate integrative ePortfolios in their courses and curricula, and create the scaffolding to develop students’ skills and metacognition.

The book opens by outlining the underlying learning theory and the key concepts of integrative learning and by describing the purpose, structure and implementation of ePortfolios. Subsequent sections cover classroom practices and assignments to help students understand themselves as learners; make connections between course content, their personal lives, and to the curriculum; bridge theory to practice; and consider issues of audience and communication and presentation in developing their portfolios. The book goes on to cover technological issues and assessment, with a particular emphasis on the use of rubrics; and concludes with explicated examples of ePortfolios created in a first-year program, ePortfolios created by graduating students, career-oriented ePortfolios, and lifelong ePortfolios.

For both experienced faculty and administrators, and readers just beginning to use ePortfolios, this book provides a framework and guidance to implement them to their fullest potential. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (Terry Rhodes)
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction

Part One: Key Concepts
ch. 1 ePortfolios as a Tool for Integrative Learning
ch. 2 Integrating Knowledge: The Crux of an Education
ch. 3 Retooling Your Syllabus and Teaching: Integrating Integrative Learning and ePortfolios Into Your Course

Part Two: Teaching for Integrative Learning
ch. 4 Fostering Reflective Practice
ch. 5 Making Connections or Integrating Knowledge
ch. 6 Making Connections for Lifelong Learning
ch. 7 Communicating Effectively in ePortfolios: A Picture Is Worth a Thousand Words

Part Three: Creating the ePortfolio
ch. 8 Designing an ePortfolio System
ch. 9 Making an ePortfolio Using Free Web-Based Software

Part Four: At the End
ch. 10 Assessment of ePortfolios: Using Rubrics to Assess
ch. 11 Parting Thoughts

References
Index
Additional Info:
Vanderbilt University’s very helpful and brief overview of metacognition (“thinking about one’s thinking”) with helpful references throughout and good ideas for helping students put it into practice.
Additional Info:
Vanderbilt University’s very helpful and brief overview of metacognition (“thinking about one’s thinking”) with helpful references throughout and good ideas for helping students put it into practice.
Additional Info:
Three substantial pages, well-researched, and accessible. The site seeks to link student thinking, learning and performance in a peer tutoring program. Provided by the Learnwell Projects.
Additional Info:
Three substantial pages, well-researched, and accessible. The site seeks to link student thinking, learning and performance in a peer tutoring program. Provided by the Learnwell Projects.
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Metateaching and the Instructional Map

Book
Timpson, William M.
1999
Atwood Publishing, Madison, WI
LB1025.3.T56 1999
Topics: Assessing Students   |   Leadership and Faculty Development

Additional Info:
Bill Timpson presents his conception of metateaching. As metacognition is the idea of thinking about thinking, metateaching is the idea of thinking about teaching. Your mind will be infused with new, innovative — yet practical — ways to think about your classroom after reading this book.
You will learn about the Instructional Map, a systematic tool to help you organize your classes and visualize the direction, components, and impact of different ...
Additional Info:
Bill Timpson presents his conception of metateaching. As metacognition is the idea of thinking about thinking, metateaching is the idea of thinking about teaching. Your mind will be infused with new, innovative — yet practical — ways to think about your classroom after reading this book.
You will learn about the Instructional Map, a systematic tool to help you organize your classes and visualize the direction, components, and impact of different aspects of teaching. Ideas from the fields of cartography and orienteering will give you a fresh angle from which to view your teaching practice. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Passages and Pathfinders
Introduction

ch. 1: Of Story and Journey, Map, and Place
ch. 2: The Essence of Maps
ch. 3: Metacognition and Metateaching
ch. 4: The Instructional Map Explained
ch. 5: Using the Instructional Map
ch. 6: Observations, Presentations. and Student Reflections
ch. 7: The Instructional Map and Various Instructional Approaches

References
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Postsecondary Play: The Role of Games and Social Media in Higher Education

Book
Tierney, William G.; Corwin, Zoë; Fullerton, Tracy; Ragusa, Giesele, eds.
2014
Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD
LB2395.7.P68 2014
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Using Technology   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
The college application process—which entails multiple forms, essays, test scores, and deadlines—can be intimidating. For students without substantial school and family support, the complexity of this process can become a barrier to access. William G. Tierney and his team at the University of Southern California approach this challenge innovatively. Using the tools of online games and social media, they have developed ways to make applying for college much ...
Additional Info:
The college application process—which entails multiple forms, essays, test scores, and deadlines—can be intimidating. For students without substantial school and family support, the complexity of this process can become a barrier to access. William G. Tierney and his team at the University of Southern California approach this challenge innovatively. Using the tools of online games and social media, they have developed ways to make applying for college much less intimidating.

While the vast majority of college students use social media and gaming in their everyday lives, colleges and universities have been slow to recognize and harness the power of either. Postsecondary Play explores the significance of games and social media in higher education, and particularly how they can be used to attract, retain, educate, and socialize students.

Tierney, a past president of the American Educational Research Association, has gathered some of the best research on the emerging role of multiplayer games in the classroom and how these tools can boost student confidence and increase college access. Scholars writing from a wide variety of disciplines—college access, social media, game studies, and learning sciences—provide concrete examples to illustrate the new and complex ways in which students learn in response to social media and games. Tierney and the contributors find that, although games can be powerful tools for encouraging underserved students, quality game design and mastering the concept of play—the ability to develop skills while engaging in the game—are essential in the effective use of serious games in teaching and learning.

Summarizing a decade of research in game design and learning, Postsecondary Play will appeal to higher education scholars and students of learning, online gaming, education, and the media. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Introduction, Why Games and Social Media? (Zoë B. Corwin, William G. Tierney, Tracy Fullerton, and Gisele Ragusa)

Part I - What is the Current Landscape of Higher Education?
ch. 1 The Disruptive Future of Higher Education (William G. Tierney)
ch. 2 The Need to Increase College Enrollment and Completion (Laura W. Perna)
ch. 3 Transition Readiness: Making the Shift from High School to College in Social Media World (David Conley and Mary Seburn)
ch. 4 From Communication to Community: How Games and Social Media Affect Postsecondary Stakeholders (Zoë B. Corwin)

Part II - What’s in a Game?
ch. 5 What Games Do Well: Mastering Concepts in Play (Tracy Fullerton)
ch. 6 The Open Laptop Exam: Reflections and Speculations (Henry Jenkins and Adam S. Kahn)
ch. 7 Games, Passion, and “Higher” Education (James Paul Gee)
ch. 8 Game-Like Learning: Leveraging the Qualities of Game Design and Play (Katie Salen)

Part III - What Do We Know about Games and What Do We Need to Learn?
ch. 9 Assessing Learning in Video Games (Valerie Shute, Matthew Ventura, Yoon Jeon Kim, and Lubin Wang)
ch. 10 Implications and Applications of Sociable Gaming for Higher Education (Nicole B. Ellison, Donghee Yvette Wohn, and Carrie Heeter)
ch. 11 Gender, Social Media, Games, and the College Landscape (Gisele Ragusa)
ch. 12 How Much Technology Is Enough? (Steven Weiland)

Conclusion - The Shape of Things to Come (William G. Tierney and Zoë B. Corwin)
Glossary
Contributors
Index
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Promoting Student Metacognition

Article
Tanner, Kimberly D.
2012
CBE Life Sciences Education,Vol. 11, 113-120, Summer
Topics: Learning Designs   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
“Metacognition” refers to helping students learn how to learn. This article provides suggestions for integrating student metacognition into a college course. It uses the example of a biology classroom, but the material is easily transferable. 
Additional Info:
“Metacognition” refers to helping students learn how to learn. This article provides suggestions for integrating student metacognition into a college course. It uses the example of a biology classroom, but the material is easily transferable. 
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Teach Students How to Learn: Strategies You Can Incorporate Into Any Course to Improve Student Metacognition, Study Skills, and Motivation

Book
McGuire, Saundra Yancy
2015
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB1025.3.M356 2015
Topics: Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Miriam, a freshman Calculus student at Louisiana State University, made 37.5% on her first exam but 83% and 93% on the next two. Matt, a first year General Chemistry student at the University of Utah, scored 65% and 55% on his first two exams and 95% on his third—These are representative of thousands of students who ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Miriam, a freshman Calculus student at Louisiana State University, made 37.5% on her first exam but 83% and 93% on the next two. Matt, a first year General Chemistry student at the University of Utah, scored 65% and 55% on his first two exams and 95% on his third—These are representative of thousands of students who decisively improved their grades by acting on the advice described in this book.

What is preventing your students from performing according to expectations? Saundra McGuire offers a simple but profound answer: If you teach students how to learn and give them simple, straightforward strategies to use, they can significantly increase their learning and performance.

For over a decade Saundra McGuire has been acclaimed for her presentations and workshops on metacognition and student learning because the tools and strategies she shares have enabled faculty to facilitate dramatic improvements in student learning and success. This book encapsulates the model and ideas she has developed in the past fifteen years, ideas that are being adopted by an increasing number of faculty with considerable effect.

The methods she proposes do not require restructuring courses or an inordinate amount of time to teach. They can often be accomplished in a single session, transforming students from memorizers and regurgitators to students who begin to think critically and take responsibility for their own learning.

Saundra McGuire takes the reader sequentially through the ideas and strategies that students need to understand and implement. First, she demonstrates how introducing students to metacognition and Bloom’s Taxonomy reveals to them the importance of understanding how they learn and provides the lens through which they can view learning activities and measure their intellectual growth. Next, she presents a specific study system that can quickly empower students to maximize their learning. Then, she addresses the importance of dealing with emotion, attitudes, and motivation by suggesting ways to change students’ mindsets about ability and by providing a range of strategies to boost motivation and learning; finally, she offers guidance to faculty on partnering with campus learning centers.

She pays particular attention to academically unprepared students, noting that the strategies she offers for this particular population are equally beneficial for all students.

While stressing that there are many ways to teach effectively, and that readers can be flexible in picking and choosing among the strategies she presents, Saundra McGuire offers the reader a step-by-step process for delivering the key messages of the book to students in as little as 50 minutes. Free online supplements provide three slide sets and a sample video lecture.

This book is written primarily for faculty but will be equally useful for TAs, tutors, and learning center professionals. For readers with no background in education or cognitive psychology, the book avoids jargon and esoteric theory. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Dedication
Acknowledgements
Introduction

ch. 1 Saundra’s journey: From traditional instructor to academic transformer
ch. 2 Why don’t our students already know how to learn?
ch. 3 Metacognition: What it is and how it helps students become independent learners
ch. 4 The power of teaching Bloom’s Taxonomy and the Study Cycle to students
ch. 5 Metacognitive learning strategies at work
ch. 6 Mindset matters
ch. 7 Connections between emotions, motivation, and learning
ch. 8 What faculty can do to boost motivation, positive emotions, and learning
ch. 9 What students can do to boost motivation, positive emotions, and learning
ch. 10 Partnering with your campus learning center
ch. 11 Teaching learning strategies to groups
ch. 12 Teaching unprepared students

Epilogue- Experiment and have fun!

Appendix A: Compilation of strategies for students
Appendix B: Books and weblinks recommended for students
Appendix C: Compilation of strategies for instructors
Appendix D: Resources for presenting learning strategies to groups
Appendix E: Learning strategies inventory
Appendix F: Dramatic individual student improvement
Appendix G: Selected student feedback
Appendix H: Slides from Chemistry Presentation
Appendix I: An Advanced Placement physics class

References
About the Authors
Index
Additional Info:
An extensive set of short articles to help students learn to write.
Additional Info:
An extensive set of short articles to help students learn to write.
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Using Reflection and Metacognition to Improve Student Learning: Across the Disciplines, Across the Academy

Book
Kaplan, Matthew; Silver, Naomi; LaVaque-Manty, Danielle; and Meizlish, Deborah, eds.
2013
Stylus Publishing, LLC, Sterling, VA
LB2331.U85 2013
Topics: Cognitive Development   |   Multiple Intelligences & Learning Styles   |   Constructivist & Active Learning Theory

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Research has identified the importance of helping students develop the ability to monitor their own comprehension and to make their thinking processes explicit, and indeed demonstrates that metacognitive teaching strategies greatly improve student engagement with course material.

This book -- by presenting principles that teachers in higher education can ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
Abstract: Research has identified the importance of helping students develop the ability to monitor their own comprehension and to make their thinking processes explicit, and indeed demonstrates that metacognitive teaching strategies greatly improve student engagement with course material.

This book -- by presenting principles that teachers in higher education can put into practice in their own classrooms -- explains how to lay the ground for this engagement, and help students become self-regulated learners actively employing metacognitive and reflective strategies in their education.

Key elements include embedding metacognitive instruction in the content matter; being explicit about the usefulness of metacognitive activities to provide the incentive for students to commit to the extra effort; as well as following through consistently.

Recognizing that few teachers have a deep understanding of metacognition and how it functions, and still fewer have developed methods for integrating it into their curriculum, this book offers a hands-on, user-friendly guide for implementing metacognitive and reflective pedagogy in a range of disciplines.

Offering seven practitioner examples from the sciences, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, the social sciences and the humanities, along with sample syllabi, course materials, and student examples, this volume offers a range of strategies for incorporating these pedagogical approaches in college classrooms, as well as theoretical rationales for the strategies presented.

By providing successful models from courses in a broad spectrum of disciplines, the editors and contributors reassure readers that they need not reinvent the wheel or fear the unknown, but can instead adapt tested interventions that aid learning and have been shown to improve both instructor and student satisfaction and engagement. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Acknowledgments
Foreword

ch. 1 Reflective Pedagogies and the Metacognitive Turn in College Teaching (Naomi Silver)
ch. 2 Make Exams Worth More than the Grade: Using Exam Wrappers to Promote Metacognition (Marsha C. Lovett)
ch. 3 Improving Critical-Thinking Skills in Introductory Biology Through Quality Practice and Metacognition (Paula P. Lemons, Julie Reynolds, Amanda Curtin, Ahrash Bissell)
ch. 4 Reflection and Metacognition in Engineering Practice (Denny Davis, Michael Trevisan, Paul Leiffer, Jay McCormack, Steven Beyerlein, M. Javed Khan, and Patricia Brackin)
ch. 5 “The Steps of the Ladder Keep Going Up”: A Case Study of Hevruta as Reflective Pedagogy in Two Universities (Mary C. Wright, Jeffrey L. Bernstein, Ralph Williams)
ch. 6 Implementing Metacognitive Interventions in Disciplinary Writing Classes (Mika LaVaque and E. Margaret Evans)
ch. 7 Designs for Writing: A Metacognitive Strategy for Iterative Drafting and Revising (E. Ashley Hall, Jane Danielewicz, and Jennifer Ware)
ch. 8 Reflection, ePortfolios, and WEPO: A Reflective Account of New Practices in a New Curriculum (Kathleen Blake Yancey, Leigh Graziano, Rory Lee, and Jennifer O'Malley)
ch. 9 Annotated Bibliography (Naomi Silver)

Contributors
Index
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What's the Use of Lectures?

Book
Bligh, Donald A.
2000
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA
LC6515.B55 2000
Topics: Lectures and Large Classes

Additional Info:
In this first American edition of a best-selling classic, Donald Bligh draws from decades of research and hands-on experience to help college and university teachers develop and use lectures effectively. What's the Use of Lectures? is an indispensable guide for anyone who aspires to be a skilled lecturer and teacher. It examines the nature of teaching and learning in a classroom lecture--describing how students learn, how much knowledge they retain, ...
Additional Info:
In this first American edition of a best-selling classic, Donald Bligh draws from decades of research and hands-on experience to help college and university teachers develop and use lectures effectively. What's the Use of Lectures? is an indispensable guide for anyone who aspires to be a skilled lecturer and teacher. It examines the nature of teaching and learning in a classroom lecture--describing how students learn, how much knowledge they retain, and how to enhance their attention and motivation. Bligh builds on this information to share strategies forcreating organized, thoughtful, and effective lectures. Topics include taking notes, using handouts, practicing different formats and styles, obtaining feedback, overcoming difficulties, evaluating the lecture, and testing alternative methods when lecturing is not adequate. Also included are tables and diagrams to illustrate different approaches to lecturing. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Part 1 What Objectives can Lectures Achieve?
ch. 1 Evidence of What Lectures Achieve

Part 2 What Factors Affect the Acquisition of Information?
ch. 2 Factors Influencing Memory
ch. 3 Factors Affecting Students' Attention
ch. 4 Motivating Students

Part 3 What Lecture Techniques Apply these Factors Most Effectively?
ch. 5 Lecture Organization
ch. 6 Making a Point
ch. 7 Reasons and Explanations
ch. 8 Aids to Comprehending a Point
ch. 9 Note Taking in Lectures
ch. 10 The Purpose, Preparation, and Use of Handouts
ch. 11 Lecture Styles
ch. 12 Ways of Obtaining Feedback
ch. 13 Evaluation of Lectures
ch. 14 Overcoming Common Difficulties
ch. 15 Lectures for the Promotion of Thought
ch. 16 Lectures to Teach Attitudes

Part 4 Alternatives when Lecturing is Inadequate
ch. 17 The Lecture Method Alone is Rarely Adequate
ch. 18 Teaching Methods to Use with Lectures
ch. 19 Some Combinations of Teaching Methods

Part 5 Preparation for the use of Lectures
ch. 20 Thinking the Lecture Through
ch. 21 Writing the Notes
ch. 22 Lecturing for the First Time
ch. 23 Conclusion
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Why Students Resist Learning: A Practical Model for Understanding and Helping Students

Book
Tolman, Anton O. and Kremling, Janine, eds.
2017
Stylus, Sterling, VA
LB2343.4.W555 2017
Topics: 18-22 Year Olds   |   Cognitive Development

Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
However personally committed faculty may be to helping students learn, their students are not always as eager to participate in this endeavor, and may react with both active and passive resistant behaviors, including poor faculty evaluations.

The purpose of this book is to help faculty develop a coherent and integrated ...
Additional Info:
Click Here for Book Review
However personally committed faculty may be to helping students learn, their students are not always as eager to participate in this endeavor, and may react with both active and passive resistant behaviors, including poor faculty evaluations.

The purpose of this book is to help faculty develop a coherent and integrated understanding of the various causes of student resistance to learning, providing them with a rationale for responding constructively, and enabling them to create conditions conducive to implementing effective learning strategies.

In this book readers will discover an innovative integrated model that accounts for student behaviors and creates a foundation for intentional and informed discussion, evaluation, and the development of effective counter strategies. The model takes into account institutional context, environmental forces, students’ prior negative classroom experiences, their cognitive development, readiness to change, and metacognition. The various chapters take the reader through the model’s elements, exploring their practical implications for teaching, whether relating to course design, assessments, assignments, or interactions with students.

The book includes a chapter written entirely by students, offering their insights into the causes of resistance, and their reflections on how participating on this project has affected them.

While of great value for faculty, this book is also useful to faculty developers advising future and current faculty, as well as to administrators, offering insight into how institutional values impact teaching practice and student attitudes. (From the Publisher)

Table Of Content:
Foreword (John Tagg)
Acknowledgments
Preface: What Makes This Book Unique (Anton O. Tolman)

ch. 1 Defining and Understanding Student Resistance (Anton O. Tolman, Andy Sechler, and Shea Smart)
ch. 2 Student Voices: Discovering Resistance (Averie Hamilton, Andy Sechler, Colt Rothlisberger, Shea Smart, Anton O. Tolman, Matthew Anderson, Rob Blair, and Amy Lindstrom)
ch. 3 Obstacles, Biases, and the Urgent Need to Understand the Social Cost of Resistance (Anton O. Tolman, Andy Sechler, and Shea Smart)
ch. 4 The Impact of Institutional Culture on Student Disengagement and Resistance to Learning (Janine Kremling and Erikca DeAnn Brown)
ch. 5 Societal and Environmental Influences That Shape Student Motivation (Christopher Lee and Amy Lindstrom)
ch. 6 Through the Students’ Eyes: Internalized Forces That Shape Student Motivation (Christopher Lee, Andy Sechler, and Shea Smart)
ch. 7 Negative Classroom Experiences (Janine Kremling, Colt Rothlisberger, and Shea Smart)
ch. 8 Seeing the Invisible: How Cognitive and Developmental Influences Shape Student Resistance (Trevor Morris, Rob Blair, and Colt Rothlisberger)
ch. 9 How Promoting Student Metacognition Can Reduce Resistance (Rob Blair, Anton O. Tolman, Janine Kremling, and Trevor Morris)
ch.10 Creating a Campus Climate to Reduce Resistance (Anton O. Tolman, Janine Kremling, and Ryan Radmall)

Epilogue: Final Thoughts (Anton O. Tolman, Janine Kremling, and Trevor Morris)
Appendix
TTM Learning Survey
Learning Strategies and Self-Awareness Assessment #1 (LSSA)
Learning Strategies and Self-Awareness Assessment #3
Becoming Aware of Your Learning Approach
Interpreting the TTM Survey
About the Editors and Contributors
Index
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